WorldWideScience

Sample records for technological social political

  1. Marketing Social Service Programs Using Political Campaign Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Discusses how human services agencies can use strategies and information technologies similar to those used in political campaigns to identify needs and attitudes for social services campaigns. Marketing for social services programs is described, and the use of computers for a political campaign and for a teenage pregnancy program is compared.…

  2. The Social Shaping of Technology: A New Space for Politics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshinaka, Yutaka; Clausen, Christian; Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2003-01-01

    The social shaping of technology (SST) perspective has developed as a response to techno-economically rational and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. It has brought together analysts from different backgrounds with a common interest in the role of social...... effects, which are non-neutral and distributed, as the processes of shaping themselves have been. The chapter develops the notion of SST through socio-technical spaces. Here a heterogeneous set of elements, comprising of techniques, social actors, attribution of meanings, and problem definitions, etc...... and political action for socio-technical change. Thus, SST is a broad term, covering a large domain of studies and analyses concerned with the mutual influence of technology and society on technology development. In this chapter we emphasise the political dimensions of social shaping, through a focus...

  3. The Social Shaping of Technology: A New Space for Politics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoshinaka, Yutaka; Clausen, Christian; Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2003-01-01

    change. We identify a new perspective on political processes, with a broader focus on the political dimensions of technological decision-making, and a broader treatment of socio-technical space, maintaining a focus on inclusion and exclusion of actors, salient issues and how they are dealt....... together set the stage for technology development. Within the framework of socio-technical spaces, the TA activities are analysed to illustrate how social shaping can be identified in a range of instances: from actual influences on specific technology developments, to influence on larger societal......The social shaping of technology (SST) perspective has developed as a response to techno-economically rational and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. It has brought together analysts from different backgrounds with a common interest in the role of social...

  4. On the Political Value of Network Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Since the 1990s,with the emergence of the Internet,rapid development of network technology,based on computer technology,communication technology and information technology,has affected all aspects of social life.As the network technology has the characteristics of openness,interactivity,anonymity,transparency,globalization and the decentralization,it is becoming more and more popular and adds a number of new technologies of variables and restrictive factors into traditional sense of political participation and political control mode.The links between Internet and politics grow increasingly and the political value of network technology becomes more prominent.

  5. Technological innovations and public politics: social environmental analyses in the context of sugar-ethanol industrial activities in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlene Maria C. de Ávila Plaza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims at discussing the importance of the technological innovations as propellers of the economic development of the nations as well as the role of the public politics directed toward the socioeconomics and institutional agents who are a part of the productive and innovative chain of the country. We try to analyze the sugar-ethanol sector and its consequences concerning the environmental aspects, being emphasized the State of Goiás and the “Cerrado” bioma. In the social aspects, we demonstrate the necessity to conciliate economic development with social-environmental sustainability, to propitiate a healthy environment and improvement of the working conditions and life for the citizens who perform the functions of sugar cane cutters of this sector. It is important to emphasize that the article does not intend to underestimate the economic practices of the sugar-ethanol companies, but to analyze certain aspects concerning the environment and the social factor, so that consistent politics is implemented in order to promote sustainability, balanced with enterprise and governmental responsibilities and commitments allied to the tripod: economy, environment and society. Key-words: Technological innovation; Public Politics; Sustainable Development; Sugar-ethanol Sector; Biofuels

  6. Social Politics: Agenda Setting and Political Communication on Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xinxin; Chen, Bo-Chiuan; Maity, Mrinmoy; Ferrara, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Social media play an increasingly important role in political communication. Various studies investigated how individuals adopt social media for political discussion, to share their views about politics and policy, or to mobilize and protest against social issues. Yet, little attention has been devoted to the main actors of political discussions: the politicians. In this paper, we explore the topics of discussion of U.S. President Obama and the 50 U.S. State Governors using Twitter data and a...

  7. The social, moral, ethical, legal and political implications of today's biological technologies: an Indian point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Pushpa M

    2006-01-01

    The last 50 years have seen an increasing emphasis on ethical, moral, social, legal, political and economic implications of science for reasons that are discussed in this article. Biotechnology has been no exception to this trend. Areas of biotechnology where the above implications have been important, are briefly described. Ethical and related issues in today's biology-based technologies are discussed with special reference to India. Examples of technological exploitation within a country, or of one country by another, using modern biology-based technologies are given. The possible implications of one new and emerging biology-based technology are discussed. It is concluded that a well-informed and knowledgeable society is the only assured insurance against possible misuse of biology-based technologies of today and tomorrow, including their use for the exploitation of people. The recent decision of the Prime Minister of India to set up a National Knowledge Commission is mentioned in this context.

  8. Twitter politics : social media, political reporting and online politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graham, Todd

    2013-01-01

    This project studies the potential of social media for journalism and political communication, and its impact on democracy. It asks how the three actors in the triangle of political communication – politicians, journalists and citizens – use Twitter and how this effects information dissemination and

  9. Social Politics: Agenda Setting and Political Communication on Social Media

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xinxin; Maity, Mrinmoy; Ferrara, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Social media play an increasingly important role in political communication. Various studies investigated how individuals adopt social media for political discussion, to share their views about politics and policy, or to mobilize and protest against social issues. Yet, little attention has been devoted to the main actors of political discussions: the politicians. In this paper, we explore the topics of discussion of U.S. President Obama and the 50 U.S. State Governors using Twitter data and agenda-setting theory as a tool to describe the patterns of daily political discussion, uncovering the main topics of attention and interest of these actors. We examine over one hundred thousand tweets produced by these politicians and identify seven macro-topics of conversation, finding that Twitter represents a particularly appealing vehicle of conversation for American opposition politicians. We highlight the main motifs of political conversation of the two parties, discovering that Republican and Democrat Governors are...

  10. Organizational Politics, Social Network, and Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Kang, Sora; Lee, Jongwon

    This research identifies the social relationship and structure among members as well as organization’s political inclination, through which, it also identifies the current status of knowledge management. The result shows that the socio-technological factors (individual, knowledge and IT factors) affect knowledge transfer and the knowledge transfer influences performance and that the members’ relationship based on the political inclination of the organization has a major moderating effect on the above two relation.

  11. Political Socialization and Political Interest: The Role of School Reassessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskimaa, Vesa; Rapeli, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the lack of political interest and engagement among Western youth. This has led to a revival of political socialization studies. One recent finding is that (late) adolescence is key to understanding the development of interest for politics. This study builds on this finding by examining political interest among…

  12. The Ventriloquist's Dummy? The Role of Technology in Political Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    2000-01-01

    This article examines the active role of technology in political processes, drawing on organisational politics and sociology of technology. A case study of the processes of the management of technology demonstrates the multiple roles that technology plays in developing a promoting coalition...... with a political programme. This programme joins ann directs the actors. Technology is part of the structural context of the process the process itself and the competing political programmes. The active role of technology in the process is examined through recurring and reciprocal patterns of social control over...

  13. Information warfare technologies in political discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpova Anna Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempt to examine the technology of «information warfare» in this paper. The dominant theme of the paper is that the outcome of the information warfare is important not only for the future of a state itself but for the future of the world balance of forces. The main task of geopolitical actors in information warfare is to introduce ideas corresponding to their interests into mass consciousness. All participants of political conflicts have common features in technologies of Information warfare. The information anomie is the indicator of the great geopolitical actors’ personified interests on the stage of «information warfare» - the process resulted in destroying the communicative line: report-information understanding and disrupting the social order in society. In this paper authors describe the following Information Warfare technologies: "Political volcano" technology; "SPIN" technology; "Widening media resource" technology; "specific gravity" technology; "Cold War 2.0" technology and Information cleaningup technology. It is assumed that in the future there will be new instructions on applying technologies of information warfare. To impart perspective to the paper we consider examples, opinions and trends.

  14. Pluralism in political corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, J.; Kourula, A.

    2012-01-01

    Within corporate social responsibility (CSR), the exploration of the political role of firms (political CSR) has recently experienced a revival. We review three key periods of political CSR literature—classic, instrumental, and new political CSR—and use the Rawlsian conceptualization of division of

  15. Pluralism in political corporate social responsibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkinen, J.; Kourula, A.

    2012-01-01

    Within corporate social responsibility (CSR), the exploration of the political role of firms (political CSR) has recently experienced a revival. We review three key periods of political CSR literature—classic, instrumental, and new political CSR—and use the Rawlsian conceptualization of division of

  16. Nazi Education: A Case of Political Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Herbert

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how the German Nazi party arranged for the political socialization of German children through public education in the 1930s. Topics include philosophy of the Nazi party, political socialization of teachers, and teaching materials for Nazi education. Implications for education's role in politics are explored. (CH)

  17. Politicizing science: conceptions of politics in science and technology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    This essay examines five ideal-typical conceptions of politics in science and technology studies. Rather than evaluating these conceptions with reference to a single standard, the essay shows how different conceptions of politics serve distinct purposes: normative critique, two approaches to empirical description, and two views of democracy. I discuss each conception of politics with respect to how well it fulfills its apparent primary purpose, as well as its implications for the purpose of studying a key issue in contemporary democratic societies: the politicization of science. In this respect, the essay goes beyond classifying different conceptions of politics and also recommends the fifth conception as especially conducive to understanding and shaping the processes whereby science becomes a site or object of political activity. The essay also employs several analytical distinctions to help clarify the differences among conceptions of politics: between science as 'political' (adjective) and science as a site of 'politics' (noun), between spatial-conceptions and activity-conceptions of politics, between latent conflicts and actual conflicts, and between politics and power. The essay also makes the methodological argument that the politics of science and technology is best studied with concepts and methods that facilitate dialogue between actors and analysts. The main goal, however, is not to defend a particular view of politics, but to promote conversation on the conceptions of politics that animate research in social studies of science and technology.

  18. The Politics of Social Action in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana Cohen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the attitudes of public sector professionals toward work in order to understand how a neoliberal policy orientation in Morocco has affected the relationship between social identity and political practice. The paper suggests that policy reforms have undermined the association between social identity and the nation-based social and political purpose of public institutions and instigated new dependence in self-identification and political practice on relations with low-income service users. Professionals no longer act to preserve a conceptual identification like the middle class, instead finding political and social meaning through demonstrating the capacity to defy institutional rules and policy expectations of behaviour.

  19. International Political Sociology Beyond European and North American Traditions of Social and Political Thought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huysmans, Jef; Wæver, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Introduction to 'Forum' on 'International Political Sociology Beyond European and North American Traditions of Social and Political Thought'......Introduction to 'Forum' on 'International Political Sociology Beyond European and North American Traditions of Social and Political Thought'...

  20. Handbook of political citizenship and social movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    This Handbook uniquely collates the results of several decades of academic research in these two important fields. The expert contributions successively address the different forms of political citizenship and current approaches and recent developments in social movement studies. Salient social

  1. Political anthropology and social order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luigi Palmisano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author discusses the role of democracy in the post-global context. By “post-global” he intends that the grands récits (systems of thought and ideologies which according to Lyotard were doomed to disappear in the post-modern era are still present and active but that they are not obvious anymore: they work underground within the processes of economic, social, political production. The author proceeds by examining the three principles on which societies order themselves: the sharing and establishment of blood ties – or time ties –, the sharing and establishment of space ties – or territorial ties – and, finally, the sharing of common action such as planning actions for the future. The author argues that democracy is the only form of political organization which is able to guarantee the possibility to these three principles of ordering the world to co-exist in such a way that none of the three principles can survive or prosper at the expense of the other two. But today this balance is threatened by a new element which sprouts from the third principle – the sharing of common action – in this case, the order of the market: a new transnational order which is also juridical, the order produced by the relations between economic actors becomes juridical. The State, intended here as expression of the territorial principle of organization of a society, is contractually week in this new context which the author calls the post-global context, and transnational holdings easily colonize the Lebenswelt. According to the author, it is not possible to practice democracy, to have strength as territorial unit, without the public and visible discussion of other ties, which are not territorial. The practice of assembly dialogue is therefore essential. He further states that democracy is a tension and not a guaranteed condition or state that one can keep to oneself

  2. Management of Technology - a political process approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Most management of technology writings fail to address enterprise developments as political processes, where visions, coalitions and emergence are central features. The paper report of a participants observation study of management of technology processes.......Most management of technology writings fail to address enterprise developments as political processes, where visions, coalitions and emergence are central features. The paper report of a participants observation study of management of technology processes....

  3. The Social and Political Role of Social Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何姣玥

    2014-01-01

    Social media such as Blog, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and so on are not only use for entertainment and communica-tion, but also plays social and political role on people’s daily life. Whether social media enhance democracy or not and how social media impact on journalism and the issues of social media, especially the social networking will be discusses on this article.

  4. A Research on Social and Political Use of Social Media in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet ÇETİNKAYA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media, generated by advances in internet technology, are heavily used by individuals of every age and every class both in Turkey and all over the world. Social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Google+ make virtual societies possible, and enable ideas, opinions and comments to be shared. This sh aring of visual and auditory context without any limitations has produced a more democratic platform. The democratic structure specific to social media enables them to be used for social and political purposes. In this study, a research is conducted on soc ial/political use of social media in Turkey. Results of the research revealed that majority of the participants (46.6% spend 2 to 4 hours on social media and 75.6% of the participants use smart phones for social media access. 11.2% of participants stated that they use social media for political and social purposes. 78.9% of the participants use Twitter and Facebook for political/social information sharing. 67.7% of participants frequently use Twitter for political/social purposes. In terms of political iss ues, participants prefer to use social media for domestic affairs rather than international affairs. The most controversial result was about the participants’ pessimistic attitude towards social media. Some part of the participants think that social media will not change anything in Turkey, and the other part states that social media usage will divide up the society. Detailed analyses are given throughout the article.

  5. Political corporate social responsibility and development

    OpenAIRE

    Adelopo, I.; Yekini, K.; Raimi, L.

    2015-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has attracted varied applications in management. This chapter contribution provides evidence of a political CSR where multinational corporations (MNCs) are complementing government’s role in bridging governance gap. The governance gap thesis and political costs hypothesis provide grounding for the discussions in this paper. Data from case studies across the Middle-Eastern countries were critically analysed and justify the political and developmental under...

  6. Political Socialization in Elementary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palonsky, Stuart B.

    1987-01-01

    Argues that (1) understanding of the ways in which children think about the political aspects of their lives has been limited by functionalist views of schooling and positivist research paradigms; and (2) research should focus on ways children appropriate information from their experiences and use it to construct personal political realities.…

  7. The Politics and Anti-Politics of Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , and citizenship? Addressing these questions, the authors draw on social movement theories to explore the role of religious identities, action frames, political opportunity structures, and resource mobilization in African religions’ reaction to the AIDS epidemic. The book’s findings are rooted in fieldwork...

  8. Family Political Communication and Social Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tims, Albert R.

    1986-01-01

    Supports the argument that social values have an impact on family environment, determining the political information and communication activity the child is exposed to and shaping parent-child relations. (PD)

  9. Traversing a Political Pipeline: An Intersectional and Social Constructionist Approach Toward Technology Education for Girls of Color

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    First, this paper argues that applications of SCOT in feminist science and technology studies have largely focused on analyzing how gender and technology are coproduced, resulting in lack of scholarship that examines the mutually constitutive relationship between technology, gender and other intersecting categories, such as race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and ability. Second, this paper argues that an intersectional view of technology can dismantle the language of objectivity deep...

  10. Political diversity will improve social psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, José L; Crawford, Jarret T; Stern, Charlotta; Haidt, Jonathan; Jussim, Lee; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-01-01

    Psychologists have demonstrated the value of diversity--particularly diversity of viewpoints--for enhancing creativity, discovery, and problem solving. But one key type of viewpoint diversity is lacking in academic psychology in general and social psychology in particular: political diversity. This article reviews the available evidence and finds support for four claims: (1) Academic psychology once had considerable political diversity, but has lost nearly all of it in the last 50 years. (2) This lack of political diversity can undermine the validity of social psychological science via mechanisms such as the embedding of liberal values into research questions and methods, steering researchers away from important but politically unpalatable research topics, and producing conclusions that mischaracterize liberals and conservatives alike. (3) Increased political diversity would improve social psychological science by reducing the impact of bias mechanisms such as confirmation bias, and by empowering dissenting minorities to improve the quality of the majority's thinking. (4) The underrepresentation of non-liberals in social psychology is most likely due to a combination of self-selection, hostile climate, and discrimination. We close with recommendations for increasing political diversity in social psychology.

  11. A Political, Economic, Social, Technology, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE Approach for Risk Identification of the Tidal Industry in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Kolios

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of renewable and especially tidal energy through a political, economic, social, technology, legal and environmental (PESTLE analysis approach and by reviewing the most up to date relevant literature. The study focuses on the United Kingdom given the favourable environmental resources for such technologies; the number of different design concepts that are currently under development as well as the research funding that has been invested over the last few years. Findings of the analysis identify the risks and multiple stakeholders involved at all stages of the tidal energy projects development from the conceptualization of the design, right through to decommissioning. Many of the stakeholders present benefits to the tidal developers through funding, incentives and knowledge sharing, but at the same time they also present potential risks to the future of projects. This is mostly down to different approaches of the most important aspect of tidal energy that needs to be considered, making it hard for technologists and developers to equally address all requirements. From this research it can be concluded that several of these risks can be mitigated early on providing that particular stakeholders are involved at the correct stage of a project.

  12. Social media, parties, and political inequalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, K.T.E.; Spierings, C.H.B.M.

    2016-01-01

    This book examines how social media have transformed politics in established democracies. Specifically, the authors examine the influence of the unique qualities of social media on the power balance between and within parties. They present a general theory as well as an in-depth case study of the Ne

  13. Handbook of political citizenship and social movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, H.A.

    2014-01-01

    This Handbook uniquely collates the results of several decades of academic research in these two important fields. The expert contributions successively address the different forms of political citizenship and current approaches and recent developments in social movement studies. Salient social move

  14. The political dimension of "linking social capital"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    . Through an analysis of existing analytical practices, the article concludes that linking social capital is often subordinated to the two related social capital concepts of bonding and bridging, and that linking social capital is often exclusively defined and operationalized based on expressions...... of organizational trust and participation. The article proposes a recalibration to encompass the political dynamics, and political survival theory is recommended as a way to address the hitherto underexplored governance dimension. Rather than using trust as the analytical pivot, this analytical entry point may...

  15. Review essay: Social media, politics and protest

    OpenAIRE

    Markham, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Invited review of three recent titles on social media and protest cultures:\\ud \\ud Lina Dencik and Oliver Leistert (eds), Critical Perspectives on Social Media and Protest: Between Control and Emancipation. London: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015.\\ud \\ud Daniel Trottier and Christian Fuchs (eds), Social Media, Politics and the State: Protests, Revolutions, Riots, Crime and Policing in the Age of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. New York and Abingdon: Routledge, 2015.\\ud \\ud Julie Uldam and Anne Vest...

  16. The Digital Citizen: social machine politics are here to stay

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hara, Kieron

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 US elections showcased several Internet-based technologies. Much of the most influential political commentary appeared on microblogging sites, while both presidential candidates exploited the power of social media, going with the grain of modern ideas of individualistic citizenship. Barack Obama's campaign was notable for its integration of social media, analysis of big data, and offline effort, which seems to have been a key factor in an unusually close race.

  17. Social technologies and socialization of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Leijten

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Whether we like it or not, and how many difficulties this may pose, scientific research and technology are becoming the “property” of everybody and increasingly will become subject of public guidance and political decision making. Socialization happens because what people think, want and do has become central to the development of science and technology. Socialization of research is simply happening because it is the development characteristic of a society in which knowledge is becoming the main driving force. And just like in agricultural or industrial societies in the past it leads to (re-invent the institutions and mechanisms which allow the knowledge society to function properly.This note will further explore the developments contributing to the socialization of research and their impact on research and research institutes. It will focus more on technologies than on science per se, because applications and usage will become the main drivers.

  18. Political Power and Social Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivarsson, Søren; Rud, Søren

    Studies of colonialism and empire have increasingly drawn attention to the problem of conceptualizing the political logic of colonial projects and the circumstances of state formation in colonial contexts. Concepts such as ‘colonial governmentality’ (Prakash, Thomas, Scott, Legg), ‘state effect...... state remains undertheorized and underanalysed. With this workshop we wish to bring together a small group of scholars working on less studied colonial states. Hereby we wish to open up for a fruitful exchange on what such cases can tell us about the generic nature of the colonial state and hereby...

  19. Positive Politeness & Social Harmony in Literary Discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawal F. Abbas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strategies of politeness are not arbitrarily chosen by speakers in interaction. Instead, the choice of a strategy is constrained by a number of contextual features (socio-cultural variables, such as the relative power of the speakers, the social distance of the speakers and what the speakers happen to be negotiating at the time of speaking. This study focuses on the linguistic strategies of politeness, and more specifically on the positive politeness, as represented in fiction. The novel chosen is that of Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables- a novel in which the main character Anne Shirley tries her best to establish common grounds with others until she achieves friendly and social harmonious relationships with nearly everybody. To show the above point, Brown and Levinson’s (1987 theory of politeness is adopted to account for the linguistic strategies, in addition to some subsequent contribution provided by Spencer-Oatey (2002 to account for sociality rights and obligations. This model is chosen to explore the relation between language use and the social relationship of the speakers. A point of departure, and according to O’Driscoll (1996, Brown and Levinson’s hierarchy of politeness strategies allows attention to positive to cover more ground than that subsumed under positive politeness (super-strategy 2. That is why baldly on-record (super-strategy 1 is used to pay positive face. The analysis shows that most of Anne’s directives in this speech event, which are linguistic realizations of both super-strategy 1 and 2, are meant to establish common grounds to achieve friendly and harmonious relationships with others.

  20. Does Social Background Influence Political Science Grades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruneh, Gizachew

    2013-01-01

    This paper tests a hypothesized linear relationship between social background and final grades in several political science courses that I taught at the University of Central Arkansas. I employ a cross-sectional research design and ordinary least square (OLS) estimators to test the foregoing hypothesis. Relying on a sample of up to 204…

  1. Social Justice and Political Orthodoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianoff, Greg

    2007-01-01

    Since 2003, the Teachers College of Columbia University has maintained a policy of evaluating students based on their "commitment to social justice." Before last summer, Columbia could blame the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, the main accrediting body for schools of education, for those evaluation criteria. The…

  2. The global politics of science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Carpes, Mariana; Knoblich, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of scholars have begun to see science and technology as relevant issues in International Relations (IR), acknowledging the impact of material elements, technical instruments, and scientific practices on international security, statehood, and global governance. This two-volume collection brings the debate about science and technology to the center of International Relations. It shows how integrating science and technology translates into novel analytical frameworks, conceptual approaches and empirical puzzles, and thereby offers a state-of-the-art review of various methodological and theoretical ways in which sciences and technologies matter for the study of international affairs and world politics. The authors not only offer a set of practical examples of research frameworks for experts and students alike, but also propose a conceptual space for interdisciplinary learning in order to improve our understanding of the global politics of science and technology.

  3. Social Justice and Social/Political Education: A Theoretical Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Ted

    1983-01-01

    Social/political education programs need an epistemological underpinning of clearly articulated principles of social justice--e.g., Rawls' two principles. However, such principles require operationalisation. Habermas' extension of Kohlberg's theory of moral development would provide a viable theoretical framework for the development of a…

  4. The Politics of Humanitarian Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Lindskov

    Med udgangspunkt i teori og koncepter fra Michel Foucaults værker,såvel som indsigter fra Science and Technology Studies (STS), udforsker bogen tre forskellige eksempler på humanitære aktørers brug af ny teknologi: vacciner, genmodificerede majs og biometrisk registreringsteknologi.......Med udgangspunkt i teori og koncepter fra Michel Foucaults værker,såvel som indsigter fra Science and Technology Studies (STS), udforsker bogen tre forskellige eksempler på humanitære aktørers brug af ny teknologi: vacciner, genmodificerede majs og biometrisk registreringsteknologi....

  5. Social christianity and the constitution of a new political subject

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălin-Valentin RAIU

    2012-01-01

    The issue of "the political subject" analyzed among others by Michel Foucault and William Connolly is offering to the political scientists a very important tool for their research. In this paper we have tried to find out if the social and political movement called "Social Christianity" from the late nineteenth century had proposed a new political subject for the modernity dominated by the liberalism and socialism. Thus, Social Christianity was not just a middle way between liberalism and soci...

  6. Social Networks and Political Parties in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adler Lomnitz, Larissa

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the origin and evolution of two Chilean political parties (the Radical Party and the Christian Democrat Party through the analysis of the social networks that originated and composed them. The aim of this study is to propose a model of national political cultures on the basis of the structure of social networks related to power and of the symbol system, which legitimizes it. The structure of social networks, horizontal and vertical, are based on reciprocal or redistributive forms of exchange, on what is being exchanged and on the articulation between networks. In every society there are symmetrical and asymmetrical exchanges, which produce horizontal and vertical networks. These networks interact among themselves to form the social fabric. The dominance of some over others and how they combine, delineate the character of the political culture (authoritarian vs. egalitarian. Chile is a multiparty country within which there are cohorts of horizontal groups of friends, who informally exercise a central control over their members and create invisible boundaries setting them apart from others, in which leadership is under constrains. The result is both a strong presidential system based on an almost fanatic legitimacy, combined with factionalism and a strong parliamentary system.

  7. Political conservatism as motivated social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, John T; Glaser, Jack; Kruglanski, Arie W; Sulloway, Frank J

    2003-05-01

    Analyzing political conservatism as motivated social cognition integrates theories of personality (authoritarianism, dogmatism-intolerance of ambiguity), epistemic and existential needs (for closure, regulatory focus, terror management), and ideological rationalization (social dominance, system justification). A meta-analysis (88 samples, 12 countries, 22,818 cases) confirms that several psychological variables predict political conservatism: death anxiety (weighted mean r = .50); system instability (.47); dogmatism-intolerance of ambiguity (.34); openness to experience (-.32); uncertainty tolerance (-.27); needs for order, structure, and closure (.26); integrative complexity (-.20); fear of threat and loss (.18); and self-esteem (-.09). The core ideology of conservatism stresses resistance to change and justification of inequality and is motivated by needs that vary situationally and dispositionally to manage uncertainty and threat.

  8. High political participation, high social capital? A relational analysis of youth social capital and political participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teney, Celine; Hanquinet, Laurie

    2012-09-01

    Social capital has been alleged to increase the capacity for political mobilization. Yet, until now, the empirical debate has not succeeded in rendering a detailed account of the relationships between social capital and political participation partly because of the use of a reductive conception and operationalization of both concepts. Using a multidimensional and relational technique (multiple correspondence analysis) and a detailed youth survey data from Belgium, the article demonstrates that youth draw on diverse forms of social capital and that these forms vary along socio-economic status and ethnic origin. Six classes based on the forms of social capital were identified. Two of them - the 'Committed' and 'Religious' are highly political active. The 'Committed' Class, based on a diversified social capital, consists mainly of non-immigrant youth with a high socio-economic background undertaking a large diversity of political activities. The 'Religious' Class, based on a narrow social capital built around religious activities, is mostly composed of ethnic minority youth with a low SES involved in more specific political activities.

  9. Files supporting "Talking Politics on Social Media"

    OpenAIRE

    Fredheim, Rolf; Moore, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    This repository includes a description of the files needed to replicate the findings reported in 'Talking Politics on Social Media' by Rolf Fredheim and Alfred Moore --README.txt --anon.Rdata Rdata file containing deidentified commenting data needed to reproduce main figures and findings reported in the paper. --reproduction.py script used to identify reason-giving, agreement, disagreement, and insults. This script requires Python 2, version 2.5 or higher, and the modules codecs, ner, pyencha...

  10. Social media as political party campaign in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Abdillah, Leon Andretti

    2014-01-01

    Social media as a trend in the Internet is now used as a medium for political campaigns. Author explores the advantages and social media implementation of any political party in Indonesia legislative elections 2014. Author visited and analyzed social media used by the contestants, such as: Facebook, and Twitter. Author collected data from social media until the end of April 2014. This article discusses the use of social media by political parties and their features. The results of this study ...

  11. The Internet and Social Media in Political Participation in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Andi Alimuddin Unde; Seniwati

    2016-01-01

    - This research explores the Internet and social media in political participation in Indonesia. The Integrated Participatory Political Marketing (IPPM) and the Mixed-Mediated and Online Political Campaigning (MMOPC) are the concepts to posit new alternative models of marketization of politics and professionalization of campaign. This paper analyses the Internet and social media during Jokowidodo???s campaign. This research uses social media such as Facebook, and Twitter, and also Internet ...

  12. The Internet and Social Media in Political Participation in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Alimuddin, Andi; Seniwati

    2016-01-01

    Thank You for Hasanuddin University Abstract-- This research explores the Internet and social media in political participation in Indonesia. The Integrated Participatory Political Marketing (IPPM) and the Mixed- Mediated and Online Political Campaigning (MMOPC) are the concepts to posit new alternative models of marketization of politics and professionalization of campaign. This paper analyses the Internet and social media during Jokowidodo???s campaign. This research uses social ...

  13. Declining cleavages and political choices : the interplay of social and political factors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Nan Dirk de; Heath, Anthony; Need, Ariana

    2001-01-01

    Many social scientists believe that in the Netherlands there has been a decline in the political impact of traditional class and religious divisions over the last quarter-century. In understanding the evolving political impact of social divisions it is important to recognise that political behaviour

  14. Declining cleavages and political choices: the interplay of social and political factors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Nan Dirk; Heath, Anthony; Need, Ariana

    2001-01-01

    Many social scientists believe that in the Netherlands there has been a decline in the political impact of traditional class and religious divisions over the last quarter-century. In understanding the evolving political impact of social divisions it is important to recognise that political behaviour

  15. Social justice and the politics of recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfken, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Comments on the original article, "Psychology and social justice: Why we do what we do" by M. J. T. Vasquez (see record 2012-18676-002). Vasquez pointed to numerous initiatives and task forces that the American Psychological Association (APA) has established to address the marginalization and subordination of various groups. There is little doubt that the concerns addressed by these initiatives and task forces are important and play a central role in the development of a just society. Although Vasquez noted that "social realities are important determinants of distress" she failed to appreciate the extent to which our social relations emerge against the background of specific political and economic structures. The cost of this oversight is the perpetuation of a politics of recognition that does little to address the economic inequalities that are a defining feature of unjust societies. Were APA to restrict its attention to psychological distress or access to resources, it would place APA in the service of maintaining rather than transforming the existing structure of society. APA should consider developing initiatives and task forces to investigate the role that capitalism plays in the perpetuation of inequality and exploitation. It may also be time to reflect on why an institution that claims to be dedicated to social justice has had so little to say about one of the dominant features of modern society. © 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. GLOBALIZATION AS A POLITICAL, ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL PHENOMENON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Victoria Flores Trujillo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Globalization is defined as a process that integrates knowledge worldwide, has its historical reference on changes in the ways processes, methods and information are addressed; documented its inception in the late twentieth century, Castells, M. (2001 beyond the discrepancy about whether it is a product of technological development or an inevitable evolution of capitalism, research arises from the formulation of the following questions: How important is the study of globalization ?, What has produced important contributions in the scientific community about globalization? And What are the perspectives or approaches addressed? . This work aims to show how the scientific community has produced knowledge about this phenomenon addressing the political, economic and social approaches: From the economic point of view reconfigures how to address the processes of production, distribution and consumption of goods and services in the world, permeating this way all international economic events. From the political point of view, besides the redistribution of emerging geopolitical blocs, it establishes a new category of state, transnational state. From the social point of view, it shows evidence of the negative effects of globalization on resizing the category personal, local or regional or even in global risk-Global group. The research is documentary literature, their contribution to social science evidence to characterize globalization as political, economic and social phenomenon of the century that permeates all areas of study applied.

  17. ARE THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES CHANGING POLITICS? CASE STUDY IN GALICIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda García Vázquez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the industrial society, politicians had to command the language TV since the intensity of the reaction was more important than the length of the message. They had to make categorical statements. In the Information Society with information and communication technologies (TICs, this changes to a great extent due to pluralism and the fact that more people make themselves heard. Blogs appear as a way to give opinion and information, and can be considered as an alternative form of expression –blogs give different views on news ignored by the main media-. Activists, political parties, organizations and citizens use websites, blogs or wikis as a means to insist and create opinion. TICs and cooperative tools of Web 2.0 increase people’s interest in politics, individual commitment and participation and cause political mediators to disappear. This paper presents a reflection on the impact of TICs on the theory of politics, and the results of a quantitative analysis of cases from the observation of how TICs are used on the social platform “Nunca Máis”, as well as by the autonomous government Xunta de Galicia, the Parliament of Galicia and the political party Bloque Nacionalista Galego.

  18. The Place of Political Diversity within the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwald, Mitchell; Wiener, Diane R.; Smith-Osborne, Alexa; Smith, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines political ideology and its implications as a newer diversity variable within social work education. Responding to internal assessments and external critiques of social work education, the dynamics of how diverse political ideologies might manifest in 5 core course concentrations--human behavior in the social environment,…

  19. The Place of Political Diversity within the Social Work Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwald, Mitchell; Wiener, Diane R.; Smith-Osborne, Alexa; Smith, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines political ideology and its implications as a newer diversity variable within social work education. Responding to internal assessments and external critiques of social work education, the dynamics of how diverse political ideologies might manifest in 5 core course concentrations--human behavior in the social environment,…

  20. Fostering marginalized youths' political participation: longitudinal roles of parental political socialization and youth sociopolitical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A

    2012-09-01

    This study examines the roles of parental political socialization and the moral commitment to change social inequalities in predicting marginalized youths' (defined here as lower-SES youth of color) political participation. These issues are examined by applying structural equation modeling to a longitudinal panel of youth. Because tests of measurement invariance suggested racial/ethnic heterogeneity, the structural model was fit separately for three racial/ethnic groups. For each group, parental political socialization: discussion predicted youths' commitment to produce social change and for two groups, longitudinally predicted political participation. This study contributes to the literature by examining civic/political participation among disparate racial/ethnic groups, addresses an open scholarly question (whether youths' commitment to create social change predicts their "traditional" participation), and emphasizes parents' role in fostering marginalized youths' civic and political participation.

  1. Eastern European Political Socialization Modeling Research: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Florela Voinea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents empirical modeling research on political socialization of the citizens in the new Eastern European democracies. The political socialization issue offers a comparative perspective over the modeling methodologies in analytical paradigms. Eastern European political culture research has revealed features of the electoral behavior and political participation which can be identified in different degrees in all the new democracies in the area: passivity with respect to political activity of parties, elites and institutions, political apathy or lack of reaction to anti-democratic actions, skepticism or distrust in institutions, scarce participation to social movements. Several authors explain the actual political behavior of the Eastern European citizens’ and their low social and political involvement by the (political culture heritage of the communist regimes in which they lived for a long time, and which keeps shaping their political attitudes towards the state, civil society, government and institutions. Research issues in the analysis of political participation are traditionally based on statistics analyses of empirical evidence coming from public surveys. However, scarcity ofempirical data from the communist periode with regard to (political socialization, values and beliefs represent a major obstacle towards a better understanding of the historical roots of current behaviors and attitudes. Scarcity of observational data might be overcome by computational and simulation modeling.

  2. Engaging Adolescents in Politics: The Longitudinal Effect of Political Socialization Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintelier, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a political socialization perspective, this study examined the development of political participation during adolescence and early adulthood. We explore the effect of parents, peers, school media, and voluntary associations on political participation. Self-reported data were collected from 3,025 Belgian adolescents at three points in…

  3. The Chinese People’s Liberation Army and Political Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    THE CHINESE PEOPLE’S LIBERATION ARMY AND POLITICAL SOCIALIZATION by LIEUTENANT COLONEL GEORGE K. OSBORN, USA (What is the role of the Chinese ...People’s Liberation Army in the Political Socialization o f the Chinese People?) The hypothesis here advanced is that, except for a period during...the decade of the 1950’s, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) has played a major role in the political socialization not only of those who

  4. A Computational Approach to Politeness with Application to Social Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil, Cristian; Jurafsky, Dan; Leskovec, Jure; Potts, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for identifying linguistic aspects of politeness. Our starting point is a new corpus of requests annotated for politeness, which we use to evaluate aspects of politeness theory and to uncover new interactions between politeness markers and context. These findings guide our construction of a classifier with domain-independent lexical and syntactic features operationalizing key components of politeness theory, such as indirection, deference, impersonalization and modality. Our classifier achieves close to human performance and is effective across domains. We use our framework to study the relationship between politeness and social power, showing that polite Wikipedia editors are more likely to achieve high status through elections, but, once elevated, they become less polite. We see a similar negative correlation between politeness and power on Stack Exchange, where users at the top of the reputation scale are less polite than those at the bottom. Finally, we apply our class...

  5. Mediatization of Lithuanian politics on social networking sites and its compatibility with social media logic

    OpenAIRE

    Povilaitytė, Živilė

    2014-01-01

    Given the novelty of political campaigning on social networking sites in Lithuania and the critique, it has received from social media experts, the object of the master thesis encompasses mediatization of Lithuanian politics on Facebook, when social media logic becomes adapted in political campaigning and integrated into the political agenda. Accordingly, the MA thesis developed its aim to define in what ways mediatization of Lithuanian politics manifests on Facebook and if public-relatio...

  6. Technology of social work

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Educational manual contains the basis of the lecture course by discipline «Technology of social work» for students of specialty «Social work», plans and guidelines for practical exercises, control questions and bibliography to each topic.

  7. The political voice of young citizens Educational conditions for political conversation – school and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Andersson

    2012-01-01

    Political conversation is a prerequisite for social cohesion in society. Due to digital media, a new educational situation has been shaped that creates different conversational possibilities in which the political conversation can take place. The analysis of two cases, the international students’ questionnaire used in the ICCS 2009 and findings from research in a Swedish net community, represents two spaces – school and social media – containing specific educational conditions for political c...

  8. Piracy and the Politics of Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the understanding of how and where politics are made has changed radically. Scholars such as Ulrich Beck and Maria Bakardjieva have discussed how political agency is enacted outside of conventional party organizations, and political struggles increasingly focus on single issues. Over the past two decades, this transformation of politics has become common knowledge, not only in academic research but also in the general political discourse. Recently, the proliferation of digita...

  9. Political participation in social policy's construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Guedes Rocha

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The global context created by the First World War meant that Brazil was forced to accelerate its process of industrialization causing the numerical growth of the working class and the expansion of trade union activities in the country. Because of this, the Brazilian government increased its interest in controlling the different factors of industrial production process aimed at intensifying the process of capitalist accumulation in the country. At the same time, began the implementation of a series of welfare measures in the country as part of the conformation of the Brazilian system of social policies. If, initially, the system was linked primarily to the institutional apparatus of the state, in the mid-twentieth century, and more recently, we can see the growth of the bond between these social policies and the entities deprivation of neoliberal orientation. Thus, this article aims to observe the historical context and the relationship between the emergence and development of various forms of political participation in the construction of social policies in Brazil.

  10. Third Space, Social Media and Everyday Political Talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, Scott; Graham, Todd; Jackson, Daniel; Bruns, Axel; Skogerbø, Eli; Christensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders Olof; Enli, Gunn Sara

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical research into online politics to date has primarily focused on what might be called formal politics or on how activists and social movements utilize social media to pursue their goals. However, in this chapter, we argue that there is much to be gained by investigating how p

  11. Education and Economic, Political, and Social Change in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huong, Pham Lan; Fry, Gerald W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the complex relations among history, education, political economy, and social change in Vietnam. Vietnam has a long history of education and a literate culture. The evolution of Vietnamese culture and society is characterized by both persistence and change. Social and political persistence and change have been…

  12. Third Space, Social Media and Everyday Political Talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, Scott; Graham, Todd; Jackson, Daniel; Bruns, Axel; Skogerbø, Eli; Christensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders Olof; Enli, Gunn Sara

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical research into online politics to date has primarily focused on what might be called formal politics or on how activists and social movements utilize social media to pursue their goals. However, in this chapter, we argue that there is much to be gained by investigating how

  13. Third Space, Social Media and Everyday Political Talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, Scott; Graham, Todd; Jackson, Daniel; Bruns, Axel; Skogerbø, Eli; Christensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders Olof; Enli, Gunn Sara

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical research into online politics to date has primarily focused on what might be called formal politics or on how activists and social movements utilize social media to pursue their goals. However, in this chapter, we argue that there is much to be gained by investigating how p

  14. Soft Energy Paths Revisited: Politics and Practice in Energy Technology Transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Schelly

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that current efforts to study and advocate for a change in energy technologies to reduce their climate and other environmental impacts often ignore the political, social, and bodily implications of energy technology choices. Framing renewable energy technologies exclusively in terms of their environmental benefits dismisses important questions about how energy infrastructures can be designed to correspond to democratic forms of socio-politics, forms of social organization that involve independence in terms of meeting energy needs, resilience in terms of adapting to change, participatory decision making and control, equitable distribution of knowledge and efficacy, and just distribution of ownership. Recognizing technological choices as political choices brings explicit attention to the kinds of socio-political restructuring that could be precipitated through a renewable energy technology transition. This paper argues that research on energy transitions should consider the political implications of technological choices, not just the environmental consequences. Further, emerging scholarship on energy practices suggests that social habits of energy usage are themselves political, in that they correspond to and reinforce particular arrangements of power. Acknowledging the embedded politics of technology, as the decades’ old concept of soft path technologies encourages, and integrating insights on the politics of technology with insights on technological practices, can improve future research on energy policy and public perceptions of energy systems. This paper extends insights regarding the socio-political implications of energy paths to consider how understandings of energy technologies as constellations of embedded bodily practices can help further develop our understanding of the consequences of energy technologies, consequences that move beyond environmental implications to the very habits and behaviors of patterned energy

  15. SOCIAL THEORY OF INTERNATIONAL POLITICS: The impact of social constructivism in international politics Alexander Wendt

    OpenAIRE

    Barros, Marilene; University of California Santa Barbara

    2013-01-01

     Following the structure of Wendt’s book, I will present in this article the main arguments of his social theory, and then explain how Wendt applies them to international politics. This account will render a critique those points to the problems and promises of Wendt’s social constructivism. I argue that despite flaws in his constitutive approach, his focus on the domestic-international aspect of agency and its relation to structure (of the state system) renders a significant contribution to ...

  16. Economic, Social and Political Aspect of Globalization on Health in Developing Countries (with Segregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batool Rafat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, scholars and human rights activists for more national and international responsibilities in a "right to health for everyone" exchange ideas and also propose some strategies. One of the major international problems of health hazards result from globalization. The Relationship between globalization and health aspects of economic, technological, political, social, scientific and cultural should be studied. This study intends to review the aspects of economic, social and political globalization on the health. In this case ,Kof index is which includes all three aspects of economic, social and political globalization agenda. The results show that economic globalization has a negative effect on health in developing countries and globalization, social and political effects are positive and statistically significant. The result is the same for both women and men, and there are only minor differences in the coefficients.

  17. Online Marketing in Indian Politics: Role of Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareena Bhatia Kakkar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Indian Politics has always been a field of importance for every individual, organization and nation. There is a lot of contribution of the young politicians and voters in politics. The research was conducted to find out how social media has influenced the young voters towards politics and whether it has an impact on them or not. The research was conducted by adopting primary and secondary method for collecting data and the result was favorable that social media has a powerful impact on the young voters. The research was conducted in Delhi/NCR i.e. Delhi, Gurgaon and Faridabad. Our study is to explain social media as a powerful tool of influence on people towards politics. Also, the research was conducted to study the online marketing strategies through social media of various Indian Political Parties. There is an increase of the presence of various Indian Political Parties on social media i.e. social networking sites and they are using social media as a platform to market and promote their party and politics among the large volume of users of these sites.

  18. Manipulation in political discourse (on the basis of social and political texts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobas Pavel Pavlovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an attempt is made to consider manipulation in political discourse, based on the material texts socio-political themes on the basis of the three aspects of the language - semantics, syntactic and pragmatic - taking into account that the pragmatist is exactly what changes when the reception of the manipulation becomes socially productive.

  19. Political mobilisation, ethnic diversity and social cohesion: the conditional effect of political parties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M Helbling; T. Reeskens; D. Stolle

    2013-01-01

    Recent research on the consequences of ethnic diversity for social cohesion indicates that the effects of diversity are not necessarily universal. In this article we hypothesise that the rhetoric of political parties conditions whether diversity negatively affects generalised trust. Political campai

  20. Political mobilisation, ethnic diversity and social cohesion: the conditional effect of political parties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbling, M; Reeskens, T.; Stolle, D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent research on the consequences of ethnic diversity for social cohesion indicates that the effects of diversity are not necessarily universal. In this article we hypothesise that the rhetoric of political parties conditions whether diversity negatively affects generalised trust. Political campai

  1. The Kaziranga National Park: Dynamics of Social and Political History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saikia Arupjyoti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost after a century of experimenting, Kaziranga National Park is now a well-known example of the success of wildlife conservation. Conservationists have no hesitation in ascribing the success of this story to the careful application of the science of wildlife conservation. A large section of the Assamese middle class would like to associate the institution as organic to their success story. For the state too it is a matter of pride. This journey of success is not a linear growth of success and a re-look into the social and political history of this national park will help us understand the complexities underlying these claims. The ideological paradigms of wildlife conservation in Kaziranga National Park have changed significantly over a long period. Since its establishment as a game sanctuary in the early twentieth century and gradually being given the status of a national park, Kaziranga has experienced varied forms of conservation agenda. Rather than a mere technological explanation for the success of the conservation project of Kaziranga, more of it was based on the social and political history.

  2. New Media and Social Media in the Political Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Momoc

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the 2009 Romanian presidential elections and the way in which thecandidates interacted with the new communication technologies. After the first research conducted on the2004 online electoral campaigns, we noticed that, in Romania, the degree of alphabetization and politicalparticipation (the number of people knowing how to read and write, or the number of those effectivelyparticipating at the poll is just as small as it was after the mass internet was introduced and after thenumber of internet subscribers increased. We observed that the websites and blogs with the highest trafficare the entertainment dedicated ones, the tabloids, and not the cultural ones, not the quality online press.This research intends to clear up whether in Romania social media are rather helping the moderatecandidates or the extremist candidates – from an electoral point of view. This article will be incorporated inthe research called Electoral Communication in Romania after 1989. Old and New Technologies inPresidential Campaigns which is part of the post-doctoral program POSDRU/89/1.5/S/62259, Sociohumanand political applied sciences. Post-doctoral training program and post-doctoral researchscholarships in the field of the socio-human and political sciences.

  3. Debating the Future: A Social Security Political Leadership Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackaway, Chapman; Goertzen, Brent J.

    2008-01-01

    Students are well served by course simulations that employ active learning styles and student-driven interaction. For debate on political issues, particular public policies are quite effective in stimulating that discussion. We developed an in-class simulation of political debate on the issue of Social Security. We describe the simulation itself,…

  4. The Mass Media and Political Socialization: Chile, 1970-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Amy R.

    2005-01-01

    This project seeks to determine the effect of the mass media on political attitudes and behaviors in Chile between the years 1970 and 2000. The relationship between the media and "political socialization" is just now gaining recognition in scholarly research, and Chile offers an excellent case study. This paper traces these two variables…

  5. Verifying disarmament: scientific, technological and political challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilat, Joseph R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25

    There is growing interest in, and hopes for, nuclear disarmament in governments and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) around the world. If a nuclear-weapon-free world is to be achievable, verification and compliance will be critical. VerifYing disarmament would have unprecedented scientific, technological and political challenges. Verification would have to address warheads, components, materials, testing, facilities, delivery capabilities, virtual capabilities from existing or shutdown nuclear weapon and existing nuclear energy programs and material and weapon production and related capabilities. Moreover, it would likely have far more stringent requirements. The verification of dismantlement or elimination of nuclear warheads and components is widely recognized as the most pressing problem. There has been considerable research and development done in the United States and elsewhere on warhead and dismantlement transparency and verification since the early 1990s. However, we do not today know how to verifY low numbers or zero. We need to develop the needed verification tools and systems approaches that would allow us to meet this complex set of challenges. There is a real opportunity to explore verification options and, given any realistic time frame for disarmament, there is considerable scope to invest resources at the national and international levels to undertake research, development and demonstrations in an effort to address the anticipated and perhaps unanticipated verification challenges of disarmament now andfor the next decades. Cooperative approaches have the greatest possibility for success.

  6. Social Media and Socio-Political Change: An Asian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Pang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the widespread adoption of social media in many Asian societies, these platforms are increasingly used in a variety of ways to promote civic and political aims but such uses are shaped by various stakeholders and contexts of use. In this special issue, four papers on Japan, Singapore, Malaysia and China-Australia present highly contextualized assessments of the role of social media in civic and political life in Asia.

  7. Online Marketing in Indian Politics: Role of Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Kareena Bhatia Kakkar; Vivek Singh Student, GD Goenka University, Sohna (Haryana) India

    2014-01-01

    Indian Politics has always been a field of importance for every individual, organization and nation. There is a lot of contribution of the young politicians and voters in politics. The research was conducted to find out how social media has influenced the young voters towards politics and whether it has an impact on them or not. The research was conducted by adopting primary and secondary method for collecting data and the result was favorable that social media has a powerful impact on the yo...

  8. A mathematics course for political and social research

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Will H

    2013-01-01

    Political science and sociology increasingly rely on mathematical modeling and sophisticated data analysis, and many graduate programs in these fields now require students to take a ""math camp"" or a semester-long or yearlong course to acquire the necessary skills. Available textbooks are written for mathematics or economics majors, and fail to convey to students of political science and sociology the reasons for learning often-abstract mathematical concepts. A Mathematics Course for Political and Social Research fills this gap, providing both a primer for math novices in the social s

  9. Political Acclamation, Social Media and the Public Mood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    -theoretical, historical and sociological investigations and regards acclamation as a ‘social institution’ following Mauss. Acclamation is a practice that forms publics, whether as the direct presence of the ‘people’, mass-mediated ‘public opinion’, or a ‘public mood’ decipherable through countless social media postings......This article approaches social media from the theory of the religio-political practice of acclamation revived by Agamben and following twentieth-century social and political thought and theology (of Weber, Peterson, Schmitt, Kantorowicz). It supplements that theory by more recent political....... The article surveys issues of differential geographies of access, weighting of posts, value-creation, orality and gesture, algorithmic governmentality, and Big Data and knowledge production. It argues that social media constitute a public from a mass of individualized, private postings. It concludes...

  10. Data visualization in political and social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Zinovyev, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    The basic objective of data visualization is to provide an efficient graphical display for summarizing and reasoning about quantitative information. During the last decades, political science has accumulated a large corpus of various kinds of data such as comprehensive factbooks and atlases, characterizing all or most of existing states by multiple and objectively assessed numerical indicators within certain time lapse. As a consequence, there exists a continuous trend for political science to gradually become a more quantitative scientific field and to use quantitative information in the analysis and reasoning. It is believed that any objective analysis in political science must be multidimensional and combine various sources of quantitative information; however, human capabilities for perception of large massifs of numerical information are limited. Hence, methods and approaches for visualization of quantitative and qualitative data (and, especially multivariate data) is an extremely important topic. Data v...

  11. Political parties and Facebook: A study of Icelandic political parties and their social media usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldvin Þór Bergsson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of social media in the national discourse is increasing but little is known about their true effects on political communication and participation. The paper examines how the Icelandic political parties used social media during the campaign for the 2013 general elections and possible influence of the electorate. Data from the Icelandic National Election Study was used to examine a possible link between political interest and participation. International studies are used as a reference since Icelandic studies on the subject are limited, and a theoretical overview of the nature and effect of social media is provided. The findings of this paper are that social media was primarily used as a one-way communication tool and that interaction between parties and the electorate was limited. Facebook is by far the most important social media due to its spread and easiness to send information to a large group. The study does not find evidence for the claim that voters had much effect on the campaign through social media nor that social media affected the election results. People with much interest in politics are more likely to use the internet to receive information from the parties.

  12. Turkish “politics of intentions” as a pathological case: Low social trust in Turkey and its political consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Ekmekci

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I analyze social polarization in Turkey and offer suggestions as to how to ameliorate it. I first review the literature on the relationship between social trust and democracy and then draw the current picture of social and political trust in Turkey using data from the World Values Survey. Then I explain political distrust and polarization in Turkey utilizing the concept of 'politics of intentions' and elaborate on the negative consequences of this type of politics, which is very much dominant in contemporary Turkish politics. Finally, I evaluate the options and tools available to Turkish people and politicians for fighting high social distrust and polarization in Turkey.

  13. Adult Education and Political and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanakatwe, J. M.

    1970-01-01

    The author, secretary general of the Republic of Zambia, discusses education (and particularly adult education) as a political imperative in Africa. He cites the problems of illiteracy and of the desire for a democratic system, and suggests that population growth must be adjusted to development potential. (MF)

  14. Managing for Political Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherer, Andreas Georg; Rasche, Andreas; Palazzo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    to the debate and outline the original economic and political context. The following section explores emerging changes in the institutional context relevant to PCSR and reconsiders some of the assumptions underlying Habermas’ thesis of the postnational constellation. This highlights some neglected issues...

  15. Social marketing: dimensions of power and politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S

    1982-01-01

    The effective us of marketing strategies by nonprofit organizations necessitates involvement in political activities, i.e., mobilizing power to influence others. Most nonprofit groups and marketing experts who work for nonprofit groups are not sufficiently aware of the value of using the tactics of politics to win support for their causes. The experiences of a voluntary group which used politics and power to develop a program aimed at assisting unemployed black youth were presented. The group wanted to establish a workshop to provide training for hard core unemployed youth. The group needed to raise funds to set up the workshop. The 1st step was to identify a target group of potential donors, and then to develop a strategy for selling their product, i.e., the worthiness of the workshop project. The group decided to direct its fund raising activities toward organizations in the community rather than individuals. The market was segmented, and the product was presented differently to differ groups. Initially, the voluntary group was powerless. Political tactics were subsequently used to legitimate the group and its product. A network of influencial sympathizers, primarily clergymen and politicians, was established. This network helped the group garner the support of the targeted donor organizations. The threat of sanctions was used to gain support for the project, but sanctions were applied with considerable care. For example, the support of local politicians was obtained partially by implicitly threatening them with the possibility of bad publicity if they failed to promote the project. Voluntary organizations are not immune to internal conflict and competition. In introducing a marketing perspective into a voluntary organization, internal politics must be taken into account. In the case presented here, the marketer had to decide who in the organization to align himself with and then develop strategies to increase his influence and the influence of his allies. In

  16. Integrating social science and genetics: news from the political front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatemi, Peter K; Dawes, Christopher T; Frost-Keller, Amanda; Settle, Jaime E; Verhulst, Brad

    2011-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the use of genetic models to expand the understanding of political preferences, attitudes, and behaviors. Researchers in the social sciences have begun incorporating these models and have revealed that genetic differences account for individual differences in political beliefs, behaviors, and responses to the political environment. The first Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences Conference, held at Boulder, Colorado in May of 2010, brought together these researchers. As a result, we jointly review the last 5 years of research in this area. In doing so, we explicate the methods, findings, and limitations of behavior genetic approaches, including twin designs, association studies, and genome-wide analyses, in their application toward exploring political preferences.

  17. Measuring the effects of social media participation on political party communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, R.C.; Hillegersberg, van J.; Huibers, T.; Reddick, C.; Aikins, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Political parties can potentially benefit from Social Media to shape interactions between their members. This chapter presents the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM), which measures the effects of Social Media Participation on political party communities. As people and politicians increasingly

  18. Measuring the effects of social media participation on political party communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Huibers, T.; Reddick, C.; Aikins, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Political parties can potentially benefit from Social Media to shape interactions between their members. This chapter presents the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM), which measures the effects of Social Media Participation on political party communities. As people and politicians increasingly

  19. Measuring the Effects of Social Media Participation on Political Party Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, R.; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Reddick, C.; Aikins, S.

    2012-01-01

    Political parties can potentially benefit from Social Media to shape interactions between their members. This chapter presents the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM), which measures the effects of Social Media Participation on political party communities. As people and politicians increasingly

  20. Political Expression on Social Media: The Role of Communication Competence and Expected Outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velasquez, Alcides; Rojas, Hernando

    2017-01-01

    ... of political participation. Specifically, we contribute to the understanding of social media political expression by examining the influence of communication competence and expected outcomes on expressive behaviors...

  1. Political aspects of geographical information technologies with examples from imperial and post-independence India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Graham David

    The goal of this research is to examine some of the political dimensions of digital geographical information technologies in order to allow better assessment of their increasing use. Although the conclusions and recommendations are applicable to many regions of the world where these technologies are being introduced, this research derives most of its examples from India. Since at least the early days of British imperialism, decisions regarding land use in India have been informed by various types of information, including cartographic ones. In this thesis it is argued that this information was neither neutral nor objective but rather formed political and ideological statements concerning social relations with the landscape. These statements were reflected both in the nature of the data which were collected and in the ways in which these data were presented. By examining the historical evolution of geographical information technologies in British India and attendant social and environmental impacts, the stage is set for critical speculation on the possible impacts resulting from the introduction of digital geographical information technologies such as remote sensing and geographical information systems. This research draws heavily from the work of historian of cartography Brian Harley. Harley's work is extended to include consideration of the ways in which human-environment relationships are reflected and altered by geographic information technologies. This discussion of possible political and environment implications is influenced by recent literature in the areas of political ecology and the history of cartography. It is concluded that although there are many obstacles including unequal access to the technology, unequal access to information, and issues of control over information creation, which may reinforce and intensify existing social and political inequities, there is cause for some cautious optimism about the potential beneficial outcomes of the use of

  2. Corruption, political culture and negative social capital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Baquero

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the problems in strengthening Brazilian democracy has been the endurance of continued corruption on the part of state officials. The result has been the institutionalization of a political culture, which shows a growing alienation, and apathy of citizens regarding politics. This behavior has its origins in citizens´ perception that the state and public authorities cannot be trusted producing an inertial democracy with low stocks of social capital. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between corruption practices by state authorities and the structuring of a defective political culture in Brazil. The working hypothesis is that serious cases of institutionalized corruption are possible due to invisible social ties created among public authorities, producing social capital of a negative nature, which constraints the effective advancements in Brazilian democracy.

  3. Sports, Global Politics, and Social Value Change: A Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rensmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite their important role in forging, constructing and self-ascribing social identities and shaping popular culture, sports have long been a marginalized subject of social science inquiry, cultural studies, and research on international politics. Only in recent years this has begun to change. The article seeks to advance the still nascent but emerging cross-disciplinary field of research on sports and global politics in two ways: first, by addressing largely unexplored issues of sports, politics, and social conflicts, putting the spotlight on sociopolitical arenas beyond commercialized sports mega events, which have attracted most scholarly attention in contemporary research; and second, by generating hypotheses on the indirect political effects of sports cultures, in particular on the relationship between local social identities—reinforced through sports—and cosmopolitan value change. These interlinked spatial and substantive claims ground a new critical research framework and agenda: it examines sports as profoundly embedded in socioeconomic, cultural and political forms of rule and domination but also seeks to disclose sports’ emancipatory and subversive potential in advancing globalization from below.

  4. Influence of Social Reform Ideologies on Industrial/Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireh, Maduakolam

    2016-01-01

    The founding of industrial/technology education in Ameria represents the convergence of many influences dating back to the pre-industrial revolution era. Social reform movement, one of these influences, set out to change conditions considered to be causes of poverty and other social problems through active engagements in political, educational,…

  5. Course Syllabus: The Social Impact of Computer Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    This syllabus describes the course background, central themes and issues, texts, resources, and recommended readings. Main topics are the sociology of information technology, computers and social change, telecommunications, computers and human interactions, applications in working, and social issues and political implications. (YP)

  6. Pruning the news feed: Unfriending and unfollowing political content on social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leticia Bode

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Social media allow users some degree of control over the content to which they are exposed, through blocking, unfriending, or hiding feeds from other users. This article considers the extent to which they do so for political reasons. Survey data from Pew Research suggests that political unfriending is relatively rare, with fewer than 10% of respondents engaging in the practice. Analysis finds support for the idea that political unfriending is most common among those who talk about politics, those strongest in ideology, those that see the most politics in social media, and those that perceive the greatest political disagreement in their social networks. This suggests that social media are not exacerbating the political information gap as political information on social media is likely still reaching the least politically engaged, whereas the most politically engaged may opt out of political information within social media but still receive it elsewhere.

  7. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Brian E; Taylor, Harry O; Glass, Joseph E; Margerum-Leys, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  8. Information and Communication Technologies in Social Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Perron

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICTs are electronic tools used to convey, manipulate and store information. The exponential growth of Internet access and ICTs greatly influenced social, political, and economic processes in the United States, and worldwide. Regardless of the level of practice, ICTs will continue influencing the careers of social workers and the clients they serve. ICTs have received some attention in the social work literature and curriculum, but we argue that this level of attention is not adequate given their ubiquity, growth and influence, specifically as it relates to upholding social work ethics. Significant attention is needed to help ensure social workers are responsive to the technological changes in the health care system, including the health care infrastructure and use of technology among clients. Social workers also need ICT competencies in order to effectively lead different types of social change initiatives or collaborate with professionals of other disciplines who are using ICTs as part of existing strategies. This paper also identifies potential pitfalls and challenges with respect to the adoption of ICTs, with recommendations for advancing their use in practice, education, and research.

  9. On the history of political diversity in social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binning, Kevin R; Sears, David O

    2015-01-01

    We argue that the history of political diversity in social psychology may be better characterized by stability than by a large shift toward liberalism. The branch of social psychology that focuses on political issues has defined social problems from a liberal perspective since at least the 1930s. Although a lack of ideological diversity within the discipline can pose many of the problems noted by Duarte et al., we suggest that these problems (a) are less apparent when the insights of social psychology are pitted against the insights from other social science disciplines, and (b) are less pressing than the need for other types of diversity in the field, especially ethnic and racial diversity.

  10. The changing demographic, legal, and technological contexts of political representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Benjamin

    2005-10-25

    Three developments have created challenges for political representation in the U.S. and particularly for the use of territorially based representation (election by district). First, the demographic complexity of the U.S. population has grown both in absolute terms and in terms of residential patterns. Second, legal developments since the 1960s have recognized an increasing number of groups as eligible for voting rights protection. Third, the growing technical capacities of computer technology, particularly Geographic Information Systems, have allowed political parties and other organizations to create election districts with increasingly precise political and demographic characteristics. Scholars have made considerable progress in measuring and evaluating the racial and partisan biases of districting plans, and some states have tried to use Geographic Information Systems technology to produce more representative districts. However, case studies of Texas and Arizona illustrate that such analytic and technical advances have not overcome the basic contradictions that underlie the American system of territorial political representation.

  11. Applied Social Science, Teaching, and Political Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Edward; Garrido-Pinto, German

    1977-01-01

    Behind differences in style of North and Latin American social scientists lie profound divergences of conceptions of social science and of typical levels of analysis. Important consequences of these differences follow for styles of teaching, research, or community involvement. This paper explores these cleavages and exemplifies how one might teach…

  12. Social media participation and local politics: a case study of the Enschede council in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin; Hillegersberg, van Jos; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Wimmer, Maria A.; Tambouris, Efthimios; Macintosh, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are often seen as political game changers. Yet little is known of the effects of social media on local politics. In this paper the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM) is introduced for studying the effects of social media on local political comm

  13. Social Media Participation and Local Politics: A Case Study of the Enschede Council in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Wimmer, Maria A.; Tambouris, Efthimios; Macintosh, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are often seen as political game changers. Yet little is known of the effects of social media on local politics. In this paper the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM) is introduced for studying the effects of social media on local political

  14. Social Media Participation and Local Politics: A Case Study of the Enschede Council in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, R.; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tambouris, E.; Macintosh, A.

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are often seen as political game changers. Yet little is known of the effects of social media on local politics. In this paper the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM) is introduced for studying the effects of social media on local political

  15. Social Media Participation and Local Politics: A Case Study of the Enschede Council in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, R.; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Wimmer, M.A.; Tambouris, E.; Macintosh, A.

    2013-01-01

    Social media such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are often seen as political game changers. Yet little is known of the effects of social media on local politics. In this paper the Social Media Participation Model (SMPM) is introduced for studying the effects of social media on local political comm

  16. Understanding Islamist political violence through computational social simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Jennifer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mackerrow, Edward P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patelli, Paolo G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eberhardt, Ariane [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stradling, Seth G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the process that enables political violence is of great value in reducing the future demand for and support of violent opposition groups. Methods are needed that allow alternative scenarios and counterfactuals to be scientifically researched. Computational social simulation shows promise in developing 'computer experiments' that would be unfeasible or unethical in the real world. Additionally, the process of modeling and simulation reveals and challenges assumptions that may not be noted in theories, exposes areas where data is not available, and provides a rigorous, repeatable, and transparent framework for analyzing the complex dynamics of political violence. This paper demonstrates the computational modeling process using two simulation techniques: system dynamics and agent-based modeling. The benefits and drawbacks of both techniques are discussed. In developing these social simulations, we discovered that the social science concepts and theories needed to accurately simulate the associated psychological and social phenomena were lacking.

  17. A Political Economy Theory of Government Debt and Social Security

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the determinants of government debt and social security for the old in a closed-economy, overlapping-generation model. Under the probabilistic voting, the model presents (i) an intergenerational link of resource allocation via debt and social security; (ii) multiple political equilibria; and (iii) a negative cor- relation between tax and debt. These three results are robust to the introduction of public goods as an alternative government expenditure or to the introduction ...

  18. Political Practica: Educating Social Work Students for Policymaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, James L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 131 bachelor's level and 30 master's level programs in social work found that less than 20% of undergraduate and 50% of graduate programs offered practica in government relations, electoral politics, and policy advocacy and development, and that existing practica were almost exclusively in government relations. Recommendations for…

  19. Politics without "Brainwashing": A Philosophical Defence of Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialystok, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Social justice education (SJE) is a ubiquitous, if inconsistently defined, component of contemporary education theory and practice. Recently, SJE has come under fire for being politically biased and even "brainwashing" children in the public education system. In a liberal democracy such as our own, it is important that state-sponsored…

  20. Technology and social communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, G.A.

    1996-12-31

    For centuries advances in what we now term media have generated concerns about the effect these advances have on values and morality-books, stage drama, movies, TV, and now computer-based fantasy and Internet-based distribution. These media comprise some of the most powerful agents for developing our fundamental strategies for living. Computer-based fantasy can provide waves of sensations that everyday life does not prepare us for; they create a wow effect. The implications are especially, strong for adolescents. Wow effects come to seem ordinary. We can easily overdose on them with a subsequent dulling of sensibility that motivates one to seek the next level. As the wow effect is numbed, socializing restrictions break down. A psychological strategy of distancing is one defense against enhanced imagery - a strategy of cool as antidote. The wow-cool dipole can foster a role as spectator that inhibits empathy and a fundamental distancing from the self. Technology - the source of our concerns-can also help to counteract them. The most powerful drive in children is to learn mastery of the world. New input and output devices and especially properly designed software can enhance the capacity to learn and to be creative, i.e. to gain mastery over the world. These powerful new modes of communication not only give us great access to the world, they give the world great access to us. We must supplant what is now mostly a passive broadcast system with interactive exploration and two-way communication.

  1. The effects of social media on political party perception and voting behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, Peter; Vries, de Sjoerd; Vries, de Peter W.; Zeeuw, de Erik

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine to what extent social media influences political party perception (PPP) and political voting behavior. Based on literature a conceptual model was developed which measures political interest, political trust, religion and the use of social media and their effects on PPP

  2. The effects of social media on political party perception and voting behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, Peter; de Vries, Sjoerd A.; de Vries, Pieter Walter; de Zeeuw, Erik

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine to what extent social media influences political party perception (PPP) and political voting behavior. Based on literature a conceptual model was developed which measures political interest, political trust, religion and the use of social media and their effects on PPP

  3. The politics of (Dis-)engagements with technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupret, Katia

    technologies change practices and professions (e.g. Berg; Mol; Orlikowski; Vikkelsø) and research on technological literacy (Dakers; Garmire; Dupret & Hasse) focusing on what it takes to learn and master new technologies suggest that professionals perform creative invisible ‘work-arounds’ when dealing......’ sustainability and development and show aspects of technology use that adds and criticize its acknowledged purpose to secure standardizations and efficiency. The politics of technology use in work life become reactualized with the different types of engagements....

  4. SOCIAL ORDERS AND POLITICAL ANALYSIS OF REGIONAL PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Voskressenski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Contemporary Political Science deals mainly with three major research fields (typology of social order within countries, existing and emerging regional identity and world order in international system, which are studied separately. This division is a product of the traditional, West-centric theories. The current article building upon achievements of the Russian school of Asian studies and new reality of the West and East proposes framework for complex approach towards political reality with due account of interdependence between global, regional and national levels.

  5. Present challenges of research and technology politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulow, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    Research and technology in Germany are discussed. The rapid transfer of scientific knowledge and techniques from the laboratory to the manufacturing and industrial communities is identified as a priority. It is recommended that the government give maximum support to the aviation and space flight industries.

  6. Social Media Use and Online Political Participation Among College Students During the US Election 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei “Chris” Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 4,556 US college students were surveyed immediately after Election 2012 to investigate what social media–related psychological and behavioral factors predicted their online political participation. Structural equation modeling and hierarchical multiple regression results showed that online social capital, political self-efficacy, and Facebook group participation were positive predictors of online political participation, while social trust did not directly influence online political participation. General political use of Facebook and Twitter was a positive predictor of online political participation; however, extensive Facebook and Twitter use was a negative predictor. Implications for research and political practice are discussed.

  7. What’s Political about Solar Electric Technology? The User’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Schelly

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scholars in science and technology studies have debated the various ways in which technologies are (or are not political. Here, I examine how users themselves understand and articulate the politics of a specific technology—residential solar electric technology—and how understandings of politics interact with motivations to adopt. Based on interviews with 48 individuals in 36 households across the state of Wisconsin who have adopted residential solar electric technology, I consider the user’s perspective on the question: “What’s political about residential solar electric technology use?” These users were asked about the politics of this technology and how their understanding of the technology’s politics shaped their own motivation for adoption. These solar electric technology adopters saw solar electric technology as both imbued with political character based on the current national political scene and as inherently, innately political. They described how solar electric technology interacts with the politics of environmentalism, challenges “politics-as-usual” and can bring about decentralization and redistribution of wealth. In short, to the users of solar electric technology, this technological artifact is, indeed, political; it both interacts with, and offers an alternative to, current American political structures. Further, their perspectives on the politics of solar technology shaped their understandings of motivations for and limitations to adoption of this alternative technology.

  8. Social networks, politics and Commitment 2.0: Spanish MPs on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Sixto, B.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a technologically and sociologically advanced society, the organizations that do not use the new media and the cyber communication techniques are probably doomed to failure. In this virtual sphere the social networks constitute a suitable resource and channel for the implementation of political marketing 2.0, as it provides a scenario where the interaction with users is possible. From this perspective, we verified their presence of the 350 members of the Spanish Congress on Facebook, the country’s most popular social network, in order to establish the predominant typologies, updating frequency, contents, resources, and the types of information posted in this spaces.This article also examines the interactivity of MPs in what we have termed Commitment 2.0: political communication in personal contexts such as social networks requires going from the participatory attitude to the participatory action; that is, to accept the interaction 2.0 as the correct behaviour on the network.

  9. The Social Media Paradox Explained: Comparing Political Parties’ Facebook Strategy Versus Practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalsnes, Bente

    2016-01-01

    .... Political parties and individual politicians can use social media to bypass media and communicate directly with voters through websites and particularly social media platforms such as Facebook...

  10. Social Investment after Neoliberalism: Policy Paradigms and Political Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeming, Christopher; Smyth, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The concept of the 'social investment state' refocuses attention on the productive function of social policy eclipsed for some time by the emphasis on its social protection or compensation roles. Here we distinguish between different social investment strategies, the Nordic 'heavy' and the Liberal 'light', with particular reference to the inclusive growth approach adopted in Australia. In 2007, social democrats in Australia returned to government with a clear mandate to reject the labour market deregulation and other neoliberal policies of its predecessor, and to tackle entrenched social and economic disadvantage in Australian society. For the last five years, social investment and inclusive growth has been at the centre of the Australian social policy agenda. Against this background, the article examines and critically assesses the (re)turn to 'social investment' thinking in Australia during Labor's term in office (2007-13). Analysis focuses not just on what was actually achieved, but also on the constraining role of prevailing economic and political circumstances and on the processes that were used to drive social investment reform. In many ways, the article goes some way to exposing ongoing tensions surrounding the distinctiveness of 'social investment' strategies pursued by leftist parties within the (neo)liberal state.

  11. Social development in Costa Rica. The social gap; a matter of economic, political and social definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Montero Cordero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To simultaneously achieve development and equity results from human beings’ generation of capabilities on equal terms; you cannot speak of social development when few receive the utility of the joint effort of many. In Costa Rica the social protection systems are being threatened by the sustainability of public funds, due to low tax burdens, impoverished collections, tax evasion and structurally fixed costs, condemning our economy to social instability and thus the widening the income gap, education, health, ethnicity, services and other elements of development. The errors of inclusion and exclusion are much of the corruption and cronyism that have historically been taking over our democratic systems, issue that confronts us with an inescapable and urgent necessity; improving the skills and abilities of public employees in assertive selection of public policies to mitigate the effects of a globalized and polarized world in the social, political and economic areas.

  12. Political Correctness—Between Fiction and Social Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeri Lichev

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays political correctness (PC is blamed by its opponents because of a failed model of multiculturalism, an influx of migrants and the threat of terrorist acts. Obviously, a definition of tolerance given by UNESCO in 1995 has lost its meaning. In order to argue a possibility of a global ethos based on new understandings of PC, the authors refer to contemporary achievements of semiotics, hermeneutics and philosophical anthropology. We use a critical method developed in the hermeneutical tradition of P. Ricoeur, J. Kristeva, Tz. Todorov and others. Criticism is directed at (1 paradoxes of postmodern philosophical attempts for justification the idea of political correctness; (2 the way of introducing new terminology, as on a language level it leads, not to inclusion, but to exclusion, of disadvantaged people because as E. Benveniste states, the third person is rather the non-person. The conclusion is that politically correct speech should be grounded on a basis which takes into account the three persons of verb conjugation. Similar philosophical and ethical ideas can be found in works of J. Kristeva, Tz. Todorov, P. Ricoeur. An example is given for how these ideas can be implemented in the fields of film and art. This is one of the possible ways of overcoming the exclusion of disadvantaged people who are only named in politically correct terms, and not as participants, in social and political dialogue.

  13. Ideology: Its Resurgence in Social, Personality, and Political Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, John T; Nosek, Brian A; Gosling, Samuel D

    2008-03-01

    We trace the rise, fall, and resurgence of political ideology as a topic of research in social, personality, and political psychology. For over 200 years, political belief systems have been classified usefully according to a single left-right (or liberal-conservative) dimension that, we believe, possesses two core aspects: (a) advocating versus resisting social change and (b) rejecting versus accepting inequality. There have been many skeptics of the notion that most people are ideologically inclined, but recent psychological evidence suggests that left-right differences are pronounced in many life domains. Implicit as well as explicit preferences for tradition, conformity, order, stability, traditional values, and hierarchy-versus those for progress, rebelliousness, chaos, flexibility, feminism, and equality-are associated with conservatism and liberalism, respectively. Conservatives score consistently higher than liberals on measures of system justification. Furthermore, there are personality and lifestyle differences between liberals and conservatives as well as situational variables that induce either liberal or conservative shifts in political opinions. Our thesis is that ideological belief systems may be structured according to a left-right dimension for largely psychological reasons linked to variability in the needs to reduce uncertainty and threat. © 2008 Association for Psychological Science.

  14. THE BIOTERRORISM THREAT: TECHNOLOGICAL AND POLITICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. F. PILAT

    2000-03-01

    Bioterrorism--along with biowarfare, from which it may not always be distinguishable in practice--will be a feature of the strategic landscape in the 21st century and is high on the US national security agenda. Bioterrorism poses a potential threat to the US population, agriculture, interests, friends and allies, and military forces (asymmetric threats). Yet these possibilities have not been widely pursued or realized by terrorists. The perceived threat is far worse than anything experienced to date, and is largely technologically driven.

  15. An Introduction to Social Semantic Web Mining & Big Data Analytics for Political Attitudes and Mentalities Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schatten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The social web has become a major repository of social and behavioral data that is of exceptional interest to the social science and humanities research community. Computer science has only recently developed various technologies and techniques that allow for harvesting, organizing and analyzing such data and provide knowledge and insights into the structure and behavior or people on-line. Some of these techniques include social web mining, conceptual and social network analysis and modeling, tag clouds, topic maps, folksonomies, complex network visualizations, modeling of processes on networks, agent based models of social network emergence, speech recognition, computer vision, natural language processing, opinion mining and sentiment analysis, recommender systems, user profiling and semantic wikis. All of these techniques are briefly introduced, example studies are given and ideas as well as possible directions in the field of political attitudes and mentalities are given. In the end challenges for future studies are discussed.

  16. ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND POLITICAL FACTS AND PERSPECTIVES OF 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu RADU

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the turbulent year of 2016, with deep geopolitical changes, the new year of 2017 promises to be full of challenges in what concerns the economic, social, political and geostrategic area. The key events of the last year (the Brexit, the elections in the USA, the events in Turkey, the force demonstrations of Russia, the situation of the migration wave etc. shall have an impact on the global economic development and on the repositioning of its main actors. This paperwork intends to analyze the main consequences of the recent events on the short term progress in what concerns the economic, social, political and geostrategic area. We hereby intend to review the facts and the main potential progress on the economic status of this year which was so complicated, both for the European Union and for every member of it.

  17. Internal Social and Political Developments: Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    problem seems like that of squaring a circle. Morocco Morocco, by contrast to Algeria, does not lack politibal infrastructure. Though meaningful national...reasoning. Are we then just to conclude, with some Moroccans, that the king has baraka ? Or might there be a flaw to the argument? Why, for all its...political infrastructure, and De.;tour Socialism has been reinter reted to mean a liboralization of the economy. But comparisons with Miorocco are

  18. Everyday politics, social practices and movement networks: daily life in Barcelona's social centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Luke

    2015-06-01

    The relations between everyday life and political participation are of interest for much contemporary social science. Yet studies of social movement protest still pay disproportionate attention to moments of mobilization, and to movements with clear organizational boundaries, tactics and goals. Exceptions have explored collective identity, 'free spaces' and prefigurative politics, but such processes are framed as important only in accounting for movements in abeyance, or in explaining movement persistence. This article focuses on the social practices taking place in and around social movement spaces, showing that political meanings, knowledge and alternative forms of social organization are continually being developed and cultivated. Social centres in Barcelona, Spain, autonomous political spaces hosting cultural and educational events, protest campaigns and alternative living arrangements, are used as empirical case studies. Daily practices of food provisioning, distributing space and dividing labour are politicized and politicizing as they unfold and develop over time and through diverse networks around social centres. Following Melucci, such latent processes set the conditions for social movements and mobilization to occur. However, they not only underpin mobilization, but are themselves politically expressive and prefigurative, with multiple layers of latency and visibility identifiable in performances of practices. The variety of political forms - adversarial, expressive, theoretical, and routinized everyday practices, allow diverse identities, materialities and meanings to overlap in movement spaces, and help explain networks of mutual support between loosely knit networks of activists and non-activists. An approach which focuses on practices and networks rather than mobilization and collective actors, it is argued, helps show how everyday life and political protest are mutually constitutive.

  19. Enduring politics: the culture of obstacles in legislating for assisted reproduction technologies in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Allison

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Assisted reproductive technology has become a normalized part of reproductive medicine in many countries around the world. Access, however, is uneven and inconsistent, facilitated and restricted by such factors as affordability, social and moral acceptance or refusal and local cultures of medical practice. In Ireland, assisted reproductive technology has been available since 1987 but remains unregulated by legislation. This creates an uncertain and untenable legal circumstance given the contested issues related to constitutional protection of the right to life of the unborn and the indeterminate legal status of embryos in vitro. This paper examines the impact of an enduring political impasse. It explores how clinical assisted reproductive technology services in Ireland operate both inside and outside dominant institutional frameworks, meeting a pronatalist and pro-family social and political agenda, while sometimes contradicting the pro-life politics that has continued to shape women’s reproductive lives. The medical approaches to infertility thus intersect with the ongoing debates around abortion, the failure of the government to regulate, and notions of embodied motherhood and responsibility within changing meanings of family and kinship. At the same time women and their partners seek assisted reproductive technology treatment in other countries throughout the European Union where laws differ and availability of services varies. A decade has passed since the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction in Ireland released its recommendations; the enduring legislative vacuum leaves women, families and practitioners in potential legal limbo.

  20. A Critical Review on the Concept of Social Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Leibetseder

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—A critical analysis of the term social technology from a social science point of view.Design/Methodology/Approach—Review of the term “social technology” from a social science point of perspective in connection to the study of governmentality and power in a Foucauldian way.Findings—The article covers the perspective that social technology provides social science knowledge for a purpose. Such a notion allows an in depth debate about the meaning of social order in modern societies. Establishing distinctive techniques now forms the basis of the modern state and governance. Social technology forms the basis of governmental decisions; it allows for a use of social theories and methods for a purpose in politics and introduces a specific conception of power between the individual and public powers. Therefore, it alters government in three ways: It provides expert power to define solutions for social problems based on social science knowledge. It transforms government. Social technology exemplifies a support system for an ordered method of the way of government, it allows for the conduct of others and self based on scientific expertise. It can define new areas of problems in need of a change of government.Research limitations/implications—Consequently, social technology requests a critical analysis using a governmental approach. Such an approach focuses on problems on the governed subject and how governing works and why it has evolved in that way towards the subject and what kind of ideas and thinking lies within the discourse.

  1. Epistemological, Social, and Political Conundrums in Social Constructionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Ratner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article critiques the central premise of social constructionism, namely that groups of people freely construct beliefs about things and that beliefs are "local truths" which must be honored by outsiders and cannot be evaluated by external criteria. I argue that eliminating truth claims makes all beliefs arbitrary and eliminates the very notion of error. This leads to accepting what are in fact false and dangerous beliefs. It also leads to dogmatic cults of divergent social groups maintaining any belief system they want, and rejecting in principle all criticism or need improvement. The resulting social fragmentation prevents mutual understanding and communication. While social constructionism claims to be radically anti-modernist, i.e., anti-capitalist, the social fragmentation and uncritical thinking it promotes, exactly reflect the practices of capitalists who work for their own self-interests, disregard community concerns, and dismiss factual evidence about capitalism's negative effects on the environment, health, and society. I propose that real community and understanding require an acceptance of "modernist" scientific principles that can critique harmful practices and design social reform. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs060142

  2. Social issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology master's degrees: the socio-political stakes of curricular choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fages, Volny; Albe, Virginie

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes a study of the various ways in which social and ethical issues are integrated in the curricula of nanoscience and nanotechnology master degrees. During the last decade, new types of courses have appeared in science and technology universities, first in the United States and now reaching Europe and France, associating a call for interdisciplinarity with a strong convergence of science and industry and new ways of integrating social and/or human sciences in scientific curricula. These courses entitled "science and society", meant for science students, lean on (and participate in the construction of) specific ways of describing science, technology, and the social world, generally saturated with political values. The integration of these courses in science education, linked with a strong effort to specify new institutional organizations of scientific practice and education (in particular through political support of emerging fields like nanoscience, synthetic biology, or the cognitive sciences), may play an important role in the acculturation of future scientists and engineers to "good" scientific practices and discourses. The case of nanoscience and nanotechnology is particularly revealing of the changes which are now taking place in some universities. This paper will strive to identify different types of courses called "nano and society", taking examples from both French and American contexts, and linking them to more or less implicit socio-epistemic and political values.

  3. The changing demographic, legal, and technological contexts of political representation

    OpenAIRE

    Forest, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Three developments have created challenges for political representation in the U.S. and particularly for the use of territorially based representation (election by district). First, the demographic complexity of the U.S. population has grown both in absolute terms and in terms of residential patterns. Second, legal developments since the 1960s have recognized an increasing number of groups as eligible for voting rights protection. Third, the growing technical capacities of computer technology...

  4. Politics, pleasure, violence: Swedish defence propaganda in social media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ferrada Stoehrel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the Swedish Armed Forces have produced and distributed highly edited video clips on YouTube that show moving images of military activity. Alongside this development, mobile phone apps have emerged as an important channel through which the user can experience and take an interactive part in the staging of contemporary armed conflict. This article examines the way in which the aesthetic and affective experience of Swedish defence and security policy is socially and (media-culturally (co-constructed and how the official representation of Swedish military intervention (reproduces political and economic effects when these activities are distributed through traditional and social media such as YouTube and digital apps. Based on Isabela and Norman Fairclough’s thoughts on political discourse, Michel Foucault’s dialectic idea of power/knowledge, and Sara Ahmed’s concept of the affective, I discuss how the Swedish digital military aesthetic is part of a broader political and economic practice which has consequences beyond the digital, the semiotic and what might at first glance appear to be pure entertainment. 

  5. The politics of corruption, inequality, and the socially excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Salas, Anna

    2013-07-01

    In this article, the production of knowledge in the context of socially excluded people exposed to inequality, oppression, and exploitation is problematized. The analysis follows Enrique Dussel's philosophical exegesis of the politics of power and corruption and his vision of a critical transformation of the social political order. The argument is also informed by the work of critical educator Paulo Freire, who elucidates the conditions of oppression and marginalization and highlights the importance of conscientization to develop a critical awareness of these conditions. Hannah Arendt's work on the politics of understanding totalitarianism also assists in the elucidation of the machinery that operates behind oppression to sustain power and inequality. The article emphasizes the need to recognize the inequality of conditions that exists between the producer of knowledge and those who live through inequality and oppression in their lived corporality. A critical transformation of the process of production of knowledge is needed to both acknowledge the conditions that sustain this endeavour in the first place and avoid the corruption of knowledge. A work of conscientization is also necessary among knowledge producers to undertake a critical analysis of inequality that exposes the corruption of power. This analysis needs to examine and unmask the hidden mechanisms that perpetuate inequality and oppression and serve only the interests of a few. The abysmal gaps between the wealthy and the poor within and among countries bespeak a degree of human indifference that reflects a most serious and complex phenomenon that perverts something profoundly human in our societies.

  6. THE SPECIFICS OF THE TRANSLATION OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL TEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. PASHKOWSKAYA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the aspect of translation in the process of foreign language teaching. The main attention is paid to translation of social and political texts such as statements, addresses and speeches of state, party and public figures, all sorts of articles and publications of international, governmental and non-governmental organizations, the number of which is very large in mass media. They contain information of the leading economists on the activities of international financial institutions, reflect the real world of business, and offer a wide range of views and opinions on political events. Socio-political texts in Russian, as well as in foreign languages, not only provide information about various events or problems, but also make special impact on readers. Particular attention is paid to the lexical units which are used in translation of such texts. Such lexical units reflect the evolution of society, define public relationships. They are in continual «movement», replacing or supplementing the existing notation systems by words and abbreviations which reflect the emergence of new facts and concepts in the relevant field of social life. Knowledge of this kind of vocabulary enables students to solve practical problems of translation, summarization and annotation of this kind of literature.

  7. Political Parties and Social Policy Responses to Global Economic Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Peter; Kaasch, Alexandra; van Hooren, Franca

    2014-01-01

    responses, albeit in ways that go beyond traditional partisan theory.We show that the partisan conflict and the impact of parties are conditioned by existing welfare state configurations. In less generous welfare states, the party composition of governments plays a decisive role in shaping the direction...... to global economic crises vary significantly across countries. What explains the cross-national and within-case variation in responses to crises?We discuss several potential causes of this pattern and argue that political parties and the party composition of governments can play a key role in shaping crisis...... of social policy change. By contrast, in more generous welfare states, i.e., those with highly developed automatic stabilisers, the overall direction of policy change is regularly not subject to debate. Political conflict in these welfare states rather concerns the extent to which expansion or retrenchment...

  8. Social Justice and Social Order: Binding Moralities across the Political Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoff-Bulman, Ronnie; Carnes, Nate C

    2016-01-01

    Two studies explored the relationship between political ideology and endorsement of a range of moral principles. Political liberals and conservatives did not differ on intrapersonal or interpersonal moralities, which require self-regulation. However differences emerged on collective moralities, which involve social regulation. Contrary to Moral Foundations Theory, both liberals and conservatives endorsed a group-focused binding morality, specifically Social Justice and Social Order respectively. Libertarians were the group without a binding morality. Although Social Justice and Social Order appear conflictual, analyses based on earlier cross-cultural work on societal tightness-looseness suggest that countries actually benefit in terms of economic success and societal well-being when these group-based moralities co-exist and serve as counterweights in social regulation.

  9. The Influence of Social Media in Vietnam’s Elite Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Thiem Hai BUI

    2016-01-01

    There has been a notable rise of social media in Vietnam’s politics in recent years. The use of social media in generating and exchanging content for public consumption has become increasingly complex and sophisticated. The development of social media has led to the public being better informed about key political and economic issues of public concern. Social media is also playing a visible role in the competition among political factions. Increased exposure and public scrutiny has had a grea...

  10. Ideology as a Political Science of the Social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Ricciardi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the doctrine of ideology proposed by Destutt de Tracy in the late eighteenth century, the paper reconstructs its historical relationship with the social science, of which it was originally meant to be the ultimate expression. The historical necessity of ideology as a political science of the social is found in its ability to mediate and legitimize power relationships. It is not for chance that the Marxian critique of ideology is a radical critique of the constitution of power in a capitalist society. The attempt of the social science to neutralize the problem of power through the abandonment of the value judgments leads instead to the declaration of the end of ideologies. In the last part, the paper analyses the way in which ideology, after its identification with the forms of total domination, returns as a neoliberal tool of legitimizing market as a society without history.

  11. The social shaping of nuclear energy technology in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the question why the South African government intends to procure nuclear energy technology, despite affordable and accessible fossil and renewable energy alternatives. We analyse the social shaping of nuclear energy technology based on the statements of political actors in the public media. We combine a discourse network analysis with qualitative analysis to establish the coalitions in support and opposition of the programme. The central arguments in the debate are cost, s...

  12. New social movements and political process: The politics of hydroelectric power in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Luzia M.

    This dissertation analyzes the mobilization and impact of the ecology movement mobilizing against and challenging hydroelectric power plants in the Alps. It argues that the political process model is the most fruitful framework for such a study, linking a political system's structural constraints and opportunities to movement action via organizational resources. The mobilization process resulting in movement impact is conceived as an interactive process among social movements, authorities, other opponents, and potential counter movements. The case study method is then used to analyze three action campaigns launched against hydro power plants in Graubunden since the 1970s: Ilanz I and II, Greina, and Curciusa. In terms of the movement's narrow goal of preventing a plant, Ilanz I and II is a failure, Greina a success, and Curciusa ambiguous. Yet the author defines movement impact more broadly, including procedural, reactive and proactive substantive impact, and structural impact, changes in the alliance/conflict system, and social learning. Based on the evidence from the case studies, these factors affect movement outcome positively: visibility in the media and framing the debate, adjusting the target level and movement repertoire to the opportunity structure and the spatial concentration of the issue, proactivity, and organizational resources with a well developed division of labor, internal communication, and a non-partisan alliance system at all levels. There are two main conceptual contributions. First, the author analyzes the political opportunity structure at all levels of the federal polity--the national, cantonal, and communal--as well as the interplay among the levels. The fact that the cantonal and communal levels exhibit more elements of closure than the national level helps explain differences in movements' organizational resources, movement repertoire, targeting of movement action, and thus movement impact. Second, the author develops the spatial

  13. (DIS)ENCHANTMENT The Development of Social Movements into Institutionalised Politics in Greece and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Priess, Kamilla; Nordenlund, Nanna Mathilde; Uldall Thomsen, Marie; Waili, Michèle; Bøgelund, Ulrik André

    2015-01-01

    The imprecise nature of the transition from social movement to political party cannot be sufficiently explained with existing social and political theory, and thus invite to the study of the liminality between them. Trying to bridge the two disciplines, this project applies a theoretical framework consisting of Sidney Tarrow’s cycle of protest, Charles Tilly’s contentious politics, Donatella della Porta’s notion of movement parties, and Francesca Polletta’s notion of prefigurative politics...

  14. Technological Dynamics and Social Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerberg, Jan; Feldman, Maryann; Srholec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes factors shaping technological capabilities in USA and European countries, and shows that the differences between the two continents in this respect are much smaller than commonly assumed. The analysis demonstrates a tendency toward convergence in technological capabilities...... for the sample as a whole between 1998 and 2008. The results indicate that social capabilities, such as well-developed public knowledge infrastructure, an egalitarian distribution of income, a participatory democracy and prevalence of public safety condition the growth of technological capabilities. Possible...

  15. Social Media and Political Change in the 21st century: the African Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaechi M. Chidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Technology no doubt is the engine that drives the modern world, both for destruction and good; and one of the wonders of modern technology is the computer and the allied internet. Modern communication network now relies on the internet using the computer and mobile telephones. In fact, there is no place to hide with the internet and the handy smart phones with which calls are made and pictures and videos recorded and transmitted across boundaries and continents. The advancements in the computer and internet systems in the last decade of the 20th century produced radical changes in both internet connectivity and features available to users through which people are linked across the globe. The three most basic of these internet features that have radically shaped modern communication are, Facebook, Twitters, and the U-Tube, among others. The three are the most popular and core elements of the social media compartment of our modern internet system. Computer technology has broken the boundaries of closed societies and systems, making actions and activities in such systems open and available to the wider world. Through the internet and its core elements, repressive regimes have been exposed and activities going on in liberal societies are shared. Interestingly, Africa became the starting point for the agitation for political change, which was bolstered by the social media. The so-called “Arab Spring”, which first started in Africa through expositions of social media, saw the dismantling of three despotic and ruthless regimes in Arab North Africa, thus giving vent to agitations for an end to dictatorship and illiberality in other Arab states. The paper will examine the role of the social media in political transformation and change of dictatorial regimes in Africa and the consequences such would have on the overall political template of Africa.

  16. Political Technologies in Strengthening Ethnopolitical (Inter-Ethnic and Inter-Confessional Dialogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayduk Vadim Vitalyevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Situations with uncertain developments and results are more often taking place in the world of politics. In this regard, the role of actors who are interested in the implementation of plans for peaceful conflict resolution and non-violence is becoming more urgent. The modern world is replete with situations in which a decision should be made only by qualified intermediaries (mediators, whose purpose is to resolve the conflict by the most effective and painless method. This article discusses the main aspects of the technology which is new for the political reality – political mediation as a vital means for solving complex inter-ethnic and interconfessional problems. The author attempts to identify general and specific characteristics of the conflict field that are peculiar for both international and inter-ethnic contradictions arising in the process of multilateral relations of nations with each other and between ethnic groups in multi-ethnic space. At this, the attention is focused on the fact that the conflicts arise out of the contradictions between the interests of these social organisms. The article provides the system of argumentation of the thesis that the use of mediation technologies helps to achieve the combination of the parties’ autonomy and to guarantee a mutually beneficial result on a common ground. For this purpose the conflicting parties endow a third party with certain powers – the mediator, who is involved in order to look at the conflict from the side and help conflicting actors to get rid of excessive emotion and bias in a dispute. Thus, political mediation is a form of alternative expert and political dispute resolution and settlement, voluntarily elected by conflicting communities on the basis of their desire to reach agreement and political objectivity.

  17. Information Communication Technology and Politics: A Synthesized Analysis of the Impacts of Information Technology on Voter Participation in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuma, Clive Katiba

    2011-01-01

    The availability of political information throughout society made possible by the evolution of contemporary information communication technology has precipitated conflicting debate regarding the effects of technology use on real life political participation. Proponents of technology argue that the use of new information technology stimulates…

  18. The Social Media Political Subject Is an Infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Karatzogianni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Any random sampling of a Facebook timeline or Twitter feed, to take the obvious examples, provides a prepackaged view of global politics. It is restrictive because we choose it to reflect our own pet subjects, groups, likes, and world interests. The lens is prejudiced to reflect our race, class, gender, sexuality, ideology, and affective positionality. We enter a social media world as many as 10 or 50 times a day that has ourselves as the center of the universe. This communication world is similar to an infant’s world: Someone else decides what we can see, what we can consume, what is that extra treat we can earn, if we are good: in social media terms, if we pay for it by reputational capital, or simply, if we spend enough money.

  19. Mischaracterizing social psychology to support the laudable goal of increasing its political diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagly, Alice H

    2015-01-01

    Duarte et al.'s arguments for increasing political diversity in social psychology are based on mischaracterizations of social psychology as fundamentally flawed in understanding stereotype accuracy and the effects of attitudes on information processing. I correct their misunderstandings while agreeing with their view that political diversity, along with other forms of diversity, stands to benefit social psychology.

  20. Social Background, Civic Education and Political Participation of Young People--The German Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onken, Holger; Lange, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Due to social and political change the process of young citizens' political socialization was put on a new basis in West European democracies over the last decades. In this article we discuss some aspects of this development and show their consequences. We analyse empirical findings from Germany, focussing on the relevant social factors which…

  1. An Analysis of the Social and Political Issues in Jane Austen’s Novels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱蕾

    2015-01-01

    Some researchers criticized Jane Austen for her seeming obliviousness to the big social and political upheavals in the outside world of her time. However, some hints of social and political issues could also be found through careful reading. This thesis tries to analyze them from the aspects of social class and female consciousness in her novels.

  2. Energy Policy is Technology Politics The Hydrogen Energy Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl-Jochen Winter [ENERGON, Obere St. Leonhardstr. 9, 88662 Uberlingen, T 07551 944 5940, F 07551 944 5941 (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Germany's energy supply status shows both an accumulation of unsatisfactory sustainabilities putting the nation's energy security at risk, and a hopeful sign: The nation's supply dependency on foreign sources and the accordingly unavoidable price dictate the nation suffers under is almost life risking; the technological skill, however, of the nation's researchers, engineers, and industry materializes in a good percentage of the indigenous and the world's energy conversion technology market. Exemplified with the up and coming hydrogen energy economy this paper tries to advocate the 21. century energy credo: energy policy is energy technology politics{exclamation_point} Energy source thinking and acting is 19. and 20. century, energy efficient conversion technology thinking and acting is 21. century. Hydrogen energy is on the verge of becoming the centre-field of world energy interest. Hydrogen energy is key for the de-carbonization and, thus, sustainabilization of fossil fuels, and as a storage and transport means for the introduction of so far un-operational huge renewable sources into the world energy market. - What is most important is hydrogen's thermodynamic ability to exergize the energy scheme: hydrogen makes more technical work (exergy) out of less primary energy{exclamation_point} Hydrogen adds value. Hydrogen energy and, in particular, hydrogen energy technologies, are to become part of Germany's national energy identity; accordingly, national energy policy as energy technology politics needs to grow in the nation's awareness as common sense{exclamation_point} Otherwise Germany seems ill-equipped energetically, and its well-being hangs in the balance. (author)

  3. Social Media Use and Online Political Participation Among College Students During the US Election 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Hongwei “Chris” Yang; Jean L. DeHart

    2016-01-01

    A total of 4,556 US college students were surveyed immediately after Election 2012 to investigate what social media–related psychological and behavioral factors predicted their online political participation. Structural equation modeling and hierarchical multiple regression results showed that online social capital, political self-efficacy, and Facebook group participation were positive predictors of online political participation, while social trust did not directly influence online politica...

  4. The politics of health technology assessment in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozieranski, Piotr; McKee, Martin; King, Lawrence

    2012-12-01

    First, to identify risks associated with the scientific evaluation of drugs considered for state reimbursement in Poland through exploring strategies of influence employed by multinational drug companies in relation to the Agency for Health Technology Assessment (AHTAPol). Second, to ascertain whether the outcomes of drug evaluation meet the interests of the public payer in reimbursing cost-effective drugs supported by robust pharmacoeconomic evidence. We conducted 109 in-depth semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of stakeholders involved in the reimbursement process in Poland. We analysed four available documentary sources, including recommendations issued by the AHTAPol. AHTAPol recommendations were an instrumental part of the blame avoidance strategy by political elites. Drug producers utilised direct and indirect strategies of influence. The direct strategies involved building relationships with a circle of health technology assessment analysts and medical experts working for the Agency. The indirect strategies employed leaders of opinion in the medical milieu, patient organisations, and political elites to endorse policy positions favourable to drug companies. The AHTAPol positively recommended an increasing proportion of the drugs it assessed, many of them reported as not cost-effective or supported by dubious pharmacoeconomic evidence. The strategies of influence entail a number of risks that may undermine the scientific evaluation of drugs. Some outcomes of drug evaluation may favour the interests of multinational drug companies over those of the public payer. We suggest that the risks involved in drug evaluation might be mitigated through (1) professionalization of health technology assessment; (2) restriction of job seeking and post public-payer employment; (3) disclosure and management of experts' conflicts of interest; (4) institutionalisation of patient and public involvement; and (5) increased institutional separation of the AHTAPol from

  5. New technology implementation: Technical, economic and political factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J. W., Jr.; Susman, G. I.; Porter, P. S.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the process of implementing advanced manufacturing technology, based on studies of numerous organizations. This process is seen as consisting of a series of decisions with technical, economic, and political objectives. Frequency decisions involve specifications, equipment, resources/organization, and location. Problems in implementation are viewed as resulting from tradeoffs among the objectives, the tendency of decision makers to emphasize some objectives at the expense of others, and the propensity of problems to spread from one area to another. Three sets of recommendations, based on this analysis, are presented.

  6. Suriname - politics, technology, and Third World energy strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auty, R.M.

    Suriname illustrates how some developing countries responded to the oil price shocks by developing domestic energy sources as a substitute for imported oil. Suriname's effort to develop a capital-intensive hydrosmelter aluminum project ran into both technical and political problems despite its economic appeal. A combination of delays, inflation, and disappointing bauxite deposits raised the final cost estimation of the first stage from $460 to $740 million. A military coup slowed the project until the appeal of a green-technology option of small-scale rural development revived interest. The country's response to the 1973 oil shock still lacks coherence. 1 figure, 1 table.

  7. The politics of relative deprivation: A transdisciplinary social justice perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mengzhu; Exeter, Daniel J; Anderson, Anneka

    2015-05-01

    Relative deprivation was defined by Townsend (1987, p. 125) as "a state of observable and demonstrable disadvantage, relative to the local community or the wider society or nation to which an individual, family or group belongs". This definition is widely used within social and health sciences to identify, measure, and explain forms of inequality in human societies based on material and social conditions. From a multi-disciplinary social science perspective, we conducted a systematic literature review of published material in English through online database searches and books since 1966. We review the concept and measurement of relative 'deprivation' focussing on area-based deprivation in relation to inequities in health and social outcomes. This paper presents a perspective based in Aotearoa/New Zealand where colonisation has shaped the contours of racialised health inequities and current applications and understandings of 'deprivation'. We provide a critique of Townsend's concept of deprivation and area-based deprivation through a critical, structural analysis and suggest alternatives to give social justice a better chance. Deprivation measures used without critical reflection can lead to deficit framing of populations and maintain current inequities in health and social outcomes. We contend therefore that the lack of consideration of (bio)power, privilege, epistemology and (bio)politics is a central concern in studies of deprivation. Our review highlights the need for the academy to balance the asymmetry between qualitative and quantitative studies of deprivation through trans-disciplinary approaches to understanding deprivation, and subsequently, social and health inequities. We recommend that deprivation research needs be critically applied through a decolonising lens to avoid deficit framing and suggest that there is space for a tool that focuses on measuring the unequal distribution of power and privilege in populations.

  8. Political Skill and Work Attitudes: A Comparison of Multiple Social Effectiveness Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Christina M; Meriac, John P

    2015-01-01

    In the realm of social effectiveness constructs, political skill has seen increased attention as a predictor of work performance and attitudes. However, the extent that political skill is distinct from related variables in this area remains an important question. The current study examined the proportion of variance explained by political skill in job satisfaction and turnover intentions above and beyond other social effectiveness variables (i.e., social intelligence, emotional intelligence, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). Results indicated that political skill was the strongest predictor of these outcomes, and explained a significant proportion of variance in them, beyond the other four social effectiveness constructs.

  9. Chile: Una Vision Politica, Economica y Social (Chile: A Political, Economic, and Social View).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Hwang, Adriana

    1972-01-01

    This address seeks to explain in brief the historical background and political, economic, and social conditions leading to the democratic election of a Marxist president in Chile. A historical sketch of Chilean government from independence in 1810 is provided with a description of the situation just before Salvador Allende's election in 1969. Some…

  10. An Examination of the Political and Social Literacy of Adult Citizens in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Nili Ahmadabadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Literacy is a fundamental right and a springboard not only for achieving "education for all", but also for eradicating poverty and increasing participation in society. Political and social literacy is about understanding how politics and social behaviors shape our daily lives. In order to improve the political and social literacy process, it is highly important to recognize effective factors in shaping People's awareness. This study is performed to determine students' points of view concerning such factors. Responsible citizens respect others and participate in political, economic, social and cultural life. The present study aims at examining the level of political and social literacy of adult citizens participating in unofficial adults training centers in Isfahan city. Material & Methods According to the purpose of the research which was to measure the extent of social and political literacy of adults, the research method in this study is descriptive. Research population include 2572 adults (above 35 years old, who attended in instructional programs of the training centers of Isfahan's public agencies in 2011. The estimated number of sample size is 380 who were randomly selected through multistage cluster sampling method. The instrument was a researcher-made questionnaire comprising of 29 items which is designed in two political and social dimensions, with an acceptable level of reliability test (0.84, via Cronbach’s Alpha. The collected data were analyzed through one-sample T-test and ANOVA. Discussion of Results & Conclusions Findings showed that: 1 adults’ social literacy is higher than political literacy, 2 in a significant way, the political literacy of adults is not in good shape, 3 there is a significant difference between averages of political and social literacy in terms of education of adult citizens, 4 there is a significant difference between the averages of political and social literacy in terms of sex: level of

  11. The Border Crossed Us: Education, Hospitality Politics, and the Social Construction of the "Illegal Immigrant"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Dennis Carlson explores some of the implications of Derrida's "hospitality politics" in helping articulate a progressive response to a rightist cultural politics in the United States of policing national, linguistic, and other borders. He applies the concept of hospitality politics to a critical analysis of the social construction…

  12. The Border Crossed Us: Education, Hospitality Politics, and the Social Construction of the "Illegal Immigrant"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, Dennis Carlson explores some of the implications of Derrida's "hospitality politics" in helping articulate a progressive response to a rightist cultural politics in the United States of policing national, linguistic, and other borders. He applies the concept of hospitality politics to a critical analysis of the social construction…

  13. Predicting Civic and Political Engagement: Family Socialization and Age-Group Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrolyn P. Carter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Scholars suggest that there has been a significant decline in civic and political engagement among recent generations. Using data from the 2006 Civic and Political Health of the Nation survey, it is found that education, socioeconomic status and family socialization predict civic and political engagement during adulthood. In addition, a higher percentage of adults volunteer and vote more than young adults.

  14. Managing the Business of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeretta Horn Nord

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A greater number of consumers use social technologies-social media, social networking, and social relevance-than organizations. Economically, however, companies have much to gain by taking the plunge. Results show that organizations that have made the effort to increase their knowledge and build social technology platforms have experienced astounding results. The purpose of this article is to discuss social technology categories and present a strategy for knowledge management so that organizations may successfully implement these technologies. A huge growth is expected in the number of companies whose management will make a decision or have already made a decision to develop social technology platforms in the near future. This article provides a straight forward approach accompanied by examples of real companies who have used social technologies and experienced real returns–many in the millions of dollars. The intention is to provide a concise, up-to-date social technologies knowledge management guide.

  15. WHEN THE PRESENT GETS US ... GLOBALIZATION: NEW TECHNOLOGIES, STRATEGY AND POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Martín Fragachán

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The current phase of the capitalist world development receives the name of globalization and has brought a series of consequences: a few positive and great very denials, some of which will try to be analyzed by me in the lines that continue later, insisting, very specially, in those who say to the development of new technologies of communication, to the called “social networks” and to the consequences that the same ones have had both for the communication and for the development of new modalities of political strategy.

  16. Political Participation as Public Pedagogy – The Educational Situation in Young People’s Political Conversations in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Andersson; Maria Olson

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that young people’s political participation in the social media can be considered ‘public pedagogy’. The argument builds on a previous empirical analysis of a Swedish net community called Black Heart. Theoretically, the article is based on a particular notion of public pedagogy, education and Hannah Arendt’s expressive agonism. The political participation that takes place in the net community builds up an educational situation that involves central characteristics: co...

  17. The Influence of Social Media in Vietnam’s Elite Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiem Hai BUI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a notable rise of social media in Vietnam’s politics in recent years. The use of social media in generating and exchanging content for public consumption has become increasingly complex and sophisticated. The development of social media has led to the public being better informed about key political and economic issues of public concern. Social media is also playing a visible role in the competition among political factions. Increased exposure and public scrutiny has had a great impact on the way the political apparatus operates and the closed-door preparations made by party-state elites to select top leadership. This paper examines the patterns of use of social media and highlights some of its prominent features and roles in Vietnam’s politics. I investigate the impact that social media exerts, as well as the constraints on its use for the public.

  18. Talking Politics on Twitter: Gender, Elections, and Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon C. McGregor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As campaign discussions increasingly circulate within social media, it is important to understand the characteristics of these conversations. Specifically, we ask whether well-documented patterns of gendered bias against women candidates persist in socially networked political discussions. Theorizing power dynamics as relational, we use dialectic configurations between actors as independent variables determining network measures as outcomes. Our goal is to assess relational power granted to candidates through Twitter conversations about them and whether they change depending on the gender of their opponent. Based on more than a quarter of a million tweets about 50 candidates for state-wide offices during the 2014 US elections, results suggest that when a woman opposes a man, the conversation revolves around her, but she retains a smaller portion of rhetorical share. We find that gender affects network structure—women candidates are both more central and more replied to when they run against men. Despite the potential for social media to disrupt deeply rooted gender bias, our findings suggest that the structure of networked discussions about male and female candidates still results in a differential distribution of relational power.

  19. USING SOCIAL MEDIA IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS. EVIDENCE FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra-Ioana ANDRONICIUC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim at gaining insight into the Romanian president’s online campaign during the 2014 elections. Although there is a growing body of literature on online political campaigns in Western democracies, little research exists on using Social Media in an emergent economy like Romania. In order to take a closer look at the president’s online communication strategy, we conducted a content analysis on the posts published on the president’s official Facebook page over the two weeks leading up to Election Day. This study is the first of this kind and it indicates that president Iohannis used close-ended messages to control the speech, while reaching out to emotion to gain users’ support.

  20. USING SOCIAL MEDIA IN POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS. EVIDENCE FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andra-Ioana ANDRONICIUC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim at gaining insight into the Romanian president’s online campaign during the 2014 elections. Although there is a growing body of literature on online political campaigns in Western democracies, little research exists on using Social Media in an emergent economy like Romania. In order to take a closer look at the president’s online communication strategy, we conducted a content analysis on the posts published on the president’s official Facebook page over the two weeks leading up to Election Day. This study is the first of this kind and it indicates that president Iohannis used close-ended messages to control the speech, while reaching out to emotion to gain users’ support.

  1. The Social Media Paradox Explained: Comparing Political Parties’ Facebook Strategy Versus Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Kalsnes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Political parties’ interaction strategy and practice on Facebook is the topic of this article. Political parties and individual politicians can use social media to bypass media and communicate directly with voters through websites and particularly social media platforms such as Facebook. But previous research has demonstrated that interaction on social media is challenging for political parties. This study examines the disparity between interaction strategy and online responsiveness and finds that political parties identify three clear disadvantages when communicating with voters online: online reputation risk, negative media attention, and limited resources. In addition, the authenticity requirement many parties adhere to is creating a “social media interaction deadlock,” which is increasing the disparity between the parties’ expressed strategy and online performance. This study compares major and minor political parties’ interaction strategy during the 2013 national election in Norway and combines interviews of political communication directors with an innovative method to collect Facebook interaction data.

  2. Schools, Democratic Socialization and Political Participation: Political Activity and Passivity among Swedish Youths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Ekman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present text is based on a key note lecture (‘Civic Education, Democracy and Political Participation’ delivered at the symposium Globalization of School Subjects – Challenges for Civics, History, Geography and Religious Education, Karlstad University, 13–14 December, 2012. Drawing on recent developments in research on political participation and civic engagement, the text starts out with a discussion about different ways of understanding political passivity. Subsequently, the text turns to a brief analysis of ways in which schools may provide young people with political skills and competencies needed in a democratic society. Three dimensions of political citizenship are highlighted: political efficacy, political literacy, and political participation; and the analysis focuses on the impact of a number of different school-related factors on these three ‘citizenship competencies’.

  3. Political personal branding in social media under the European Parliamentary Elections 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Malmi, Anni

    2014-01-01

    This thesis commissioned by MEP Sirpa Pietikäinen concerns political personal branding in social media. The focus is on adjusting personal branding efficiently in social media particularly in the political field. The thesis is a qualitative study. The study method used is benchmarking with the primary data of expert interviews. The secondary data includes other researches on the topic, books and online publications that are analyzed from the political personal branding point of view. Besides ...

  4. "Women's Rights as Human Rights: A Political and Social Economy Approach within a Deep Democratic Framework"

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Haider A.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we offer the social capabilities based approach to women's rights as human rights. We begin with the standard approach and discuss the universal human rights model before developing the social capabilities approach followed throughout the rest of this paper. In this paper by political economy we mean the classical state and civil society and their interactions. By social economy we mean the underlying social basis of the political economy including the family structure. Khan(199...

  5. The Power And Hermeneutic Limits Of Social Fact Analysis In Political Science Research On Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The character of prominent political science explanation on central questions of political modernity in Turkey reflects the philosophical underpinnings of social fact analysis as articulated by Emile Durkheim. Social fact analysis is particularly interesting in relation to ongoing philosophical discussions in the philosophy of social inquiry that reveal both its analytical power and limits in contrast to hermeneutical approaches to social explanation. Here I seek to illuminate both of these e...

  6. Political Socialization in the Family and Young People's Educational Achievement and Ambition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauglo, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Using data from a large-scale survey of Norwegian youth, the study examines the relationships that the performance in key academic subjects and aiming for higher education have with political socialization at home. The more often adolescents aged 13-16 talk with parents about politics and social issues, the better their performance is and the more…

  7. Political parties, institutions, and the dynamics of social expenditure in times of austerity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kittel, B.; Obinger, H.

    2003-01-01

    The containment of social expenditure growth has been a core issue of public policy in advanced industrial countries since the 1980s and has received much academic attention. Among the most extensively discussed explanatory factors of social expenditure are partisan politics and political

  8. A Social Role Theory Perspective on Gender Gaps in Political Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekman, Amanda B.; Schneider, Monica C.

    2010-01-01

    Men and women tend to espouse different political attitudes, as widely noted by both journalists and social scientists. A deeper understanding of why and when gender gaps exist is necessary because at least some gender differences in the political realm are both pervasive and impactful. In this article, we apply a social role theory framework to…

  9. Understanding Citizenship, Understanding Social Media? The effects of digital media on citizenship understanding and political participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; Albæk, Erik

    Is there a connection between increased use of digital media and changing patterns of political participation? This study tests how use of online media for different purposes (social interaction, creative expression, online news use, social media news use) is related to three types of political p...

  10. Farm Ownership, Political Participation, and Other Social Participation in Central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Es, J. C.; Whittenbarger, Robert L.

    This study investigates the relationship between land ownership and social and political participation. A sociological thesis holding that land ownership is the basis of social class distinction and, more importantly, widespread differences in economic and political power is tested in a case study of some 300 farmers in Central Brazil. Findings…

  11. A Critical Review on the Concept of Social Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Leibetseder

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—A critical analysis of the term social technology from a social science point of view.Design/Methodology/Approach—Review of the term “social technology” from a social science point of perspective in connection to the study of governmentality and power in a Foucauldian way.Findings—The article covers the perspective that social technology provides social science knowledge for a purpose. Such a notion allows an in depth debate about the meaning of social order in modern societies. Establishing distinctive techniques now forms the basis of the modern state and governance. Social technology forms the basis of governmental decisions; it allows for a use of social theories and methods for a purpose in politics and introduces a specific conception of power between the individual and public powers. Therefore, it alters government in three ways: It provides expert power to define solutions for social problems based on social science knowledge. It transforms government. Social technology exemplifies a support system for an ordered method of the way of government, it allows for the conduct of others and self based on scientific expertise. It can define new areas of problems in need of a change of government.Research limitations/implications—Consequently, social technology requests a critical analysis using a governmental approach. Such an approach focuses on problems on the governed subject and how governing works and why it has evolved in that way towards the subject and what kind of ideas and thinking lies within the discourse.Research type—general review.

  12. INTERACTION AND DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION SUBJECTS IN THE BLACK SEA REGION: ANTI-CRISIS POLITICAL-ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    YURCHENKO NATALYA

    2016-01-01

    The global economic and political dynamics of sets certain parameters of social motivation to develop adaptive models of economic growth, based on the constructed anti-crisis policy and administrative technologies, which are the subject of this research. The change of technological orders determines certain stages of formation of the relevant political and administrative practices to ensure the safety and long-term development of the southern regions of the country, taking into account their ...

  13. Exploring Affordances of Facebook as a Social Media Platform in Political Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Dyrby, Signe

    2013-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed political parties adopting social media as part of their election campaign strategy to encourage citizen participation and involvement. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what Facebook as a social media platform is perceived to afford political parties i...... engaging in social media activities as part of their campaign strategy.......In recent years we have witnessed political parties adopting social media as part of their election campaign strategy to encourage citizen participation and involvement. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what Facebook as a social media platform is perceived to afford political parties...... to promote political interests and enable dialogue, 2) projection of an image of authenticity through informal media and 3) creating interaction and involvement through dynamic relationships with supporters. A closer look at the parties’ actual use of Facebook shows that the majority of the intended...

  14. Danish Approaches in Social Studies of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Birgitte

    1995-01-01

    Danish contribution to a EU-COST A4 action analysing the emergence of social studies of technology, the Science-Technology-Society field and the 'new sociology' of technology in Europe.......Danish contribution to a EU-COST A4 action analysing the emergence of social studies of technology, the Science-Technology-Society field and the 'new sociology' of technology in Europe....

  15. Health technology assessment implementation: the politics of ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Using a 2009 American debate on a federal public health recommendation on mammography screening for women under the age of 50 as a case study, it is argued that public acceptance of health technology assessment (HTA) depends on the ethical acceptability of its recommendations. At the same time, that acceptability cannot be separated from the politics and values of the health care system of which it is part. In the United States, those values display a sharp ideological split between a conservative individual-based ethic and a liberal community-oriented ethic. A clash of this kind cannot be solved by invocation of ethical principles when it is those principles themselves that are in conflict. Inevitably HTA acceptance is threatened by this conflict as is the fate of health care reform.

  16. Living Up to the Code's Exhortations? Social Workers' Political Knowledge Sources, Expectations, and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff, Brandi Jean; Hoefer, Richard; Watson, Larry Dan

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of Social Workers' (NASW's) Code of Ethics urges social workers to engage in political action. However, little recent research has been conducted to examine whether social workers support this admonition and the extent to which they actually engage in politics. The authors gathered data from a survey of social workers in Austin, Texas, to address three questions. First, because keeping informed about government and political news is an important basis for action, the authors asked what sources of knowledge social workers use. Second, they asked what the respondents believe are appropriate political behaviors for other social workers and NASW. Third, they asked for self-reports regarding respondents' own political behaviors. Results indicate that social workers use the Internet and traditional media services to stay informed; expect other social workers and NASW to be active; and are, overall, more active than the general public in many types of political activities. The comparisons made between expectations for others and their own behaviors are interesting in their complex outcomes. Social workers should strive for higher levels of adherence to the code's urgings on political activity. Implications for future work are discussed.

  17. THRESHOLD EFFECTS IN THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROCESSES. SOCIAL-ENERGY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Yurevich Petukhov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to investigate the threshold effects in the social and political processes through the creation mathematical model of the social system. Method or the methodology of the work:As the basic approach used by the author's socio-energy approach. The method is based equation stream of social energy through the system, then the model is based on nonlinear dynamic system with application the ideas of fractal geometry to calculate the individual elements of the structures, as well as the Langevin equation to account for fluctuations in the social and political processes. Using this equation is created a model of the communication of the field that describes interaction of individuals in societyAs a result, on the basis of created the mathematical theory of a computer modeling of the impact of the information of one social system to another, which has revealed pattern of such processes as reflexivity, and also the presence of characteristic peaks (bifurcation points.The area of application of the results: in modeling and forecasting processes in social systems in the conditions of the information wars.

  18. Theoretical and methodological bases of studying the symbolization of social and political reality in transit societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Slavina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is an attempt to form a methodological foundation to explore the process of symbolic constructioning of reality in the political systems in a state of democratic transition. From the author’s point of view, such transit systems differ with the phenomenal features of transitional type of sign-symbolic context. There are the most significant of them: the confrontation of symbols of old and new, and the formation of public anxiety due to violation of the established values (significant symbols. The result of these processes is the emergence of the conditions for increasing capacity of perception of new symbols (re-symbolization, transmigration of symbolic forms, the appearance of spontaneous symbolic interactions in the community in the form of political protests, rallies, and panic. In this regard, it is necessary to understand the possibilities of the productive management of the collective consciousness in transit period to achieve mental solidarity of concrete society with democratic values. To perform this task, author develops the appropriate tools, which are based on the phenomenological theory, the Schutz’s theory of the constitution of the multiple realities, the philosophy of symbolic forms of E. Cassirer, the theory of social construction of P. Berger and T. Luckmann, as well as Lotman’s semiotic concept. It is concluded that in the collision of alternative symbolic projects of social order it is advisable to resort to controlled symbolization (the production of special symbolic codes of political legitimation. At the same time it is important to understand the mechanisms of auto- symbolization of the society (changing of mass consciousness by virtue of the progressive development of the political culture of people. Careless use of these technologies in the countries with non-consolidated democracy may become a factor of destabilization and formation of the conditions for authoritarian rollback.

  19. Political Parties and Interest Groups Members' Patterns of Social Network Site Usage in Kyrgyzstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elira Turdubaeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kyrgyzstan, with a high level of political participation and an avant-garde position regarding internet access in Central Asia, broadband and social media penetration in the population, is a critical case for studying social network sites (SNSs in relation to political participation. This study analyzes the practices and attitudes of SNS users in Kyrgyzstan. Two types of users – members of political parties and members of interest organizations – are interviewed in focus groups about their practices and attitudes towards political content in the social network site Facebook. The findings indicate that, to some extent, the political engagement is indeed occurring within the Facebook environment, suggesting that the popular social networking sites (SNSs are an avenue for young people to express and share their political views. Facebook allowed users to share their political beliefs, support specific candidates, and interact with others on political issues. Participants’ perceptions regarding the appropriateness of political activity on Facebook, as well as the specific types of political activities they engaged in and witnessed within the site, were also explored.

  20. Social Shaping in Danish Technology Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Grethe; Clausen, Christian

    2003-01-01

    for technology policy initiatives at the beginning of the new millennium, as prerequisites for socially feasible and desirable technology development and innovation. On the basis of the Danish technology assessments of the 1980s, it is argued that technology assessments and the social shaping perspectives...... in these projects contributed to new insights into the processes of technological change and thus to policy formulation. The social shaping perspective and technology assessment experiences are suggested as important guides to future technology strategies.......The term ‘social shaping of technology’ has been used broadly as a response to techno-economic deterministic understandings of the relations between technology and society. Social shaping has brought together analysts from different backgrounds who share a common interest in the role of social...

  1. Social-ecological systems, social diversity, and power: insights from anthropology and political ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fabinyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A social-ecological system (SES framework increasingly underpins the "resilience paradigm." As with all models, the SES comes with particular biases. We explore these key biases. We critically examine how the SES resilience literature has attempted to define and analyze the social arena. We argue that much SES literature defines people's interests and livelihoods as concerned primarily with the environment, and thereby underplays the role of other motivations and social institutions. We also highlight the SES resilience literature's focus on institutions and organized social units, which misses key aspects of social diversity and power. Our key premise is the importance of inter- and multi-disciplinary perspectives. To illustrate this, we draw attention to the critique of earlier ecological anthropology that remains relevant for current conceptualizations of SESs, focusing on the concepts of social diversity and power. And we discuss insights from social anthropology and political ecology that have responded to this critique to develop different ways of incorporating social diversity and power into human-environment relations. Finally, we discuss how these social science perspectives can help improve the understanding of the "social" in SES resilience research.

  2. Science and Technology Parks in the Context of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Leichteris

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present a new approach to science and technology park concept and the development prospects in the context of social technologies. Globalization and the spread of social technologies are expanding the influence of science and technology parks on national innovation systems. It opens new directions for research in this area, as well as the practical use of social technologies in the development of science and technology parks. The paper also examines the science and technology park as an institutionalized concept of social technology. In this article the interdisciplinary approach for analyzing the complex concept of science and technology parks is used to explore the theoretical relationships with the social technologies concept. The possible links are identified and illustrated by practical examples ofLithuanian science and technology parks. Finally suggestions for further research are made. Based on the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature in both fields (science and technology parks; social technologies three possible theoretical links are established: a the use of social technologies in science and technology parks b the role of a science park as an intermediate body in the humanization and socialization of technologies c science and technology parks as an institutionalized concept of social technology. The theoretical model is supported by empirical illustrations from the development of Lithuanian science and technology parks, therefore further research in all three directions is feasible and needed. As this research takes a merely theoretical approach to the social systems investigation, it can be qualified only as a preparational stage for further research. The practical examples used in the article are more illustrative than evidence based and shall not be considered as case studies. The research offers an initial framework for researching science and technology parks in the context of social technologies

  3. Science and Technology Parks in the Context of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgaras Leichteris

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. This article aims to present a new approach to science and technology park concept and the development prospects in the context of social technologies. Globalization and the spread of social technologies are expanding the influence of science and technology parks on national innovation systems. It opens new directions for research in this area, as well as the practical use of social technologies in the development of science and technology parks. The paper also examines the science and technology park as an institutionalized concept of social technology. In this article the interdisciplinary approach for analyzing the complex concept of science and technology parks is used to explore the theoretical relationships with the social technologies concept. The possible links are identified and illustrated by practical examples of Lithuanian science and technology parks. Finally suggestions for further research are made. Based on the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature in both fields (science and technology parks; social technologies three possible theoretical links are established: a the use of social technologies in science and technology parks b the role of a science park as an intermediate body in the humanization and socialization of technologies c science and technology parks as an institutionalized concept of social technology. The theoretical model is supported by empirical illustrations from the development of Lithuanian science and technology parks, therefore further research in all three directions is feasible and needed. As this research takes a merely theoretical approach to the social systems investigation, it can be qualified only as a preparational stage for further research. The practical examples used in the article are more illustrative than evidence based and shall not be considered as case studies. The research offers an initial framework for researching science and technology parks in the context of social

  4. The Impact of Politics 2.0 in the Spanish Social Media: Tracking the Conversations around the Audiovisual Political Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, José M.; Correyero, Beatriz

    After the consolidation of weblogs as interactive narratives and producers, audiovisual formats are gaining ground on the Web. Videos are spreading all over the Internet and establishing themselves as a new medium for political propaganda inside social media with tools so powerful like YouTube. This investigation proceeds in two stages: on one hand we are going to examine how this audiovisual formats have enjoyed an enormous amount of attention in blogs during the Spanish pre-electoral campaign for the elections of March 2008. On the other hand, this article tries to investigate the social impact of this phenomenon using data from a content analysis of the blog discussion related to these videos centered on the most popular Spanish political blogs. Also, we study when the audiovisual political messages (made by politicians or by users) "born" and "die" in the Web and with what kind of rules they do.

  5. Citizenship beyond politics: the importance of political, civil and social rights and responsibilities among women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzendahl, Catherine; Coffé, Hilde

    2009-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that men are more engaged as citizens than are women. Yet, little is known about gender cleavages across a variety of citizenship norms. To what extent do men and women define citizenship differently? To address that question, this study examines the importance men and women assign various citizenship rights and responsibilities using 2004 ISSP data from 18 Western, industrialized nations. Using a disaggregated approach to understanding definitions of citizenship, we examine political, civil, and social rights and responsibilities. After controlling for a variety of demographic and attitudinal influences, we find that men and women are not different in their views regarding the importance of political responsibilities. However, women do view political rights as significantly more important than do men. Further, in comparison to men, women view both civil and social responsibilities and rights domains as significantly more important.

  6. The costs of socializing with government officials: A new measure of corporate political connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We construct a new measure to capture corporate political connections, which is based on the amount a corporation spends on socializing with government officials. We examine the validity of this measure using the exogenous turnover of top local officials and find that firms increase their political networking expenditures when top local officials are replaced. Compared to state-owned enterprises (SOEs, non-state-owned enterprises (non-SOEs react more aggressively to changes in local officials, which implies that non-SOEs have stronger incentives to build political connections with officials through social intercourse. We also find that firms located in regions with low levels of marketization react more aggressively to the turnover of local politicians. In addition, we find a positive effect of corporate political socializing expenditures on corporate performance and valuation, which suggests that political connections built through social intercourse benefit corporations.

  7. The costs of socializing with government officials:A new measure of corporate political connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjing; Li; Liming; Zhao

    2015-01-01

    We construct a new measure to capture corporate political connections, which is based on the amount a corporation spends on socializing with government officials. We examine the validity of this measure using the exogenous turnover of top local officials and find that firms increase their political networking expenditures when top local officials are replaced. Compared to state-owned enterprises(SOEs), non-state-owned enterprises(non-SOEs) react more aggressively to changes in local officials, which implies that non-SOEs have stronger incentives to build political connections with officials through social intercourse. We also find that firms located in regions with low levels of marketization react more aggressively to the turnover of local politicians. In addition, we find a positive effect of corporate political socializing expenditures on corporate performance and valuation, which suggests that political connections built through social intercourse benefit corporations.

  8. Social, Economic, and Political Issues Affecting End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopcheck, Janet

    2016-02-01

    For many decades, Americans showed a preference for delaying death through a technological imperative that often created challenges for nurses in caring for dying patients and their families. Because of their vast knowledge of health and healing, and their proximity to patients' bedsides, nurses are often well positioned to advocate for healthcare reform and legislation to improve end-of-life care. This article provides an overview of the social, economic, and political factors that are shaping end-of-life care in the United States. First, historical perspectives on end-of-life care are presented to enhance understanding of why some clinicians and patients seem to resist change to current practices. Second, end of care issues related to advanced technology utilization, societal expectations of care, clinical practices, financial incentives, palliative care services, and policy reforms are discussed. Finally, future recommendations are provided to encourage nurses and other healthcare providers to improve care for individuals facing end-of-life care decisions.

  9. Political Participation as Public Pedagogy--The Educational Situation in Young People's Political Conversations in Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik; Olson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In this article we argue that young people's political participation in the social media can be considered "public pedagogy". The argument builds on a previous empirical analysis of a Swedish net community called Black Heart. Theoretically, the article is based on a particular notion of public pedagogy, education and Hannah Arendt's…

  10. Technological Literacy and Political Participation in McLean County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 266 residents of McLean County, Illinois, found that 91 percent believe technology makes life easier; 70 percent believe people are too technologically dependent; those with a history of political participation felt confident engaging in political activities regarding nuclear power, automation, and genetic engineering; and the public…

  11. Technological Literacy and Political Participation in McLean County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 266 residents of McLean County, Illinois, found that 91 percent believe technology makes life easier; 70 percent believe people are too technologically dependent; those with a history of political participation felt confident engaging in political activities regarding nuclear power, automation, and genetic engineering; and the public…

  12. THE NEED OF CONNECTING THE TECHNOLOGY, POLITICAL AND CULTURAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Merdzhanovska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the need of connecting the technology, political and cultural system in the right way to achieve the companies’ goals in terms of globalization and changes. The leaders have the main role in realizing the company’s strategy. They must be strategy focused and they are responsible for connecting the employees, processes and technologies. In the beginning of the paper, the characteristics of strategy focused leadership are analyzed. The available tools of strategy focused leadership through the model are presented. The matrix of strategy management can be used like a manual which helps the management in connecting systems with managerial instruments: mission and strategy, organization structure and management of human resources. The goal of the paper is to show that with professional approach, the strategy focused leaders play the main role in connecting and changing the existing systems in companies. This is the way of reaching the best performance of companies and surviving at the global world market.

  13. The Influence of Social Media Towards Student Political Participation During the 2014 Indonesian Presidential Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Kholid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to examine the political par- ticipation of social media users particularly of Facebook and Twitter during the 2014 Indonesian presidential election. The data collection was per- formed through survey with accidental sampling methods. Samples were taken from population of undergraduate students of political and social sci- ences faculty at five universities in Yogyakarta namely UGM, UIN Sunan Kalijaga, UMY, UNY and UPN “Veteran” Yogyakarta. Using statistic descriptive, this research conceptualizes the political participation of social media users while the relations of social me- dia and political participation is analyzed through OLS Regression. The findings indicated that the level of political participation of the social media users during the election was categorized as good. How- ever, the facilities offered by the two social media applications were not maximally used to supporting political participation activities. On the other hand, the result OLS regression shows that there were positive and significant correlations and influences of social media towards the political participation of its users during the election even though the per- centage was small.

  14. Investigating the Relationship between Social Capital and Political Consumerism among Isfahan University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Javad Emamjomezadeh

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to theoretically and experimentally analyze the effect of social capital on political consumption among students of Isfahan University. Results indicated a significant relationship between social capital and interest in value, ethical and political considerations of commodity consumption. This corresponds with the theories of Micheletti, John and Klein, Andersen and Tobiasen, Stoll and Hooghe, Dawson and Valendorf., which have shown that social trust and social associations in people with a high social capital have considerable effect on their actions and leads to their tendency toward boycotting or encouraging purchase of necessities according to their own political, cultural and ethical values. In other words, there appears to be significant differences among students under study in terms of social capital and this manifests itself in their political consumption. In general, findings indicate a positive relation between social capital and political consumerism. Therefore, research hypothesis is confirmed. In other words, individuals with a higher social capital consume politics more than those with lower social capital.

  15. The Politics of Global Health Security: Problemetizing a Social Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Blouin Genest

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Why have states, in a somewhat short period of time (1995-2005, suddenly decided to “cooperate” regarding global infectious disease surveillance? What kind of “cooperation” is it? Why did states apparently surrender part of their sovereign power to the WHO by giving it the power to declare pandemic at the global scale without state consent? These questions appear especially relevant in the context where issues of health and diseases at the global scale have been explicitly linked with the concepts of “risk”, “security”, “emergency”, “crisis”, “intelligence”, and “terrorism”. The objective of this article is to start answering these questions by first of all looking at the problems and paradoxes of the practices of Global Health Security through an analysis of the microbial space, capitalistic cooperation, and the production of information and data about health security. Secondly, the article draws the attention to the politics behind the structuration of Global Health Security as a social evidence by looking at contested concepts that represent promising research avenues.

  16. Education, Ethnicity, and Political Socialization: The Case of Pakistan. Studies in Education & Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Aftab A.

    This study examines the relationship between the educational system, the ethnic communities, and political instability in Pakistan. The major assumption of this study is that, with socioeconomic and political inequities aside, the educational policies alone lack the representation of indigeneous ethnic values in the national educational system,…

  17. Challenges for Social-Ecological Transformations: Contributions from Social and Political Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Görg

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Transformation has become a major topic of sustainability research. This opens up new perspectives, but at the same time, runs the danger to convert into a new critical orthodoxy which narrows down analytical perspectives. Most research is committed towards a political-strategic approach towards transformation. This focus, however, clashes with ongoing transformation processes towards un-sustainability. The paper presents cornerstones of an integrative approach to social-ecological transformations (SET, which builds upon empirical work and conceptual considerations from Social Ecology and Political Ecology. We argue that a critical understanding of the challenges for societal transformations can be advanced by focusing on the interdependencies between societies and the natural environment. This starting point provides a more realistic understanding of the societal and biophysical constraints of sustainability transformations by emphasising the crisis-driven and contested character of the appropriation of nature and the power relations involved. Moreover, it pursues a transdisciplinary mode of research, decisive for adequately understanding any strategy for transformations towards sustainability. Such a conceptual approach of SET is supposed to better integrate the analytical, normative and political-strategic dimension of transformation research. We use the examples of global land use patterns, neo-extractivism in Latin America and the global water crisis to clarify our approach.

  18. Exploring Affordances of Facebook as a Social Media Platform in Political Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Dyrby, Signe

    2013-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed political parties adopting social media as part of their election campaign strategy to encourage citizen participation and involvement. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what Facebook as a social media platform is perceived to afford political parties...... to promote political interests and enable dialogue, 2) projection of an image of authenticity through informal media and 3) creating interaction and involvement through dynamic relationships with supporters. A closer look at the parties’ actual use of Facebook shows that the majority of the intended...... engaging in social media activities as part of their campaign strategy....

  19. The political solidarity model of social change: dynamics of self-categorization in intergroup power relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Emina; Reynolds, Katherine J; Turner, John C

    2008-11-01

    Social and political change involves a challenge to the status quo in intergroup power relations. Traditionally, the social psychology of social change has focused on disadvantaged minority groups collectively challenging the decisions, actions, and policies of those in positions of established authority. In contrast, this article presents a political solidarity model of social change that explores the process by which members of the majority challenge the authority in solidarity with the minority. It is argued that political solidarity as a social change process involves a contest between the authority and the minority over the meaning of a shared (higher order) identity with the majority. When identity ceases to be shared with the authority and becomes shared with the minority, majority challenge to authority in solidarity with the minority becomes possible. The model's contributions to existing social psychological approaches to social change are also discussed.

  20. Producing and Consuming the Controversial--A Social Media Perspective on Political Conversations in the Social Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Teachers find it difficult to conduct political controversial conversations in the social science classroom and due to an increased use of social media in educational settings new challenges and possibilities are raised. The use of social media causes fundamental changes to the role of the learner who becomes a producer and consumer--a…

  1. Social Science and Social Struggle: Understanding the Necessary Confluence of Scholarship and Political Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Clow

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Social scientists and historians are wary to acknowledge that political commitments play a part in their explanations of society. But we all know they do. Are we poor scientists? Not according to the Edinburgh School, which argues all successful scientific theories are but practical knowledge, shaped by the encounter of human purpose and empirical world. Practical knowledge always involves the uncertain, trial and error application of the intellectual resources drawn from exemplary solutions to new situations. Praxis is the only valid path to knowledge. But no matter how successful, practical knowledge is a theoretically and empirically limited ‘working knowledge' which cannot produce sure understanding of the generative processes producing what we see. What distinguishes studies of society from those of Nature is that the political purposes of conflicting scholarly traditions are so deeply and manifestly divergent. Implications? Above all we should be skeptical about any strong claims to theoretical certainty, on our part or by others. Dogmatism and sectarianism are epistemologically untenable in the Edinburgh view. Scientific debate would be advanced if we were as open about our political orientations as we are enjoined to be about research design and methodology. And demanded the same of others. This may be possible across ‘camps' in the same tradition and even ideological barriers, where goodwill prevails. In the public sphere the Edinburgh perspective suggests the shifting of the grounds of debate and the framing/reframing of issues requires a tacit recognition that social knowledge is shaped by its political purposes and cannot simply be ‘the facts ma'am, just the facts.'

  2. Social Networks and the Development of Political Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostie-Goulet, Eugenie

    2009-01-01

    The recent decline in voter turnout, a trend largely attributed to lack of youth participation, has focused the attention of many scholars on the study of young people and politics. While great strides have been made in understanding youth disengagement, one dimension of the field that remains understudied is the development of political interest.…

  3. Power, Order, and the Politics of Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    . Building on Laitin (1998, 2007), Bloom (2008), and others, my two Baltic cases in turn discuss the use of political power along yet another dimension - ethnicity. Recent advances in political economy (Alesina and La Ferera 2005) and social capital theory (Putnam 2007) have documented the manifold negative...

  4. Tipping the Balance of Power : Social Media and the Transformation of Political Journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Marcel; Graham, Todd; Bruns, Axel; Skogerbø, Eli; Christensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders Olof; Enli, Gunn

    2015-01-01

    The advent of social media in politics has changed the relationship between political journalists and politicians. Especially Twitter has developed into a regular news beat. Journalists use it to build relationships with politicians and quote their tweets in coverage. For many politicians, tweeting

  5. Economic and Social Political Ideology and Homophobia: The Mediating Role of Binding and Individualizing Moral Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael D; Öz, Haluk C M; Marsden, Arthur D

    2017-05-02

    Previous research has linked conservative political ideology with homophobia. Political ideology has also been linked to differences in moral decision-making, with research suggesting that conservatives and liberals may use different values in their moral decision-making processes. Moral foundations theory is a model of moral decision-making that proposes that individuals emphasize different domains in moral decision-making. Conservatives tend to emphasize binding foundations, while liberals tend to emphasize individualizing foundations. Utilizing large, ethnically diverse college samples, the purpose of these two cross-sectional studies (Study 1 N = 492; Study 2 N = 861) was to explore whether moral foundations mediate the relationship between political ideology and homophobia. These studies explored economic and social political ideology separately and utilized a two-factor model of moral foundations theory (individualizing and binding foundations). Results of both studies found that conservative economic and social political ideology was positively associated with homophobia. Study 1 found that both conservative economic and social political ideology had an indirect effect on homophobia through binding foundations. Study 2 found that both economic and social political ideology had an indirect effect on homophobia through both binding and individualizing foundations. Overall, the results were consistent with the notion that moral foundations may explain the relationship between political ideology and homophobia.

  6. Tipping the Balance of Power : Social Media and the Transformation of Political Journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Marcel; Graham, Todd; Bruns, Axel; Skogerbø, Eli; Christensen, Christian; Larsson, Anders Olof; Enli, Gunn

    2015-01-01

    The advent of social media in politics has changed the relationship between political journalists and politicians. Especially Twitter has developed into a regular news beat. Journalists use it to build relationships with politicians and quote their tweets in coverage. For many politicians, tweeting

  7. Women in transnational migrant activism: supporting social justice claims of homeland political organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mügge, L.

    2013-01-01

    This article studies the conceptions of social justice of women active in transnational migrant politics over a period of roughly 20 years in the Netherlands. The novel focus on migrant women reveals that transnational politics is almost completely male-dominated and -directed. Two of the exceptions

  8. Comparative social policy and political conflict in advanced welfare states: Denmark and Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esping-Andersen, G

    1979-01-01

    There has developed an abundant literature on the social and political determinants of social policies, but few have addressed the question of how state policies, once implemented, affect the system of stratification in civil society. This article examines the political consequences of social policy in Denmark and Sweden, countries in which a social democratic labor movement has predominated for decades. Superficially, these two highly developed welfare states appear very similar. Yet the political and social contexts in which their social policies have evolved differ substantially. I shall demonstrate the argument that the traditional welfare state approach may be conducive to a new and powerful political conflict, which directly questions the legitimacy of the welfare state itself, unless government is successful in subordinating private capitalist growth to effective public regulation. In Denmark, where social democratic governments have failed to match welfare state growth with more control of private capital, social policy has tended to undermine the political unity of the working class. Consequently, the Social Democratic Party has been weakened. Social welfare programs, in effect, have helped create new forms of stratification within the working class. In Sweden, social democratic governments have been quite successful in shifting a decisive degree of power over the private market to the state. This has helped avert a crisis of the welfare state, and has also been an important condition for continued social democratic hegemony and working-class unity. I conclude that social reform politics tend to be problematic from the point of view of the future power of social democratic movements.

  9. Australian Politics in a Digital Age

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Peter John

    2013-01-01

    Information and communications technologies are increasingly important in the Australian political landscape. From the adoption of new forms of electoral campaigning to the use of networking technology to organise social movements, media technology has the potential to radically change the way politics is conducted and experienced in this country. The first comprehensive volume on the impact of digital media on Australian politics, this book examines the way these technologies shape political...

  10. Politics, Morality, Innovation, and Misrepresentation in Physical Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Jed Z.

    2016-09-01

    The pressures of politics, the desire to be first in innovation, moral convictions, and the potential dangers of error are all factors that have long been at work in the history of science and technology. Every so often, the need to reach a result may require leaving out a few steps here and there. Historians think and argue best through stories, so what follows are several tales, each of which exemplifies one or more of these aspects, though some reach back nearly two hundred years. The first concerns the depletion of the ozone layer; the second involves the discovery of electric waves by Heinrich Hertz in 1888; the third concerns the controlled production of electromagnetic radiation by Guglielmo Marconi and John Ambrose Fleming in the early 1900s; the fourth portrays the circumstances surrounding Joseph von Fraunhofer's discovery and use of the spectral lines in the 1810s; our final case involves a bitter controversy between the physicist Hermann von Helmholtz and the astronomer Friedrich Zöllner in the 1890s.

  11. Ideological and Political Education Function of Political Socialization%高校思想政治教育的政治社会化功能探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李天英

    2014-01-01

    Ideological and political education is the main way of political socialization, Through the analysis in the college students’ politi-cal cognition, political attitude, political personality and the political behavior of College Ideological and political education function, And the in-fluence of the political system, to explore the optimal path of Ideological and political education in universities.%思想政治教育是政治社会化的主要途径,通过分析高校思想政治教育在大学生政治认知、政治态度、政治人格和政治行为上发挥的功能以及对政治体系的影响,进而探索高校思想政治教育的优化路径。

  12. The social function of technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, F. P.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of preserving the uneasy balance between a dynamic society and the equilibrium of man-environment society is discussed. Four sets of activities involved in technology assessment are considered: (1) Technology forecasting is necessary to warn of future dangers and opportunities, for effective timing, and to identify tradeoffs and alternatives. But forecasting is also chancy at best. (2) Social indicators need to be developed for the characterization of social status and measurement of social progress, as well as a better understanding of social needs. (3) With respect to technology assessment, the conflict between profitable directions of innovations and socially desirable directions is described, and a systematic way is needed to determine in advance what is technologically feasible to meet social needs. (4) National goals with respect to scientific and technological developments are also required.

  13. Tensions and Challenges: Interrelationships between Social Movements and Progressive Institutional Politics in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro M. Bacallao-Pino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Latin America is the scenario of both significant counterhegemonic social movements and allegedly progressive (or even anti-capitalist governments. The article aims to analyse the interrelationships between those collective agents and institutional politics in that scenario. Based on a general approach to some relevant social movements from the region, the positions of some particular Latin American governments and its leaders, as well as the examination of secondary sources, the text examines three main aspects that mediate the interrelationships between social movements and progressive institutional politics: the singular way in which social movements understand the sense of “politics”, the postures with respect to those collective agents assumed by those governments and the importance of autonomy for social movements. Social movements understand politics not as a separate dimension, but as a process of accumulation from sociability, in a continuity between social and political dimensions based on everyday experience of life, including this way social practices traditionally located outside established political institutions. Autonomy is a central value for those social actors, defining their position with regard to political parties, labour unions, churches and other traditional organisations. It is a value that crosses all their practices and the possibility of articulation to projects developed from governments, from the local level to the Latin American one. Against this, the vision on social movements of allegedly progressive (or even anti-capitalist governments is mediated by the purpose of understanding them from the point of view of traditional political rules, and two significant attitudes towards those social agents are some purposes of criminalisation and co-optation.

  14. Politeness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Bergson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the English translation of a speech Bergson made at Lycée Henri-IV on July 30, 1892. This is an interesting text because it anticipates Bergson’s last book, his The Two Sources of Morality and Religion. Like the distinction in The Two Sources between the open and the closed, “Politeness” defines its subject matter in two ways. There is what Bergson calls “manners” and there is true politeness. For Bergson, both kinds of politeness concern equality. Manners or material politeness amount to the ritualized greetings and formalities by means of which we usually define politeness. Unfortunately and like The Two Sources, Bergson attributes this formalized relation to other human beings with primitive and “inferior races.” Nevertheless, Bergson sees in these formalities an attempt, in the name of equality, to ignore other people’s talents and merits so that one can dominate morally superior people. In contrast, true politeness or “spiritual politeness” consists in “intellectual flexibility.” When one meets a person of superior morality, one is flexible in one’s relation to him or her; one abandons the formalities in order to really live her life and think her thoughts. Here we find equality too: “what defines this very polite person is to prefer each of his friends over the others, and to succeed in this way in loving them equally.” After making a comparison to dance, Bergson defines spiritual politeness as “a grace of the mind.” Since both kinds of politeness concern equality, Bergson associates both with justice. However, beyond these two kinds of politeness and justice there is “politeness of the heart,” which concerns charity. In order to indicate politeness of the heart, Bergson describes the kind of person, a sensitive person, who anxiously awaits a word of praise in order to feel good about herself but who also, when she hears a word of reproach, is thrown into sadness. Although Bergson calls the

  15. Network interventions - How citizens’ social media networks influence their political participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; de Vreese, Claes Holger; Albæk, Erik

    Social media platforms are special places of information exposure because they are structured around a user’s social network and not around content, like other news media. Studies could show that news exposure on social media can affect citizens’ political participation due to the personalized, t...

  16. The Political Rhetoric in Sermons and Select Social Media in Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Political Rhetoric in Sermons and Select Social Media in Three Pentecostal ... Journal for the Study of Religion ... to those in the highest offices of government and thus able to influence the way in which the country was governed.

  17. The political construction of social inclusion through Further Education policy (1997 – 2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, J

    2009-01-01

    This thesis explores ‘social inclusion’ as a political construction of the New Labour government between 1997 and 2007. The process of construction is frequently situated within policy from the Further Education (FE) sector. A critical discourse analysis of government documents, and interviews conducted with key policy makers, exposes the underlying ideologies and politics which were involved in the process of constructing social inclusion. The analysis reveals three dominant construction...

  18. The Influence of Social Media Towards Student Political Participation During the 2014 Indonesian Presidential Election

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar Kholid; Rahmawati Husein; Dyah Mutiarin; Septiyan Listiya E. R

    2015-01-01

    This research attempts to examine the political par- ticipation of social media users particularly of Facebook and Twitter during the 2014 Indonesian presidential election. The data collection was per- formed through survey with accidental sampling methods. Samples were taken from population of undergraduate students of political and social sci- ences faculty at five universities in Yogyakarta namely UGM, UIN Sunan Kalijaga, UMY, UNY and UPN “Veteran” Yogyakarta. Using statistic descriptive, ...

  19. Social and Technological Development in Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1997-01-01

    This papers studies the processes developing technology and its social "sorroundings", the social networks. Positions in the debate on technological change is discussed. A central topic is the enterprise external development and decision processes and their interplay with the enterprise internal...

  20. Political Primitivism, Differential Socialization, and Lower-Class Leftist Radicalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portes, Alejandro

    1971-01-01

    Examines hypotheses linking lower class leftist radicalism to the political primitivism caused by lack of education, lack of media exposure, infrequent participation in organizations, and personal isolation--on the basis of data from 382 Chilean urban slum dwellers. (RJ)

  1. Female Political Participation in Afghanistan: Social Realities and Internal Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    equality at the village level. Women’s rights are further hindered by geographic factors. Thus, joining political movements or running for office to...in their day-to-day lives. 57 Joining political movements or running for office to ~ffect chang~ in Afghanistan may seem unrealistic or even...1 Constitution of Afghanistan. 2 Swanee HWlt, "Let Wom~n Rule," Foreign Affairs 86 (May 2007): 109-120. 3 Jennifer L. Fluri, " Feminist -Nation

  2. Political tolerance in Serbia and Europe: Social and psychological roots

    OpenAIRE

    Todosijević Bojan

    2008-01-01

    Tolerance of political opponents is one of the basic preconditions of a democratic society. Empirical research, however, typically reveals low levels of tolerance even in societies with long democratic tradition. This paper presents a comparative study of the sources of individual differences in the degree of political tolerance in Europe, with special reference to Serbia. According to Sullivan et al.'s theory (Sullivan et al. 1979, 53-55), socio-demographic factors are decisive for the choic...

  3. Handbook of social network technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2010-01-01

    Social networking is a concept that has existed for a long time; however, with the explosion of the Internet, social networking has become a tool for people to connect and communicate in ways that were impossible in the past. The recent development of Web 2.0 has provided many new applications, such as Myspace, Facebook, and LinkedIn. The purpose of ""Handbook of Social Networks: Technologies and Applications"" is to provide comprehensive guidelines on the current and future trends in social network technologies and applications in the field of Web-based Social Networks. This handbook includes

  4. The Philosophy of Science and Technology in China: Political and Ideological Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanlin

    2014-01-01

    In China, the philosophy of science and technology (PST) is derived from "Dialectics of Nature" (DN), which is based on Engels' unfinished book "Dialektik der Natur." DN as a political ideology provides political guidance for scientists and engineers. Therefore, since 1981, "Introduction to Dialectics of Nature"…

  5. Who's Who in Internet Politics: A Taxonomy of Information Technology Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A decade ago, before the tech boom collapsed and the digital economy bubble burst, it seemed to some that issues surrounding information technology (IT) might be central to the politics of the early 21st century. But after September 11, 2001, with so much else on everyone's minds, "digital politics" seemed a boring sideshow. Technocrats,…

  6. The Philosophy of Science and Technology in China: Political and Ideological Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanlin

    2014-01-01

    In China, the philosophy of science and technology (PST) is derived from "Dialectics of Nature" (DN), which is based on Engels' unfinished book "Dialektik der Natur." DN as a political ideology provides political guidance for scientists and engineers. Therefore, since 1981, "Introduction to Dialectics of Nature" (IDN)…

  7. The Philosophy of Science and Technology in China: Political and Ideological Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanlin

    2014-01-01

    In China, the philosophy of science and technology (PST) is derived from "Dialectics of Nature" (DN), which is based on Engels' unfinished book "Dialektik der Natur." DN as a political ideology provides political guidance for scientists and engineers. Therefore, since 1981, "Introduction to Dialectics of Nature" (IDN)…

  8. Disciplining ethnicity: social sorting intersects with political demography in Israel's pre-state period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibler, Anat

    2014-04-01

    This article presents an analysis of the professional and political activities of the demographer Roberto Bachi prior to Israel's establishment as a state in 1948. The article describes his involvement in two interconnected major areas: first, his advocacy of pro-natal policies, connected to a nation-building strategy by the Jewish population to achieve numerical dominance over Arab Palestinians in areas to be incorporated in the Jewish state, and second, the development of Jewish ethnic distinctions, particularly the 'Mizrahi type', to track differences in birthrates and changing cultural features within the Jewish population. The article also revises the historical record by showing the importance of this ethnic classification in the years prior to the large waves of Jewish immigration from Arab countries. Without the reworking of the popular category 'Mizrahi' into a scientifically systematized category by a demographer who would become the head of the state's Central Bureau of Statistics upon its founding in 1948, this binary social epistemology could not be as strong and legitimate as it actually was. Two factors account for Bachi's success. First was his ability to provide a new way of understanding the present in terms of the future. His numerical predictions on the Jewish and Arab demographic development made statistics and demography an indispensable technology for public policy and social planning. Second was his role as a boundary actor--a unique mediating position between political and scientific spheres. The Israeli case study exemplifies similar dynamics found in other countries during periods of structuring the modern state, namely, processes in which experts of infrastructural knowledge such as statistics and demography saw themselves as responsible for the national progress and its social modernity.

  9. Social Media and Political Communication. Case Study – The Parliamentary Parties In Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tănase Tasenţe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to examine the extent to which parliamentary parties from Romania are using Social Media to promote their image and political messages, but also the level of participation of supporters in social networks. More than that, another objective of this paper aims to identify similarities between the hypothetical percentages of supporters of political parties in Social Media, electoral percentages of accessing the Romanian Parliament and the current political configuration of the Romanian Parliament. The research focused on comparative analysis of the “de facto” representation of the parliamentary parties in the romanian community and the degree of representation in social networks. The Research method used is quantitative analysis of the online documents and working tool used is the traffic analysis and the degree of the participation in social networks.

  10. NEW MEDIA: FROM THE VIRTUAL REALITY IN THE SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ACTUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дмитрий Игоревич Каминченко

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/subjectConsideration of «new» media phenomenon with virtualistics.Method/methodologyVirtualistics.Results of workConclusions on the role of «new» media as a connecting link between virtual reality and the social and political actuality. An attempt to define new areas of using these media.  Application of resultsThe results can be applied to the process of political consultation.ConclusionsThe «new» media is as a channel of communication between virtual reality and the social and political actuality. This role is carried out in the course of the exchange of information and agendas and in the sphere of social and political self-organizing.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-4-5

  11. The Social Shaping Approach to Technology Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Jørgensen, Ulrik; Clausen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The social shaping of technology (SST) approach has been developed as a response and extension to the ideas of techno-economic rationality and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. The SST approach seems especially promising in areas of technology where visions...... are manifold, societal interests conflicting, and applications and markets are non-existing or still under construction. The emerging high technology areas and several areas of more sustainable development like organic food production and renewable energy are examples of this kind, where techno......-economic networks are unstable or under construction and social and environmental potentials and risks difficult, if not impossible to assess. The paper explores the potential of a social shaping of technology approach to technology foresight within such technology areas and presents the methodological aspects...

  12. The Social Shaping Approach to Technology Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Jørgensen, Ulrik; Clausen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The social shaping of technology (SST) approach has been developed as a response and extension to the ideas of techno-economic rationality and linear conceptions of technology development and its consequences. The SST approach seems especially promising in areas of technology where visions are ma...

  13. 基于网络信息技术的政治参与研究%Research on Political Participation Based on Network Information Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴春岩

    2016-01-01

    Network politics is the network information technology to the political system,government management,international relations and other areas of the new political phenomenon,the political carrier,the political structure and the political charac-teristics of the total.With the development of information technology,the internet is becoming more and more popular and so-cial citizens can participate in social life through the network.The political participation of the political participation based on the network information technology has the characteristics of political participation,identity,participation,low cost,open space and so on.Citizens can participate in social and political life through search engines,electronic voting,internet forums, micro -blog,wechat,etc.The political participation based on the network information technology has improved the degree of political freedom,the development of the political participation way and the supervision and restriction of public power.%网络政治是网络信息技术给政治制度、政府管理、国际关系等领域所带来的新型政治现象、政治载体、政治格局和政治特点的总和。信息技术的发展使网络的普及率越来越高,社会公民可以快捷的通过网络参与到社会生活的方方面面,尤其对社会政治的参与度越来越高。基于网络信息技术的政治参与具有政治参与身份匿名、参与方式多样、参与成本低廉、参与空间开放等特点。公民可以通过搜索引擎、电子投票、网络论坛、微博微信等参与社会政治生活。基于网络信息技术的政治参与提高了公民的政治自由程度、发展了政治参与方式和增强了公民对公权力的监督约束。

  14. Nuclear waste and social planning - in the need of sustainable political legitimacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strandberg, Urban; Andren, Mats [Goeteborg Univ. (SE). Centre for Public Sector Research (CEFOS)

    2006-09-15

    The proposition in this paper is that handling nuclear waste in an efficient, democratic and legitimate way presupposes a thorough reflection on the limits and possibilities of social planning and legitimacy, and a deliberate extension of the meaning of these concepts. The central point consists in an analysis of the concept political legitimacy. When the concept was established in the period after 1799, it had meanings of both legality and morality. A legitimate solution could be justified either in terms of (national) law or specified norms. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, legitimacy dealt mainly with the issues of legal foundations and moral justification based in institutions and discourses. This conception of legitimacy is inadequate when applied to the issue of nuclear waste as a social phenomenon. The time aspect is much longer than the period we reasonably can make predictions regarding the design of social institutions. How can we make guarantees that will endure for a period of time that is so long that we cannot possibly say anything about the very existence of human societies, and far less make predictions about the stability of social institutions 100,000 years into the future? Likewise, the comparatively short time period of implementation, during which the planned nuclear waste repositories are to be built and finally shut tight, is far more extended than any other societal project. When neither the ideological, nor the institutional and technological stability are possible to secure, the main question will be: Who/what grants legitimacy to the societal handling of nuclear waste? We tentatively maintain that the social handling of nuclear waste demands that social planning and legitimacy be linked with a clear and distinct assumption of responsibility. It must be a geographically and temporally universalistic assumption of responsibility. In addition, the management of nuclear waste in a sustainable and legitimate manner requires both a

  15. The Chinese Politics of Communication Technology: Utility, State Building and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an examination into the formulation and construction of information and communication technology policy in China. It traces the rise of information technology and the "informatization" drive in China's political rhetoric, and identifies the changes and trajectory of information and communication technology in China's…

  16. ADMINISTRATIVE-POLITICAL GOVERNANCE IN RUSSIA IN CONDITIONS OF SOCIAL TENSION AGGRAVATION: BACKGROUND OF CONFLICT STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Yurchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to problems of administrative and political governance in Russia in the context of social unrest. The analysis of the situation prevailing in contemporary Russian society and the factors contributing to increased social tensions. It is noted that in the current environment, the organization of the system of administrative and political governance is a key factor in the reduction of tension in the social ecology. In the process of administrative and political management of social conflict is important to consider the stage of its formation and development. The parameters of variability, the variability of political behavior in complex space is a multi-ethnic society are fixed on the basis of monitoring ethno-social interactions, as well as methods of event analysis and cognitive mapping. For sustainable development of the Russian state, there is a need for timely anticipation and prevention of dangerous trends in the growth of social tension that, in turn, indicates the need for continuous improvement of all activities of public authorities, including supervision and management. These circumstances require leadership fundamentally new approaches to the administrative and political management, based on advanced, forward-looking information, allowing you to move from reactive management to proactive government and regional regulation, in a timely manner recognizing potential threats.

  17. From Utopia to Dystopia: Levels of explanation and the politics of social psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Klein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the political underpinnings of the debate surrounding levels of explanation in social psychology. The development of this discipline since the late 1920s has been informed by an individualistic view of human nature inspired by political liberalism. The article first considers how social psychological research on attribution and forced compliance has questioned the validity of this view. With the latest development in social cognition and social neuroscience, this liberal view has been replaced by another variant of individualism which leaves little room to individual freedom. George Herbert Mead's view of the self and mind as outcomes of social organisation is presented as an alternative to these two forms of individualism. In conclusion, I suggest that, informed by a Meadian perspective, social psychology should address the challenge posed by the advent of neurosciences by considering how social factors may impact upon brain functioning.

  18. Inside the Social Open Method of Coordination: The hard politics of ‘soft’ governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhercke, B.W.R.

    2016-01-01

    The process of European integration has irreversibly altered the configuration of national welfare states. In spite of formidable institutional and political hurdles, incremental European social regulation led to the development of a genuine EU social policy. This PhD is mainly concerned with one pa

  19. On Welfare and Terror: Social Welfare Policies and Political-Economic Roots of Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that social welfare policies may reduce international and domestic terrorism. Social policies likely affect terrorism in offsetting ways but, on balance, should diminish preferences for terrorism by reducing economic insecurity, inequality, poverty, and religious-political extremism. Thus, countries with more generous welfare…

  20. American Indians Today. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, J. Milton, Ed.; Simpson, George Eaton, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    Aspects of social change among American Indians and in the relationships of Indians to government and the larger society are examined in the collection of articles by 12 political and social scientists. Focusing on recent developments, this look at American Indians today encompasses rapid population growth, urbanization of the Indian population,…

  1. The Institutionalization of Sociology in France: Its Social and Political Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund, III

    1984-01-01

    Through an examination of the development of the discipline of sociology in France in the period 1880-1925, this article sheds light on some of the more general processes at work in the institutionalization of the social sciences and on the social and political consequences of that institutionalization. (RM)

  2. Inequalities in health by social class dimensions in European countries of different political traditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Espelt (Albert); C. Borrell (Carme); M. Rodriguez-Sanz (Maica); C. Muntaner (Carles); M.I. Pasarin (María Isabel); J. Benach (Joan); M.M. Schaap (Maartje); A.E. Kunst (Anton); V. Navarro (Vicente)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare inequalities in self-perceived health in the population older than 50 years, in 2004, using Wright's social class dimensions, in nine European countries grouped in three political traditions (Social democracy, Christian democracy and Late democracies). Methods: Cros

  3. Inside the Social Open Method of Coordination: The hard politics of ‘soft’ governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhercke, B.W.R.

    2016-01-01

    The process of European integration has irreversibly altered the configuration of national welfare states. In spite of formidable institutional and political hurdles, incremental European social regulation led to the development of a genuine EU social policy. This PhD is mainly concerned with one pa

  4. Two Schools: Children, Social Stratification, and the Politics of Everyday Life. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselman, Mark

    This research concerned political socialization in the early grades in two elementary schools with particular attention to differential socialization of middle and lower class children, and boys and girls. The research focused on authority patterns, teacher-pupil and pupil-pupil behavior streams and interaction, how teachers present the outside…

  5. Social Epistemology and Its Politically Correct Words: Avoiding Absolutism, Relativism, Consensualism, and Vulgar Pragmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Leigh

    2005-01-01

    Where social epistemology has been applied in environmental education research, certain words have come to be associated with it, such as, "social," "contextualized," "strategic," "political," "pragmatic," "democratic," and "participatory." In this paper, I first suggest interpretations of these words that potentially avoid absolutism, relativism,…

  6. Political Participation and Social Capital among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Central Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracin, Julia; Valeva, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the influence of bridging and bonding social capital in political participation while controlling for sociodemographic and psychological factors among Mexicans and Mexican Americans in Illinois. Bridging social capital significantly predicted two types of participation. Participants who felt their lives were linked to those of…

  7. Attenuating the effects of social stress: the impact of political skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Paul; Harris, Ranida B; Harris, Kenneth J; Wheeler, Anthony R

    2007-04-01

    This study investigates the impact of perceived social stressors on job and career satisfaction. Additionally, the authors investigate whether individuals' reported levels of political skill could attenuate the negative effects of social stressors on these outcome variables. The authors test these hypotheses with a sample of 246 alumni from a private, Midwestern university. The authors' results provide support for the hypothesized negative influence of social stressors on job and career satisfaction and indicate that political skill can moderate these relationships. Practical implications and directions for future research are offered. Copyright (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Transformations of the Political Communication in Social Media Era – from Mediatization to Decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tănase Tasente

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The political communication in media era performs on two dimensions: the horizontal dimension – between political actors and journalists – and on vertical dimension – the media product is decentralized to the consumer public. In Social Media Era, the horizontal dimension completely disappears and the communication is routed by the online opinion leaders in the social groups. Thus, in the new public space, the main communication actors are not journalists and politicians, but publicreceptor, which plays the role of opinion leaders. In Social Media, we can talk a lot about “the power of the receptor”, that is decentralizing, without intermediaries, the political message to discuss it in the social groups to which they belong.

  9. An Analytic Glossary to Social Inquiry Using Institutional and Political Activist Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bisaillon PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This analytic glossary, composed of 52 terms, is a practical reference and working tool for persons preparing to conduct theoretically informed qualitative social science research drawing from institutional and political activist ethnography. Researchers using these approaches examine social problems and move beyond interpretation by explicating how these problems are organized and what social and ruling relations coordinate them. Political activist ethnography emerges from, and extends, institutional ethnography by producing knowledge explicitly for activism and social movement organizing ends. The assemblage of vocabulary and ideas in this word list are new, and build on existing methodological resources. This glossary offers an extensive, analytic, and challenging inventory of language that brings together terms from these ethnographic approaches with shared ancestry. This compilation is designed to serve as an accessible “one-stop-shop” resource for persons using or contemplating using institutional and political activist ethnography in their research and/or activist projects.

  10. The social origins and political uses of popular narratives on Serbian disunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumović Slobodan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The text offers an examination of socio-political bases, modes of functioning, and of the consequences of political instrumentalisation of popular narratives on Serbian disunity. The first section of the paper deals with what is being expressed and what is being done socially when narratives on Serbian disunity are invoked in everyday discourses. The next section investigates what political actor sty, by publicly replicating them, or by basing their speeches on key words of those narratives. The narratives on Serbian disunity are then related to their historical and social contexts, and to various forms of identity politics with which they share common traits. The nineteenth century wars over political and cultural identity, intensified by the struggle between contesting claims to political authority, further channeled by the development of party politics in Serbia and radicalized by conflicts of interest and ideology together provided the initial reasons for the apparition of modern discourses on Serbian disunity and disaccord. Next, addressed are the uninnally solidifying or misinterpreting really existing social problems (in the case of some popular narratives on disunity, or because of intentionally exploiting popular perceptions of such problems (in the case of most political meta-narratives, the constructive potential related to existing social conflicts and splits can be completely wasted. What results is a deep feeling of frustration, and the diminishing of popular trust in the political elites and the political process in general. The contemporary hyperproduction of narratives on disunity and disaccord in Serbia seems to be directly related to the incapacity of the party system, and of the political system in general, to responsibly address, and eventually resolve historical and contemporary clashes of interest and identity-splits. If this vicious circle in which the consequences of social realities are turned into their causes is to be

  11. Political Socialization and Mass Media Use: A Reverse Causality Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Alexis S.

    A reverse causality model treating mass media use for public affairs information as a result rather than as a cause of political behavior was tested utilizing surveys of 190 Mexican-American, 176 black, and 225 white adults. The criterion variable used in each sample was frequency of television and newspaper use for public affairs information. The…

  12. Criticism of the Press: Its Social, Psychological and Political Origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; And Others

    This study examines data from several national polls about press coverage during the Watergate scandal, in order to assess the origins of press criticism. The polls were conducted between 28 September and 6 October 1973, during June 1974, and in August 1974. The data suggest that political variables--particularly support of Nixon, party…

  13. Radical Connections: A Journey through Social Histories, Biography and Politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jane

    2010-01-01

    This lecture will revisit nineteenth and twentieth century education policy and politics in the light of the experiences and struggles of a (nowadays) virtually unknown educator activist. Beautiful, tireless, courageous and principled, socialist school teacher Mary Bridges Adams (1855-1939) gave up her life for the Cause. Encouraged by William…

  14. Examining Social Political Contexts in Teacher Preparation in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ilham; Wong, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    This study explores teaching English as a foreign language in the West Bank, Palestine. It investigates the perspectives of a group of faculty, preservice, and in-service teachers about teaching and learning English in the primary grades under the overarching harsh realities of political conflict and instability. The study demonstrates the…

  15. Class voting, social changes and political changes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Giedo; de Graaf, Nan Dirk; Need, Ariana

    2011-01-01

    To what extent can the decline of class voting in the Netherlands be explained by sociological factors (compositional changes, the evolution of the class structure and economic progressivism) and political factors (a party-merger and changing party positions)? Multinomial logit (MNP) and conditional

  16. Examining Social Political Contexts in Teacher Preparation in Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Ilham; Wong, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    This study explores teaching English as a foreign language in the West Bank, Palestine. It investigates the perspectives of a group of faculty, preservice, and in-service teachers about teaching and learning English in the primary grades under the overarching harsh realities of political conflict and instability. The study demonstrates the…

  17. 网络技术的政治参与因素分析%Analysis of the Political Participation Factors of Network Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴春岩

    2016-01-01

    The development of information and network technology provides a new way for citizens to participate in political par-ticipation.According to the theory of the relationship between the development of network technology and the social and politi-cal participation,network technology development level and social political level exist the dialectical relationship,and this in-teraction process and result,reflected network technology in the political process in the social politics of positive and negative effects.Social informatization level,traditional management system and network management level are the impact of our citizens in the application of network technology to participate in the political activities of the main factors.%信息和网络技术的发展为公民政治参与提供了新的渠道和方式。根据网络技术发展与社会政治参与的关系理论,网络技术的发展程度与社会政治化水平存在着辩证关系,而这种相互作用的过程与结果,就体现为网络技术在政治应用过程中所起到的社会政治化的促进和阻碍作用。社会信息化水平、传统管理体制和网络管理程度是目前影响我国公民应用网络技术参与政治活动的主要因素。

  18. Disentangling the Importance of Psychological Predispositions and Social Constructions in the Organization of American Political Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Brad; Hatemi, Peter K; Eaves, Lindon J

    2012-06-01

    Ideological preferences within the American electorate are contingent on both the environmental conditions that provide the content of the contemporary political debate and internal predispositions that motivate people to hold liberal or conservative policy preferences. In this article we apply Jost, Federico, and Napier's (2009) top-down/bottom-up theory of political attitude formation to a genetically informative population sample. In doing so, we further develop the theory by operationalizing the top-down pathway to be a function of the social environment and the bottom-up pathway as a latent set of genetic factors. By merging insights from psychology, behavioral genetics, and political science, we find strong support for the top-down/bottom-up framework that segregates the two independent pathways in the formation of political attitudes and identifies a different pattern of relationships between political attitudes at each level of analysis.

  19. Women in Transnational Migrant Activism: Supporting Social Justice Claims of Homeland Political Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza Mügge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the conceptions of social justice of women active in transnational migrant politics over a period of roughly 20 years in the Netherlands. The novel focus on migrant women reveals that transnational politics is almost completely male-dominated and -directed. Two of the exceptions found in this article include a leftist and a Kurdish women organization supporting the communist cause in the 1980s and the Kurdish struggle in the 1990s in Turkey, respectively. In both organizations gender equality was subordinated to broader ideologies of political parties in their homeland. Leftist activists in the cold war era supported a narrow definition of the "politics of redistribution," while and Kurdish activists, combined classical features of the latter with those of traditional identity politics.

  20. Social Attitudes and Political Debate on Immigration: Spanish Perceptions of Romanian Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon McMAHON

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Prior to 2002 the Romanian population in Spain was negligible, yet today it constitutes the largest immigrant population, raising questions of how this country receives and integrates new migrant groups and negotiates perceptions of similarity and difference between natives and foreigners. Using survey data from the Centro de Investigaciones Científicas and political debates from the Congreso de los Diputados this paper asks how perceptions of Romanian immigrants develop over time. The paper finds that social perceptions of Romanian immigration and political debate on the Romanian population in Spain are somewhat disconnected, as social attitudes develop independently of elite-level political discourse. Therefore, just as immigrants are not perceived or presented in the same way in politics and society, or on a national and a local level, neither do the processes based on these perceptions, such as discrimination or exclusion, play out in the same way.

  1. The effect of political generation on identity and social change: Age cohort consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robyn Lewis; Rohlinger, Deana A

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we explore how political generation affects the ways in which diverse individuals come together and change their social and personal identities. Drawing on 52 in-depth interviews with members of the Red Hat Society, we show that women draw on their political generation, and the gains of the women's movement specifically, to oppose cultural constructions of aging. The Red Hat Society provides a "free space" for women to foster a collective identity that both visibly challenges aging norms and provides its members new standards for self-approval. We conclude by highlighting the importance of focusing on political generation to understand collective action over the life course and call for more scholarship on the function of political generation in social change.

  2. Social Media as a Marketing Tool & its Impact on Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, social media is becoming one of the most popular forms of communication. People spend their time online on these networks discussing, sharing and experimenting. These new channels have also drastically changed the marketing world. Indeed, more and more businesses use social media as a marketing tool. This thesis will give insight into the actual situation of a constantly changing and evolving topic: social media marketing. Indeed, just being on social media is not enough to real...

  3. Limited = Limiting Reading of Social Constructionism: A Reply to Carl Ratner's "Epistemological, Social, and Political Conundrums in Social Constructionism"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Dey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available RATNER's "Epistemological, Social, and Political Conundrums in Social Constructionism" provides ample illustration of how a grossly negligent, read both limited and limiting, exegesis of social constructionism has the demonstrable effect of installing the impression of the subject matter forming a homogeneous unity and an utmost negative one at that. The present commentary will show that the irony of RATNER's article is not that it has gotten social constructionism completely wrong but that it conceals that he himself is a (hyperreal constructionist and that his account might be used for pinpointing how the construction of (hyperreality works in textual practice. To rebut RATNER's assertion that social constructionist theorizing engenders a relativistic worldview of "everything goes" on the basis of his own account, it will be shown that though his truth is (partly random, temporary and thus alterable it does have real implications (both existent and potential for those referring to it, in either positive or negative terms. The commentary will close with tentative suggestions for an ethos of reading that seeks to cultivate a sensitivity towards the singular spirit of social constructionist writings as well as the necessity of creative inheriting and hence invention. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0801474

  4. Tipping the Balance of Power: Social Media and the Transformation of Political Journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Broersma, M.; T. Graham

    2016-01-01

    The advent of social media in politics has changed the relationship between political journalists and politicians. Especially Twitter has developed into a regular news beat. Journalists use it to build relationships with politicians and quote their tweets in coverage. For many politicians, tweeting has become a common practice to communicate their viewpoints and to influence public debate by bypassing the news media. Building on previous research on both journalism content and practice, this ...

  5. Stuck in Traffic: Sexual Politics and Criminal Injustice in Social Movements Against Human Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, Edith Celine Marie

    2011-01-01

    Stuck in Traffic: Sexual Politics and Criminal Injustice in Social Movements Against Human TraffickingThis dissertation analyzes the sexual politics of transnational movements against human trafficking. I track the periodic securitization of women's migration and commercial sexual exploitation in international affairs from the Victorian-era movement against "White Slavery" to the contemporary campaign against "modern day slavery" and sex trafficking, using the case of Thailand to investigate ...

  6. Social Scholarship: Applying Social Networking Technologies to Research Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Participatory web-based technologies have the potential to change the way scholars engage in scholarship. One reason Web 2.0 technologies, such as online social networking, are not widely integrated in PreK-12 and postsecondary education is the lack of modeling by educators. Their lack of research-based best practices limits the ability to…

  7. Technological change as social proces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article distinguishes between different meanings that technology has as well as the different 'roles' that technologies play in society. udfoldes tre forståelser af teknologisk forandring. Der sigtes på at fremstille forskellige meningsdannelser, som i sit samspil konstituerer et samfunds opf...

  8. Policy without politics: the limits of social engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Vicente

    2003-01-01

    The extent of coverage provided by a country's health services is directly related to the level of development of that country's democratic process (and its power relations). The United States is the only developed country whose government does not guarantee access to health care for its citizens. It is also the developed country with the least representative and most insufficient democratic institutions, owing to the constitutional framework of the political system, the privatization of the electoral process, and the enormous power of corporate interests in both the media and the political process. As international experience shows, without a strong labor-based movement willing to be radical in its protests, a universal health care program will never be accepted by the US establishment.

  9. The Political Economy of Poverty and Social Inequality:The Case of Montería

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega-Montes, Jorge Eliécer; Valencia-Jiménez, Nydia Ninna; Restrepo-Valencia, Marleny

    2013-01-01

    This text is the result of an investigation about the current state of poverty and social inequality in the city of Monteria. The information is presented based on the main theories that support social public policy and the Political Constitution of Colombia. At the same time, the text emphasizes the theories on human capacities proposed by Amartya Sen. The target population includes all the social class levels of the urban population of Monteria (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6). A probabilistic, strat...

  10. Social media, cyber-dissent, and constraints on online political communication in Central Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Bowe, Brian; Freedman, Eric; Blom, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Recent world events have demonstrated that the Internet-and social media tools in particular-are increasingly useful for political organizing, not merely frivolous virtual spaces for youthful publics to connect socially. Rather, social media is touted as "the crucible in which repressed civil societies can revive and develop." For the people of Central Asia-where free expression is curtailed and news outlets are under official or non-state, non-official government censorship-information and c...

  11. Social Media and Political Participation : Are Facebook, Twitter and YouTube Democratizing Our Political Systems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, R. (Robin); Hillegersberg, van J. ( ); Huibers, T. (Theo)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a literature review in regard to Social Media and participation. Besides that, to understand the meaning and impact of Social Media on elections, we show field results from the 2010 and 2011 elections in the Netherlands. There are several challenges when it comes t

  12. Social media and political participation: are Facebook, Twitter and YouTube democratizing our political systems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, R.C.; Hillegersberg, van J.; Huibers, T.W.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a literature review in regard to Social Media and participation. Besides that, to understand the meaning and impact of Social Media on elections, we show field results from the 2010 and 2011 elections in the Netherlands. There are several challenges when it comes t

  13. Social Media and Political Participation: Are Facebook, Twitter and YouTube Democratizing Our Political Systems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Effing, Robin; van Hillegersberg, Jos; Huibers, Theo W.C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a literature review in regard to Social Media and participation. Besides that, to understand the meaning and impact of Social Media on elections, we show field results from the 2010 and 2011 elections in the Netherlands. There are several challenges when it comes t

  14. Discovering Mobile Social Networks by Semantic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jason J.; Choi, Kwang Sun; Park, Sung Hyuk

    It has been important for telecommunication companies to discover social networks from mobile subscribers. They have attempted to provide a number of recommendation services, but they realized that the services were not successful. In this chapter, we present semantic technologies for discovering social networks. The process is mainly composed of two steps; (1) profile identification and (2) context understanding. Through developing a Next generation Contents dElivery (NICE) platform, we were able to generate various services based on the discovered social networks.

  15. Political economy and social psychology of nuclear safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Gwang Sik

    2009-03-15

    The contents of this book are consideration on independence of nuclear safety regulations, analysis of trend in internal and external on effectualness of nuclear safety regulations, political psychology of a hard whistle, how to deal with trust and distrust on regulation institute, international trend and domestic trend of nuclear safe culture, policy for building of trust of people on nuclear safety and regulations, measurement and conception of nuclear safety and for who imposes legal controls?.

  16. Simposio Internacional "Changing politics through digital networks: the role of ICTs in the formation of new social and political actors and actions"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Borge

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Participación en el Simposio Internacional "Changing Politics through digital networks: the role of ICTs in the formation of new social and political actors and actions", que tuvo lugar en la Universidad de Florencia los días 5 y 6 de octubre del 2007.

  17. Multidisciplinary studies of the social, economic and political impact resulting from recent advances in satellite meteorology. Volume 6: Executive summary. [technological forecasting spacecraft control/attitude (inclination) -classical mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of the technological impact of modern satellite weather forecasting for the United States is presented. Topics discussed are: (1) television broadcasting of weather; (2) agriculture (crop production); (3) water resources; (4) urban development; (5) recreation; and (6) transportation.

  18. Social and technological aspects of disaster resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Revez, Alexandra; Sparf, Jorgen

    2016-01-01

    Large scale projects tasked with designing infrastructures and urban networks resilient to disasters face a common challenge, i.e. the need to address concomitant technological issues and social problems. What is more, conflicting technologies and the diverse philosophical underpinnings of distinct...

  19. Social media, new technologies and history education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees; Haydn, Terry; Carretero, Mario; Berger, Stefan; Grever, Maria

    This chapter explores the implications of recent developments in technology and social media, having a significant impact on the way in which young people learn history in schools and outside schools. New technology not only has a positive influence on education, it also has unintended negative

  20. Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Moyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often unexpected ways in which medical technologies are appropriated by diverse actors in homes, clinics and communities. The authors highlight key insight

  1. Plant gene technology: social considerations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 3 (3), pp. 156-158 ... The genetic modification of plants by gene technology is of immense potential benefits, but there may ... this modern age. ... advantages over the current rate of food production and.

  2. Political Participation in Late Modernity among Norwegian Youth: An Individual Choice or a Statement of Social Class?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Guro; Berglund, Frode

    2008-01-01

    Past research has established socioeconomic status as a major determinant of political participation. This explanation has been challenged by sociologists such as Giddens and Beck, who claim that politics in late modernity has become influenced by social class and family tradition to a "lesser" degree than politics in the traditional…

  3. Removing Dams, Constructing Science: Coproduction of Undammed Riverscapes by Politics, Finance, Environment, Society and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew J. Grabowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dam removal in the United States has continued to increase in pace and scope, transitioning from a dam-safety engineering practice to an integral component of many large-scale river restoration programmes. At the same time, knowledge around dam removals remains fragmented by disciplinary silos and a lack of knowledge transfer between communities of practice around dam removal and academia. Here we argue that dam removal science, as a study of large restoration-oriented infrastructure interventions, requires the construction of an interdisciplinary framework to integrate knowledge relevant to decision-making on dam removal. Drawing upon infrastructure studies, relational theories of coproduction of knowledge and social life, and advances within restoration ecology and dam removal science, we present a preliminary framework of dams as systems with irreducibly interrelated political, financial, environmental, social, and technological dimensions (PFESTS. With this framework we analyse three dam removals occurring over a similar time period and within the same narrow geographic region (the Mid-Columbia Region in WA and OR, USA to demonstrate how each PFESTS dimension contributed to the decision to remove the dam, how it affected the process of removing the dam, and how those dimensions continue to operate post removal in each watershed. We conclude with a discussion of a joint research and practice agenda emerging out of the PFESTS framing.

  4. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus.1 Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake. PMID:23970863

  5. Addressing social resistance in emerging security technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchener-Nissen, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    In their efforts to enhance the safety and security of citizens, governments and law enforcement agencies look to scientists and engineers to produce modern methods for preventing, detecting, and prosecuting criminal activities. Whole body scanners, lie detection technologies, biometrics, etc., are all being developed for incorporation into the criminal justice apparatus. Yet despite their purported security benefits these technologies often evoke social resistance. Concerns over privacy, ethics, and function-creep appear repeatedly in analyses of these technologies. It is argued here that scientists and engineers continue to pay insufficient attention to this resistance; acknowledging the presence of these social concerns yet failing to meaningfully address them. In so doing they place at risk the very technologies and techniques they are seeking to develop, for socially controversial security technologies face restrictions and in some cases outright banning. By identifying sources of potential social resistance early in the research and design process, scientists can both engage with the public in meaningful debate and modify their security technologies before deployment so as to minimize social resistance and enhance uptake.

  6. Technology and the Politics of Change at Work: The Case of Dalebake Bakeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Patrick; Gunson, Nicky

    2002-01-01

    A case study of automation in the British baking industry illustrates several perspectives: (1) technological change as inevitable due to external market forces; (2) selection and implementation of technology as an outcome of strategic choices; and (3) awareness of the need for change as part of a political process in which choices are made among…

  7. Towards a Political Theory of Social Work and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The article focuses on Gramsci's elaboration of the concept of hegemony to analyze the function of Social Work during the periods of Fordism and post-Fordism. It discusses the limits and opportunities for a democratic development in the theory and praxis of Social Work.

  8. Anticipatory Socialization and Male Catholic Adolescent Socio-Political Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, James M.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Merton and Kitts' thesis of anticipatory socialization is supported. The importance of the class of destination, as opposed to the class of origin is underscored implying that anticipatory socialization is a primary explanation for differential attitudes formulated before adolescents have undergone mobility or achieved status positions equal to…

  9. The Social and Political Construction of Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroeck, Michel; Coussee, Filip; Bradt, Lieve

    2010-01-01

    We analyse two foundational social problems regarding early childhood education. The first, in the late nineteenth century, is infant mortality, a social problem that constituted the historical legitimation for the first creches. The second, the prevention of school failure, is very topical today. By analysing these examples in their historicity,…

  10. Social, state and political society: Reflections on Mental Health Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Laurentino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to develop a historical, theoretical and critical debate about mental health, as a social policy, resulting from the dialectical relationship between state and civil society. The adopted methodology is qualitative, consisting on a bibliographical and reflexive review, through which it aims to evaluate positions of various authors on the subject. A discussion of the historical development of the Mental Health policy in Brazil was made, emphasizing the presence of various social movements, such as the Workers in Mental Health Movement, the Sanitary Reform Movement, the Psychiatric Reform Movement and the Anti-Asylum Movement. Therefore, it is verified that society has great ability to fight for effective social policies, in order to mitigate the destructive effects of capitalism. It is concluded that, although social policy is incapable of overcoming the social order, it includes significant changes to the recognition and assurance of rights to the people deprived of wealth and power in society.

  11. The Political economy of retirement and social security

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    ??Porqu?? existen programas de seguridad social que transfieren recursos desde los trabajadores a los mayores? (ii) ??Porqu?? los programas de seguridad social preveen que para cobrar la pensi??n los trabajadores tienen que jubilarse? (iii) ??Cu??l es el impacto del proceso de envejecimiento de la poblaci??n sobre la jubilaci??n y la seguridad social? (iv) ??Cu??l es la evidencia emp??rica sobre la importancia de la fin??mica demogr??fica como determinante de la jubilaci??n y de la seguridad ...

  12. Political Entrepreneurialism: Reflections of a Civil Servant on the Role of Political Institutions in Technology Innovation and Diffusion in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Bitange Ndemo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper narrates how an innovative political institution in Kenya gained support from private sector players in the Information and Communications Technology (ICT sector. The paper is centered on the reflections of a top civil servant who leveraged Lewin’s theoretical foundations and leadership to propel Kenya from obscurity to global renown in the ICT arena. The paper details the leadership of key players in the political system explaining on how their tolerance for risk encouraged ICT diffusion and innovation in Kenya. The paper delves into the details of executive decision making and how those decisions influence different stakeholders. The analysis reveals why Kenya succeeded where its neighbours did not. It shows that Kenya’s continued success in ICTs depends upon its stability – endemic corruption and previous political decisions could threaten this. The paper will also highlight the emergence of a new crop of innovators developing new applications across all sectors including education, health, agriculture and financial services.

  13. Cognitive Engagement and Online Political Participation on Social Media among Youths in Malaysia: The Moderating role of Political Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulrauf Aishat Adebisi; binti Abdul Hamid Norsiah; bin Ishak Mohd Sobhi

    2017-01-01

    The role of political knowledge in engendering political participation among youths in a society cannot be overstated. Yet, there is scarcity of research in this area. Thus, this study assessed the moderating role of political knowledge in the relationship between Access to Political Information on Facebook and Twitter (APIFT), Political Interest (PI) and Policy Satisfaction (PS) with Online Political Participation on Facebook and Twitter (OPPFT). A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 238...

  14. Understanding the impact of political violence in childhood: a theoretical review using a social identity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Orla T

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reviews the literature that has assessed the psychological impact of political violence on children. Concern for those growing up in situations of political violence has resulted in two areas of research within psychology: the first considers children as victims of conflict and considers the mental health consequences of political violence. The second considers children as protagonists or aggressors in conflict and considers related moral and attitudinal consequences of exposure to political violence. These two literatures are most often considered separately. Here the two strands of research are brought together using a social identity framework, allowing apparently divergent findings to be integrated into a more coherent understanding of the totality of consequences for children and young people growing up in situations of armed conflict. © 2013.

  15. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 500,000 files of research in the social sciences. It hosts 16 specialized collections of data in education, aging,...

  16. Religious and Ethnic Discrimination: Differential Implications for Social Support Engagement, Civic Involvement, and Political Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Ysseldyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social identity threats, depending on the content of the identity targeted, may evoke varying socio-political responses. In this regard, religious discrimination may be especially threatening, challenging both the social group and its belief system, thereby promoting more active collective responses. This research examined how religious and ethnic identification differentially evoked engagement with support resources (ingroup and spiritual, civic involvement (including individual and collective action-taking, and political participation (voting or political consciousness following group-based threats. Study 1 drew from the Canadian Ethnic Diversity Survey (N = 1806. Participants who reported religious discrimination demonstrated greater religious identification, ingroup social engagement, and civic involvement—comparable associations were absent for ethnic discrimination. Study 2 (N = 287 experimentally primed participants to make salient a specific incident of religious or ethnic discrimination. Although ethnic discrimination elicited greater ingroup support-seeking and political consciousness, religious discrimination was perceived as especially harmful and evoked more individual and collective action-taking. Further to this, religious high-identifiers’ responses were mediated by engagement with ingroup or spiritual support in both studies, whereas no mediated relations were evident for ethnic identification. Findings are discussed in terms of distinct socio-political responses to threats targeting identities that are grounded in religious belief systems.

  17. Social Exclusion/Inclusion: Foucault's Analytics of Exclusion, the Political Ecology of Social Inclusion and the Legitimation of Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.; Besley, Tina A. C.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a broad philosophical and historical background to the dyad of social exclusion/inclusion by examining the analytics and politics of exclusion first by reference to Michel Foucault who studies the modern history of exclusion and makes it central to his approach in understanding the development of modern institutions of emerging…

  18. Social Exclusion/Inclusion: Foucault's Analytics of Exclusion, the Political Ecology of Social Inclusion and the Legitimation of Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michael A.; Besley, Tina A. C.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a broad philosophical and historical background to the dyad of social exclusion/inclusion by examining the analytics and politics of exclusion first by reference to Michel Foucault who studies the modern history of exclusion and makes it central to his approach in understanding the development of modern institutions of emerging…

  19. Political Parties and Social Policy Responses to Global Economic Crises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starke, Peter; Kaasch, Alexandra; van Hooren, Franca

    2014-01-01

    Based on empirical findings froma comparative study onwelfare state responses to the four major economic shocks (the 1970s oil shocks, the early 1990s recession, the 2008 financial crisis) in four OECD countries, this article demonstrates that, in contrast to conventional wisdom, policy responses...... to global economic crises vary significantly across countries. What explains the cross-national and within-case variation in responses to crises?We discuss several potential causes of this pattern and argue that political parties and the party composition of governments can play a key role in shaping crisis...... responses, albeit in ways that go beyond traditional partisan theory.We show that the partisan conflict and the impact of parties are conditioned by existing welfare state configurations. In less generous welfare states, the party composition of governments plays a decisive role in shaping the direction...

  20. International politics of low carbon technology development: carbon capture and storage (CCS) in India

    OpenAIRE

    Kapila, Rudra Vidhumani

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the international political dynamics of developing low carbon technology. Specifically, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology as a climate mitigation strategy in a developing country context is examined. CCS is a technological solution that allows for the continued use of fossil fuels without the large amounts of associated CO2 emissions. This entails capturing the CO2 emitted from large point sources, such as a coal-fired power station, and transport...

  1. Youth Involvement in Politically Motivated Violence: Why Do Social Integration, Perceived Legitimacy, and Perceived Discrimination Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten S. De Waele

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Several major theories of crime causation have been applied to the study of violence towards persons and towards property (vandalism. Less frequently, these middle-range theoretical frameworks are applied to explain individual differences in political violence. Against a background of growing concern about right-wing political violence among adolescents, the present study examines the role of a number of independent variables derived from different theoretical frameworks in a sample of 2,879 Flemish adolescents. Using blockwise regression models, the independent effects of key independent variables from social control theory, procedural justice theory, general strain theory, social learning theory, and self-control theory are assessed. The results support an integrative approach towards the explanation of political violence. The implications of our findings for future studies on violent extremism are discussed.

  2. Connected Activism: Indigenous Uses of Social Media for Shaping Political Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Elena Duarte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies describe digital tactics as specific strategies actors apply within broader repertoires of contention, specifically in social and political contexts. A comparison of EZLN, Idle No More, and the ongoing Rio Yaqui water rights movement reveals the kinds of community knowledge work that has to happen prior to and around activating digital tactics in Indigenous rights movements, including choices in messaging and discourses of Indigeneity, targeting of movement opponents, and selection of digital tools and techniques. Activists harness these communicative affordances to practice a politics of visibility, cultivate solidarity, diffuse an Indigenous consciousness, enforce dominant governments’ trust and treaty responsibilities, and remind many of the irrevocable injustice of colonialism. Designing methodologies that account for specific Indigenous social and political contexts as well as the affordances of various digital environments is part of the future work of Indigenous media theorists.

  3. Seizing the Digital High Ground: Military Operations and Politics in the Social Media Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    certainly be traced to the standard sources: weak governance, low economic opportunity, corruption , income inequality , human rights violations, and...Politics in the Social Media Era 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR Lt Col Andrew Ridland, British Army 5d...of social media, is changing how society operates. Confidentiality is being replaced by openness; information that was hitherto the preserve of a few

  4. Political tolerance in Eastern and Western Europe: Social and psychological roots

    OpenAIRE

    Todosijevic, Bojan; Enyedi, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    According to Sullivan et al.’s (Sullivan et al. 1979, 53-55, Sullivan et al. 1985) theory, social and psychological factors play different roles in political tolerance. Target-group selection is shaped by socio-demographic characteristics, since in this way people try to adjust themselves to their social environment. On the other side, the degree of tolerance is a function of personality and other psychological factors. The paper examines whether the causal model proposed by Sullivan and his ...

  5. [Street social education: historical, political and pedagogical bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Walter Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    This work is about street social education as a pedagogical system that started in Latin America in the late 1970s, as the street population formed mostly by children and adolescents called for attention. The first street social educators were 'pastoral' agents working at the praça da Sé a place with large numbers of street children in São Paulo. Based on the Liberation Theology and on the pedagogies developed by Paulo Freire, Celestine Freinet, Anton Makarenko, and Emília Ferreiro, the street educators developed a conceptual field and participated in the promulgation of the 1988 Federal Constitution, particularly by writing and introducing the 'Estatuto da Criança e do Adolescente' (the 'Child and Adolescent Statute'). Street social education is currently latent and suffering the consequences of program discontinuity caused by successive changes of government. It is, therefore important to know the conceptual proposals.

  6. Glosario adicional del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (Supplementary Glossary of Socio-Political Neologisms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents the first part of a glossary of new social and political terms. Each entry is followed by a paragraph defining its meaning and origin, and by one or more quotations, where the word appears in unusually extensive contexts. Quotations are taken mostly from the news media. (MES)

  7. Citizenship Education as a Response to Colombia's Social and Political Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rosario; Mesa, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    In response to the difficult social, economic and political problems that Colombia faces, such as inequality, discrimination, weak civil society--fuelled by illegality and drug trafficking--the Colombian Ministry of Education has embarked on an ambitious citizenship education program, with the hope of strengthening the role of education by…

  8. Theory of Systems and Social-Political Realities of Modern Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V A Annikova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the process of forming the theory of systems as a scientific paradigm of social-humanitarian cognition. Focusing their attention on the interpretations of the structural composition of a political system, the authors analyze the relations between the state and the citizens of modern Russia, the actually effective mechanisms of interaction between the authorities and public associations.

  9. Social Inequality and Changes in Students' Expected Political Participation in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Juan C.; Miranda, Daniel; Bonhomme, Macarena; Cox, Cristián; Bascopé, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To what extent does social origin impact the disposition of students toward becoming politically involved in their future adult life? Using Chilean data from Civic Education Study, 1999 (N = 5688), and International Civic and Citizenship Education Study, 2009 (N = 5192), the present research analyzes, on the one hand, the impact of socioeconomic…

  10. Towards a de-biased social psychology: The effects of ideological perspective go beyond politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, David C

    2015-01-01

    Reasonable conservatives are in short supply and will not arrive to save social psychology any time soon. The field needs to save itself through de-biasing. The effects of a liberal worldview permeate and distort discussion of many topics that are not overtly political, including behavioral genetics and evolutionary psychology, the fundamental attribution error, and the remarkably persistent consistency controversy.

  11. CANDIDATES IN THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS IN ROMANIA (2014: THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN POLITICAL MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Patrut

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of social media has drawn the attention of the specialists from the political marketing because it contributes quickly and efficiently to the increase of the political product’s visibility and appeals to its supporters for content creation and viral promotion of the political messages. In addition, the candidate can communicate directly with the citizens and may involve them in creating virtual communities. In our study we briefly present the way in which social media was used, timidly at first, during the campaign for the 2008 parliamentary elections, for the 2009 presidential elections and for the 2012 local and parliamentary elections. The importance of social media increased during the 2012 Romanian presidential impeachment referendum and contributed decisively to rallying voters to go to the polls and, implicitly, to the Klaus Iohannis’s victory in the 2014 presidential elections. We have focused especially on Facebook, as social network, because it has managed to attract the largest number of users in Romania. The success of the 2.0 political actors does not imply (only to use the network as an alternative news channel, but especially to establish the bidirectional connection and constant interaction with virtual friends.

  12. Glosario adicional del nuevo lenguaje politico-social (Supplementary Glossary of Socio-Political Neologisms).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents the first part of a glossary of new social and political terms. Each entry is followed by a paragraph defining its meaning and origin, and by one or more quotations, where the word appears in unusually extensive contexts. Quotations are taken mostly from the news media. (MES)

  13. Should social psychologists create a disciplinary affirmative action program for political conservatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweder, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Freely staying on the move between alternative points of view is the best antidote to dogmatism. Robert Merton's ideals for an epistemic community are sufficient to correct pseudo-empirical studies designed to confirm beliefs that liberals (or conservatives) think deserve to be true. Institutionalizing the self-proclaimed political identities of social psychologists may make things worse.

  14. Social Inequality and Changes in Students' Expected Political Participation in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Juan C.; Miranda, Daniel; Bonhomme, Macarena; Cox, Cristián; Bascopé, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To what extent does social origin impact the disposition of students toward becoming politically involved in their future adult life? Using Chilean data from Civic Education Study, 1999 (N = 5688), and International Civic and Citizenship Education Study, 2009 (N = 5192), the present research analyzes, on the one hand, the impact of socioeconomic…

  15. Social Inequality and Changes in Students' Expected Political Participation in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Juan C.; Miranda, Daniel; Bonhomme, Macarena; Cox, Cristián; Bascopé, Martín

    2014-01-01

    To what extent does social origin impact the disposition of students toward becoming politically involved in their future adult life? Using Chilean data from Civic Education Study, 1999 (N = 5688), and International Civic and Citizenship Education Study, 2009 (N = 5192), the present research analyzes, on the one hand, the impact of socioeconomic…

  16. Political tolerance in Eastern and Western Europe: Social and psychological roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todosijevic, Bojan; Enyedi, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    According to Sullivan et al.’s (Sullivan et al. 1979, 53-55, Sullivan et al. 1985) theory, social and psychological factors play different roles in political tolerance. Target-group selection is shaped by socio-demographic characteristics, since in this way people try to adjust themselves to their s

  17. Gender Achievement and Social, Political and Economic Equality: A European Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireson, Gren

    2017-01-01

    Differences in gender equality based on social, political and economic factors is cited, by some writers, as a contributory factor in the differentially greater achievement of boys in STEM subjects through the concept of gender stratification. Gender differences, especially in mathematics, have been linked directly to gender parity in wider…

  18. The social and political lives of zoonotic disease models: narratives, science and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Melissa; Scoones, Ian

    2013-07-01

    Zoonotic diseases currently pose both major health threats and complex scientific and policy challenges, to which modelling is increasingly called to respond. In this article we argue that the challenges are best met by combining multiple models and modelling approaches that elucidate the various epidemiological, ecological and social processes at work. These models should not be understood as neutral science informing policy in a linear manner, but as having social and political lives: social, cultural and political norms and values that shape their development and which they carry and project. We develop and illustrate this argument in relation to the cases of H5N1 avian influenza and Ebola, exploring for each the range of modelling approaches deployed and the ways they have been co-constructed with a particular politics of policy. Addressing the complex, uncertain dynamics of zoonotic disease requires such social and political lives to be made explicit in approaches that aim at triangulation rather than integration, and plural and conditional rather than singular forms of policy advice.

  19. "Place" as an integrating concept in natural resource politics: propositions for a social science research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony S. Cheng; Linda E. Kruger; Steven E. Daniels

    2003-01-01

    This article lays out six propositions centering on a relationship between peopleplace connections and strategic behavior in natural resource politics. The first two propositions suggest a strong and direct connection between self-identity, place, and how individuals perceive and value the environment. The third, fourth, and fifth propositions tie together social group...

  20. The Personal, Social, and Political Functions of Young Children's Reading and Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, William; Kamberelis, George

    A study examined the personal, social, and political functions that underlie the reading and writing that young children do about themselves, their families and communities, and their culture. Subjects, five third-grade children attending an inner-city elementary school, participated in an alternative language arts program involving independent…

  1. A Trigger or a Muffler? - Examining the Dynamics of Crosscutting Exposure and Political Expression in Online Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Young Bae

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the potential of online social media to serve as a sphere for political discourse and investigates the extent to which everyday uses of online social networking sites can expose citizens to politically diverse viewpoints.  In addition, this study asks whether such crosscutting exposure in online social networks will act as a trigger or a muffler for political expression – that is, whether exposure political difference will stimulate or discourage political discussions.  With analyses of a sample of online social networking site users in the context of the 2012 presidential election in South Korea, this study explicates the link between crosscutting exposure and citizens’ political expressions in social media.  Results reveal that contrary to the predictions in previous literature, exposure to politically incongruent viewpoints in online social networking sites does not seem to undermine users’ expressive behaviors but instead positively contribute to political expression.  In addition, this study shows the significant role of citizens’ perceptions of candidate support in their own networks, and illustrates that the dynamics of political expression differ significantly depending on the users’ age.

  2. Neoliberalism, Conservative Politics, and ‘Social Recapitalization’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashbee, Edward

    2014-01-01

    , certainly if measured by taking government spending as a proportion of gross domestic product (GDP), has proved stubbornly resistant to retrenchment processes. Against this background, some on the right have periodically turned to social recapitalization and ways of developing greater civic engagement......, although the Conservative-led government in the UK has through the austerity measures pursued from 2010 onwards been able to ‘shrink’ the state (considered as a proportion of GDP), it has not had the capacity or commitment to bring about social recapitalization. Although some broader inclusion initiatives...

  3. An Appraisal of the Utilisation of Social Media for Political ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof

    sampling responded to 249 copies of questionnaire administered. .... The aim of the study is to basically evaluate the extent to which social media are redefining the ..... The survey research design method was used to execute the study. The study ... filled correctly and used for the analysis, 20 were considered invalid.

  4. Social Enterprise, education and the new political economy of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carney, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a research agenda for studying social enterprise (SE) initiatives in education reform. Whilst based on research experiences gained in Nepal, the discussion here is relevant for similar SE efforts in other ‘developing’ countries as well as high-income contexts...

  5. The Politics of Britishness: Multiculturalism, Schooling and Social Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This paper is set against a backdrop of contemporary concerns about Britishness. It explores the dominant view that unprecedented levels of cultural diversity within western contexts such as the UK are undermining social cohesion and are attributable to minority groups' failure to connect or assimilate with mainstream "British" (read…

  6. Needed: A Political Program for the Technological Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitch, Eugene

    1972-01-01

    Man must assume responsibility for his own survival.'' Human societies, acting together, must use new technologies for constructive purposes, and avoid their use for the destruction of society, or for irreversible degradation of the environment.'' (Author/AL)

  7. Social Movements and Political Agency in the Digital Age: A Communication Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Kavada

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital media pose a dual challenge to conventional understandings of political agency. First, digital media destabilize long-held assumptions about the nature of collective action, about social movements and their capacity to effect change. This is because digital media are thought to facilitate more decentralized, dispersed, temporary and individualized forms of political action that subvert the notion of the collective as singular, unified, homogeneous, coherent, and mass. One way of resolving this challenge is to view the collective in looser terms, as a process rather than as a finished product, a conceptualization that can be influence our understanding not only of social movements, but also of other political actors and of society as a whole. Second, digital media highlight the need to take communication seriously in how we conceptualize both collective action and political agency. Placing communication at the centre allows us to develop this looser and more processual understanding of the collective by studying it as a process that is constituted in and through communication. Inspired by organizational communication and particularly the work of Taylor and van Every (2000, this essay proposes a conception of collective action as emerging in conversations and solidified in texts. This conceptualization allows for a more multiplex and variegated view of political agency that takes into account the specific context where agency is exercised and the power that different actors can exert in a communicative process of negotiation, persuasion and claim-making.

  8. It may be harder than we thought, but political diversity will (still) improve social psychological science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jarret T; Duarte, José L; Haidt, Jonathan; Jussim, Lee; Stern, Charlotta; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-01-01

    In our target article, we made four claims: (1) Social psychology is now politically homogeneous; (2) this homogeneity sometimes harms the science; (3) increasing political diversity would reduce this damage; and (4) some portion of the homogeneity is due to a hostile climate and outright discrimination against non-liberals. In this response, we review these claims in light of the arguments made by a diverse group of commentators. We were surprised to find near-universal agreement with our first two claims, and we note that few challenged our fourth claim. Most of the disagreements came in response to our claim that increasing political diversity would be beneficial. We agree with our critics that increasing political diversity may be harder than we had thought, but we explain why we still believe that it is possible and desirable to do so. We conclude with a revised list of 12 recommendations for improving political diversity in social psychology, as well as in other areas of the academy.

  9. Social Movements and Political Agency in the Digital Age: A Communication Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Kavada

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital media pose a dual challenge to conventional understandings of political agency. First, digital media destabilize long-held assumptions about the nature of collective action, about social movements and their capacity to effect change. This is because digital media are thought to facilitate more decentralized, dispersed, temporary and individualized forms of political action that subvert the notion of the collective as singular, unified, homogeneous, coherent, and mass. One way of resolving this challenge is to view the collective in looser terms, as a process rather than as a finished product, a conceptualization that can be influence our understanding not only of social movements, but also of other political actors and of society as a whole. Second, digital media highlight the need to take communication seriously in how we conceptualize both collective action and political agency. Placing communication at the centre allows us to develop this looser and more processual understanding of the collective by studying it as a process that is constituted in and through communication. Inspired by organizational communication and particularly the work of Taylor and van Every (2000, this essay proposes a conception of collective action as emerging in conversations and solidified in texts. This conceptualization allows for a more multiplex and variegated view of political agency that takes into account the specific context where agency is exercised and the power that different actors can exert in a communicative process of negotiation, persuasion and claim-making.

  10. Cognitive Engagement and Online Political Participation on Social Media among Youths in Malaysia: The Moderating role of Political Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrauf Aishat Adebisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of political knowledge in engendering political participation among youths in a society cannot be overstated. Yet, there is scarcity of research in this area. Thus, this study assessed the moderating role of political knowledge in the relationship between Access to Political Information on Facebook and Twitter (APIFT, Political Interest (PI and Policy Satisfaction (PS with Online Political Participation on Facebook and Twitter (OPPFT. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on 238 undergraduate students of Universiti Utara Malaysia. Questionnaire was used to collect data which was analysed using Partial Least Squares-MultiGroup Analysis (PLS-MGA. Results revealed that political knowledge moderated the relationship between access to political information on Facebook and Twitter and political interest with youth online political participation on Facebook and Twitter. However, it did not moderate the relationship between policy satisfaction with youth online political participation on Facebook and Twitter. Generally, these findings suggests that political knowledge plays a significant role in youth online political participation in Malaysia. Consequently, this study has added empirical evidence to predictors of political participation while at the same time contributing to the body of knowledge on online political participation.

  11. Teacher quality in a political and social setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorf, Hans; Kelly, Peter; Hohmann, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on theoretical contributions and empirical data the article examines the relationship between educational paradigms in the school debate as well as their presence as tools for reflection and choice of action in teaching practice. Special attention is paid to the role of knowledge and skills...... as a vehicle for social emancipation. Finally, a few implications for the recent Danish teacher education reform are indicated....

  12. Peaceful Protest, Political Regimes, and the Social Media Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    asserts democracies must meet the following conditions to fulfill the democratic promises; empowerment of its citizens, free supply, free demand...techniques, such as its “Great Firewall” and government-employed Internet police, to filter Internet users ’ content. China’s restrictions...peaceful protest as its social media user rates rise. Anocratic regimes, or intermediate regimes, display both democratic and authoritarian

  13. Popular social movements as educators: theoretical and political contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Marcon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to scrutinize the educational dimension of popular social movements and, from such a viewpoint, to identify their critical and emancipatory educational potentialities. The main issue is to understand how popular social movements are educational, not only to their militants, but also to social organizations, the State and society as a whole. In order to meet such challenges, references have been drawn on contributions by Boaventura de Sousa Santos so as to validate criticism to the hegemonic epistemology, particularly the monoculture of knowledge and linear time, contrasting it to the southern epistemology stressing the ecologies of knowledge and temporality. In order to provide validity to the perspective of temporalities, other contributions have been considered, such as those by Walter Benjamin and Edward Thompson. Finally, the experience of organization of landless farmers in the early 1980s in Encruzi- lhada Natalino, Ronda Alta/RS is analyzed. That encampment is crucial not only for its crucial contribution to the organization of the Landless Movement (MST, but also for the educational dimension of its militants, as well as leadership formation and the formulation of other assumptions, particularly when land and agricultural policies are concerned

  14. Migrant Workers' Community in China: Relationships among Social Networks, Life Satisfaction and Political Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Xu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The millions of persons migrating from China´s rural areas to urban spaces have contributed greatly to the country´s decades-long economic growth, and the influx of migrants has changed the fabric of China´s urban social and economic life. These internal migrants, similar to many international immigrants, depend heavily on their social networks, which are often developed in their rural villages, for jobs, housing, financial assistance, and social support both during and after migration. Consequently, migrants´ networks function distinctly in well-being and behavior. Using data from the 2006 China General Social Survey, this article seeks to 1 investigate the existence of migrant sub-groups in China, 2 understand the characteristics of social networks among sub-groups, and 3 explore the relationships social networks hold to life satisfaction and political participation among China´s migrant population. This article asserts that China´s migrant population includes several sub-groups emerging on the basis of gender, education, age, and marital status, which in turn produce different patterns of ties and social interactions among their social networks. While this article finds very different employment patterns among migrant sub-groups, migrant networks do not appear to strongly influence perceptions and behaviors, such as life satisfaction and political participation. This article also argues that individual networks could facilitate the development of migrant communities in cities.

  15. "Are You an African?" The Politics of Self-Construction in Status-Based Social Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Jill; Rodriquez, Jason

    2009-05-01

    Current debates over identity politics hinge on the question of whether status-based social movements encourage parochialism and self-interest or create possibilities for mutual recognition across lines of difference. Our article explores this question through comparative, ethnographic study of two racially progressive social movements, "pro-black" abolitionism and "conscious" hip hop. We argue that status-based social movements not only enable collective identity, but also the personal identities or selves of their participants. Beliefs about the self create openings and obstacles to mutual recognition and progressive social action. Our analysis centers on the challenges that an influx of progressive, anti-racist whites posed to each movement. We examine first how each movement configured movement participation and racial identity and then how whites crafted strategic narratives of the self to account for their participation in a status-based movement they were not directly implicated in. We conclude with an analysis of the implications of these narratives for a critical politics of recognition. Keywords: identity politics, social movements, race, self, hip hop.

  16. More tweets, more votes: social media as a quantitative indicator of political behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digrazia, Joseph; McKelvey, Karissa; Bollen, Johan; Rojas, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Is social media a valid indicator of political behavior? There is considerable debate about the validity of data extracted from social media for studying offline behavior. To address this issue, we show that there is a statistically significant association between tweets that mention a candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives and his or her subsequent electoral performance. We demonstrate this result with an analysis of 542,969 tweets mentioning candidates selected from a random sample of 3,570,054,618, as well as Federal Election Commission data from 795 competitive races in the 2010 and 2012 U.S. congressional elections. This finding persists even when controlling for incumbency, district partisanship, media coverage of the race, time, and demographic variables such as the district's racial and gender composition. Our findings show that reliable data about political behavior can be extracted from social media.

  17. More tweets, more votes: social media as a quantitative indicator of political behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Digrazia

    Full Text Available Is social media a valid indicator of political behavior? There is considerable debate about the validity of data extracted from social media for studying offline behavior. To address this issue, we show that there is a statistically significant association between tweets that mention a candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives and his or her subsequent electoral performance. We demonstrate this result with an analysis of 542,969 tweets mentioning candidates selected from a random sample of 3,570,054,618, as well as Federal Election Commission data from 795 competitive races in the 2010 and 2012 U.S. congressional elections. This finding persists even when controlling for incumbency, district partisanship, media coverage of the race, time, and demographic variables such as the district's racial and gender composition. Our findings show that reliable data about political behavior can be extracted from social media.

  18. The Political Future of Social Medicine: Reflections on Physicians as Activists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, H Jack

    2017-03-01

    The academic discipline of social medicine has always had a political and policy advocacy component, in addition to its core functions of research and teaching. Its origins lie in the 18th and 19th centuries, in the work of Johann Peter Frank and Rudolph Virchow, among others. Virchow's dictum that "politics is nothing else but medicine on a large scale" highlights that most social determinants of health are politically determined and shape population health. Yet despite intense epidemiological and sociological research on the social determinants of health, less attention has been paid to this political and policy dimension.During the 1960s, the author and many other clinicians were directly involved in attempts to use health care institutions to foster structural change. However, the author argues that efforts to assist individual patients and more effectively manage their interactions with the health care system, as described in the articles in this issue's special collection on "structural competency," while worthy and useful, do not confront root causes. Going forward, efforts to effect structural change must take place outside the arena of the clinical encounter and involve interprofessional teams and collaborations with nongovernmental organizations. They should intervene directly on the structures that contribute to illness such as poor housing, income and wealth inequality, inferior education, racism and residential segregation, and toxic concentrations of extreme poverty in urban areas. Collectively, these efforts-within and outside the spheres of medicine-represent the real operative form of structural competency.

  19. Technology, power and the political economy of inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guy, Frederick; Skott, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Technology can affect the distribution of income directly via its influence on both the bargaining power of different parties and the marginal product of different factors of production. This paper focuses mainly on the first route. The role of power is transparent in the case of medieval choke...... points but modern network technologies have similar features. There is also substantial evidence --from truckers and retail clerks to CEOs -- that power affects the determination of wages. But power relations inevitably have institutional dimensions; regulatory frameworks influence industry structures...

  20. Recurring Themes in the History of Social and Political Philosophy [Teme recurente in istoria filosofiei sociale si politice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio SANDU

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Philosophy, from its origins in ancient Greece was concerned about social order and statutory rules of social coexistence. Although autonomous in contemporary sciences, legal and social policy are still deeply linked to the major philosophical ideas, which continued certain impact. Change of paradigms in the sphere of knowledge, is usually followed by a new model of social action. Not all philosophical views have proved efficient on social practice, on the contrary some of them have gone when they are applied in the political conflict or social movement particularly those with serious implications for humanity. The case made by Nietzsche doctrine which was adopted as the ideological basis for Nazi propaganda, and in whose name millions were murdered by ethnic criteria just for beeing Hebrews or Romma population from considerations of belonging to an inferior race. Socialist and communist ideals of Karl Marx can be considerate as origin of the totalitarian communist ideology. We present below some of the thinkers who have influenced the evolution of society in the social-political and legal, philosophers who were concerned about the evolution of society, the state and the ideas about democracy, rule of law, equality before the law, human dignity and human rights, with no pretense of completeness.

  1. The Politics of Social Responsibility in the Romanian Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gheorghe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ethics and social responsibility have become a delicate subject specially in the economicallydeveloped countries. Underestimating their impact can lead to the loss of clients, the diminishing of theeconomic activity and to difficulties for acquiring new customers. The implicit consequences for business are:diminished productivity, few development opportunities and significant decrease of the company’s marketvalue. Recently, the disparagement of these concepts by the local or central authorities may draw upsupplementary economic costs which can be found in taxes and assessments paid by contributors.

  2. How Does Football Influence the Political System and Juridify Social Movements? Brazil, June 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano Schwartz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available According to current trends in the analysis of new social movements, protests are related to economic issues or social inequalities, particularly those of a religious or ethnic nature which, in turn, produce new communications directed at the political system. The present study aims to determine the relationship between football and the social movements that occurred in Brazil in June 2013, as well as investigate the responses of the political system to these social grievances, centered primarily on the juridification of these social spheres. Thus, it focuses on how the legal and political systems absorb these communications into their self-referential logic. To that end, the methodology used is based on the structural functionalism of Niklas Luhmann and his theory of autopoietic social systems. The results demonstrate that both systems – political and legal – were significantly influenced by football, specifically by the substantial investments allocated to hosting the 2014 World Cup in Brazil which, when contrasted with the low return of public services in the country, reveal the root causes of June 2013. Según las tendencias actuales en el análisis de los nuevos movimientos sociales, las protestas están relacionadas con cuestiones económicas o desigualdades sociales, en particular las de carácter religioso o étnico que, a su vez, producen nuevas comunicaciones dirigidas al sistema político. Este estudio pretende determinar la relación entre el fútbol y los movimientos sociales que se produjeron en Brasil en junio de 2013, así como investigar las respuestas del sistema político a estas demandas sociales, centradas principalmente en la juridificación de estas esferas sociales. Por lo tanto, se centra en cómo los sistemas legales y políticos absorben estas comunicaciones en su lógica autorreferencial. Para ello, la metodología empleada se basa en el funcionalismo estructural de Niklas Luhmann y su teoría de los sistemas

  3. Developing Ethical Guidelines for Creating Social Media Technology Policy in Social Work Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Shane R. Brady; David A. McLeod; Jimmy A. Young

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss social media technology in the context of social work education. While social media technology is prevalent in social work education, most discourse about ethical use of social media in the classroom has taken a prescriptive and overly cautious approach that neglects the context dependent nature that social work educators teach in as well as the overwhelmingly positive potential of social media technology in the classroom. This paper utilizes social constructivist theo...

  4. Technology and Politics: Incentives for Youth Participation. Working Paper 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, Shanto; Jackman, Simon

    2004-01-01

    No other group is as disengaged from elections as youth. Voter turnout in the United States trails that of other industrialized societies, and is particularly anemic among youth between the ages of 18 and 24. The purpose of this study was to assess whether young people's expertise with information technology could be harnessed to stimulate a…

  5. Motivations for Social Media Use and Impact on Political Participation in China: A Cognitive and Communication Mediation Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Chan, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Integrating uses and gratifications theory and the cognitive/communication mediation model: this study examines Chinese students' use of social media and subsequent impact on political participation. An integrative framework is proposed where media use, political expression, and political cognitions (efficacy and knowledge) play important mediating roles between audience motivations and participation. Structural equation analyses showed support for the integrated model. Guidance and social utility motivations exhibited different indirect effects on online and offline participation through social media news, discussion, and political efficacy. Entertainment motivations exhibited no direct or indirect effects. Contrary to expectations and previous literature, surveillance motivations exhibited negative direct and indirect effects on offline participation, which may be attributed to the particular Chinese social and political context. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. Trends, Issues, and Gaps in Technology for Elementary Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Pat; Field, Sherry L.; Roach, Pamela S.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the status of technology in elementary social studies. Reviews research on technology and elementary social studies, explores various examples of practice, discusses how preservice social studies methods textbooks treat the issue of using technology, and identifies beliefs held by elementary social studies teachers. (CMK)

  7. The Impact of Ubiquitous Technologies on the Art Museum as Urban [Political] Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Mogens; Søndergaard, Morten

    The Museum is part of a ubiquitous framing of cultural production and a common, urban (political) space. In later years, technology has enhanced the ubiquity, as well as challenged the foundation of, the Museum. From this enhancement and challenge, which is transforming the museum itself, new...

  8. The Politics of Curriculum Reform in Canada: The Case of Technology Education in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrina, Stephen; Dalley, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrates the case of technology education in British Colombia and discusses its invulnerability of teachers to curriculum reform. Draws on historical and survey data related to school practices and Ministry of Education enrollment data disaggregated by sex. Casts these data into a politics of curriculum framework informed by the work of…

  9. A Political and Social History of HIV in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simelela, Nono; Venter, W D Francois; Pillay, Yogan; Barron, Peter

    2015-06-01

    For the past 25 years, South Africa has had to deal with the inexorable and monumental rise of HIV. From one or two isolated cases, in the late 1980s, South Africa now has an estimated 6.4 million people infected with HIV, with high rates of concomitant tuberculosis, which will profoundly affect the country for decades to come. For nearly 10 years, the South African government's response to the HIV epidemic was described as denialist, which was estimated to have resulted in the deaths of 330,000 people because lifesaving antiretroviral therapy (ART) was not provided (Chigwedere et al. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 49:410-15, 2008; Heywood 2004). However, the story of the HIV and AIDS response in South Africa over the past 5 years is one of great progress after almost a decade of complex and tragic denialism that united civil society in a way not seen since the opposition to apartheid. Today, South Africa can boast of close to 3 million people on ART, by far the largest number in the world. Prevention efforts appear to be yielding results but there continues to be large numbers of new infections, with a profound peak in incidence in young women aged 15 to 24 years. In addition, infections occur across the gender spectrum in older age groups. As a result of the massive increase in access to ART after 2004 and particularly after 2008 as political will towards the HIV ART programme improved, there has been a marked increase in life expectancy, from 56 to 61 years in the period 2009-2012 alone; the aggressive expansion of the prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) to HIV-positive pregnant women has been accompanied by dramatic decrease in HIV transmission to infants; and a 25 % decrease in child and infant mortality rates in the period 2009-2012. This progress in access is significantly due to a civil society movement that was prepared to pose a rights-based challenge to a governing party in denial and to brave health officials, politicians and clinicians

  10. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Philip E.

    2014-05-01

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about 10 billion per year, and proposes to add about 5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  11. The science, technology, and politics of ballistic missile defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, Philip E. [Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    America's missile defense systems are deployed at home and abroad. This includes the Groundbased Missile Defense (GMD) system in Alaska and California, the Phased Adaptive Approach in Europe (EPAA), and regional systems in the Middle East and Asia. Unfortunately these systems lack workable architectures, and many of the required elements either don't work or are missing. Major review and reconsideration is needed of all elements of these systems. GMD performance in tests has gotten worse with time, when it ought to be getting better. A lack of political support is not to blame as the DoD spends about $10 billion per year, and proposes to add about $5 billion over the next five years. Russia objects to the EPAA as a threat to its ICBM forces, and to the extensive deployment of U.S. military forces in countries such as Poland, the Czech Republic and Romania, once part of the Soviet Union. Going forward the U.S. should keep working with Russia whose cooperation will be key to diplomatic gains in the Middle East and elsewhere. Meanwhile, America's missile defenses face an enduring set of issues, especially target discrimination in the face of attacks designed to overwhelm the defenses, stage separation debris, chaff, decoys, and stealth. Dealing with target discrimination while also replacing, upgrading, or adding to the many elements of U.S. missiles defenses presents daunting budget priorities. A new look at the threat is warranted, and whether the U.S. needs to consider every nation that possesses even short-range missiles a threat to America. The proliferation of missiles of all sizes around the world is a growing problem, but expecting U.S. missile defenses to deal with all those missiles everywhere is unrealistic, and U.S. missile defenses, effective or not, are justifying more and more offensive missiles.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting and Earnings Management: The Role of Political Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Yip

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Francis, Nanda and Olsson (2008 proposed that earnings quality influence firms’ disclosure decisions. We examine whether Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR disclosure is related to earnings management and if the relationship is mitigated by political cost considerations or by the firm’s ethical predisposition. We argue that the relationship between CSR reporting and earnings management is context-specific and we consider one particular context, the political environment. We test our hypotheses by regressing earnings management on CSR disclosure while controlling for other factors that may affect the level of earnings management. We find a significant relationship between CSR reporting and earnings management, and more specifically, we find evidence of a negative (complementary relationship in the oil and gas industry while we find evidence of a positive (substitutive relationship in the food industry. The evidence supports the view that the relationship between CSR reporting and earnings management is affected by the political environment and not by ethical considerations.

  13. Power, Order, and the Politics of Social Policy in Central and Eastern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    I discuss the use of power to safeguard political stability by policymakers in four post-communist cases: Hungary and Poland, and Estonia and Latvia. My treatment is in line with traditional path dependency and 'generous' or 'emergency' welfare state interpretations, but adds a more strategic...... reforms. Policymakers in the Visegrad cases have not merely provided (generous) emergence safety nets for exogenously given groups of at-risk citizens. They have proactively reshaped the distributions of transition winners and losers in the polity, and of contributors and dependants in the welfare state....... Building on Laitin (1998, 2007), Bloom (2008), and others, my two Baltic cases in turn discuss the use of political power along yet another dimension - ethnicity. Recent advances in political economy (Alesina and La Ferera 2005) and social capital theory (Putnam 2007) have documented the manifold negative...

  14. Rethinking radical politics in the context of assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Radical feminists have argued for both the radical potential of assisted reproductive technology (ART) and its oppressive and damaging effects for women. This paper will address the question of what constitutes a radical feminist position on ART; I will argue that the very debate over whether ART liberates or oppresses women is misguided, and that instead the issue should be understood dialectically. Reproductive technologies are neither inherently liberating nor entirely oppressive: we can only understand the potential and effects by considering how they are actually taken up within a culture. The internal contradictions, tensions, and inconsistencies within ART and the way it is addressed within the law points to a dialectic that resists a simple reductivist understanding.

  15. Social Background, Civic Education and Political Participation of Young People – the German Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Onken

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to social and political change the process of young citizens’ political socialization was put on a new basis in West European democracies over the last decades. In this article we discuss some aspects of this development and show their consequences. We analyse empirical findings from Germany, focussing on the relevant social factors which influence the individual propensity to participate in politics. The impact of the financial and economic crisis in Europe on political attitudes will also be considered, taking in account sociological aspects. Based on the empirical findings we discuss implications for civic education. In contrast to many discussions in literature about this issue, in which the focus is on the need to put the various influences of political socialization into a broader context, we argue that the parental social background is the crucial upstream factor, prior to e.g. civic education. The conclusion indicates that a group‐specific educational approach, taking into account the social background, is the most promising one for reaching the normative goal of civic education: Politically self‐determined citizens. Aufgrund der sozialen und politischen Veränderungen ist die politische Sozialisation Jugendlicher in den Westeuropäischen Demokratien auf eine neue Grundlage gestellt worden. In diesem Beitrag diskutieren wir Aspekte dieser Entwicklung und zeigen, welche Folgen sich aus diesen ergeben. Wir analysieren empirische Befunde aus Deutschland mit dem Schwerpunkt auf die Frage, welche sozialen Faktoren relevant sind für die individuelle politische Partizipationsbereitschaft. Der Einfluss der Finanz‐ und Wirtschaftskrise in Europa auf politische Einstellungen wird dabei ebenfalls betrachtet. Dies geschieht unter Berücksichtigung der soziologischen Aspekte. Auf Grundlage der Ergebnisse Fragen wir nach den Folgen für die politische Bildung. Im Gegensatz zu dem in der Literatur häufig vertretenen Ansatz, die politische

  16. Learning through social interaction in game technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waern, Annika (Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Kista, Sweden); Raybourn, Elaine Marie

    2005-05-01

    The present ITSE journal special issue on 'Learning About Social Interaction through Gaming' is the result of an invitation to the attendees of a one-day workshop on 'Social Learning Through Gaming' co-organized by the guest editors and held at the Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI) conference on April 26, 2004 in Vienna, Austria. CHI is one of the premiere conferences on human-computer interaction. CHI 2004 attracted hundreds of delegates from all over the world. The CHI workshop program results from a competitive selection process. The Social Learning through Gaming workshop was filled to capacity and attended by approximately 25 participants from Europe and North America who submitted position papers that were refereed and selected for participation based on the relevancy and innovativeness of the research. The participants came together to share research on play, learning, games, interactive technologies, and what playing and designing games can teach us about social behaviors. The present special issue focuses on learning about social aspects through gaming: learning to socialize through games and learning games through social behavior.

  17. BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION VS. SOCIAL POLITICS: AN ASSESSMENT WITH REGARD TO TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N.Sozer

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The discipline of business administration has close relations with the disciplines of economics, law, behavioral sciences, statistics and mathematics. The manager of an enterprise should not only manage the sources of capital securing the maximum profit, but also he/she should have knowledge on how to manage the people working for the enterprise (workers and other personnel. Social politics is the discipline which analyses the human relations arising from economic affairs. Thus the main concern of this discipline is the influence of economics on human beings and society as well as the social problems arising from economic affairs. The aim is the general harmony between all the segments of the society, i.e. creation and maintenance of social balance. Globalization has shown its effects also on the existing disciplines. For instance business administration has adopted the concept of social responsibility enlarging its field of interest. As a result of this enlargement, social politics and social responsibility have largely corresponded to each other in terms of scope. However this correspondence is valid only for partners, but not for actors and instruments involved.

  18. The current state of play of research on the social, political and legal dimensions of HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Vera; Ferguson, Laura; Aggleton, Peter; Mane, Purnima; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Giang, Le Minh; Barbosa, Regina M.; Caceres, Carlos F.; Parker, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a critical overview of social science research presented at the 2014 International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia. In an era of major biomedical advance, the political nature of HIV remains of fundamental importance. No new development can be rolled out successfully without taking into account its social and political context, and consequences. Four main themes ran throughout the conference track on social and political research, law, policy and human rights: first, the importance of work with socially vulnerable groups, now increasingly referred to as “key populations”; second, continued recognition that actions and programs need to be tailored locally and contextually; third, the need for an urgent response to a rapidly growing epidemic of HIV among young people; and fourth, the negative effects of the growing criminalization of minority sexualities and people living with HIV. Lack of stress on human rights and community participation is resulting in poorer policy globally. A new research agenda is needed to respond to these challenges. PMID:25859715

  19. New Social Media and Politics in Thailand: The Emergence of Fascist Vigilante Groups on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Schaffar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, Facebook has become a battleground between competing political camps in Thailand. Facebook groups like the Social Sanction group, tellingly abbreviated as SS, and the Rubbish Collector Organization, which was founded in 2014 and has attracted more than 200,000 members, have played a crucial role in the process of political radicalization. The aim of these groups is to expose political opponents by accusing them of lèse-majesté, which can result in a prison sentence of 15 years or more. The groups also serve as fora for hate speech and are increasingly used as a tool of mobilization for state-sponsored mass events by the authoritarian regime that came to power with the coup d’état of May 2014. Contrary to its popular perception as a tool for democratization, Facebook has been successfully used by political groups reminiscent of fascist vigilante groups. This paper analyses the genesis of these groups and discusses the phenomenon in a broader political and historical context.

  20. The Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility: Techniques of Neutralization, Stakeholder Management and Political CSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooks, Gary; Gilmore, Anna; Collin, Jeff; Holden, Chris; Lee, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Since scholarly interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has primarily focused on the synergies between social and economic performance, our understanding of how (and the conditions under which) companies use CSR to produce policy outcomes that work against public welfare has remained comparatively under-developed. In particular, little is known about how corporate decision-makers privately reconcile the conflicts between public and private interests, even though this is likely to be relevant to understanding the limitations of CSR as a means of aligning business activity with the broader public interest. This study addresses this issue using internal tobacco industry documents to explore British-American Tobacco's (BAT) thinking on CSR and its effects on the company's CSR Programme. The article presents a three-stage model of CSR development, based on Sykes and Matza's theory of techniques of neutralization, which links together: how BAT managers made sense of the company's declining political authority in the mid-1990s; how they subsequently justified the use of CSR as a tool of stakeholder management aimed at diffusing the political impact of public health advocates by breaking up political constituencies working towards evidence-based tobacco regulation; and how CSR works ideologically to shape stakeholders' perceptions of the relative merits of competing approaches to tobacco control. Our analysis has three implications for research and practice. First, it underlines the importance of approaching corporate managers' public comments on CSR critically and situating them in their economic, political and historical contexts. Second, it illustrates the importance of focusing on the political aims and effects of CSR. Third, by showing how CSR practices are used to stymie evidence-based government regulation, the article underlines the importance of highlighting and developing matrices to assess the negative social impacts of CSR.

  1. Developing Ethical Guidelines for Creating Social Media Technology Policy in Social Work Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane R. Brady

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss social media technology in the context of social work education. While social media technology is prevalent in social work education, most discourse about ethical use of social media in the classroom has taken a prescriptive and overly cautious approach that neglects the context dependent nature that social work educators teach in as well as the overwhelmingly positive potential of social media technology in the classroom. This paper utilizes social constructivist theory and the Competing Values framework to guide the development of an ethical decision making framework for social work educators to use in order to create dynamic classroom policies related to social media technology. The authors strive to make a modest contribution to the existing literature related to social media technology and social work through the development of this new ethical decision making framework and discourse related to social media technology, ethics, and social work education.

  2. Varieties of second modernity: the cosmopolitan turn in social and political theory and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Ulrich; Grande, Edgar

    2010-09-01

    The theme of this special issue is the necessity of a cosmopolitan turn in social and political theory. The question at the heart of this introductory chapter takes the challenge of 'methodological cosmopolitanism', already addressed in a Special Issue on Cosmopolitan Sociology in this journal (Beck and Sznaider 2006), an important step further: How can social and political theory be opened up, theoretically as well as methodologically and normatively, to a historically new, entangled Modernity which threatens its own foundations? How can it account for the fundamental fragility, the mutability of societal dynamics (of unintended side effects, domination and power), shaped by the globalization of capital and risks at the beginning of the twenty-first century? What theoretical and methodological problems arise and how can they be addressed in empirical research? In the following, we will develop this 'cosmopolitan turn' in four steps: firstly, we present the major conceptual tools for a theory of cosmopolitan modernities; secondly, we de-construct Western modernity by using examples taken from research on individualization and risk; thirdly, we address the key problem of methodological cosmopolitanism, namely the problem of defining the appropriate unit of analysis; and finally,we discuss normative questions, perspectives, and dilemmas of a theory of cosmopolitan modernities, in particular problems of political agency and prospects of political realization.

  3. REFERENDUMS, VOTING AND POLLS AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF CONTEMPORARY SCOTTISH SOCIAL AND POLITICAL LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Kozlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a relatively short chronological period, two referendums were held in Scotland. Recently (September 2016 with the filing of the Scottish National Party was initiated by the largest survey of the general population, various social, age status, but equally concerned about their fate and the fate of future generations (not completed at the time of writing. It is obvious that the Scottish public and political life, as nowhere else in the world, the popularity of these forms are monitoring public opinion, on the basis of which the results of the political agenda of the day is being built in the future, not only the nationalists, but also the other major political parties ‒ the Conservatives and Labour. This article proposes to analyze the consequences of the last voting in the context of the prospects for a new referendum on independence. It should be particularly emphasized that the Scottish National Party in the person of its former and current leaders do not doubt in the very short term, repeated referendum, arguing that as a foreign (Brexit and internal circumstances: the dominance of the political scene unpopular in conservative region, the supporters population growth nationalists, the transformation of social consciousness in the direction of traditional national values, etc.

  4. A Study of the Social and Psychological Factors Affecting Political Participation among University Professors: research subject: University of Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Masoudnia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction   Political Participation is one of the main discussions in political sociology and political development in all countries. It is considered as an aspect of political development that can also support the political organizations to achieve democracy. In fact, the degree of political participation is a mean to know whether governments are logical or not.   The main goal of this study is to examine social-psychological causes influencing political participation of Isfahan University teachers. The factor of political tendency and membership in organs are based on Huntington’s and Nelson’s Views. They considered social superiority and a person’s capability on a person’s tendency on political participation. They believed that if a person tends to be a member of group and councils, they will perform political participation more. On the other hand, there are other factors such as age, education, earning, race, tribe, religion which are based on Budwell’s View.   It is necessary that some factors such as media and political effects are based on Olson’s theory.   First hypothesis: There are some relations between demographic factors (people’s age, sex, single / marriage, member in organs and political Participation.   Second hypothesis: There are some relations between political environment and political Participation.   Third hypothesis: There are some relations between individualism and political Participation.   Fourth hypothesis: There are some relations between political knowledge and political Participation.   Fifth hypothesis: There are some relations between collective media and political Participation.   Sixth hypothesis: There are some relations between political tendency and political Participation.   Seventh hypothesis: There are some relations between political effects and political Participation.   Eighth hypothesis: There are some relations between relative abandonment and political Participation.

  5. Transitional justice as social control: political transitions, human rights norms and the reclassification of the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudai, Ron

    2017-09-12

    This article offers an interpretation of transitional justice policies - the efforts of post-conflict and post-dictatorship societies to address the legacy of past abuses - as a form of social control. While transitional justice is commonly conceptualized as responding to a core problem of impunity, this article argues that such formulation is too narrow and leads to lack of coherence in the analysis of the diverse array of transitional mechanisms, which include among others trials, truth commissions, reparations for victims and apologies. Building on the work of Stanley Cohen, the article contends that the core transitional problem is the denial of human rights violations, and consequently that the common purpose of all transitional justice mechanisms is to reclassify the past: redefining as deviant some acts and individuals which prior to the transition were considered 'normal'. The article identifies and analyses three themes in the application of a social control framework to transitional justice: (1) truth, memory and retroactive social control, pertains to the way truth-seeking transitional justice mechanisms reclassify past events by engaging in social control of and through memory; (2) censure, celebration and transitional social control refers to the reclassification of categories of individuals through expressions of both social disapproval and praise; and (3) civil society and social control from below concerns the role of social movements, organizations and groups as informal agents of social control during transitions. The concluding section recaps and briefly explores the concept of 'good moral panic' in the context of political transitions. While the concept of social control tends to have negative connotations for critical sociologists, this work suggests that efforts to categorize, punish and disapprove certain behaviours as deviant may not only be viewed as supporting a conservative status-quo, but also as promoting fledging human rights norms.

  6. Learning from variations in institutions and politics: the case of social health insurance in France and Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Ryozo; Steffen, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Despite their similar theoretical model, social health insurance schemes are based on different societal relationships, administrative structures, and political institutions. The aim of this comparative study is to deepen our understanding of how different institutional settings affect the politics of health care reforms and impact the policy outcome of those politics. The paper first isolates the most strategic institutional differences and similarities between the two countries, including: ...

  7. On the Social and Political Effects of Opening in Rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Housi Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available What are the economic, social and political effects when previously isolated villages are opened to the outside world? Scholars from different traditions expect different sorts of positive or negative affects to occur. Rural China presents an ideal environment to study this question empirically. Villages within rural China are in the process of being opened to the outside world in different forms, such as through being connected by road, the investment of agribusiness, or urbanization. Moreover this opening is being driven and shaped by different actors, including local residents, government and businesses. The different ways and actors that this opening occurs affect the nature of the opening, as well as its impact on the economic, social and political characteristics of the village.

  8. Revealing the transformatory moment of learning technology: the place of critical social theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Hall

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In revealing the transformatory moment of learning technology, a holistic andongoing critique that is related to a range of socio-cultural factors is required.This critique further uncovers the social relations that frame the place of learningtechnology in bourgeois capitalist work and the development of the knowledgeeconomy. This article argues that critical social theory, and the social and powerrelationships that it highlights, is central to the uncovering of this revelation. Asa result of a holistic, or totalising, analysis based upon the political economy oftechnology in education, a framework that enables educators to examine its educationalvalue is uncovered. Iterating and re-producing this framework works asa constant critique of educational practice within capitalism, and critiques deterministicor hegemonic views of technology-as-progress. As a result, this articleseeks to demonstrate how critical social theory might enable educators to analyselearning technology as historically situated, and thereby to use critique to revealand produce practical alternatives to sociocultural problems.

  9. Social technologies : Cross-disciplinary reflections on technologies in and from the social sciences Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Vikkelso, Signe; Beaulieu, Anne

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction, we explore the relevance to critical psychology of the ideas about technology that have come from science and technology studies (STS), which we argue allow a new look at a classic theme in critical approaches in psychology. Rather than seeing psychical and social reality as ob

  10. Feministas en el Foro Feminists at the World Social Forum: challenges for a new political culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Celiberti

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El articulo trata sobre la forma de incursión de expresiones significativas de la pluralidad feminista en el Foro Social Mundial expresa. Estas incursiones expresan los cambios en las subjetividades y en las estrategias de lucha que comienzan a desarrollar los movimientos feministas en particular y los movimientos sociales en general, en el marco de un mundo globalizado y en el nuevo milenio. Es un proceso inédito, que esta impulsando el desarrollo de nuevos paradigmas para la acción colectiva, que combina lo local y lo global, la interconexión de múltiples agendas y la recuperación de una dimensión mas profunda de la justicia económica, social, cultural y simbólica, ampliando, en este proceso, el concepto de la política, lo político y el poder. El articulo coloca en debate las formas de hacer política de los movimientos sociales que confluyen en el Foro - que arrastran viejas dinámicas y al mismo tiempo recrean los nuevos paradigmas - y que abren la posibilidad de reinventar un mapa emancipatorio y un imaginario social, capaz de competir con el consenso neoliberal y el pensamiento único, recuperando la diversidad y la pluralidad de sujet@s y actor@s sociales.The article deals with the ways of incursion of the feminist plurality's significant expressions in the World Social Forum. These incursions express the changes in the subjectivities and in strategies of struggle that feminist movements in particular and social movements in general begin to develop, in the frame of a globalised world and in the new millennium. It's an unprecedented process, that is promoting the development of new paradigms for collective action, that combines local and global issues, the interconnection of multiple agendas and the recovery of a more profound dimension of economic, social, cultural and symbolic justice, broadening, in this process, the concept of politics, the political and the power. The article sets discussion around the ways in which social

  11. Entrepreneurship as a source of economic, political, and social improvement in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rabarijaona, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A three-country case study was used to analyze the economic, political, and social impacts of entrepreneurship, and the development of entrepreneurship in Sub-Saharan Africa was studied through the lens of five entrepreneurial factors (freedom, labor, infrastructure, governance, and business environment). An increase of foreign direct investments, growing economic freedom for citizens, and a higher gross domestic product per capita wer...

  12. Book review: Macedonia: the political, social, economic and cultural foundations of a Balkan state

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Daniel Martyn

    2013-01-01

    Macedonia: The Political, Social, Economic and Cultural Foundations of a Balkan State is a collection of twelve essays taking an in-depth look at the multi-layered relationships between different groups in Macedonia from an anthropological perspective. Daniel M. Knight finds the book to offer revealing insights into the rich tapestry of life in modern-day Macedonia, especially in the areas of religion and ethnicity.

  13. Exploring the social and political aspects of talent management in organisations.

    OpenAIRE

    Zesik, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Talent management has been an area of significant organisational focus since 1997 when McKinsey and Company first introduced the concept of the ‘war for talent’. What appears to have been neglected in many subsequent talent management publications, however, is the tension between the rhetoric and reality of talent management. The objective of the research is to explore this tension in the context of the social and political aspects of managing talent in organisations and to gain a deeper unde...

  14. Introduction; open access in the social and political sciences : threat or opportunity?

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, MJ

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces a Symposium which brings together the academic and publishing industry in two key countries (the UK and the US) to analyse and assess the implications of Open Access (OA) journal publishing in the social and political sciences, as well as its different formats and developments to date. With articles by three academics (all involved in academic associations) and three publishers, the Symposium represents an exchange of views which help each of the two sectors understand...

  15. The rise and fall of HIV prevalence in Zimbabwe: the social, political and economic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen; Broom, Alex

    2011-09-01

    For more than 10 years Zimbabwe has experienced social, political and economic instability, including the near collapse in 2008 of its health system. Paradoxically, this period has also seen a fall in estimated HIV prevalence, from 25.6% in 1996 to 13.7% in 2009. This article examines this development in a socio-political and historical context. We focus on the complex interplay of migration, mortality, individual behaviour change, and economic patterns in shaping the presumed epidemiological waning of HIV prevalence in Zimbabwe and explore the evolution and management of the country's HIV/AIDS response. Our assessment of the role that the Zimbabwean state has played in this development leads to the conclusion that a decline in HIV prevalence has been as much an artefact of dire social, political and economic conditions as the outcome of deliberate interventions. Lastly, we propose the need to contextualise available epidemiological data through qualitative research into the social aspects of HIV and the everyday lives of individuals affected by it.

  16. Structuring Knowledge of Subcultural Folk Devils through News Coverage: Social Cognition, Semiotics, and Political Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Patrick Williams

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The folk devil concept has been well used in subcultural studies, yet its importance might be better served by distinguishing among multiple conceptual frames through which it is articulated. In this article, I clarify how folk devils are made possible through the interaction of three concepts used by sociologists to study everyday life. The first is the process of social cognition, where producers and consumers of news construct and propagate a shared definition of who subcultural youths are and why they should be the object of fear. The second are the semiotic structures of genre and narrative, which narrow the interpretive process of producers and receivers alike and sustain discourses that limit how subcultural youths can be understood in the news. The third has to do with political economy, where the ideological features of mass mediated news-making keep the news industry in relative control of meaning making. Social cognition, semiotics, and the political economy dialectically produce the phenomenon of the subcultural folk devil and support its objective effects. I review several studies of market and state-controlled media societies and note that, in both types, the objective effects on youths are similar and significant. In studying how subcultural youths are framed in the media output of transitional states and societies, the conceptual value of social cognition, semiotics, and political economy should be recognised.

  17. The micro-level foundations and dynamics of political corporate social responsibility: hegemony and passive revolution through civil society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourula, A.; Delalieux, G.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of the political roles firms play in society is a flourishing stream within corporate social responsibility (CSR) research. However, few empirical studies have examined multiple levels of political CSR at the same time from a critical perspective. We explore both how the motivations of m

  18. Revolutionary networks. Women’s political and social activism in Cold War Italy and Yugoslavia (1945-1957)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonfiglioli, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Cold War era has generally been represented as a moment of conservatism when it comes to women’s activism. While women’s political participation in the Second World War had been studied in detail, women’s political and social activism in Cold War Europe has remained under-researched. In my disse

  19. The micro-level foundations and dynamics of political corporate social responsibility: hegemony and passive revolution through civil society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourula, A.; Delalieux, G.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of the political roles firms play in society is a flourishing stream within corporate social responsibility (CSR) research. However, few empirical studies have examined multiple levels of political CSR at the same time from a critical perspective. We explore both how the motivations of

  20. The micro-level foundations and dynamics of political corporate social responsibility: hegemony and passive revolution through civil society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourula, A.; Delalieux, G.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of the political roles firms play in society is a flourishing stream within corporate social responsibility (CSR) research. However, few empirical studies have examined multiple levels of political CSR at the same time from a critical perspective. We explore both how the motivations of m

  1. Adult Learning in Political (Un-Civil) Society: Anti-Colonial Subaltern Social Movement (SSM) Pedagogies of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Dip

    2011-01-01

    Through a selective deployment of conceptualisations from subaltern studies, in particular the concepts of political (un-civil) society and an autonomous domain (or a people's politics that suggests the plausibility of dominance without hegemony), this article distinguishes a subaltern social movement (SSM) formation and related anti-colonial SSM…

  2. The micro-level foundations and dynamics of political corporate social responsibility: hegemony and passive revolution through civil society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kourula; G. Delalieux

    2014-01-01

    Exploration of the political roles firms play in society is a flourishing stream within corporate social responsibility (CSR) research. However, few empirical studies have examined multiple levels of political CSR at the same time from a critical perspective. We explore both how the motivations of m

  3. Revolutionary networks. Women’s political and social activism in Cold War Italy and Yugoslavia (1945-1957)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonfiglioli, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Cold War era has generally been represented as a moment of conservatism when it comes to women’s activism. While women’s political participation in the Second World War had been studied in detail, women’s political and social activism in Cold War Europe has remained under-researched. In my disse

  4. A 61-million-person experiment in social influence and political mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Robert M; Fariss, Christopher J; Jones, Jason J; Kramer, Adam D I; Marlow, Cameron; Settle, Jaime E; Fowler, James H

    2012-09-13

    Human behaviour is thought to spread through face-to-face social networks, but it is difficult to identify social influence effects in observational studies, and it is unknown whether online social networks operate in the same way. Here we report results from a randomized controlled trial of political mobilization messages delivered to 61 million Facebook users during the 2010 US congressional elections. The results show that the messages directly influenced political self-expression, information seeking and real-world voting behaviour of millions of people. Furthermore, the messages not only influenced the users who received them but also the users' friends, and friends of friends. The effect of social transmission on real-world voting was greater than the direct effect of the messages themselves, and nearly all the transmission occurred between 'close friends' who were more likely to have a face-to-face relationship. These results suggest that strong ties are instrumental for spreading both online and real-world behaviour in human social networks.

  5. The Philosophy of Science and Technology in China: Political and Ideological Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanlin

    2014-09-01

    In China, the philosophy of science and technology (PST) is derived from "Dialectics of Nature" (DN), which is based on Engels' unfinished book Dialektik der Natur. DN as a political ideology provides political guidance for scientists and engineers. Therefore, since 1981, "Introduction to Dialectics of Nature" (IDN) has been an obligatory course for master's degree students who study natural science or technology. In 1987, DN was renamed PST by the Chinese government in order to communicate and do research. The IDN teachers constitute most of the scholars who research PST. Nowadays, in China, PST includes philosophy of nature, philosophy of science, philosophy of technology, sociology of science, sociology of technology, "science, technology and society," history of science, history of technology, management of science, and management of technology due to having too many IDN teachers. In fact, it is neither a branch of philosophy, nor a subject. The number of the IDN teachers has been increasing since 1981, which makes PST a miscellaneous collection of many branches or subjects. Finally, PST is facing two new challenges: the reduction of IDN and academic corruption.

  6. Social Technologies and Informal Knowledge Sharing within and across Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is focused on both empirical and conceptual contributions relative to the roles social technologies play in informal knowledge sharing practices, both within and across organizations. Social technologies include (a) traditional social technologies (e.g., email, phone and instant messengers), (b) emerging social…

  7. The history of 'Social Technology', 1898-1930

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Wierenga, Tjardie

    2013-01-01

    Since the term was first coined, in the late nineteenth century, 'social technology' has had a mixed fate. Whereas 'technology' has become one of the keywords of the twentieth century, 'social technology' never quite seemed to settle in the vocabulary of social theory. In this article, we focus on t

  8. Social Technologies and Informal Knowledge Sharing within and across Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrahi, Mohammad Hosein

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral dissertation is focused on both empirical and conceptual contributions relative to the roles social technologies play in informal knowledge sharing practices, both within and across organizations. Social technologies include (a) traditional social technologies (e.g., email, phone and instant messengers), (b) emerging social…

  9. The history of 'Social Technology', 1898-1930

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Maarten; Wierenga, Tjardie

    2013-01-01

    Since the term was first coined, in the late nineteenth century, 'social technology' has had a mixed fate. Whereas 'technology' has become one of the keywords of the twentieth century, 'social technology' never quite seemed to settle in the vocabulary of social theory. In this article, we focus on t

  10. Enhancing the concept of corporate diplomacy : encompassing political corporate social responsibility, international relations, and peace through commerce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westermann-Behaylo, M.K.; Rehbein, K.; Fort, T.

    2015-01-01

    Corporate diplomacy is an emerging concept within the management literature. It describes corporate conduct in the international arena, particularly in challenging political and social environments. Management scholarship and practitioner literature have focused on the communication processes and in

  11. Enhancing the concept of corporate diplomacy : encompassing political corporate social responsibility, international relations, and peace through commerce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westermann-Behaylo, M.K.; Rehbein, K.; Fort, T.

    2015-01-01

    Corporate diplomacy is an emerging concept within the management literature. It describes corporate conduct in the international arena, particularly in challenging political and social environments. Management scholarship and practitioner literature have focused on the communication processes and

  12. Adult Development Theory and Political Analysis: An Integral Account of Social and Political Change in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Fein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available I propose a reading of social, political and discursive change in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia which is inspired by an integral, above all developmental perspective. In view of explaining Russia’s current political trajectory, I make several arguments. First, I claim that Russian politics are still to a large extent determined by the effects of a threefold crisis of sense-making. Neither the collapse of the Soviet empire, nor the question of how to define democratic government nor the lack of a resilient national identity have so far been resolved and re-appropriated in a transformative manner. Second, I try to show how this affects various aspects and dimensions of Russian politics. Third, I engage in a brief overview of a number of adult development models, asking to what extent and how the characteristics of consciousness development, particular stage characteristics, and the general logics and dynamics of successful and unsuccessful development these models describe can be helpful to the analysis of Russian politics. Also, I discuss their compatibility and parallels with discourse theory and analysis as an increasingly popular methodology in Russian Studies. Of the developmental models reviewed, the theory of political development by Stephen Chilton and the self-protective action logic in Susanne Cook-Greuter’s model of self and identity development are particularly relevant for my purpose. On these grounds, it is argued that since Vladimir Putin’s taking office as Russian president and later prime-minister, politics and (official political discourse have increasingly come to follow self-protective action logics as conceived by Susanne Cook-Greuter. This diagnosis, which could either be understood as a regression or as a realignment of internal and external dimensions of political development, can be explained as a reaction to Russia’s crisis of identity followed by a loss of internal stability and international influence connected

  13. Technological, political and economic changes and their implications for the evolution of broadcasting services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadayoni, Reza

    2000-01-01

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis is changes in the market for broadcasting services as a result of technological, political, and economic drivers. Broadcasting services can be categorised as a part of the ICT-based information and knowledge intensive services that have gone through radical changes...... and demand sites, scarcity of transmission resources, and the historical aspects that make the development of the broadcasting service market different from other information and knowledge intensive services....

  14. Trends in Addressing Social Needs: A Longitudinal Study of Congregation-Based Service Provision and Political Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad R. Fulton

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available When congregations seek to address social needs, they often pursue this goal through acts of service and political engagement. Over the past three decades, a tremendous amount of research has been dedicated to analyzing congregation-based service provision and political participation. However, little is known about how congregations’ involvement in these arenas has changed during this period. To help fill this gap, this study analyzes three waves of data from a national survey of congregations to assess how congregations’ participation patterns in service-related and political activities have been changing since the 1990s. It also examines trends among subpopulations of congregations grouped by their religious tradition, ethnoracial composition, and ideological orientation. Overall, this study finds that among most types of congregations, the percentage participating in service-related activities is substantial and increasing, while the percentage participating in political activities is less substantial and decreasing. This decline in political participation has implications for the role congregations play in addressing social needs. Relieving immediate needs through service provision without also pursuing long-term solutions through political participation can limit congregations’ ability to comprehensively address social needs. Among the few types of congregations that have high and/or increasing participation rates in both service-related and political activities are Catholic, predominantly Hispanic, and politically liberal congregations.

  15. Socio-political, cultural and economic preferences and behaviour of the social and cultural specialists and the technocrats : Social class or education?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güveli, Ayse; Need, Ariana; Graaf, Nan Dirk de

    2007-01-01

    Do the social and cultural specialists differ from the technocrats and other social classes with respect to their socio-political, cultural and economic preferences and behaviour? If they do, is this attributable to their level and field of education? The social and cultural specialists are assumed

  16. Social movements in the media and political agendas in Spain: the case of PAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángeles Feliu Albaladejo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the presence of the Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca (PAH, their actions and claims in the Spanish media agenda and the political agenda in 2014. After describing the role of the platform as a social movement in Spain, it is analyzed the coverage that the three major print media (El País, El Mundo and ABC have done throughout the year, from the perspective of Framing, noting the evaluative treatment made by the newspapers about the Platform. On the other hand, it is carried out an analysis of the political agenda regarding mentions of PAH and their actions in the parliamentary debate in the Congress of Deputies, differentiating between the symbolic and the substantial agenda. The data show, on the one hand, a different treatment of the social movement by the three newspapers, which would correspond to the different ideological position of each media. On the other hand, the political parties in the Chamber include in a quantitatively different way the PAH in their speeches –being Izquierda Plural the group that realizes more mentions in the period– and most of them belong to the symbolic agenda. The timing of the two agendas does not show a clear influence between them.

  17. Awakening to the politics of food: Politicized diet as social identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, Chelsea; Fernandes, Samantha A; Hyers, Lauri L

    2016-12-01

    In this qualitative study, the process of developing a politicized identity around diet was explored through a social psychological lens. Applying one of the most influencial models of group identity development proposed by Cross (1978) in which an "encounter" experience spurs an awakening into a politicized identity, we asked 36 participants who followed alternative diets due to political reasons to describe their unique encounter experiences that brought them to their politicized awakening. Their self-identified diets included pescetarian, vegetarian, vegan, raw, non-GMO/organic, and reduced meat consumption. Participants described the rationale for their diets, their "encounter" or awakening to their politicized diets, and whether they viewed their diet as a part of their identity. Using thematic analysis, we identified four key types of encounters that sparked their politicization: a series of integrated events, exposure to educational materials, a direct visceral emotional experience, and guidance from a role model. We discuss the results with regard to the politics of food, the nature of the politicized dieter's identity as part of a minority food culture, and the difficulties of engaging in political action through one's diet. The underexplored benefits of applying social psychological theories of identity to research on dietary subcultures is also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Actores sociales y ambitos de construccion de politicas ambientales Social actors and scenarios in the generation of environmental politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gudynas

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Se analiza el concepto de "actores claves" en la generación de políticas ambientales. Independientemente de la definición de actor social que se maneje, el asumir la existencia de actores claves ofrece limitaciones conceptuales y prácticas, ya que éstos son coyunturales a cada situación específica. Todos pueden ser actores claves en generar políticas ambientales cumpliendo papeles diferenciales. Como alternativa se utiliza el término de "actores destacados" y se revisan aspectos sobresalientes de varios de ellos en América Latina. Seguidamente se postula que el análisis se debe centrar en los escenarios sociales donde esos actores se pueden manifestar. Se ofrece una distinción preliminar de escenarios que permite integrar a nuevos y viejos movimientos sociales y establecer relaciones de articulación y equivalencia.The concept of "key actors" in the field of environmental politics is analyzed. Beyond the definition of social actor, the assumption of the existence of key actors implies conceptual and practical limitations, as it depends of each specific situation. Everyone could be a key actor under differential roles in the generation of environmental politics. As an alternative, the term "noteworthy actors" is used and a brief review of them in Latin America is presented. The relevant question should address the social scenarios from where these actors can express themselves. A preliminary distinction of scenarios is presented, in which old and new social movements could be integrated and relationships of articulation and equivalence could be established.

  19. Political Advertising: A Roadblock in Teaching Social Studies Students the Importance of Truthful Political Communication to a Democratic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The author contends that too much political advertising is a form of public relations "spin" in which the truth is sacrificed and the political process damaged as a result. The goal of much of this advertising too frequently focuses on transmitting "disinformation" that, while perhaps not technically a lie, is intended not to inform the public but…

  20. Political Advertising: A Roadblock in Teaching Social Studies Students the Importance of Truthful Political Communication to a Democratic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    The author contends that too much political advertising is a form of public relations "spin" in which the truth is sacrificed and the political process damaged as a result. The goal of much of this advertising too frequently focuses on transmitting "disinformation" that, while perhaps not technically a lie, is intended not to inform the public but…

  1. Modern standardization case studies at the crossroads of technology, economics, and politics

    CERN Document Server

    Schneiderman, R

    2015-01-01

    Modern Standardization -- Case Studies at the Crossroads of Technology, Economics, and Politics covers the development of new technical standards, how these standards are typically triggered, and how they are submitted to standards development organizations (SDOs) for review and evaluation. It fills the gap in the shortage of reference material in the development of real-world standards. The increasing pace of innovation in technology has accelerated the competitive nature of standardization, particularly in emerging markets. Modern Standardization addresses these and other issues through a series of case studies in a format designed for academics and their engineering, business, and law school students.

  2. The OHS consultant as a 'political reflective navigator' in technological change processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole

    2004-01-01

    The occupational health service (OHS) in Denmark is rarely involved as adviser when technological changes take place in client enterprises. To support OHS efforts in this area, the work practice of OHS consultants has been studied in four cases of technological change. Traditionally, the role...... is an 'actor' who pursues a work environment agenda in a complex network in which other actors pursue other agendas such as productivity, economics, quality, etc. The consultant is political in the sense of pursuing a work environment agenda; the consultant is reflective in the sense of being able to switch...

  3. A Hierarchy of Linear Threshold Models for the Spread of Political Revolutions on Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, John C

    2015-01-01

    We study a linear threshold agent-based model (ABM) for the spread of political revolutions on social networks using empirical network data. We propose new techniques for building a hierarchy of simplified ordinary differential equation (ODE) based models that aim to capture essential features of the ABM, including effects of the actual networks, and give insight in the parameter regime transitions of the ABM. We relate the ABM and the hierarchy of models to a population-level compartmental ODE model that we proposed previously for the spread of political revolutions [1], which is shown to be mathematically consistent with the proposed ABM and provides a way to analyze the global behaviour of the ABM. This consistency with the linear threshold ABM also provides further justification a posteriori for the compartmental model of [1]. Extending concepts from epidemiological modelling, we define a basic reproduction number $R_0$ for the linear threshold ABM and apply it to predict ABM behaviour on empirical networ...

  4. An Exploration of Social Identity: The Geography and Politics of News-Sharing Communities in Twitter

    CERN Document Server

    Herdağdelen, Amaç; Gard-Murray, Alexander; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2012-01-01

    The importance of collective social action in current events is manifest in the Arab Spring and Occupy movements. Electronic social media have become a pervasive channel for social interactions, and a basis of collective social response to information. The study of social media can reveal how individual actions combine to become the collective dynamics of society. Characterizing the groups that form spontaneously may reveal both how individuals self-identify and how they will act together. Here we map the social, political, and geographical properties of news-sharing communities on Twitter, a popular micro-blogging platform. We track user-generated messages that contain links to New York Times online articles and we label users according to the topic of the links they share, their geographic location, and their self-descriptive keywords. When users are clustered based on who follows whom in Twitter, we find social groups separate by whether they are interested in local (NY), national (US) or global (cosmopoli...

  5. Political and social context of not attaining the Millennium Development Goal to reduce poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Solís, Marco; Gil-González, Diana; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2008-10-01

    Eradication of poverty is Target 1 of the first of eight Millennium Development Goals, which were adopted by world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly in the year 2000. This study aims to explore the influence of political and social context in the achievement of poverty eradication. A retrospective ecological study was carried out to explore associations between progress towards the achievement of Target 1 in 2002 and political and social context variables. The study contained cross-sectional estimates in 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2002. The analysis and observation unit was the countries (n = 88). A descriptive analysis was made, as well as simple and multiple analyses with logistic regression. Of the 88 countries studied, 71 (80.7%) are not on track to achieving the target of eradicating poverty. The factor most associated with non-attainment of this goal was reduced government consumption per capita (odds ratio, OR: 13.8; 95% confidence interval, CI: 2.92-65.26). In the multiple regression analysis, the most significant factors are: reduced government consumption per capita (OR: 9.8; 95% CI: 1.82-52.75), losses in the balance between imports and exports (OR: 5.3; 95% CI: 1.32-21.54) and more inequality in family income (OR: 4.7; 95% CI: 1.12-20.01). Progress towards achievement of Target 1 seems to be hindered, fundamentally, by the significant reduction in government consumption in certain countries and the absence of redistribution policies. To understand the political determinants of poverty, more attention must be paid to the national and international political milieu, which seem to have a relevant impact on this problem and hence on population health.

  6. Creation of positive image in small business as social technology

    OpenAIRE

    Bokareva V. B.

    2011-01-01

    Article purpose is the analysis of creation of positive image in small-scale business as social technology. Problems: to make definition of small-scale business and social technologies; to allocate intrinsic characteristics of social technologies; to define technolozation process of formation of image. The practical importance of article consists in possibility of application of the resulted recommendations in practice of social management by small-scale business.

  7. Political representation for social justice in nursing: lessons learned from participant research with destitute asylum seekers in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthill, Fiona

    2016-09-01

    The concept of social justice is making a revival in nursing scholarship, in part in response to widening health inequalities and inequities in high-income countries. In particular, critical nurse scholars have sought to develop participatory research methods using peer researchers to represent the 'voice' of people who are living in marginalized spaces in society. The aim of this paper is to report on the experiences of nurse and peer researchers as part of a project to explore the experiences of people who find themselves destitute following the asylum process in the UK. In seeking to explore social injustice, three challenges are identified: lack of a robust political theory, institutional/professional constraints and an absence of skills to engage with the politics of social (in)justice. Each challenge is presented, opposing voices outlined and some possible solutions are suggested. The work of political theorist Nancy Fraser is used as a conceptual framework, in particular her focus on mis/framing and political representation for social justice. In addition, it is suggested that social justice needs to be further embedded in nursing policy and curriculum. Finally, nurses are encouraged to develop practical political skills to engage with both politics and the media in a neoliberal globalizing world.

  8. Social Technologies to Jump Start Geoscience Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Christopher; Martinez, Cynthia; Gonzales, Leila

    2010-05-01

    Collaborative and social technologies have been increasingly used to facilitate distributed data collection and observation in science. However, "Web 2.0" and basic social media are seeing limited coordinated use in building student and early-career geoscientists knowledge and understanding of the profession and career for which they have undertaken. The current generation of geology students and early career professionals are used to ready access to myriad of information and interaction opportunities, but they remain largely unaware about the geoscience profession, what the full scope of their opportunities are, and how to reach across institutional and subdisciplinary boundaries to build their own professional network. The American Geological Institute Workforce Program has tracked and supported the human resources of the geosciences since 1952. With the looming retirement of Baby Boomers, increasing demand for quality geoscientists, and a continued modest supply of students entering the geosciences, AGI is working to strengthen the human resource pipeline in the geosciences globally. One aspect of this effort is the GeoConnection Network, which is an integrated set of social networking, media sharing and communication Web 2.0 applications designed to engage students in thinking about careers in the geosciences and enabling them to build their own personal professional network. Developed by the American Geological Institute (AGI), GeoConnection links practicing and prospective geoscientists in an informal setting to share information about the geoscience profession, including student and career opportunities, current events, and future trends in the geosciences. The network includes a Facebook fan page, YouTube Channel, Twitter account and GeoSpectrum blog, with the goal of helping science organizations and departments recruit future talent to the geoscience workforce. On the social-networking platform, Facebook, the GeoConnection page is a forum for students and

  9. POLITICAL POWER IN THE PRISM OF POLITICAL ANALYSIS (EXPERIENCE REVIEW OF CURRENT RESEARCH DIRECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Kuryukin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The broad theoretical material considered relevant areas of the study of political power. Reveals the patterns of occurrence and development of a strictly scientific views on political power as a phenomenon and a social process. Determined the current trends of development of theoreticalunderstanding of political power in relation to the stages of its evolution. The most urgent technological model of exercising political power.

  10. Theoretical Insights for Developing the Concept of Social Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Skaržauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—Social technologies continue to grow in popularity in society. Even though the term “social technology” is most commonly used to refer to new social media such as Twitter and Facebook, a redefinition of this concept based on the original definition is needed. Nowadays the concept of “social technology” has several aspects, which destabilize the dominant image of technology. It emphasizes the social sciences and the humanities as shapers of society, reconsiders the strength of “soft technologies.” The aim of this paper is to provide rich insight into the concept of social technologies’ and to develop the meaning of social technologies in information and knowledge society by analysing new needs and application forms of social technologies.Findings—the research contributed to the understanding of the concept of social technologies. Based on the analysis and synthesis of the scientific literature, a theoretical framework for defining social technologies was developed.Research limitations/implications—the research is limited in a few aspects. For a deeper understanding of social technologies and for developing technological perspectives in social sciences a broader theoretical, as well as empirical, research is necessary. In order to generalise the research findings, further research should include different dimensions from the perspective of other sciences.

  11. Socializing the public: invoking Hannah Arendt's critique of modernity to evaluate reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The article examines the writings of one of the most influential political philosophers, Hannah Arendt, and specifically focuses on her views regarding the distinction between the private and the public and the transformation of the public to the social by modernity. Arendt's theory of human activity and critique of modernity are explored to critically evaluate the social contributions and implications of reproductive technologies especially where the use of such technologies is most dominant within Western societies. Focusing on empirical studies on new reproductive technologies in Israel, it is argued, powerfully demonstrates Arendt's theory, and broadens the perspectives through which society should evaluate these new technologies towards a more reflective understanding of its current laws and policies and their affect on women more generally.

  12. Social mobility in 20 modern societies: The role of economic and political context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Meir; Andersen, Robert

    2012-05-01

    It is commonly argued that social mobility rates are influenced by economic and political conditions. Nevertheless, research on this issue has tended to be hindered by two limitations that make it difficult to draw strong conclusions about contextual effects: (1) seldom have country-level and individual-level influences been tested simultaneously, and (2) only rarely have data more recent than the 1970s been employed. We improve on previous research by employing multilevel models fitted to relatively recent survey data collected from 20 modern societies by the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) and national-level characteristics derived from various official sources. Our findings demonstrate systematic cross-national variation in the association between the occupational status of respondents and their fathers. Consistent with the industrialization thesis, this variation is positively associated with per-capita GDP, suggesting that more affluent nations are characterized by more open and fluid stratification structures. Our results also suggest the importance of political regimes and migration for social mobility. In contrast, economic inequality appears to explain very little of the cross-national variation in mobility rates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Impact of a ministry edict: social and political aspects of obstetric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Fernando; Moraes, Nilson Alves; Nascimento, Maria Aparecida de Luca

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative study presents the impact of the Ministerial Edict (number 2.815/98) relative to the inclusion of a set of procedures created by the obstetrician nurses in Public Health System (Sistema Unico de Saúde--SUS). The objectives of this study are: present two excerpts which were published in a very popular newspaper and in a bulletin of the medical professional segment in 1998; analyze TV news which constitute different and tense discourses. The study identified two ideas, which were based on three pieces of news collected from the press. The first idea corresponds to the lack of visibility regarding the technical competence of obstetrician nurses in the social context. The second is related to the political acknowledgement of this service, which can be observed through the payment of obstetric nursing procedures according to a price list established by the Public Health System. Our final considerations are related to the social and political situation of obstetric nursing, in spite of the interventionist manipulation of society carried out by the media, which tries to create social-ideological discourses in order to obtain consensus and (re) produce truths.

  14. Political Dysmetropsia – Activist tactics in the (under)formatted world of social media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Hjalmar Alexander Bang; Birkbak, Andreas; Madsen, Anders Koed

    ’s agnostic relation to content. Activists meet an abundance of opportunities to engage in things near and far, and big and small issues, all mixed up and treated similarly by the social media platform. Drawing on Thévenot, we can say that both familiar and public ways of communicating are present side......In an age of social media, activists are met with an abundance of opportunities to engage in things near and far. An activist engaged in environmental causes, for instance, might be presented with a photo from his brother’s community garden next to a plea from Greenpeace to support wildlife...... to as ‘political dysmetropsia’, borrowing the name of a group of visual illusions, which distort one’s sense of size or depth. This paper presents a study of how activists handle political dysmetropsia in their social media practices. We draw on Thévenot’s sociology of engagement to argue that engagement always...

  15. Sense of community, neighboring, and social capital as predictors of local political participation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingwen; Perkins, Douglas D; Chow, Julian Chun-Chung

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the state of sense of community, neighboring behavior, and social capital in the People's Republic of China, and explores their ability to predict local political participation, in the form of voting in elections for Urban Resident/Rural Villager Committees. Using a nationally representative survey, rural, older and married residents and those with a primary or high school education and higher perceived socio-economic status are more likely to participate. In rural areas, men are more likely than women to vote. For urban residents, knowing one's neighbors is more important whereas in rural areas, neighboring behavior is more important, but both predict voting. Social capital does not generally predict Chinese people's local political participation. Western definitions of social capital derived from theories about networking, bonding and bridging ties may be too culturally individualistic for China, whose collectivist society and agrarian kinship networks predate Communism. Simply knowing and helping one's neighbors, rather than more abstract notions of trust, reciprocity or membership, may lead to the development of local democracy.

  16. The politics of technology and site location: impact of state interventionism on an Indian public sector firm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Subramanian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Can an industrial organisation simultaneously fulfil economic and social functions, that is to say successfully reconcile its own priorities of optimal resource utilisation and productive efficiency with the larger objectives of social justice defined for it by public authorities? This is the central question this paper whose compass is restricted to the 1980s asks, and seeks to answer on the basis of a study of locational and technology choices at a big public sector manufacturing firm, Indian Telephone Industries. It will show how decisions pertaining both to the implantation of new state-owned factories and the sourcing of technology were shaped not by an economic rationale but a political one where employment generation took precedence over all other considerations. This was a consequence, on the one hand, of the paradigm of state-initiated industrial development embraced by India after Independence in 1947 and which held out the promise of future prosperity for the population at large; on the other, of the mode of governance prevailing in public enterprises where state interventionism rhymed with the complete loss of autonomy for managements. The paper concludes by pointing out that however justified the redistributive goals allocated to public enterprises from the standpoint of improving living standards, they proved highly detrimental to their efficient working as well as onerous for the exchequer.

  17. Bedouin in Lebanon: Social discrimination, political exclusion, and compromised health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatty, Dawn; Mansour, Nisrine; Yassin, Nasser

    2013-04-01

    Global inequalities in health have long been associated with disparities between rich and poor nations. The middle-income countries of the Levant (Lebanon, Syria and Jordan) have developed models of health care delivery that mirror the often complex make-up of their states. In Lebanon, which is characterized by political clientelism and sectarian structures, access to health care is more contingent on ethnicity and religious affiliation than on poverty. This case study of the Bedouin of the Middle Bekaa Valley of Lebanon is based on interviews with policymakers, health care providers and the Bedouin as part of a study funded by the European Commission between 2006 and 2010. The study explores the importance of considering social discrimination and political exclusion in understanding compromised health care. Three decades after the Declaration of Alma Ata (1978), which declared that an acceptable level of health care for all should be attained by the year 2000, the Bedouin community of Lebanon remains largely invisible to the government and, thus, invisible to national health care policy and practice. They experience significant social discrimination from health practitioners and policymakers alike. Their unfair treatment under the health system is generally disassociated from issues of wealth or poverty; it is manifested in issues of access and use, discrimination, and resistance and agency. Overcoming their political exclusion and recognizing the social discrimination they face are steps that can be taken to protect and promote equal access to basic reproductive and child health care. This case study of the Bedouin in Lebanon is also relevant to the health needs of other marginalized populations in remote and rural areas.

  18. Gender-based violence in Egypt: analyzing impacts of political reforms, social, and demographic change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosetti, Elena; Abu Amara, Nisrin; Condon, Stéphanie

    2013-03-01

    Over recent decades, Egypt has witnessed developments in gender equality. This article discusses recent changes relating to violence against women within this context. Statistical data from the Egyptian DHS surveys is used to describe trends in reported violence and in attitudes toward marital abuse, as well as to examine the survey tools used to measure violence. While findings reflect a growing awareness regarding the issue, the number of women reporting spousal violence remained stable during the study period. The results are contextualized within the political and social debate in which NGO's and women's rights activists play a central role.

  19. POLITICAL EDUCATION, SOCIAL REPRESENTATIONS AND GEOGRAPHY: a proposal for secondary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pasti

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This paper discusses a proposal for political education conducted for high school students, from a conflictual approach. We focus on a method for planning and executing the activities, based on the theory of social representations. RESUMO: O presente artigo apresenta uma proposta de projeto de formação política realizado para estudantes do ensino médio, a partir de uma abordagem dialética e com foco no método utilizado para planejamento e preparação das atividades, baseado na teoria das representações sociais.

  20. What Inverted U Can Do for Your Country: A Curvilinear Relationship Between Confidence in the Social System and Political Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocka, Aleksandra; Górska, Paulina; Jost, John T; Sutton, Robbie M; Bilewicz, Michał

    2017-08-24

    We examined the link between political engagement and the tendency to justify the sociopolitical system. On one hand, confidence in the system should be negatively related to political engagement, insofar as it entails reduced desire for social change; on the other hand, system confidence should also be positively related to political engagement to the extent that it carries an assumption that the system is responsive to citizens' political efforts. Because of the combination of these 2 opposing forces, the motivation for political engagement should be highest at intermediate levels of system confidence. Five studies revealed a negative quadratic relationship between system confidence and normative political engagement. In 2 representative surveys, Polish participants with moderate levels of system confidence were more likely to vote in political elections (Study 1) and to participate in solidarity-based collective action (Study 2). Two field studies demonstrated a negative quadratic relationship between system confidence and actual participation in political demonstrations (gender equality and teachers' protests in Poland; Studies 3 and 4). This pattern of results was further corroborated by analyses of data from 50 countries drawn from the World Value Survey: we observed negative quadratic relationships between system confidence and collective action as well as voting. These relationships were stronger in democratic (vs. nondemocratic) regimes (Study 5). Our results suggest that some degree of system confidence might be useful to stimulate political engagement within the norms of the system. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. When 'I' equals 'we' : Exploring the relation between social and personal identity of extreme right-wing political party members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baray, Gamze; Postmes, Tom; Jetten, Jolanda

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of self-defining groups to explain how personal and social aspects of identity relate to each other among members of an extreme right-wing political party. Two studies were conducted. Study 1 examined how affiliation with a social group that has clear-cut, rigid nor

  2. When 'I' equals 'we' : Exploring the relation between social and personal identity of extreme right-wing political party members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baray, G.; Postmes, T.; Jetten, J

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of self-defining groups to explain how personal and social aspects of identity relate to each other among members of an extreme right-wing political party. Two studies were conducted. Study 1 examined how affiliation with a social group that has clear-cut, rigid nor

  3. Civic Education as a Collaborative Dimension of Social Studies Education in Attainment of Political Ethics in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dania, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The paper investigated Civic Education as a collaborative dimension of Social Studies Education in attainment of political ethics in Nigeria. The study adopted the survey research design. The sample for the study consisted of 580 Social Studies teachers selected from thirty secondary schools in the three senatorial districts of Delta State. The…

  4. Eugenics, politics and the state: social democracy and the Swiss 'gardening state'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottier, Véronique

    2008-06-01

    This article explores the connections between eugenics, politics and the state, taking the Swiss case as a particular focus. It is argued that Switzerland provides a historical example of what Bauman [Bauman, Z. (1989). Modernity and the Holocaust. Cambridge: Polity Press.] describes as 'gardening states': states that are concerned with eliminating the 'bad weeds' from the national garden and thereby constructing sharply exclusionary national identities. The Swiss experiments with eugenics (1920s-1960s) can be seen as an example of an ongoing struggle against 'difference'. Against this backdrop I will examine, first, the ways in which state regulation of reproductive sexuality, and other eugenic measures, became central mechanisms for dealing with cultural and other 'differences' in the Swiss nation. Second, I will analyse the gendered nature of such mechanisms, as well as the preoccupation with racial 'difference' exemplified by eugenic policies towards 'Gypsies'. To conclude, I will examine the impact of political institutions and political ideology, in particular, social democracy, on these eugenic gardening efforts.

  5. Effects of first time voters’ political social media use on electoral behaviour - A smartphone-based measurement of media exposure to political information in an election campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohme, Jakob; de Vreese, Claes; Andersen, Kim

    The relationship between the citizens, the media, and political actors in democracies has changed over the last decade, particularly in response to changes in the media environment, which are amplified by digital communication. Nowadays it’s nothing new that online media play a main role in citiz......The relationship between the citizens, the media, and political actors in democracies has changed over the last decade, particularly in response to changes in the media environment, which are amplified by digital communication. Nowadays it’s nothing new that online media play a main role...... in citizens’ political media diet. Especially social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter or YouTube offer an up-to-date stream of information, easy to tune in and with personalized content citizens (or at least their network) are interested in. A recent study by PEW (Mitchell, Gottfried & Matsa, 2015......) showed that 61 % of citizens between 18-33 years old name ‘Facebook’ when being asked where they have received information about politics in the last week; for 34-49 year Facebook is still the main source for political information this age group. But while we watch the digitalization undermining formerly...

  6. Political Sociology and Social Movements%政治社会学与社会运动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    铁锴

    2015-01-01

    上世纪70年代,社会运动的研究一直处在一个多样化的探索社会结构和政治行为之间关系的社会学传统中,并专注于解释运动的意识形态、目的、动机、或暴力倾向等政治取向变量。随后,一个摆脱传统的观点重新定义了核心问题,它从根本上缩小了研究动员过程的兴趣范围:无论他们是谁,无论他们的目标是什么,为了成长和成功,社会团体怎么样调动资源,招募追随者并驾御政治环境。批评者后来坚持认为,意义的建构、集体身份的形成、情绪的刺激和放大在动员中会发挥重要却被忽视的作用,他们这些可选方案对已经缩小的问题建构本身也没有构成挑战,由此产生的子领域在很大程度上放弃了寻求解释运动的政治取向的变化。在革命、工会和民族动员相关领域的研究人员保留了解释政治取向的兴趣,尽管他们常常认为这主要是动员的副产品。正在复苏的关于社会结构对运动政治取向影响的理论将需要整合来自相关研究主题广泛而分散的洞见。%Until the 1970s,the study of social movements was firmly within a diverse sociological tradition that explored the relationship between social structure and political behavior,and was preoccupied with explaining variation in the political orienta⁃tion of movements:their ideologies,aims,motivations or propensities for violence. Subsequently,a breakaway tradition rede fi ned the central problem,radically narrowing the scope of interest to the process of mobilization—how social groups, whoever they are and whatever their aims,marshal resources,recruit adherents,and navigate political envi⁃ronments in order to grow and succeed. Critics would later insist that the construction of meaning,the forma⁃tion of collective identities,and the stimulation and amplification of emotions play vital and neglected roles in mobilization,but these alternatives

  7. Effect of (social) media on the political figure fever model: Jokowi-fever model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Benny; Samat, Nor Azah

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, political figures begin to utilize social media as one of alternative to engage in communication with their supporters. Publics referred to Jokowi, one of the candidates in Indonesia presidential election in 2014, as the first politician in Indonesia to truly understand the power of social media. Social media is very important in shaping public opinion. In this paper, effect of social media on the Jokowi-fever model in a closed population will be discussed. Supporter population is divided into three class sub-population, i.e susceptible supporters, Jokowi infected supporters, and recovered supporters. For case no positive media, there are two equilibrium points; the Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio less than one and the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio greater than one. For case no negative media, there is only the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if the condition is satisfied. Generally, for case positive media proportion is positive, there is no Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point. The numerical result shows that social media gives significantly effect on Jokowi-fever model, a sharp increase or a sharp decrease in the number of Jokowi infected supporters. It is also shown that the boredom rate is one of the sensitive parameters in the Jokowi-fever model; it affects the number of Jokowi infected supporters.

  8. Investigating Political Participation and Social Information Using Big Data and a Natural Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hale, Scott A; Margetts, Helen; Yasseri, Taha

    2014-01-01

    Social information is particularly prominent in digital settings where the design of platforms can more easily give real-time information about the behaviour of peers and reference groups and thereby stimulate political activity. Changes to these platforms can generate natural experiments allowing an assessment of the impact of changes in social information and design on participation. This paper investigates the impact of the introduction of trending information on the homepage of the UK government petitions platform. Using interrupted time series and a regression discontinuity design, we find that the introduction of the trending feature had no statistically significant effect on the overall number of signatures per day, but that the distribution of signatures across petitions changes: the most popular petitions gain even more signatures at the expense of those with less signatories. We find significant differences between petitions trending at different ranks, even after controlling for each petition's ind...

  9. Applying Antonio Gramsci's philosophy to postcolonial feminist social and political activism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Louise

    2009-07-01

    Through its social and political activism goals, postcolonial feminist theoretical approaches not only focus on individual issues that affect health but encompass the examination of the complex interplay between neocolonialism, neoliberalism, and globalization, in mediating the health of non-Western immigrants and refugees. Postcolonial feminism holds the promise to influence nursing research and practice in the 21st century where health remains a goal to achieve and a commitment for humanity. This is especially relevant for nurses, who act as global citizens and as voices for the voiceless. The commitment of nursing to social justice must be further strengthened by relying on postcolonial theories to address issues of health inequities that arise from marginalization and racialization. In using postcolonial feminist theories, nurse researchers locate the inquiry process within a Gramscian philosophy of praxis that represents knowledge in action.

  10. From political economy to sociology: Francis Galton and the social-scientific origins of eugenics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Chris

    2011-09-01

    Having coined the word 'eugenics' and inspired leading biologists and statisticians of the early twentieth century, Francis Galton is often studied for his contributions to modern statistical biology. However, whilst documenting this part of his work, historians have frequently neglected crucial aspects of what motivated Galton to establish his eugenics research programme. Arguing that his work was shaped more by social than by biological science, this paper addresses these oversights by tracing the development of Galton's programme, from its roots in a debate about political economy to his appeals for it to be taken up by sociologists. In so doing, the paper not only returns Galton's ideas to their original context but also provides a reason to reflect on the place of the social sciences in history-of-science scholarship.

  11. [The social-political-environmental and health reality of families belonging to a vulnerable community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzari, Carla Kowalski; Backes, Dirce Stein; Backes, Marli Stein; Marchiori, Mara Teixeira; Souza, Martha Teixeira de; Carpes, Adriana Dornelles

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to ascertain the perception of community leadership, health professionals and users regarding citizenship status and the enhancement of the healthcare conditions of families belonging to a vulnerable community. This is an exploratory study of a qualitative nature, guided by theory based on data. Data were collected between July and December 2009, by means of interviews with four community health leaders, a team of eight family health team professionals and twelve health users. The codification of the data resulted in the following categories: Understanding the social conditions, the political conditions, the environmental conditions and the health conditions of families in a vulnerable community. The conclusions reached were, that if on the one hand the social security and health policies made it possible to reduce poverty and local inequalities, on the other hand they do not ensure the requisite enhancement of citizenship or even the improvement of health conditions.

  12. Individual and social determinants of obesity in strategic health messages: Interaction with political ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rachel; Hinnant, Amanda; Leshner, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Antiobesity health communication campaigns often target individual behavior, but these ads might inflate the role of individual responsibility at the expense of other health determinants. In a 2 × 2 full-factorial, randomized, online experiment, 162 American adults viewed antiobesity advertisements that varied in emphasizing social or individual causation for obesity through text and images. Locus for attribution of responsibility for obesity causes and solutions was measured, as was how these responses were moderated by political ideology. Participants who viewed text emphasizing individual responsibility were less likely to agree that genetic factors caused obesity. Conservative participants who viewed images of overweight individuals were less likely than liberal participants to agree that social factors were responsible for causing obesity. In addition, among conservative participants who viewed images of fast food versus images of overweight individuals, agreement that the food industry bore some responsibility mediated support for policy solutions to obesity. These findings, among others, demonstrate that awareness of multilevel determinants of health outcomes can be a precursor of support for policy solutions to obesity among those not politically inclined to support antiobesity policy. In addition, stigmatizing images of overweight individuals in antiobesity campaigns might overemphasize the role of individual behavior in obesity at the expense of other factors.

  13. Women's roundtable discussion on the economic, social and political impacts of the Southeast Asian financial crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, G

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes the main issues revealed at a women's roundtable discussion on the Economic, Social, and Political Impacts of the Southeast Asian Financial Crisis. The discussion was organized by the Development Alternatives of Women for the New Era (DAWN) and was held during April 12-14, 1998, in Manila, the Philippines. The aim was to explore the effects of the financial crisis and its management by states and multilateral agencies on women's political, economic, cultural, and social status; and to reach regional understanding of new issues for the women's movement in Asia and to identify areas of advocacy. Participants included women scholars and activists from Southeast, East, and South Asia; Africa; the Caribbean; Latin America; and the Pacific. Participants came from a wide variety of backgrounds. Nine issues were emphasized. For example, some predicted the currency devaluation before July 1997. The financial crisis is linked with globalization. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is the primary institution for addressing the financial crisis. IMF conditions on inflation rates and budget surpluses are recessionary and government budget oriented. The crisis has exposed cronyism and corruption within capitalism. Patriarchal values have reemerged as Asian values. Women have lost jobs and income, while the cost of living continues to increase. Prostitution has become more acceptable as legitimate work. Women's human rights are not legally protected. State ideology assumes domestic and sex roles. Issues in each region are identified. 14 key issues pertain to all regions.

  14. Governing at a distance: social marketing and the (bio) politics of responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawshaw, Paul

    2012-07-01

    In the recently published lectures from the College de France series, The Birth of Bio-Politics, Foucault (2009) offers his most explicit analysis of neo-liberal governmentality and its impact upon states and societies in the late twentieth century. Framed in terms of the bio-political as a mode of governance of populations and its relationship to neo-liberalism, these lectures offer a rich seam of theoretical resources with which to interrogate contemporary forms of governmentality. This paper seeks to apply these and some recent critical analysis by Foucauldian scholars, to the study of health governance, with particular reference to the use of social marketing as a strategy to improve the health of populations 'at a distance'. Reflecting a broader decollectivisation of welfare, such strategies are identified as exemplars of neo-liberal methods of governance through inculcating self management and individualisation of responsibility for health and wellbeing. Drawing on original empirical data collected with a sample of fifty long term unemployed men in 2009, this paper critically examines social marketing as a newer feature of health governance and reflects upon participants' responses to it as a strategy in the context of their wider understandings of health, choice and responsibility.

  15. Preventing adolescent pregnancy: biological, social, cultural, and political influences on age at first sexual intercourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Raquel; Araújo-Pedrosa, Anabela; Pereira, Joana; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2014-08-01

    Age at first sexual intercourse (AFSI) is the initial factor related to adolescents' sexual life that may increase the risk of adolescent pregnancy. We explored the biological, social, cultural, and political predictors of AFSI addressing several gaps that prevent us from generalizing the results of past research to adolescent pregnancy prevention. We also explored the moderating effects of cultural variables on the links between social and political predictors and AFSI. Our sample consisted of 889 Portuguese female adolescents aged 12-19. Earlier age at menarche, non-intact family structure, maternal history of adolescent pregnancy, lower maternal emotional warmth, absence of religious involvement, and living in Portugal's mainland and in a legal context penalizing abortion predicted earlier AFSI. School attendance predicted earlier AFSI among adolescents of European ethnic origin; adolescents of non-European ethnic origin presented the opposite, but non-significant, pattern. These findings suggest that, in addition to isolated characteristics, factors from different ecological contexts should be considered when planning interventions designed to foster healthy and informed transitions to sexual initiation and prevent the related risks of unwanted outcomes. We discuss implications for future research and practice.

  16. Challenging Social Class In American Political Discourse: Bernie Sanders, Occupy Wall Street, and the New Discourse of Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examines how the dominant ideas about social class in American political discourse have been challenged by the rhetoric of the Bernie Sanders campaign in the 2016 presidential primary election. Through critical discourse analysis, I find that Bernie Sanders is the main bearer of a new discourse of inequality in American political and public discourse, which has its roots in the Occupy Wall Street movement in 2011 and previous developing strands from the 1990s and early 2000s.

  17. The Value "Social Responsibility" as a Motivating Factor for Adolescents' Readiness to Participate in Different Types of Political Actions, and Its Socialization in Parent and Peer Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Based on a sample of tetrads (N = 839), including 16 year-old adolescents, their mothers, fathers, and same-sex friends, it was analyzed in which way the value social responsibility is related to adolescents' readiness for different types of political participation. Results showed that social responsibility was positively linked to readiness for…

  18. The Value "Social Responsibility" as a Motivating Factor for Adolescents' Readiness to Participate in Different Types of Political Actions, and Its Socialization in Parent and Peer Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Based on a sample of tetrads (N = 839), including 16 year-old adolescents, their mothers, fathers, and same-sex friends, it was analyzed in which way the value social responsibility is related to adolescents' readiness for different types of political participation. Results showed that social responsibility was positively linked to readiness for…

  19. [Political psychology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Mária; Bella, Tamás

    2013-04-21

    In Hungary one can mostly find references to the psychological processes of politics in the writings of publicists, public opinion pollsters, philosophers, social psychologists, and political analysts. It would be still important if not only legal scientists focusing on political institutions or sociologist-politologists concentrating on social structures could analyse the psychological aspects of political processes; but one could also do so through the application of the methods of political psychology. The authors review the history of political psychology, its position vis-à-vis other fields of science and the essential interfaces through which this field of science, which is still to be discovered in Hungary, connects to other social sciences. As far as its methodology comprising psycho-biographical analyses, questionnaire-based queries, cognitive mapping of interviews and statements are concerned, it is identical with the psychiatric tools of medical sciences. In the next part of this paper, the focus is shifted to the essence and contents of political psychology. Group dynamics properties, voters' attitudes, leaders' personalities and the behavioural patterns demonstrated by them in different political situations, authoritativeness, games, and charisma are all essential components of political psychology, which mostly analyses psychological-psychiatric processes and also involves medical sciences by relying on cognitive and behavioural sciences. This paper describes political psychology, which is basically part of social sciences, still, being an interdisciplinary science, has several ties to medical sciences through psychological and psychiatric aspects.

  20. Technology and Education: Non-prioritized Technology in an Adaptive Society: A Socio-political View. An Occasional Paper on Man/Society/Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, William G.

    This seminar paper explores the relationship between technology and society, based on the position that man has not developed a social system that gives adequate guidance to technology. The hypothesis is that if technology has no priority, then it has no purpose. Talcott Parsons' concepts of functional imperatives and pattern variables are…

  1. Technology and Education: Non-prioritized Technology in an Adaptive Society: A Socio-political View. An Occasional Paper on Man/Society/Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, William G.

    This seminar paper explores the relationship between technology and society, based on the position that man has not developed a social system that gives adequate guidance to technology. The hypothesis is that if technology has no priority, then it has no purpose. Talcott Parsons' concepts of functional imperatives and pattern variables are…

  2. Technology, Political Economy, and Economic Development in the Middle East and North Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brach, Juliane

    2009-01-01

    allocation of resources is rooted deeply in regional political economy structures. These results challenge the scholarly debate, but can help to understand why international structural adjustment programs that focused on privatization and trade liberalization only showed limited success in the MENA region....... efforts. Using cross-country regressions, this paper identifies two binding constraints to economic development in the Arab countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA): 1) Most countries are not able to apply or adopt existing technologies efficiently and 2) The economically inefficient...

  3. 论《比较政治制度》在大学生政治社会化过程的作用%Theory of comparative political system in college students' political socialization process role

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖勇

    2011-01-01

    大学生政治社会化具有实施主渠道的特定性、政治社会化过程的互动性、政治社会化环境的变动性等特征。大学生政治社会化的基本内容主要有政治理论知识、方向、情感和能力社会化四个方面。大学生政治社会过程存在“大学生接受正规政治系统影响的主动性不强”、“大学生继承创新主流政治文化的能力不够”、“政治行为能力不足”等障碍。影响大学生政治社会化的主要因素有政治社会化基础的脆弱、消极的政治态度定势、思维方式的缺陷等。比较政治制度的学习有助于提高大学生的政治修养和政治素质、有助力完善大学生的政治人格、有助力提高大学生的政治参与能力。%College students" political socialization of specificity in main channel with implementation of political socialization, interactivity, political socialization environmental changes in features. The basic content of college students " political socialization basically has political theory knowledge, the direction, the emotion and the socialization four aspects ability. College students" political social process exists "college students accept regular political system influence initiative is not strong", "college students of mainstream political culture inherited innovation ability enough" ,"political behavior ability inadequacy" barriers. The main affecting the university students" political socialization of political socialization factors are based vulnerability, negative political attitude, mode of thinking mode of flaws. Comparison of the political system study will help improve college students " political culture and political quality, help to improve college students" political personality, help improve university students" political participation ability.

  4. Scientific and Technological Literacy as a Social Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourez, Gerard

    1997-01-01

    Speculates on the strength of the relationships between science, technology, and society. Provides information on a social movement called Scientific and Technological Literacy (STL) and discusses how familiar individuals need to be with these concepts. (DDR)

  5. POLITICAL PARTY “UNITED RUSSIA” IN 2003-2014: CREATING OF NEW POLITICAL SPACE AND MODERNIZATION OF ECONOMY, BUSINESS AND SOCIAL SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Poletaev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the activities of the political party «United Russia» in the sphere of development and implementation of programs of socio-economic modernization, and reveals the essential role of the political party «United Russia» in the formation of mechanisms of interaction between government and business-community of Russia in 2003-2014. The author on the basis of the study notes that the political party «United Russia» in the period under review, highest priority attention to the formation in Russian Federation of a new political and business consciousness that is the key to further successful development of Russian innovative economy and business. The importance of the party «United Russia» gives the implementation of social programs of support, which aims to improve the social fabric of society, to promote training of highly qualified personnel, young specialists – managers, entrepreneurs, scientists, business managers, etc. a Special attention of the political party «United Russia» pays the elaboration of the strategy of innovative development, introduction in manufacture of nanotechnology, the development of fundamental science as a basis for future modernization breakthrough. The leadership of the party «United Russia» called for increased dialogue between government and business, strengthens constructive corporate engagement of business organizations and party structures in order to intensify the modernization process in the field of business and economics as well as to solve the strategic task – creation of innovative economy and knowledge-based business, modernization of Russia in the XXI century.

  6. The "chicken-and-egg" development of political opinionsThe roles of genes, social status, ideology, and information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beattie J D

    2017-01-01

    Twin studies have revealed political ideology to be partially heritable. Neurological research has shown that ideological differences are reflected in brain structure and response, suggesting a direct genotype-phenotype link. Social and informational environments, however, also demonstrably affect brain structure and response. This leads to a "chicken-and-egg" question: do genes produce brains with ideological predispositions, causing the preferential absorption of consonant information and thereby forming an ideology, or do social and informational environments do most of the heavy lifting, with genetic evidence the spurious artifact of outdated methodology? Or are both inextricably intertwined contributors? This article investigates the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to ideological development using a role-play experiment investigating the development of opinions on a novel political issue. The results support the view that the process is bidirectional, suggesting that, like most traits, political ideology is produced by the complex interplay of genetic and (social/informational) environmental influences.

  7. The Bruce Report and social welfare leadership in the politics of Toronto’s “Slums”, 1934–1939.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Slum clearance and rebuilding first became a serious political project in Toronto during the 1930s. Following the release of a systematic housing survey known as the Bruce Report (1934), a set of actors distinguished by their planning authority with respect to social agencies, influence over social work education, coordination of social research, and role as spokespersons of religious bodies inaugurated a political struggle over state power. While the campaign failed, it called forth a reaction from established authorities and reconfigured the local political field as it related to low-income housing. This article gives an account of these processes by drawing upon correspondence and minutes of meetings of city officials and the campaign’s organizers, newspaper clippings, and published materials.

  8. Resources and technologies in Social Occupational Therapy: actions with the poor youth in town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseli Esquerdo Lopesa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The METUIA team from the Occupational Therapy Department of the Federal University of Sao Carlos – UFSCar has been elaborating procedures and resources, which have produced contributions to the action of occupational therapy based on a local and communal dimension, aiming at a locally rooted technical contribution and directed to face the challenges of the social field. The territory notion adopted presupposes historical, economic, social and cultural dimensions that contextualize a given geographical area where the therapeutic and occupational action is developed. We have been dealing with questions related to the poor urban youth and working in the production of social technologies (understood as products, techniques or replicable methodologies developed in interaction with the community, and that represent alternatives for social transformation, which have been able to foster new possibilities of action, integrating and articulating actions of macro and micro social scope. This article presents discussions on Workshops of Dynamics, Activities and Projects; Individual and Territorial Follow-up; Articulation of Resources in the Social Field; and Dynamization of the Social Care Network. We support a continuous and critical reflection on the labor process, assuming the technical, ethical and political dimensions that comprise the professional qualification of occupational therapists. We also advocate that the practical and conceptual existence of these technologies promotes actions associated with the social question of the lives of these young individuals, seeking the expansion of equality, recognition of differences, and their space in the public sphere, so that more participation can be produced with more freedom, autonomy and solidarity.

  9. Beyond Rock. Social commitment and political conscience through Popular Music in Australia 1976 - 2002. The case of Midnight Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bonastre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The work and career of Midnight Oil illustrate a case of interaction between culture and politics in Australia. Furthermore they represent an example of social commitment from the sphere of urban popular culture. For a quarter of a century Midnight Oil offered a critical and ideological interpretation of the Australian social and political evolution. Aware of and sensitive to changes and events happening around them, five Sydneysiders thought about Australian identity in terms of what they considered to be their national challenges from a universal perspective. Hence, they approached issues like pacifism, Indigenous rights and environmentalism and developed a social and political discourse based on the defence of human rights and a condemnation of capitalist excesses. Through more than a hundred songs and almost two thousand gigs the band urged politicians to reassess the institutions. At the same time they criticized people’s apathy asking them for a deeper engagement with the development of the country’s welfare. Finally, in December 2002, Peter Garrett quit his singer-activist journey to launch a political career by joining the Australian Labor Party, for which he is the current Minister for School Education, Early Childhood and Youth in the Julia Gillard Government. It is thus that now we can make sense of the extent to which the political and social message of a rock band can actually generate enough credibility to allow for the lead singer´s transition from the stage to parliament.

  10. The social comfort of wearable technology and gestural interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lucy E; Profita, Halley; Zeagler, Clint; Clawson, James; Gilliland, Scott; Do, Ellen Yi-Luen; Budd, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The "wearability" of wearable technology addresses the factors that affect the degree of comfort the wearer experiences while wearing a device, including physical, psychological, and social aspects. While the physical and psychological aspects of wearing technology have been investigated since early in the development of the field of wearable computing, the social aspects of wearability have been less fully-explored. As wearable technology becomes increasingly common on the commercial market, social wearability is becoming an ever-more-important variable contributing to the success or failure of new products. Here we present an analysis of social aspects of wearability within the context of the greater understanding of wearability in wearable technology, and focus on selected theoretical frameworks for understanding how wearable products are perceived and evaluated in a social context. Qualitative results from a study of social acceptability of on-body interactions are presented as a case study of social wearability.

  11. Multiethnic Neighbourhoods as Sites of Social Capital Formation: Examining Social to Political "Integration" in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ranu

    2006-01-01

    In an "ideal" democratic society, publicly funded schools serve many purposes. Aside from its educational mandate, schools are places for neighbourhood integration, social capital formation and the fostering of civil society. For newly arrived immigrants, especially those with young children, schools are important sites of settlement experiences.…

  12. Social Status, Cognitive Ability, and Educational Attainment as Predictors of Liberal Social Attitudes and Political Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoon, Ingrid; Cheng, Helen; Gale, Catharine R.; Batty, G. David; Deary, Ian J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the prospective associations between family socio-economic background, childhood intelligence ("g") at age 11, educational and occupational attainment, and social attitudes at age 33 in a large (N = 8804), representative sample of the British population born in 1958. Structural equation Modeling identified a latent trait of…

  13. Social shaping of technology in TA and HTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Christian; Yoshinaka, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses how the social shaping of technology (SST) approach may be useful in understanding the role played by technology assessment within the context of technological development and change. It is proposed that an SST perspective on TA (or HTA) yields particular insight, regardless...... of whether or not the TA activity bases itself on a social shaping understanding of technology. This is because SST addresses the socially negotiated character of technological development, where TA itself may be construed as an element influencing the process of such negotiation. At the same time, TA...... is a construction, that is, itself a product of negotiations involving social actors. Thus, an understanding that TA is socially shaped, and is involved in the shaping of technology, opens up for a perspective on TA as both entailing constraints and enablements within the context of the particular agenda...

  14. The Process of Democratisation and Social Equality, Inequality. The Old-New Challenge of Politics and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sándor KARIKÓ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Social equality is a primeval and precious concept, a natural history-shaper fortitude, an orphic requirement and impression. Modern (from the new and recent era politics ceaselessly and directly claims that every person is equal in the social sense. If the state of political and legal equality is confronted by all-time reality, it becomes immediately clear that in everyday life we cannot find social equality, but the gloomy atmosphere of social inequality. This study (presentation argues that in the contention against social inequality the education for democracy in the short run and directly can only provide little help, however, in a long-term view and indirectly it is able to offer much more. Therefore, from this point of view we can face a negative and positive tendency and effort.

  15. Social Issues in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Master's Degrees: The Socio-Political Stakes of Curricular Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fages, Volny; Albe, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a study of the various ways in which social and ethical issues are integrated in the curricula of nanoscience and nanotechnology master degrees. During the last decade, new types of courses have appeared in science and technology universities, first in the United States and now reaching Europe and France, associating a call for…

  16. Impact of Globalisation On Economic Growth in Romania: An Empirical Analysis of Its Economic, Social and Political Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Neagu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the link between globalisation and economic growth in Romania for a time span of 24 years. Data from World Bank were used in an econometrical model in order to highlight the impact of globalisation, expressed by the KOF globalisation index and its components (economic, social and political globalisation indices on economic growth rate. A statistical strong and positive link is found between GDP per capita dynamics and overall globalisation index as well as between GDP growth rate and economic and political globalisation, except the social dimension of globalisation which has a negative impact on economic growth in Romania for the time span 1990-2013.

  17. Political Reform and the Historical Trajectories of U.S. Social Movements in the Twentieth Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenta, Edwin; Caren, Neal; Stobaugh, James E.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a political reform theory, a political and historical institutionalist argument that holds that shifts in political structures, partisan regimes and policy greatly influence movements. We appraise this argument, along with resource mobilization, political opportunity and media alternatives, by analyzing 600,000 articles in the "New York…

  18. The Social Tenant, the Law and the UK’s Politics of Austerity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P Carr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers current cuts to social housing provision in the UK made in the name of austerity. It focuses particularly on the ‘bedroom tax’ —the cut to housing benefit for working-age social housing tenants whose property is deemed to provide more bedrooms than they need. It begins by explaining the long-standing political project of social housing in the UK. This background is important to explain the emergence of a discursively ghettoized population within social housing. We then turn to the ‘bedroom tax’ itself. We consider the two quite separate rationales underpinning its introduction. One rationale —fairness— is the focus of the politicians; the other —under-occupation— provides the focus for policy analysts. Both offer different versions of truth about the social in social housing and both are unconvincing. For us, this is significant because the politics of austerity require the support of public opinion. We then consider some strategies of resistance to the ‘bedroom tax’ which harness the disruptive potential of fairness before concluding that the bedroom tax requires relatively little unpacking to reveal it as an ideological device which operates to increase inequality whilst deploying a rhetoric of fairness. Este artículo analiza los recortes en las prestaciones de viviendas sociales que se realizan actualmente en el Reino Unido en nombre de la austeridad. Se centra particularmente en el 'impuesto dormitorio' -el recorte en el subsidio de vivienda para inquilinos en edad de trabajar, cuya vivienda se considera que tiene más dormitorios de los que necesitan. Comienza explicando el proyecto político de viviendas sociales, de larga tradición en el Reino Unido. Estos antecedentes son importantes para explicar el surgimiento de guetos en las viviendas sociales. A continuación se centra en el "impuesto dormitorio” en sí mismo. Se analizan los dos diferentes motivos que sustentan su promulgación. Una es

  19. 思想政治教育的政治社会化作用探讨%A Probe into the Political Socialization of the Ideological and Political Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛

    2012-01-01

    Political and ideological education is a comprehensive education carried out by the ruling class and political party in a particular society in order to achieve its political goal. Political socialization is the process in which individuals gain political knowledge and develop political attitudes. It is also the process of instilling political standard into social members in a specific social culture. Political and ideo- logical education aims to cultivate political identification of social members, increase their political partic- ipation and improve their political skills. It is an important means of political socialization. However, political and ideological education, while serving the function of political socialization, should deal with some specific aspects. One is the object of political education. Special attention should be paid to the youth and the migrant population. Attention should also be paid to the new social environment and new variables such as network, which exert a great influence on the political and ideological education.%思想政治教育是在特定社会中居于统治地位的阶级、政党为了实现政治目标而对社会成员采取的综合性教育实践活动;而政治社会化既是社会个体获取政治知识、形成政治态度、培养政治情感等的过程,又是特定社会培养、训练社会成员政治规范等的过程。思想政治教育能够培养社会成员的政治认同,并增长其政治参与知识,提高其政治技能,是政治社会化的一个重要手段,具有政治社会化作用。但是,思想政治教育在发挥政治社会化作用时也有应该注意的问题,在教育对象上要注意突出教育对象的选择性,青年人和社会流动人口需要倍加注意;并且也要注意新的社会环境新生变量如网络对思想政治教育社会化作用发挥的影响。

  20. Social Technologies for Online Learning: Theoretical and Contextual Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Karen; Jones, Allan; Holden, Georgina; Curcher, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Three exemplars are presented of social technologies deployed in educational contexts: wikis; a photo-sharing environment; and a social bookmarking tool. Students were found to engage with the technologies selectively, sometimes rejecting them, in the light of their prior conceptions of education. Some students (a minority in all the studies) were…

  1. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  2. Technology in Social Work Education: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wretman, Christopher J.; Macy, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing prevalence of technology-based instruction, social work faculty need a clear understanding of the strengths and limitations of these methods. We systematically examined the evidence for technology-based instruction in social work education. Using comprehensive and rigorous methods, 38 articles were included in the review. Of…

  3. Social Crisis Prevention: A Political Alert Index for the Israel-Palestine Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    André De Palma; Federico Perali; Nathalie Picard; Roberto Ricciuti; Alexandrina Ioana Scorbureanu

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a novel approach to crisis prevention based on data on premonitory political and religious events and the international media coverage of publicly sensitive circumstances. We implement our method to the Israel-Palestine conflict. First we identify two main political scenarios associated with "good" and "bad" political times of low or high levels of political unrest using a hierarchical clustering technique. Then we construct a political alert index to predict the probabili...

  4. The psychological effects of Apartheid psychoanalysis: social, moral and political influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommisse, J

    1986-01-01

    The notorious governmental policy of Apartheid affects the people of that country psychologically, as well as politically, socially, economically and medically. It does so in a variety of ways, including: the humiliating effects on blacks and arrogance inducing effects on whites; the disruption of family-life by the enforced migrant labor system; the stunted brain-development and behavioral effects that result from the inexcusably widespread childhood malnutrition in that wealthy country, (the world's 6th-largest food-exporter); the distortions and alienations in personality development, on racial lines; the mental breakdowns and suicides that result from the physical and mental torture that unchanged security-police detainees are subjected to while under interrogation. In addition, when mental health services are required they are grossly inferior for blacks, especially in the rural areas and particularly in out-patient care. The white-doctor: black-patient relationship, perforce the rule, is distinctly problematic in this socio-political climate. The World Medical Association and the World Psychiatric Association have been supportive to the South African government and silent, respectively, in the face of all the documented information on this hazardous public health situation. The United Nations and its agencies, the World Health Organization and the Centre Against Apartheid, should be commended for their work and unequivocal stands on this issue and should be heeded in their calls for a principled response by more of the world's psychiatric, psychological and medical communities.

  5. POSTMARXISMUL DESPRE APLICAREA IDEILOR MARXISTE ÎN CONTEXTUL SOCIAL-POLITIC ACTUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela POPA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Teoria postmarxistă reprezintă o abordare alternativă în raport cu teoria marxistă ortodoxă a fenomenelor de ordin sociopolitic şi, sub aspect teoretic, propune o revizuire a arsenalului conceptual marxist, iar sub aspect metodologic extinde spectrul analitic cu noi metode împrumutate din psihanaliză, structuralism şi poststructuralism. Promotorii postmarxis-mului sunt interesaţi în înţelegerea şi explicarea mecanismelor de formare a subiectivităţii individuale şi în revelarea diferenţelor identitare în cadrul societăţii contemporane.THE POST-MARXISM ON THE APPLICATION OF MARXIST IDEAS IN SOCIAL-POLITICAL ACTUAL CONTEXT Post-Marxist theory is an alternative approach to the classical Marxist theory of socio-political phenomena and proposes, theoretically, a revision of Marxist conceptual arsenal. Methodological, it extends the analytical spectrum with new borrowed methods from psychoanalysis, structuralism and poststructuralism. The promoters of Post-Marxism are interested in understanding and explaining the mechanisms of individual subjectivity formation and in revealing the identity differences in contemporary society.

  6. Hmong Across Borders or Borders Across Hmong? Social and Political Influences Upon Hmong People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasit Leepreecha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Hmong are a transnational ethnic people, because of their dispersal from China into Southeast Asia in the early 19th century and from Southeast Asia to Western countries from 1975 onward. However, even within the context of Southeast Asia and southern China, the Hmong are a transnational ethnic group, due to state boundaries and the enforcement of international laws.Scholars speak as though the Hmong population has crossed political and legal borders by their movement across state boundaries and international borders. However, I argue that it is the political, social, and legal borders that have cut across the Hmong people and subjected them to be citizens of different modern nation-states. Even in the present time, these borders still, and continuously, play important roles that cross and divide the Hmong people into distinctive subgroups and fragments. In this article, I will start by describing the generally understood situation of Hmong being across national borders, and then will explain my argument that borders are across the Hmong.

  7. Migrant female domestic workers: debating the economic, social and political impacts in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, B S; Huang, S; Gonzalez, J

    1999-01-01

    This article analyzes the impact of migrant female domestic workers on the socioeconomic and political context in Singapore. Although Singapore state policy opposes long-term immigration, there is a labor shortage which permits a transient work force of low-skilled foreign workers. In the late 1990s, Singapore had over 100,000 foreign maids, of whom 75% were from the Philippines, 20% were from Indonesia, and the rest were from Sri Lanka. Legislation ensures their short-term migrant status, restricts their numbers, and governs their employment. Migrant workers are also regulated through a stringent allocation system based on household income of employers and the need for caregivers for children. Work permits are conditioned on non-marriage to citizens of Singapore or pregnancy. Terms and conditions of migrant employment are not specified, which permits long hours of work and potential for inhumane treatment. Migrant women fulfill jobs not desired by natives and accept these jobs at lower wages. There is disagreement about the motivation for the maid levy and its need, fairness, and effectiveness in reducing demand for foreign maids. Most public discussion focuses on social values and morality of foreign maids. Politically, tensions arise over the legality of migration, which results from tourist worker migration to Singapore and circumvents Filipino labor controls. Most of the adjustment cases that come to the attention of OWWA are tourist workers. Policies should be gender sensitive.

  8. Social structures and political alternatives in Latin America / Estructuras sociales y alternativas políticas en América Latina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Maestre Alfonso

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The Importance and centrality of social structures becomes more evident in those societies in which social problems, along with cultural or historical factors, are the cause of deep socio-cultural differences or social distance. This is the case in Latin America, where two kinds of social structures can be found: modern and archaic or traditional. Belonging to one of them or to the other will reinforce or weaken the choices for economic and political options. An apparently inevitable failure of most public administrations is their tendency to forget or ignore those situations, or even to address and solve the social problem.

  9. Rightist Education and Godly Technology: Cultural Politics, Gender, and the Work of Home Schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Apple

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The secularity of the state is seen by 'authoritarian populist' religious conservatives as imposing a world-view that is out of touch with the deep religious commitments that guide their lives. In the process, authoritarian populists have taken on subaltern identities and claimed that they are the last truly dispossessed groups. To demonstrate their increasing power in educational and social policy, I situate a specific set of technologies-the Internet-within the social context of its use in this community. I focus on the growing home-schooling movement and suggest that to understand the societal meaning and uses of these technologies, we need to examine the social movement that provides the context for their use. I also argue that we need to analyze critically the kind of labor that is required in home schooling, who is engaged in such labor, and how such labor is interpreted by the actors who perform it.

  10. The Role of the Technology Supplier in the Politics of Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian

    1996-01-01

    from a multitude of positions outside the factory. This includes the impacts through formation of subjectivity, labour market, social security, the origin of rawmateriel, ie.the production chains, and the technology used in the factory. On the basis of a Danish study the role of the technology supplier...... is then examined. It is argued that supplier and customer tend to build up a interdependency of economic, social and technical character, denoted as segments. The segments works as a fortification of a dominant alliance between suppliers representatives and parts of management. The segments further works...... as a inclusion mechanism for a technical and organizational solution and as exclusion of other alternatives. In this way the segments are extended factory regimes. Thus the argument made, is that Burawoys factory regime should be extended to an understanding of the social forces "behind" and "attached...

  11. Social Movements and New Forms of Political Organization: Podemos as a Hybrid Party

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Chironi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the restructuring of the party systems in several European countries was accompanied or preceded by massive waves of anti-austerity protests. Although the causal relation between these mobilizations and the rise of new parties has already been assessed, the organizational features remain understudied. To fill this gap, here we analyse the impact of the cycle of anti-austerity and pro-real democracy protests which emerged in 2011 with the birth and organizational development of the Spanish party Podemos. Bridging two subfields of social and political sciences—movement studies and party studies—we pay particular attention to the dichotomy between horizontality and verticality within Podemos' organization. In particular, we address the issues of social movement effects as well as party foundation and organizational development. Our main findings suggest that movement mobilization played a large role in shaping Podemos' foundational choices, particularly with reference to the fundamental principles of the party and its strategic positioning. Podemos is also experimenting new democratic methods internally. Nonetheless, empirical analysis shows that, overall, the influence of movements' organizational models on the organizational structure of the party has been limited. Yet, the result is a “hybrid” party that finds a balance between the horizontalism of social movements and the efficiency of parties.

  12. South-South cooperation in health: bringing in theory, politics, history, and social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle; Muntaner, Carles; Afzal, Zabia

    2017-10-02

    Since the mid-2000s, the practice of South-South cooperation in health (SSC) has attracted growing attention among policymakers, health and foreign affairs ministries, global health agencies, and scholars from a range of fields. But the South-South label elucidates little about the actual content of the cooperation and conflates the "where" with the "who, what, how, and why". While there have been some attempts to theorize global health diplomacy and South-South cooperation generally, these efforts do not sufficiently distinguish among the different kinds of practices and political values that fall under the South-South rubric, ranging from economic and geopolitical interests to social justice forms of solidarity. In the spirit of deepening theoretical, historical, and social justice analyses of SSC, this article: (1) critically revisits international relations theories that seek to explain SSC, exploring Marxian and other heterodox theories ignored in the mainstream literature; (2) traces the historical provenance of a variety of forms of SSC; and (3) introduces the concept of social justice-oriented South-South.

  13. The Digital Economy: Social Interaction Technologies – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teófilo Redondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction technologies (SIT is a very broad field that encompasses a large list of topics: interactive and networked computing, mobile social services and the Social Web, social software and social media, marketing and advertising, various aspects and uses of blogs and podcasting, corporate value and web-based collaboration, e-government and online democracy, virtual volunteering, different aspects and uses of folksonomies, tagging and the social semantic cloud of tags, blog-based knowledge management systems, systems of online learning, with their ePortfolios, blogs and wikis in education and journalism, legal issues and social interaction technology, dataveillance and online fraud, neogeography, social software usability, social software in libraries and nonprofit organizations, and broadband visual communication technology for enhancing social interaction. The fact is that the daily activities of many businesses are being socialized, as is the case with Yammer (https://www.yammer.com/, the social enterprise social network. The leitmotivs of social software are: create, connect, contribute, and collaborate.

  14. Diversity policy, social dominance, and intergroup relations: predicting prejudice in changing social and political contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimond, Serge; Crisp, Richard J; De Oliveira, Pierre; Kamiejski, Rodolphe; Kteily, Nour; Kuepper, Beate; Lalonde, Richard N; Levin, Shana; Pratto, Felicia; Tougas, Francine; Sidanius, Jim; Zick, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to authors of previous single-nation studies, we propose that supporting multiculturalism (MC) or assimilation (AS) is likely to have different effects in different countries, depending on the diversity policy in place in a particular country and the associated norms. A causal model of intergroup attitudes and behaviors, integrating both country-specific factors (attitudes and perceived norms related to a particular diversity policy) and general social-psychological determinants (social dominance orientation), was tested among participants from countries where the pro-diversity policy was independently classified as low, medium, or high (N = 1,232). Results showed that (a) anti-Muslim prejudice was significantly reduced when the pro-diversity policy was high; (b) countries differed strongly in perceived norms related to MC and AS, in ways consistent with the actual diversity policy in each country and regardless of participants' personal attitudes toward MC and AS; (c) as predicted, when these norms were salient, due to subtle priming, structural equation modeling with country included as a variable provided support for the proposed model, suggesting that the effect of country on prejudice can be successfully accounted by it; and (d) consistent with the claim that personal support for MC and AS played a different role in different countries, within-country mediation analyses provided evidence that personal attitudes toward AS mediated the effect of social dominance orientation on prejudice when pro-diversity policy was low, whereas personal attitudes toward MC was the mediator when pro-diversity policy was high. Thus, the critical variables shaping prejudice can vary across nations.

  15. [Social politics against poverty and in favor of health in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Irigoyen-Coria, Arnulfo; Gómez-Clavelina, Francisco Javier; Fernández-Ortega, Miguel Angel

    2006-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges that Mexico faces is to fight against the poverty. The transition of a characteristic welfare model from the government in a closed economy, to an open economy where the functions of the State are limited, has modified the modalities of the social politics against poverty. Six indispensable conditions are identified for poverty's reduction: 1. Economic development with stability in order to generate more and better jobs for poor people. 2. To improve regional economies. 3. To improve home conditions of poor people. 4. To elevate education levels (to encourage an authentic heath education). 5. To diminish catastrophic expenses for health problems. 6. Technical training for all workers. The impact of poverty over health can provide valuable elements to establish effective preventive strategies on health workers.

  16. Youths' views on corruption control in China: politics and social censure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guoping; Lo, T Wing; Li, Carrie

    2013-12-01

    It has been asserted that criminal law and common morality are not sufficient terms to describe specific behaviors as corruption because those in power have the capacity to include or exclude certain behavior as a category in the law. Thus, corruption should not be just treated as an objective behavioral category but as a form of social censure. This article reports on a quantitative and qualitative study that collected the views of Chinese youth on the control of corruption in China. It was found that they agreed with the moral-negative judgements behind the censure of corruption, and that bureaucratic forces can be mobilised to punish the corrupt and degrade their status. Mediation analysis discovered that political functions mediate the association between the moral-negative nature and bureaucratic form of the censure of corruption and status degradation of the censured.

  17. Latest legal and social developments in the euthanasia debate: bad moral consciences and political unrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, N

    2007-06-01

    Several events that took place during recent years, such as the French Act on the rights of patients and the end of life, the Terri Schiavo case and Lord Joffe's proposal for an Assisted Dying Bill in the United Kingdom, have triggered the debate on euthanasia more than ever. It is therefore opportune to revisit basic notions related thereto and to make a comparative analysis of the legal regime of euthanasia in several countries in Europe and elsewhere, as well as to try to see how the public awareness of the problem has of late developed. There seems to be a clear trend in many legal systems towards an increasing respect for the patient's right to self-determination. However, we are still looking at a complex social game, where legal and medical terminology are manipulated and euphemisms are invented in order to accommodate bad moral consciences and avoid political unrest.

  18. Corporate Power and Social Policy: The Political Economy of the Transnational Tobacco Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Chris; Lee, Kelley

    2009-12-01

    Drawing on published tobacco document research and related sources, this article applies Farnsworth and Holden's conceptual framework for the analysis of corporate power and corporate involvement in social policy (2006) to the transnational tobacco companies (TTCs). An assessment is made of TTCs' structural power, the impact upon their structural position of tobacco control (TC) policies, and their use of agency power. The analysis suggests that, as a result of the growth of TC policies from the 1950s onwards, TTCs have had to rely on political agency to pursue their interests and attempt to reassert their structural position. The collapse of the Eastern bloc and the liberalisation of East Asian economies presented new structural opportunities for TTCs in the 1980s and 1990s, but the development of globally coordinated TC policies facilitated by the World Health Organisation's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control has the potential to constrain these.

  19. Satire politique et sociale dans les opérettes de Gilbert et Sullivan Political and Social Satire in Gilbert and Sullivan’s Operettas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Cornic

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Although Gilbert and Sullivan’s Operas were first and foremost light, humorous works devised to entertain their mostly middle-class audience, they are characterised by a certain amount of political and social satire, as this paper aims to show through telling examples. Beyond the merry and pleasant songs which remain part and parcel of the English cultural heritage, the shafts directed against the social and political institutions (especially the House of Lords and the class system have lost none of their piquancy and even relevance for today’s audience.

  20. Social dominance orientation: revisiting the structure and function of a variable predicting social and political attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Arnold K; Sidanius, Jim; Pratto, Felicia; Levin, Shana; Thomsen, Lotte; Kteily, Nour; Sheehy-Skeffington, Jennifer

    2012-05-01

    Social dominance orientation (SDO) is one of the most powerful predictors of intergroup attitudes and behavior. Although SDO works well as a unitary construct, some analyses suggest it might consist of two complementary dimensions--SDO-Dominance (SDO-D), or the preference for some groups to dominate others, and SDO-Egalitarianism (SDO-E), a preference for nonegalitarian intergroup relations. Using seven samples from the United States and Israel, the authors confirm factor-analytic evidence and show predictive validity for both dimensions. In the United States, SDO-D was theorized and found to be more related to old-fashioned racism, zero-sum competition, and aggressive intergroup phenomena than SDO-E; SDO-E better predicted more subtle legitimizing ideologies, conservatism, and opposition to redistributive social policies. In a contentious hierarchical intergroup context (the Israeli-Palestinian context), SDO-D better predicted both conservatism and aggressive intergroup attitudes. Fundamentally, these analyses begin to establish the existence of complementary psychological orientations underlying the preference for group-based dominance and inequality.