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Sample records for technetium tellurides

  1. Studies on focal alveolar bone healing with technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate and gold-collimated cadmium telluride probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchimochi, M.; Hosain, F.; Engelke, W.; Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The benefit of using a collimator for a miniaturized cadmium telluride probe was evaluated by monitoring the bone-healing processes for 13 weeks after the induction of small iatrogenic alveolar bone lesions in one side of the mandible in beagles. Technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate (200 to 300 MBq, 5.1 to 8.1 mCi, in a solution of 0.5 to 1 ml, intravenously) was used as a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical. The radioactivity over the bone lesion (L) and the contralateral normal site (C) in the mandible were measured between 1.5 and 2 hours after injection of the tracer, and the activity ratio L/C served as an index of relative bone uptake. A study of six dogs revealed that the healing response to a hemispheric bone defect of 2 mm diameter in the cortical bone could not be detected by an uncollimated probe, and in a repeated study in two dogs the use of a gold collimator (5 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) did not increase the L/C ratio significantly. A second study in six dogs with 5 mm lesions showed that although systematic trends in the time courses of the L/C ratio obtained both with and without the collimator could be demonstrated, the L/C ratio of collimated versus uncollimated measurements was significantly (p less than 0.005) increased. In three of the latter six dogs, abscesses developed after 9 weeks, leading to a second increase (p less than 0.05) of the L/C ratio with collimation compared with the noninflammation group; without collimation no significant (p greater than 0.15) difference between the two groups could be demonstrated

  2. Technetium and technetium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijdo, W.L.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the results of a literature survey on technetium and technetium alloys. The literature has been searched through 1993. The survey was focused on technetium and (binary cubic) technetium alloys, but other important information on technetium has not been omitted from this survey. This report has been written with the aim to collect more information about phase systems which could be of importance in the transmutation process by neutrons of technetium. With the information presented in this report, it should be possible to select a suitable technetium alloy for further investigation regarding to the transmutation process. (orig.)

  3. Diagnostic Performance of a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography System With Low-Dose Technetium-99m as Assessed by Fractional Flow Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikamori, Taishiro; Hida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Shiba, Chie; Murata, Naotaka; Hoshino, Kou; Hokama, Yohei; Yamashina, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Although stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using a cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera facilitates radiation dose reduction, only a few studies have evaluated its diagnostic accuracy in Japanese patients by applying fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. We prospectively evaluated 102 consecutive patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease with a low-dose stress/rest protocol ((99m)Tc radiotracer 185/370 MBq) using CZT SPECT. Within 3 months, coronary angiography was performed and a significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or as a lesion of <90% and ≥ 50% stenosis with FFR ≤0.80. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 75%, and 82% for left anterior descending artery stenosis, 76%, 81%, and 79% for left circumflex artery stenosis, and 87%, 92%, and 90% for right coronary artery stenosis. When limited to 92 intermediate stenotic lesions in which FFR was measured, stress SPECT showed 77% sensitivity, 91% specificity, and 84% accuracy, whereas the diagnostic value decreased to 52% sensitivity, 68% specificity, and 58% accuracy based only on visual estimation of ≥75% diameter narrowing. CZT SPECT demonstrated a good diagnostic yield in detecting hemodynamically significant coronary stenoses as assessed by FFR, even when using a low-dose (99m)Tc protocol with an effective dose ≤5 mSv. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1217-1224).

  4. Technetium chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  5. Doping of germanium telluride with bismuth tellurides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrikosov, N.Kh.; Karpinskij, O.G.; Makalatiya, T.Sh.; Shelimova, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Effect of germanium telluride doping with bismuth fellurides (Bi 2 Te 3 ; BiTe; Bi 2 Te) on phase transition temperature, lattice parameters and electrophysical properties of alloys is studied. It is shown that in alloys of GeTe-Bi 2 Te 3 (BiTe)(Bi 2 Te) cross sections solid solution of GeTe with Bi 2 Te 3 , characterized by deviation from stoichiometry, and germanium in the second phase the quantity of which increases during the transition from GeTe-Bi 2 Te 3 cross section to GeTe-Bi 2 Te are in equilibrium. Lower values of holes concentration and of electric conductivity and higher values of thermo e.m.f. coefficient in comparison with alloys of GeTe-Bi 2 Te 3 cross section with the same bismuth content are characterized for GeTe-Bi 2 Te cross section alloys. It is shown that in the range of GeTe-base solid solution the α→γ phase transformation which runs trough the two-phase region (α→γ) is observed with tellurium content increase. Extension of α-phase existence region widens with the bismuth content increase. Peculiarities of interatomic interaction in GeTe-base solid solutions with isovalent and heterovalent cation substitution are considered [ru

  6. Technetium in environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Robb, P.; Warwick, P.

    1983-01-01

    A method for the determination of technetium in a sample of environmental water is described. Technetium, in the TcO 4 - form, is extracted from the sample onto an anion-exchange resin from which it is removed subsequently by washing with 4 M sodium thiocyanate solution. The eluted technetium-thiocyanate complex is then subjected to solvent extraction, where the technetium is further concentrated into butan-2-one. The organic phase is evaporated onto a planchette and the β activity due to the technetium determined by an anticoincidence Geiger counter. Detection limits of 0.5 ng of technetium-99 have been obtained for the counter and sample volumes in excess of 500 cm 3 can be analysed readily. The sorption of several technetium compounds onto soil from a variety of water types has also been investigated. Preliminary results are presented and the importance of the chemical form of technetium used in such studies is discussed briefly. (author)

  7. Technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.A. de; Ferro F, G.

    2003-01-01

    The first radiopharmaceuticals of 99m Tc, also call of 'first generation' as colloids, aggregates and simple complexes were developed with relative easiness without it was necessary a wide understanding of its chemical structure. In the radiopharmaceuticals of 'second generation' were included those derived of the HIDA for hepatobiliary images, MAG3 and EC for images of tubular renal de purification, HMPAO and ECD for images of cerebral perfusion and MIBI and tetrofosmin for images of heart perfusion, that which implies a bigger demand in terms of the chemical knowledge. At the moment, we can affirm that the future of the radiopharmaceuticals of 99m Tc is based on the use of small and relevant biomolecules with high biological activity that allow the visualization in vivo of specific receiving sites and/or its expression in diverse pathologies. It is for it that with the 'third generation' is necessary a wide one knowledge of the chemistry of the technetium that allows the design and characterization of highly specific bio complexes. In this book, although focused mainly to the chemistry of the Tc, a brief revision is also presented on the main biologically active molecules that, coordinated the 99m Tc, present a high recognition In vivo for specific receivers. (Author)

  8. Nitrosyl complexes of technetium; Nitrosylkomplexe des Technetiums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, Janine

    2016-09-22

    The presented thesis describes syntheses and characterization of novel technetium nitrosyl compounds with various ligand systems. The main focus is the synthesis of low-valent technetium nitrosyl complexes with cyclopentadienyl ligands. [German] Gegenstand der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die Synthese und Charakterisierung neuer Technetiumnitrosylverbindungen mit unterschiedlichen Ligandensystemen. Hauptaugenmerk wurde dabei auf die Darstellung niedervalenter Tc(NO)-Verbindungen mit Cyclopentadienyl-Liganden gelegt.

  9. Radionuclide Basics: Technetium-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technetium-99 (chemical symbol Tc-99) is a silver-gray, radioactive metal. It occurs naturally in very small amounts in the earth's crust, but is primarily man-made. Technetium-99m is a short-lived form of Tc-99 that is used as a medical diagnostic tool.

  10. Technetium compounds and their field of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaitseva, L.L.; Velichko, A.V.; Vinogradov, I.V.

    1988-02-01

    This chapter reviews the different applications of technetium and technetium compounds in catalysis, corrosion inhibition, superconductivity of technetium alloys, diagnostic techniques, radioisotope generators and radiopharmaceuticals. 649 refs [fr

  11. Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    Since the late 1970's the coordination chemistry of technetium has been developed remarkably. The background of the development is obviously related to the use of technetium radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis in nuclear medicine. Much attention has also been denoted to the chemical behavior of environmental 99 Tc released from reprocessing plants. This review covers the several aspects of technetium chemistry, including production of radioisotopes, analytical chemistry and coordination chemistry. In the analytical chemistry, separation of technetium, emphasizing chromatography and solvent extraction, is described together with spectrophotometric determination of technetium. In the coordination chemistry of technetium, a characteristic feature of the chemistry of Tc(V) complexes is referred from the view point of the formation of a wide variety of highly stable complexes containing the Tc=O or Tc≡N bond. Kinetic studies of the preparation of Tc(III) complexes using hexakis (thiourea) technetium(III) ion as a starting material are summarized, together with the base hydrolysis reactions of Tc(III), Tc(IV) and Tc(V) complexes. (author)

  12. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  13. Electrochemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.D.; Alabama Univ., Birmingham

    1982-01-01

    Recent work on the electrochemistry of technetium is reviewed, covering the period 1973-1980. Topics include polarographic studies of aqueous pertechnetate, coulometric studies of aqueous pertechnetate at mercury cathodes, and electrochemistry of pertechnetate at solid electrodes. A review is also given of electrochemistry of other technetium compounds, non-aqueous systems, chemical redox reactions, and substitution reactions. Consideration is also given to studies of electrochemistry at tracer concentrations, electrolytic syntheses, standard electrode potentials, and electroanalytical methods. (author)

  14. Final Report Technetium Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is required by the current contract to remove radioactive technetium FR-om stored caustic nuclear waste solutions. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has worked with typical envelopes of these wastes to optimize the removal process. To support the studies, SRTC developed a rapid on-line remote analyzer to monitor technetium and rhenium levels in solutions as well as track other metals in the solutions through the process operations. Rhenium was used as a non-radioactive substitute for technetium in process development studies. The remote monitor was based on inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Fiber optic cable and extended RF cabling removed the plasma source FR-om the spectrometer and instrument electronics

  15. Technetium in chemistry and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.; Nicolini, M.; Wagner, H.N.

    1983-01-01

    This volume explores the potential of technetium radiopharmaceuticals in clinical nuclear medicine. The authors examine the capabilities of synthetic inorganic chemists to synthesize technetium radiopharmaceuticals and the specific requirements of the nuclear medicine practitioner. Sections cover the chemistry of technetium, the production of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium, and the use of technetium radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

  16. Fluorido complexes of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine chemistry has received considerable interest during recent years due to its significant role in the life sciences, especially for drug development. Despite the great nuclear medicinal importance of the radioactive metal technetium in radiopharmaceuticals, its coordination chemistry with the fluorido ligand is by far less explored than that of other ligands. Up to now, only a few technetium fluorides are known. This thesis contains the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of novel technetium fluorides in the oxidation states ''+1'', ''+2'', ''+4'' and ''+6''. In the oxidation state ''+6'', the fluoridotechnetates were synthesized either from nitridotechnetic(VI) acid or from pertechnetate by using reducing agent and have been isolated as cesium or tetraethylammonium salts. The compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. In the intermediate oxidation state ''+4'', hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) was known for long time and studied spectroscopically. This thesis reports novel and improved syntheses and solved the critical issues of early publications such as the color, some spectroscopic properties and the structure of this key compound. Single crystal analyses of alkali metal, ammonium and tetramethylammonium salts of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) are presented. In aqueous alkaline solutions, the ammonium salt of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) undergoes hydrolysis and forms an oxido-bridged dimeric complex. It is the first step hydrolysis product of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) and was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. Low-valent technetium fluorides with the metal in the oxidation states of ''+2'' or ''+1'' are almost unknown. A detailed description of the synthesis and characterization of pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) is presented. The complex was isolated as alkali metal salts, and spectroscopic as well as structural features of the complexes are presented. Different salts of the trans

  17. Rise time spectroscopy in cadmium telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, Claude; Siffert, Paul; Carnet, Bernard; Le Meur, Roger.

    1980-11-01

    By a simultaneous analysis of rise time and pulse amplitude distributions of the signals issued from various cadmium telluride detectors, it is possible to obtain informations about surface and bulk trapping, field distribution within the detectors, as well as charge collection and transport properties. These investigations have been performed on both pure and chlorine doped and materials for various surfaces preparation conditions [fr

  18. Anomalous properties of technetium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryuchkov, S.V.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of critical evaluation of literature data in the field of chemistry of technetium cluster compounds with ligands of a weak field a conclusion is made on specific, ''anomalous'' properties of technetium cluster complexes which consist in an increased ability of the given element to the formation of a series of binuclear and multinuclear clusters, similar in composition and structure and easily transforming in each other. The majority of technetium clusters unlike similar compounds of other elements are paramagnetic with one unpaired electron on ''metallic'' MO of loosening type. All theoretical conceptions known today on the electronic structure of technetium clusters are considered. It is pointed out, that the best results in the explanation of ''anomalous'' properties of technetium clusters can be obtained in the framework of nonempirical methods of self-consistent field taking into account configuration interactions. It is also shown, that certain properties of technetium clusters can be explained on the basis of qualitative model of Coulomb repulsion of metal atoms in clusters. The conclusion is made, that technetium position in the Periodic table, as well as recently detected technetium property to the decrease of effective charge on its atoms during M-M bond formation promote a high ability of the element to cluster formation both with weak field ligands and with strong field one

  19. Technetium discharges into the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luykx, F.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99 is the most important technetium isotope released to the environment because of its long life and its relatively high fission yield. Its release to date, mainly as a result of nuclear fuel reprocessing, is estimated to be of the order of 1000 TBq. The quantity from nuclear weapons testing would only be some 10-15% of this value. (author)

  20. Fluorido complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari

    2013-07-04

    Fluorine chemistry has received considerable interest during recent years due to its significant role in the life sciences, especially for drug development. Despite the great nuclear medicinal importance of the radioactive metal technetium in radiopharmaceuticals, its coordination chemistry with the fluorido ligand is by far less explored than that of other ligands. Up to now, only a few technetium fluorides are known. This thesis contains the synthesis, spectroscopic and structural characterization of novel technetium fluorides in the oxidation states ''+1'', ''+2'', ''+4'' and ''+6''. In the oxidation state ''+6'', the fluoridotechnetates were synthesized either from nitridotechnetic(VI) acid or from pertechnetate by using reducing agent and have been isolated as cesium or tetraethylammonium salts. The compounds were characterized spectroscopically and structurally. In the intermediate oxidation state ''+4'', hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) was known for long time and studied spectroscopically. This thesis reports novel and improved syntheses and solved the critical issues of early publications such as the color, some spectroscopic properties and the structure of this key compound. Single crystal analyses of alkali metal, ammonium and tetramethylammonium salts of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) are presented. In aqueous alkaline solutions, the ammonium salt of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) undergoes hydrolysis and forms an oxido-bridged dimeric complex. It is the first step hydrolysis product of hexafluoridotechnetate(IV) and was characterized by spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. Low-valent technetium fluorides with the metal in the oxidation states of ''+2'' or ''+1'' are almost unknown. A detailed description of the synthesis and characterization of pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) is presented. The

  1. Occurency and aqueous processing of tellurides from Sonora (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo, S.; Perez, E.; Ecinas, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Tellurium production is limited mainly to that obtained from the treatment of electrolyte muds from copper refineries. however, there are several other sources from which the precious metal tellurides are potentially attractive. This work presents a review of the main localitiesin Sonora (Mexico), where tellurides have been found. In addition, based upon the physical chemistry fundamentals for tellurium and precious metal tellurides, the aqueous extraction and recovery routes are discussed. (Author) 51 refs

  2. Technetium behavior and recovery in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinken, G.E.

    1995-12-01

    Technetium-99 in soils is of great concern because of its long half-life and because it can not be detected readily. This work reviews the behavior of technetium in various types of soils. A method for extracting technetium from soil was developed with the use of technetium-95m and 99m to determine recoveries at each step. Technetium chemistry is very complicated and problem areas in the behavior and recovery have been highlighted. Technetium is widely used in nuclear medicine and a review of its chemistry pertaining to radiopharmaceuticals is relevant and helpful in environmental studies. The technetium behavior in the patented citric acid method for the removal of toxic metals in contaminated soils was studied. An innovative method using solid phase extraction media for the concentration of technetium extracted from soils, with water and hydrogen peroxide, was developed. This technique may have a useful environmental application for this type of remediation of technetium from contaminated

  3. Technetium Behavior and Recovery in Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinken,G.E.

    1995-12-01

    Technetium-99 in soils is of great concern because of its long half-life and because it can not be detected readily. This work reviews the behavior of technetium in various types of soils. A method for extracting technetium from soil was developed with the use of technetium-95m and 99m to determine recoveries at each step. Technetium chemistry is very complicated and problem areas in the behavior and recovery have been highlighted. Technetium is widely used in nuclear medicine and a review of its chemistry pertaining to radiopharmaceuticals is relevant and helpful in environmental studies. The technetium behavior in the patented citric acid method for the removal of toxic metals in contaminated soils was studied. An innovative method using solid phase extraction media for the concentration of technetium extracted from soils, with water and hydrogen peroxide, was developed. This technique may have a useful environmental application for this type of remediation of technetium from contaminated soils.

  4. Substitution reactions of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, T.

    1997-01-01

    Substitution reactions of a series of technetium complexes are considered in comparison with corresponding reactions of rhenium. Rhenium and technetium complexes are rather inert in substitution reactions, the latter are characterized by greater rate constants when they proceed according to dissociative mechanism. In rare cases when k Tc /k Re id little it is assumed that the reaction proceeds according to the associative mechanism. (author)

  5. Tellurium self-diffusion and point defects in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Method of radioactive indicators was used to determine factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride with different deviation of the composition from stoichiometric in the range of enrichment by tellurium. It was found that at 973 K factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride depend slightly on the vapor pressure of tellurium equilibrium with solid phase

  6. Chemistry and structure of technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Boas, J.F.; Bonnyman, J.; Williams, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    The structures of tris(2-aminobenzenethiolato) technetium(VI) and dichlorobis(diethyldithiocarbamato) thionitrosyltechnetium(V) have been determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction analysis. The preparation and chemistry of thiocyanato complexes of technetium have been investigated

  7. Development of planar waveguides in zinc telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valette, Serge

    1977-02-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) is one of the most attractive semi-conductors for monolithic integrated optics. In this study, the general characteristics of the planar optical waveguides achieved by implantation of light ions in ZnTe are investigated. Different aspects of prism-coupling and coherent light guiding have been taken up theoretically and experimentally. Some assumptions about the physical origin of these structures are discussed in order to explain all these results and the weak losses which have been measured. [fr

  8. Technetium-aspirin molecule complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shahawy, A.S.; Mahfouz, R.M.; Aly, A.A.M.; El-Zohry, M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-aspirin and technetium-aspirin-like molecule complexes were prepared. The structure of N-acetylanthranilic acid (NAA) has been decided through CNDO calculations. The ionization potential and electron affinity of the NAA molecule as well as the charge densities were calculated. The electronic absorption spectra of Tc(V)-Asp and Tc(V)-ATS complexes have two characteristic absorption bands at 450 and 600 nm, but the Tc(V)-NAA spectrum has one characteristic band at 450 nm. As a comparative study, Mo-ATS complex was prepared and its electronic absorption spectrum is comparable with the Tc-ATS complex spectrum. (author)

  9. Mercury telluride as a zero-gap semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berchenko, N.N.; Pashkovskij, M.V.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a review of main properties of mercury telluride which is a representative of a new class of substances - gapless semiconductors. The causes leading to the appearance of a gapless state in mercury chalcogenides are considered; it is demonstrated that the main role in the formation of the inverse band structure belongs to relativistic corrections. The specific properties of mercury telluride are associated with the zero forbidden band, p-like nature of electron states of the conduction band and its nonparabolicity, resonance states of impurities and anomalies of dielectric permittivity. Conditions of forbidden band appearing in mercury telluride under the effect external factors are analyzed

  10. Environmental behavior of technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, M.D.S.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a review of the literature on technetium-99. The chemical and physical properties of some technetium compounds are considered, and a discussion of possible source terms is included. Literature on the environmental behavior of technetium is presented, including its behavior in the bodies of animals and humans. The primary sources of Tc-99 in the environment are fallout from atomic detonations and releases from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The environmental behavior of technetium-99 has been studied predominantly with respect to movement in soil and accumulation in plants. There is a surprising scarcity of data on behavior of Tc-99 in the atmosphere and in aquatic systems. Additional work needs to be conducted in these two areas to determine behavior and to acquire baseline concentration data. Much of the soil work has produced contradictory results. In-depth studies of holdup mechanisms for Tc-99 in both geological repositories and soil need to be conducted. Since plants represent a potential bioaccumulation of Tc-99, plant uptake studies of Tc-99 under field conditions also need to be done

  11. Oscillator strengths for neutral technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garstang, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Oscillator strengths have been calculated for most of the spectral lines of TcI which are of interest in the study of stars of spectral type S. Oscillator strengths have been computed for the corresponding transitions in MnI as a partial check of the technetium calculations

  12. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  13. Technetium accumulation, fate, and behavior in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Wildung, R.E.; Garland, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    Technetium, a product of the nuclear fuel cycle, is highly soluble in water and mobile in soils as the pertechnetate ion (TcO - 4 ). Soluble ions in soil have the potential for competing with nutrient ions for membrane carrier sites involved in ion uptake by plants. A study was, therefore, undertaken to determine the availability, toxicity, and mechanism of pertechnetate uptake by soybean (Glycine max cv. Williams). Technetium was effectively accumulated by plants at soil concentrations of 0.01 to 0.1 μg/g and in nutrient culture at levels as low as 0.02 pg/ml. Plants grown on soils containing technetium at levels below 0.1 μg/g effectively removed up to 90% of the technetium from soil. Minimal mobilization of technetium from vegetative tissues to the seed occurred during senescence. Chemical analyses indicated that the xylem-mobile form of technetium was TcO 4 - . The uptake rate of technetium by intact plants was multiphasic over the concentration range of 0.01 to 10μM; this suggests active uptake and a specificity for technetium in the root absorption process. Because of the efficiency of technetium accumulation and the probability of its chemical toxicity, competition kinetic studies were undertaken to identify possible nutrient analogs. Nutrients effective in reducing technetium uptake included the Mn 2+ , SO 4 2- , H 2 PO 4 - , and MoO 4 2- ions

  14. Sample preparation and characterization of technetium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Serizawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kousaku; Itoh, Mitsuo

    1997-10-01

    Technetium-99 is a long-lived fission product with a half-life of about 2.1 x 10 5 years, which decays by β-emission. For the transmutation of 99 Tc, research on solid technetium was started. Technetium metal powder purchased was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, γ-ray spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and -mass spectrometry. The lattice parameters obtained were agreed with the reported values. The metallic impurity was about 15 ppm, where aluminum and iron contributed mainly. No impurity nuclide with γ-emission was found. Using the technetium metal powder, button-, rod-, and disk-shaped samples of technetium metal were prepared by arc-melting technique. Thermal diffusivity of technetium metal was measured on a disk sample from room temperature to 1173 K by laser flash method. The thermal diffusivity decreased with increasing temperature though it was almost constant above 600 K. (author)

  15. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Baelen, J.; Hurtger, C.; Cogneau, M.; Van der Ben, D.; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95m-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography

  16. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Baelen, J. van; Hurtgen, C.; Cogneau, M.; Ben, D. van der; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography. (author)

  17. Technetium recovery from high alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A.

    2016-07-12

    Disclosed are methods for recovering technetium from a highly alkaline solution. The highly alkaline solution can be a liquid waste solution from a nuclear waste processing system. Methods can include combining the solution with a reductant capable of reducing technetium at the high pH of the solution and adding to or forming in the solution an adsorbent capable of adsorbing the precipitated technetium at the high pH of the solution.

  18. Method of producing radioactive technetium-99M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karageozian, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    A chromatographic process of producing high purity and high yield radioactive Technetium-99m. A solution containing Molybdenum-99m and Technetium-99m is placed on a chromatographic column and eluted with a neutral solvent system comprising an organic solvent and from about 0.1 to less than about 10% of water or from about 1 to less than about 70% of a solvent selected from the group consisting of aliphatic alcohols having 1 to 6 carbon atoms. The eluted solvent system containing the Technetium-99m is then removed leaving the Technetium-99m as a dry, particulate residue

  19. Sorption of radionuclide technetium on minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Min; Fan Xianhua; Wei Liansheng; Zhang Yingjie; Jiao Haiyang

    2004-01-01

    The study on adsorption behavior of technetium on antimonial minerals is performed in batch experiments and the influence of adsorption time, mineral granularity, solid-liquid ratio, initial concentration, pH value and reducing ion. On technetium adsorption are considered according to adsorption ratios of hepta valent and quadrivalent technetium on stibnite and antimony ocher, the results show that reduction of technetium from heptavelence to quadrivalence could improve adsorption ratios, which provide reference data for selecting buffer-backfill materials in high level rad waste deep geological diplosal. (author)

  20. Studies of antimony telluride and copper telluride films electrodeposition from choline chloride containing ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Sin, Ion [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Prioteasa, Paula [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Splaiul Unirii 313, Bucharest (Romania); Cotarta, Adina [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Cojocaru, Anca, E-mail: a_cojocaru@chim.upb.ro [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Anicai, Liana [Center of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania); Visan, Teodor [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-07-29

    Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the deposition of antimony telluride or copper telluride from ionic liquid consisting in mixture of choline chloride with oxalic acid. In addition, the cathodic process during copper telluride formation was studied in the mixture of choline chloride with ethylene glycol. The results indicate that the Pt electrode is first covered with a Te layer, and then the more negative polarisation leads to the deposition of Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} or Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} semiconductor compounds. Thin films were deposited on copper and carbon steel at 60–70 °C and were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, energy X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their stoichiometry depends on the bath composition and applied potential. EDS and XRD patterns indicate the possible synthesis of stoichiometric Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase and Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, and Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases, respectively, by controlling the ratio of ion concentrations in ionic liquid electrolytes and deposition potential. - Highlights: • Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} and Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} films electrodeposited from choline-chloride-based ionic liquids. • The stoichiometry of film depends on the bath composition and deposition potential. • Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases were identified in X-ray diffraction patterns.

  1. Technetium removal from aqueous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, P.A.; Jones, C.P.; Junkison, A.R.; Turner, A.D.; Kavanagh, P.R.

    1992-03-01

    The research discussed in this report has compared several ''state of the art'' techniques for the removal of traces of the radionuclide, technetium, from aqueous wastes. The techniques investigated were: electrochemical reduction to an insoluble oxide, electrochemical ion exchange, seeded ultrafiltration and chemical reduction followed by filtration. Each technique was examined using a simulant based upon the waste generated by the Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant (EARP) at Sellafield. The technique selected for further investigation was direct electrochemical reduction which offers an ideal route for the removal of technetium from the stream (DFs 10-100) and can be operated continuously with a low power consumption 25 kW for the waste generated by EARP. Cell designs for scale up have been suggested to treat the 1000m 3 of waste produced every day. Future work is proposed to investigate the simultaneous removal of other key radionuclides, such as ruthenium, plutonium and cobalt as well as scale up of the resulting process and to investigate the effect of these other radionuclides on the efficiency of the electrochemical reduction technique for the removal of technetium. Total development and full scale plant costs are estimated to be of the order of 5 pounds - 10M, with a time scale of 5 -8 years to realisation. (author)

  2. Technetium complexation by macrocyclic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fan Yu.

    1983-01-01

    Research in nuclear medicine are directed towards the labelling of biological molecules, however, sup(99m)Tc does not show sufficient affinity for these molecules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of macrocyclic compounds to bind strongly technetium in order to be used as complexation intermediate. The reducing agents used were a stannous complex and sodium dithionite. Cryptates and polyesters are not good complexing agents. They form two complexes: a 2:1 sandwich complex or 3:2 and a 1:1 complex. Cyclams are good complexing agents for technetium their complexations strength was determined by competition with pyrophosphate, gluconate and DTPA. Using the method of ligand exchange, the oxidation state of technetium in the Tc-cyclam complex was IV or V. They are 1:1 cationic complexes, the complex charge is +1. The biodistribution in rats of labelling solutions containing (cyclam 14 ane N 4 ) C 12 H 25 shows a good urinary excretion without intoxication risks [fr

  3. Telluride School, Telluride, Colorado solar-energy-system performance evaluation, February 1982-April 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Telluride School solar site is an elementary/junior-senior high school in Colorado with a passive/active hybrid solar energy system designed to supply 40% of the heating load. It is equipped with a 1428 square foot, double glazed Trombe wall, a 1392 square foot greenhouse with collection tube, and an auxiliary oil-fired boiler. Monthly performance data are tabulated for the overall system and for the Trombe wall, greenhouse, and greenhouse storage. System operation is illustrated by graphs of typical Trombe wall insolation and temperatures and typical greenhouse insolation and temperatures. (LEW)

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou, Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2- xSb xTe 3) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2- xSb xTe 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties.

  5. Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Zinc Telluride Films for Back Contact to Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Tushar M.; Drayton, Jennifer; Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) films have been deposited onto uncoated glass superstrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) sputtering with different amounts of nitrogen introduced into the process gas, and the structural and electronic transport properties of the resulting nitrogen-doped ZnTe (ZnTe:N) films characterized. Based on transmission and x-ray diffraction measurements, it was observed that the crystalline quality of the ZnTe:N films decreased with increasing nitrogen in the deposition process. The bulk carrier concentration of the ZnTe:N films determined from Hall-effect measurements showed a slight decrease at 4% nitrogen flow rate. The effect of ZnTe:N films as back contact to cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells was also investigated. ZnTe:N films were deposited before or after CdCl2 passivation on CdTe/CdS samples. Small-area devices were characterized for their electronic properties. Glancing-angle x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed substantial loss of zinc from the samples where CdCl2 passivation was carried out after ZnTe:N film deposition.

  6. Recovery of technetium from nuclear fuel wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlin, W.W.

    1975-01-01

    Technetium is removed from aqueous, acidic waste solutions. The acidic waste solution is mixed with a flocculant, e.g., an alkaline earth metal hydroxide or oxide, to precipitate certain fission products. Technetium remains in solution and in the resulting supernatant alkaline aqueous phase. The supernatant alkaline aqueous phase is made acidic and electrolyzed in an electrolytic cell under controlled cathodic potential conditions to deposit technetium on the cathode. Elemental technetium is removed from the cathode. Technetium is separated from other plated fission product metals by extraction from an alkaline solution with an organic extractant, such as pyridine, having affinity for technetium. Technetium is separated from the organic extractant by steam distillation and the resulting aqueous phase treated with ammoniacal reagent to precipitate technetium as ammonium pertechnetate. The precipitate may be acidified to form an aqueous acidic solution of fission product metal values and the solution electrolyzed in an electrolytic cell under controlled cathodic potential conditions and at a potential sufficiently negative to plate out from the solution those fission product metals desired. The metal deposit is stripped from the cathode and stored until its radioactivity has diminished. (U.S.)

  7. Process for producing radioactive technetium 99 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karageozian, H.L.

    1979-01-01

    Active aluminium oxide containing Molybdenum 99 and technetium 99 m is treated with a neutral solvent consisting of water, methylethylketone and ethanol. Technetium 99 m remains on the chromatographic material after drying, in the form of a dry powder. Other aliphatic alcohols can also be utilised. (DG) [de

  8. Chemistry of technetium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, K.M.

    1980-08-01

    Technetium release to the environment may occur during separation and recovery of spent nuclear fuels, or in disposal of aqueous waste from nuclear facilities, hospitals, or other users. The chemistry and sources of technetium are reviewed as a basis for prediction of its behavior in the environment

  9. Study of sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Dong; Fan Xianhua; Su Xiguang; Zeng Jishu

    2001-01-01

    The sorption behaviors of technetium on pyrrhotine are studied with batch experiment and dilute sulfuric acid is used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. Sorption and desorption experiment are performed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions (inert gas box). The results show that a significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine is found under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral is supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 ·nH 2 O. Desorption process of the sorbed technetium into dilute sulfuric acid is found to be different under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. On addition of H 2 O 2 to the leach solution a sudden increase of the technetium concentration is observed

  10. Electrochemical Deposition of Lanthanum Telluride Thin Films and Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Su (Ike); Farias, Stephen; Cammarata, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Tellurium alloys are characterized by their high performance thermoelectric properties and recent research has shown nanostructured tellurium alloys display even greater performance than bulk equivalents. Increased thermoelectric efficiency of nanostructured materials have led to significant interests in developing thin film and nanowire structures. Here, we report on the first successful electrodeposition of lanthanum telluride thin films and nanowires. The electrodeposition of lanthanum telluride thin films is performed in ionic liquids at room temperature. The synthesis of nanowires involves electrodepositing lanthanum telluride arrays into anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous membranes. These novel procedures can serve as an alternative means of simple, inexpensive and laboratory-environment friendly methods to synthesize nanostructured thermoelectric materials. The thermoelectric properties of thin films and nanowires will be presented to compare to current state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the deposited films and nanowires are characterized using SEM and EDAX analysis.

  11. EPR investigations on technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abram, U.; Munze, R.; Kirmse, R.; Stach, J.

    1986-01-01

    Stimulated by the widespread use of the isotope /sup 99m/Tc in the field of nuclear medicine, there has been a substantial growth of interest in the chemistry of this man-made element. A particular need emerges for analytical methods allowing solution investigations of coordination compounds of technetium with low substance use. Considering these facts, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EPR) appears to be a very suitable method because only very small amounts of the compounds are needed (lower than 1 mg). The resulting spectra give information regarding the valence state, symmetry and bonding properties of the compounds under study

  12. Technetium removal: preliminary flowsheet options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eager, K.M.

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the results of a preliminary investigation into options for preliminary flowsheets for 99Tc removal from Hanford Site tank waste. A model is created to show the path of 99Tc through pretreatment to disposal. The Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) flowsheet (Orme 1995) is used as a baseline. Ranges of important inputs to the model are developed, such as 99Tc inventory in the tanks and important splits through the TWRS flowsheet. Several technetium removal options are discussed along with sensitivities of the removal schemes to important model parameters

  13. Properties of Nanostructure Bismuth Telluride Thin Films Using Thermal Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth telluride has high thermoelectric performance at room temperature; in present work, various nanostructure thin films of bismuth telluride were fabricated on silicon substrates at room temperature using thermal evaporation method. Tellurium (Te and bismuth (Bi were deposited on silicon substrate in different ratio of thickness. These films were annealed at 50°C and 100°C. After heat treatment, the thin films attained the semiconductor nature. Samples were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to show granular growth.

  14. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb 1-x Ca x Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while its thermoelectric properties

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of lead telluride/bismuth antimony telluride nanocomposites for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, Shreyashi; Zhou Chen; Morelli, Donald; Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Uher, Ctirad; Brock, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous nanocomposites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride (Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 ) with lead telluride (PbTe) nanoinclusions have been prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation approach. The Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and Hall coefficient were measured from 80 to 380 K in order to investigate the influence of PbTe nanoparticles on the thermoelectric performance of nanocomposites. The Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities of nanocomposites decrease with increasing PbTe nanoparticle concentration due to an increased hole concentration. The lattice thermal conductivity decreases with the addition of PbTe nanoparticles but the total thermal conductivity increases due to the increased electronic thermal conductivity. We conclude that the presence of nanosized PbTe in the bulk Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 matrix results in a collateral doping effect, which dominates transport properties. This study underscores the need for immiscible systems to achieve the decreased thermal transport properties possible from nanostructuring without compromising the electronic properties. - Graphical abstract: PbTe nanoparticles introduced into p-type Bi 2 Te 3 by incipient wetness results in decreased lattice thermal conductivity, but also acts as an electronic dopant, resulting in an overall decrease in thermoelectric performance. Highlights: ► Composites of PbTe nanoparticles in Bi 2−x Sb x Te 3 were formed by incipient wetness. ► PbTe nanoparticles leads to decreased κ l , consistent with phonon scattering. ► PbTe nanoparticles lead to decreased S and ρ, due to increased carriers. ► Collateral doping from PbTe leads to decreased ZT with increasing concentration. ► Immiscible systems are preferred for improved ZT.

  16. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The central problem in thermoelectric material research is the selection of ... temperature range (400–1000 K), and bismuth telluride-based materials .... parent from the results that band non-parabolicity has a significant effect on the .... M P Singh thankfully acknowledges financial assistance from the Council of Scien-.

  17. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  18. Sorption of radioactive technetium on pyrrhotine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, D.; Fan, X.H.; Su, X.G.; Zeng, J.S.; Dong, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The sorption behavior of technetium on pyrrhotine was studied with batch experiments and diluted sulfuric acid (less than 2.88 mol/l) was used to dissolve the technetium adsorbed on pyrrhotine. A significant sorption of technetium on pyrrhotine was observed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the sorption on the mineral was supposed to be due to the reduction of TcO 4 - to insoluble TcO 2 x nH 2 O. Sorbed technetium on the mineral could be desorbed by diluted sulfuric acid. The maximum desorption ratio under aerobic conditions was much higher than that of under anaerobic conditions, meanwhile, the desorption rates under anaerobic conditions were higher than that of under aerobic conditions in the initial stage of the experiments. (author)

  19. Technetium behaviour under deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T.T.

    1993-01-01

    The migration behaviour of technetium under deep geological conditions was investigated by performing column tests using groundwater and altered granitic rock sampled from a fracture zone in a granitic pluton at a depth of about 250 m. The experiment was performed under a pressure of about 0.7 MPa in a controlled atmosphere glove box at the 240 m level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. The technetium was strongly sorbed on the dark mafic minerals in the column. With the exception of a very small unretarded fraction that was eluted with the tritiated water, no further breakthrough of technetium was observed. This strong sorption of technetium on the mineral surface was caused by reduction of Tc(VII), probably to Tc(IV) even though the groundwater was only mildly reducing. (author) 5 figs., 4 tabs., 15 refs

  20. Radiation decomposition of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Rempel, S.; Westendorf, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals are shown to be subject to autoradiation-induced decomposition, which results in increasing abundance of pertechnetate in the preparation. This autodecomposition is catalyzed by the presence of oxygen, although the removal of oxygen does not prevent its occurrence. The initial appearance of pertechnetate in the radiopharmaceutical is shown to be a function of the amount of radioactivity, the quantity of stannous ion used, and the ratio of /sup 99m/Tc to total technetium in the preparation

  1. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan; Ghafouri, Niloufar; Smith, Casey; Peterson, Rebecca Lorenz; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa; Najafi, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning

  2. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental and radioactive waste samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferencova, M.; Peter Tkac, P.

    2007-01-01

    Technetium is known for its high mobility in a soil-water system in non-reducing aerobic condition and also high bio-availability for plants, because the most stable form of technetium in natural surface environment is pertechnetate which is highly soluble. The chemical form of technetium changes with environmental conditions. Concentration of technetium in the environment is very low, therefore many separation steps are needed for technetium determination. It has been developed a method for the routine determination of technetium-99 from environmental matrices and radioactive wastes using technetium-99m as an internal yield monitor. Technetium-99 is extracted from the soil samples with nitric acid. Many contaminants are co-precipitated with ferric hydroxide and technetium in the supernatant is pre-concentrated and further purified using anion exchange chromatography. Final separation of technetium was achieved by extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from sulphuric acid or pure water. The chemical yield is determined through the measurement of technetium-99m by scintillation counting system and the technetium-99 activity is measured using proportional counter after decay of the technetium-99m activity. Typical recoveries for this method are in the order 50-60 % (authors)

  3. Technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Wilczewski, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate is described. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung

  4. About thermo-electric properties of bismuth telluride doped by gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akperov, M.M.; Ismailov, Sh.S.; Shukyurova, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Results of study of the Gd impurities effect on the bismuth telluride thermo-electric properties are presented. The experiment was carried out within the temperature range T=300-700 K. It is determined, that at temperature increase the energy level is appreciably closing up to bismuth telluride forbidden zone which makes up 0.16-0.24 eV. Such anomalous energy properties of gadolinium in telluride affect on material thermoelectric properties

  5. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  6. Linkable thiocarbamoylbenzamidines as ligands for bioconjugation of Rhenium and Technetium; Kopplungsfaehige Thiocarbamoylbenzamidine als Liganden zur Biokonjugation von Rhenium und Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo Gomez, Juan Daniel

    2015-04-27

    Bioconjugation reactions with Rhenium and Technetium are of high importance for the development of novel radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine. In this thesis the possibilities for bioconjugation using linkable Thiocarmbamoylbenzamidines as ligands for the complexation of Rhenium and Technetium were examined.

  7. Technetium in the geologic environment - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torstenfelt, B.; Allard, B.; Andersson, K.; Olofsson, U.

    1981-07-01

    The authors present a literature survey of technetium, discussing, in particular, the oxidation states, the chemistry of technetium in connection with spent nuclear fuel storage, the sorption of technetium in rock, clay, soil and sea bottom sediments. (G.T.H.)

  8. Technetium compounds; Compuestos de tecnecio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.A. de [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga 15, 14000 Tlalpan D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The first radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m} Tc, also call of 'first generation' as colloids, aggregates and simple complexes were developed with relative easiness without it was necessary a wide understanding of its chemical structure. In the radiopharmaceuticals of 'second generation' were included those derived of the HIDA for hepatobiliary images, MAG3 and EC for images of tubular renal de purification, HMPAO and ECD for images of cerebral perfusion and MIBI and tetrofosmin for images of heart perfusion, that which implies a bigger demand in terms of the chemical knowledge. At the moment, we can affirm that the future of the radiopharmaceuticals of {sup 99m} Tc is based on the use of small and relevant biomolecules with high biological activity that allow the visualization in vivo of specific receiving sites and/or its expression in diverse pathologies. It is for it that with the 'third generation' is necessary a wide one knowledge of the chemistry of the technetium that allows the design and characterization of highly specific bio complexes. In this book, although focused mainly to the chemistry of the Tc, a brief revision is also presented on the main biologically active molecules that, coordinated the {sup 99m} Tc, present a high recognition In vivo for specific receivers. (Author)

  9. Technetium Immobilization Forms Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-05-01

    Of the many radionuclides and contaminants in the tank wastes stored at the Hanford site, technetium-99 (99Tc) is one of the most challenging to effectively immobilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), the Tc will partition between both the high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions of the tank waste. The HLW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the HLW vitrification facility and the LAW fraction will be converted to another glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility. In both vitrification facilities, the Tc is incorporated into the glass waste form but a significant fraction of the Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment systems at both facilities. The aqueous off-gas condensate solution containing the volatilized Tc is recycled and is added to the LAW glass melter feed. This recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the LAW glass but it also disproportionally increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed which increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or the required supplemental LAW treatment capacity.

  10. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m iron-dextran enhancement of technetium pyrophosphate uptake in tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pojer, P.M.; Jakovljevic, A.C.; Wise, K.N.

    1985-01-01

    The biodistribution of technetium-99m was studied in T-cell lymphoma and selected organs of iron-dextran treated and control mice given technetium-99m pyrophosphate. The results showed that high serum iron levels increased tumour uptake of technetium pyrophosphate. This supports the hypothesis that technetium, in common with other metal-based tumour seeking radiopharmaceuticals, is transported to tumours as a ligand-free protein-bound cation. (U.K.)

  11. The molybdenum-technetium solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, N.C.; Wolfsberg, K.; Rokop, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are attempting to measure the time-averaged 8 B solar-neutrino flux over 10 Myr by measuring 98 Tc produced through the 98 Mo( nu ,e - ) reaction in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. This will test the prediction of periodic mixing of the Sun's core over long time intervals. To separate technetium from 10,000-ton quantities of Henderson ore, the authors have taken advantage of the commercial processing of molybdenite. Technetium, volatilized during roasting of molybdenite to MoO 3 , was scrubbed from the gas stream and collected on anion exchange columns. After sample reduction and chemical separation and purification they measured technetium, as TcO 4 - , using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Measurement of 99 Tc in spiked and 98 Tc in unspiked fractions from one sample gives an apparent solar neutrino production rate of 95.8 SNU. However, roaster memory probably invalidates this result

  12. Highvalent and organometallic technetium and rhenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlke, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic methods in nuclear medicine allow a detailed description of morphological organ structures and their function. The beta emitting isotope Tc-99 has optimal physical properties (140 keV gamma rays, half-life 6 h) and is therefore used for radiopharmaceuticals. The thesis is concerned with the search for new technetium complexes and their reproducible production. The (TcO3) core is of main interest. The second part of the thesis deals with organometallic technetium and rhenium complexes with carbonyl ligands and N-heterocyclic carbenes that show stability in aerobic aqueous solutions.

  13. Determination of technetium-99 from complex matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lixiong Wang; Lei Tang; Tongzai Yang; Yanqiu Yang; Liang Yang

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an approach that can be used for efficient separation and determination of 99 Tc (as pertechnetate) after contamination of the environment by nuclear materials. The samples were decomposed by fusion in a mixture of potassium hydroxide and potassium nitrate. After fusion, technetium remains as the pertechnetate anion (TcO 4 - ). The technetium was isolated from the sample by technique combining solvent extraction, anion exchange, then, again, solvent extraction. After separation, 99 Tc was measured by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry with 97 Tc as spike. This method yielded nanogram detection limits for 99 Tc. (author)

  14. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  15. Contributions to the coordination chemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.

    1989-08-01

    New types of technetium complexes were synthesized and analyzed by IR-, 1 H- and 99 Tc nmr as well as EPR spectra. They were tested for their potential catalytic activity in special organic reactions and their relevance to catalytic reactions, for example as intermediate compounds, is discussed in depth. 317 refs., 20 figs. (BBR) [de

  16. Electrochemical preparation of technetium hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    This work describes the liquid chromatographic and electrochemical analysis of electrogenerated technetium hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) complexes, and studies the effectiveness of the resulting bone imaging agents. Anion exchange High Performance Liquid Chromatography is used to separate components, and γ emission is used as the detection mode. The reaction mixtures were prepared at a series of reduction potentials and pH values, at both carrier added and no carrier added technetium levels. The results indicate that all three parameters affect the final complex composition to varying degrees. By optimizing the conditions, a preparation was made which results in a high percentage of a Tc-HEDP complex thought to be a very good home imager. This component was isolated chromatographically and injected into female Sprague-Dawley rats. Comparisons were run on the uptake for seven tissue types at two incubation times. Mercury and Reticulated Vitreous Carbon were used as the working electrode materials, and it is shown how reduced technetium will significantly alter the electrode characteristics, where a conditioned electrode will produce different complexes from those produced at fresh electrode material. By employing coulometric analysis as the preparation was reduced, an n value of 4 was calculated for a particular complex. This procedure involved tracking the radioactive technetium species carefully to account for all electrons used in the system. Finally, an electrochemical detection method for HEDP was explored, utilizing the property of mercury complexation. Anodic sweep Differential Pulse Polarography gives an analytical signal for HEDP at +0.250 V vs Ag/AgCl

  17. Synthesis and characterization of volatile technetium compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Bradley C.; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Ken R.

    2013-01-01

    Technetium-99 is an important fission (T 1/2 = 2.13.105 y) product of the nuclear industry. Technetium in its highest oxidation state (VII) is highly mobile and can represent a threat to the environment. There are over 55 million gallons of high level mixed waste located at the Hanford site. Waste tanks at the Hanford site contain Tc that could potentially leak, and in the context of management of technetium, a glass waste form was proposed to counteract the issue. In the process of synthesizing melt glass between the temperatures of 600°C and 1100°C, volatile technetium compounds were observed in the reaction tube. These compounds displayed characteristic colors based upon the reaction environments of either breathing air or nitrogen gas. A breathing air atmosphere produces a red compound that adheres to the walls of the reaction tube. An atmosphere of nitrogen gas produces a white compound that was observed on the walls of the reaction tube. (author)

  18. An introduction to technetium-99m generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrashkin, S.

    1984-02-01

    The role played by technetium-99m generators in diagnostic medicine, their physical and chemical fundamentals and their main technical characteristics are discussed. This report is intended as a general introduction to a group of reports which summarize the work done on the development and production of the generators, and research on the chemical and physical aspects of the generator systems

  19. Concentration of technetium by marine organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Nakahara, M.

    1990-01-01

    Accumulation and excretion of technetium by marine organisms were observed in radioisotope tracer experiments to determine concentration factors for estimating radiation dose to humans from radioactive pollution of marine environments. Marine fish, crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, and seaweeds were reared in sea water labeled with 95m Tc to observe uptake from sea water. The organisms were then transferred into unlabeled sea water for depuration experiments. Concentration factors were calculated from uptake and excretion rates. Also considered was the contribution of food-chain transfer of technetium, observed by administering labeled seaweeds to mollusks or echinoderms. Low accumulations were shown by fish, crustaceans, pelecypods and cephalopods, whereas high concentration factors were observed in gastropods and seaweeds. Species specificity or specific accumulation in special organs or tissues was not evident except in seaweed, where the difference was clearly species-associated. Relatively high rates of technetium retention were observed in the organisms administered labeled seaweed. The higher concentrations observed in gastropods, compared to those in pelecypods, were thought to result from different feed habits. The adaptability of some species as indicator organisms for monitoring 99 Tc in sea water was recognized, but the contribution of technetium to radiation dose was considered insignificant

  20. The origins of Technetium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoppa, P.

    1986-01-01

    The origins of Technetium in the environment are briefly illustrated, taking into account its main sources represented by same plants of nuclear fuel cycle and by fallout fallowing nuclear explosion in atmosphere. An evaluation is also made of the TC-99 quantitees deriving from the production of nuclear power present in radioactive wastes before their final disposal

  1. Electrical properties of cadmium telluride films doped with antimony

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atdaev, B.S.; Garyagdyev, G.; Grin', V.F.; Noskov, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of cadmium telluride doping with antimony on electric and photoelectric properties is investigated. Temperature dependence of dark (σ d ) and photoconductivity (σ p ) during excitation from the range of proper absorption in the temperature range 77-300 K and spectral distribution of photoconductivity at 300 K are investigated. It is shown that in the process of doping antimony diffusses intensively over CdTe grain boundaries, decreasing potential barriers between them and due to diffusion into CdTe grains it changes their electrical properties. The acceptor character of antimony impurity can be caused by antimony diffusion into tellurium sublattice owing to proximity of their ionic and covalent radii

  2. XAFS studies of nickel-doped lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radisavljevic, Ivana; Novakovic, Nikola; Ivanovic, Nenad; Romcevic, Nebojsa; Manasijevic, Miodrag; Mahnke, Heinz-Eberhard

    2009-01-01

    The problem of impurities and defect states in lead telluride-based semiconductors is of crucial importance for their practical applications. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) techniques are capable to address some of the key issues regarding impurities position, their valent state, as well as the local structural changes of the host lattice in the immediate surrounding of the impurity atoms. In this paper we present the results of the Ni K-absorption edge XAFS studies of Ni-doped PbTe at different temperatures. Analysis of near edge and extended XAFS regions of the measured spectra provided information about exact local environment and lattice ordering around Ni atoms.

  3. Technetium sorption by stibnite from natural water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretroukhine, V.; Sergeant, C.; Deves, G.; Poulain, S.; Vesvres, M.H.; Thomas, B.; Simonoff, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption of technetium by powdered and polished mineral stibnite Sb 2 S 3 has been investigated in simulated and natural underground waters from the Meuse/Haute-Marne region (France). The sorption by powdered stibnite has been found to be complete under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions in batch experiments. The sorption rate is higher in the absence of oxygen than under aerobic condition. Increasing the temperature from 30 C to 60 C results in a rise of the sorption rate by 9.1 and 27 times under anaerobic and aerobic conditions, respectively. The observed differences in sorption kinetics in the presence and in absence of oxygen are explained by the interaction of oxygen with sulfide ion in aerobic conditions and by the reduction of technetium(VII) by iron(II) and by other impurities present in natural water and in the mineral, and by the subsequent sorption of Tc(IV) on stibnite under anaerobic conditions. The sorption on a polished mineral surface resulted in the formation of a technetium film, probably Tc 2 S 7 , with a thickness of 1-3 μg Tc/cm 2 pH 3-6 and 4-12 μg Tc/cm 2 at 9-12. The simultaneous formation of stibnite colloids with adsorbed technetium occurs at pH 9-12. The study of the technetium film on the mineral by proton induced X-ray emission analysis showed it to be at least one order of magnitude thinner on the SiO 2 impurities than on the main Sb 2 S 3 component and the iron impurities. (orig.)

  4. Application of cadmium telluride detectors to high energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.; Thomas, G.; Cuzin, M.; Verger, L.

    1991-01-01

    15 years ago, Cadmium Telluride detectors have been investigated in our laboratory as possible detectors for medical scanners [1]. Today most of these machines are using high pressure Xenon gas as multicells detectors, BGO or CdWO 4 scintillators for industrial computerized tomography. Xenon gas detectors are well suited for detection of 100 KeV X-rays and enables to build 1000 cells homogeneous detector with a dynamic range of 3 decades. BGO and CdWO 4 scintillators, associated with photomultipliers or photodiodes are used for higher energy (400 KeV). They present a low afterglow and a dynamic range of 4 to 5 decades. Non destructive testing of very absorbing objects (eg 2 m diameter solid rocket motor) by X-ray tomography requires much higher energy X-rays (16 MeV) and doses up to 12000 rads/min at 1 meter. For this application Cadmium Telluride detectors operating as photoconductors are well suited. A prototype of tomograph machine, able to scan 0.5 m diameter high density objects has been realized with 25 CdTe detectors (25x15x0.8 mm 3 ). It produces good quality 1024x1024 tomographic images

  5. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  6. Magneto-photoconductivity of three dimensional topological insulator bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bingchen; Eginligil, Mustafa; Yu, Ting

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic field dependence of the photocurrent in a 3D topological insulator is studied. Among the 3D topological insulators bismuth telluride has unique hexagonal warping and spin texture which has been studied by photoemission, scanning tunnelling microscopy and transport. Here, we report on low temperature magneto-photoconductivity, up to 7 T, of two metallic bismuth telluride topological insulator samples with 68 and 110 nm thicknesses excited by 2.33 eV photon energy along the magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane. At 4 K, both samples exhibit negative magneto-photoconductance below 4 T, which is as a result of weak-antilocalization of Dirac fermions similar to the previous observations in electrical transport. However the thinner sample shows positive magneto-photoconductance above 4 T. This can be attributed to the coupling of surface states. On the other hand, the thicker sample shows no positive magneto-photoconductance up to 7 T since there is only one surface state at play. By fitting the magneto-photoconductivity data of the thicker sample to the localization formula, we obtain weak antilocalization behaviour at 4, 10, and 20 K, as expected; however, weak localization behaviour at 30 K, which is a sign of surface states masked by bulk states. Also, from the temperature dependence of phase coherence length bulk carrier-carrier interaction is identified separately from the surface states. Therefore, it is possible to distinguish surface states by magneto-photoconductivity at low temperature, even in metallic samples.

  7. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuh, David K.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Burns, Carol J.

    2003-12-19

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry that is necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term remediation of high-level waste posed by this element. These challenges may be divided into two categories: unexpected behavior of technetium in high-level waste tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites and the behavior of technetium in waste forms.

  8. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuh, David K.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Burns, Carol J.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry that is necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term remediation of high-level waste posed by this element. These challenges may be divided into two categories: unexpected behavior of technetium in high-level waste tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites and the behavior of technetium in waste forms

  9. X-ray electron investigation of technetium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerasimov, V.N.; Kryuchkov, S.V.; Kuzina, A.F.; Kulakov, V.M.; Pirozhkov, S.V.; Spitsyn, V.I.; Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol'zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii)

    1982-01-01

    Investigation results of a number of technetium compounds using the method of X-ray electron spectroscopy have been presented for the first time. Calculation of effective charge for compounds without Tc-Tc bond and cluster complexes with strong Tc-Tc bond is made. Strong interdependence of effective charge and properties of technetium clusters is shown. Binding energies for certain cluster complexes of technetium with halides are given

  10. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process

  11. Some aspects of the assay of technetium in environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, P.

    1983-09-01

    Technetium, as 99 Tc, was rapidly concentrated from large sample volumes (> 500 cm 3 ) by use of an anion exchange column after removal of ruthenium isotopes by precipitation. The bulk of the technetium can be removed from the resin by elution with sodium thiocyanate followed by further concentration by extraction with butan-2-one. Evaporation of solvent onto a planchette followed by measurement of emitted beta radiation can determine technetium levels. Method is capable of removing between 10 -15 and 10 -6 g of technetium from 500 cm 3 of water. (author)

  12. Sources and behavior of technetium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, E.H.; Scoppa, P.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium is a man-made element produced in increasing amounts during the last decades. The chemical and physical properties of some technetium compounds are considered, and a discussion of possible source terms is included. Literature on the environmental behavior of technetium is reviewed to evaluate its transfer and equilibrium distribution in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Considerable effort has been expended in the last years in order to understand the biogeochemical processes responsible for the long-term behavior of technetium in the environment and its transfer through food chains as well as to identify critical pathways of the long-lived radioisotope Tc-99 from the environment to man. (Auth.)

  13. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  14. Sorption behaviour of radioactive technetium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Deying

    1996-01-01

    The sorption behaviour of technetium in different soils has been studied by batch experiments under aerobic conditions. The soil samples have been taken to study the characteristics and to derive the pH-Eh values. In addition, the activated carbon and reduced iron powder have been selected as additives to the JAERI sand according to the former research work, so that the technetium sorption behaviour in the artificial soils can be studied under similar conditions. The experimental results show that all these soil samples except for the gluey soil have a very small distribution coefficient for Tc, while the artificial soils have a very large distribution coefficient for Tc. Besides, for artificial soils, the distribution coefficient (R d ) values will become larger and larger when more additive is added and more contact time is allowed. The physico-chemical fixation processes and possible sorption modes have been discussed as well

  15. Geochemistry of natural technetium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.; Cappis, J.H.; Perrin, R.E.; Rokop, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium and plutonium in unprocessed nuclear reactor wastes are major concerns with regard to their containment in the geologic environment. Both nuclides have long half-lives; therefore, they will exist long after engineered barriers can be considered reliable. Consequently, strategies for the containment of these two elements depend on their retention in the geologic barrier until they have decayed to innocuous levels. Because these are the rarest elements in nature, there have been few direct observations of their geochemical behavior; predictions concerning their fate in the repository are based on properties that can be observed in the laboratory. The authors are attempting to complement the laboratory work by studying the geochemistry of natural plutonium and technetium. Ratios of anthropogenic to naturally occurring isotopes are discussed

  16. Technetium-99 m generator safety simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sang Koo; Kim, Chong Yeal

    2008-01-01

    Technetium ( 99m Tc) is one of the most widely used radioactive isotopes for diagnosis in the world. In general, 99m Tc is produced inside the so called technetium generator where 99Mo decays to 99m Tc. And the generator is usually made out of lead to shield relatively high energy radiation from 99m Tc and 99 Mo. In this paper, a GEANT4 simulation is carried out to test the safety of the 99m Tc generators, taking domestic and Japanese products with radioactivity of 18.50 GBq (500 mCi) for example. According to the domestic regulation on radiation safety, the dose at 10 cm and 100 cm away from the surface of radiation shielder should not exceed 2 mSv∙h -1 and 0.02 mSv∙h -1 , respectively. The simulated dose turned out about only 10% of the limit, satisfying the domestic regulation

  17. Study of ammonia synthesis using technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on catalytic properties of technetium in ammonia synthesis reaction. The preparation of technetium catalysts on ν-Al 2 O 3 , BaTiO 3 , BaO-ν-Al 2 O 3 substrates is described. The investigation of catalytic activity of catalysts was carried out at a pressure of 1 atm. in vertical reactor with volume rate of 15000 h - 1 in the temperature range of 350-425 deg. The amount of catalyst was 0.5-1 g, the volume- 0.5 ml, the size of granules- 2-3 mm. Rate constants of ammonia synthesis reaction were calculated. Seeming activation energies of the process have meanings wihtin the limits of 40-50 kcal/mol. It was shown that with increase in concentration of Tc on BaTiO 3 the catalytic activity rises in comparison with pure Tc. The reduction of catalytic activity with increase of metal content on Al 2 O 3 begins in the limits of 3.5-6.7% Tc/ν-Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst of 5.3% Tc/4.1% Ba/ν -Al 2 O 3 compound has the maximum activity. Technetium catalysts possess the stable catalytic activity and don't requre its reduction during several months

  18. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  19. Effect of thallium impurity on hole scattering in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hole mobility in PbTe monocrystalline specimens in the temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K has been investigated. Detected is a sharp increase in scattering cross section of light and heavy holes in the specimens having the Hall hole concentration p approximately (5+-9)x10 19 cm -3 explained by resonant scattering into a band of quasilocal states of thallium located lower than the ceiling of heavy carrier zone by 0.01+-0.01 eV. Very large differences in resonant scattering of current carriers into the quasilocal states of In and Tl in PbTe result from the inertial polarizability of a crystal. The same mechanism is used to explain long-lived relaxation of zone electron concentration in lead telluride and Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te doped with indium [ru

  20. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; James, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  1. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  2. Measurement and behaviour of technetium in fast reactor fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, C.; Kyffin, T.W.

    1986-02-01

    A method is described for the spectrophotometric measurement of technetium in plant solutions from the reprocessing of fast reactor fuel. The technetium is selectively extracted using tri-iso-octylamine. After back extraction, thiocyanate is added, in the presence of tetrabutyl-ammonium hydroxide, to form the red hexa-thiocyanato anionic complex in a chloroform medium. The concentration of the technetium is then calculated from the spectrophotometric measurement of this complex. This method was applied to bulk samples, collected during a PFR fuel reprocessing campaign, to identify the main routes followed by technetium through the reprocessing plant. In order to understand the probable behaviour of technetium in the process plant streams, an investigation into the influence of plutonium IV nitrate on the extraction of Tc (VII) into 20%v/v tributyl phosphate/odourless kerosene solution from nitric acid solutions, was initiated. The results of this investigation, along with the known distribution coefficient for the extraction of the uranyl/technetium complex U0 2 (N0 3 )(Tc0 4 ).2TBP and the redox chemistry of technetium, are used to predict the probable behaviour of technetium in the process plant streams. This predicted behaviour is compared with the experimental results and reasonable agreement is obtained between experiment and theory, considering the history of the samples analysed. (author)

  3. Transfer of technetium from soil to paddy and upland rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kei; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki

    1995-01-01

    Soil-plant transfer factors (concentration ratio between the plant and soil) of technetium in paddy and upland rice plants were obtained from laboratory experiments. The transfer factor is one of the most important parameters for environmental radiation dose assessment. Technetium tracer ( 95m TcO 4 - ) was added to the soil prior to rice cultivation. The transfer factor of technetium for the hulled grains (brown rice) of paddy rice (≤0.0002) was much lower than for that of upland rice (0.021). The transfer factors for both types of hulled grains were much lower than in the leaves. The technetium decontamination rate from hulled grains by polishing was 34%, the percentage of the weight decrease being 12%. The concentration of technetium in the soil solution collected from the paddy rice soil (flooded conditions) decreased rapidly with time due to its adsorption on the soil. In the upland rice soil (non-flooded) solution, the decrease in the technetium concentration was fairly slow. The low transfer factors for the paddy rice plants could be explained by the immobilization of technetium in the flooded soil. The oxidation-reduction potentials (Eh) in the flooded soil decreased rapidly with time. We conclude that technetium tracer added as TcO 4 - to flooded soil is readily transformed to an insoluble form (e.g.TcO 2 ) under the reducing conditions provided by flooding. (author)

  4. Accelerators for forming cationic technetium complexes useful as radiodiagnostic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tweedle, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to compositions for making cationic radiodiagnostic agents and, in particular, to accelerator compounds for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents, kits for preparing such 99m Tc-labelled cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium, and methods for labelling such cationic radiodiagnostic agents with technetium

  5. Search for technetium in natural tin metallurgical residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, C.W.

    1996-07-01

    Possible instability of baryons inside the nuclei might result in accumulation of rare isotopes in natural ores. In this respect, isotopes of technetium have certain advantages that can be useful in the search for technetium in nonradioactive ores by chemical methods. In this paper, we review the history of technetium research and discuss a new approach to the search for natural technetium associated with tin ores which appears to offer a rare possibility of discovering a smelting operation by-product such as flue dust, in which the volatile technetium heptoxide (Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7}), like rhenium heptoxide (Re{sub 2}O{sub 7}), would be expected to concentrate. Our concept of a search for technetium in these materials would be based on the assumption that traces of rhenium could occur in the ore and could be traced most easily by neutron activation of small samples. Such a procedure would confirm that an enrichment from the ore to the flue dust actually occurs with the rhenium and therefore should occur with technetium. Furthermore, this occurrence should identify the best location to search for technetium.

  6. A method for the determination of technetium in environmental waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, P.; Warwick, P.; Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described which can be used to determine technetium-99 levels in a range of water types. Ruthenium isotopes which may interfere in the analysis are removed from the sample by precipitation before concentration of pertechnetate onto an ion-exchange column. Other nuclides can be removed from the column using NaOH before elution of the technetium using NaSCN. The technetium in the NaSNC eluent can then be extracted into butan-2-one which can be evaporated onto a planchette. Technetium-99m is used as a yield tracer and after this has decayed away to negligible levels. The amount of technetium on the planchette can be determined by measuring the rate of beta radiation emission from the final concentrate. (author)

  7. Corrosion and antifouling characteristics of technetium 99 in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Strekalov, P.V.; Balakhovskij, O.A.; Mikhajlovskij, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    The results are presented of studying the corrosive and antifouling properties of metallic technetium-99 in the Barents Sea and the Sea of Japan. Foil of 99 Tc glued on acrylic plastic served as a sample. High corrosion resistance and antifouling properties exhibited by 99 Tc in seawater point to favorable prospects of further studies aimed at development of new methods for protection against corrosion and fouling of metallic structures and parts with the use of technetium. The antifouling properties of technetium would evidently be used most efficiently when coating materials of high corrosion resistance to seawater (titanium, stainless steels, special alloys, etc.) with layers of technetium. The use of technetium for coating low-alloyed or carbon steels employed in seawater is yet problematic

  8. Technetium migration in natural clays; Migration von Technetium in natuerlichem Tongestein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-10-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  9. Evolution of technetium speciation in reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, Wayne W.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Shuh, David K.; Edelstein,Norman M.

    2003-11-24

    Cementitious waste forms (CWFs) are an important component of the strategy to immobilize high-level nuclear waste resulting from plutonium production by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Technetium (99Tc) is an abundant fission product of particular concern in CWFs due to the high solubility and mobility of pertechnetate, TcO4-, the stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. CWFs can more effectively immobilize 99Tc if they contain additives that reduce mobile TcO4- to immobile Tc(IV) species. Leaching of 99Tc from reducing CWFs that contain Tc(IV) is much slower than for CWFs containing TcO4-. Previous X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies showed that the Tc(IV) species were oxidized to TcO4- in reducing grout samples prepared on a laboratory scale. Whether the oxidizer was atmospheric O2 or NO3- in the waste simulant was not determined. In actual CWFs, rapid oxidation of Tc(IV) by NO3- would be a concern, whereas oxidation by atmospheric O2 would be of less concern due to the slow diffusion and reaction of O2 with the reducing CWF. To address this uncertainty, two series of reducing grouts were prepared using TcO4- containing waste simulants with and without NO3-. In the first series of samples, the TcO4- was completely reduced using Na2S, and the samples were placed in containers that permitted O2 diffusion. In these samples, all of the technetium was initially present as aTc(IV) sulfide compound, TcSx, which was characterized using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and is likely Tc2S7. The TcSx initially present in the grout samples was steadily oxidized over 4 years. In the second series of samples, all of the TcO4- was not initially reduced, and the grout samples were placed in airtight containers. In these samples, the remaining TcO4- continued to be reduced as the samples aged, presumably due to the presence of reducing blast furnace slag. When samples in the second series were exposed to atmosphere, the

  10. Behavior of technetium in paddy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, K.; Muramatsu, Y.; Ban-Nai, T.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the chemical form of soluble technetium in paddy soil and its availability to a rice plant, soil incubation and uptake experiments have been carried out using 95m Tc as a tracer. The chemical form of the soluble Tc was observed by gel chromatography and found not to be pertechnetate, but rather to be associated with soluble organic matter. An uptake experiment with rice seedlings using nutrient solution showed that this Tc-organic matter complex was less available than pertechnetate. (author)

  11. Control of technetium at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saraceno, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Technetium-99 entered the gaseous diffusion complex as a volatile impurity in recycled uranium that was fed to the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Subsequently, it entered the Oak Ridge and Portsmouth cascades as an impurity in Paducah product feed. Most of the technetium was adsorbed on cascade equipment in increasingly high concentrations as it moved up the cascade. Since the low energy beta radiation produced by technetium cannot penetrate cascade equipment, it presents no significant hazard to workers as long as it remains inside of equipment. However, when equipment that contains high concentrations of technetium is opened for maintenance or change-out, precautions are taken to ensure worker safety. Traps containing activated alumina are used at the plant vent streams to limit radioactive emissions as far as possible. Annual vent stream emissions have been well below DOE limits. To allow continued compliance, other potential trapping agents have been tested. Several that limit emissions more effectively than activated alumina have been found. Other traps containing magnesium fluoride are used in the upper cascade to reduce the technetium concentration. Waste solutions from decontamination can also contain technetium. These solutions must either be stored for controlled discharge or treated to remove the technetium. To allow the latter, an ion exchange facility is being installed for operation by the end of FY-1982. Liquid discharges at Portsmouth have usually been less than 5% of the DOE imposed limits

  12. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2007-10-12

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term disposal of high-level nuclear waste posed by this element. The primary issues examined during the course of this project were the behavior of technetium and its surrogate rhenium during waste vitrification and glass corrosion. Since the redox behavior of technetium can play a large role in determining its volatility, one goal of this research was to better understand the behavior of technetium in glass as a function of the redox potential of the glass melt. In addition, the behavior of rhenium was examined, since rhenium is commonly used as a surrogate for technetium in waste vitrification studies. A number of glasses similar to Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glasses were prepared under controlled atmospheres. The redox state of the glass was determined from the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio in the cooled glass, and the speciation of technetium and rhenium was determined by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The behavior of rhenium and technetium during glass alteration was also examined using the vapor hydration test (VHT).

  13. Technetium-99 in the Irish marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.; Fegan, M.; Pollard, D.; Long, S.; Hayden, E.; Ryan, T.P

    2001-07-01

    Technetium-99 activity concentrations in seawater and biota from Irish coastal waters are presented. Time series measurements of {sup 99}Tc in seawater and Fucus vesiculosus from the western Irish Sea show that activity concentrations have increased in line with the increase in discharges of {sup 99}Tc from Sellafield. The peak in activity concentrations in both seawater and Fucus vesiculosus occurred in 1997 approximately two years after the peak in {sup 99}Tc discharges. The highest activity concentration recorded in Fucus vesiculosus showed a 29-fold increase over the mean concentration for the period 1988-1993. Technetium-99 activity concentrations were measured in fish, lobsters, prawns, mussels and oysters landed at major fishing ports on the east and northeast coasts of Ireland between 1996 and 1998. Concentration factors for {sup 99}Tc in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and certain species of fish, crustaceans and molluscs from the Irish Sea were estimated. In general, these concentration factors were higher than those in the literature which were derived from laboratory studies, but agreed well with values which were based on field studies. The mean committed effective doses to Irish typical and heavy seafood consumers due to {sup 99}Tc in the period 1996-1998 were 0.061 and 0.24 {mu}Sv, respectively.

  14. Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, Norman M.; Burns, Carol J.; Shuh, David D.; Lukens, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Technetium (99Tc, half-life = 2.13x105 years, b-emitter) is one of the radionuclides of major concern for nuclear waste disposal. This concern is due to the long half-life of 99Tc, the ease with which pertechnetate, TcO4 -, migrates in the geosphere, and the corresponding regulatory considerations. The problem of mobility of pertechnetate in the environment is compounded by the fact that pertechnetate is the thermodynamically stable form of technetium in aerobic environments. These two factors present challenges for the safe, long term immobilization of technetium in waste forms. Because of the stability of pertechnetate, technetium has been assumed to exist as pertechnetate in the aqueous phase of nuclear waste tanks. However, recent studies indicate that a significant fraction of the technetium is in a different chemical form. This program addresses the fundamental solution chemistry of technetium in the waste tank environment, and in a second part, the stability of technetium in various waste forms. The chemistry of this element will be studied in aqueous solutions at high pH, with various added salts such as nitrate, nitrite, and organic complexants, and as a function of radiation dose, to determine whether radiolysis effects can reduce TcO4 -. A separate facet of this research is the search for chemical forms of technetium that may be thermodynamically and/or kinetically stable and may be incorporated in various waste forms for long term storage. This phase of the program will address the problem of the possible oxidation of lower valent technetium species in various waste form matrices and the subsequent leaching of the highly soluble TcO4 -

  15. The regulation of technetium-99 discharges at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayall, A.

    2002-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent Magnox fuel at BNFL Sellafield produces a liquid waste concentrate containing technetium-99 and other, more radiotoxic, radionuclides such as plutonium and americium. The concentrate is known as medium active concentrate (MAC). Prior to 1981, MAC was discharged to sea untreated after several years' storage, during which short-lived radionuclides underwent radioactive decay. In the early 1980s, discharges of MAC were suspended and it was retained in storage tanks, pending the construction of a plant to remove the radionuclides of greatest radiological concern (these did not include technetium- 99). The Enhanced Actinide Removal Plant started operation in 1994 and began to clear the backlog of stored waste MAC, as well as current arisings from Magnox reprocessing. As a consequence technetium-99 was once more discharged to sea. Subsequently, concentrations of this radionuclide in the marine environment increased. In particular, there was a significant increase in the concentration of technetium-99 in lobster in the Irish Sea. An increase in technetium-99 has also been detected at locations far distant from Sellafield, e.g. in Scandinavian coastal waters, albeit at very low concentrations. This dispersal of technetium- 99 throughout the Irish Sea and further afield has therefore caused concern, although the radiological impact is low. This paper examines the nature and source of the technetium-99 in sea discharges at Sellafield and the levels of past and current discharges as well as their impact. It goes on to describe the Environment Agency's recent proposals on the future regulation of technetium-99 discharges and how these should lead to substantial reductions in not only technetium-99 discharges, but also of other radionuclides such as caesium-137 and strontium-90. (author)

  16. Method of stably radiolabeling antibodies with technetium and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, C.H.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for labeling antibodies or antibody fragments with radionuclides of technetium or rhenium to obtain stable labeling, comprising: reacting a reduced radioisotope of technetium or rhenium with an antibody or antibody fragment, or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated antibody or antibody fragment, in the presence of free or carrier-bound diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The amount of DTPA is sufficient to substantially completely inhibit binding of the reduced technetium or rhenium to nonstable binding sites of the antibody or antibody fragment, or the DTPA-conjugated antibody or antibody fragment. The resultant stably labeled antibody or antibody fragment, or DTPA[conjugated antibody or antibody fragment is recovered

  17. The radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and the radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenant, V.

    1998-01-01

    In less than fifty years, the place of nuclear medicine is become primordial. Among all the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, the technetium-99m is the most used because of its physico-chemical properties and its great availability with the molybdenum-99m - technetium-99m generator. Since 1992, the radiopharmaceuticals, the packages, the generators are included in the pharmaceutic monopole. They are now under the reliability of the radio-pharmacist. This thesis has for object to introduce these different radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and to show the primordial place of the radio-pharmacist in a service of nuclear medicine. (N.C.)

  18. Ion exchange removal of technetium from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ion exchange methods for removing technetium from waste salt solutions have been investigated by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). These experiments have shown: Commercially available anion exchange resins show high selectivity and capacity for technetium. In column runs, 150 column volumes of salt solution were passed through an ion exchange column before 50% 99 Tc breakthrough was reached. The technetium can be eluted from the resin with nitric acid. Reducing resins (containing borohydride) work well in simple hydroxide solutions, but not in simulated salt solutions. A mercarbide resin showed a very high selectivity for Tc, but did not work well in column operation

  19. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, H. R.; Quam, W.; DeVore, T.; Vogle, R.; Weslowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5

  20. Preliminary uranium enrichment analysis results using cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Paulus, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and EG ampersand G ORTEC have jointly developed a portable ambient-temperature detection system that can be used in a number of application scenarios. The detection system uses a planar cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with custom-designed detector support electronics developed at LLNL and is based on the recently released MicroNOMAD multichannel analyzer (MCA) produced by ORTEC. Spectral analysis is performed using software developed at LLNL that was originally designed for use with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems. In one application, the CZT detection system determines uranium enrichments ranging from less than 3% to over 75% to within accuracies of 20%. The analysis was performed using sample sizes of 200 g or larger and acquisition times of 30 min. The authors have demonstrated the capabilities of this system by analyzing the spectra gathered by the CZT detection system from uranium sources of several enrichments. These experiments demonstrate that current CZT detectors can, in some cases, approach performance criteria that were previously the exclusive domain of larger HPGe detector systems

  1. Cadmium zinc telluride as a mid-infrared variable retarder

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, William; Taherion, Saeid; Kumar, F. Joseph; Giles, David; Hore, Dennis

    2018-04-01

    The electro-optic behavior of cadmium zinc telluride is examined in the mid-infrared region between 3 and 11 μm, for applied DC field strengths of up to 106 V/m. The measurements performed here include full characterization of the polarization state of the transmitted light by means of the Stokes vector. We demonstrate the suitability of this material for DC variable retarder applications such as those achieved by quarter- or half-wave retardation. A comparison of two different metallic coatings for electrodes, gold and indium, reveals important differences in performance that are attributed to the homogeneity of the field through the bulk of the crystal. We illustrate that, in the case of both metals, the same electro-optic coefficients are measured, but regions of higher and lower retardation result in significant depolarization in the case of gold. Such depolarization may adversely affect the contrast ratio in a light valve, or increase the voltage necessary for the operation of an arbitrary polarization state generator.

  2. Theoretical study of bismuth-doped cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez-Proupin, E.; Rios-Gonzalez, J. A.; Pena, J. L.

    Cadmium telluride heavily doped with bismuth has been proposed as an absorber with an intermediate band for solar cells. Increase in the photocurrent has been shown recently, although the overall cell efficiency has not improved. In this work, we study the electronic structure and the formation energies of the defects associated to bismuth impurities. We have performed electronic structure calculations within generalized density functional theory, using the exchange-correlation functional HSE(w) , where the range-separation parameter w has been tuned to reproduce the CdTe bandgap. Improving upon previous reports, we have included the spin-orbit interaction, which modifies the structure of the valence band and the energy levels of bismuth. We have found that interstitial Bi (Bii) tends to occupy Cd vacancies, cadmium substitution (BiCd) creates single donor level, while tellurium substitution (BiTe) is a shallow single acceptor. We investigate the interaction between these point defects and how can they be combined to create a partially filled intermediate band. Supported by FONDECYT Grant 1130437, CONACYT-SENER SUSTENTABILIDAD ENERGETICA/project CeMIE-Sol PY-207450/25 and PY-207450/26. JARG acknowledges CONACYT fellowship for research visit. Powered@NLHPC (ECM-02).

  3. Niobium and zirconium telluride thin films prepared by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, M.; Pailharey, D.; Mathey, Y.

    2000-01-01

    A versatile procedure of sputter deposition, well adapted for getting a large of Te/M ratios (with M = Zr or Nb), has led to the synthesis of several highly anisotropic zirconium and niobium poly tellurides in thin film form. Upon tuning the two key parameters of the process, i.e., the Te percentage in the target and the substrate temperature during the deposition, preparation of systems ranging from ZrTe 0 .72 to ZrTe 6 .7, on the one hand, and from NbTe 1 .28 to NbTe 7 .84, on the other, has been achieved. Besides their amorphous or crystalline (with or without preferential orientations) behavior and their relationship to known structural types, the most striking feature of these films is their large departure from the stoichiometry of the bulk Mte x reference compounds. This peculiarity, together with the possible changes of composition under annealing, are described and interpreted in terms of variable of Te and M atoms trapped or intercalated within the parent structures. (author)

  4. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  5. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  6. Development of a cadmium telluride pixel detector for astrophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Walter R.; Mao, Peter H.; Rana, Vikram R.; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Ushio, Masayoshi; Aono, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Goro; Kokubun, Motohide; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2009-08-01

    We are developing imaging Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) pixel detectors optimized for astrophysical hard X-ray applications. Our hybrid detector consist of a CdTe crystal 1mm thick and 2cm × 2cm in area with segmented anode contacts directly bonded to a custom low-noise application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CdTe sensor, fabricated by ACRORAD (Okinawa, Japan), has Schottky blocking contacts on a 605 micron pitch in a 32 × 32 array, providing low leakage current and enabling readout of the anode side. The detector is bonded using epoxy-gold stud interconnects to a custom low noise, low power ASIC circuit developed by Caltech's Space Radiation Laboratory. We have achieved very good energy resolution over a wide energy range (0.62keV FWHM @ 60keV, 10.8keV FWHM @ 662keV). We observe polarization effects at room temperature, but they are suppressed if we operate the detector at or below 0°C degree. These detectors have potential application for future missions such as the International X-ray Observatory (IXO).

  7. The radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and the radiopharmacy; Les radiopharmaceutiques marques au technetium-99m et la radiopharmacie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenant, V

    1998-10-01

    In less than fifty years, the place of nuclear medicine is become primordial. Among all the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine, the technetium-99m is the most used because of its physico-chemical properties and its great availability with the molybdenum-99m - technetium-99m generator. Since 1992, the radiopharmaceuticals, the packages, the generators are included in the pharmaceutic monopole. They are now under the reliability of the radio-pharmacist. This thesis has for object to introduce these different radiopharmaceuticals labelled with technetium-99m and to show the primordial place of the radio-pharmacist in a service of nuclear medicine. (N.C.)

  8. Review of technetium behavior in relation to nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paquette, J.; Reid, J.A.K.; Rosinger, E.L.J.

    1992-05-01

    This report contains available information which determine possible methods of the transfer of technetium element from waste disposal facilities to the biosphere. It also includes possible effects upon human beings and environment. 65 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  9. Preparation and quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuels, D.L.

    1978-11-01

    Appropriate procedures for the production and quality control of technetium-99m based radiopharmaceuticals in hospital radiopharmacy consistent with the recently published Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice are discussed

  10. Physical chemical quality control of the molybdenum technetium generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, E.; Cruz, J.; Isaac, M.; Gamboa, R.; D'Alessandro, K.; Desdin, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    Comparative operational procedure imported molybdenum technetium generators have been made. Procedures for determination of chemical, radiochemical and radionuclidic purities that may be applied in Hospital's laboratories and in the quality control of generators production are developed

  11. Special features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdanov, V.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Ravich, Yu.I.; Dereza, A.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    Specific features of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride are investigasted. Lead telluride samples with chlorine additions (with tellurium excess) and, besides, with bromine- and iodine additions were studied in order to reveal general regularities in alloyind with all halogen donor impurities. Experimental dependences of the difference between the electron and hole concentrations (n-p) in PbTe as a function of an amount of introduced halogen impurities (Ni) are presented for samples with a maximum compensation at 295 K. General features of the n-p=f(Ni) dependence are presented for all halogens. The hypothesis on the kinetic mechanism of increasing the efficiency of self-compensation of halogen donor action in lead telluride is suggested

  12. Process for obtaining oxygen doped zinc telluride monocrystals and scintillator crystals obtained by this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Maurice; Moreau, Roland; D'Haenen, J.-P.; Merenda, Pierre.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for obtaining oxygen doped zinc telluride monocrystals, for use as scintillator crystals for ionising radiation detectors. The following operations are carried out in succession: one or several zinc telluride crystals are introduced into a silica ampoule together with a ternary mixture of zinc tellurium and oxygen, as an oxide or hydroxide of these elements; the ampoule is pumped down to a high vacuum and sealed; the sealed ampoule containing the mixture and monocrystals is placed in a kiln and brought to a uniform temperature sufficient to make the mixture three-phased, depending on its composition; the zinc telluride crystalline compound remains solid; the ampoule is then tempered to bring it quickly back to ambient temperature [fr

  13. Under used technetium-99m generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushtaq, A.

    2001-01-01

    Health care reform truly has become a global issue and it will undoubtedly have a dramatic impact on the future of nuclear medicine business in particular. A bigger concern within the nuclear medicine community is its competitiveness with other modalities and cost effectiveness.Technetium-99m and its generators are playing key role for the majority of diagnostic scans performed in the world today. Availability of ''9''9''mTc can be increased if it is separated from ''9''9Mo after much shorter growth times. After proper planning with the extra ''9''9''mTc, a significant number of scans can be performed or we would be able to order approximately 30% low activity ''9''9Tc generators to fulfill our requirements

  14. Technetium-99m-human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.W.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1975-01-01

    Exogenous fibrinogen has been successfully labeled with /sup 99m/Tc using a modified electrolytic method. The exact labeling mechanism has not been determined. Experimental data suggest that the labeling process of /99m/Tc-fibrinogen is quite similar to that of /sup 99m/Tc-human serum albumin as reported earlier by Benjamin. Technetium-99m-fibrinogen is stable in human plasma or in 1 percent buffered human serum albumin. A binding efficiency of 76 percent has been achieved with approximately 25 percent clottable protein. The entire labeling procedure requires less than 1 hr of preparation time. This short labeling time in a closed system may allow development of a practical method for labeling autologous fibrinogen, thus eliminating the risk of hepatitis transmission. (U.S.)

  15. Labeling of creatinine with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurt Lambrecht, F. [Ege Univ., Bornova, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications, Inst. of Nuclear Sciences; Durkan, K. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Buca, Izmir (Turkey). Chemistry Technicianship Program, Izmir Vocational School; Soylu, A. [Dokuz Eylul Univ., Narlidere, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty

    2004-07-01

    Creatinine is a clinically important index of renal glomerular filtration rate. Urine creatinine levels can be used as a screening test to evaluate kidney function or can be part of the creatinine clearance test. In case of kidney dysfunction or muscle disorders the creatinine concentration in serum/plasma may rise to a higher value than in healthy body. Technetium- 99m has been used in nuclear medicine and in biomedical research to label molecular and cellular structures employed as radiotracers. {sup 99m}Tc is utilized to label molecules and cells, used as radiopharmaceuticals, and also to label biological species. It presents many desirable characteristics. SnCl{sub 2} method is frequently used as a reducing agent in the {sup 99m}Tc- labeling process. Creatinine metabolism might be investigated by using labeled {sup 99m}Tc- creatinine in healthy or uremic rats. (orig.)

  16. Anionic sorbents for arsenic and technetium species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero, Daniel A.; Moore, Robert Charles; Bontchev, Ranko Panayotov; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Zhao, Hongting; Salas, Fred Manuel; Holt, Kathleen Caroline

    2003-01-01

    Two sorbents, zirconium coated zeolite and magnesium hydroxide, were tested for their effectiveness in removing arsenic from Albuquerque municipal water. Results for the zirconium coated zeolite indicate that phosphate present in the water interfered with the sorption of arsenic. Additionally, there was a large quantity of iron and copper present in the water, corrosion products from the piping system, which may have interfered with the uptake of arsenic by the sorbent. Magnesium hydroxide has also been proven to be a strong sorbent for arsenic as well as other metals. Carbonate, present in water, has been shown to interfere with the sorption of arsenic by reacting with the magnesium hydroxide to form magnesium carbonate. The reaction mechanism was investigated by FT-IR and shows that hydrogen bonding between an oxygen on the arsenic species and a hydrogen on the Mg(OH)2 is most likely the mechanism of sorption. This was also confirmed by RAMAN spectroscopy and XRD. Technetium exists in multiple oxidation states (IV and VII) and is easily oxidized from the relatively insoluble Tc(IV) form to the highly water soluble and mobile Tc(VII) form. The two oxidation states exhibit different sorption characteristics. Tc(VII) does not sorb to most materials whereas Tc(IV) will strongly sorb to many materials. Therefore, it was determined that it is necessary to first reduce the Tc (using SnCl2) before sorption to stabilize Tc in the environment. Additionally, the effect of carbonate and phosphate on the sorption of technetium by hydroxyapatite was studied and indicated that both have a significant effect on reducing Tc sorption

  17. The performance of gel technetium-99m generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yishu

    2004-01-01

    Technetium-99m, as one of the important radionuclides in nuclear medical science, has been widely used for diseases diagnosis in both developed and developing countries for many years. Technetium-99m can be obtained from both fission-type and gel-type Tc-99m generator. Fission-type generator was prepared by Molybdenum-99 separated from fission products of uranium-235 and gel-type was prepared by irradiating nature MoO 3 in reactor, and a series of chemical and physical processes. This paper briefly describes the manufacturing technical process of gel-type Technetium-99 generator, including the preparation of target containing nature MoO 3 , the target irradiation in reactor, gel preparation, gel filtration and drying, dried gel cracking, generator loading and activity calibration of generator. The performances of gel-type Technetium-99m generator, such as elution efficiency, elution profile, the pH, Mo breakthrough, Zirconium content, radiochemical purity, radionuclidic purity, sterility and pyrogencity of eluate, are also expatiated in detail. Comparing with fission-type Technetium-99m generator, the defects of gel-type Technetium-99m generator are enumerated and their overcoming solutions are recommended in this paper. (author)

  18. Study of the synthesis of ammonia over technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spetsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    The catalytic properties of technetium in the synthesis of ammonia have been studied in the present work. Technetium catalysts according to specific yield surpass all know catalysts for the synthesis of ammonia. The enhanced catalytic activity of technetium compared to manganese and rhenium is apparently explained by the presence of the radioactivity of 99 Tc. The processes of adsorption, orientation of the adsorbed molecules, and their binding energies can differ during radiation action. Irradiation of the carrier, occurring through #betta#-emission of 99 Tc, with doses of 4-8 x 10 3 rad/day, increased the number of defects in the crystal structure where stabilization of technetium atoms was possible. The existence of charged centers can cause an increase in the dissociative chemisorption of nitrogen, which is the limiting stage of the process. Technetium catalysts possess a stable catalytic activity and do not require its restoration for several months. Results suggest that the use of technetium as a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia has real advantages and potential possibilities

  19. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institute of Defence Scientists and Technologists, CFEES Complex, Brig. S. K. Majumdar Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Li, Qing; He, Jiale; Hu, Weida, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Lab for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); He, Kai; Lin, Chun [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I–V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I–V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from −9 V to −2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I–V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from −3 V to −5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  20. Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilova, M.G.; Sveshnikova, L.L.; Stavitskaya, T.A.; Repinskij, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    Dissolution kinetics of lead telluride in alkali solutions of hydrogen peroxide was investigated. Dependences of change of PbTe dissolution rate on concentration of hydrogen peroxide and alkali in the solution were obtained. It is shown that dissolution rate of lead telluride is affected by dissolution rate of lead oxide, representing the product of ReTe dissolution. The obtained regularities can be explained by change of solution structure with increase of KOH concentration and by the state of hydrogen peroxide in the solution

  1. Simulation of core-level binding energy shifts in germanium-doped lead telluride crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyubin, A.S.; Dedyulin, S.N.; Yashina, L.V.; Shtanov, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    To simulate the changes in core-level binding energies in germanium-doped lead telluride, cluster calculations of the changes in the electrostatic potential at the corresponding centers have been performed. Different locations of the Ge atom in the crystal bulk have been considered: near vacancies, near another dopant site, and near the surface. For calculating the potential in the clusters that model the bulk and the surface of the lead telluride crystal (c-PbTe), the electron density obtained in the framework of the Hartree-Fock and hybrid density functional theory (DFT) methods has been used [ru

  2. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning process using predeposition surface treatment methods for reduced TE-metal contact resistance. As a demonstration vehicle, a 2 × 2 mm2-sized integrated planar thermoelectric generator (TEG) is shown to harvest 0.7 μ W from 21-K temperature gradient. Transistor performance showed no significant change upon post-CMOS TEG integration, indicating, for the first time, the CMOS compatibility of the Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, which could be leveraged for realization of high-performance integrated micro-TE harvesters and coolers. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Technetium 99-m labeled radio-diagnostic agents employing stannous tartrate and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Wilczewski, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung. 31 claims, no drawings

  4. Assessment of Technetium in the Savannah River Site Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.; Evans, A.G.

    1993-07-01

    Assessment of Technetium in the Savannah River Site Environment is the last in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of SRS operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium cesium, iodine, uranium plutonium, strontium, and carbon. Technetium transport and metabolism have been studied by the nuclear industry because it is a fission product of uranium, and by the medical community because 99m Tc commonly is used as a diagnostic imaging agent in nuclear medicine. Technetium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. The only isotope with environmental significance is 99 Tc. Because of the small activities of 99 Tc relative to other fission products, such as 90 Sr and 137 Cs, no measurements were made of releases to either the atmosphere or surface waters. Dose calculations were made in this document using conservative estimates of atmospheric releases and from a few measurements of 99 Tc concentrations in the Savannah River. Technetium in groundwater has been found principally in the vicinity of the separation areas seepage basins. Technetium is soluble in water and follows groundwater flow with little retardation. While most groundwater samples are negative or show little technetium a few samples have levels slightly above the limits set by the EPA for drinking water. The overall radiological impact of SRS 99 Tc releases on the offsite maximally exposed individual during 38 years of operations can be characterized by maximum individual doses of 0.1 mrem (atmospheric) and 0.8 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 13,680 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same time period. Technetium releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports

  5. Processing and Characterization of Thin Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Anna

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has the highest theoretical limit to conversion efficiency of single-junction photovoltaic (PV) technologies today. However, despite a maximum theoretical open-circuit voltage of 1.20 V, record devices have historically had voltages pinned around only 900 mV. Voltage losses due to high recombination rates remains to be the most complex hurdle to CdTe technology today, and the subject of on-going research in the physics PV group at Colorado State University. In this work, an ultrathin CdTe device architecture is proposed in an effort to reduce bulk recombination and boost voltages. By thinning the CdTe layer, a device's internal electric field extends fully towards the back contact. This quickly separates electrons-hole pairs throughout the bulk of the device and reduces overall recombination. Despite this advantage, very thin CdTe layers also present a unique set of optical and electrical challenges which result in performance losses not as prevalent in thicker devices. When fabricating CdTe solar cells, post-deposition treatments applied to the absorber layer are a critical step for achieving high efficiency devices. Exposure of the polycrystalline CdTe film to a chlorine species encourages the passivation of dangling bonds and larger grain formation, while copper-doping improves device uniformity and voltages. This work focuses on experiments conducted via close-space sublimation to optimize CdCl2 and CuCl treatments for thin CdTe solar cells. Sweeps of both exposure and anneal time were performed for both post-deposition treatments on CdTe devices with 1.0 mum absorber layers. The results demonstrate that thin CdTe devices require substantially less post-deposition processing than standard thicker devices as expected. Additionally, the effects of CdTe growth temperature on thin devices is briefly investigated. The results suggest that higher growth temperatures lead to both electrical and stoichiometric changes in CdTe closely associated

  6. Technetium-99m Sestamibi in Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saber, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Technetium-99m 2-methoxy - isobutyl - isonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) has been reported to be useful in evaluating patients with multiple myeloma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of technetium-99m sestamibi (99mTc-MIBI) scintigraphy in the diagnosis. staging and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma. Methods and Materials: twenty-five consecutive patients with multiple myeloma were studied using 99mTc- MIBI. Of the 25 patients included in this study, 6 were in stage I, II in stage II and 8 in stage III. Anterior and posterior whole-body imaging were obtained 20 min after I.V. injection of 740 MBq of 99mTc-MIBI. Four different MIBI patterns could be described in our patients: physiological (P), diffuse (D), focal (F) and combined diffuse and focal (D+F). All patients in stages II and III as well as 3 patients in stage I were treated with chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and prednisone) then 99mTc-MlBI scans were repeated after 6 courses. Results: in comparison to conventional X-ray skeletal survey, 99mTc-MIBI scans showed a higher number of myeloma bone disease at diagnosis. All patients with stage II and III multiple myeloma were positive with 99mTc-MlBl scans at diagnosis. The pattern of positive MIBI accumulation was diffuse in 13 (52%) patients, focal in 4 (16%) and combined focal and diffuse in 6 (24%) patients. The intensity of 99mTc-MIBI correlated with disease activity as determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), number of plasma cells in bone marrow and serum electrophoresis. There was a direct correlation between 99mTc-MIBI scan result and clinical outcome of patients following 6 courses of chemotherapy. Sensitivity and specificity of 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy in detecting myeloma bone lesions were 92% and 90% respectively. Conclusion: 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy is a reliable method to evaluate bone marrow activity in patients with multiple myeloma and follow-up of myeloma bone lesions

  7. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaics: ES and H issues, solutions, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zweibel, K.; Moskowitz, P.; Fthenakis, V.

    1998-02-01

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a growing business worldwide, with new technologies evolving towards potentially large-volume production. PV use produces no emissions, thus offsetting many potential environmental problems. However, the new PV technologies also bring unfamiliar environment, safety, and health (ES and H) challenges that require innovative solutions. This is a summary of the issues, solutions, and perspectives associated with the use of cadmium in one of the new and important PV technologies: thin-film, cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV, which is being developed and commercialized by several companies including Solar Cells Inc. (Toledo, Ohio), BP Solar (Fairfield, California), and Matsushita (Japan). The principal ES and H issue for thin-film cadmium telluride PV is the potential introduction of cadmium--a toxic heavy metal--into the air or water. The amount of cadmium in thin-film PV, however, is quite small--one nickel cadmium flashlight battery has about as much cadmium (7 g) as a square meter of PV module using current technology--and a typical cordless power tool will have 5--10 batteries. CdTe modules are also very well sealed, limiting the chance of release. Nonetheless, minimizing the amount of cadmium in cadmium telluride modules and preventing the introduction of that cadmium into the environment is a top priority for National Renewable Energy Laboratory researchers and cadmium telluride PV manufacturers

  8. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ADSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrnes, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will

  9. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs

  10. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukens, Wayne W. Jr.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO 4 - , soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium

  11. The quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals produced at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, K.J.

    1983-08-01

    The methods of quality control used for technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals produced at the AAEC Research Establishment are described for both non-fission and fission derived sources of sodium pertechnetate, technetium-99m labelled radipopharmaceuticals, and reagent kits produced for technetium-99m labelling

  12. Experimental measurements of the solubility of technetium under near-field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilkington, N.J.; Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-05-01

    The solubility of technetium in contact with hydrated technetium dioxide under near-field conditions has been measured experimentally. The values obtained were changed little by a change in pH or in the filtration method used. The presence of organic degradation products increased slightly the solution concentration of technetium. (author)

  13. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens Jr., Wayne W.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-12-23

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium.

  14. Sorption characteristics of technetium on crosslinked chitosan from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Rajec, P.

    2014-01-01

    Sorption of technetium on crosslinked chitosan was studied using batch techniques in static arrangement of experiment under aerobic conditions at laboratory temperature. The adsorption of technetium was rapid and the percentage of the technetium sorption was > 98 %. In the pH range of 3-11 adsorption of technetium on crosslinked chitosan was > 98 %. The competition effect of Fe 3+ towards TcO 4 - sorption on crosslinked chitosan was stronger than the competition effect of other observed cations. The selectivity of crosslinked chitosan for these cations in solution with the concentration above 1·10 -3 mol·dm -3 was in the order Fe 3+ > Ca 2+ > Na + > Fe 2+ . The competition effect of (ClO 4 ) - towards TcO 4 - sorption was stronger than the competition effect of (SO 4 ) 2 - ions. From these results it can be expected that crosslinked chitosan could be a suitable sorbent for the immobilization of technetium in the liquid radioactive waste. (authors)

  15. Uptake and distribution of technetium in several marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Myttenaere, C.; Van Baelen, J.; Cogneau, M.; van der Ben, D.

    1983-01-01

    The uptake or chemical form of technetium in different marine algae (Acetabularia, Cystoseira, Fucus) has been examined and a simple model to explain the uptake of technetium in the unicellular alga, Acetabularia, has been conceptualized. At low concentrations in the external medium, Acetabularia can rapidly concentrate technetium. Concentration factors in excess of 400 can be attained after a time of about 3 weeks. At higher mass concentrations in the medium, uptake of technetium by Acetabularia becomes saturated resulting in a decreased concentration factor (approximately 10 after 4 weeks). Approximately 69% of the total radioactivity present in /sup 95m/Tc labelled Acetabularia is found in the cell cytosol. In Fucus vesiculosus, labelled with /sup 95m/Tc, a high percentage of technetium is present in soluble ionic forms while approximately 40% is bound, in this brown alga, in proteins and polysaccharides associated with cell walls. In the algal cytosol of Fucus vesiculosus, about 45% of the /sup 95m/Tc appears to be present as anionic TcO - 4 and the remainder is bound to small molecules. 8 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  16. Complexes of technetium with polyhydric ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, L.L.Y.; Ronca, N.; Solomon, N.A.; Steigman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Polyhydric complexes of Tc(V) show absorption bands near 500 nm, with molar absorptivity coefficients of about 100. The shorter-chain compounds like ethylene glycol produce complexes which quickly disproportionate to Tc(IV) (as TcO 2 ) and Tc(VII) (as TcO 4 - ) on acidification. The longer-chain ligands like mannitol and gluconate do not. However, while the mannitol complex shows no change in spectrum from pH 12 to pH 3, the gluconate and glucoheptonate compounds show a definite spectral change on acidification, starting at pH 5. Electrophoresis similarity showed a change in mobility with pH for Tc-glucoheptonate, but none for Tc-mannitol. It was concluded that the carboxylic acid group of glucoheptonate was not binding the technetium. In 25 molal choline chloride the glucoheptonate-Tc mole ratio was 1:1 or less. A similar result emerged from a similar experiment in methylcellosolve as solvent. (author)

  17. Technetium cyanide chemistry: synthesis and characterization of technetium(III) and -(V) cyanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trop, H.S.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.

    1980-01-01

    Several new technetium cyanide complexes have been prepared and characterized. The reaction of ammonium hexaiodotechnetate(IV) with potassium cyanide in refluxing aqueous methanol under nitrogen yields potassium heptacyanotechnetate(III) dihydrate, K 4 Tc(CN) 7 .2H 2 O (1). Infrared and Raman measurements indicate that 1 has a pentagonal bipyramidal structure (D/sub 5h/) in both solid and solution. Aqueous solutions of 1 are air sensitive, decomposing to potassium oxopentacyanotechnetate(V) tetrahydrate, K 2 TcO(CN) 5 .4H 2 O (2). This species can also be prepared from the reaction of TcO 2 .xH 2 O with hot aqueous potassium cyanide solutions. Hydrolysis of 2 in water yields potassium trans-dioxo-tetracyanotechnetate(V), K 3 TcO 2 (CN) 4 (3). Preparation of 3 can also be achieved from the treatment of [TcO 2 (Py) 4 ]ClO 4 .2H 2 O with aqueous potassium cyanide. Infrared and Raman measurements on 3 are consistent with the proposed trans-dioxo (D/sub 4h/) structure. Reaction of the oxotetrachlorotechnetate(V) anion, TcOCl 4 , with potassium cyanide in methanol produces trans-oxomethoxytetracyanotechnetate(V). [TcO(OMe)(CN) 4 ] (4). The full details of the synthesis and characterization of these interesting technetium(III) and -(V) complexes, as well as observations on the infrared and Raman spectra of trans-dioxo metal complexes and the hydrolysis of species 2, are presented

  18. Adsorption of technetium-99m tetrofosmin and technetium-99m furifosmin on plastic syringes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosch, R.; Granegger, S.; Sinzinger, H.

    1998-01-01

    Some groups have reported that adsorption of radiopharmaceuticals on disposable plastic syringes can reach levels of almost 50%. This high loss of radioactivity stimulated us to carry out similar studies. Our measurements were done in combination with patient studies. Therefore, we used 2-ml syringes, all of the same brand. The radioactivity in the syringe was measured immediately before and after injection. a total of 500-600 MBq technetium-99m labelled tetrofosmin or technetium-99m furifosmin was administered to 48 patients using four different injection techniques (n = 6 for each technique with each tracer): with needles, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer; with butterflies, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer. Neither in syringes nor in needles or butterflies did more than 7% of the initial radioactivity remain. The entire residual activity in syringe plus needle or syringe plus butterfly together never exceeded the 9% limit. Furthermore, in a pilot study we measured the remaining radioactivity in the vial; here, too, we found no more than 14% of total radioactivity. These findings indicate that total retention of radioactivity during elution and application of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin and 99m Tc-furifosmin with material used in our setting does not approach relevant amounts. (orig.)

  19. Adsorption of technetium-99m tetrofosmin and technetium-99m furifosmin on plastic syringes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartosch, R.; Granegger, S.; Sinzinger, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Vienna (Austria)

    1998-09-01

    Some groups have reported that adsorption of radiopharmaceuticals on disposable plastic syringes can reach levels of almost 50%. This high loss of radioactivity stimulated us to carry out similar studies. Our measurements were done in combination with patient studies. Therefore, we used 2-ml syringes, all of the same brand. The radioactivity in the syringe was measured immediately before and after injection. a total of 500-600 MBq technetium-99m labelled tetrofosmin or technetium-99m furifosmin was administered to 48 patients using four different injection techniques (n = 6 for each technique with each tracer): with needles, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer; with butterflies, 1 min blood incubation at 22 C, 10 or 30 min after preparation of the tracer. Neither in syringes nor in needles or butterflies did more than 7% of the initial radioactivity remain. The entire residual activity in syringe plus needle or syringe plus butterfly together never exceeded the 9% limit. Furthermore, in a pilot study we measured the remaining radioactivity in the vial; here, too, we found no more than 14% of total radioactivity. These findings indicate that total retention of radioactivity during elution and application of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and {sup 99m}Tc-furifosmin with material used in our setting does not approach relevant amounts. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  20. Technetium behaviour in Boom Clay - a laboratory and field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Ilett, D.J.; Cowper, M.M.; Pilkington, N.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J. [AEA Technology plc, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Canniere, P.R. de; Wang, L. [SCK.CEN, Waste and Disposal Project, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes a study of technetium solubility and migration under chemical conditions representative of those prevailing in a Boom Clay environment. Laboratory and in situ measurements yielded similar aqueous concentrations of technetium, of about 1 x 10{sup -8} mol dm{sup -3}, close to the concentrations measured for hydrated technetium(IV) oxide TcO{sub 2}.1.6H{sub 2}O in the solubility studies. From fitting the curves of the Tc concentrations as function of time, distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values were estimated to lie between 0.8 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1} and 1.8 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Exposure of the system at 80 C and to {gamma}-radiation dose rates of several hundred Gy h{sup -1} resulted in only minor differences in behaviour. (orig.)

  1. Technetium behaviour in Boom Clay - a laboratory and field study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Ilett, D.J.; Cowper, M.M.; Pilkington, N.J.; Tweed, C.J.; Williams, S.J.; Canniere, P.R. de; Wang, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a study of technetium solubility and migration under chemical conditions representative of those prevailing in a Boom Clay environment. Laboratory and in situ measurements yielded similar aqueous concentrations of technetium, of about 1 x 10 -8 mol dm -3 , close to the concentrations measured for hydrated technetium(IV) oxide TcO 2 .1.6H 2 O in the solubility studies. From fitting the curves of the Tc concentrations as function of time, distribution coefficient (K d ) values were estimated to lie between 0.8 cm 3 g -1 and 1.8 cm 3 g -1 . Exposure of the system at 80 C and to γ-radiation dose rates of several hundred Gy h -1 resulted in only minor differences in behaviour. (orig.)

  2. Technetium SPECT agents for imaging heart and brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linder, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    One major goal of radiopharmaceutical research has been the development of technetium-based perfusion tracers for SPECT imaging of the heart and brain. The recent clinical introduction of the technetium complexes HM-PAO, ECD and DMG-2MP for brain imaging, and of CDO-MEB and MIBI for heart imaging promises to revolutionize the field of nuclear medicine. All of these agents appear to localize in the target tissue in proportion to blood flow, but their mechanisms of localization and/or retention may differ quite widely. In this talk, a survey of the new technetium SPECT agents will be presented. The inorganic and biological chemistry of these complexes, mechanisms of uptake and retention, QSAR studies, and potential clinical applications are discussed

  3. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Liyan [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yan, Shancheng, E-mail: yansc@njupt.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China); Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Yang, Fan [School of Geography and Biological Information, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210046 (China)

    2014-03-15

    hydrogen storage, compared with the nanowires. The nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm, covering the UV–visible–NIR region. This good performance of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements of new photodetection and photosensing applications. Highlights: • The In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm. • The nanotube is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which makes it suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage. • A possible growth mechanism of the indium telluride nanotubes was proposed. • In addition, no In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes have been reported until now.

  4. Insolubilization of technetium by microorganisms in waterlogged soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Tagami, Keiko

    2003-01-01

    In order to clarify the technetium behavior in paddy field ecosystem, insolubilization of technetium in the water covering waterlogged soils was studied. Fourteen soils collected from paddy fields (9 samples) and upland fields (5 samples) were waterlogged for 7 days. After the collection of water covering the waterlogged soils, a radio tracer 95m TcO 4 - was added to the water. After 4 days incubation of the water, the tracer was separated into four fractions: insoluble, pertechnetate, cationic, and other forms of technetium. On an average, 13% of the 95m TcO 4 - changed to insoluble forms and the maximum ratio of the insolubilization was 76%. This result shows that insolubilization of technetium can occur in the water covering the waterlogged soils. Subsequently, mechanisms of Tc insolubilization were studied using the sample that showed the maximum insolubilization of Tc among the soil samples. When microorganisms were removed from the water by filtration, insoluble forms of Tc decreased to 3.6%. In contrast, the insolubilization ratio increased to 86% by the addition of organic substrates. The insolubilization, therefore, was caused by microorganisms. Furthermore, the addition of antibiotics on bacteria resulted in 23% of the insolubilization, while the antibiotic on fungi did not affect on the insolubilization. If the insolubilization were caused by biosorption, the insolubilization ratio would not decrease for the sample added antibiotics on bacteria. Therefore, these results suggest that the insolubilization of technetium is caused by bioaccumulation of living bacteria. Because the cultures with 95m TcO 4 - were incubated under aerobic conditions, technetium-insolubilizing microorganisms would presumably be aerobic bacteria. (author)

  5. Absorption of technetium by plants in relation to soil type contamination level and time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousny, J.M.; Myttenaere, C. (Louvain Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physiologie Vegetale)

    1981-01-01

    Plants of Pisum sativum (var. Merveille de Kelvedon) were grown on seven typical european soils contaminated with different levels of /sup 99/Tc(0.17; 1.7 and 17 ..mu..Ci/kg). Added initially as pertechnetate, the technetium absorption has been studied for three successive cultures. The translocation of technetium from soil to plant leaves is high, but its transfer is reduced in soils rich in organic matter (Fen) or poorly drained (Braunerde). Aging reduces the technetium transfer and modify its relative distribution in plant (relatively more technetium is found in fruits); these results let suppose some modification of the technetium chemical form in soils with time.

  6. Study on interference of technetium in spectrophotometric estimation of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revathi, P.; Saipriya, K.; Madhavan Kutty, V.K.; Srinivasa Rao, G.; Vijayakumar, N.; Kumar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of uranium is essential for process control purposes as well as to arrive optimum parameters for further waste management in reprocessing industry. Uranium estimation is done by spectrophotometry using ammonium thiocyanate, DBM, PAR and Br-PADAP as chromogenic reagents for colour development. Extractive spectrophotometry can also be used to eliminate some of the interfering ions. During inter method comparison, technetium was found to be interfering in the thiocyanate spectrophotometry. This study is an effort to find out the extent of technetium interference in the estimation of uranium by spectrophotometry using the above said chromogenic reagents. (author)

  7. Determination of technetium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.H.; Ballou, N.E.

    1978-01-01

    A detection limit of 6 x 10 -11 g has been achieved for measurement of technetium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. A commercially available, demountable, hollow cathode lamp was used and both argon and neon were used as fill gases for the lamp. The range of applicability of the method, when the unresolved 2614.23 to 2615.87 A doublet is used for analysis, is from 60 pg to at least 3 ng of technetium per aliquot analyzed. 3 figures, 1 table

  8. Selective sorption of technetium from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Groundwater used for processing uranium or plutonium at DOE sites is frequently contaminated with the radionuclide {sup 99}Tc. DOE`s Paducah and Portsmouth sites are typical of the contamination problem. Solutions contaminated with radionuclides were poured into lagoons and burial pits, which created a plume that has seeped into the sandy aquifers below the vadose zone. Technetium is the principal radioactive metal-ion contaminant in Paducah site ground-water, and it is present at a concentration of about 25 ng/L. At Portsmouth, Tc is present in the groundwater at a concentration that varies greatly with distance from the source, and concentrations of >400 ng/L have been reported. Commercially available anion-exchange resins can remove the TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} ion in the presence of typical anions found in groundwater, but improving the selectivity will result in substantial cost savings in terms of the quantity of resin needed and the scale of the equipment required to treat huge flows rates. The pertechnetate anion is strongly sorbed on commercially-available strong-base anion-exchange resins, but in view of the low (typically nanomolar) concentrations of Tc involved, enhanced selectivity for the pertechnetate anion over other anions commonly found in groundwater such as chloride, sulfate, and nitrite will be needed. The authors have prepared and evaluated new anion-exchange resins that were designed to be highly selective for pertechnetate. The technology involves building those features that are known to enhance the selectivity of pertechnetate over other anions into the exchange sites of the resin (hydrophobicity), while at the same time maintaining favorable exchange kinetics.

  9. Behavior of technetium in freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, /sup 95m/Tc, as a pertechnetate, was released to a small, experimental, freshwater pond, and the concentrations were determined in biotic and abiotic components of the pond ecosystem. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in fish and snails. Results from this study indicated that uptake through the food chain was an important source of technetium to the higher trophic levels (i.e., fish). In the current study, an experimental pond was spiked with /sup 95m/Tc in the pertechnetate form, and the concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were measured in the lower trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on measuring the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and the aquatic macrophyte Elodea canadensis. Fish were excluded from the pond to allow the development of a large zooplankton population. The concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in water decreased from 0.75 Bq/mL 1 h after the pond was spiked, to 0.21 Bq/mL at 20 d. Throughout the experiment, at least 98% of the /sup 95m/Tc in the water was in the dissolved fraction (0.4 ..mu..m). Zooplankton accumulated /sup 95m/Tc rapidly, having concentration factors (Bq/g sample wet wt. divided by Bq/g water) ranging from 3 at 4 h to 36 at 20 d. Concentration factors ranged from 3 to 8 for benthic insects and from 1 to 62 for the aquatic macrophyte.

  10. Distribution of technetium-99 in surface soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2000-01-01

    Technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) is an important fission product which has been widely distributed in the environment as a result of fallout from nuclear weapons testing. In order to improve our understanding of the behavior of 99 Tc in the environment, it is essential that we obtain more reliable information on the levels, distribution and fate of 99 Tc in the environment. In this study, the concentration of global fallout 99 Tc, in several surface soil samples (0 - 20 cm) collected in Japan, were determined by ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy). The range of 99 Tc in rice paddy field, upland field and other soils determined in this study were 0.006 - 0.11, 0.004 - 0.008 and 0.007 - 0.02 Bq kg -1 dry, respectively. 137 Cs was used as a comparative indicator for the source of 99 Tc, because the fission yields from 235 U and 239 Pu were about the same (ca. 6%) for the two isotopes, and the behavior and distribution of 137 Cs in the environment is reasonably well understood. The 137 Cs contents in rice paddy field, upland field and other soils range between 1.7 - 28, 1.4 - 9.2 and -1 dry, respectively. The activity ratios of 99 Tc/ 137 Cs in all soil samples were (0.6 - 5.9) x 10 -3 . Most of the measured ratios were one order of magnitude higher than the theoretical one obtained from fission. However, this ratio in soil, presumably depends on not only both the characteristic of radionuclides and the soil, but also on their contents after deposition to the earth's surface. (author)

  11. Configuration Entropy Calculations for Complex Compounds Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhayatun; Susanto Imam Rahayu; Surdia, N.M.; Abdul Mutalib

    2002-01-01

    Recently, the study of technetium complexes is rapidly increasing, due to the benefit of 99m Tc complexes (one of Tc nuclear isomers), which are widely used for diagnostics. Study of the structure-stability relationship of Tc complexes based on solid angle has been done by Kung using a Solid Angle Factor Sum (SAS). The SAS is hypothesized to be related to stability. SAS has been used by several researchers either for synthesis or designing the reaction route of the Tc complex formation and predicting the geometry of complex structures. Although the advantages of the SAS were very gratifying, but the model does not have the theoretical basis which is able to explain the correlation of steric parameters to physicochemical properties of complexes especially to those connected to a complex's stability. To improve the SAS model, in this research the model was modified by providing a theoretical basis for SAS. The results obtained from the correlation of the SAS value to the thermodynamic stability parameters of simple complexes show the values to have a similar trend as the standard entropy (S 0 ). The entropy approximation model was created by involving some factors which are not used in Kung's model. Entropy optimization to the bond length (ML) has also been done to several complexes. The calculations of SAS value using the calculated R for more than 100 Tc complexes provide a normalized mean value of 0.8545 ± 0.0851 and have similar curve profiles as those of Kung's model. The entropy value can be obtained by multiplying the natural logarithm of the a priori degeneracy of a certain distribution (Ω) and the Boltzmann constant. The results of Ω and In Ω of the Tc complexes have a narrow range. The results of this research are able to provide a basic concept for the SAS to explain the structure-stability relationship and to improve Kung's model. (author)

  12. Behavior of technetium in freshwater environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, B.G.; Frank, M.L.; Hoffman, F.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    In a previous study, /sup 95m/Tc, as a pertechnetate, was released to a small, experimental, freshwater pond, and the concentrations were determined in biotic and abiotic components of the pond ecosystem. A simple mathematical model was developed to predict the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in fish and snails. Results from this study indicated that uptake through the food chain was an important source of technetium to the higher trophic levels (i.e., fish). In the current study, an experimental pond was spiked with /sup 95m/Tc in the pertechnetate form, and the concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were measured in the lower trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on measuring the concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and the aquatic macrophyte Elodea canadensis. Fish were excluded from the pond to allow the development of a large zooplankton population. The concentration of /sup 95m/Tc in water decreased from 0.75 Bq/mL 1 h after the pond was spiked, to 0.21 Bq/mL at 20 d. Throughout the experiment, at least 98% of the /sup 95m/Tc in the water was in the dissolved fraction (0.4 μm). Zooplankton accumulated /sup 95m/Tc rapidly, having concentration factors (Bq/g sample wet wt. divided by Bq/g water) ranging from 3 at 4 h to 36 at 20 d. Concentration factors ranged from 3 to 8 for benthic insects and from 1 to 62 for the aquatic macrophyte

  13. Study of the chemical behaviour of technetium during irradiated fuels reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelverte, A.

    1988-04-01

    This paper deals with the preparation of the lower oxidation states +III +IV and +V of technetium in nitric acid and its behaviour during the reprocessing of nuclear fuels (PUREX process). The first part of this work is a bibliographical study of this element in solution without any strong ligand. By chemical and electrochemical technics, pentavalent, tetravalent and trivalent technetium species, were prepared in nitric acid. The following chemical reactions are studied: - trivalent and tetravalent technetium oxidation by nitrate ion. - hydrazine and tetravalent uranium oxidation catalysed by technetium: in those reactions, we point out unequivocally the prominent part of trivalent and tetravalent technetium, - technetium behaviour towards hydroxylamine. Technetium should not cause any disturbance in the steps where hydroxylamine is employed to destroy nitrous acid and hydrazine replacement by hydroxylamine in uranium-plutonium partition could contribute to a best reprocessing of nuclear fuels [fr

  14. The chemical speciation of technetium in the environment: a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparkes, S.T.; Long, S.E.

    1987-07-01

    This report reviews the current understanding of the chemical forms and behaviour of technetium in the environment. Technetium (VII) is the dominant species in most systems, however when reducing conditions arise technetium (IV) species predominate. Pertechnetate is a highly mobile ion in aqueous media and can exhibit significant environmental transfer. Technetium (IV) is readily sorbed by sediments and is able to complex with various ligands which subsequently determine its fate. Complexation with high molecular weight organic moieties reduces the availability of technetium although this is not necessarily the case with smaller molecules. In plants, technetium is absorbed as TcO 4 - and can become incorporated into organic molecules. The technetium present in such forms is generally considered less available for uptake by the ingesting animal than aqueous TcO 4 - , although significant transfer of this element has been reported from food into eggs. Areas of potential future interest are suggested. (author)

  15. Volatility literature of chlorine, iodine, cesium, strontium, technetium, and rhenium; technetium and rhenium volatility testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langowski, M.H.; Darab, J.G.; Smith, P.A.

    1996-03-01

    A literature review pertaining to the volatilization of Sr, Cs, Tc (and its surrogate Re), Cl, I and other related species during the vitrification of Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW) streams has been performed and the relevant information summarized. For many of these species, the chemistry which occurs in solution prior to the waste stream entering the melter is important in dictating their loss at higher temperatures. In addition, the interactive effects between the species being lost was found to be important. A review of the chemistries of Tc and Re was also performed. It was suggested that Re would indeed act as an excellent surrogate for Tc in non-radioactive materials testing. Experimental results on Tc and Re loss from sodium aluminoborosilicate melts of temperatures ranging from 900--1350 degrees C performed at PNL are reported and confirm that Re behaves in a nearly identical manner to that of technetium

  16. Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in Biogeochemical Controls on Technetium Mobility in FRC Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J.R.; McBeth, J.M.; Livens, F.R.; Bryan, N.D.; Ellis, B.; Sharma, H.; Burke, I.T.; Morris, K.

    2004-01-01

    Technetium-99 is a priority pollutant at numerous DOE sites, due to its long half-life (2.1 x 10 5 years), high mobility as Tc(VII) in oxic waters, and bioavailability as a sulfate analog. 99 Tc is far less mobile under anaerobic conditions, forming insoluble Tc(IV) precipitates. As anaerobic microorganisms can reduce soluble Tc(VII) to insoluble Tc(IV), microbial metabolism may have the potential to treat sediments and waters contaminated with Tc. Baseline studies of fundamental mechanisms of Tc(VII) bioreduction and precipitation (reviewed by Lloyd et al, 2002) have generally used pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, in order to develop conceptual models for the biogeochemical cycling of Tc. There is, however, comparatively little known about interactions of metal-reducing bacteria with environmentally relevant trace concentrations of Tc, against a more complex biogeochemical background provided by mixed microbial communities in the subsurface. The objective of this new NABIR project is to probe the site specific biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC (Oak Ridge, TN). This information is required for the rational design of in situ bioremediation strategies for technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. We will use a combination of geochemical, mineralogical, microbiological and spectroscopic techniques to determine the solubility and phase associations of Tc in FRC sediments, and characterize the underpinning biogeochemical controls. A key strength of this project is that many of the techniques we are using have already been optimized by our research team, who are also studying the biogeochemical controls on Tc mobility in marine and freshwater sediments in the UK in a NERC funded companion study.

  17. Fluoridonitrosyl complexes of technetium(I) and technetium(II). Synthesis, characterization, reactions, and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasekaran, Samundeeswari Mariappan; Spandl, Johann; Hagenbach, Adelheid; Köhler, Klaus; Drees, Markus; Abram, Ulrich

    2014-05-19

    A mixture of [Tc(NO)F5](2-) and [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) is formed during the reaction of pertechnetate with acetohydroxamic acid (Haha) in aqueous HF. The blue pentafluoridonitrosyltechnetate(II) has been isolated in crystalline form as potassium and rubidium salts, while the orange-red ammine complex crystallizes as bifluoride or PF6(-) salts. Reactions of [Tc(NO)F5](2-) salts with HCl give the corresponding [Tc(NO)Cl4/5](-/2-) complexes, while reflux in neat pyridine (py) results in the formation of the technetium(I) cation [Tc(NO)(py)4F](+), which can be crystallized as hexafluoridophosphate. The same compound can be synthesized directly from pertechnetate, Haha, HF, and py or by a ligand-exchange procedure starting from [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](HF2). The technetium(I) cation [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) can be oxidized electrochemically or by the reaction with Ce(SO4)2 to give the corresponding Tc(II) compound [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](2+). The fluorido ligand in [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+) can be replaced by CF3COO(-), leaving the "[Tc(NO)(NH3)4](2+) core" untouched. The experimental results are confirmed by density functional theory calculations on [Tc(NO)F5](2-), [Tc(NO)(py)4F](+), [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](+), and [Tc(NO)(NH3)4F](2+).

  18. Mechanism of manganese (mono and di) telluride thin-film formation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raj Kishore; Singh, Gurmeet; Shul, Yong Gun; Kim, Hansung

    2007-03-01

    Mechanistic studies on the electrocrystallization of manganese telluride (MnTe) thin film are reported using aqueous acidic solution containing MnSO 4 and TeO 2. Tartaric acid was used for the inhibition of hydrated manganese oxide anodic growth at counter electrode. A detailed study on the mechanistic aspect of electrochemical growth of MnTe using cyclic voltametry is carried out. Conditions for electrochemical growth of manganese mono and di telluride thin films have been reported using cyclic voltammetric scans for Mn 2+, Te 4+ and combined Mn 2+ and Te 4+. X-ray diffraction showed the formation of polycrystalline MnTe films with cubic, hexagonal and orthorhombic mixed phases. MnTe film morphology was studied using scanning electron microscope. Susceptibility and electrical characterization supports the anti-ferromagnetic behavior of the as-deposited MnTe thin film.

  19. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  20. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  1. Detection of pulmonary hemorrhage with technetium-labeled red cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Laman, D.; Sachs, M.; Miller, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to aid in the diagnosis of massive pulmonary hemoptysis would be helpful in guiding more-invasive procedures such as bronchial artery angiography, which carries a risk of transverse myelitis. A patient was studied with technetium-labeled red cells and successfully detected a site of intermittent hemorrhage from the lung

  2. Coordination chemistry of technetium as related to nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.

    1982-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the area of technetium coordination chemistry during the last five years. The main driving force behind this recent surge of interest in the field has been due to the practical application of technetium-99m in the rapidly growing speciality of nuclear medicine. Technetium-99 is one of the products of nuclear fission reactions, but it was the development of the molybdenum-99-technetium-99m generator about two decades ago that provided the basis for the development of radiopharmaceuticals routinely used in modern diagnostic applications. The chemistry of this element has proven to be quite rich owing to its multiple oxidation states and variable geometry. This can be attributed to its position in the middle of the periodic table. Diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals comprise predominantly III, IV and V oxidation states of Tc and involve a variety of coordination complexes. Even though the chemistry of Tc has been slow to evolve, recent synthetic advances have provided a more scientific basis for the study of a number of compounds with diverse coordination geometries and structures. Ligands with oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur donor atoms have been utilized to elucidate various aspects of the coordination chemistry of Tc. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis has been extensively used to characterize Tc complexes and thus construct a firm foundation for the study of synthetic and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of this element. (author)

  3. Evaluation of reflux oesophagitis with technetium-99m-labelled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sucralfate binds with denuded protein to form a stable complex to protect the damaged mucosa. By utilising this property, technetium-99m-labelled sucraJfate can be used to demonstrate ulceration in the upper gastro-intestinal tract. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate 99mTc-labelled sucralfate in the diagnosis of ...

  4. Investigation on chemistry of model compounds of technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.; Hartmann, E.

    1983-01-01

    The report summarized experimental and theoretical results concerning the chemical structures and the biodistribution of hydrophilic technetium chelates with hydroxycarboxylic and aminopolycarboxylic acids, thiol compounds and aliphatic and aromatic nitrogen compounds as ligands. Methods which are suitable for synthesizing and characterizing defined chelates of Tc(V), Tc(IV) and Tc(III) have been developed for crystlline substances and species in solution, respectively. For certain types of technetium chelates three dimensional structure models were calculated from atomic parameters. The electron energies and electron distribution of Tc(V) thiol compounds were calculated by quantum chemical methods in order to interprete physical properties of these substances. Biodistribution studies revealed relationships between the osteotropic behaviour and the structure of phosphorous and non-phosphorous technetium chelates and between the kidney uptake and ligand exchange ability of Tc(V) hydroxycarboxylates. Important parameters for the production of technetium-99m kits have been elaborated and used for the optimization of radiopharmaceuticals (bone-, kidney and hepatobiliaer agents). (author)

  5. Technetium and diazotrophic organisms: toxicity, localization, transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.M.; Delmotte, A.; Roucoux, P.; Hove, C. van

    1982-01-01

    Three diazotrophic organisms, together with one leguminous organism in symbiosis with one of them, were cultivated in the presence of various quantities of technetium, of which the localization, transfer factors and toxicity were studied in relation to the age of the organisms and their type of metabolism. The paper discusses the biochemical aspects of the results. (author)

  6. Membrane-based separation technologies for cesium, strontium, and technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kafka, T.

    1996-01-01

    This work is one of two parallel projects that are part of an ESP task to develop high-capacity, selective, solid extractants for cesium, strontium, and technetium from nuclear wastes. In this subtask, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is collaborating with 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota, working in cooperation with IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah

  7. Technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labelled radiodiagnostic agents by reducing sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate with stannous tartrate is given. Human serum albumine (HSA) and 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-disodiumphosphonate (HEDSPA), which are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the lung and bone, were labelled in this way

  8. Technetium: The First Radioelement on the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Erik V.; Yates, Mary Anne; Poineau, Frederic; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    The radioactive nature of technetium is discussed using a combination of introductory nuclear physics concepts and empirical trends observed in the chart of the nuclides and the periodic table of the elements. Trends such as the enhanced stability of nucleon pairs, magic numbers, and Mattauch's rule are described. The concepts of nuclear binding…

  9. Immobilization of technetium and nitrate in cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallent, O.K.; McDaniel, E.W.; Del Cul, G.D.; Dodson, K.E.; Trotter, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The leachabilities of technetium and nitrate wastes immobilized in cement-based grouts have been investigated. Factors found to affect the leachabilities include grout mix ratio, grout fluid density, dry solid blend composition, and waste concentration. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Diagnostic Genesis Features of Au-Ag Selenide-Telluride Mineralization of Western Java Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Tintin Yuningsih

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.3.1.67-76The ore mineralogy of the westernmost part of West Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cikotok, and Cirotan are characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, whereas the eastern part of West Java including Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. Mineralogy of Se-type deposits at Pongkor, Cikidang, Cibaliung, Cisungsang, and Cirotan and Te-type deposits at Arinem and Cineam shows their different geochemical characteristics. Mineralogical and geochemical differences can be explained by variation of physico-chemical conditions that existed during gold-silver deposition by applying the phase relation among sulfide, telluride, and selenide mineral association in the deposits. The relative values of ƒSe2(g, ƒTe(g, and ƒS2(g control the actual presence of selenide or telluride minerals within the West Java deposits, which also depend on their concentrations in the hydrothermal fluid. Even though the concentration of selenium in the hydrothermal fluid of Te-type deposits might have been similar or even higher than that in the Se-type, early substitution of selenium in the sulfide minerals prevents its concentration in the hydrothermal fluid to the levels for precipitating selenide minerals. Therefore, early sulfide mineral deposition from reduction fluids will not increase the ƒSe2(g/ƒS2(g ratio to form selenide minerals in Te-type deposits of Arinem and Cineam, other than selenium-bearing sulfide mineral such as Se-bearing galena or Se-bearing pyrargyrite-proustite.

  11. Donor impurity self-compensation by neutral complexes in bismuth doped lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravich, Yu.I.; Nemov, S.A.; Proshin, V.I.

    1994-01-01

    Self-compensation is calculated of impurity doping action in semiconductors of the A 4 B 6 type by neutral complexes, consisting of a vacancy and two impurity atoms. Complexes entropy is estimated and the thermodynamic potential is minimized in the concentration of single two-charge vacancies and complexes. Calculation results are compared with experimental data, obtained when lead telluride doping by bismuth. Account for complex formation improves agreement theory with experiment. 4 refs., 1 fig

  12. Technetium-99m ceftizoxime kit preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diniz, Simone Odilia Fernandes; Siqueira, Cristiano Ferrari; Nelson, David Lee; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare a kit of 99 m Tc-ceftizoxime ( 99m Tc-CFT), with stability and biological activity preserved, able to identify a septic focus (E. coli) in the experimental infection model in rats. The preparation of the CFT kit involved the use of lyophilized solutions containing the antibiotic ceftizoxime and the sodium dithionite reducing agent (6.0 mg/m L). After lyophilization, the kit was reconstituted with 1.0 mL of sodium 99m Tc pertechnetate solution (Na 99m Tc O 4- ) with an activity of 370 MBq. The solution was boiled for 10 min and filtered through a cellulose ester filter. The labeling efficiency was on the order of 92%, remaining stable for six hours and the kit remained stable for two months. The biological activity of the 99m Tc-CFT was evaluated by diffusion in agar impregnated with E.coli and S. aureus. Seven Wistar rats, weighing from 200 to 250 g, were used for the development of the septic focus. After 24 hours from the induction of the infectious site (E.coli), the animals were anesthetized and 0.1 mL of 99m Tc-CFT (37 MBq) was injected into the tail veins of the animals. The images were obtained with a gamma camera one, two and six hours after injection and the regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated. The diameters of the inhibition halos for 99 m Tc-CFT were 27.16 ± 0.23 and 27.17 ± 0.20 for S.aureus and E.coli, respectively, while those for the unlabeled CFT were 30.4 ± 0.33 and 29.43 ± 0.26, respectively. The results for the biodistribution of 99m Tc-CFT in infected animals furnished a ratio of 1.97 ± 0.31, 2.10 ± 0.42 and 2.01 ± 0.42 for cpm-target/cpm-no target for the one, two and six-hour periods, respectively. The images showed a clear uptake of labeled antibiotic ( 99m Tc-CFT) by the infectious site during the experiment. The results attest to the viability of producing a kit with 99m technetium-labeled ceftizoxime for the investigation of infectious processes. (author)

  13. Technetium-99m ceftizoxime kit preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diniz, Simone Odilia Fernandes; Siqueira, Cristiano Ferrari; Nelson, David Lee; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento [Minas Gerais Univ. Federal, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia]. E-mail: simone@farmacia.ufmg.br; Martin-Comin, Josep [Bellvitge Univ., Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The aim of this work was to prepare a kit of {sup 99}m Tc-ceftizoxime ({sup 99m} Tc-CFT), with stability and biological activity preserved, able to identify a septic focus (E. coli) in the experimental infection model in rats. The preparation of the CFT kit involved the use of lyophilized solutions containing the antibiotic ceftizoxime and the sodium dithionite reducing agent (6.0 mg/m L). After lyophilization, the kit was reconstituted with 1.0 mL of sodium {sup 99m} Tc pertechnetate solution (Na {sup 99m} Tc O{sub 4-}) with an activity of 370 MBq. The solution was boiled for 10 min and filtered through a cellulose ester filter. The labeling efficiency was on the order of 92%, remaining stable for six hours and the kit remained stable for two months. The biological activity of the {sup 99m} Tc-CFT was evaluated by diffusion in agar impregnated with E.coli and S. aureus. Seven Wistar rats, weighing from 200 to 250 g, were used for the development of the septic focus. After 24 hours from the induction of the infectious site (E.coli), the animals were anesthetized and 0.1 mL of {sup 99m} Tc-CFT (37 MBq) was injected into the tail veins of the animals. The images were obtained with a gamma camera one, two and six hours after injection and the regions of interest (ROIs) were calculated. The diameters of the inhibition halos for {sup 99}m Tc-CFT were 27.16 {+-} 0.23 and 27.17 {+-} 0.20 for S.aureus and E.coli, respectively, while those for the unlabeled CFT were 30.4 {+-} 0.33 and 29.43 {+-} 0.26, respectively. The results for the biodistribution of {sup 99m} Tc-CFT in infected animals furnished a ratio of 1.97 {+-} 0.31, 2.10 {+-} 0.42 and 2.01 {+-} 0.42 for cpm-target/cpm-no target for the one, two and six-hour periods, respectively. The images showed a clear uptake of labeled antibiotic ({sup 99m} Tc-CFT) by the infectious site during the experiment. The results attest to the viability of producing a kit with {sup 99m} technetium-labeled ceftizoxime for the

  14. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  15. Cyclotron Production of Technetium-99m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Katherine M.

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has emerged as the most widely used radionuclide in medicine and is currently obtained from a 99Mo/ 99mTc generator system. At present, there are only a handful of ageing reactors worldwide capable of producing large quantities of the parent isotope, 99Mo, and owing to the ever growing shutdown periods for maintenance and repair of these ageing reactors, the reliable supply 99mTc has been compromised in recent years. With an interest in alternative strategies for producing this key medical isotope, this thesis focuses on several technical challenges related to the direct cyclotron production of 99mTc via the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction. In addition to evaluating the 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc and 100Mo(p,x)99Mo reactions, this work presented the first experimental evaluation of the 100Mo(p,2n) 99gTc excitation function in the range of 8-18 MeV. Thick target calculations suggested that large quantities of cyclotron-produced 99mTc may be possible. For example, a 6 hr irradiation at 500 μA with an energy window of 18→10 MeV is expected to yield 1.15 TBq of 99mTc. The level of coproduced 99gTc contaminant was found to be on par with the current 99Mo/99mTc generator standard eluted with a 24 hr frequency. Highly enriched 100Mo was required as the target material for 99mTc production and a process for recycling of this expensive material is presented. An 87% recovery yield is reported, including metallic target preparation, irradiation, 99mTc extraction, molybdate isolation, and finally hydrogen reduction to the metal. Further improvements are expected with additional optimization experiments. A method for forming structurally stable metallic molybdenum targets has also been developed. These targets are capable of withstanding more than a kilowatt of beam power and the reliable production and extraction of Curie quantities of 99mTc has been demonstrated. With the end-goal of using the cyclotron-produced 99mTc clinically, the quality of the cyclotron

  16. Method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Delphin, Walter H.

    1979-07-24

    A method for recovering palladium and technetium values from nuclear fuel reprocessing waste solutions containing these and other values by contacting the waste solution with an extractant of tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate in an inert hydrocarbon diluent which extracts the palladium and technetium values from the waste solution. The palladium and technetium values are recovered from the extractant and from any other coextracted values with a strong nitric acid strip solution.

  17. Bronchoalveolar lavage and technetium-99m glucoheptonate imaging in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieske, T.R.; Sunderrajan, E.V.; Passamonte, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    A patient with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia was evaluated using bronchoalveolar lavage, technetium-99m glucoheptonate, and transbronchial lung biopsy. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed 43 percent eosinophils and correlated well with results of transbronchial lung biopsy. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate lung imaging demonstrated intense parenchymal uptake. After eight weeks of corticosteroid therapy, the bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophil population and the technetium-99m glucoheptonate uptake had returned to normal. We suggest that bronchoalveolar lavage, with transbronchial lung biopsy, is a less invasive way than open lung biopsy to diagnose chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. The mechanism of uptake of technetium-99m glucoheptonate in this disorder remains to be defined

  18. Method for radiolabeling proteins with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockford, D.R.; Rhodes, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a substrate to be radiolabeled with technetium-99m is admixed with a buffered stannous chloride composition having a pH between about 4.5 and about 8.5 wherein the stannous chloride is produced from a non-oxidized tin source, the buffered stannous chloride is purged of oxygen and the buffer comprises a mixture of alkali metal biphthalate and an alkali metal tartrate. Alternatively, the buffer may include alkali metal borate or gentisate. The stannous chloride solution is admixed with the buffer and the resultant mixture is neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The neutralized solution then is admixed with the substrate eventually to be radiolabeled with technetium-99m. This solution is allowed to incubate for several hours (usually over 15 hours) in the absence of oxygen and at room temperature

  19. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental samples: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2012-01-01

    Due to the lack of a stable technetium isotope, and the high mobility and long half-life, 99Tc is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity as well as nuclear waste management. 99Tc is also an important tracer for oceanographic...... research due to the high technetium solubility in seawater as TcO4−. A number of analytical methods, using chemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurement techniques, have been developed over the past decades for determination of 99Tc in different environmental samples....... This article summarizes and compares recently reported chemical separation procedures and measurement methods for determination of 99Tc. Due to the extremely low concentration of 99Tc in environmental samples, the sample preparation, pre-concentration, chemical separation and purification for removal...

  20. Preparation of a generator of technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimeno de Osso, F.

    1981-01-01

    Practical description is given of equipment and operations necessary in the preparation of an isotopic generator of technetium-99m. The preparation and application of the active solution and throughly washed of the chromatographic column have been studied in order to allow molibdenum-99 to be adsorbed on a small band, and the solution of tectium-99m to be eluted with high efficiency and purity. The equipment and accesories used are easy and safety to manage, simplifying operations to be carried out with the active product, eliminating the sterile environment in the shielded cell, and facilitating the preparation of the solution of technetium-99m in sterile and pyrogen-free conditions.(author) [es

  1. Behavior of technetium in nuclear waste vitrification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Ian L

    Nearly 100 tests were performed with prototypical melters and off-gas system components to investigate the extents to which technetium is incorporated into the glass melt, partitioned to the off-gas stream, and captured by the off-gas treatment system components during waste vitrification. The tests employed several simulants, spiked with 99m Tc and Re (a potential surrogate), of the low activity waste separated from nuclear wastes in storage in the Hanford tanks, which is planned for immobilization in borosilicate glass. Single-pass technetium retention averaged about 35 % and increased significantly with recycle of the off-gas treatment fluids. The fraction escaping the recycle loop was very small.

  2. Physics of the missing atoms: technetium and promethium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, H.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium (Z = 43) and promethium (Z = 61) are by far the least abundant of all atoms below the radioactive elements (Z = 84 onwards). Their scarcity confirms theoretical predictions emerging from a theory of the photon derived from synchronous lattice electrodynamics. This theory has given precise theoretical values for the fine-structure constant and the constant of gravitation G and is now shown in this paper to indicate resonant interactions between the vacuum lattice oscillations and technetium and promethium. In the case of promethium there is strong reason for believing that this atom can assume supergravitational or antigravitational properties, accounting for its scarcity. This paper not only adds support to the earlier theoretical work on the photon and gravitation, but suggests a research route that might lead to new technology based on controlled interactions with gravity fields

  3. Technetium labelled plasminogen activator - a potential reagent for thrombus detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsma-De Waal, J.H.; Boer, A.C. de; Cox, P.H.; Pillay, M.; Stassen, J.H.; Collen, D.

    1987-12-01

    The preparation of a technetium labelled plasminogen activator complex using a solid phase labelling technique is described. The labelled complex showed no significant loss of fibrinolytic activity in vitro and showed in vivo a rapid uptake in thrombi in an animal model and in human volunteer patients with known thrombi when injected into a vein draining to the thrombotic region. Systemic injection showed no uptake in the thrombi probably due to rapid sequestration of the complex by the liver.

  4. Overview of nuclear medicine and the role of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    One of the driving forces for the elucidation of the chemistry of 99 Tc was the discovery of the Molybdenum Technetium generator. Since this generator system produces no-carrier-added 99 Tc, these studies at the nanomolar level mostly involve chromatography, and that analytical tool is then used to link the no-carrier added and carrier chemistry. These well-defined 99 Tc compounds are used in vivo to measure perfusion, but biochemical probes offer an exciting target for further exploration

  5. Extraosseous uptake of 99sup(m)technetium methylene diphosphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.R.; Kun, L.; Casper, J.; Babbitt, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    A child with a ganglioneuroblastoma and tumor uptake of 99 sup(m)technetium methylene diphosphate ( 99 sup(m)Tc-MDP) is presented. After surgical removal of an encapsulated tumor and radiation therapy, an interval bone scan demonstrated the same presurgical abnormality. Awareness of abnormal uptake of 99 sup(m)Tc-MDP in irradiated renal tissue prevents interpreting radiation nephritis as recurrent tumor. (orig.) [de

  6. Effect of humic acid on sorption of technetium by alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.; Rawat, N.; Kar, A.S.; Tomar, B.S.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Tc sorption on alumina has been studied under aerobic as well anaerobic condition over pH 3-10. → Effect of humic acid on sorption of Tc by alumina has been investigated. → Linear additive modeling and surface complexation modeling were carried out to delineate the role of humic acid in Tc(IV) sorption in ternary system of Tc(IV)-humic acid-alumina. → Sorption of humic acid onto alumina and strong complexation of Tc(IV) with humic acid were found to govern the sorption of Tc(IV) in the ternary system. - Abstract: Sorption of technetium by alumina has been studied in absence as well as in presence of humic acid using 95 Tc m as a tracer. Measurements were carried out at fixed ionic strength (0.1 M NaClO 4 ) under varying pH (3-10) as well as redox (aerobic and reducing anaerobic) conditions. Under aerobic conditions, negligible sorption of technetium was observed onto alumina both in absence and in presence of humic acid. However, under reducing conditions (simulated with [Sn(II)] = 10 -6 M), presence of humic acid enhanced the sorption of technetium in the low pH region significantly and decreased at higher pH with respect to that in absence of humic acid. Linear additive as well as surface complexation modeling of Tc(IV) sorption in presence of humic acid indicated the predominant role of sorbed humic acid in deciding technetium sorption onto alumina.

  7. Multi-organ technetium complexes production and use thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, G.A.; Pestel, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical complexes, useful as radiopharmaceuticals, are formed by reacting technetium-99m with substituted or unsubstituted alkyl monophosphonic acids and certain ester derivatives thereof. The complexes are formed by reducing pertechnetate ion chemically or electrolytically in the presence of the phosphonic acid. By chemical modification of the phosphonic acid complexing agent, it is possible to ''tailor'' complexes for kidney, liver or bone imaging. The complexes are normally used in a physiologically acceptable aqueous medium. 20 Claims, No Drawings

  8. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N 2 S 2 and N 3 S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents

  9. Mew organometallic complexes of technetium in different oxidation states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachim, J.E.

    1993-09-01

    New organometallic compounds of Tc(I), Tc(III) and Tc(VII) were synthesized and their properties examined. These compounds were correlated with their homologous compounds of manganese and rhenium, which were also synthesized by the same route. The molecular and crystal structures of most technetium complexes and of the homologous complexes of manganese and rhenium were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. (orig.) [de

  10. Thermal neutron cross section measurements for technetium-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.A.; Schroeder, N.C.; Fowler, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium, because of its long half-like (213,000 years) and ability to migrate in the environment, is a primary contributor to the long-term radioactivity related risk associated with geologic nuclear waste disposal. One proposal for converting technetium to an environmentally benign element investigating transmutation with an accelerator-based system, (i.e., Accelerator Transmutation of Waste, ATW). Planning for efficient processing of technetium through the transmuter will require knowledge of the thermal neutron cross section for the 99 Tc (n,γ) 100 Tc reaction. The authors have recently remeasured this cross section. Weighed aliquots (19-205 μg) of a NIST traceable 99 Tc standard were irradiated for 30-150 sec using the pneumatic open-quotes rabbitclose quotes system of LANL's Omega West Reactor. The two gamma rays from the 15.7-sec half-life product were measured immediately after irradiation on a high-resolution Ge detector. Thermal fluxes were measured using gold foils and Cd wrapped gold foils. The observation cross section is 19 ± 1 b. This agrees well with the 1977 value but has half the uncertainty

  11. Non-Pertechnetate Technetium Sensor Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crawford, Amanda D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heineman, William R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Branch, Shirmir D. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-09-01

    There remain several significant uncertainties in the understanding and modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford waste tanks, glass, and low-temperature waste forms. A significant (2% to 25%) fraction of the 99Tc in the water-soluble portion of the tank waste may be present as a non-pertechnetate species that has not been identified and, based on experimentation to date, cannot be effectively separated from the wastes. This task will provide a sensor specifically tuned to detect the Tc(I)-carbonyl species believed to constitute the main fraction of the non-pertechnetate form of technetium. By direct measurement of the non-pertechnetate species, such a sensor will help reduce the uncertainties in the modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford tanks and waste forms. This report summarizes work done in FY 2014 exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Progress made in FY 2014 was sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management and is summarized in this report.

  12. Technetium-99m ceftizoxime kit preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Odília Fernandes Diniz

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to prepare a kit of 99mTc-ceftizoxime (99mTc-CFT, with stability and biological activity preserved, able to identify a septic focus (E. coli in the experimental infection model in rats. The preparation of the CFT kit involved the use of lyophilized solutions containing the antibiotic ceftizoxime and the sodium dithionite reducing agent (6.0 mg/mL. After lyophilization, the kit was reconstituted with 1.0 mL of sodium 99mTc-pertechnetate solution (Na99mTcO4- with an activity of 370 MBq. The solution was boiled for 10 min and filtered through a cellulose ester filter. The labeling efficiency was on the order of 92%, remaining stable for six hours and the kit remained stable for two months. The biological activity of the 99mTc-CFT was evaluated by diffusion in agar impregnated with E.coli and S. aureus. Seven Wistar rats, weighing from 200 to 250 g, were used for the development of the septic focus. After 24 hours from the induction of the infectious site (E.coli, the animals were anesthetized and 0.1 mL of 99mTc-CFT (37 MBq was injected into the tail veins of the animals. The images were obtained with a gamma camera one, two and six hours after injection and the regions of interest (ROIs were calculated. The diameters of the inhibition halos for 99mTc-CFT were 27.16 ± 0.23 and 27.17 ± 0.20 for S.aureus and E.coli, respectively, while those for the unlabeled CFT were 30.4 ± 0.33 and 29.43 ± 0.26, respectively. The results for the biodistribution of 99mTc-CFT in infected animals furnished a ratio of 1.97 ± 0.31, 2.10 ± 0.42 and 2.01 ± 0.42 for cpm-target/cpm-no target for the one, two and six-hour periods, respectively. The images showed a clear uptake of labeled antibiotic (99mTc-CFT by the infectious site during the experiment. The results attest to the viability of producing a kit with 99m technetium-labeled ceftizoxime for the investigation of infectious processes.O objetivo deste trabalho foi preparar um kit de Tc

  13. Method of preparation of technetium-99m labelled radio-diagnostic agents and a stable non radio-active carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A method of preparing improved technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents is described by reducing technetium-99m with stannous tartrate. Such radiodiagnostic agents are useful in scintigraphic examinations of the bone and lung

  14. High pressure liquid chromatographic assay of technetium in solutions of sodium pertechnetate produced at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrington, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is used for the assay of nanogram quantities of technetium and to determine technetium in decayed pharmaceutical products, derived from three methods of manufacture. These methods of manufacture give comparably low levels of technetium-99, at the time of collection of the solution. However, when the solutions are used to produce ready-to-inject technetium-99m, high levels of technetium-99 are present at the time of calibration, which is the day after the collection date. Where sensitive reagent kits are to be labelled, freshly collected solutions of technetium-99m should be used. The HPLC assay is a valuable technique for the quality control of technetium-based radiopharmaceuticals, and for investigation of methods of manufacture of technetium-99m. Experimental studies confirmed the findings of previous workers

  15. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  16. Tiny optical fiber temperature sensor based on temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Qiang; Song, Zhangqi; Song, Dongyu; Zhang, Xueliang; Li, Bingsheng; Yu, Yang; Chen, Yuzhong

    2018-03-01

    The temperature-dependent refractive index of zinc telluride film can be used to develop a tiny, low cost and film-coated optical fiber temperature sensor. Pulse reference-based compensation technique is used to largely reduce the background noise which makes it possible to detect the minor reflectivity change of the film in different temperatures. The temperature sensitivity is 0.0034dB/° and the background noise is measured to be 0.0005dB, so the resolution can achieve 0.2°.

  17. Cadmium telluride gamma-radiation detectors with a high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, L.A.; Dorogov, P.G.; Ivanov, V.I.; Khusainov, A.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper considers the possibility of improving the energy resolution of cadmium telluride gamma-radiation detectors through the choice of the geometry and size of the sensitive region of the detector. The optimum ratio of the product of the mobility and lifetime for electrons to the same product for holes from the point of view of energy resolution is greater than or equal to 10 2 for a detector of spherical geometry and should be less than or equal to 10 for a cylindrical geometry and approximately 1 for a planar geometry. The optimum values of the major and minor radii of a spherical detector are calculated

  18. Formation of solid solutions on the boundary of zinc oxidezinc telluride heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurkan, A.E.; Buzhor, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Distribution of ZnO x Te 1-x alloy composition on the interface of zinc oxide-zinc telluride heterojunction depending on the production conditions is investigated. A regularity in the formation of an extended area with constant alloy composition is detected. The regularity is explained by the fact that electric Peltier field conditioned by contact of two heterogeneous semiconductors participates in the solid solution formation process. Peltier field levels off the composition at the end length section. So, a possibility of creating a section with the assigned minor thickness alloy constant composition controlled in the interface of heterojunction occurs

  19. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P., E-mail: aplysenko@hse.ru; Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B. [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Russian Federation); Belov, A. G. [OAO GIREDMET State Research and Design Institute of the Rare-Metal Industry (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  20. Iron telluride nanorods-based system for the detection of total mercury in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prathik; Lin, Zong-Hong [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Liang, Chi-Te [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, Huan-Tsung, E-mail: changht@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Elucidation of the detection of mercury using iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs), and dose-response curve for varying concentrations of Hg{sup 2+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs) are prepared from tellurium nanowires (Te NWs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury telluride nanorods (HgTe NRs) form by cation exchange reaction of FeTe NRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 2+} ions released catalyze the oxidation of ABTS by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury is effectively determined in blood with an LOD of 1.31 nM at S/N ratio 3. - Abstract: We have developed a simple, colorimetric iron telluride (FeTe) nanorods (NRs) based system for the detection of mercury, mainly based on the cation exchange reaction between FeTe NRs and Hg{sup 2+}. FeTe NRs (length, 105 {+-} 21 nm) react with Hg{sup 2+} to form HgTe NRs (length, 112 {+-} 26 nm) and consequently release Fe{sup 2+} ions that catalyzes the oxidation between a peroxidase substrate 2,2 Prime -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The concentration of Fe{sup 2+} and thereby Hg{sup 2+} can be determined by measuring the absorbance of the ABTS oxidized product at 418 nm. This approach allows the detection of Hg{sup 2+}, with a limit of detection of 1.31 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio 3 and a linear range 5-100 nM (R{sup 2} = 0.99). The low-cost, simple, sensitive, and reproducible assay has been validated for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} in a blood sample (SRM 955c), with the result being in good agreement with that provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  1. Crystalline perfection and mechanical investigations on vertical Bridgman grown Bismuth telluride (Bi_2Te_3) single crystals for thermoelectric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, Anuj; Vijayan, N.; Singh, Budhendra; Thukral, Kanika; Maurya, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    High efficiency thermoelectric materials plays a vital role in power generation and refrigeration applications. Bismuth telluride (Bi_2Te_3) is one among them. In the present work single crystal of bismuth telluride was grown using vertical Bridgman technique. The phase of grown crystals was analysed using a powder X-ray diffractometer. Quality of the grown crystal was assessed by using high resolution X-ray diffractometer and observed that it is fairly good. Further mechanical investigations on grown crystal was carried out using nano-indentation technique and various mechanical properties like hardness, stiffness and Young’s modulus were evaluated. Observed results clearly indicate its suitability for thermoelectric applications.

  2. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while its thermoelectric

  3. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  4. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while

  5. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT-STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.B.; Cooke, G.A.; Lockrem, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents the effort to sequester technetium by the use of getters, reductants (tin(II) apatite and ferrous sulfate), sorbents (A530E and A532E ion exchange resins), and cementitious waste form. The pertechnetate form of technetium is highly soluble and mobile in aerobic (oxidizing) environments.

  6. Determination of Technetium-99 in Environmental Samples by Solvent Extraction at Controlled Valence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Q.J.; Aarkrog, A.; Dahlgaard, H.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution coefficients of technetium and ruthenium are determined under different conditions with CCl4, cyclohexanone, and 5% tri-isooctylamine (TIOA)/xylene. A method for analyzing 99Tc in environmental samples has been developed by solvent extraction in which the valences of technetium...

  7. Technetium-99m labeled radiodiagnostic agents for liver and bone marrow scanning and method of preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinski, V.J.; Peacock, F.R.

    1977-01-01

    An improved technetium-99m labeled colloid and method of preparation comprising reducing technetium-99m with stannous oxalate and stabilizing with sodium phytate are described. This radiodiagnostic agent is useful in the scintigraphic examination of the reticuloendothelial system, particularly the liver. In addition, by autoclaving this product with saline, it becomes a superior bone marrow scanning agent

  8. Ligand-free, protein-bound technetium-99m. Evidence for tumour localisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakovljevic, A.C.; Pojer, P.M.

    1984-11-01

    An hypothesis that cations accumulate in tumours independent of ligand is tested. A preparation of technetium-99m known to be ligand-free (that is, the technetium is protein bound and no other ligand is injected) has been shown to accumulate in a T-cell lymphoma

  9. Strain effect on the heat transport properties of bismuth telluride nanofilms with a hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Win-Jin; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Chao-Chun

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the mechanical behavior of bismuth telluride nanofilms with holes by using an equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The holes had diameters of 20, 30, 40, and 50 Å. The thermal conductivity values of the nanofilms were calculated under different strains at different temperatures using a nonequilibrium MD simulation. The simulation revealed that the thermal conductivity of a bismuth telluride nanofilm with a hole decreases with an increase in hole diameter at different strains. For a film with a perfect structure at 300 K, a 48% reduction (from 0.33 to 0.17 W/m K) in the thermal conductivity was observed at a 7% tensile strain. In addition, the thermal conductivity increased by approximately 39% (from 0.33 to 0.46 W/m K) at a 7% compressive strain. A very low value (0.11 W/m K) of thermal conductivity is obtained for the nanofilm with a hole diameter of 50 Å at a 7% tensile strain at 300 K.

  10. Effect of electronic contribution on temperature-dependent thermal transport of antimony telluride thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won-Yong; Park, No-Won [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji-Eun [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon-Gil, E-mail: sgyoon@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Jung-Hyuk [School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Kwon, E-mail: sangkwonlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We investigated thermal transport of the antimony telluride thin films. • The contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity increased up to ∼77% at 300 K. • We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component. - Abstract: We study the theoretical and experimental characteristics of thermal transport of 100 nm and 500 nm-thick antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) thin films prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was measured at temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 K, using four-point-probe 3-ω method. Out-of-plane thermal conductivity of the Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin film was much lesser in comparison to the bulk material in the entire temperature range, confirming that the phonon- and electron-boundary scattering are enhanced in thin films. Moreover, we found that the contribution of the electronic thermal conductivity (κ{sub e}) in total thermal conductivity (κ) linearly increased up to ∼77% at 300 K with increasing temperature. We theoretically analyze and explain the high contribution of electronic component of thermal conductivity towards the total thermal conductivity of the film by a modified Callaway model. Further, we find the theoretical model predictions to correspond well with the experimental results.

  11. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  12. Possible bicollinear nematic state with monoclinic lattice distortions in iron telluride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, Christopher B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herbrych, Jacek W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dagotto, Elbio R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Moreo, Adriana [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Here, iron telluride (FeTe) is known to display bicollinear magnetic order at low temperatures together with a monoclinic lattice distortion. Because the bicollinear order can involve two different wave vectors (π/2,π/2) and (π/2,–π/2), symmetry considerations allow for the possible stabilization of a nematic state with short-range bicollinear order coupled to monoclinic lattice distortions at a TS higher than the temperature TN where long-range bicollinear order fully develops. As a concrete example, the three-orbital spin-fermion model for iron telluride is studied with an additional coupling ˜λ12 between the monoclinic lattice strain and an orbital-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry. Monte Carlo simulations show that with increasing ˜λ12 the first-order transition characteristic of FeTe splits and bicollinear nematicity is stabilized in a (narrow) temperature range. In this new regime, the lattice is monoclinically distorted and short-range spin and orbital order breaks rotational invariance. A discussion of possible realizations of this exotic state is provided.

  13. The use of cadmium telluride γ spectrometers in monitoring activity deposited in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.T.

    1977-01-01

    The ability to inspect and test key components and when necessary repair or replace them is a significant factor in the safety case submitted before consent is given for construction of a nuclear reactor. A knowledge of the probable rate of deposition and isotopic composition of radioactive contamination in these areas is necessary and since it is not always practicable to take samples away to the laboratory for analysis, direct gamma ray spectroscopy in the contaminated environment is sometimes used. The experience of direct monitoring with a cadmium telluride spectrometer in two such reactor situations is reported. In the first situation, a remotely cooled intrinsic Germanium spectrometer was used in equivalent positions and spectra from both systems are presented. The relative merits of the two systems are discussed. In the second situation, measurements were made in an environment at 70 deg C in radiation levels of 10Rh -1 . An improvised cooling system was used to maintain the Cadmium Telluride at about 20 deg C and Pile-up Rejection was used to enable count rates of about 10 5 s -1 to be handled. It is noted that the usually quoted detector parameters, resolution and crystal volume, are not necessarily the most important in practical spectrometry of mixed isotopes. As with germanium detectors, the most useful parameter is probably the Peak-to-Compton ratio

  14. The Evaluation of Novel Tin Materials for the Removal of Technetium from Groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Kent E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Technetium-99 (99Tc) is present at several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including the Hanford, Oak Ridge, Paducah, Portsmouth, and Savannah River sites. Due to its mobility, persistence, and toxicity in the environment, developing means to immobilize and/or remove technetium from the environment is currently a top priority for DOE. However, there are currently very few approaches that effectively manage the risks of technetium to human health and the environment. The objective of this study is to evaluate novel synthetic materials that could enable direct removal of technetium from groundwater. The following report •assesses the viability of existing methodologies for synthesis of tin (II) apatite for in situ formation and remediation of 99Tc within the subsurface environment •discusses the development of alternative methodologies for production of tin (II) apatite •evaluates nanoporous tin phosphate materials for removal of technetium from groundwater.

  15. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  16. Determination of technetium-99 in environmental samples: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Keliang; Hou Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Wu Wangsuo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The source term, physicochemical properties, environmental distribution and behaviour of 99 Tc are presented. ► Various sample pre-treatment and pre-concentration techniques of technetium are discussed. ► Chemical separation and purification techniques for 99 Tc in environmental samples are reviewed. ► Measurement techniques for 99 Tc in environmental level and automated analytical methods are reviewed. ► The reported analytical methods of 99 Tc are critically compared to provide overall information. - Abstract: Due to the lack of a stable technetium isotope, and the high mobility and long half-life, 99 Tc is considered to be one of the most important radionuclides in safety assessment of environmental radioactivity as well as nuclear waste management. 99 Tc is also an important tracer for oceanographic research due to the high technetium solubility in seawater as TcO 4 − . A number of analytical methods, using chemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurement techniques, have been developed over the past decades for determination of 99 Tc in different environmental samples. This article summarizes and compares recently reported chemical separation procedures and measurement methods for determination of 99 Tc. Due to the extremely low concentration of 99 Tc in environmental samples, the sample preparation, pre-concentration, chemical separation and purification for removal of the interferences for detection of 99 Tc are the most important issues governing the accurate determination of 99 Tc. These aspects are discussed in detail in this article. Meanwhile, the different measurement techniques for 99 Tc are also compared with respect to advantages and drawbacks. Novel automated analytical methods for rapid determination of 99 Tc using solid extraction or ion exchange chromatography for separation of 99 Tc, employing flow injection or sequential injection approaches are also discussed.

  17. Non-pertechnetate Technetium Sensor Research and Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Samuel A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Branch, Shirmir D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lines, Amanda M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heineman, William R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Several significant uncertainties remain regarding the understanding and modeling of the fate and speciation of technicium-99 (99Tc) in Hanford waste tanks, glass, and low-temperature waste forms. A significant (2% to 25%) fraction of the 99Tc in the water-soluble portion of the tank waste may be present as one or more non pertechnetate species that have not been identified and to date, cannot be effectively separated from the wastes. This task will provide a sensor specifically tuned to detect the Tc(I)-carbonyl species believed to constitute the main fraction of the non-pertechnetate form of technetium. By direct measurement of the non-pertechnetate species, such a sensor will help reduce the uncertainties in the modeling of the fate and speciation of 99Tc in Hanford tanks and waste forms. This report summarizes work performed in FY2016 that was sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management and demonstrates the protocol for using fluorescent Tc(I)-tricarbonyl complex as a means to detect the non-pertechnetate species within tank waste solutions. The protocol was optimized with respect to ligand concentration, solvent choice, reaction temperature and time. This work culminated in the quantitation of Tc(I)-tricarbonyl within a waste simulant, using a standard addition method for measurement. This report also summarizes the synthesis and high-yield preparation of the low-valence technetium species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, which will be used as the technetium standard material for the demonstration of the non-pertechnetate species in actual wastes.

  18. Technetium and neptunium reactions in basalt/groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Kelmers, A.D.; Kessler, J.H.; Clark, R.J.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Young, G.C.; Case, F.I.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms and apparent concentration limits for Tc(VII) and Np(V) for a variety of groundwater/basalt systems were determined using Grande Ronde basalt samples representative of the Hanford Site candidate high-level waste repository. Under oxic redox conditions (air present), little or no sorption of technetium was observed; neptunium exhibited low to moderate sorption ratios. Under anoxic redox conditions (oxygen-free), low to moderate sorption of technetium was often observed, but the extent of sorption was highly dependent upon the groundwater composition and the method of pretreatment (if any) of the basalt. Sorption isotherms for technetium under reducing redox conditions (hydrazine added) indicate an apparent concentration limit of approximately 10 -6 mol/l Tc. No apparent concentration limit was found for neptunium for concentrations in groundwater up to 10 -6 mol/l and 8 x 10 -7 mol/l under oxic and reducing (hydrazine added) redox conditions, respectively. Valence control and valence analysis experiments suggest that the sorption or precipitation of Tc and Np from groundwater in the presence of basalt may result from a heterogeneous reaction occurring on the surface of the basalt. One of the critical factors of this reduction reaction appears to be the accessibility of the reactive ferrous iron component of the basalt. The laboratory simulation of groundwater redox conditions representative of the repository environment through the use of solution phase redox reagents is of questionable validity, and information obtained by such experimental methods may not be defensible for site performance assessment calculations. Anoxic experiments conducted in an argon-filled glove box appear better suited for the laboratory simulation of in situ redox conditions. 15 references, 6 figures

  19. Technetium and neptunium reactions in basalt/groundwater systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.E.; Arnold, W.D.; Kelmers, A.D.; Kessler, J.H.; Clark, R.J.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Young, G.C.; Case, F.I.; Westmoreland, C.G.; Florida State Univ., Tallahassee)

    1984-01-01

    Sorption isotherms and apparent concentration limits for Tc(VII) and Np(V) for a variety of groundwater/basalt systems were determined using Grande Ronde basalt samples representative of the Hanford Site candidate high-level waste repository. Under oxic redox conditions (air present), little or no sorption of technetium was observed; neptunium exhibited low to moderate sorption ratios. Under anoxic redox conditions (oxygen-free), low to moderate sorption of technetium was often observed, but the extent of sorption was highly dependent upon the groundwater composition and the method of pretreatment (if any) of the basalt. Sorption isotherms for technetium under reducing redox conditions (hydrazine added) indicate an apparent concentration limit of approximately 10 -6 mol/L Tc. No apparent concentration limit was found for neptunium for concentrations in groundwater up to approx. 10 -6 mol/L and 8 x 10 -7 mol/L under oxic and reducing (hydrazine added) redox conditions, respectively. Valence control and valence analysis experiments suggest that the sorption or precipitation of Tc and Np from groundwater in the presence of basalt may result from a heterogeneous reaction occurring on the surface of the basalt. One of the critical factors of this reduction reaction appears to be the accessibility of the reactive ferrous iron component of the basalt. The laboratory simulation of groundwater redox conditions representative of the repository environment through the use of solution phase redox reagents is of questionable validity, and information obtained by such experimental methods may not be defensible for site performance assessment calculations. Anoxic experiments conducted in an argon-filled glove box appear better suited for the laboratory simulation of in situ redox conditions. 15 refs., 6 tabs

  20. Can aquatic macrophytes mobilize technetium by oxidizing their rhizosphere?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, S.C.; Evenden, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    Technetium (Tc) is very mobile in aerated surface environments, but is essentially immobile and biologically unavailable in anaerobic sediments. Aquatic macrophyte roots penetrate anaerobic sediments, carrying O 2 downward and frequently creating oxidizing conditions in their rhizosphere. The authors hypothesized that this process could mobilize otherwise unavailable Tc, possibly leading to incorporation of Tc into human or animal foods. Through experiments with rice (Oryza sativa L.), and with a novel artificial macrophyte root, they concluded that this pathway is unlikely to be important for annual plants, especially in soils with a high biological oxygen demand. The relatively slow oxidation of Tc limited its mobilization by short-lived root systems

  1. Technetium scanning in Kaposi's sarcoma and its simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnoe, R.; Kalivas, J.

    1982-01-01

    The clinical picture of ulcerated purple plaques on the legs often suggests several diagnoses: Kaposi's sarcoma, stasis dermatitis, atrophie blanche (livedoid vasculitis), and a poorly understood condition called acroangiodermatitis of Favre-Chaix (pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma). Even the skin biopsy may not always be conclusive. We describe our experience with three patients with pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma, one with true Kaposi's sarcoma and two with atrophie blanche. Clinical and histopathologic similarities among these three conditions pointed up the need for additional confirmatory studies, i.e., isotope scanning. The technetium scan was positive in both Kaposi's sarcoma and pseudo-Kaposi's sarcoma but negative in atrophie blanche

  2. Experimental study and quality control of a technetium-99 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimeno de Osso, F.

    1981-01-01

    The performarce of a generator of technetium-99m to be used in nuclear medicine is studied. The most interesting characteristic of this generator is the use of a U-shaped chromatographuc column so as to improve its efficiency and design without increasing the weight of its shield. With the aim of improving certain aspects of the generator, molibdenum-99 was applied to adecuate pH, pirogens were removed from the column set up before application, application was effected on a dry column, the smallest alumina particles were separated on the column, etc. The most important parameters of an isotopic generator are studied, and the corresponding quality controls performed. (author)

  3. Environmental behavior of technetium-99 and iodine-129

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garland, T.R.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The environmental behavior of technetium-99 and iodine-129 was once thought to be similar, particularly with respect to their soil solubility and biological interactions. Over the past several years, the comparative behavior of these two anions has been studied with respect to their fate in natural environments (both aquatic and terrestrial). The mechanisms studied include physical, chemical and biological parameters that account for differences in soil behavior, cycling between soil and/or air to vegetation, adsorption and metabolism in plants, and their availability and fate following ingestion by animals

  4. Mass spectral analysis of cationic and neutral technetium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, S.E.; McCormick, T.J.; Nunn, A.N.; Treher, E.N.

    1986-01-01

    Cationic and neutral technetium compounds have been characterized by mass spectrometry using a variety of ionization methods. These compounds include octahedral cationic complexes containing phosphorous and arsenic ligands such as DIPHOS and DIARS and neutral complexes containing PnAO and dimethylglyoxime, DMG, or cyclohexanedione dioxime, CDO, ligands. Boronate esters incorporating methyl and butyl derivatives of the DMG and CDO dioximes represent a new class of seven-coordinate Tc radiopharmaceuticals whose characterization by mass spectrometry has not previously been described. These complexes show promise as myocardial imaging agents. (author)

  5. Determination of technetium by total reflection x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez, J.I.; Greaves, E.D.; Nemeth, P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a technique using total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) for determination of Technetium produced by elution of chromatography generators with physiological saline solutions. The analysis with the 18.41 keV K α line of Technetium was accomplished with monochromatized K α radiation from a silver anode x-ray tube operated at 45 keV and 20 mA. This radiation at 22.104 keV is efficiently coupled to the 21.054 keV absorption edge of Tc. It is also of advantage in the direct analysis of organic and saline properties of the Tc-bearing samples. Quantification was accomplished by internal standard addition of Ga and using an interpolated value of the sensitivity for Tc between Molybdenum and Rhenium. Data processing was carried out with the QXAS-AXIL software package. System sensitivity was found adequate for direct Tc determination of eluted saline solutions. The interest and advantages of the use of the technique as an auxiliary in the synthesis and characterization of Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnosis in nuclear medicine are discussed. Detection limits in the matrices analyzed are reported. (author)

  6. 99m Technetium pyrophosphate myocardium scintigraphy. First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, Paul.

    1976-01-01

    99m technetium pyrophosphate myocardium scintigraphy is a very recent examination technique. This work gives the results obtained on 61 patients. As a vector of the isotope, pyrophosphate has the advantage over polyphosphate of a fast bone uptake there it should be stressed that a 90 minute pause is necessary between the intraveinous injection of the isotope and the photographic recording so that the reading is not troubled by the labelled intracardiac blood pool image, an image quality criterion being the estimation of a good costal fixation which in fact appears sooner or later according to the subject. The role of pyrophosphate, chelator of calcium in fixation of the isotope on the myocardium, could be explained by the fast appearance of 'dense bodies', made up of calcium hydroxyapathice crystals, in the mitochondria of myocardium cells having undergone an irreversible necrotic process. The choice of 99 m technetium is based on its ease of use: 6 hour half-life, high-energy pure gamma emission at 140 keV. The fixed image studied under two incidences, front and left anterior oblique, is obtained from mobile images given by the scintillation camera used in connection with a data processing system. Several facts are underlined, explaining the disadvantages, advantages and indications of the method [fr

  7. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M.; Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K.

    2013-01-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection

  8. Analysis of americium, plutonium and technetium solubility in groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiji

    1999-08-01

    Safety assessments for geologic disposal of radioactive waste generally use solubilities of radioactive elements as the parameter restricting the dissolution of the elements from a waste matrix. This study evaluated americium, plutonium and technetium solubilities under a variety of geochemical conditions using the geochemical model EQ3/6. Thermodynamic data of elements used in the analysis were provided in the JAERI-data base. Chemical properties of both natural groundwater and interstitial water in buffer materials (bentonite and concrete) were investigated to determine the variations in Eh, pH and ligand concentrations (CO 3 2- , F - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , NO 3 - and NH 4 + ). These properties can play an important role in the complexation of radioactive elements. Effect of the groundwater chemical properties on the solubility and formation of chemical species for americium, plutonium and technetium was predicted based on the solubility analyses under a variety of geochemical conditions. The solubility and speciation of the radioactive elements were estimated, taking into account the possible range of chemical compositions determined from the groundwater investigation. (author)

  9. The retention mechanism of technetium-99m-HM-PAO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neirinckx, R D; Burke, J F; Harrison, R C

    1988-01-01

    Preparations of d,l- and meso-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) labeled with technetium-99m were added to rat brain homogenates diluted with phosphate buffer (1:10). The conversion of d,l-HM-PAO to hydrophilic forms took place with an initial rate constant of 0.12 min-1. Incubation of the b......Preparations of d,l- and meso-hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HM-PAO) labeled with technetium-99m were added to rat brain homogenates diluted with phosphate buffer (1:10). The conversion of d,l-HM-PAO to hydrophilic forms took place with an initial rate constant of 0.12 min-1. Incubation....... This correspondence of values supports the notion that GSH may be important for the in vivo conversion of 99mTc-labeled HM-PAO to hydrophilic forms and may be the mechanism of trapping in brain and other cells. A kinetic model for the trapping of d,l- and meso-HM-PAO in tissue is developed that is based on data...

  10. Labelling of metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) with Technetium-99m radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maula Eka Sriyani; Dini Natanegara; Aang Hanafiah Ws

    2015-01-01

    Various neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases are able to localized and staged by Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). MIBG is a molecule that has a chemical structure similarities with noradrenaline in the adrenal. The research on 131 I-MIBG has been successfully conducted in the tumor imaging. This research of preparing 99m Tc-MIBG that will be used as a diagnostic agent for adrenal tumors was carried out. MIBG labeling activities with technetium-99m radionuclide were carried out through labeling of MIBG with technetium-99m and radiochemical purity analysis. The labeling of MIBG was carried out using both direct and indirect methods with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) as a co-ligand. Determination of 99m Tc-MIBG labeling efficiency was performed using paper chromatography with Whatman 3MM/dried acetone and Whatman 31ET/acetonitrile 50%. The results of labeling efficiency using the indirect method with DTPA as a co-ligand was obtained 93.44 ± 1.93%, which the concentration of MIBG was 2 mg/0.5 mL H 2 O, concentration of co-ligand was 37,5 μg of SnCl 2 .2H 2 O and DTPA of 1,125 mg at pH 6.5 for 15 minutes incubation in the room temperature ( 25 °C). (author)

  11. Monoclonal anti-elastin antibody labelled with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Silva, Claudia R. da; Araujo, Adriano C. de; Bernardo Filho, Mario; Porto, Luis Cristovao M.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca; Souza, J.E.Q.; Frier, Malcolm

    1999-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) is widely employed in nuclear medicine due to its desirable physical, chemical and biological properties. Moreover, it is easily available and normally is inexpensive. A reducing agent is necessary to label cells and molecules with 99m Tc and stannous chloride (Sn C L 2 ) is usually employed. Elastin is the functional protein component of the elastic fiber and it is related with some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema and others. The present study refers to the preparation of the 99m Tc labeled monoclonal anti-elastin antibody. The monoclonal antibody was incubated with an excess of 2-iminothiolane. The free thiol groups created, were capable of binding with the reduced technetium. Labeling was an exchange reaction with 99m Tc-glucoheptonate. The labeled preparation was left at 4 deg C for one hour. Then, it was passed through a Sephadex G50 column. Various fractions were collected and counted. A peak corresponding to the radiolabeled antibody was obtained. Stability studies of the labelled anti-elastin were performed at 0,3 6, 24 hours, at both 4 deg C or room temperature. The biodistribution pattern of the 99m Tc-anti-elastin was studied in healthy male Swiss mice. The immunoreactivity was also determined. An useful labeled-anti-elastin was obtained to future immunoscintigraphic investigations. (author)

  12. Biomedical tracers: technetium-99 m complexing sulfur polydentate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendennoune, A.

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic and acyclic tetra sulfur ligands have been synthesized and some of them have been labelled with technetium-99m. These works have two different aims: 1- Development of methods permitting to obtain easily potential technetium complexing sulfur polydentate chelates. 2- Research of positive and neutral complexes of this metal likely to replace thalium-201 in the coronary flow estimation and [TcO-HMPAO] sup 0 complex in the cerebral scintigraphy, respectively. In this work, first, different ways for obtaining dithioetherdithiols and cyclic tetrathioethers containing functional groups have been carried out, then complexation of the core of nitrutechnetium (TcN) sup 2+ at tracers scale, by dithioetherdithiols, using exchange reaction with [sup 9 sup 9 sup m TcNCl sub 4 ] sup - ion complex or sup 99 sup m TcN Cl sub 2 [P(CH sub 2 CH sub 2 CN) sub 3 ] sub 2 has been studied. Finally, biological distribution in swiss mouse of these technetiated complexes has been studied. 135 refs., 30 figs., 13 tabs. (F.M.)

  13. Stripping voltammetric behavior of technetium at various chemically modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, R.

    1990-09-01

    In monitoring of nuclear processing plants and storage facilities the necessity arises of assaying traces of the artificial radioactive element technetium. The oxidation states IV and VII are of particular interest. Stripping voltammetry is among the methods of assay which are suited for this purpose. It allows an enhanced selectivity to be achieved by preconcentration of the analyte and of an oxidation state of the analyte, respectively, at the electrode used. This specific enrichment is successful after appropriate chemical modification of the electrode through immobilization of a Tc-specific reagent. When various approaches of chemical modification of a glassy carbon electrode were examined, the tetraphenylarsonium chloride extractant, which is highly selective with respect to technetium, proved to be the best suited reagent, capable of fixation both by ionic and by covalent bonding on an electrodeposited polymer film. For ionic immobilization the reagent was reacted to m-sulfophenyltriphenyl arsonium and then bound to a copolymer of vinylferrocene and vinylpyridine, which had been provided with cations. It was possible to enrich Tc(VII) at such an electrode and to determine it by stripping voltammetry down to a concentration of 1x10 -8 M after 5 minutes enrichment time. (orig./EF) [de

  14. Nature`s uncommon elements: Plutonium and technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Dixon, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Chemical Science and Technology Div.; Cramer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada). Whiteshell Lab.

    1998-01-06

    The authors have taken advantage of the extremely sensitive method of thermal ionization mass spectrometry to measure technetium and plutonium concentrations in sample masses that are smaller by as much as three orders of magnitude than those used in the early research efforts. The work reported in this paper extends the understanding of the geochemistry of plutonium and technetium by developing detailed descriptions of their associations in well characterized geologic samples, and by using modern neutron-transport modeling tools to better interpret the meaning of the results. Analyses were conducted on samples from three uranium ore deposits selected for their contrasting geochemical environments. The Cigar Lake deposit is an unweathered, unaltered primary ore in a reducing environment which is expected to closely approximate a system that is closed with respect to uranium and its products. The Koongarra deposit is a shallow system, both altered and weathered, subject to active ground water flow. Finally, a sample from the Beaverlodge deposit is included because it is a commercially-available uranium ore standard that allows demonstration of the precision of the analytical results.

  15. The aqueous corrosion behavior of technetium - Alloy and composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvinen, G.; Kolman, D.; Taylor, C.; Goff, G.; Cisneros, M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mausolf, E.; Poineau, F.; Koury, D.; Czerwinski, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Metal waste forms are under study as possible disposal forms for technetium and other fission products. The alloying of Tc is desirable to reduce the melting point of the Tc-containing metal waste form and potentially improve its corrosion resistance. Technetium-nickel composites were made by mixing the two metal powders and pressing the mixture to make a pellet. The as-pressed composite materials were compared to sintered composites and alloys of identical composition in electrochemical corrosion tests. As-pressed samples were not robust enough for fine polishing and only a limited number of corrosion tests were performed. Alloys and composites with 10 wt% Tc appear to be more corrosion resistant at open circuit than the individual components based on linear polarization resistance and polarization data. The addition of 10 wt% Tc to Ni appears beneficial at open circuit, but detrimental upon anodic polarization. Qualitatively, the polarizations of 10 wt% Tc alloys and composites appear like crude addition of Tc plus Ni. The 1 wt% Tc alloys behave like pure Ni, but some effect of Tc is seen upon polarization. Cathodic polarization of Tc by Ni appears feasible based on open circuit potential measurements, however, zero resistance ammetry and solution measurements are necessary to confirm cathodic protection.

  16. Determination of degradation conditions of exchange resins containing technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera S, A.; Monroy G, F.; Quintero P, E.

    2014-10-01

    The quantification of Tc-99 in spent exchange resins, coming from nuclear power plants, is indispensable to define their administration. The Tc-99 is a pure beta emitter of 210000 years of half-life, volatile and of a high mobility in water and soil. For this reason, the objective of this work is to establish a digestion method of ionic exchange resins containing technetium that retains more than 95% of this radioisotope. Mineralization tests were carried out of a resin Amberlite IRN-150 by means of an oxidation heat, in acid medium, varying the resin mass, the medium volume, the media type, the temperature and the digestion time. The digested samples were analyzed by gas chromatography to estimate the grade of their degradation. The 99m Tc was used as tracer to determine the technetium percentage recovered after mineralizing the resin. The digestion process depends on the temperature and the resin mass. At higher temperature better mineralization of samples and to greater resin mass to a constant temperature, less degradation of the resin. The spectra beta of the 99m Tc and 99 Tc are presented. (Author)

  17. Labelling of biological structures with technetium 99 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo Filho, M.

    1988-01-01

    The labelling of red blood cells (RBC) with technetium 99m ( 99m Tc) depends on several factors, as the stannous ion (Sn ++ ) concentration, the time and temperature of incubation, the anticoagulant utilized, the presence of plasma proteins (PP) and others. Although the blinding of 99m Tc with hemoglobin and PP are similar, they appear to have specific characteristics as demonstrated by precipitation with alcohol, acetone, trichloroacetic acid, hydrochloric acid and mercury chloride. The bacterial cultures labeled with Technetium- 99m , at optimal Sn ++ ion concentration, presents a large stability and their viability is not altered by this treatment. The electrophoretic mobility, the hydrophobicity, the cationized ferritin distribution and the adherence to human buccal epithelial cells are not modified either. The possibility of labelling with 99m Tc of planaria and cercariae of Schistossoma mansoni evaluative cycle increases the utilization of this radionuclide to an experimental level. The results described with the labelling of these biological structures with 99m Tc demonstrated that stable labeled and viable operations are obtained. (author)

  18. Technetium-99 in lobsters from the western Irish sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fegan, Mary

    1999-05-01

    Technetium-99, the most important radionuclide of technetium release to the environment, is a pure beta emitter with a half-life of 2.13 x 10(5) years. It behaves conservatively in seawater and is likely to remain available to biota for a long time. The dominant and most stable form of technetium in oxygenated seawater is the pertechnetate ion, Tco4. The principle source of radionuclide contamination of the Irish Sea has been the liquid waste discharges of low level radionuclide effluent from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at Sellafield on the Cumbria Coast. In 1994 the annual discharge authorization limit for 99Tc was increased from 10 TBq to 200 TBq. Lobster concentrates 99Tc to a high degree with concentration factors of 1x 10(3) reported in the literature. The mean 99Tc activity concentrations in lobsters caught close to Sellafield were reported to have risen by a factor of 20 in 2 years from 390 Bq/kg (wet weight) in 1993 to 8300 Bq/kg (wet weight) in 1995. This study was undertaken to determine the 99Tc activity concentration in lobsters from the western Irish Sea. Lobsters were collected from the east and north east coasts of Ireland over the period June 1997 to July 1998 and analysed using a radioanalytical method which was based on the anion-exchange seperation of technetium as pertechnetate. A gas-flow proportional counter was used to measure to 99Tc activity concentration in each sample. Technetium-99 activity concentrations were measured in the muscle from the tail, the right and the left claws and also in the green gland, the hepatopancreas and the cardiac fore-gut. The results of the measurements showed, as expected, that the 99Tc activity concentrations were not as high as those in the samples from the Cumbrian coast. The mean 99Tc activity concentrations, over the sampling period, in the tail, right and left claw muscles were 214, 124 and 136 BQ/kg (wet weight) respectively. The mean 99Tc activity concentrations in the green gland

  19. Charge sharing and charge loss in a cadmium-zinc-telluride fine-pixel detector array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaskin, J.A.; Sharma, D.P.; Ramsey, B.D.

    2003-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a cadmium-zinc-telluride multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard X-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750 μm pitch), 1 mm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300 μm pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values

  20. Structural, Mechanical and Thermodynamic Properties under Pressure Effect of Rubidium Telluride: First Principle Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidai K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available First-principles density functional theory calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, elastic and thermodynamic properties of rubidium telluride in cubic anti-fluorite (anti-CaF2-type structure. The calculated ground-state properties of Rb2Te compound such as equilibrium lattice parameter and bulk moduli are investigated by generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PBE that are based on the optimization of total energy. The elastic constants, Young’s and shear modulus, Poisson ratio, have also been calculated. Our results are in reasonable agreement with the available theoretical and experimental data. The pressure dependence of elastic constant and thermodynamic quantities under high pressure are also calculated and discussed.

  1. Heavily doped GaAs:Te layers grown by MOVPE using diisopropyl telluride as a source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniltsev, V. M.; Demidov, E. V.; Drozdov, M. N.; Drozdov, Yu. N., E-mail: drozdyu@ipmras.ru; Kraev, S. A.; Surovegina, E. A.; Shashkin, V. I.; Yunin, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    The capabilities of GaAs epitaxial layers extremely heavily doped with tellurium by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy using diisopropyl telluride as a source are studied. It is shown that tellurium incorporation into GaAs occurs to an atomic concentration of 10{sup 21} cm{sup –3} without appreciable diffusion and segregation effects. Good carrier concentrations (2 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –3}) and specific contact resistances of non-alloyed ohmic contacts (1.7 × 10{sup –6} Ω cm{sup 2}) give grounds to use such layers to create non-alloyed ohmic contacts in electronic devices. A sharp decrease in the electrical activity of Te atoms, a decrease in the electron mobility, and an increase in the contact resistance at atomic concentrations above 2 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –3} are detected.

  2. Effect of ball milling time on thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khade, Poonam; Bagwaiya, Toshi; Bhattacharaya, Shovit; Singh, Ajay; Jha, Purushottam; Shelke, Vilas

    2018-04-01

    The effect of different milling time on thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) was investigated. The nanomaterial was prepared by varying the ball milling time and followed by hot press sintering. The crystal structure and phase formation were verified by X-ray diffraction and Raman Spectroscopy. The experimental results show that electrical conductivity increases whereas thermal conductivity decreases with increasing milling time. The negative sign of seebeck coefficient indicate the n-type nature with majority charge carriers of electrons. A maximum figure of merit about 0.55 is achieved for l5hr ball milled Bi2Te3 sample. The present study demonstrates the simple and cost-effective method for synthesis of Bi2Te3 thermoelectric material at large scale thermoelectric applications.

  3. High pressure and doping effects on the Curie temperature in chromium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grazhdankina, N.P.; Bersenev, Yu.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the effect of hydrostatic pressure (up to 12 kbars) on the Curie temperature Tsub(c) of solid CrTsub(1-x)Xsub(x) solutions (X=Se, Sb) are presented for x concentration values up to 0.5. The baric coefficients γ=Tsub(c)sup(-1)(dTsub(c)/dP) for all alloys investigated are negative. However the γ(x) dependence is determined by the X alloy component and correspondingly by the nature of the compression which may be either isotropic (X=Se) or anisotropic (X=Sb). Possible mechanisms of exchange spin coupling in the alloys investigated are discussed on the basis of the data obtained. It is concluded that two types of exchange interactions coexist in chromium telluride: indirect exchange of localized electrons via the anion and interaction between collectivized electrons in the narrow 3d band energy determines the Curie temperature

  4. An additive approach to low temperature zero pressure sintering of bismuth antimony telluride thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlin, Glenn C.; Tripathi, Rajesh; Nunes, Geoffrey; Lynch, Philip B.; Jones, Howard D.; Schmitt, Devin C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an additive-based approach to the formulation of thermoelectric materials suitable for screen printing. Such printing processes are a likely route to such thermoelectric applications as micro-generators for wireless sensor networks and medical devices, but require the development of materials that can be sintered at ambient pressure and low temperatures. Using a rapid screening process, we identify the eutectic combination of antimony and tellurium as an additive for bismuth-antimony-telluride that enables good thermoelectric performance without a high pressure step. An optimized composite of 15 weight percent Sb7.5Te92.5 in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 is scaled up and formulated into a screen-printable paste. Samples fabricated from this paste achieve a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 0.74 using a maximum processing temperature of 748 K and a total thermal processing budget of 12 K-hours.

  5. Trace analysis in cadmium telluride by heavy ion induced X-ray emission and by SIMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scharager, C.; Stuck, R.; Siffert, P.; Cailleret, J.; Heitz, Ch.; Lagarde, G.; Tenorio, D.

    1979-01-01

    The possibilities of using both selective heavy ion induced X-ray emission and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), for the identification of impurities present at low concentrations in cadmium telluride are examined. The relative concentrations of the impurities along CdTe crystals have been determined by exciting the X-ray emission of the elements in several slices with Ar and Kr ions and by comparing the relative characteristic X-ray emission yields. As a consequence of the quasimolecular inner shell ionization mechanism in heavy ion-atom collisions, Ar and Kr ions allow a strong excitation of the main impurities seen by SIMS namely Si, Cl and Ge, As, with only a minor contribution of Cd and Te. From the changes of the concentrations of the various impurities along the crystal, informations about segregation coefficients and compensation can be obtained

  6. Angular dependence of magnetization reversal in epitaxial chromium telluride thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pramanik, Tanmoy, E-mail: pramanik.tanmoy@utexas.edu; Roy, Anupam, E-mail: anupam@austin.utexas.edu; Dey, Rik, E-mail: rikdey@utexas.edu; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Movva, Hema C.P.; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2017-09-01

    Highlights: • Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in epitaxial Cr{sub 2}Te{sub 3} has been investigated. • Presence of a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution is observed. • Magnetization reversal is explained quantitatively using a 1D defect model. • Relative roles of nucleation and pinning in magnetization reversal are discussed. • Domain structures and switching process are visualized by micromagnetic simulation. - Abstract: We investigate magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal mechanism in chromium telluride thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We report existence of strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in these thin films, along with a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution. The angular variation of the switching field observed from the magnetoresistance measurement is explained quantitatively using a one-dimensional defect model. The model reveals the relative roles of nucleation and pinning in the magnetization reversal, depending on the applied field orientation. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to visualize the domain structure and switching process.

  7. First operation of cesium telluride photocathodes in the TTF injector RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    Sertore, D; Flöttmann, K; Stephan, F; Zapfe, K; Michelato, P

    2000-01-01

    During the run 1998/1999 a new injector based on a laser-driven RF gun was brought in operation at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac at DESY, in order to produce the beam structure and quality required either by TeV collider and SASE FEL experiments. High quantum efficiency cesium telluride photocathodes, prepared at Milano and transferred to DESY, have been successfully operated in the RF gun. A bunch charge of 50 nC, only limited by space charge effects, was achieved. The photocathodes have shown an operative lifetime of several months. A new cathode surface finishing has showed a promising decrease of the photocathode dark current. Measurements of dark current, quantum efficiency and lifetime are reported.

  8. The radiochemical purity of technetium-99m-tin-diethylene-triamino-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, M.; Costerousse, O.; Merlin, L.; Coehn, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The effect on radiochemical purity was studied as a function of the storage period of tin-DTPA solution and of the technetium-complex solution. The quantity of the pertechnetate ions present in the solution is determined by ascending paper chromatography, and an attempt was made to clarify the bond type of technetium by a spectrophotometric method. The tin-DTPA solutions for complexing of the reduced technetium are stable over a period of 8 weeks. The yield of the radiopharmaceutical product is better than 95%. (G.Gy.)

  9. Investigation of the interaction of hydroxyapatite with technetium in association with stannous pyrophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Jette, D.; Somers, E.

    1981-01-01

    The individual components of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate were studied with respect to their interaction with hydroxyapatite. It is demonstrated that the role of the pyrophosphate molecule is one of a solubilizing and transporting molecule to carry the technetium atom to the site of the hydroxyapatite where the chelate disassociates and both the pyrophosphate and the technetium individually bind to the hydroxyapatite. The stannous ion is shown to associate with the hydroxyapatite also and although also solubilized by the pyrophosphate appears to be less strongly associated with the pyrophosphate. (author)

  10. Measurement of glomerular filtration rate in children using technetium-99m diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaronson, I.A.; Mann, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    During the past 5 years, we have measured the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by the slope-clearance method using technetium-99m diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid technetium-99m-DTPA in 130 infants and children. The results in 22 children have been compared with inulin clearance, and a very good correlation between the two methods of measurement of GFR was demonstrated (r = 0,9616; P less than 0,0001). This study provides further evidence that technetium-99m-DTPA is a satisfactory agent for the clinical measurement of GFR in children

  11. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Radiation Application Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh [Yazd University, Department of Physics, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahighi, Reza [Sharif University of Technology, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with {sup 68}Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with {sup 68}Ga NPs ({sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The {sup 68}Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the {sup 68}Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of {sup 68}Ga radionuclide, the {sup 68}Ga rate at CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  12. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh; Rahighi, Reza; Feizi, Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with 68Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with 68Ga NPs (68Ga@ CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The 68Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the 68Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of 68Ga radionuclide, the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  13. Studies in technetium chemistry, Project 1: Evaluation of technetium acetylacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents, Project 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.G.; Packard, A.B.; Treves, S.; Davison, A.

    1990-01-01

    Although the emphasis in our original submission was on N 2 S 2 and N 3 S coordinating ligands in technetium(V), we have now broadened the chemistry studies into areas that encompass new systems that allow the generation of neutral complexes. This change was based upon developments that have taken place in our basic chemistry studies that could bear on one of the original aims of this work, i.e., the design of complexes designed to penetrate cellular membranes and to remain trapped in target tissues. Among these topics are oxotechnetium(V) complexes containing amine and alcoholate ligands, coordination compounds containing the alternative technetium(V) nitrido core and the synthesis at macroscopic levels of a tetradentate ''umbrella'' ligand that successfully binds the metal. Basic studies with the original bisamide-bisthiol ligand system have continued with the identification of the products formed when aqueous solutions of the complex [TcO(ema)] - are acidified. This material is isolatable as yellow/brown crystals when HCl is added to the tetraphenylarsonium salt of the complex synthesized according to published procedures. Elemental analysis, FAB(+) mass spectrometry and 1 H NMR results were consistent with the formulation TcO(ema)H. Infrared spectra showed a dramatic shift in the Tc = O stretch to 966 cm -1 , as distinct from 945 cm -1 in the original complex

  14. Immobilization and Limited Reoxidation of Technetium-99 by Fe(II)-Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-shik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Smith, Steven C.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Buck, Edgar C.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Lukens, Wayne W.

    2010-09-30

    This report summarizes the methodology used to test the sequestration of technetium-99 present in both deionized water and simulated Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant waste solutions.

  15. Analysis of one thousand liver scans carried out using technetium phytate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasquier, J; de Laforte, C; Roux, F; Bisset, J P; Paulin, R [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1977-10-01

    One thousand liver scans were carried out using technetium phytate. This soluble compound is transformed in the circulating blood into a colloid by chelation of serum calcium, thereby forming a macromolecular phytate of calcium and technetium. The presenting symptoms are compared with the isotopic findings. This microcolloid has the advantages common to all technetium tracers and, in addition, is easy to prepare and has the advantage of a distribution between the liver, spleen, and bone of the same type as that seen with colloidal gold 198 without the dosimetric problems associated with the latter. Although it has a level of hepatic fixation which is less than that of certain sulphide complexes of technetium it appears to provide a better reflection of the colloidopexic function of the liver.

  16. Analysis of one thousand liver scans carried out using technetium phytate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, J.; Laforte, C. de; Roux, F.; Bisset, J.P.; Paulin, R.

    1977-01-01

    One thousand liver scans were carried out using technetium phytate. This soluble compound is transformed in the circulating blood into a colloid by chelation of serum calcium, thereby forming a macromolecular phytate of calcium and technetium. The presenting symptoms are compared with the isotopic findings. This microcolloid has the advantages common to all technetium tracers and, in addition, is easy to prepare and has the advantage of a distribution between the liver, spleen and bone of the same type as that seen with colloidal gold 198 without the dosimetric problems associated with the latter. Although it has a level of hepatic fixation which is less than that of certain sulphide complexes of technetium it appears to provide a better reflection of the colloidopexic function of the liver [fr

  17. Chemistry of rhenium and technetium. II. Schiff base complexes with polyfunctional amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Preez, J.G.H.; Gerber, T.I.A.; Fourie, P.J.; Van Wyk, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Amino acid Schiff base technetium(V) complexes of salicylaldehyde with l-cysteine, l-serine, l-histodine, l-threonine, l-glutamic acid and l-tryptophan have been preapred by direct reaction and by constituent combination. The amino acid part of the ligands coordinates to the technetium through the carboxylate group, while the other available functional group of the amino acids plays a more minor role as blocking group or in intramolecular bonding. 3 tables

  18. A method for the preparation of lipophilic macrocyclic technetium-99m complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troutner, D.E.; Volkert, W.A.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for the preparation of technetium complexes applicable as diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals is suggested and documented with 27 examples. Technetium-99m is reacted with a suitable complexant selected from the class of alkylenamine oximes containing 2 or 3 carbon atoms in the alkylene group. The lipophilic macrocyclic complexes possess an amine, amide, carboxy, carboxy ester, hydroxy or alkoxy group or a suitable electron acceptor group. (M.D.). 7 tabs

  19. Obtention of scintillography images by low density lipoproteins labelled with technetium 99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, S.; Coelho, I.; Zanardo, E.; Pileggi, F.; Meneguethi, C.; Maranhao, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    The low density lipoproteins carry the most part of the cholesterol in the blood plasma. These lipoproteins are labelled with technetium-99-m and have been used for obtaining images in nuclear medicine. The introduction of this technique is presented, aiming futures clinical uses. Scintillographic images are obtained 25 minutes and 24 hours after the injection of 3 m Ci of low density lipoproteins - technetium-99 m in rabbits. (C.G.C.)

  20. Structure impact on the thermal and electronic properties of bismuth telluride by ab-initio and molecular dynamics calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Termentzidis, K; Pokropivny, A; Xiong, S-Y; Chumakov, Y; Volz, S; Woda, M; Cortona, P

    2012-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics and ab-initio methods to predict the thermal and electronic properties of new materials with high figures of merit. The simulated systems are bulk bismuth tellurides with antisite and vacancy defects. Optimizations of the materials under investigation are performed by the SIESTA code for subsequent calculations of force constants, electronic properties, and Seebeck coefficients. The prediction of the thermal conductivity is made by Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD) using the LAMMPS code. The thermal conductivity of bulk bismuth telluride with different stoichiometry and with a number of substitution defects is calculated. We have found that the thermal conductivity can be decreased by 60% by introducing vacancy defects. The calculated thermal conductivities for the different structures are compared with the available experimental and theoretical results.

  1. Positive thyroid cancer scintigraphy using technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, J.; Nyvltova, O.; Blazek, T.; Vlcek, P.; Racek, P.; Novak, Z.; Preiningerova, M.; Hubackova, M.; Krizova, M.; Zimak, J.; Bilek, R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the possibility of detecting thyroid cancer recurrences without the need for withdrawal of thyroid suppressive treatment. Upper-body or whole-body scintigraphy was performed in a group of 200 patients evaluated for differentiated thyroid cancers in 1993 and 1994 using technetium-99m sestamibi. Scans were performed 20-30 min following i.v. administration of 500 MBq of 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI). Bone and lung metastases were detected with very high sensitivity and specificity, with a very high predictive value of negative results and a somewhat lower predictive value of positive results. The sensitivity and specificity of findings in the neck were lower but the predictive value of negative results was high. Whole-body scans with 99m Tc-MIBI are a useful tool in the follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, for the detection of distant metastatic lesions. (orig.)

  2. Solidification/stabilization of technetium in cement-based grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Bostick, W.D.; Spence, R.D.; Shoemaker, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Mixed low-level radioactive and chemically hazardous process treatment wastes from the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are stabilized by solidification in cement-based grouts. Conventional portland cement and fly ash grouts have been shown to be effective for retention of hydrolyzable metals (e.g., lead, cadmium, uranium and nickel) but are marginally acceptable for retention of radioactive Tc-99, which is present in the waste as the highly mobile pertechnate anion. Addition of ground blast furnace slag to the grout is shown to reduce the leachability of technetium by several orders of magnitude. The selective effect of slag is believed to be due to its ability to reduce Tc(VII) to the less soluble Tc(IV) species. 12 refs., 4 tabs

  3. Mechanisms of sorption of neptunium and technetium on argillaceous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, P.J.; West, J.M.; Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    It is of pressing concern to understand the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment and in particular long-lived ones (e.g. Np-237 and Te-99) in argillaceous rocks. Clay formations have been chosen as likely candidates for holding low level radioactive waste repositories and in the event of leakage of radionuclides into the geosphere some knowledge of their fate is required in a far-field safety assessment study. The objectives of this present work were to examine the properties of neptunium and technetium in ground-waters associated with clay-rich materials and to ascertain the variations in sorption of these radionuclides under different environmental conditions and to use the information in a forecast of transport through a clay layer

  4. The determination of technetium-99 in environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, B.R.; Ibbett, R.D.; Williams, K.J.; Lovett, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    The Aquatic Environment Protection Division of the Directorate of Fisheries Research (DFR), Lowestoft carries out analyses, on a routine basis, for a considerable range of radionuclides in a wide variety of environmental materials. Technetium-99 is included in the list of radionuclides for which analysis is regularly carried out as part of the DFR monitoring programme. Its determination is inevitably somewhat labour-intensive and over the years the procedures used have changed to accommodate increasing demands for information on the environmental behaviour of the nuclide. Reliable analytical procedures for the radiochemical separation and assaying of 99 Tc are thus important. Radiometric and gravimetric analyses described in this publication have been developed over a substantial period of time and have given excellent results in international intercomparison exercises. (author)

  5. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ([/sup 99m/Tc]Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of [/sup 99m/Tc]Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. [/sup 99m/Tc]Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, [/sup 99m/Tc]Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa

  6. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scanning in osteoarthritic hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckland-Wright, J.C.; Lynch, J.A.; Macfarlane, D.G.; Homoeopathic Hospital, Tunbridge; Fogelman, I.; Emery, P.

    1991-01-01

    In this prospective study, the radiological features characteristic of osteoarthritis of the hand were compared with the radionuclide bone scan images. A total of 32 patients was assessed at 6-monthly intervals for 18 months. Microfocal radiographs were taken at each visit. The high magnification and resolution of this technique permitted direct measurement of joint space width, subchondral sclerosis, osteophyte number and area and juxta-articular radiolucency area for each joint in the hand. Four-hour technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scans were taken at 0 and 12 months and the activity of tracer uptake at each joint scored. The latter was compared with each X-radiographic feature at every visit and the changes between visits analysed. The scan scores did not correlate with any of the X-radiographic features other than osteophyte size. During the study the size of growing and remodelling osteophytes increased significantly at joints with raised or increased isotope uptake. (orig.)

  7. Technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scanning in osteoarthritic hands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland-Wright, J.C.; Lynch, J.A. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Anatomy); Macfarlane, D.G. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Anatomy Homoeopathic Hospital, Tunbridge (UK). Dept. of Rheumatology); Fogelman, I. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Emery, P. (United Medical and Dental Schools of Guy' s and Saint Thomas' , London (UK). Dept. of Rheumatology)

    1991-01-01

    In this prospective study, the radiological features characteristic of osteoarthritis of the hand were compared with the radionuclide bone scan images. A total of 32 patients was assessed at 6-monthly intervals for 18 months. Microfocal radiographs were taken at each visit. The high magnification and resolution of this technique permitted direct measurement of joint space width, subchondral sclerosis, osteophyte number and area and juxta-articular radiolucency area for each joint in the hand. Four-hour technetium 99m methylene diphosphonate bone scans were taken at 0 and 12 months and the activity of tracer uptake at each joint scored. The latter was compared with each X-radiographic feature at every visit and the changes between visits analysed. The scan scores did not correlate with any of the X-radiographic features other than osteophyte size. During the study the size of growing and remodelling osteophytes increased significantly at joints with raised or increased isotope uptake. (orig.).

  8. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  9. Extraction of technetium from simulated Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaiko, D.J.; Vojta, Y.; Takeuchi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Aqueous biphasic separation systems are being developed for the treatment of liquid radioactive wastes. These extraction systems are based on the use of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) for the selective extraction and recovery of long-lived radionuclides, such as 129 I, 75 Se, and 99 Tc, from caustic solutions containing high concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, and carbonate. Because of the high ionic strengths of supernatant liquids in Hanford underground storage tanks, aqueous biphasic systems can be generated by simply adding aqueous PEG solutions directly to the waste solution. In the process, anionic species like I - and TcO 4 - are selectively transferred to the less dense PEG phase. The partition coefficient for a wide range of inorganic cations and anions, such as sodium, potassium, aluminum, nitrate, nitrate, and carbonate, are all less than one. The authors present experimental data on extraction of technetium from several simulated Hanford tank wastes at 25 degree and 50 degree C

  10. Technetium-99m HMPAO labeled leukocytes in inflammation imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Kimiichi; Yoshikawa, Kyousan; Imazeki, Keiko; Minoshima, Satoshi; Arimizu, Noboru

    1991-01-01

    Technetium-99m-HMPAO (Tc-99m-HMPAO) labeled leukocyte imaging was carried out in 19 patients at 3-5 hr after reinjection. There were no side effects noted. Tc-99m leukocyte images showed gall bladder, colon, kidney, and urinary bladder activity in normal distribution as a result of excretion of the eluted Tc-99m complex. They yielded a sensitivity of 93%, a specificity of 100% and an accuracy of 95%. They were correctly positive in 14 out of 19 cases. But one false negative case was seen in a patient with pyonephrosis showing a lack of renal function with decreased renal blood flow. It was concluded that they have some advantages over In-111 leukocyte images, but we have to consider the fact that the ureteral obstruction or the lack of renal function with decreased renal blood flow may result in a false positive or a false negative case. (author)

  11. The abdominal technetium scan (a decade of experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, D.R.; Duszynski, D.O.; Camboa, E.; Karp, M.P.; Jewett, T.C. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Out of 270 children with gastrointestinal symptoms, the indications for technetium scanning were: gastrointestinal tract bleeding (165 patients), abdominal pain (99 patients) and a history of intussusception (6 patients). Thirty children had abnormal findings, while the remaining 240 patients had normal scans. Four of the 30 children with positive scans were not explored, while the others underwent laparotomy. Of the 26 operated patients, 12 (46%) had a Meckel's diverticulum. Nine patients (34%) had other pathologic lesions that were detected by the scan. Five had true false positives as no pathologic lesions were found. Of the 240 children with negative scans, 19 were eventually explored because of persistent symptoms or clinical findings. Two of these had a Meckel's diverticulum. Eleven had a negative exploration while six had other surgical lesions. Technitium scan should reliably detect around 80%-90% of Meckel's diverticula. It will also accurately exclude the diagnosis of Meckel's diverticulum in over 90% of patients

  12. Technetium-99m DMSA preparation: Trivial issues causing severe problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1997-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) in children involving renal parenchyma, upper collecting system or bladder is one of the major causes for consideration in the diagnosis and management of paediatric nuclear medicine. Acute pyelonephritis is one of the prime causes of morbidity associated with urinary tract infection in children which can lead to progressive renal damage. Technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is used extensively for the assessment of UTI in paediatrics. The radiopharmaceutical preparation could be influenced by several factors, most of them are trivial, but invariably have severe impact on the quality of the scintiphotographs. This communication is mainly to highlight some of the issues related to 99 mTc-DMSA preparation and the possible precautionary measures that need to be taken to obviate unwarranted problems. (author)

  13. Technetium in late-type stars. I. Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little-Marenin, I.R.; Little, S.J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of about 90 spectra (11 or 13A/mm) of nonvariable and variable (mostly Mira variables) M, MS, S, CS, and C stars for the presence of the radioactive element technetium (T/sub 1/2/approx. =2 x 10 5 y) suggests that Tc is most often present at certain variability periods. Stars with no Tc I lines in their spectra can be found at most periods (P-bar=234/sup d/), whereas stars with Tc I lines have periods in most cases in excess of 300 days (P-bar=330/sup d/ +- 83/sup d/). Interpreting our data in terms of kinematic studies by Feast (1963) suggests that the stars with Tc are Pop I and that variables without Tc are largely Pop II type stars

  14. Sup(99m) Technetium - labeled red blood cells 'in vitro'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo Filho, M.; Souza Moura, I.N. de; Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    A simple technique for the preparation of sup(99m) Tc labeled red blood cells using a comercial kit is described. To each 3ml of plain blood with anti-coagulant was added 1ml of solution of commercial kit with 6.8 μg of stannous chloride. This mixture was incubated in water bath, at 37 0 C, for 60 minutes. Then technetium-99m was added and the mixture was left for another ten minutes, in water bath, at 37 0 C. Under these conditions there was the best labeling of the red blood cells. Similar results were obtained with a solution of stannous chloride prepared freshly. The labeling is strong for 6.8 μg stannous chloride because the labeling was not removed by the several washes of the red blood cells or by the left in water bath. (Author) [pt

  15. Study of the catalytic activity of supported technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokorovskaya, O.V.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive d metal 43 Tc 99 has catalytic properties in the synthesis of ammonia. For the purpose of reducing the quantity of the radioactive metal and of increasing the specific surface, the active component was applied to BaTiO 3 and gamma-Al 2 O 3 supports. This paper uses charcoal as a support and a table presents the catalytic activity of the samples during the synthesis of ammonia. X-ray diffractometric investigation of the catalysts was carried out with the use of Cu K /SUB alpha/ radiation. It is shown that the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants of technetium in the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants remain practically constant for all the catalyst samples studied, attesting to the absence of a specific metal-support interaction during the synthesis of ammonia

  16. Uptake of technetium from seawater by red abalone Haliotis rufescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Technetium accumulation from seawater by the abalone Haliotis rufescens was studied with 95 Tc. Concentration factors, uptake rates, steady state concentrations, and biological half-lives were determined experimentally for whole-body uptake. Whole-body concentration factors ranged from 135 to 205; biological half-life was 60 days. Changes in concentration factors were determined for six tissues during the uptake period. The highest activities were in the order of: digestive gland>gill>kidneys>heart>gonad>columnar muscle. Dead shells accumulated little activity compared to shells of living abalone. Gills and digestive system appear to be the routes of entry. Autoradiography shows that of the muscular tissues the outer edge of the foot and epipodium are the most active and the edible columnar muscle the least active. (author)

  17. Thallium-technetium-subtraction scintigraphy in secondary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adalet, I.; Hawkins, T.; Clark, F.; Wilkinson, R.

    1994-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1992 thallium-technetium subtraction scintigraphy (TTS) was performed on 74 patients with clinical and biochemical evidence of hyperparathyroidism. Twenty-five of the 53 investigations since 1988 were conducted on patients with renal failure with a suspicion of secondary hyperparathyroidism. In a retrospective study we have evaluated radioisotope scintigraphy for patients with adenoma and for renal failure patients with possible parathyroid hyperplasia. Thirty of 74 patients underwent neck exploration. Scintigraphy detected 17 of 24 parathyroid adenomas (sensitivity 71%). In contrast, in six renal patients who came to operation, scintigraphy localised only 5 of 20 hyperplastic parathyroid glands (sensitivity 25%) and in one renal patient we localised a parathyroid adenoma. A review of the literature shows low detection rates for hyperplasia by TTS to be a common observation. Based on these findings a rational approach is offered for parathyroid localisation in renal patients prior to neck exploration. (orig.)

  18. Effect of applied potential on electrochemically reduced technetium diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.L. Jr.; Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals continue to play a major role in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Their ability to provide both structural and functional information provides a unique advantage which even the more recent imaging techniques cannot provide. The Tc-99m isotope possesses nuclear decay characteristics which allow maximum organ imaging following intravenous injection while delivering a minimal radiation burden to the patient. Due to the diphosphonate ligands' strong affinity for bone, Tc-99m diphosphonate complexes are routinely used for the determination of bone abnormalities such as cancerous tumors. Electrochemical reduction provides the additional parameter needed to increase the yield of a single component. This work presents the effect of varying the applied potential of the mercury pool electrode at selected pH values. The result of this variation in applied potential is tracked by anion exchange chromatographic separation based on the negatively charged Tc-diphosphonate complexes. These chromatograms are compared to those obtained by standard chemical reduction

  19. Synthesis of new Technetium 99 agents from aryl piperozine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenati, Kaouther

    2012-01-01

    This work arises in the context of developing specific radiopharmaceuticals for serotoninergic 5-HT 1A receptors, for scintigraphic imaging by SPECT. these being involved in several neuropathology. Starting from new derivative of Technetium cytectrene bearing the methoxyphenyl piperazine moiety that have revealed an impressive brain uptake (2.47 pour cent ID/G), we thought to obtain an other radiocomplexe characterized by a more stable brain retention. To do this we added a spacer amino propyl to the first ligand 1-((2methoxyphenyl) piperazine carboxamide ferrocene, thus obtaining 1(3-aminopropyl) 4 (2-methoxyphenyl piperazine) ferrocene carboxamide. We report here the synthesis of the tricarbonyl 99mT c radioligand, its characterization and its biological study. The biodistribution is characterized by a very large uptake in the lungs and relatively slow depuration.Brain absorption is reduced compared to the analogue of origin with equivalent cerebral retention time.

  20. Studies of technetium chemistry. Pt.8. The regularities of the bond length and configuration of rhenium and technetium complexes in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozheng; Liu Boli

    1995-01-01

    Some bond length regularities in MO 6 , MO-4, MX 5 α and MX 4 αβ moieties of technetium and rhenium compounds are summarized and rationalized by cavity model. The chemical properties of technetium and rhenium are so similar that their corresponding complexes have almost the same configuration and M-X bond lengths when they are in cavity-controlled state. Technetium and Rhenium combine preferably with N, O, F, S, Cl and Br when they are in higher oxidation states (>3), but preferably with P, Se etc. when they are in lower oxidation states ( 4 αβ is approximately constant; (2) the average M-X bond length of MX 6 varies moderately with the oxidation state of M; (3) the bond length of M-X trans to M-α in MX 5 α has a linear relationship with the angle

  1. Sorption of iodine, chlorine, technetium and cesium in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, M.; Lusa, M.; Lehto, J.; Hakanen, M.; Vaaramaa, K.

    2011-01-01

    The safety assessment of final disposal of spent nuclear fuel will include an estimate for the behavior of waste nuclides in the biosphere. As a part of this estimate also the sorption of radioactive iodine, chlorine, technetium and cesium in soil is to be considered. The chemistry and the sorption of these radionuclides in soils are described in this literature survey. Behavior of I-129, Cl-36 and Tc-99 in the environment is of great interest because of their long half-lives and relatively high mobilities. The importance of Cs-135 arises from its high content in spent nuclear fuel and long physical half-life, even though it is considered relatively immobile in soil. Factors affecting the migration and sorption of radionuclides in soils can be divided into elemental and soil specific parameters. The most important elemental factor is the speciation of the element, which is influenced by the soil redox potential, pH and complex forming ligands. Soil micro-organisms can either serve as sorbents for radionuclides or affect their speciation by altering the prevailing soil redox conditions. Soil organic matter content and mineral properties have a marked influence on the retention of radionuclides. The sorption of anionic radionuclides such as I-, Cl- and TcO 4 - is pronounced in the presence of organic matter. Clay minerals are known to bound cesium effectively. The effect of speciation of radioactive iodine, chlorine, technetium and cesium in soil is considered in this study, as well as the effect of soil micro-organisms, organic matter and mineral properties. (orig.)

  2. Preparation of L-asparagine complex with technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persano, S.C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation of technetium chelated to L-asparagine is aimed at for obtention of potentially useful radiopharmaceutical in nuclear medicine. The reduction of pertechnetate anion ( 99 TcO - 4 and sup(99m) TcO - 4 ) using hydrazine as a reducing agent is studied with use of polarographic spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. Spectrophotometric determination shows that the aqueous solution of amonium sup(-99m) Tc pertechnetate absorbs at 244, 248 and 290 nm. After reduction the species absorbs at 330 and near 495-530 nm. Polarographic measurements with 0,1 N NaOH electrolyte show a half-wave potential E sub(1/2 = -0,82 V for technetium +VII. After the addition of increasing amounts of hydrazine into a solution containing Tc+VII, the half wave potential shifts to more positives values, indicating the reduction of Tc+VII. Chromatographic determinations are in good agreement with polarographic analysis, emphatizing reduction of Tc+IV by hydrazine. The reduced 99 Tc shows ability of being incorporated into L-asparagine forming a cristalline compound with melting point 118.6 0 C. Infrared absorption spectrometry shows that amino and carboxyl groups are bound to the metal in this complex. The yield of sup(99m) Tc incorporation into L-asparagine at 60 0 C in 30 minutes is up to 95%. The labeled complex can be presented as a radiopharmaceutical product. Tissue distribution performed in groups of normal and bearing lymphoma Walker 256 Wistar rats (50-60) shows that the radiopharmaceutical concentrates seletively in the tumor and is fastly excreted by the kidney and it doesn't have significant affinity for any organ, being so adequate for the formation of tumoral images. (Authors) [pt

  3. An investigation of the effect of the quantity of stannous ion on the quality of technetium-99m labelled albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Rempel, S.; Westendorf, B.A.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of maintaining a low ratio of stannous ion to albumin molecules in order to obtain a high quality technetium-99m labelled albumin is demonstrated. It is further shown that the direct preparation of technetium-99m albumin by reduction of the technetium-99m pertechnetate with stannous ion inevitably leads to the contamination of the product with a certain amount of tin colloid which is also labelled with technetium-99m. It is demonstrated that this can be avoided by utilizing labelling techniques involving the initial formation of other technetium chelates which are less stable than the albumin complex under certain conditions, adding the albumin to that preparation, adjusting the conditions and thus allowing the albumin to become labelled with technetium-99m via an exchange with the original chelating agent. (author)

  4. Nitrido-technetium(V) complexes with amino acids: Preparation and X-ray crystal structure of the L-cysteinate ethyl ester technetium(V) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchi, A.; Rossi, R.; Marvelli, L.; Bertolasi, V.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-99m is the radionuclide of choice in diagnostic nuclear medicine due to its ideal photon energy of 140 keV and half-life of 6 h. Neutral, stable, and lipophilic technetium complexes with diamino dithiol ligands (DADT) have been widely studied as potential brain perfusion agents and a 99m Tc complex of N,N'-1,2-ethylenediylbis(L-cysteine diethyl ester) (L,L-ECD) has been proposed as a marker of regional cerebral blood flow. It crosses the blood brain barrier (BBB) and is retained in the brain owing to enzymatic hydrolysis of one ester group yielding to a more polar species. More recently, 99m Tc-cysteine complex has been evaluated in animal distribution studies for tumor diagnosis, but its chemical structure has not been determined. A large number of transition metal complexes with amino acids and peptides have been synthesized and structurally characterized to understand their interactions with proteins and antibodies, as well as biocatalytic processes, but only a limited number of rhenium and technetium compounds have been reported. Up to now, the only technetium complex to be characterized by X-ray analysis that contains amino acids as ligand is [TcO(L,L-ECD)]. The author's interest in the nitrido-technetium chemistry is due to the discovery of a new method for preparing radiopharmaceuticals containing the [ 99m Tc triple-bond N] 2+ core. In this communication the authors report the synthesis and characterization of nitrido-technetium complexes with L-cysteine ethyl ester (CYS-OEt), L-cysteine (CYS) and cysteamine (CSA) and the first X-ray crystal structure of a [TcN] 2+ -amino acid complex

  5. Effects of chemical intermixing on electrical and thermal contact conductances at metallized bismuth and antimony telluride interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devender,; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati, E-mail: Ramanath@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Lofgreen, Kelly; Mahajan, Ravi [Intel Corporation, Assembly Test and Technology Development, Chandler, Arizona 85226 (United States); Yamaguchi, Masashi [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian [Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Tailoring electrical and thermal contact conductivities (Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}) across metallized pnictogen chalcogenide interfaces is key for realizing efficient thermoelectric devices. The authors report that Cu, Ni, Ti, and Ta diffusion and interfacial telluride formation with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and p-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} influence both Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}. Cu metallization yields the highest Γ{sub c} and the lowest Σ{sub c}, correlating with maximal metal diffusion and copper telluride formation. Ni diffuses less and yields the highest Σ{sub c} with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} due to p-type nickel telluride formation, which diminishes Σ{sub c} improvement with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} interfaces. Ta and Ti contacts yield the lowest properties similar to that in Ni-metallized structures. These correlations between interfacial diffusion and phase formation on electronic and thermal transport properties will be important for devising suitable metallization for thermoelectric devices.

  6. Diffusion of iron in β-iron telluride (Fe1.12Te) by Moessbauer spectroscopy and tracer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magara, Masaaki; Tsuji, Toshihide; Naito, Keiji

    1993-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of iron in a β-iron telluride (Fe 1.12 Te) polycrystalline sample was measured by Moessbauer diffusional line broadening method which relates to the collapse of coherence in gamma-ray photon by the atomic jump at local sites. The diffusion coefficient of iron along the c-axis in nearly single crystal of β-iron telluride was also measured by tracer technique which shows the results of an atom transport in long distance. The activation energies for the diffusion of iron in Fe 1.12 Te obtained by the Moessbauer spectroscopy and the tracer method were 91.5±5.4 and 106±23 kJ/mol, respectively. The diffusion coefficients of iron in β-iron telluride obtained by Moessbauer line broadening are in fair agreement with the values averaged from that along c-axis obtained by tracer method and that along a- and b-axes obtained from reaction rate constant between iron and tellurium by the previous study of the present authors. (orig.)

  7. Analysis of Technetium Species and Fractions in Natural Seaweed Using Biochemical Separation and ICP-MS Measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang; Hou, Xiaolin; Qiao, Jixin

    2016-01-01

    An extremely high accumulation and retention of technetium in marine plants, especially brown seaweed, makes it a unique bioindicator of technetium. In the present work, a novel approach was developed for the speciation analysis of technetium in seaweed, wherein a series of biochemical separations....... Besides the inorganic species of TcO4-, most of technetium (>75%) combined with organic components of seaweed such as algin, cellulose, and pigment. This investigation could provide important fundamental knowledge for studying the processes and mechanisms of 99Tc accumulation in the natural seaweed....

  8. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Chen, Xiaomei; Oyama, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m -1 K -2 ) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m -1 K -2 ), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output load as high as 50

  9. Sorption of technetium and its analogue rhenium on bentonite material under aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinsova, H.; Koudelkova, M.; Konirova, R.; Vecernik, P.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of technetium on bentonite materials has been studied from the point of view of characterization of long-term radioactive elements behavior in nuclear waste repository. Bentonite R (locality Rokle, Czech Republic) and two types of model groundwater (granitic and bentonite) were selected for the sorption experiments. It is generally known that bentonite materials show an excellent cation-exchange capacity and, on the other hand, a poor uptake of anions. Technetium occurs under aerobic conditions in its most stable oxidation state (+VII) as pertechnetate, which makes a question of its sorption on bentonite more complex when compared with e.g. Cs + or Sr 2+ . To increase the K d values for technetium sorption on bentonite, it is necessary to carry out the experiments under anaerobic conditions in the presence of reducing agent, which is capable to lower the oxidation state of technetium which enables its successful immobilization. The aim of our research has been to find out the conditions suitable for the technetium sorption on selected bentonite under oxidizing conditions. The sorption experiments with Tc-99 on bentonite have been carried out by batch method. The influence of the addition of different materials (e.g. activated carbon, graphite, Fe 2+ , Fe) with bentonite, the effect of solid:aqueous phase ratio and a pH value on the percentage of technetium uptake and on the K d values were tested. Perrhenate was selected as an analogue of pertechnetate in non-active experiments of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and isotachophoresis (ITP). The percentage of rhenium sorbed on bentonite material was determined from the decrease of perrhenate peak area (CE) and from the shortening of the ITP zone corresponding to perrhenate. Both electromigration methods provided comparable results. The results obtained in this study with non-active material were compared to those of technetium acquired by radiometry and polarography. (authors)

  10. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-01-01

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi 2 Te 3 ) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi 2 Te 3 were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  11. N-hydroxysuccinimide-mediated photoelectrooxidation of aliphatic alcohols based on cadmium telluride nanoparticles decorated graphene nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navaee, Aso; Salimi, Abdollah

    2013-01-01

    A simple nonenzymatic electrochemical protocol is proposed for the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols using formed N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) radical cation on the graphene nanosheets/L-cysteine/cadmium telluride quantum dot (QD) nanocomposite (GNs/Cys/CdTe) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. At first, graphene oxide (GO) is chemically synthesized from graphite after which Cys is covalently functionalized to GO through formation of amide bonds between carboxylic acid groups of GO and amine groups of Cys. The resulting GNs/Cys is used as a capping agent to synthesize CdTe QD nanoparticles. After the characterization of the as-made nanocomposite which confirmed the successful attachment of CdTe nanoparticles to the GNs, the ability of the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified GC electrode toward the nonenzymatic ethanol electrooxidation is examined in the presence of NHS as an effective mediating system. Our results revealed that the proposed system possess a good activity to NHS electrooxidation and subsequently, ethanol oxidation. Moreover, the GNs/Cys/CdTe modified electrode displayed a significant photoelectrocatalytic activity toward the ethanol oxidation upon illumination by visible light. The photoactive GNs/Cys/CdTe nanohybrid presented here showing favorable photoelectrochemical features for nonenzymatic aliphatic alcohols oxidation may hold great promise to the development of electrochemical sensors and biofuel cells

  12. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunett, B.A.; Lund, J.C.; Van Scyoc, J.M.; Hilton, N.R.; Lee, E.Y.; James, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors

  13. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  14. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  15. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  16. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  17. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  18. Fluorescence Stability of Mercaptopropionic Acid Capped Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots in Various Biochemical Buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borse, Vivek; Kashikar, Adisha; Srivastava, Rohit

    2018-04-01

    Quantum dots are the semiconductor nanocrystals having unique optical and electronic properties. Quantum dots are category of fluorescent labels utilized for biological tagging, biosensing, bioassays, bioimaging and in vivo imaging as they exhibit very small size, signal brightness, photostability, tuning of light emission range, longer photoluminescence decay time as compared to organic dyes. In this work, we have synthesized and characterized mercaptopropionic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (MPA-CdTe QDs) using hydrothermal method. The study further reports fluorescence intensity stability of quantum dots suspended in different buffers of varying concentration (1-100 mM), stored at various photophysical conditions. Fluorescence intensity values were reduced with increase in buffer concentration. When the samples were stored at room temperature in ambient light condition the quantum dots suspended in different buffers lost the fluorescence intensity after day 15 (except TRIS II). Fluorescence intensity values were found stable for more than 30 days when the samples were stored in dark condition. Samples stored in refrigerator displayed modest fluorescence intensity even after 300 days of storage. Thus, storage of MPA-CdTe QDs in refrigerator may be the suitable choice to maintain its fluorescence stability for longer time for further application.

  19. Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride photon detector for epithermal neutron spectroscopy--pulse height response characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Bracco, A.; D'Angelo, A.; Gorini, G.; Imberti, S.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Resonance Detector Spectrometer was recently revised for neutron spectroscopic studies in the eV energy region. In this technique one makes use of a photon detector to record the gamma emission from analyser foils used as neutron-gamma converters. The pulse-height response of a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride photon detector to neutron capture emission from 238 U and 197 Au analyser foils was characterised in the neutron energy range 1-200 eV. The experiment was performed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS neutron-pulsed source. A biparametric data acquisition, specifically developed for these measurements, allowed the simultaneous measurements of both the neutron time of flight and γ pulse-height spectra. Through the analysis of the γ pulse-height spectra the main components of the signal associated with resonant and non-resonant neutron absorption were identified. It was also shown that, in principle, energy discrimination can be used to improve the signal to background ratio of the neutron time-of-flight measurement

  20. Effect of reducing agent strength on the growth and thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Asmaa; Hassan, Nazly; Refaat, Heba M.; Soliman, Hesham M. A.; El-Dissouky, A.

    2018-03-01

    A novel combination of Trizma, as an environmentally friendly chelating agent, with either weak or strong reducing agent was used to produce n-type bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanocrystals via water-based chemical route. The synthesized powders were consolidated into pellets utilizing spark plasma sintering (SPS). The sintered n-type pellets exhibited potentially high electrical conductivities (5.29 × 105 and 5.23 × 105 S.m‑1) and low lattice thermal conductivities (0.12 and 0.25 Wm‑1K‑1) respectively. These thermoelectric (TE) properties suggested that the partially coherent boundaries permitted significant phonons scattering and electrons transfer. These led to an enhanced figure-of-merit (ZT) values (0.52 and 0.97), which are considered to be significant among the reported ZT values at room-temperature for the undoped synthesized n-type Bi2Te3 nanoparticles. Therefore, the current investigation displayed an efficient method to improve ZT of TE materials via nanostructure orchestrating, resulting in a worthy candidate n-type nanostructured Bi2Te3 for room-temperature TE applications.

  1. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRUNETT, BRUCE A.; DOYLE, BARNEY L.; JAMES, RALPH B.; VIZKELETHY, GYORGY; WALSH, DAVID S.

    1999-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated

  2. Effect of the interface on the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of bismuth telluride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tang-Yu; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Fang, Te-Hua; Huang, Chao-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) is a type of thermoelectric material used for energy generation that does not cause pollution. Increasing the thermoelectric conversion efficiency (ZT) is one of the most important steps in the development of thermoelectric components. In this study, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of quintuple layers of Bi2Te3 nanofilms with different atomic arrangements at the interface and study the effects of varying layers, angles, and grain boundaries. The results indicate that the Bi2Te3 nanofilm perfect substrate has the ideal Young’s modulus and thermal conductivity, and the maximum yield stress is observed for a thickness of ∼90 Å. As the interface changed, the structural disorder of atomic arrangement affected the mechanical properties; moreover, the phonons encounter lattice disordered atomic region will produce scattering reduce heat conduction. The results of this investigation are helpful for the application of Bi2Te3 nanofilms as thermoelectric materials.

  3. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, J.

    2007-04-01

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented

  4. Synthesis and Properties of Metallic Technetium and Technetium-Zirconium Alloys as Transmutation Target and Radioactive waste storage form in the UREX+1 Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Thomas [Idaho State University/Idaho National Laboratory, 1776 Science Center Drive, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)]|[Harry Reid Center, University Nevada - Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R. [Harry Reid Center, University Nevada - Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In the application of UREX+1 process, technetium will be separated together with uranium and iodine within the first process step. After the separation of uranium, technetium and iodine must be immobilized by their incorporation in a suitable waste storage-form. Based on recent activities within the AFCI community, a potential candidate as waste storage form to immobilize technetium is to alloy the metal with excess zirconium. Alloys in the binary Tc-Zr system may act as potential transmutation targets in order to transmute Tc-99 into Ru-100. We are presenting first results in the synthesis of metallic technetium, and the synthesis of equilibrium phases in the binary Tc-Zr system at 1400 deg. C after arc-melting and isothermal annealing under inert conditions. Samples were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction, Rietveld analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and electron probe micro-analysis, which allows us to construct the binary Tc-Zr phase diagram for the isothermal section at 1400 deg. C. (authors)

  5. Development of a remote spectroelectrochemical sensor for technetium as pertechnetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David James

    Subsurface contamination by technetium (Tc) is of particular concern in the monitoring, characterization, and remediation of underground nuclear waste storage tanks, processing areas, and associated surroundings at the Hanford Site and other U.S. DOE sites nationwide. The concern over this radioactive element arises for two reasons. First, its most common isotope, 99Tc, has an extremely long lifetime of 2.15 x 105 years. Second, it's most common chemical form in environmental conditions, pertechnetate (TcO4-), exhibits very fast migration through soils and readily presents itself to any nearby aquifer. Standard procedures of sampling and analysis in a laboratory prove to be slow and costly in the case of subsurface contamination by radioactive materials. It is highly desirable to develop sensors for these materials that possess the capability of either in-situ or on-site placement for continuous monitoring or immediate analysis of collected samples. These sensors need to possess adequate detection limit and selectivity, rapid response, reversibility (many measurements with one sensor), the ability to perform remotely, and ruggedness. This dissertation describes several areas of the continued work toward a sensor for 99Tc as TcO4-. Research initially focused on developing spectroelectrochemical instrumentation and a disposable sensing element, engineered to address the need to perform remote measurements. The instrument was then tested using samples containing 99Tc, resulting in the development of ancillary equipment and techniques to address concerns associated with performing experiments on radioactive materials. In these tests, the electrochemistry of TcO4 - was demonstrated to be irreversible. Electrochemical reduction of TcO4- on a bare or polymer modified electrode resulted in the continuous build up of technetium oxide (TcO2) on the electrode surface. This TcO2 formed in visual quantities in these films during electrochemistry, and proved to be non-ideal for

  6. Speciation of technetium in acidic media: effect of α radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denden, Ibtihel

    2013-01-01

    This project is part of the fundamental study of technetium speciation in highly acidic medium. The behaviour of technetium in HTFMS was carried out in the absence then in the presence of a irradiation. Given these two different conditions, spectrophotometric results of Tc(VII) reduction are similar. XAS analysis indicates the formation of a cyclic dimer of Tc(IV) complexed to triflate ligands and formulated asTc 2 O 2 (CF 3 SO 3 ) 4 (H 2 O)4. This compound is linearized to Tc(IV)-O-Tc(IV) with the increase of HTFMS concentration. At high concentration of HTFMS +98% (11.15 M), the protonated species TcO 3 (OH)(H 2 O) 2 which is formed in the absence of external ionizing radiations, is reduced to the V oxidation state under a irradiation. Structural characterization by EXAFS spectroscopy and DFT calculations suggests the formation of monomer species of Tc(V)-triflate complexes where [OTc(F 3 CSO 3 ) 2 (H 2 O)2] + and [OTc(F 3 CSO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 ] - compounds were proposed. In concentrated H 2 SO 4 (CH 2 SO 4 ≥ 12 M), a-radiolysis experiments of Tc(VII) were performed in order to compare the radiolytic behaviour of Tc(VII) in both comparable media HTFMS and H 2 SO 4 . XANES studies show that radiolytic reduction of Tc(VII) leads to the formation of Tc(V)-Tc(VII) mixture in H 2 SO 4 13 M and just Tc(V) in 18 M of H 2 SO 4 . The analysis of EXAFS spectra is consistent with the formation of [TcO(HSO 4 ) 3 (H 2 O) 2 ] and [TcO(HSO 4 )3(H 2 O)(OH)] - monomer complexes in H 2 SO 4 13 M and [Tc(HSO 4 ) 3 (SO 4 )(H 2 O)] and [Tc(HSO 4 ) 3 (SO 4 )(OH)] - species at 18 M of H 2 SO 4 . (author)

  7. Ion Exchange Column Tests Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Morse, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-12-20

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed on site. There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important. Options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste, as well as to examine the volatility of 99Tc during the vitrification process. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. A conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. SuperLig® 639 is an elutable ion exchange resin. In the tank waste, 99Tc is predominantly found in the tank supernate as pertechnetate (TcO4-). Perrhenate (ReO4-) has been shown to be a good non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in laboratory testing for this ion exchange resin. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient and column resin maturation kinetics testing using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from simulated LAW. This revision includes results from testing to determine effective resin operating temperature range. Loading tests were performed at 45°C, and the computer modeling was updated to include the temperature effects. Equilibrium contact testing indicated that this batch of

  8. Comparison between hemosiderin and Technetium-99 in sentinel lymph node biopsy in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasques, Paulo Henrique Diogenes; Aquino, Ranniere Gurgel Furtado de; Pinheiro, Luiz Gonzaga Porto; Torres, Roberto Vitor Almeida; Bezerra, Jose Lucas Martins; Brasileiro, Luis Porto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the safety and potential equivalence of the use of hemosiderin compared to the Technetium-99 in sentinel lymph node biopsy in human breast cancer. Methods: Non-random sample of 14 volunteer women diagnosed with breast cancer with primary tumors (T1/T2) and clinically tumor-free axilla were submitted to the identification of sentinel lymph node using hemosiderin obtained from autologous blood injected in the periareolar region 24h before surgery on an outpatient basis. Patients received preoperative subareolar intradermal injection of Technetium-99 in the immediate preoperative period. Patients were submitted to sentinel lymph node biopsy, with incision in the axillary fold guided by Gamma-Probe, dissection by planes until the identification of the point of maximum uptake of Technetium-99, identifying the marked nodes and their colors. All surgical specimens were sent for pathological and immunohistochemical study. Results: The results showed no evidence of side effects and/or allergic and non-allergic reactions in patients submitted to SLNB with hemosiderin. The SLN identification rate per patient was 100%. SLNB identification rate per patient with hemosiderin was the same as that of Technetium, with a concordance rate of 100% between the methods. Conclusion: Hemosiderin is a safe dye that is equivalent to Technetium in breast sentinel lymph node biopsy. (author)

  9. Molybdenum and technetium cycle in the environment. Physical chemical evolution and mobility in soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saas, A.; Denardi, J.L.; Colle, C.; Quinault, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Molybdenum 99 and technetium 99 from liquid discharges of base nuclear installations (reactors, reprocessing plants, UF 6 treatment, etc.) can reach the environment via irrigation waters and atmospheric deposits. The contribution to the soil by irrigation results in a physical-chemical transformation, the results of which, in the case of technetium 99, could be volatilization via microbes. The changes in the physical-chemical forms of technetium in different soils reveals the preponderant effect of the initial amount deposited. The determination of the rate of technetium and molybdenum assimilation shows a certain similarity in behaviour; yet the localization of these isotopes is not the same. The transfer of molybdenum and technetium via the root system is different in its intensity; this is mainly due to different physical-chemical forms. Finally, each isotope has an optimum assimilation threshold and a toxicity threshold. The study of the physical-chemical evolution and the mobility in the soil-plant-water table system of these two isotopes shows a new aspect with respect to certain transfer channels to the human being [fr

  10. Reduction And Sequestration Of Pertechnetate To Technetium Dioxide And Protection From Reoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J. B.; Johnson, J. M.; Moore, R. C.; Hagerty, K.; Rhodes, R. N.; Huber, H. J.; Moore, W. P.

    2012-01-01

    This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(lI)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO 4 ). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(ll)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period of time (6 weeks). Previous work indicated that the Sn(II) apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(lI)apatite exhibited a direct correlation with the pH of the technetium-spiked simulant media

  11. The incorporation of technetium into a representative low-activity waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W.L.; Bakel, A.J.; Bowers, D.L.; Buck, E.C.; Emery, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    A glass that has been tested to understand the corrosion behavior of waste glasses with high soda contents for immobilizing Hanford incidental wastes has been made by melting crushed glass with either TcO 2 or NaTcO 4 at 1,100--1,300 C. Incorporation of technetium in the glass was affected by solubility or kinetic effects. Metallic technetium inclusions formed in all the TcO 2 -doped glasses. Inclusions also formed in glasses with added NaTcO 4 that were melted at 1,100 C, but a glass melted at 1,200 C did not contain detectable inclusions. The presence of Tc-bearing inclusions complicates the interpretation of results from dissolution tests because of the simultaneous release of technetium from more than one phase, the unknown surface areas of each phase, and the possible incorporation of technetium that is released from one phase into another phase. A glass containing about 0.15 mass % Tc dissolved in the glass is being used in dissolution tests to study the release behavior of technetium

  12. Determination of a method to inhibit technetium migration at the repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statler, V.; Tulenko, J.; Cloke, P.

    1990-01-01

    The long-term migration of 99 Tc (213,000-yr half-life) must be considered when examining the disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository. This report outlines an investigation of the effects of iron, tin, stannous chloride, copper, manganese, and vanadium as reactants added to a mixture of technetium and J-13 well water to cause technetium precipitation. The J-13 well water was chosen because it is representative of the groundwater located at Yucca Mountain. A state-of-the-art computer software package, EQ3/6, was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and was utilized in this study to project the result when metallic iron, tin, copper, manganese, and vanadium and the compound stannous chloride are individually added to a mixture of metallic technetium and J-13 well water. The computer codes in this study indicate that the problems associated with technetium migration at the federal repository are not insurmountable if a reactant capable of producing reducing conditions to the incoming groundwater is integrated into the waste package. Further work will focus on the laboratory experimentation to validate the computer results and to determine the best materials and configurations to inhibit technetium migration at the repository

  13. Comparison between hemosiderin and Technetium-99 in sentinel lymph node biopsy in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasques, Paulo Henrique Diogenes; Aquino, Ranniere Gurgel Furtado de; Pinheiro, Luiz Gonzaga Porto, E-mail: luizgporto@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departamento de Cirurgia; Alves, Mayara Maia [Rede Nordeste de Biotecnologia (RENORBIO/UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Torres, Roberto Vitor Almeida; Bezerra, Jose Lucas Martins [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Brasileiro, Luis Porto [Faculdades INTA, Sobral, CE (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the safety and potential equivalence of the use of hemosiderin compared to the Technetium-99 in sentinel lymph node biopsy in human breast cancer. Methods: Non-random sample of 14 volunteer women diagnosed with breast cancer with primary tumors (T1/T2) and clinically tumor-free axilla were submitted to the identification of sentinel lymph node using hemosiderin obtained from autologous blood injected in the periareolar region 24h before surgery on an outpatient basis. Patients received preoperative subareolar intradermal injection of Technetium-99 in the immediate preoperative period. Patients were submitted to sentinel lymph node biopsy, with incision in the axillary fold guided by Gamma-Probe, dissection by planes until the identification of the point of maximum uptake of Technetium-99, identifying the marked nodes and their colors. All surgical specimens were sent for pathological and immunohistochemical study. Results: The results showed no evidence of side effects and/or allergic and non-allergic reactions in patients submitted to SLNB with hemosiderin. The SLN identification rate per patient was 100%. SLNB identification rate per patient with hemosiderin was the same as that of Technetium, with a concordance rate of 100% between the methods. Conclusion: Hemosiderin is a safe dye that is equivalent to Technetium in breast sentinel lymph node biopsy. (author)

  14. Kit for preparing a technetium-99m myocardial imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woulfe, S.R.; Deutsch, E.A.; Dyszlewski, M.; Neumann, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a kit for preparing a technetium 99m myocardial imaging agent. It comprises a first vial containing a lyophilized pyrogen free, sterile mixture of an effective reducing agent and a first ligand having the following general formula: wherein the R 1 groups may be the same or different and are selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, hydroxy, C 1 - C 5 alkyl, C 1 - C 5 alkyl substituted by hydroxyl, ether, ester, amide, ketone, aldehyde and nitrile; the R 2 groups may be the same or different and are selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, hydroxy, C 1 - C 5 alkyl, C 1 - C 5 alkyl substituted by hydroxyl, ether, ester, amide, ketone, aldehyde, and nitrile; the X and Y groups may be the same or different and are selected from the group consisting of oxygen and sulfur; and n is equal to 1 or 2; and a second vial containing a lyophilized pyrogen free, sterile protected salt of a phosphine ligand

  15. Absence of young white dwarf companions to five technetium stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.V.; Lambert, D.L.

    1987-10-01

    A search for hot companions to five stars of type MS and S has been carried out using the IUE satellite. No hot companions were detected for the MS stars HR 85, 4647, 6702, and 8062, and the S star HR 8714. Limits on the luminosities of possible white dwarf companions provide lower limits of 2-5x10 to the 8th yr to the ages of any degenerate companions. All five stars exhibit strong Tc I lines, and the presence of technetium, with a half-life of 2.1x10 to the 5th yr, signifies recent nucleosynthesis. The limits on the ages of possible white dwarf companions that are equal to or greater than 1000 half-lives of Tc exclude the possibility that the s-process elemental enhancement seen in these MS and S stars resulted from mass transfer from a more highly evolved companion (as is probably the mechanism by which barium stars are created). These MS and S stars represent a sample of true thermally pulsing asymptotic giant-branch stars. 41 references.

  16. Technetium Chemistry in HLW: Role of Organic Complexants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Blanchard, David L. Jr.; Campbell, James A.; Cho, Herman M.; Rai, Dhanpat Rai; Xia, Yuanxian; Conradson, Steven D.

    2002-01-01

    Technetium complexation with organic compounds in tank waste plays a significant role in the redox chemistry of Tc and the partitioning of Tc between the supernatant and sludge components in waste tanks. These processes need to be understood so that strategies to effectively remove Tc from high-level nuclear waste prior to waste immobilization can be developed and so that longterm consequences of Tc remaining in residual waste after sludge removal can be evaluated. Only limited data on the stability of Tc-organic complexes exists, and even less thermodynamic data on which to develop predictive models of Tc chemical behavior is available. To meet these challenges, we present a research program to study Tc-speciation in actual tank waste using state-of-the-art analytical organic chemistry, separations, and speciation techniques. On the basis of such studies, we will acquire thermodynamic data for the identified Tc-organic complexes over a wide range of chemical conditions in order to develop credible models to predict Tc speciation in tank waste and Tc behavior during waste pretreatment processing and in waste tank residuals

  17. Condensation mechanisms of tetravalent technetium in chloride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, F.

    2004-10-01

    In deep storage technetium can exist in degree IV or III. Recent studies on Tc(IV) have shown that Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ , Tc IV (μ-O) 2 Tc IV structure, is a precursor for precipitation of TcO 2 . Few data are available on Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ Subject of this thesis is the mechanism of condensation of Tc(IV) leading to this form. Kinetic studies have shown that the condensation of Tc IV Cl 5 (H 2 O) - in chloride media leads to a dimer. XAS studies resulted in a linear structure Tc IV -O-Tc IV . This compound, formulated as Tc 2 OCl 10 4- , is stable at pH = 0.3, it undergoes cyclization to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH =1.5 and is oxidized to TcO 4 - under α radiation. In 3 M chloride media, TcO 2 lead to formation Tc 2 OCl 10 4- at pH = 0.3 and to Tc n O y (4n-2y)+ at pH = 1.5. An electrochemical cell permitting 'in situ' XAS measurement was developed. XANES studies have shown that the reduction of Tc(VII) lead to a Tc(IV)/Tc(III) mixture. (author)

  18. Technetium behavior in sulfide and ferrous iron solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Pertechnetate oxyanion ( 99 TcO 4- ), a potentially mobile species in leachate from a breached radioactive waste repository, was removed from a brine solution by precipitation with sulfide, iron, and ferrous sulfide at environmental pH's. Maghemite (ν-Fe 2 O 3 ) and geothite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant minerals in the precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -ferrous iron reaction. The observation of small particle size and poor crystallinity of the minerals formed in the presence of Tc suggested that the Tc was incorporated into the mineral structure after reduction to a lower valence state. Amorphous ferrous sulfide, an initial phase precipitating in the TcO 4- -ferrous iron-sulfide reaction, was transformed to goethite and hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) on aging. The black precipitate obtained from the TcO 4- -sulfide reaction was poorly crystallized technetium sulfide (Tc 2 S 7 ) which was insoluble in both acid and alkaline solution in the absence of strong oxidents. The results suggested that ferrous- and/or sulfide-bearing groundwaters and minerals in host rocks or backfill barriers could reduce the mobility of Tc through the formation of less-soluble Tc-bearing iron and/or sulfide minerals

  19. Biodistribution of 99m technetium labeled creatinine in healthy rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, O.; Soylu, A.; Kavukcu, S.; Lambrecht, F. Yurt; Durkan, K.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of creatinine, one of the toxic guanidine compounds, in various tissues has not been studied in detail by using radiolabeled creatinine. Our objective was to investigate the biodistribution of creatinine labeled with 99m technetium ( 99m Tc) by the stannous (II) chloride method in healthy male Wistar rats. Quality controls were carried out by radio thin layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and paper electrophoresis. The labeling yield was 85 ± 2% under optimum conditions (pH 7 and 100 μg stannous chloride). Rats (N 12) were injected intravenously with 99m Tc creatinine and their blood and visceral organs were evaluated for 99m Tc-creatinine uptake as percent of the injected dose per gram wet weight of each tissue (%ID/g). The lowest amount of uptake was detected in the brain and testis. When the rate of uptake was evaluated, only the kidney showed increasing rates of uptake of 99m Tc-creatinine throughout the study. Kidneys showed the highest amount of uptake throughout the study (P < 0.001 compared to all other organs), followed by liver, spleen and lung tissue. (author)

  20. Quality control of technetium-labelled lung imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosula, S.R.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made of the labelling of macroaggregated albumin particles (MAA) with sup(99m)Tc using three commercial kits, and the results compared with those obtained with albumin microspheres. The tagging efficiency was measured by three different methods, and the chemistry and radiochemical nature of the sup(99m)Tc-MAA supernates or eluates were also investigated. The total body distribution of the sup(99m)Tc-MAA supernates was determined in mice after tail-vein injection. The results indicated that technetium-labelled MAA preparations may contain sup(99m)Tc-tagged albumin, similar to human serum albumin in solution. The nature of labelling pattern of MAA and the albumin microspheres indicated that the macroaggregates and microspheres were not completely or uniformly labelled during a one-step addition of pertechnetate. The lung aggregates had a large residual labelling capacity. Consideration is given to the significance of these results in lung perfusion studies. (U.K.)

  1. Absorption behavior of technetium and rhenium through plant roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, K.; Uchida, S.

    2004-01-01

    The absorption behavior of technetium (Tc) and rhenium (Re) through plant roots was studied using nutrient solution culture. Radish samples, grown in culture solutions for 20-30 days in a green house, were transferred into plastic vessels containing nutrient solutions contaminated with multi-tracer solutions including Tc-95m and Re-183. The plant samples were grown individually for 1-7 days under laboratory conditions. The activities of radionuclides in nutrient solutions and oven-dried plant parts (roots, fleshy roots and leaves) were measured with Ge detecting systems. The concentrations of Tc-95m and Re-183 in the nutrient solutions after harvesting the plants were almost the same as those in the initial solution. Possibly, the radionuclides were taken up with water through plant roots. The distributions of Tc and Re in the plants showed no differences, thus, soluble Tc and Re absorption by plant samples were the same. It is suggested that Re could be used as a geochemical tracer of Tc in the soil environment. (author)

  2. Technetium labeling of dextran incorporating cysteamine as a ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Kazuhisa; Hara, Kazumichi; Imamura, Takeshi; Fujioka, Toshihiro; Takata, Jiro; Karube, Yoshiharu

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Technetium-99m-labeled dextran is a useful imaging agent for procedures such as angiocardiography and lymphoscintigraphy. To improve the availability of 99m Tc-labeled dextran, we designed a cysteamine ligand system for dextran labeling. Methods: Cysteamine derivatized dextran was synthesized as follows. Dextran was oxidized with sodium periodate, coupled with cysteamine and reduced with sodium borohydride to provide the desired amine ligand. The cysteamine-dextran conjugate was then labeled with reduced 99m Tc. Whole-body scintigraphy and biodistribution were examined following injection of the 99m Tc-labeled cysteamine-conjugated dextran ( 99m Tc-cysteamine-dextran) in ICR mice. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed after intradermal injection of 99m Tc-cysteamine-dextran in SD rats. Results: The cysteamine-derived dextran was easily labeled with reduced 99m Tc in greater than 96% yield. 99m Tc-cysteamine-dextran has a higher chelation stability against diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) than the 99m Tc-dextran. Axillary lymph nodes were clearly visible after intradermal injection of 99m Tc-cysteamine-dextran in rats. Conclusion: These results suggest that 99m Tc-cysteamine-dextran is available for lymphoscintigraphy. This methodology could expand the usage of 99m Tc-labeled dextran, particularly for diagnostic purposes

  3. Technetium 99mTc Pertechnetate Brain Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Sang Min; Park, Jin Yung; Lee, Ahn Ki; Chung, Choo Il; Hong, Chang Gi; Rhee, Chong Heon; Koh, Chang Soon

    1968-01-01

    Technetium 99 mTc pertechnetate brain scanning were performed in 3 cases of head injury (2 chronic subdural hematomas and 1 acute epidural hematoma), 2 cases of brain abscess and 1 case of intracerebral hematoma associated with arteriovenous anomaly. In all the cases brain scintigrams showed 'hot areas.' Literatures on radioisotope scanning of intracranial lesions were briefly reviewed. With the improvement of radioisotope scanner and development of new radiopharmaceuticals brain scanning became a safe and useful screening test for diagnosis of intracranial lesions. Brain scanning can be easily performed even to a moribund patient without any discomfort and risk to the patient which are associated with cerebral angiography or pneumoencephalography. Brain scanning has been useful in diagnosis of brain tumor, brain abscess, subdural hematoma, and cerebral vascular diseases. In 80 to 90% of brain tumors positive scintigrams can be expected. Early studies were done with 203 Hg-Neohydrin or 131 I-serum albumin. With these agents, however, patients receive rather much radiation to the whole body and kidneys. In 1965 Harper introduced 99 mTc to reduce radiation dose to the patient and improve statistical variation in isotope scanning.

  4. Technetium {sup 99m}Tc Pertechnetate Brain Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Sang Min; Park, Jin Yung; Lee, Ahn Ki; Chung, Choo Il; Hong, Chang Gi [Capital Army Hospital, ROKA, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Chong Heon; Koh, Chang Soon [Radiological Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1968-03-15

    Technetium {sup 99}mTc pertechnetate brain scanning were performed in 3 cases of head injury (2 chronic subdural hematomas and 1 acute epidural hematoma), 2 cases of brain abscess and 1 case of intracerebral hematoma associated with arteriovenous anomaly. In all the cases brain scintigrams showed 'hot areas.' Literatures on radioisotope scanning of intracranial lesions were briefly reviewed. With the improvement of radioisotope scanner and development of new radiopharmaceuticals brain scanning became a safe and useful screening test for diagnosis of intracranial lesions. Brain scanning can be easily performed even to a moribund patient without any discomfort and risk to the patient which are associated with cerebral angiography or pneumoencephalography. Brain scanning has been useful in diagnosis of brain tumor, brain abscess, subdural hematoma, and cerebral vascular diseases. In 80 to 90% of brain tumors positive scintigrams can be expected. Early studies were done with 203 Hg-Neohydrin or {sup 131}I-serum albumin. With these agents, however, patients receive rather much radiation to the whole body and kidneys. In 1965 Harper introduced {sup 99}mTc to reduce radiation dose to the patient and improve statistical variation in isotope scanning.

  5. Study on the behaviour of technetium-99 in soil environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, S.; Katagiri, H.; Watanabe, H.; Akatsu, Y.; Ishiguro, H.

    1996-01-01

    Technetium-99 (Tc-99) is an important radionuclide for environmental assessment around nuclear fuel cycle facilities, because it has a long half-life and relatively high mobility in the environment. Its determination method, distribution and behaviour in the environment have been studied. While the method using an anti-coincidence type low background gas flow counter has been principally utilized as the conventional determination method for Tc-99, in recent years other determination methods such as neutron activation analysis and liquid scintillation counting method have also been considered. However, these methods are not effective to determine Tc-99 in environmental samples. because their detection limits are not low enough and measuring times are needed. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) is a quantitative and qualitative analysis apparatus having superior characteristics such as extremely low detection limit, high resolution, high precision short measurement time and capability for simultaneous multi-elements analysis. This study developed an analysis technique to acquire field data. As the results, several information regarding the distribution and behaviour of Tc-99 in the surface soil environment was obtained. (author)

  6. Technetium-99m DTPA renal flow studies in Goldblatt hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nally, J.V.; Clarke, H.S.; Windham, J.P.; Grecos, G.P.; Gross, M.L.; Potvin, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Computer-assisted dynamic renal studies were performed on a group of 14 mongrel dogs before and after the induction of unilateral renal artery stenosis. Ninety-second technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ([/sup 99m/Tc]DTPA), 15-min [/sup 99m/Tc]DTPA, and 30-min iodine-131 orthoiodohippurate ([ 131 I]hippuran) time-activity curves were analyzed and correlated with reduction of renal blood flow as measured by electromagnetic flow probe and PAH clearance techniques. For blood flow reductions greater than 33%, the [/sup 99m/Tc]DTPA studies were judged diagnostic of unilateral renal artery stenosis in all cases, whereas the [ 131 I]hippuran time-activity curves were indicative of stenosis in only six of ten studies. Thus, in this model we find the computer-assisted 90-sec [/sup 99m/Tc]DTPA renal flow study to be superior to conventional [ 131 I]hippuran renography in the diagnosis of moderate-to-serve unilateral renal artery stenosis

  7. How good is technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine indirect cystography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeleer, C. de; Boe, V. de; Keuppens, F.; Desprechins, B.; Verboven, M.; Piepsz, A.

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the sensitivity of indirect radionuclide cystography (IRC) performed with technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3), in comparison with the micturition cystourethrography (MCUG) and direct radionuclide cystography (DRC), for the diagnosis of vesicoureteric reflux. Two groups of patients were selected: group I comprised 40 children who underwent IRC during the acute phase of urinary tract infection and an MCUG 6 weeks later; group II comprised 42 (other) children with known reflux, who underwent IRC and DRC during follow-up. Taking as the reference the total number of refluxing kidneys detected by means of any cystographic technique, 99m Tc-MAG3 ICR missed two-thirds of the refluxing kidneys. Most of the small refluxes were missed, but so too were 50% of the major refluxes. Taking as the reference 99m Tc dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy, MCUG detected 91% of the patients with DMSA abnormalities on at least one kidney, DRC detected 95%, and IRC detected 46% and 43% respectively, in groups I and II. The use of 99m Tc-MAG3 IRC as the sole technique for the detection of vesicoureteric reflux gives rise to an unacceptable number of false-negative results. (orig.)

  8. Renal 99M-technetium dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajdinovic, B.; Jaukovic, L.; Jankovic, Z.; Krstic, Z.

    2004-01-01

    99m-Technetium dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) whose ligand was used as a radioprotective agent and as a chelating compound for metal poisoning was reported to be an excellent renal imaging agent. As 99mTc-DMSA concentrates actively in the proximal convoluted tubule, it gives an image functional renal mass. Its integrity is dependent upon several factors, predominently intrarenal blood flow and intact enzyme function.Considering low radiation dose delivered by 99mTc DMSA and wide pediatric use of this radiopharmaceutical we calculate abnormal findings incidence (%).Results of 592 99m Tc-DMSA renal scintigraphy (348 children), which were classified as: 1. normal, 2. probably normal, 3. equivocal, 4. probably abnormal, 5. abnormal, are presented.Normal results were found in 269 patients (45,4%), 25% of whom was normal and 75% probably normal. Equivocal findings were found in 47 patients (7,9%). Abnormal results were presented in 276 patients (82% abnormal, 18% probably abnormal).The highest abnormal findings incidence was found in patients with congenital anomaly (88%), calculosis (87%) and policystic renal disease (79,3%). The lowest abnormal findings percentage was present in patients with urinary tract infection (12,9%) and arterial hypertension (17,3%)The role 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy in pathology is clear in pyelonephrifis, hydronephrotic kidneys, and pediatric disease (urinary tract infections, congenital anomalies) and is confirmed by our results. (authors)

  9. Characterization of electrochemically and chemically generated technetium diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.L. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Tc-Methylene diphosphonate, (MDP), the skeletal imaging ligand is most use in radiopharmacies, is the first metal-ligand complex prepared electrochemically in this work. A similar systematic evaluation of electrochemically reduced Tc-dimethylaminomethylene diphosphonate (DMAD) is presented. DMAD as well as MDP have been characterized by anion exchange HPLC following NaBH4 reduction. The goal is twofold. First, the effect of varying the applied potential on the resultant chromatographic distribution of complexes is investigated. Secondly, the combination(s) of applied potential and preparation pH which preferentially directs the formation of technetium diphosphonate complexes previously shown to be superior skeletal imaging agents is determined. EXAFS, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, is applied to the analysis of dilute solutions (10mM) of electrochemically and chemically reduced Tc-MDP complexes. Further characterizations of electrochemically and chemically generated complexes are performed using in-vitro and in-vivo physiological techniques of biodistribution and blood clearance studies on Sprague Dawley rats and beagle dogs respectively. Finally, in-vitro and in-vivo dilution studies were performed using water, human and dog urine, to determine the influence of the physiological environment on clinically prepared and injected radiopharmaceuticals

  10. Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate imaging of experimental infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riba, A.L.; Downs, J.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Andriole, V.T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate (/sup 99m/Tc-PYP) cardiac scintigraphy was performed in 15 rabbits with experimental Streptococcus sanguis aortic-valve infective endocarditis. The animals were imaged five to seven days after the administration of bacteria, and in each case abnormal accumulation of the tracer was visualized in the region of the aortic valve. Three types of cardiac scintigraphic patterns were demonstrated: focal, multifocal, and extensive, each correlating well with the anatomical extent of the lesion as defined by gross pathology. Tissue distribution studies demonstrated a 30 +- 5.3 (mean +- SEM) fold excess of radionuclide uptake in the infective endocarditis lesion compared with that of normal myocardium. Imaging of excised hearts from four animals showed an excellent correlation with in vivo imaging as well as gross pathology. Five animals with nonbacterial thrombotic aortic valve endocarditis demonstrated similar scintigraphic and tissue distribution results. In contrast, four normal animals failed to demonstrate abnormal /sup 99m/Tc-PYP cardiac scintigrams or tissue uptake. This study demonstrates that /sup 99m/Tc-PYP cardiac scintigraphy is a sensitive technique to detect experimental aortic valve endocarditis

  11. Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pegg, Ian L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding Tc inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanford’s 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into final waste forms; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other “pools” such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. This report was revised in September 2014 to add detail and correct inaccuracies in Section 5.0 on the fate of technetium (Tc) recycle from the off-gas systems downstream of the low-activity waste (LAW) melters back to the melters, based on several reports that were not found in the original literature search on the topic. The newly provided reports, from experts active in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) glass studies, the Vitreous State Laboratory at The Catholic University of America (VSL) melter and off-gas system demonstrations and overall WTP systems analysis, were not originally found on electronic databases commonly searched. The major revisions to Section 5.0 also required changes to Section 7.0 (Summary and Conclusions) and this executive summary.

  12. An introduction to technetium in the gaseous diffusion cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, D.W.

    1996-09-01

    The radioisotope technetium-99 ( 99 Tc) was introduced into the gaseous diffusion plants (GDP) as a contaminant in uranium that had been reprocessed from spent nuclear reactor fuel. 99 Tc is a product of the nuclear fission of uranium-235 ( 235 U). The significantly higher emitted radioactivity of 99 Tc generates concern in the enrichment complex and warrants increased attention (1) to the control of all site emissions, (2) to worker exposures and contamination control when process equipment requires disassembly and decontamination, and (3) to product purity when the enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) product is marketed to the private sector. A total of 101,268 metric tons of RU (∼96% of the total) was fed at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) between FY1953 and FY1976. An additional 5600 metric tons of RU from the government reactors were fed at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), plus an approximate 500 tons of foreign reactor returns. Only a small amount of RU was fed directly at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The slightly enriched PGDP product was then fed to either the ORGDP or PORTS cascades for final enrichment. Bailey estimated in 1988 that of the 606 kg of Tc received at PGDP from RU, 121 kg was subsequently re-fed to ORGDP and 85 kg re-fed to PORTS

  13. Technetium-99m in nuclear medicine and radiation protection experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M. M.; Raicevic, J. J.; Pavlovic, S.; Glisic, R.

    2002-01-01

    The one of the major contributors to personnel exposure whithin nuclear medicine laboratories is primarily now ubiquitous 99 Mo- 99m Tc generators. These generators, first available about more than forthy years ago, are now providing large quantities of 99m Tc radioactive source daily in the most laboratories, both for direct injection, as a per-technetate ion, and through the utilization of the kits for the preparation of dipherent radiopharmaceuticals. The safe and efficient utilization of technetium-99m in nuclear medicine, as other radionuclides, begin with the design, construction and operation of the 'Hot'Laboratory area, where radionuclide are stored and patient doses are prepared. Regardless of the specific physical configuration, suitable facilities need to be provided and good working practices established in order to get these principal objectives: (a) keep radiation exposure to personnel at ALARA levels; (b) prevent contamination of personnel; (c) prevent contamination of measuring instruments (including imaging devices such as gamma cameras and rectilinear scanners), and (d) prevent spread of contamination to places or persons outside the laboratory

  14. Technetium-99m sestamibi: an indicator of breast cancer invasiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopinaro, F. (Section of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Experimental Medicine, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Schillaci, O. (Section of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Experimental Medicine, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Scarpini, M. (1st Inst. of Surgery, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Mingazzini, P.L. (1st Inst. of Surgery, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Di Macio, L. (Section of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Experimental Medicine, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Banci, M. (Section of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Experimental Medicine, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Danieli, R. (Section of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Experimental Medicine, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Zerilli, M. (1st Inst. of Surgery, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Limiti, M.R. (1st Inst. of Surgery, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy)); Centi Colella, A. (Section of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Experimental Medicine, Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    As recently shown, angiogenesis is the most reliable marker of breast cancer invasiveness. Unfortunately it must be assessed by immunohistochemistry on tissue specimens. We have used technetium-99m sestamibi, a marker of regional blood flow in other organs that often but not always images breast cancer, to assess the invasiveness of this tumour. Nineteen patients, ten with nodal metastases and nine without any metastases, were studied with [sup 99m]Tc-sestamibi scintigraphy before operation. Angiogenesis was quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemical staining of endothelia for factor VIII. All the node-positive (N+) patients at surgical revesion showed a positive [sup 99m]Tc-sestamibi scan of the primary tumour and all the N-patients were negative. Nine out of ten N+ and sestamibi-positive tumours showed more than 135 microvessels/mm[sup 2] and one showed 99 microvessels/mm[sup 2]; by contrast there were 71.6[+-]12.1 microvessels/mm[sup 2] in the nine N- and sestamibi-negative tumours. Our study suggests that [sup 99m]Tc-sestamibi is a marker of breast cancer invasiveness: its uptake is related to angiogenesis and, possibly, to oxidative metabolism of the tumour. (orig.)

  15. Processing and characterization of new oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses in the Ge-Sb-Te-S-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.; Jackson, J.; Petit, L.; Rivero-Baleine, C.; Richardson, K.

    2010-01-01

    New oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses have been prepared in the Ge-Sb-Te-S-O system employing a two-step melting process which involves the processing of a chalcogenide glass (ChG) and subsequent melting with TeO 2 or Sb 2 O 3 . The progressive incorporation of O at the expense of S was found to increase the density and the glass transition temperature and to decrease the molar volume of the investigated oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses. We also observed a shift of the vis-NIR cut-off wavelength to longer wavelength probably due to changes in Sb coordination within the glass matrix and overall matrix polarizability. Using Raman spectroscopy, correlations have been shown between the formation of Ge- and Sb-based oxysulfide structural units and the S/O ratio. Lastly, two glasses with similar composition (Ge 20 Sb 6 S 64 Te 3 O 7 ) processed by melting the Ge 23 Sb 7 S 70 glass with TeO 2 or the Ge 23 Sb 2 S 72 Te 4 glass with Sb 2 O 3 were found to have slightly different physical, thermal, optical and structural properties. These changes are thought to result mainly from the higher moisture content and sensitivity of the TeO 2 starting materials as compared to that of the Sb 2 O 3 . - Graphical abstract: In this paper, we discuss our most recent findings on the processing and characterization of new ChG glasses prepared with small levels of Te, melted either with TeO 2 or Sb 2 O 3 powders. We explain how these new oxy-sulfo-telluride glasses are prepared and we correlate the physical, thermal and optical properties of the investigated glasses to the structure changes induced by the addition of oxygen in the Ge-Sb-S-Te glass network.

  16. Transmutation of technetium into stable ruthenium in high flux conceptual research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrani, N.; Boucenna, A.

    2007-01-01

    The effectiveness of transmutation for the long lived fission product technetium-99 in high flux research reactor, considering its large capture cross section in thermal and epithermal region is evaluated. The calculation of Ruthenium concentration evolution under irradiation was performed using Chain Solver 2.20 code. The approximation used for the transmutation calculation is the assumption that the influence of change in irradiated materials structures on the reactor operator mode characteristics is insignificant. The results on Technetium transmutation in high flux research reactor suggested an effective use of this kind of research reactors. The evaluation brings a new concept of multi-recycle Technetium transmutation using HFR T RAN (High Flux Research Reactor for Transmutation)

  17. Performance testing of blast furnace slag for immobilization of technetium in grout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.; Evans-Brown, B.S.; Morgan, I.L.; Shoemaker, J.L.; Bostick, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of a grout development effort to identify grout formulas that can satisfactorily sequester 99 Tc contained in an existing Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant waste. Technetium is of particular concern to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) because of its mobility and biological activity. The mobility of technetium results in large part from the movement of the pertechnate anion [prevalent in low-level radioactive waste (LLW)] through soil and geologic strata with little or no interaction with the surrounding matrix. Ground blast furnace slag has been shown to improve the leach resistance of cement-based waste forms, particularly in regard to technetium. This improved performance has been attributed to fewer and smaller pores in the solidified slags (versus a neat cement paste) and to the reduction of the pertechnate ion to a less soluble form. 9 refs., 2 tabs

  18. Diffusion of 99-technetium in bentonite under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecernik, P.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.; Vokal, A.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion experiments were performed with 99 Tc and Re (a model of technetium) in the form of pertechnetate and perrhenate in bentonite from the Rokle locality (Czech Republic). The through diffusion method was used, and the apparent diffusion coefficients (D a ) were evaluated. The effects of the particle mesh-size, bulk densities, and aerobic or anaerobic conditions on the diffusion were studied in view of the fact that oxidizing or reducing conditions influence the chemical forms of technetium and rhenium. In the presence of oxygen, technetium and rhenium occur in oxidation state VII, as anions which are soluble and mobile in the environment, whereas in reducing conditions they occur in lower oxidation states, mainly as insoluble oxides or hydroxides. Aerobic experiments were carried out in common laboratory conditions, anaerobic experiments were performed under nitrogen

  19. Quantitative radiocardiography by single-probe counting using sup(99m)technetium albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man in 't Veld, A.J.; Wenting, G.J.; Verhoeven, R.P.; Schalekamp, M.A.D.H.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative radiocardiography with sup(99m)Technetium albumin, using a single probe for percordial counting of radioactivity is a non-invasive technique to measure cardiac output. sup(99m)Technetium pertechnetate is bound to albumin by electrolytic complexation. Preparations of sup(99m)Technetium albumin showed small percentages of free radioactivity. In-vivo stability of the complex was confirmed by comparison with distribution volumes of 131 Iodine albumin and sup(113m)Indium transferrin. The isotope dilution cardiac output technique was validated by comparison with a classical indocyanine green dilution method. Results obtained by peripheral intravenous injection of the isotope were not different from those after intracardiac injection. Exact localization of the collimator over the heart was not critical. Duplicate measurements showed good reproducibility. Examples of serial measurements in patients with hyperthyroidism, primary aldosteronism and essential hypertinsion are given. The method is reliable, accurate and safe and causes no discomfort to the patient. (C.F.)

  20. Investigations of portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors for clinical studies with radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The combination of small, portable γ-radiation-sensitive Cadmium Telluride (CdTE(Cl)) crystal detectors and portable solid state data storage memories makes it feasible to extend the measuring period in a number of clinical investigations based on the use of various radioisotopes and external detection. Blood sampling can be avoided in some cases. Continuous ambulatory monitoring of relevant physiological parameters is practicable, e.g. kidney function (GFR), left ventricular ejection fraction, subcutaneous blood flow, muscle blood flow and insulin absorption in diabetic patients. In the present methodological study the applicability of the 133-Xe washout technique to subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue blood flow (SBF) has been investigated and adapted to the use of CdTe(Cl) detectors attached to the skin surface for the measurement of local 133-Xe-disappearance rate constants (k). Physical characterization of CdTe(Cl) detectors as γ-sensitive devices has been performed, and adequate counting sensitivities were found without detector energy-resolution properties. The CdTe(Cl) detectors are therefore suitable for single indicator studies. The measuring geometry of CdTe(Cl) detectors was studied and compared with that of stationary Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors in both phantom and in vivo investigations. The spatial properties of CdTe(Cl) detectors could to some extent be adjusted by pulse height discrimination and lead collimation. When long-term measurements were complicated by for instance physical activity of the patients, the small CdTe(Cl) detectors in general showed equal or better performance than the heavy and voluminous NaI(Tl) detectors. The free movement of the ambulatory patient and the avoidance of cable connections to stationary data-collecting systems gave improved possibilities for measurements of the relevant parameters. From this point of view, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors must be considered an important advance for radioactivity studies in

  1. A Fumonisins Immunosensor Based on Polyanilino-Carbon Nanotubes Doped with Palladium Telluride Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masikini, Milua; Mailu, Stephen N.; Tsegaye, Abebaw; Njomo, Njagi; Molapo, Kerileng M.; Ikpo, Chinwe O.; Sunday, Christopher Edozie; Rassie, Candice; Wilson, Lindsay; Baker, Priscilla G. L.; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I.

    2015-01-01

    An impedimetric immunosensor for fumonisins was developed based on poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline)-multi-wall carbon nanotubes doped with palladium telluride quantum dots onto a glassy carbon surface. The composite was assembled by a layer-by-layer method to form a multilayer film of quantum dots (QDs) and poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline)-multi-wall carbon nanotubes (PDMA-MWCNT). Preparation of the electrochemical immunosensor for fumonisins involved drop-coating of fumonisins antibody onto the composite modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy response of the FB1 immunosensor (GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT/anti-Fms-BSA) gave a linear range of 7 to 49 ng L−1 and the corresponding sensitivity and detection limits were 0.0162 kΩ L ng−1 and 0.46 pg L−1, respectively, hence the limit of detection of the GCE/PT-PDMA-MWCNT immunosensor for fumonisins in corn certified material was calculated to be 0.014 and 0.011 ppm for FB1, and FB2 and FB3, respectively. These results are lower than those obtained by ELISA, a provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) for fumonisins (the sum of FB1, FB2, and FB3) established by the Joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives and contaminants of 2 μg kg−1 and the maximum level recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for protection of human consumption (2–4 mg L−1). PMID:25558993

  2. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  3. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  4. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manciu, Felicia S.; Salazar, Jessica G.; Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A.

    2015-01-01

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  5. The crystal structures and powder diffraction patterns of the uranium tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.L. (State Univ. of New York, Alfred, NY (USA). Inst. of Ceramic Superconductivity); Nichols, M.C.; Boehme, D.R. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA))

    1990-10-03

    A critical review of all of the reported structures and powder diffraction patterns in the uranium telluride system has been undertaken. Structures that are correct: Cubic -- UTe: no experimental pattern exists. Retain calculated 15--865. Cubic --U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: retain the poor quality 12--610 but adopt the pattern calculated here. Cubic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}: no experimental pattern exists. Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Monoclinic {alpha}UTe{sub 3} Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Orthorhombic {beta}UTe{sub 3}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 5}: Adopt the new pattern of Boehme et al. Structures in need of refinement: Orthorhombic U{sub 2}Te{sub 3}:Adopt pattern calculated here over 34--807. Hexagonal U{sub 7}Te{sub 12}: Adopt pattern calculated here but retain 24--1368. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 1.78}: Adopt pattern calculated here and retain our modified 21--1404 reported for U{sub 4}Te{sub 7}. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 2.5}: Adopt pattern calculated here. Orthorhombic UTe{sub 3.4}: Accept recent pattern of Boehme et al. Phases for which no structures or reliable patterns exist: Orthorhombic U{sub 3}Te{sub 4}: no published pattern. Tetragonal U{sub 3}Te{sub 5}: three patterns 21--1407, 34--766 and 34--896 exit but all are of very poor quality. Phases which probably do not exist: Tetragonal UTe{sub 1.78}, Tetragonal UTe{sub 2}, Cubic UTe{sub 2} U{sub 3}Te{sub 7}(21--1402), U{sub 3}Te{sub 8}(21--1406).

  6. Technetium electrochemistry. 7. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical studies on technetium(III) and -(II) complexes containing polypyridyl ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilcox, B.E.; Deutsch, E.

    1991-01-01

    The redox properties of a series of technetium(III/II) complexes of the general formula cis(X), trans(P)-[Tc III/II X 2 (PR w R') 2 L] 10+ , where X = Cl or Br, PR 2 R' = dimethylphenylphosphine or ethyldiphenylphosphine, and L = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me 2 bpy), or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), were investigated in 0.1 M TEAP/acetonitrile by cyclic voltammetry at a platinum-disk electrode. These complexes exhibit diffusion-controlled, 1-equiv Tc(IV)/Tc(III) redox couples and also Tc(III)/Tc(II) redox couples. Spectropotentiostatic experiments on three complexes of this class in 0.5 M TEAP/DMF confirm the 1-equiv character of the Tc(III)/Tc(II) couple. The electrochemical behavior of Tc(II) complexes of the general formula trans(P)-[TcX(PR 2 R') 2 terpy] + , terpy = 2,2':6',2 double-prime-terpyridine, was also investigated under the same conditions as above. These complexes exhibit diffusion-controlled, 1-equiv Tc(III)/Tc(II) redox couples and Tc(II)/Tc(I) redox couples. Spectropotentiostatic experiments on trans(P)-[TcCl(PMe 2 Ph) 2 terpy] + confirm the 1-equiv character of the Tc(III)/Tc(II) couple but show that the Tc(II)/Tc(I) couple is not reversible on the spectropotentiostatic time scale

  7. Chemical form of technetium in corn (Zea mays) and the gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated Tc by laboratory rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Myttenaere, C.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Bruwaene, R.

    1984-01-01

    The food chain availability of technetium incorporated into plant tissue, its chemical form in corn leaves, and the potential for gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated technetium was investigated. Technetium-95m was incorporated into corn leaves via root uptake. Chemical fractionation of the /sup 95m/Tc in leaves showed that 60% was extractable with boiling ethanol and weak mineral acids. The remainder was associated with cell walls and was extractable by harsh chemical treatment. Gel permeation chromatography of the cytosol, indicated that 50% of the /sup 95m/Tc co-chromatographed with anionic pertechnetate; however, it was impossible to distinguish if this pure pertechnetate or technetium complexed with organic molecules. Technetium-95m was administered to laboratory rats in a single dose as: (1) intravenous injection of pertechnetate, (2) pertechnetate mixed with standard laboratory food, and (3) a meal containing /sup 95m/Tc biologically incorporated into corn leaves. High concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were found in the thyroids, hair, kidneys, and liver of rats. Technetium rapidly disappeared from the liver, kidneys, and other tissues, but remained in the thyroids and hair. Urinary excretion of technetium decreased, and fecal excretion increased when technetium was fed to rats as a /sup 95m/Tc incorporated into corn leaves. The percent of the administered dose absorbed into thyroid gland and the kidneys was less when technetium was biologically incorporated into corn leaves than when pertechnetate was mixed with food. Biological incorporation of technetium into plants appears to reduce its potential for food chain transfer by decreasing its availability for gastrointestinal absorption. 5 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Chemical form of technetium in corn (Zea mays) and the gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated Tc by laboratory rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Myttenaere, C.; Vandecasteele, C.M.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Bruwaene, R.

    1984-01-01

    The food chain availability of technetium incorporated into plant tissue, its chemical form in corn leaves, and the potential for gastrointestinal absorption of plant-incorporated technetium was investigated. Technetium-95m was incorporated into corn leaves via root uptake. Chemical fractionation of the /sup 95m/Tc in leaves showed that 60% was extractable with boiling ethanol and weak mineral acids. The remainder was associated with cell walls and was extractable by harsh chemical treatment. Gel permeation chromatography of the cytosol, indicated that 50% of the /sup 95m/Tc co-chromatographed with anionic pertechnetate; however, it was impossible to distinguish if this pure pertechnetate or technetium complexed with organic molecules. Technetium-95m was administered to laboratory rats in a single dose as: (1) intravenous injection of pertechnetate, (2) pertechnetate mixed with standard laboratory food, and (3) a meal containing /sup 95m/Tc biologically incorporated into corn leaves. High concentrations of /sup 95m/Tc were found in the thyroids, hair, kidneys, and liver of rats. Technetium rapidly disappeared from the liver, kidneys, and other tissues, but remained in the thyroids and hair. Urinary excretion of technetium decreased, and fecal excretion increased when technetium was fed to rats as a /sup 95m/Tc incorporated into corn leaves. The percent of the administered dose absorbed into thyroid gland and the kidneys was less when technetium was biologically incorporated into corn leaves than when pertechnetate was mixed with food. Biological incorporation of technetium into plants appears to reduce its potential for food chain transfer by decreasing its availability for gastrointestinal absorption. 5 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  9. Laser Photolysis and Thermolysis of Organic Selenides and Tellurides for Chemical Gas-phase Deposition of Nanostructured Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Pola

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Laser radiation-induced decomposition of gaseous organic selenides and tellurides resulting in chemical deposition of nanostructured materials on cold surfaces is reviewed with regard to the mechanism of the gas-phase decomposition and properties of the deposited materials. The laser photolysis and laser thermolysis of the Se and Te precursors leading to chalcogen deposition can also serve as a useful approach to nanostructured chalcogen composites and IVA group (Si, Ge, Sn element chalcogenides provided that it is carried out simultaneously with laser photolysis or thermolysis of polymer and IVA group element precursor.

  10. Reaction of 1-bromo-3-chloropropane with tellurium and dimethyl telluride in the system of hydrazine hydrate-alkali

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russavskaya, N.V.; Levanova, E.P.; Sukhomazova, Eh.N.; Grabel'nykh, V.A.; Elaev, A.V.; Klyba, L.V.; Zhanchipova, E.R.; Albanov, A.I.; Korotaeva, I.M.; Toryashinova, D.S.D.; Korchevin, N.A.

    2006-01-01

    A synthesis of oligomeric substance of thiocol type, the poly(trimethyleneditelluride), from 1-bromo-3-chloropropane and elemental tellurium is performed using a hydrazine hydrate-alkali system. Reductive splitting of the tellurocol followed by alkylation with methyl iodide give rise to preparation of bis(methyltelluro)propane, which was synthesized also from dimethyl telluride and 1,3-dihalopropanes using the N 2 H 4 ·H 2 O/KOH system. The reaction products were characterized by elementary analysis, NMR, and IR spectra. Mass spectra of the synthesized low molecular weight organotellurium compounds are considered [ru

  11. Fundamental chemistry, characterization, and separation of technetium complexes in Hanford waste. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, K.R.; Blanchard, D.L. Jr.; Schroeder, N.C.

    1998-01-01

    'The ultimate goal of this proposal is to separate technetium from Hanford tank waste. The recent work has shown that a large portion of the technetium is not pertechnetate (TcO 4 - ) and is not easily oxidized. This has serious repercussions for technetium partitioning schemes because they are designed to separate this chemical form. Rational attempts to oxidize these species to TcO 4 - for processing or to separate the non-pertechnetate species themselves would be facilitated by knowing the identity of these complexes and understanding their fundamental chemistry. Tank characterization work has not yet identified any of the non-pertechnetate species. However, based on the types of ligands available and the redox conditions in the tank, a reasonable speculation can be made about the types of species that may be present. Thus, this proposal will synthesize and characterize the relevant model complexes of Tc(III), Tc(IV), and Tc(V) that may have formed under tank waste conditions. Once synthesized, these complexes will be used as standards for developing and characterizing the non-pertechnetate species in actual waste using instrumental techniques such as capillary electrophoresis electrospray mass spectrometry (CE-MS), x-ray absorbance spectroscopy (EXAFS and XANES), and multi-nuclear NMR (including 99 Tc NMR). The authors study the redox chemistry of the technetium complexes so that more efficient and selective oxidative methods can be used to bring these species to TcO 4 - for processing purposes. They will also study their ligand substitution chemistry which could be used to develop separation methods for non-pertechnetate species. Understanding the fundamental chemistry of these technetium complexes will enable technetium to be efficiently removed from the Hanford tank waste and help DOE to fulfill its remediation mission. This report summarizes the first 8 months of a 3-year project.'

  12. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  13. Technical problems associated with the production of technetium Tc 99m tin(II) pyrophosphate kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalsky, R.J.; Dalton, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    The amount of tin(II) required for adequate reduction, complexation, and stability of technetium Tc 99m pertechnetate in radiopharmaceutical kits, and methods of preventing the loss of tin(II) during formulation of these lyophilized kits are investigated. Tin(II) loss from stannous chloride solutions was studied under several conditions, including room air versus nitrogen atmospheres, during vial filling in a laminar-flow hood with samples frozen on dry ice versus samples at room temperature, during lyophilization, and during storage under refrigerated, ambient, and elevated temperatures. Various amounts of stannous chloride, ranging from 5 to 1000 microgram/ml, were used in formulating sodium pertechnetate Tc 99m kits containing 100 mCi technetium Tc 99m and 0.4 microgram total technetium. Samples were removed at various times; hydrolyzed technetium, pertechnetate, and technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate were isolated on instant thin-layer chromatography-silica gel and quantified with a scintillation counter. The time necessary to deoxygenate distilled water by nitrogen purging was measured. Several sources of stannous chloride were assayed for tin(II) content. Tin(II) loss occurs rapidly in solution (15% in one hour) unless continuously protected with nitrogen, and during vial filling in a laminar-flow hood unless frozen with dry ice. No substantial loss of tin(II) was detected during lyophilization or during storage of lyophilized product at any of the three temperatures. A minimum of 400 microgram tin(II) was required to provide 90% technetium Tc 99m pyrophosphate at six hours after preparation. Adequate deoxygenation of small quantities (450 ml) of water was accomplished in less than one hour. Some stannous chloride salts were highly oxidized in the dry state, and only high-purity elemental tin wire gave acceptable yields of tin

  14. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COOKE GA; DUNCAN JB; LOCKREM LL

    2008-01-01

    This report is an initial report on the laboratory effort executed under RPP-PLAN-33338, Test Plan for the Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This report delineates preliminary data obtained under subcontract 21065, release 30, from the RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences. The report is predicated on CLS RPT-816, Draft Report: Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This document will be revised on receipt of the final RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences report, which will contain data subjected to quality control and quality assurance criteria

  15. Preliminary study of the migration of technetium in soil under hydrous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisson, D.H.; MacLean, S.C.; Schulz, R.K.; Borg, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The sorption of technetium compared to sodium, cesium, and strontium by a common agricultural soil was measured using a column method. As expected, no sorption of Tc occurred under conditions that substantially removed Na + , Cs + , and Sr ++ . High radioactivity levels were used to establish absorption profiles over six orders of magnitude of tracer concentration. Behavior of initially dry columns was compared with that of initially water-saturated columns; the results were not quantitatively different although there was a qualitative difference in the appearance of the profiles. Technetium tracked the moisture content of the column and hence migrated at the veloccity of the aqueous medium

  16. Studies on the solvent extraction of technetium from thiocyanate solutions in mineral acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.; Mamoon, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Technetium-99m, separated from fission molybdenum-99 was studied as a component of liquid-liquid phase distribution equilibria. 5-(4-Pyridyl)nonane in a carrier diluent, benzene, was used to study the distribution of the nuclide from thermodynamically suitable aqueous phases of electrolytes with and without sterically receptive thiocyanate ions. Efficient extraction of the metal can be accomplished in a variety of aqueous phase compositions. The separation factors with respect to molybdenum, under certain experimental conditions, are fairly high. The data have been utilized to effect clean separations of technetium from molybdenum. (author) 39 refs.; 11 figs

  17. Automation drying unit molybdenum-zirconium gel radioisotope production technetium-99M for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrova, Y.; Khromushin, I.; Medvedeva, Z.; Fettsov, I.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Since 2001 the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan has began production of radiopharmaceutical based on technetium-99m from irradiated reactor WWR-K of natural molybdenum, which allows to obtain a solution of technetium-99m of the required quality and high volume activity. In 2013 an automated system is started, which is unique and urgent task is to develop algorithms and software in Python, as well as the manufacture of certain elements of technological systems for automated production

  18. Interception and retention of technetium by vegetation and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Huckabee, J.W.; Lucas, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Field experiments were performed to quantify the initial interception and retention of technetium (Tc) by herbaceous vegetation as a consequence of direct deposition and uptake from soil. A simulated rain containing a solution of 95 /sup m/TcO 4 - was applied to plots of bare soil and plots with standing vegetation. Vegetation emerging in the baresoil plots obtained Tc predominantly from root uptake. Vegetation standing during the initial application obtained Tc from both direct foliar interception and root uptake. For the plots with standing vegetation, the estimated initial interception fraction (r) ranged from 0.079 to 0.17. The mass interception factor (r/Y/sub v/) ranged from 0.65 to 1.1 m 2 /kg. The retention of Tc by vegetation receiving direct foliar contamination varied with environmental half-times (T/sub w/) ranging from 15.9 to 18.7 days. Adjusting for the effects of growth dilution increased the values of T/sub w/ (range 21.6-28.7 days). For vegetation emerging from the plots of initial bare soil, retention was equivalent to a T/sub w/ of 43 days. These data indicated that uptake of Tc from soil diminished with time and that Tc was removed from plant tissue. In soil, a downward movement was evident, because Tc in the top 2 cm decreased with time and concentrations at lower soil depths (6-8 and 14-15 cm) and increased with time. The application of these data to predict steady-state concentrations of Tc in vegetation resulting from continuous deposition does not differ substantially from predictions based on the use of generic-default parameter values recommend in Regulatory Guide 1.109 of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

  19. Technetium Inventory, Distribution, and Speciation in Hanford Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-05-02

    The purpose of this report is three fold: 1) assemble the available information regarding technetium (Tc) inventory, distribution between phases, and speciation in Hanford’s 177 storage tanks into a single, detailed, comprehensive assessment; 2) discuss the fate (distribution/speciation) of Tc once retrieved from the storage tanks and processed into a final waste form; and 3) discuss/document in less detail the available data on the inventory of Tc in other "pools" such as the vadose zone below inactive cribs and trenches, below single-shell tanks (SSTs) that have leaked, and in the groundwater below the Hanford Site. A thorough understanding of the inventory for mobile contaminants is key to any performance or risk assessment for Hanford Site facilities because potential groundwater and river contamination levels are proportional to the amount of contaminants disposed at the Hanford Site. Because the majority of the total 99Tc produced at Hanford (~32,600 Ci) is currently stored in Hanford’s 177 tanks (~26,500 Ci), there is a critical need for knowledge of the fate of this 99Tc as it is removed from the tanks and processed into a final solid waste form. Current flow sheets for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant process show most of the 99Tc will be immobilized as low-activity waste glass that will remain on the Hanford Site and disposed at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); only a small fraction will be shipped to a geologic repository with the immobilized high-level waste. Past performance assessment studies, which focused on groundwater protection, have shown that 99Tc would be the primary dose contributor to the IDF performance.

  20. Rapid preparation method for technetium-99m bicisate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, J.C. [Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Chowdhury, S. [Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Redfern, M.G. [Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mahoney, D.W. [Section of Biostatistics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    1997-06-10

    The method currently recommended for the preparation of technetium-99m bicisate ({sup 99m}Tc-bicisate) requires a lengthy 30-min incubation at room temperature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an alternative method to shorten the preparation time. {sup 99m}Tc-bicisate was prepared with 3.7 GBq (100 mCi) {sup 99m}Tc according to the manufacturer`s instructions, except for the final incubation step, which was replaced with the microwave heating procedure. A standard thin-layer chromatography (TLC) method (i.e., Baker-Flex silica gel IB-F TLC plate with ethyl acetate as mobile phase) was used for the determination of the radiochemical purity (RCP) of {sup 99m}Tc-bicisate. Our evaluation with different microwave heating processes (300 W with different heating times) demonstrated that as the microwave heating temperature was increased (i.e., 44 -71 C), an increased percentage of samples reached 95% within 5 min post preparation (n=58). The highest RCP value (i.e., 97.4%{+-}0.5%, n=10) could be obtained immediately after an 8-s microwave heating time at 300 W (microwave temperature at 69 C), and an average RCP value of 96.4%{+-}1.3% (n=90) was maintained throughout the 24-h evaluation period. However, the trend seemed to reverse at higher microwave temperatures (i.e., 76 -90 C), which reconfirmed our initial findings that overheating had no benefit for the preparation of {sup 99m}Tc-bicisate. To ensure that temperature was the only determining factor, a hot water incubator set at 69 C was used (n=6). Similar RCP results were achieved. In conclusion, the use of a microwave oven at a low heat cycle provides a rapid and efficient way to prepare {sup 99m}Tc-bicisate. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Migration pathways of hypodermically injected technetium-99 m in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, F.M.; Mufraggi, N.; Garcia, A.; Pavia, J.; Giralt, I.; Piera, C.; Setoain, J.; Garcia, F.; Prandi, D.; Gotzens, V.

    2000-01-01

    Hypodermic injection of technetium-99 m ( 99 m TC-pertechnetate) at points of low electrical resistance give rise to rapid, longitudinal, and progressive diffusion of the radioactive tracer. We assessed the effect of cutaneous incisions that did not intersect the migration trajectory of 99 m Tc-pertechnetate and the re-establishment of pathways after the suture of incisions that intersected the migration trajectory. Linear and rapid migration of 99 m Tc-pertechnetate was not altered or prevented by incisions that did not intersect the migration pathway. Different patterns of 99 m Tc-pertechnetate spread were found when incisions intersected the radioactive pathways until restoration of the normal migration pathway observed in undamaged skin occurred. In all experiments in which migration of 99 m Tc-pertechnetate was observed, lavage of surgical wounds was followed by disappearance of the 99 m Tc-pertechnetate migration observed around the suture. Linear migration of the tracer was not observed when the incision was left uncovered, filled with petroleum jelly, or with a solid silicone sheet, but it was seen when non-sutured incisions were filled with transonic or silicone gel or covered with a solid silicone sheet parallel to the cutaneous plane. These data show that after a cutaneous incision that intersected the diffusion trajectory of the radioactive tracer, linear migration of 99 m Tc-pertechnetate hypodermically injected at points of low electrical resistance was restored before healing of the cutaneous incision and was independent of incisions made on the skin not overlying the radioactive pathway. A mechanism similar to that of capillary electrophoresis is suggested to explain the hypodermic diffusion of inert particles through specific and constant linear pathways. (orig.)

  2. Quantification of ocular inflammation with technetium-99m glucoheptonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizenblatt, J.; Caldeira, J.A.F.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Meneguetti, J.C.; Camargo, E.E.; Sao Paulo Univ., SP

    1991-01-01

    Histological and morphometric evaluation of ocular inflammation is difficult, particularly when there is extensive ocular involvement with abscess formation and necrosis. A quantitative imaging procedure applicable to humans would be important clinically. To establish such a procedure, turpentine-induced ocular inflammation was obtained by subconjunctival injection in the right eye of 55 rabbits. The left eye was used as control and injected with a volume of saline equal to the volume of turpentine in the right eye. Volumes of turpentine or saline were 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.2 and 0.6 ml, and the rabbits were divided into groups 1-5, according to these volumes. Imaging was performed 48 h after turpentine injection and 6 h after intravenous injection of 10 mCi of technetium 99m glucoheptonate ( 99m Tc-GH). An inflammatory reaction index (IRI), defined as the ratio of counts of the right eye divided by counts of the left eye, was used. IRIs were proportional to the degree of inflammation and allowed the distinction of 3 subgroups: One represented by group 4, one by group 5 and one by groups 1, 2 and 3. This method of quantification of ocular inflammatory processes using 99m Tc-GH is original, rapid, non-invasive, reproducible and safe, although unable to differentiate inflammatory processes caused by doses of turpentine which are very small and close to each other. It is conceivable that its application to humans will bring new insight into the ocular inflammatory process and response to therapy. (orig.)

  3. Production technologies for molybdenum-99 and technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-02-01

    Technetium-99m (6.02 h) is the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, accounting for more than 80% of all diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. It is almost exclusively produced from the decay of its parent 99 Mo. The present sources of 99 Mo are research reactors by using the (n,γ) nuclear reaction with natural Mo ( 98 Mo, ∼24%), resulting in inexpensive but low-specific activity 99 Mo, or by neutron-induced fission of 235 U, which results in expensive but high specific activity 99 Mo. This publication covers several aspects related to the production of 99 Mo and 99m Tc. The contributed papers reflect the current status of the technology and discuss potential alternative methodologies for the production of 99 Mo and 99m Tc for medical use. The first four papers address the technologies using nuclear reactors, including the description of a new method using an aqueous homogenous reactor core for production of fission 99 Mo and the latest development efforts to fabricate 235 U low enriched targets (LEU, 235 U). The next five papers discuss the potential of utilizing particle accelerators and assess the current status of the available nuclear data for the production of both, 99 Mo and 99m Tc with proton and deuteron beams. The last paper discusses a new technology based on gel system for the preparation of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generators using low specific activity 99 Mo produced in research reactors by the neutron activation of natural and inexpensive molybdenum oxide targets. Each individual paper was indexed and abstracted

  4. Study of reduction and complexation of technetium in the presence of humate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkac, P.

    2003-06-01

    Reduction of pertechnetate was studied by different reduction systems: Sn 2+ , Fe 2+ , ascorbic acid, mixture of ascorbic acid and Fe 3+ , and thiourea. Reduction of pertechnetate by Sn 2+ ions (5 · 10 -2 - 5 · 10 -7 mol.dm -3 ) was studied in pH range of 0.94-6.4. For effective reduction of Tc(VII) an acidic environment (pH 2+ ions higher than 1 · 10 -5 mol.dm-3 was necessary. Reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe 2+ (0.01 mol.dm -3 FeSO 4 ) was strongly dependent on pH and for reduction yield higher than 95 %, pH = 8 and higher was needed. In the presence of ascorbic acid (1 - 5 %) no significant reduction was observed. When a 5 % solution of ascorbic acid was prepared by dilution of ascorbic acid in 2 mol.dm -3 HCl, 60 % reduction after 30 minutes of reaction was observed. Reduction of Tc(VII) in the presence of ascorbic acid was most effectively observed in the presence of Fe 3+ ions. The yield of reduction was about 98 % after 20 minutes of reaction. Reduction of pertechnetate by thiourea was studied in acidic solution (HCl). Different conditions were used for reduction of 99m TcO 4 - and 99 TcO 4 - , respectively. The best yield for a routine preparation of [ 99 Tc(tu) 6 ] 3+ (tu = thiourea) was observed when 70 mg of thiourea was dissolved in 5 ml of 0.5 mol.dm -3 HCl and 0.2 - 0.5 ml of 6 · 10 -2 mol.dm -3 TcO 4 - was added. The mixture was allowed to react at least 20 hours. In the case of 99m Tc, 35 mg of thiourea was diluted in 5 ml of 2 mol.dm -3 HCl and 0.1 - 0.5 ml of pertechnetate generator solution was added. Reaction mixture was heated at 100 grad C for at least 30 minutes under nitrogen atmosphere. The yield of pertechnetate reduction for both preparation methods was about 99 %. The thiourea complex of technetium was chosen for preparation of technetium-humic complex, because it is well known as the most suitable precursor for preparation of new technetium complexes with Tc 3+ . Gel chromatography of natrium humate was carried out before preparation of

  5. Computational analysis of interfacial attachment kinetics and transport phenomena during liquid phase epitaxy of mercury cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasin, Igal; Brandon, Simon [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Ben Dov, Anne; Grimberg, Ilana; Klin, Olga; Weiss, Eliezer [SCD-Semi-Conductor Devices, P.O. Box 2250/99, Haifa 31021 (Israel)

    2010-07-01

    Deposition of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) thin films, on lattice matched cadmium zinc telluride substrates, is often achieved via Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE). The yield and quality of these films, required for the production of infrared detector devices, is to a large extent limited by lack of knowledge regarding details of physical phenomena underlying the deposition process. Improving the understanding of these phenomena and their impact on the quality of the resultant films is therefore an important goal which can be achieved through relevant computational and/or experimental studies. We present a combined computational and experimental effort aimed at elucidating physical phenomena underlying the LPE of MCT via a slider growth process. The focus of the presentation will be results generated by a time-dependent three-dimensional model of mass transport, fluid flow, and interfacial attachment kinetics, which we have developed and applied in the analysis of this LPE process. These results, combined with experimental analyses, lead to an improved understanding of the role of different transport and kinetic phenomena underlying this growth process.

  6. Preclinical evaluation of technetium 99m-labeled P1827DS for infection imaging and comparison with technetium 99m IL-8.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, S.; Rennen, H.J.J.M.; Boerman, O.C.; Baumann, S.; Cyr, J.E.; Manchanda, R.; Lister-James, J.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Dinkelborg, L.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The technetium 99 m (99mTc)-radiolabeled, leukocyte-avid peptide-glycoseaminoglycan complex, [99mTc]P1827DS, has been synthesized as an improved infection/inflammation imaging agent to [99mTc]P483H (LeukoTect, Diatide). In a phase I/II clinical trail, [99mTc]P483H images were equivalent

  7. Binuclear complexes of technetium. Evidence for bis(terdentate)bidentate coordination by the bridging ligand 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine to technetium(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Preez, J.G.H.; Gerber, T.I.A.; Gibson, M.L.; Geyser, R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used the potentially bis(terdentate) nitrogen aromatic heterocyclic ligand 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (tppz) to prepare mono- and bimetallic technetium(V) complexes bound to tppz. The stimulus for the development of the coordination chemistry of the man-made element technetium is provided by the use of complexes of this element as anatomical imaging agents in nuclear medicine. Although the chemistry of technetium(V) with nitrogen donor ligands is well understood, no complexes have been prepared using potentially terdentate neutral nitrogen donor ligands of this metal in the +5 oxidation state

  8. Scientific/Technical Report: Improvement in compensation and crystal growth of cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin G. Lynn; Kelly A. Jones

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives: (1) Growth of 12 ingots--Washington State University (WSU) more than met this goal for the project by growing 12 final ingots for the year. Nine of the twelve crystal growth ingots resolved gamma radiation at room temperature. The other three ingots where resistivity of ∼ 3 x 10 8 Ohm*cm for CG32a, CG36, and CG42 lower than expected, however none of these were tried with blocking contacts. All ingots were evaluated from tip to heel. In these three cases, the group III, dopant Aluminum (Al) was not detected to a level to compensate the Cd vacancies in the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) thus the ingots were lower resistivity. The nine ingots that were successful radiation detectors averaged a bulk resistivity of 1.25 x 10 10 Ohm*cm and with a average μτ product for electrons of ∼ 2 x 10 -4 cm 2 /V with a 1/4 microsecond shaping time with samples ∼2 mm in thickness. (2) Attempt new compensations techniques--WSU also met this goal. Several doping schemes were attempted and investigated with various amounts of excess Tellurium added to the growth. The combination of Al and Erbium (Er) were first attempted for these ingots and subsequently CG34 was grown with Al, Er and Holmium. These compensation techniques produced radiation detectors and are currently under investigation. These growths were made with significant different doping levels to determine the affect of the dopants. CG43 was doped with Indium and Er. Indium was introduced instead of Al to determine if Indium is more soluble than Al for CZT and was less oxidized. This may decrease the amount of low resistivity ingots grown by doping with Indium instead of Al. (3) Grow large single crystals--Several changes in approach occurred in the crystal growth furnace. Steps were taken to maximize the crystal growth interface during growth by modifying liners, quartz, heat sinks, crucibles and various growth steps and temperature profiles. CG39 ingot

  9. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Junpeng Fan,1–4 Ming Shao,1–4 Lu Lai,3–5 Yi Liu,3–5 Zhixiong Xie1–4,6 1College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, 2Hubei Provincial Cooperative Innovation Center of Industrial Fermentation,3State Key Laboratory of Virology, 4Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE, 5College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 6School of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator, combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. Keywords: CdTe quantum dots, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, toxicity, autophagy

  10. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of metal film on bismuth telluride-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Wen Hsuan; Chen, Yi Ray; Tseng, Shih Chun; Yang, Ping Hsing; Wu, Ren Jye; Hwang, Jenn Yeu

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion barriers have a significant influence on the reliability and life time of thermoelectric modules. Although nickel is commonly used as a diffusion barrier in commercial thermoelectric modules, several studies have verified that Ni migrates to bismuth telluride-based material during high temperature cycles and causes a loss in efficacy. In this paper, the influence of metal layers coated to p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 on the interface characterization and thermoelectric property is studied using a RF magnetron sputtering. The findings from this study demonstrate the structural and thermoelectric properties of p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 coated with different metal layers. The crystalline phase and compositional change of the interface between the Bi 2 Te 3 materials and the metal layers were determined using an X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy. Formation of NiTe was observed in the sample of Ni/p-type Bi 2 Te 3 based films post-annealed in an N 2 atmosphere at 200 °C. In contrast, no Co x Te y was formed in the sample of Co/p-type Bi 2 Te 3 based films post-annealed at 200 °C. For as-deposited Ni/p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 based legs, the Ni slightly diffused into the Bi 2 Te 3 based legs. A similar phenomenon also occurred in the as-deposited Co/p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 based legs. The Seebeck coefficients of the Co contacts on the Bi 2 Te 3 based material displayed better behavior than those of the Ni contacts on the Bi 2 Te 3 based legs. Thus Co could be a suitable diffusion barrier for bulk Bi 2 Te 3 based material. The observed effects on the thermoelectric and structural properties of metal/Bi 2 Te 3 based material are crucial for understanding the interface between the diffusion barrier and thermoelectric materials. - Highlights: • Interface characterization of metal coated to p-type and n-type Bi 2 Te 3 is studied. • We examined the phase transformation of metal/Bi 2 Te 3 based films

  11. Thermodynamics of post-growth annealing of cadmium zinc telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Aaron Lee

    Nuclear Radiation Detectors are used for detecting, tracking, and identifying radioactive materials which emit high-energy gamma and X-rays. The use of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors is particularly attractive because of the detector's ability to operate at room temperature and measure the energy spectra of gamma-ray sources with a high resolution, typically less than 1% at 662 keV. While CdZnTe detectors are acceptable imperfections in the crystals limit their full market potential. One of the major imperfections are Tellurium inclusions generated during the crystal growth process by the retrograde solubility of Tellurium and Tellurium-rich melt trapped at the growth interface. Tellurium inclusions trap charge carriers generated by gamma and X-ray photons and thus reduce the portion of generated charge carriers that reach the electrodes for collection and conversion into a readable signal which is representative of the ionizing radiation's energy and intensity. One approach in resolving this problem is post-growth annealing which has the potential of removing the Tellurium inclusions and associated impurities. The goal of this project is to use experimental techniques to study the thermodynamics of Tellurium inclusion migration in post-growth annealing of CdZnTe nuclear detectors with the temperature gradient zone migration (TGZM) technique. Systematic experiments will be carried out to provide adequate thermodynamic data that will inform the engineering community of the optimum annealing parameters. Additionally, multivariable correlations that involve the Tellurium diffusion coefficient, annealing parameters, and CdZnTe properties will be analyzed. The experimental approach will involve systematic annealing experiments (in Cd vapor overpressure) on different sizes of CdZnTe crystals at varying temperature gradients ranging from 0 to 60°C/mm (used to migrate the Tellurium inclusion to one side of the crystal), and at annealing temperatures ranging

  12. Contribution for labelling study of cellular and molecular structures of biomedical interest with technetium 99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebello, L.H.; Piotkwosky, M.C.; Pereira, J.A.A.; Boasquevisque, E.M.; Silva, J.R.M.; Reis, R.J.N.; Pires, E.T.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1992-01-01

    The methodologies for labelling bacteria, planaria and cercaria from schistosomiasis evolution cycle and in oxamniquine with technetium 99 m, developed in the Biomedical Center of Rio de Janeiro University and in the Research Center of National Institute of Cancer are shown. (C.G.C.)

  13. Increased uptake of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate in muscles in the course of polymyositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemir, Z.; Oleksa, R.; Czepczynski, R.; Sowinski, J.

    2005-01-01

    A case of a woman aged 46 years with signs of rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure is presented. Coxsackie serum test was positive. Increased uptake of Technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate ( 99mT c-MDP) by muscles of thighs and calves was observed. After 1 year no increased accumulation of radiotracer in the muscles was found

  14. Speciation and Oxidative Stability of Alkaline Soluble, Non-Pertechnetate Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Amity [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Peterson, James M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chatterjee, Sayandev [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Walter, Eric D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cho, Herman M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Washton, Nancy M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The long half-life, complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes, and high mobility in subsurface environments make technetium (Tc) one of the most difficult contaminants to dispose of and/or remediate. Technetium exists predominantly in the liquid tank waste phase as the relatively mobile form of pertechnetate, TcO4-. However, based on experimentation to date a significant fraction of the soluble Tc cannot be effectively separated from the wastes and may be present as a non- pertechnetate species. The presence of a non-pertechnetate species significantly complicates disposition of low-activity waste (LAW), and the development of methods to either convert them to pertechnetate or to separate directly is needed. The challenge is the uncertainty regarding the chemical form of the alkaline-soluble low-valent non-pertechnetate species in the liquid tank waste. This report summarizes work done in fiscal year (FY) 2014 exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium(I) species, [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants.

  15. Precipitation process for the removal of technetium values from nuclear waste solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.D.; Ebra, M.A.

    1985-11-21

    High efficiency removal of techetium values from a nuclear waste stream is achieved by addition to the waste stream of a precipitant contributing tetraphenylphosphonium cation, such that a substantial portion of the technetium values are precipitated as an insoluble pertechnetate salt.

  16. Gentc99m, computational system for the technetium-99m generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparman, I.

    1997-01-01

    The technetium-99m generator is one of the main products of the PPR, as the continuity of the technetium-99m generator production is important for supporting the development of nuclear medicine. GENTC99M has been made for computational for the technetium-99m generator and includes data processing, documentation and information GENTC99M is also very useful in quality control application especially for the determinations of yield and radionuclidic impurities which consume much time. microsoft visual basic for MS-DOS and visual basic for windows have been used for making GENTC99M. Microsoft visual basic has several features that make it an ideal development language for both MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows. These features not only increase productivity, they also provide all the tools and hooks needed to develop some very sophisticated applications. for a production centre like PPR, GENTC99M is very useful to support the data processing, documentation and information system of the technetium-99m generator and it can also be modified for other products

  17. Complex formation of technetium with the methyl esters of MAG2 and MAG1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noll, B.; Noll, S.; Grosse, B.; Johannsen, B.; Spies, H.

    1993-01-01

    Mercaptoacetylglycine methyl ester (MAG 2 ester) and mercaptoacetyldiglycine methyl ester (MAG 1 ester) were included to investigate complex formation of SH/amide ligands with technetium. The studies are aimed at finding out how blocking the carboxylic groups influences the complexation reaction, with a view to finding an approach to new lipophilic species. (orig./BBR)

  18. Sorption of technetium and its analogue rhenium on bentonite material under aerobic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koudelkova, M.; Vinsova, H.; Konirova, R.; Ernestova, M.; Jedinakova-Krizova, V.; Tereesha, M.

    2003-01-01

    The uptake of technetium on bentonite materials has been studied from the point of view of characterization of long-term radioactive elements behavior in nuclear waste repository. Bentonite R (locality Rokle, Czech Republic) and two types of model groundwater (granitic and bentonite) were selected for the sorption experiments. The aim of our research has been to find out the conditions suitable for the technetium sorption on selected bentonite under oxidizing condition. The sorption experiments with Tc-99 on bentonite have been carried out by batch method. The influence of the addition of different materials (e.g. activated carbon, graphite, Fe 2+ ) with bentonite, the effect of solid: aqueous phase ratio and a pH value on the percentage of technetium uptake and on the K d values were tested. Perrhenate was selected as an analogue of pertechnetate in non-active experiments of capillary electrophoresis (CE) and isotachophoresis (ITP). The percentage of rhenium sorbed on bentonite material was determined from the decrease of perrhenate peak area (CE) and from the shortening of the ITP zone corresponding to perrhenate. Both electromigration methods provided comparable results. The results obtained in this study with non-active material were compared to those of technetium acquired by radiometry and polarography. The 8 days kinetics of the perrhenate and pertechnetate sorption on bentonite was described mathematically with a tendency to predict long-term behavior of studied systems. (authors)

  19. Assessment of the Cast Stone Low-Temperature Waste Form Technology Coupled with Technetium Removal - 14379

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Christopher F.; Rapko, Brian M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Cozzi, Alex; Fox, Kevin M.; Mccabe, Daniel J.; Nash, C. A.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-03-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing low-temperature waste forms for immobilization of DOE aqueous waste streams, including technetium removal as an implementing technology. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the Cast Stone waste immobilization and technetium removal projects at Hanford. Science and technology gaps were identified for work associated with 1) conducting performance assessments and risk assessments of waste form and disposal system performance, and 2) technetium chemistry in tank wastes and separation of technetium from waste processing streams. Technical approaches to address the science and technology gaps were identified and an initial sequencing priority was suggested. A subset of research was initiated in 2013 to begin addressing the most significant science and technology gaps. The purpose of this paper is to report progress made towards closing these gaps and provide notable highlights of results achieved to date.

  20. Studies on technetium clethrochelate. Pt.1. Synthesis and characterization of three new BATO complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongfeng; Wang Xiangyun; Liu Yuanfang

    1995-01-01

    Three BATO (boronic acid adducts of technetium tris (dioxime) complexes are synthesized from α-dioximes, boronic acid, 99 TcO 4 - and SnCl 2 by the template reaction. Their IR and UV/V spectra are measured to have similar features as those of 99 TcCl(DMG) 3 BC 6 H 4 CH 3

  1. Labeling of thymine with 99m technetium: a suggestion of a chemical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutfilen, Bianca; Silva, Claudia Ribeiro da; Bernardo Filho, Mario; Ribeiro, Barbara Luzia Almeida; Mattos, Maura Ferreira

    1996-01-01

    Successful targeting of diagnose but also to stage cancer. It has been shown that certain tumor cells are permeable to low level of exogenous adenosine-diphosphate and adenosine-triphosphate nucleotides, that are incorporated into intracellular pools. We present the labeling of a nucleotide precursor, a base, thymine technetium-99m ( 99m Tc). (author)

  2. Labeling of thymine with {sup 99m} technetium: a suggestion of a chemical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutfilen, Bianca; Silva, Claudia Ribeiro da; Bernardo Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Ribeiro, Barbara Luzia Almeida [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica; Mattos, Maura Ferreira [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    1996-03-01

    Successful targeting of diagnose but also to stage cancer. It has been shown that certain tumor cells are permeable to low level of exogenous adenosine-diphosphate and adenosine-triphosphate nucleotides, that are incorporated into intracellular pools. We present the labeling of a nucleotide precursor, a base, thymine technetium-99m ({sup 99m} Tc). (author)

  3. Technetium(I) complexes Tc(CO)3BrL2 (L = phosphine, pyridine, isocyanide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, B.; Findeisen, M.; Olk, B.; Schmidt, K.

    1988-01-01

    Technetium pentacarbonyl bromide reacts with π-acceptor ligands L (L = phosphine, pyridine, isocyanide) to form disubstituted compounds of the type Tc(CO) 3 BrL 2 . The stereochemistry of the complexes was established by infrared and 1 H-NMR measurement. Chemical shifts and the half-widths of the 99 Tc-NMR signals are discussed. (author)

  4. Control of p-type and n-type thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride thin films by combinatorial sputter coating technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masahiro; Sasaki, Michiko; Xu, Yibin; Zhan, Tianzhuo; Isoda, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Yoshikazu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS) while changing only one of the experimental conditions, the RF power. • The dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) was optimized by the technique. • The fabrication of a Π-structured TE device was demonstrated. - Abstract: p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized by using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS). The crystal structure and crystal preferred orientation of the thin films were changed by controlling the coating condition of the radio frequency (RF) power during the sputter coating. As a result, the p- and n-type films and their dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) were optimized by the technique. The properties of the thin films such as the crystal structure, crystal preferred orientation, material composition and surface morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Also, the thermoelectric properties of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were measured. ZT for n- and p-type bismuth telluride thin films was found to be 0.27 and 0.40 at RF powers of 90 and 120 W, respectively. The proposed technology can be used to fabricate thermoelectric p–n modules of bismuth telluride without any doping process.

  5. Control of p-type and n-type thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride thin films by combinatorial sputter coating technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masahiro, E-mail: goto.masahiro@nims.go.jp [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Sasaki, Michiko [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Xu, Yibin [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Materials Database Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Zhan, Tianzhuo [Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Isoda, Yukihiro [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Shinohara, Yoshikazu [Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Green Research on Energy and Environmental Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Thermal Management and Thermoelectric Materials Group, Center for Materials Research by Information Integration (CMI2), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS) while changing only one of the experimental conditions, the RF power. • The dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) was optimized by the technique. • The fabrication of a Π-structured TE device was demonstrated. - Abstract: p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized by using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS). The crystal structure and crystal preferred orientation of the thin films were changed by controlling the coating condition of the radio frequency (RF) power during the sputter coating. As a result, the p- and n-type films and their dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) were optimized by the technique. The properties of the thin films such as the crystal structure, crystal preferred orientation, material composition and surface morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Also, the thermoelectric properties of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were measured. ZT for n- and p-type bismuth telluride thin films was found to be 0.27 and 0.40 at RF powers of 90 and 120 W, respectively. The proposed technology can be used to fabricate thermoelectric p–n modules of bismuth telluride without any doping process.

  6. Options for the Separation and Immobilization of Technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serne, R Jeffrey; Crum, Jarrod V.; Riley, Brian J.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.

    2016-01-01

    Among radioactive constituents present in the Hanford tank waste, technetium-99 (Tc) presents a unique challenge in that it is significantly radiotoxic, exists predominantly in the liquid low-activity waste (LAW), and has proven difficult to effectively stabilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, the LAW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility, but a significant fraction of Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment system. This necessitates recycle of the off-gas condensate solution to the LAW glass melter feed. The recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the immobilized LAW (ILAW), but it also disproportionately increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed, which have limited solubility in the LAW glass and thus significantly reduce the amount of LAW (glass waste loading) that can be vitrified and still maintain good waste form properties. This increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or requires the need for supplemental LAW treatment capacity. Several options are being considered to address this issue. Two approaches attempt to minimize the off-gas recycle by removing Tc at one of several possible points within the tank waste processing flowsheet. The separated Tc from these two approaches must then be dispositioned in a manner such that the Tc can be safely disposed. Alternative waste forms that do not have the Tc volatility issues associated with the vitrification process are being sought for immobilization of Tc for subsequent storage and disposal. The first objective of this report is to provide insights into the compositions and volumes of the Tc-bearing waste streams including the ion exchange eluate from processing LAW and the off-gas condensate from the melter. The first step to be assessed will be the

  7. Options for the Separation and Immobilization of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R Jeffrey [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Riley, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Among radioactive constituents present in the Hanford tank waste, technetium-99 (Tc) presents a unique challenge in that it is significantly radiotoxic, exists predominantly in the liquid low-activity waste (LAW), and has proven difficult to effectively stabilize in a waste form for ultimate disposal. Within the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, the LAW fraction will be converted to a glass waste form in the LAW vitrification facility, but a significant fraction of Tc volatilizes at the high glass-melting temperatures and is captured in the off-gas treatment system. This necessitates recycle of the off-gas condensate solution to the LAW glass melter feed. The recycle process is effective in increasing the loading of Tc in the immobilized LAW (ILAW), but it also disproportionately increases the sulfur and halides in the LAW melter feed, which have limited solubility in the LAW glass and thus significantly reduce the amount of LAW (glass waste loading) that can be vitrified and still maintain good waste form properties. This increases both the amount of LAW glass and either the duration of the LAW vitrification mission or requires the need for supplemental LAW treatment capacity. Several options are being considered to address this issue. Two approaches attempt to minimize the off-gas recycle by removing Tc at one of several possible points within the tank waste processing flowsheet. The separated Tc from these two approaches must then be dispositioned in a manner such that the Tc can be safely disposed. Alternative waste forms that do not have the Tc volatility issues associated with the vitrification process are being sought for immobilization of Tc for subsequent storage and disposal. The first objective of this report is to provide insights into the compositions and volumes of the Tc-bearing waste streams including the ion exchange eluate from processing LAW and the off-gas condensate from the melter. The first step to be assessed will be the

  8. Irradiation-induced doping of Bismuth Telluride Bi2Te3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischau, Carl Willem

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth Telluride Bi 2 Te 3 has attracted enormous attention because of its thermoelectric and topological insulator properties. Regarding its bulk band structure Bi 2 Te 3 is a band insulator with an energy gap of around 150-170 meV. However, the native anti-site defects that are present in real samples always dope this band insulator and shift the chemical potential into the valence or conduction band. In this PhD, the Fermi surface of as-grown and electron irradiated p-type Bi 2 Te 3 single crystals has been investigated extensively using electrical transport experiments. For moderate hole concentrations (p ∼< 5 x 10 18 cm -3 ), it is confirmed that electrical transport can be explained by a six-valley model and the presence of strong Zeeman-splitting. At high doping levels (p≅5 x 10 18 cm -3 ), the hole concentrations determined from Hall and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect differ significantly which is attributed to an impurity/defect band introduced by the anti-site defects. In this work, we show that it is possible to dope p-type Bi 2 Te 3 in a very controlled manner using electron-irradiation by performing detailed in- and ex-situ electrical transport studies on samples irradiated at room and at low temperatures with 2.5 MeV electrons. These studies show that the defects induced at both irradiation temperatures act as electron donors and can thus be used to convert the conduction from p- to n-type. The point of optimal compensation is accompanied by an increase of the low-temperature resistivity by several orders of magnitude. Irradiation at room temperature showed that both the p-type samples obtained after irradiation to intermediate doses as well as the samples in which the conduction has been converted to n-type by irradiation, still have a well defined Fermi surface as evidenced by SdH oscillations. By studying the Hall coefficient in-situ during low temperature electron irradiation, the coexistence of electron- and hole-type carriers was evidenced

  9. Speciation of Technetium(IV) in Bicarbonate Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alliot, I.; Fattahi, M. [Univ Nantes, CNRS, IN2P3, SUBATECH, EMN, Nantes (France); Alliot, C. [INSERM, U892, F-44093 Nantes 1 (France); GIP Arronax, F-44817 St Herblain (France); Vitorge, P. [CEA Saclay, LSRM, DEN DANS DPC SECR, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2009-11-15

    The technetium isotope {sup 99}Tc is a major fission product from nuclear reactors. Ultimately it is disposed of as radioactive waste since it has few applications outside of scientific research. Geochemical modeling of the dissolution of nuclear waste and of the solubility and speciation of the dissolved radionuclides in groundwater is an important part of the Performance Assessment for the safety of nuclear waste repositories. It relies on the availability of a critically assessed thermodynamic database. The potential of the Tc(VII)/Tc(IV) redox couple is measured here under various chemical conditions to verify the stoichiometries of Tc complexes and determine their stabilities: (i) -log{sub 10}[H{sup +}] in the range 7.0-10.0, for 0.3, 0.6, and 0.7 M [CO{sub 3}](total); (II) [CO{sub 3}](total) in the range 0.01-0.6 M at -log{sub 10}[H+] approximately 8.6; and (iii) [Tc(VII)]/[Tc(IV)] ratios of (6.02*10{sup -5} M)/10{sup -6} M) and (6.02*10{sup -5} M)/(6.02*10{sup -5} M) at -log{sub 10}[H+]= -9.1 and [CO{sub 3}](total) = 1 M. Assuming that Tc(VII), TcO{sub 4}{sup -} is the only species which exists under all the above chemical conditions, the potentiometric results can be interpreted by considering the presence of two hydroxide-carbonate monomeric complexes. The hydrolysis equilibrium between these two complexes is Tc(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {r_reversible} Tc(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 3}{sup -} + H{sup +} with -log{sub 10}[H{sup +}]{sub 1/2} = 8.69 {+-} 0.20, which is consistent with the -8.3 {+-} 0.6 corresponding hydrolysis constant of the NEA TDB review. 733 {+-} 44 mV/SHE and 575 {+-} 60 mV/SHE are measured for the standard potentials of the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Tc(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 2}, and for the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Tc(CO{sub 3})(OH){sup 3-} redox couples respectively. The corresponding formation constants from TcO(OH){sub 2} are log{sub 10}K{sub 1,2} = 19.8 {+-} 0.5 and log{sub 10}K{sub 1,3} = 10.5 {+-} 0.5, to be compared with the 19.3 {+-} 0.3 and 11

  10. Clinical usefulness of scintigraphy with sup 99m Technetium phosphates in rhabdomyolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aizawa, Nobuyuki; Hara, Yoshikuni (Shonan Kamakura Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan)); Suzuki, Yutaka; Akashi, Tsunehiro; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Uchiyama, Fujio; Mitsui, Tamito; Yamazaki, Yuki

    1990-08-01

    We performed bone scans with {sup 99m}Technetium phosphates in 15 cases of clinically suspected rhabdomyolysis admitted to Chigasaki Tokushukai Hospital. Whole body scans were performed within 5 days from the onset of illness or admission. Accumulation of the radioactivity in the skeletal muscle was revealed in 13 of the 15 cases and the involved muscle groups were visualized vividly. Etiologies of rhabdomyolysis were diverse, ranging from malignant syndrome to sepsis. Myocardial concentration was absent in all of the cases. Renal concentration of the isotope was seen in cases where the degree of rhabdomyolysis was higher and renal impairment was present. We conclude that {sup 99m}Technetium phosphate bone scan is useful in clinically suspected rhabdomyolysis as a diagnostic test and as a test to localize and quantitate the muscular involvement. (author).

  11. Clinical usefulness of scintigraphy with 99mTechnetium phosphates in rhabdomyolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Nobuyuki; Hara, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Yutaka; Akashi, Tsunehiro; Kamei, Tetsumasa; Uchiyama, Fujio; Mitsui, Tamito; Yamazaki, Yuki.

    1990-01-01

    We performed bone scans with 99m Technetium phosphates in 15 cases of clinically suspected rhabdomyolysis admitted to Chigasaki Tokushukai Hospital. Whole body scans were performed within 5 days from the onset of illness or admission. Accumulation of the radioactivity in the skeletal muscle was revealed in 13 of the 15 cases and the involved muscle groups were visualized vividly. Etiologies of rhabdomyolysis were diverse, ranging from malignant syndrome to sepsis. Myocardial concentration was absent in all of the cases. Renal concentration of the isotope was seen in cases where the degree of rhabdomyolysis was higher and renal impairment was present. We conclude that 99m Technetium phosphate bone scan is useful in clinically suspected rhabdomyolysis as a diagnostic test and as a test to localize and quantitate the muscular involvement. (author)

  12. Experimental studies on the uptake of technetium-99 to terrestrial crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joanne; Ewers, Leon [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Technetium-99 has been dispersed in the environment from many sources such as nuclear weapons testing, releases from medical or industrial processes, nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel processing facilities. The pertechnetate ion, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} is the form produced during the nuclear fuel cycle and the most likely to be released into the environment. A recent review published by Public Health England (formerly the Health Protection Agency) found that the availability for the root uptake of technetium into crops depends on whether the technetium is in a chemically non-reduced more plant available form, such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -} or a chemically reduced less plant available form, such as TcO{sub 2}. Based on the review, generic soil to crop transfer factor (TF) values for use in non-site specific UK based radiological assessments were proposed, with the TF value for the reduced form of technetium in crops around a factor of 10 lower than that for the non-reduced form. The implications of the use of different TF values on the activity concentrations in crops and animal products predicted by PHE's food chain model, FARMLAND, for both routine and accidental release situations were explored. Recommendations on the best choice of TF values for use in the model have been given for a range of contamination scenarios. A small scale experimental study has been carried out to provide further evidence that the generic assumption made on the difference between soil-crop TF values for non-reduced and reduced forms of technetium is valid. The study was also designed to establish likely time periods over which the chemical reduction of technetium takes place and to provide additional soil-crop TF values for use in UK based radiological assessments. Soil to crop TFs for crops harvested from loam and peat soils up to 4 months after contamination are about a factor of 10 higher than those seen in soil contaminated more than a year previously, indicating that the

  13. The sorption of uranium and technetium on bentonite, tuff and granodiorite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Brownsword, M.; Cowper, M.M.; Heath, T.G.; Tweed, C.J.

    1995-01-01

    A combined experimental and modeling study of the sorption of uranium and technetium on geological materials has been carried out as part of the PNC program to increase confidence in the performance assessment for a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository in Japan. Batch sorption experiments have been performed in order to study the sorption of uranium and technetium onto bentonite, tuff and granodiorite from both equilibrated seawater and de-ionized water under strongly-reducing and non-reducing conditions. A preliminary study of the sorption of uranium on mineral surfaces in granodiorite has also been undertaken using a nuclear microprobe. Mathematical modeling using the geochemical speciation program HARPHRQ in conjunction with the HATCHES database has been carried out in order to interpret the results of the sorption experiments

  14. Technetium /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin lung scans. Use in chronic childhood asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, J.S.; Koch, D.F.; Isenberg, P.D.; Werner, P.

    1976-01-01

    Serial roentgenograms and technetium /sub 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin lung scans were done simultaneously in 30 bronchodilator-dependent asthmatic children and young adults during both relative remission and attacks of status asthmaticus. When chest roentgenograms showed air trapping and increased peribronchial vascular markings associated with persistent perfusion defects, the children benefited from further laboratory studies and continuous comprehensive therapy. Serial scans provided information about underperfusion that was not discernible either by roentgenograms or by usual blood gas studies. Also, lung scans are easier to obtain in children with long-standing asthma than are detailed pulmonary tests. In our study, technetium /sup 99m/Tc macroaggregated albumin scans showed persistent regional perfusion defects in 20 children with chronic asthma during relative remission and exacerbations

  15. Preparation and characterisation of a sorbent suitable for technetium separation from environmental matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosova, A.; Rajec, P.; Reich, M.

    2003-01-01

    A sorbent based on Aliquat 336 anchored on hydrophobised silica gel support as an ion exchanger was prepared. Prepared sorbent was suitable for separation of technetium-99 from environmental matrices. The sorbent properties, sorption characteristic and distribution coefficient of 99 mTcO 4 - in various medium was studied. The chemical yield of Tc during separation process was determined using 99m Tc tracer and gamma measurement. Typical sorption recoveries of Tc for this sorbent from 0.1 M HNO 3 were more than 98 %. Typical desorption recoveries using 8 M HNO 3 were in the range 92 - 96 %. The commercial TEVA Spec resin from Eichrom Industries for comparison purpose was used as well. It was found that the prepared sorbent is suitable for separation of technetium from environmental matrices. (authors)

  16. The impact of technetium-99m-radiopharmaceuticals' design on their biological behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankovic, D.Lj.; Djokic, D.Dj. . E-mail address of corresponding author: drinaj@vin.bg.ac.yu; Jankovic, D.)

    2005-01-01

    The coordination has a great and not always predictable impact on the in-vivo behaviour of the small molecule into which the technetium-bearing chelate units is integrated. The different valence state of technetium in the complexes with some ligands changes the properties of these complexes, such as physico-chemical parameters and biological behaviour. The change of their biological behaviour has a great impact on quality of imaging study and on radiation dose to the patient. The results of the labelling of DPD and EHIDA with 99mTc(I) and their biological behaviour, in comparison with the same one for 99mTc(III)-DPD and 99mTc(III)-EHIDA complexes, confirmed that different oxidation state of 99mTc make possible forming variety of complexes with quite a different and unexpected biological behaviour. (author)

  17. Detection of unstable angina by /sup 99m/technetium pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdulla, A.M.; Canedo, M.I.; Cortez, B.C.; McGinnis, K.D.; Wilhelm, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    /sup 99m/Technetium stannous pyrophosphate has been shown to accumulate in acutely infarcted myocardium. To determine if the isotope is also taken up by severely ischemic, but not necrotic myocardium, we performed myocardial scintigraphic studies in 17 patients with chest pains. Seven of the patients satisfied conventional clinical, electrocardiographic, and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of unstable angina and showed no electrocardiographic or enzymatic evidence of myocardial necrosis. Five of these seven patients with unstable angina demonstrated abnormal localized patterns, and one showed a borderline picture. Myocardial scintiscans were normal in all of a control group of ten patients with stable angina. Thus, scanning with /sup 99m/technetium stannous pyrophosphate is shown to be of value in the objective demonstration of myocardial abnormality in unstable angina

  18. Kit development for labelling erythrocytes or leukocytes with technetium-99m in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuebin; Han Quansheng; Wang Jingcheng; Mi Hongzhi

    1996-01-01

    This study developed a modified pre tinning method for labeling erythrocytes with technetium-99m in vitro using a kit which contains stannous chloride stabilized with geneticist acid (GA) in lyophilized form. This GA-kit a sterile closed system that does not require centrifugation,washing and separation of the RBCs. The kit is simple to use and labeling takes ∼ 30 min with a typical labeling efficiency of 97.3% ± 1.2% for 60 determinations. Imaging studies were performed in rabbit using GA-kit in vitro labeling procedure and PYP-kit in vivo labeling. It shows that the heart-to-background ratio with GA in vitro labeling were significantly higher than with in vivo labeling. Leukocytes labeling with technetium-99m using the same GA kit also was studied. The labeling efficiency was 20 ∼ 41%. Thus, the GA kit is versatile and cost-effective. (author). 21 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Voltammetric assay of extremely low technetium concentrations following enrichment at the HMDE after reaction with Thiocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, M.; Ruf, H.

    1984-12-01

    It is known that in sulfuric acid solution pertechnetate is reduced by thiocyanate to form thiocyanate complexes. After this reaction the technetium acquires the capability of being adsorbed at the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) provided that a potential of -0,40 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) has been applied to the electrode. If, by application of the differential pulse voltammetry after the phase of deposition the potential at the electrode is scanned cathodically, traces of technetium can be determined very sensitively by evaluation of the peak current recorded at minus 1,27 V (Ag/AgCl). The effect is still being enhanced by the presence of not interfering small perrhenate amounts. The reproducibility of the measured values is excellent. (orig.) [de

  20. Forefront of PUREX system engineering. Chemistry and engineering of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The paper reports the activity of the research committee organized by the Atomic Energy Society of Japan on 'Ruthenium and Technetium Chemistry in the PUREX System', with focusing on basic behaviors of ruthenium, technetium and neptunium in the PUREX process, the principles of plant design, and behaviors during the final waste treatment. The scope of the work includes the following major topics: (1) basic solution and solid-state chemistry; (2) basic solution and solid-state chemistry of minor actinides in particular, Np; (3) partitioning chemistry in the PUREX system and environmental behavior of the components; (4) processes of recovery, purification, and utilization of rare metal fission products; (5) field data on plant design, operation, decontamination, and decommissioning; (6) numerical process simulations and process control technologies; (7) compilation of a data base for process chemistry and plant engineering. (S. Ohno)

  1. Osteomyelitis and infarction in sickle cell hemoglobinopathies: differentiation by combined technetium and gallium scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amundsen, T.R.; Siegel, M.J.; Siegel, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clinical records and scintigrams were reviewed of 18 patients with sickle cell hemoglobinophaties who had undergone combined technetium and gallium scintigraphy during 22 separate episodes of suspected osseous infection. The combined scintigrams were correctly interpreted as indicating osteomyelitis in four studies. Of 18 studies in patients with infarction, the combined scintigrams were correctly interpreted in 16 and showed either no local accumulation of Ga-67 or less accumulation than that of Tc-99m MDP at symptomatic sites. In the other two studies, the scintigrams were falsely interpreted as indicating osteomyelitis and showed congruent, increased accumulation of both Tc-99, MDP and Ga-67. This pattern must be considered indeterminate. Overall, the results indicate that the combination of technetium and gallium scintigraphy is an effective means to distinguish osteomyelitis from infarction in patients with sickle cell hemoglobinopathies

  2. Review of technetium chemistry research conducted at the University of Nevada Las Vegas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poineau, F.; Weck, P.F.; Forster, P.; Hartmann, T.; Mausolf, E.; Silva, G.W.C.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Rodriguez, E.E.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Cheetham, A.K.

    2009-01-01

    The chemistry of technetium is being explored at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. Our goal is to investigate both the applied and fundamental aspects of technetium chemistry, with a special emphasis on synthesis, separations, and materials science. The synthetic chemistry focuses on metal-metal multiple bonding, oxides and halides. Synthesis and characterizations of (n-Bu 4 N) 2 Tc 2 X 8 , Tc 2 (O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 X 2 (X = Cl, Br), TcO 2 , Bi 2 Tc 2 O 7 , Bi 3 TcO 8 , TcBr 3 and TcBr 4 have been performed. The applied chemistry is related to the behavior of Tc in the UREX process. Separation of U/Tc has been conducted using anion exchange resin and metallic Tc waste form synthesized and characterized. (author)

  3. Selenium-75 and technetium-95m biokinetics in rats at different physiological states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archimbaud, Yves; Grillon, Gerard; Poncy, Jean-Luc; Masse, Roland

    1992-06-01

    Selenium 79 ( 79 Se) and technetium ( 99 Tc), beta emitters, components of nuclear wastes, may increase the dose equivalent to members of the public. Data used by ICRP show that there is relatively little information on Te and Se biokinetics at different physiologic stages. Retention was almost equivalent for young, male adult and pregnant rat. Selenium was concentrated in the testis, the kidneys, the liver and the spleen as technetium was in the skin, the thyroid and the kidneys. The biological half-time for Se and Te was respectively 20 and 41 days for pregnant rats, 33 and 15 days for young rats. Placental transfer per one fetus was 0.56% of the initial activity for Te and 1.27% for Se. These data point out the eventually high doses delivered to the skin for Te and to the testis for Se. They may be taken into consideration in estimating risk by humans at different stages of life [fr

  4. Complexes of technetium, rhenium, and rhodium with sexidentate Schiff-base ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, G.; Kilcullen, N.

    1989-01-01

    The monocationic technetium (IV) and rhenium (IV) complexes with the sexidentate Schiff-base ligands tris[2-(2'-hydroxybenzylideneethyl)]amine and its substituted derivatives have been prepared and their electrochemical properties studied. The variable-temperature 90.6 MHz 13 C-{ 1 H} n.m.r. spectrum of the rhodium (III) complex of tris[2-(2-hydroxy-5'-isopropylbenzylideneethyl)-amine] has been observed, indicating fluxionality at temperatures above 218 K. (author)

  5. PREDICTION OF RELAPSE FROM HYPERTHYROIDISM FOLLOWING ANTITHYROID MEDICATION WITHDRAWAL USING TECHNETIUM THYROID UPTAKE SCANNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Abdollahi, Soraya; Farzanefar, Saeed; Abousaidi, Mohammadtagi; Esteghamati, Alireza; Naseri, Maryam; Eftekhari, Mohamad; Abbasi, Mehrshad

    2017-04-02

    Technetium thyroid uptake (TTU) is not inhibited by antithyroid drugs (ATD) and reflects the degree of thyroid stimulation. We intended to predict the relapse rate from hyperthyroidism based on TTU measurement. Out of 44 initially enrolled subjects, 38 patients aged 41.6 ± 14.6 with Graves disease (duration: 84 ± 78 months) completed the study. TTU was performed with 40-second imaging of the neck and mediastinum 20 minutes after injection of 1 mCi technetium-99m pertechnetate. TTU was measured as the percentage of the count of activity accumulated in the thyroidal region minus the mediastinal background uptake to the count of 1 mCi technetium-99m under the same acquisition conditions. Then methimazole was stopped and patients were followed. The optimal TTU cutoff value for Graves relapse prediction was calculated using Youden's J statistic. Hyperthyroidism relapsed in 11 (28.9%) patients 122 ± 96 (range: 15-290) days post-ATD withdrawal. The subjects in remission were followed for 209 ± 81 days (range: 88-390). TTU was significantly higher in patients with forthcoming relapse (12.0 ± 8.0 vs. 3.9 ± 2.0, P = .007). The difference was significant after adjustment for age, sex, history of previous relapse, disease duration, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels before withdrawal. The area under the receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.87. The optimal TTU cutoff value for classification of subjects with relapse and remission was 8.7 with sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of 73%, 100%, 100%, and 90%, respectively (odds ratio [OR] = 10.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.4-29.3). TTU evaluation in hyperthyroid patients receiving antithyroid medication is an accurate and practical method for predicting relapse after ATD withdrawal. ATD = antithyroid drugs RIU = radio-iodine uptake TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone TSI = thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin TTU = technetium thyroid uptake.

  6. Extraosseous uptake of sup(99m)technetium methylene diphosphonate: Neuroblastoma or radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.R.; Kun, L.; Casper, J.; Babbitt, D.P.

    1980-01-01

    A child with a ganglioneuroblastoma and tumor uptake of sup(99m)technetium methylene diphosphonate (sup(99m)Tc-MDP) is presented. After surgical removal of an encapsulated tumor and radiation therapy, an interval bone scan demonstrated the same presurgical abnormality. Awareness of abnormal uptake of sup(99m)Tc-MDP in irradiated renal tissue prevents interpreting radiation nephritis as recurrent tumor. (orig.) [de

  7. 3. Congress of the SA Society of nuclear medicine: Technetium-99m technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1988-08-01

    The Atomic Energy Corporation of SA Limited have been engaged in the manufacture of radioisotopes since 1967, shortly after the SAFARI-1 reactor at Pelindaba was commissioned. Since then the use of radioisotopes in South Africa has grown rapidly and at present 95% of the in vivo diagnostic radioisotopes (radiopharmaceuticals) utilized in nuclear medicine are manufactured locally. Because radioisotopes are applied mainly in sophisticated chemically or mechanically processed forms, production requires not only a skilled production team, but also the appropriate facilities for the manufacture of high-quality products which comply with the necessary safety standards. Compliance with such standards is especially important for the routine production of radiopharmaceuticals for use in nuclear medicine. Over the past 20 years technetium-99m has achieved a dominant position among the diagnostic tools in modern nuclear medicine.The scope of nuclear medicine is expanding continuously and its future lies primarily in the development of new organspecific technetium-99m radiodiagnostic agents. Many improvements and changes have been made to Tc-99m generators, the major source of Tc-99m, since they were introduced to nuclear medicine in the late 1950's. The new Peltek-F sterile Tc-99m generator developed by the Isotope Production Centre is a symbol of progress made. In order to commemorate the launching of the new Peltek-F technetium-99m generator during August 1988 it was decided to publish six papers that were presented at the Third Congress of the Society of Nuclear Medicine held at Bloemfontein during the period 15 - 17 August 1988 by members of the Isotope Production Centre. This will serve as a useful reference on various aspects of technetium-99m technology and will stimulate the use of this product as well as new research in this field

  8. Recognition of reversible and irreversible myocardial injury by technetium pyrophosphate extraction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.; Chen, Y.F.; Sell, T.L.; Lowe, J.E.; Jones, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The need for a more accurate method of detecting episodes of myocardial ischemia during cardiac operations, particularly during the ischemic arrest interval, prompted us to investigate the usefulness of measuring the active extraction of technetium pyrophosphate in identifying and quantitating ischemic injury. Twenty-four adult mongrel dogs were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass, and normothermic global ischemia was induced by cross-clamping the proximal aorta. Technetium pyrophosphate (1 mCi) was injected through a standard cardioplegia line with normal saline, simulating administration of cardioplegic solution, upon placement of the aortic cross-clamp (time 0), at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of global ischemia, and with the onset and completion of ischemic contracture. Radioactive counts were recorded over the heart at 1 second intervals, and the extraction fraction and half-time of clearance were calculated. The extraction fraction increased from 0.22 at time 0 to 0.58 at 15 minutes, 0.82 at 30 minutes, 0.85 at 45 minutes, and 0.91 at 60 minutes. The halftime increased from a baseline of 114 seconds (time 0) to a maximum of 321 seconds at 60 minutes of ischemia. The onset and completion of ischemic contracture showed a return toward baseline of both the extraction fraction and halftime of clearance, with an extraction fraction of 0.44 and 0.46 and a halftime of 135 and 133 seconds, respectively. These data clearly show that reversible myocardial injury increased the extraction and reduced the clearance of technetium pyrophosphate and that the magnitude of change related to the extent of injury. The progression to irreversible myocardial injury decreased the active extraction of technetium pyrophosphate. This simple procedure for real-time documentation of myocardial injury promises to provide easily obtainable endpoints of injury for use during cardiac operations in humans

  9. Extraosseous uptake of /sup 99/sup(m)technetium methylene diphosphonate. Neuroblastoma or radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sty, J R; Kun, L; Casper, J; Babbitt, D P

    1980-01-01

    A child with a ganglioneuroblastoma and tumor uptake of /sup 99/sup(m)technetium methylene diphosphate (/sup 99/sup(m)Tc-MDP) is presented. After surgical removal of an encapsulated tumor and radiation therapy, an interval bone scan demonstrated the same presurgical abnormality. Awareness of abnormal uptake of /sup 99/sup(m)Tc-MDP in irradiated renal tissue prevents interpreting radiation nephritis as recurrent tumor.

  10. Extraosseous uptake of sup(99m)technetium methylene diphosphonate: Neuroblastoma or radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sty, J R; Kun, L; Casper, J; Babbitt, D P [Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee (USA). Dept. of Radiology

    1980-01-01

    A child with a ganglioneuroblastoma and tumor uptake of sup(99m)technetium methylene diphosphonate (sup(99m)Tc-MDP) is presented. After surgical removal of an encapsulated tumor and radiation therapy, an interval bone scan demonstrated the same presurgical abnormality. Awareness of abnormal uptake of sup(99m)Tc-MDP in irradiated renal tissue prevents interpreting radiation nephritis as recurrent tumor.

  11. Study with radio aerosol of DTPA technetium-99 m in individuals with pulmonary disease by amiodarone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra Filho, M.

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the clearance of 99 m Technetium chelated to diethylenetriamine-penta-acetate (99 m Tc-DTPA) in amiodarone induced pulmonary disease, 40 individuals were studied in four groups. After spirometry, where a volume-time curve was registered, all individuals inhaled 740 MBq of 99 m Tc-DTPA diluted in 4 ml of saline, for five minutes. Pulmonary images were obtained in a computerized scintillation camera and 9 regions of interest were selected. (author)

  12. Technetium-99m-Labeled Autologous Serum Albumin: A Personal-Exclusive Source of Serum Component

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Li, Dian-Kun; Chuang, Mei-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Technetium-99m human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) is an important radiopharmaceutical required in nuclear medicine studies. However, the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection remains a major safety concern. Autopreparation of serum component acquired from patient provides a “personal-exclusive” source for radiolabeling. This paper is to evaluate the practicality of on-site elusion and subsequent radiolabeling efficacy for serum albumin. Results showed that the autologous elute contained more...

  13. Removal of technetium, carbon tetrachloride, and metals from DOE properties. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darab, J.G.; Mallouk, T.E.; Ponder, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of the project is to develop and characterize supported reducing agents, and solid waste forms derived from them, which will be effective in the removal of transition metal ions, chlorinated organic molecules, and technetium from aqueous mixed wastes. This work follows the discovery that a nanoscale form of zero-valent iron, dispersed on high surface area supports, reduces metal ions (chromium, mercury, and lead) and rhenium (as a surrogate for technetium) to insoluble forms much faster than does unsupported iron. The scientific goals of the project are to better understand the mechanism of the reduction process, to develop supports that are compatible with a variety of mixed waste compositions, and to develop surface modifiers for the supported iron aggregates that will optimize their selectivity for the contaminants of interest. The support composition is of particular interest in the case of technetium (Tc) separation and stabilization in the Hanford tank wastes. While it is expected that pertechnetate will be reduced insoluble TcO 2 , the support material must be compatible with the vitrification process used in the final waste disposition. The surface modifications are also a focal point for Hanford applications because of the complex and variable makeup of the tank wastes. This report summarizes progress in the first 8 months of a 3-year collaborative project involving Penn State and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).'

  14. Leaching of actinides and technetium from simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.J.; Harvey, C.O.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1979-08-01

    Leach tests were conducted using a modified version of the IAEA procedure to study the behavior of glass waste-solution interactions. Release rates were determined for Tc, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, and Si in the following solutions: WIPP B salt brine, NaCl (287 g/l), NaCl (1.76 g/1), CaCl 2 (1.66 g/l), NaHCO 3 (2.52 g/l), and deionized water. The leach rates for all elements decreased an order of magnitude from their initial values during the first 20 to 30 days leaching time. The sodium bicarbonate solution produced the highest elemental release rates, while the saturated salt brine and deionized water in general gave the lowest release. Technetium has the highest initial release of all elements studied. The technetium release rates, however, decreased by over four orders of magnitude in 150 days of leaching time. In the prepared glass, technetium was phase separated, concentrating on internal pore surfaces. Neptunium, in all cases except CaCl 2 solution, shows the highest actinide release rate. In general, curium and uranium have the lowest release rates. The range of actinide release rates is from 10 -5 to 10 -8 g/cm 2 /day. 25 figures, 7 tables

  15. Effects of concurrent drug therapy on technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate biodistribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkle, G.H.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Peek, C.; Barker, K.K.; Ice, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Drug interactions with /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate resulting in altered biodistribution were studied using chart review and animal tests. Charts of nine patients who had abnormal gallbladder uptake of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate during a two-year period were reviewed to obtain data such as concurrent drug therapy, primary diagnosis, and laboratory values. Adult New Zealand white rabbits were then used for testing the biodistribution of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate when administered concurrently with possibly interacting drugs identified in the chart review--penicillamine, penicillin G potassium, penicillin V potassium, acetaminophen, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Chart review revealed no conclusive patterns of altered biodistribution associated with other factors. The data did suggest the possibility that the five drugs listed above might cause increased hepatobiliary clearance of the radiopharmaceutical. Animal tests showed that i.v. penicillamine caused substantial distribution of radioactivity into the gallbladder and small bowel. Minimally increased gallbladder radioactivity occurred when oral acetaminophen and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole were administered concurrently. Oral and i.v. penicillins did not increase gallbladder activity. Penicillamine may cause substantial alteration of the biodistribution of technetium /sup 99m/Tc gluceptate

  16. Small-Scale Ion Exchange Removal of Cesium and Technetium from Hanford Tank 241-AN-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The pretreatment process for BNFL, Inc.'s Hanford River Protection Project is to provide decontaminated low activity waste and concentrated eluate streams for vitrification into low and high activity waste glass, respectively. The pretreatment includes sludge washing, filtration, precipitation, and ion exchange processes to remove entrained solids, cesium, transuranics, technetium, and strontium. The cesium (Cs-137) and technetium (Tc-99) ion exchange removal is accomplished by using SuperLig 644, and 639 resins from IBC Advanced Technologies, American Fork, Utah. The resins were shown to selectively remove cesium and technetium (as anionic pertechnetate ) from alkaline salt solutions. The efficiency of ion exchange column loading and elution is a complex function involving feed compositions, equilibrium and kinetic behavior of ion exchange resins, diffusion, and the ionic strength and pH of the aqueous solution. A previous experimental program completed at the Savannah River Tech nology Center2 demonstrated the conceptualized flow sheet parameters with an Envelope C sample from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107. Those experiments also included determination of Cs and Tc batch distribution coefficients by SuperLig 644 and 639 resins and demonstration of small-scale column breakthrough and elution. The experimental findings were used in support of preliminary design bases and pretreatment flow sheet development by BNFL, Inc

  17. Environmental behavior of technetium in soil and vegetation: implications for radiological impact assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, F.O.

    1982-04-01

    Significant radiological exposures have been estimated for hypothetical atmospheric releases of Tc-99 from gaseous diffusion facilities when vegetation-to-soil concentration ratios representative of laboratory experiments are substituted for generic default values assumed in current regulatory models. To test the relevancy of these laboratory ratios, field investigations were conducted to obtain measurements of the vegetation-to-soil concentration ratio for Tc-99 in samples collected near operating gaseous diffusion facilities and to observe the dynamic behavior of technetium in soil and vegetation following a single application of a sprayed solution of /sup 95m/TcO 4 - Comparison of observed field concentration ratios and calculated steady-state concentration ratios with ratios obtained from previous laboratory experiments indicates that concentration ratios obtained from field data are one to two orders of magnitude less than those obtained from the laboratory. Furthermore, a substantial accumulation of technetium in soil and vegetation may not occur over long periods of time, since concentrations of technetium in both environmental media were observed to decrease with time subsequent to initial application of /sup 95m/TcO 4 -

  18. Technetium-labeled HM-PAO studies in patients with cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.W.; Sharp, P.F.; Gemmell, H.; Evans, N.T.; MacDonald, A.F.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-labeled hexamethyl-propyleneamineoxime (HM-PAO) is a promising radiopharmaceutical for the demonstration of cerebral blood flow. Twenty-four patients who had experienced either acute stroke (AS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) were studied by x-ray CT and SPECT using technetium-labeled HM-PAO total of 26 studies. HM-PAO has a cerebral distribution similar to that of iodoamphetamine, but labeling with technetium allows good SPECT imaging on demand in any nuclear medicine department. In ten of the 16 patients who had experienced AS, findings on HM-PAO and CT studies correlated well. In six patients reduced cortical perfusion was detected on HM-PAO imaging, but only small infarcts in the internal capsule were seen on CT. In four of the eight patients who had experienced TIA, neither study revealed any abnormality. In the remaining four, areas of cortical underperfusion were seen on HM-PAO imaging, whereas the CT examination was normal. The findings in this study suggest that HM-PAO imaging is a more sensitive method for demonstrating the extent of cerebral underperfusion in cases of cerebrovascular accident

  19. Removal of Technetium, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Metals from DOE Properties - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Ponder, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    This research is a three year project involving close collaboration between chemists at Pennsylvania State University and materials scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the project is the development and characterization of supported reducing agents, and solid waste forms derived from them, which will be effective in remediation of aqueous wastes. The work follows the recent discovery that zero-valent metals, such as iron, are effective decontaminants for waste streams containing chlorinated hydrocarbons. Preliminary data, obtained at Penn State and elsewhere, have shown that the same strategy will be effective in reducing soluble compounds containing toxic metals (technetium, lead, mercury, and chromium) to insoluble forms. The Penn State group has prepared a new class of powerful reducing agents, called Ferragels, which consist of finely divided zero-valent metals on high surface area supports. Because the rate of the surface oxidation-reduction reaction depends on available surface area, Ferragels are more effective in every case tested to date than unsupported metals. The project will further develop and investigate the application of these composite materials to problems relevant to the DOE-EM mission, namely the detoxification of waste streams containing technetium, carbon tetrachloride, and toxic metal ions. The Penn State group will work closely with the PNNL group to prepare materials that are compatible with the highly corrosive liquid fraction of Hanford site tank waste, to conduct tests with waste simulants containing technetium, and to formulate and characterize vitrified waste forms derived from these materials

  20. A neutral lipophilic technetium-99m complex for regional cerebral blood flow imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narra, R.K.; Nunn, A.D.; Kuczynski, B.L.; DiRocco, R.J.; Feld, T.; Silva, D.A.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Technetium-99m-DMG-2MP (Chloro[bis[2,3-butanedionedioxime(1-)-0][2,3- butanedionedioximato (2-)-N,N',N double-prime,N'double-prime,N double-prime double-prime,N'double-prime double-prime] (2-methylpropyl borato (2-))technetium]), also known as SQ 32097 is a member of a family of neutral lipophilic compounds generally known as boronic acid adducts of technetium dioxime complexes (BATOs). After i.v. administration, the concentration of [ 99m Tc]DMG-2MP in various regions of the brain appears to be proportional to blood flow. In rats, 1.1% ID was in the brain at 5 min postinjection when the blood contained less than 3% ID. Over 24 hr excretion was 59% in the feces and 23% in the urine. The activity in monkey brain at 5 min was 2.8% ID and it cleared with a t1/2 of 86 min. Autoradiographs of monkey brain sections showed excellent regional detail with a gray/white ratio of 3.6 at 10 min. The distribution of [ 99m Tc]DMG-2MP in the monkey brain corresponds to the known cytoarchitectural pattern of cerebral glucose metabolism. The properties of [ 99m Tc]DMG-2MP make it a potentially useful agent for cerebral perfusion imaging in man

  1. Crystalline perfection and mechanical investigations on vertical Bridgman grown Bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) single crystals for thermoelectric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, Anuj [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR- National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); X-ray Analysis and Crystal Growth Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Vijayan, N., E-mail: nvijayan@nplindia.org [X-ray Analysis and Crystal Growth Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, Budhendra [TEMA-NRD, Mechanical Engineering Department and Aveiro Institute of Nanotechnology (AIN), University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Thukral, Kanika [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR- National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); X-ray Analysis and Crystal Growth Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Maurya, K.K. [X-ray Analysis and Crystal Growth Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2016-03-07

    High efficiency thermoelectric materials plays a vital role in power generation and refrigeration applications. Bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) is one among them. In the present work single crystal of bismuth telluride was grown using vertical Bridgman technique. The phase of grown crystals was analysed using a powder X-ray diffractometer. Quality of the grown crystal was assessed by using high resolution X-ray diffractometer and observed that it is fairly good. Further mechanical investigations on grown crystal was carried out using nano-indentation technique and various mechanical properties like hardness, stiffness and Young’s modulus were evaluated. Observed results clearly indicate its suitability for thermoelectric applications.

  2. Application of the ruthenium and technetium thermodynamic data bases used in the EQ3/6 geochemical codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.

    1985-04-01

    Based on a critical review of the available thermodynamic data, computerized data bases for technetium and ruthenium were created for use with the EQ3/6 geochemical computer codes. The technetium data base contains thermodynamic data for 8 aqueous species and 15 solids; 26 aqueous species and 9 solids were included in the ruthenium data base. The EQ3NR code was used to calculate solubility limits for ruthenium (8 x 10 -16 M) in ground water from Yucca Mountain, a potential nuclear waste repository site near the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The code confirmed the essentially unlimited solubility of technetium in oxidizing conditions, such as those that are believed to exist in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain and the Cambric Nuclear event site at the NTS. Ruthenium migration observed from the Cambric site was evaluated. The solubility limit for ruthenium (as the aqueous species RuO 4 - ) when constrained by RuO 2 is approximately equal to the concentration of ruthenium found in the cavity ground water (i.e., 2.1 x 10 -11 vs 4.5 x 10 -11 M). Differences in ruthenium solubility limits between Yucca Mountain and Cambric are primarily due to differences in ground-water pH. Technetium solubility (3 x 10 -8 M) for moderately reducing conditions (Eh = -0.1 V) using the metastable oxide, TcO 2 .2H 2 O, as the solubility constraint is within the range of experimental values recently published in a study of technetium sorption on basalt. Previously published technetium solubilities of 10 -12 to 10 -16 M were apparently based on a technetium data base that did not include aqueous species other than TcO 4 - . When TcO(OH) 2 0 is included in the data base, the calculated values are much closer to the experimental results. Eh-pH diagrams were also generated for a variety of conditions using the SOLUPLOT code

  3. Ag-tellurides at the site Treibolc near the village Hodrusa-Hamre; Ag-teluridy na lokalite Treibolc pri obci Hodrusa-Hamre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, J [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra mineralogie a petrologie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    Ag-tellurides were described in association with galenite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and bornite samples during examining hydrothermal mineralization of Stiavnica stratovolcano (Hodrusa-Hamre settlement) in heavily silicified sediments of Permian age. They were found and confirmed by WDS analysis. Their presence on the site is very unique with no economic use. Paragenesis originated at 250-270 grad C in the presence of fluid and zero salinity. (authors)

  4. LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

    2012-06-01

    This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The

  5. Transfer across the human gut of environmental technetium in lobsters (Homarus gammarus L.) from the Irish Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.J. [The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: g.j.hunt@cefas.co.uk; Young, A.K.; Bonfield, R.A. [The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk NR33 0HT (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    Few data are available on the uptake by the human gut of the element technetium. Of current radiological interest in connection with discharges of technetium-99 in liquid discharges from BNFL, Sellafield, is uptake from European lobsters (Homarus gammarus), whose edible parts are known to concentrate technetium. In this study, a group of eight adult volunteers (six males and two females) ate samples of edible flesh from lobsters caught off the west Cumbrian coast and provided 24 h samples of urine and faeces for analysis. Detection of uptake from the gut by difference between intake and faecal measurements proved insensitive, suggesting a low value of the gut transfer factor (f{sub 1} value) of up to 0.1 with a maximum (two standard deviations) level of about 0.3. In urine, technetium was detectable at a relatively low level compared with the intakes, consistent with a low absorption across the gut. Values for f{sub 1} were derived with the aid of literature data for excretion following intravenous administration of technetium-95m as pertechnetate, and gave averaged data for f{sub 1} in the range 0.046 to 0.23. These results are in broad conformity with those derived from the faecal measurements, and suggest a lower value than the 0.5 used by ICRP. (author)

  6. Diagnostic usefulness of technetium-99m (V) DMSA scintigraphy in cases of soft tissue tumors; In comparison with that of Ga-67 citrate scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Kotoura, Yoshihiko; Hanbara, Harumi; Hosono, Makoto; Yamamuro, Takao; Konishi, Junji (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    Technetium-99m (V) DMSA scintigraphy was performed in 76 patients with pathologically confirmed soft tissue diseases. In 56 patients, gallium-67 citrate scintigraphy was performed within two weeks after technetium-99m (V) DMSA scintigraphy. Significant uptake of technetium-99m (V) DMSA was found in all cases of sarcoma, metastatic carcinoma, progressive benignancy (extra-abdominal desmoid etc.) and granulomatous lesions, but was not found in cases of benign, solid tumors in the soft tissue (leiomyoma, neurinoma, lipoma etc.). In conclusion, it is not necessary to treat patients with soft tissue tumors in which technetium-99m (V) DMSA did not accumulate. Therefore, it can be stated that technetium-99m (V) DMSA scintigraphy is useful for the screening of malignant tumors. (author).

  7. Modelling of illuminated current–voltage characteristics to evaluate leakage currents in long wavelength infrared mercury cadmium telluride photovoltaic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Qiu, WeiCheng; Hu, Weida

    2014-01-01

    The current–voltage characteristics of long wavelength mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors have been studied using a recently suggested method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. Diodes fabricated on in-house grown arsenic and vacancy doped epitaxial layers were evaluated for their leakage currents. The thermal diffusion, generation–recombination (g-r), and ohmic currents were found as principal components of diode current besides a component of photocurrent due to illumination. In addition, both types of diodes exhibited an excess current component whose growth with the applied bias voltage did not match the expected growth of trap-assisted-tunnelling current. Instead, it was found to be the best described by an exponential function of the type, I excess  = I r0  + K 1 exp (K 2 V), where I r0 , K 1 , and K 2 are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. A study of the temperature dependence of the diode current components and the excess current provided the useful clues about the source of origin of excess current. It was found that the excess current in diodes fabricated on arsenic doped epitaxial layers has its origin in the source of ohmic shunt currents. Whereas, the source of excess current in diodes fabricated on vacancy doped epitaxial layers appeared to be the avalanche multiplication of photocurrent. The difference in the behaviour of two types of diodes has been attributed to the difference in the quality of epitaxial layers

  8. Growth of Bi doped cadmium zinc telluride single crystals by Bridgman oscillation method and its structural, optical, and electrical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcelen, V.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, J.; Dieguez, E.; Hidalgo, P.

    2010-01-01

    The II-VI compound semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is very useful for room temperature radiation detection applications. In the present research, we have successfully grown Bi doped CZT single crystals with two different zinc concentrations (8 and 14 at. %) by the Bridgman oscillation method, in which one experiment has been carried out with a platinum (Pt) tube as the ampoule support. Pt also acts as a cold finger and reduces the growth velocity and enhances crystalline perfection. The grown single crystals have been studied with different analysis methods. The stoichiometry was confirmed by energy dispersive by x-ray and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy analyses and it was found there is no incorporation of impurities in the grown crystal. The presence of Cd and Te vacancies was determined by cathodoluminescence studies. Electrical properties were assessed by I-V analysis and indicated higher resistive value (8.53x10 8 Ω cm) for the crystal grown with higher zinc concentration (with Cd excess) compare to the other (3.71x10 5 Ω cm).

  9. A simple fast microwave-assisted synthesis of thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanoparticles from homogeneous reaction-mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Susmita [Jadavpur University, Department of Instrumentation Science (India); Das, Rashmita [Jadavpur University, Department of Instrumentation and Electronics Engineering (India); Bhar, Radhaballabh [Jadavpur University, Department of Instrumentation Science (India); Bandyopadhyay, Rajib [Jadavpur University, Department of Instrumentation and Electronics Engineering (India); Pramanik, Panchanan, E-mail: pramanik1946@gmail.com [GLA University, Department of Chemistry and Nanoscience (India)

    2017-02-15

    A new simple chemical method for synthesis of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) has been developed by microwave assisted reduction of homogeneous tartrate complexes of bismuth and tellurium metal ions with hydrazine. The reaction is performed at pH 10. The nano-crystallites have rhombohedral phase identified by XRD. The size distribution of nanoparticle is narrow and it ranges between 50 to 70 nm. FESEM shows that the fine powders are composed of small crystallites. The TEM micrographs show mostly deformed spherical particles and the lattice fringes are found to be 0.137 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis shows the atomic composition ratio between bismuth and tellurium is 2:3. Thermoelectric properties of the materials are studied after sintering by spark plasma sintering method (SPS). The grain size of the material after sintering is in the nanometer range. The material shows enhanced Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity value at 300 K. The figure of merit is found to be 1.18 at 300 K.

  10. Templated growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) nanowires using pulsed-potentials in hot non-aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, T.; Raja, K.S.; Misra, M.

    2006-01-01

    A single step non-aqueous electrodeposition of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) nanowires on nanoporous TiO 2 substrate was investigated under pulsed-potential conditions. Propylene carbonate was used as the non-aqueous medium. Cyclic voltammogram studies were carried out to understand the growth mechanism of CZT. EDAX and XRD measurements indicated formation of a compound semiconductor with a stoichiometry of Cd 1-x Zn x Te, where x varied between 0.04 and 0.2. Variation of the pulsed-cathodic potentials could modulate the composition of the CZT. More negative cathodic potentials resulted in increased Zn content. The nanowires showed an electronic band gap of about 1.6 eV. Mott-Schottky analyses indicated p-type semiconductor properties of both as-deposited and annealed CZT materials. Increase in Zn content increased the charge carrier density. Annealing of the deposits resulted in lower charge carrier densities, in the order of 10 15 cm -3

  11. Comparison of Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride semiconductor and Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite scintillator as photon detectors for epithermal neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Gorini, G.; Imberti, S.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2006-01-01

    The range of applications of epithermal neutron scattering experiments has been recently extended by the development of the Resonance Detector. In a Resonance Detector, resonant neutron absorption in an analyzer foil results in prompt emission of X- and γ-rays which are detected by a photon counter. Several combinations of analyzer foils and photon detectors have been studied and tested over the years and best results have been obtained with the combination of a natural uranium and (i) Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) semiconductor (ii) Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite (YAP) scintillators. Here we compare the performance of the CZT semiconductor and YAP scintillator as Resonance Detector units. Two Resonance Detector prototypes made of natural uranium foil viewed by CZT and YAP were tested on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The results show that both YAP and CZT can be used to detect epithermal neutrons in the energy range from 1 up to 66 eV. It was found that the signal-to-background ratio of the measurement can significantly be improved by raising the lower level discrimination threshold on the γ energy to about 600 keV. The advantages/disadvantages of the choice of a Resonance Detector based on YAP or CZT are discussed together with some potential applications

  12. CsAg{sub 5}Te{sub 3}: a new metal-rich telluride with a unique tunnel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Li [Rutgers Univ., Camden, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chem.; Hongyou, Guo [Rutgers Univ., Camden, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chem.; Xiang, Zhang [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kanatzidis, M G [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-02-15

    The synthesis and structure of a new ternary silver telluride, CsAg{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, is described. The compound was prepared from a Cs{sub 2}Te-CaTe-Te flux but it can also be prepared from a direct combination of Cs{sub 2}Te and Ag{sub 2}Te under vacuum at 600 C. The crystal data for CsAg{sub 5}Te{sub 3} at 20 C (Mo K{alpha} radiation) are as follows: a=14.672(2) A and c=4.601(3) A; V=990.5(8) A{sup 3}; Z=4; D{sub calc}=7.075 g cm{sup -3}; space group, P4{sub 2} /mnm (No. 136); 2{theta}{sub max}=50 ; number of independent data collected, 572; number of data observed with I>3{sigma}(I), 267; number of variables, 32; {mu}=218.51 cm{sup -1}; extinction coefficient, 0.585x10{sup -7}; final R=0.040; R{sub w}=0.046; goodness of fit, 1.42. The compound features a new structure type with Cs{sup +}-filled, relatively large tunnels running through the lattice. The material is a semiconductor with a band gap of about 0.65 eV. ((orig.))

  13. Synthesis, characterization and enhanced thermoelectric performance of structurally ordered cable-like novel polyaniline–bismuth telluride nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Krishanu; Mitra, Mousumi; Banerjee, Dipali; Kargupta, Kajari; Ganguly, Saibal

    2013-01-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi 2 Te 3 ) nanorods and polyaniline (PANI) nanoparticles have been synthesized by employing solvothermal and chemical oxidative processes, respectively. Nanocomposites, comprising structurally ordered PANI preferentially grown along the surface of a Bi 2 Te 3 nanorods template, are synthesized using in situ polymerization. X-ray powder diffraction, UV–vis and Raman spectral analysis confirm the highly ordered chain structure of PANI on Bi 2 Te 3 nanorods, leading to a higher extent of doping, higher chain mobility and enhancement of the thermoelectric performance. Above 380 K, the PANI–Bi 2 Te 3 nanocomposite with a core–shell/cable-like structure exhibits a higher thermoelectric power factor than either pure PANI or Bi 2 Te 3 . At room temperature the thermal conductivity of the composite is lower than that of its pure constituents, due to selective phonon scattering by the nanointerfaces designed in the PANI–Bi 2 Te 3 nanocable structures. The figure of merit of the nanocomposite at room temperature is comparable to the values reported in the literature for bulk polymer-based composite thermoelectric materials. (paper)

  14. Bismuth telluride topological insulator nanosheet saturable absorbers for q-switched mode-locked Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiantao; Gross, Simon; Withford, Michael J.; Fuerbach, Alexander [Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) and MQ Photonics Research Centre, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie Univ., NSW (Australia); Zhang, Han; Guo, Zhinan [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Centre for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China)

    2016-08-15

    Nanosheets of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}), a topological insulator material that exhibits broadband saturable absorption due to its non-trivial Dirac-cone like energy structure, are utilized to generate short pulses from Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers. By depositing multiple layers of a carefully prepared Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} solution onto a glass substrate, the modulation depth and the saturation intensity of the fabricated devices can be controlled and optimized. This approach enables the realization of saturable absorbers that feature a modulation depth of 13% and a saturation intensity of 997 kW/cm{sup 2}. For the first time to our knowledge, Q-switched mode-locked operation of a linearly polarized mid-IR ZBLAN waveguide chip laser was realized in an extended cavity configuration using the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The maximum average output power of the laser is 16.3 mW and the Q-switched and mode-locked repetition rates are 44 kHz and 436 MHz, respectively. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Diagnostic performance of a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera system assessed using fractional flow reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hirokazu; Chikamori, Taishiro; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hida, Satoshi; Igarashi, Yuko; Yamashita, Jun; Ogawa, Masashi; Shiba, Chie; Usui, Yasuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Although the novel cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) camera system provides excellent image quality, its diagnostic value using thallium-201 as assessed on coronary angiography (CAG) and fractional flow reserve (FFR) has not been validated. METHODS AND RESULTS: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the CZT ultrafast camera system (Discovery NM 530c), 95 patients underwent stress thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and then CAG within 3 months. Image acquisition was performed in the supine and prone positions after stress for 5 and 3 min, respectively, and in the supine position at rest for 10 min. Significant stenosis was defined as ≥90% diameter narrowing on visual estimation, or a lesion with <90% and ≥50% stenosis and FFR ≤0.75. To detect individual coronary stenosis, the respective sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 90%, 64%, and 78% for left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis, 78%, 84%, and 81% for left circumflex stenosis, and 83%, 47%, and 60% for right coronary artery (RCA) stenosis. The combination of prone and supine imaging had a higher specificity for RCA disease than supine imaging alone (65% vs. 47%), with an improvement in accuracy from 60% to 72%. Using thallium-201 with short acquisition time, combined with prone imaging, CZT SPECT had a high diagnostic yield in detecting significant coronary stenosis as assessed using FFR.

  16. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Kriegner, Christopher J.; Schew, William A.; Kaczmar, Swiatoslav W.; Traister, Matthew; Wilson, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted

  17. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Kriegner, Christopher J.; Schew, William A.; Kaczmar, Swiatoslav W.; Traister, Matthew; Wilson, David J. [O' Brien and Gere, Ecological Sciences, E. 512 Township Line Road, Two Valley Square, Suite 120, Blue Bell, PA 19422 (United States)

    2008-01-15

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted. (author)

  18. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  19. Validation of measurements of Fourier phase and amplitude analysis of technetium99 gated cardiac scans using artificial hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiannikas, J.; Takatani, S.; MacIntyre, W.J.; Underwood, D.A.; Cook, S.A.; Go, R.T.; Napoli, C.; Nose, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The use of artificial hearts, developed for total heart replacement programs, allows assessment of the accuracy of measuring the first Fourier component phase and amplitude when applied to gated cardiac technetium 99 scans. In the extreme example of asynchrony of ventricular contraction in coronary artery disease that of ventricular aneurysms, the first Fourier component measurements of amplitude were highly correlated to volume increases suggesting that the calculated amplitude accurately reflects volume changes. The calculated asynchrony using Fourier analysis of the gated technetium 99 studies of two artificial hearts was highly accurate when compared to the predetermined calculation of phase angle difference and hence degree of asynchrony. The studies suggest that measurement of phase and amplitude using the first Fourier component of time-activity waves of gated cardiac technetium 99 studies accurately measure degree of asynchrony and volume changes respectively

  20. Investigation into the mobility of technetium (and selenium) in aquifers in Northern Germany, and of technetium in contact with natural mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, A.

    1989-01-01

    Technetium is the lightest radio element of the periodic system (No. 43). While primordial Tc doesn't exist in nature (on earth) any longer, it is produced in nuclear reactors with 6.13% of the fission products. Tc-99 has a half life of 2.13 E+5 years. A very poor retardation occurs during transportation through aquifers under oxidizing conditions. Combined with the long half life this is the reason for Tc's great hazard potential. In addition, if there is migration from the disposal site, Tc is one of the problematic elements. In aqueous solutions, Tc (VI) and (VII) are the most important valence states. Other states are only stable in connection with complexing ligands. Under reducing conditions Tc (IV) is more or less immobile. (orig.) With 95 figs., 45 tabs., 5 annexes [de

  1. Clinical comparison of cardiac blood pool visualization with technetium-99m red blood cells labeled in vivo and with technetium-99m human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, J.H.; Freitas, J.E.; Swanson, D.; Rogers, W.L.; Clare, J.M.; Brown, M.L.; Pitt, B.

    1978-01-01

    Technetium-99m red blood cells (Tc-RBC) labeled by an in vivo technique were compared with two preparations of Tc-99m human serum albumin (HSA) for cardiac blood-pool imaging. Relative distribution of the tracers was analyzed on end-diastolic frames of gated blood-pool studies and on whole-body (head to mid-thigh) anterior pinhole images. The Tc-RBC demonstrated greater relative percentage localization in the cardiac blood pool, higher target-to-background ratios in the left ventricle, and less liver concentration. For cardiac blood-pool imaging, Tc-RBC labeled by the in vivo approach appears to be superior to the two Tc-HSA preparations studied

  2. Specifications and Quality of Technetium99m Produced diopharmaceuticals According to Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaia, Jamal; Ben Othman, Monji H.; Maatoug, Maatoug A.; Maatoug, M. Omar

    2003-01-01

    A Technological revolution has occurred in the last two decades of this century in field of Cold Kits preparations processed by Lyophilization technique (A drying process while frozen) which are labeled afterwards with Technetium-99m radionuclide. Such materials are intended to be used as Radiopharmaceutical probes in nuclear medicine for the diagnosis of dynamic and static conditions of organs, and therefore; uncovering of diseases and syndromes targeting humans. Preferability and the advantages of such kits labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide over other types of radiopharmaceuticals is attributed to the unique physical properties of the radionuclide including its short half life of 6.02 hours, low photon energy of 140 keV, lacking of alpha and beta particles which are usually exposing patients to have additional exposed doses. Moreover, simplicity in obtaining such radionuclide in form portable generators containing the mother radionuclide Molybdenum - 99 (i.e. solvent extraction generators or adsorption column chromatographic generators) for-on-the- spot-labeling, and the ability of formulating the cold kits as chemical complexes located at different organs of human body. Those lyophilized kits intended for radiopharmaceutical preparations labeled with Technetium - 99m radionuclide must stand for quality assurance standards and assessments for the sake of safety, efficiency, apyrogenecity, radiochemical purity, in- vivo stability and suitability for the endeavor planed for. Therefore, in order to control and optimize those considerations, implementations of the so-called GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE composed of regulations and constitutional laws related to the process of preparation and final produced preparation must take place.(author)

  3. PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE LOW-TEMPERATURE WASTE FORM TECHNOLOGY COUPLED WITH TECHNETIUM REMOVAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.

    2014-05-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) is engaging the national laboratories to provide the scientific and technological rigor to support EM program and project planning, technology development and deployment, project execution, and assessment of program outcomes. As an early demonstration of this new responsibility, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have been chartered to implement a science and technology program addressing low-temperature waste forms for immobilization of DOE aqueous waste streams, including technetium removal as an implementing technology. As a first step, the laboratories examined the technical risks and uncertainties associated with the Cast Stone waste immobilization projects at Hanford. Science and technology needs were identified for work associated with 1) conducting performance assessments and risk assessments of waste form and disposal system performance, and 2) technetium chemistry in tank wastes and separations of technetium from waste processing streams. Technical approaches to address the science and technology needs were identified and an initial sequencing priority was suggested. The following table summarizes the most significant science and technology needs and associated approaches to address those needs. These approaches and priorities will be further refined and developed as strong integrated teams of researchers from national laboratories, contractors, industry, and academia are brought together to provide the best science and technology solutions. Implementation of a science and technology program that addresses these needs by pursuing the identified approaches will have immediate benefits to DOE in reducing risks and uncertainties associated with near-term decisions regarding supplemental immobilization at Hanford. Longer term, the work has the potential for cost savings and for providing a strong technical foundation for future

  4. Parallel critical magnetic fields of superconducting hyperthin films of vanadium and technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplov, A.A.; Mikheeva, M.N.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of limiting parallel magnetic fields Hsub(c parallel) destroying a superconducting state in films of vanadium and technetium is found out. A dependence of Hsub(c parallel) on the thickness of films up to d approximately 60 A is studied. The |dHsub(c parallel)sup(2)/dT|sub(Tsub(c)) derivative, which increases in the region of large d with the increase of 1/d and achieves the maximum va;ue at d approximately 100 A, was determined, using the experimental data. For the most thin films this derivative tends to drop (the value of the derivative changes from 16 up to 20.00 kOe 2 /k and for technetium and from 4 up to 2100 kOe 2 /k for vanadium). Such stop at |dHsub(c11)sup(2)/ dT|sub(Tsub(c)) growth during the decrease of d is not explained in the framework of the theory taking into account only orbital effects. An account of the additional paramagnetic effect (spin effects) leads to a good agreement of the experiment with the theory in the whole range of thicknesses for vanadium. For technetium films in the d range <=110 A the value of Hsub(c parallel) exceeds several times Hsub(c parallel) calculated with provision of spin effects. For d approximately 80 A and d approximately 55 A this increase achieves the triple value. This effect is explained qualitatively by the spin-orbital scattering appearing with the increase of the atomic number

  5. Elimination of interference of 129-iodine by its adsorption at extraction separation of 99-technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metelkova, M.; Tkac, P.; Kopunec, R.

    2001-01-01

    Three types of macro-amount of anions SO 4 2- , CO 3 2- , OH - in the presence of I- were chosen in this work for comparison of competition with TcO 4 - anions in extraction reaction with Ph 4 As + , where weak, medium and strong competition can be expected respectively. Ph 4 AsCl in chloroform was used as organic phase. The influence of solid AgI or AgCl on Tc extraction was also studied in this extraction systems. The extraction of technetium after four-multiplied extraction from chosen solutions was studied. This procedure was applied in the process of Tc extraction from solutions of reprocessing plant. Various concentrations of K 2 CrO 4 and UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 in water phase on Tc extraction was investigate, too. The influence of I - ( 131 I) in the process of extraction separation of technetium was studied. The iodine removal was taken out from the solution by its adsorption on insoluble AgI or AgCl phase. The yields for 99m Tc were higher than 95% in organic phase and for 131 I higher than 80% in AgI or AgCl. It is possible to note, that this procedure can be also applied for 99 Tc and 129 I separation and estimation. The results of the extraction are presented in the form of graphical plots of technetium distribution ratio (D Tc , log D Tc ) or extraction yield (E Tc %) against concentration of investigate component in aqueous phase. (authors)

  6. Sorption of technetium on composite chitosan-hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pivarciova, L.; Rosskopfova, O.; Galambos, M.; Rajec, P.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterials such as natural polymers (chitosan) and hydroxyapatite have an important application in material for bone replacement. Most of chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites are prepared by mixing hydroxyapatite particles with chitosan matrices. Another method of preparation of chitosan/hydroxyapatite composite is in-situ generation of nano-hydroxyapatite in chitosan matrix. The most common biomaterial used in the past years in hard tissue regeneration was hydroxyapatite, owing to its properties as biocompatibility, bioactivity, non-toxicity, non-immunogenicity etc. Chitosan is a polyaminosacharide, partially deacetylated product of chitin. Chitosan can be used in combination with other materials to enhance bone growth such as bone filling paste. The aims of this work were: the influence of the contact time on sorption of pertechnate anions on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites; the effect of pH on sorption of pertechnate anions on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites; the effect of foreign ions on sorption of pertechnate anions on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites. The author concluded: the percentage of technetium sorption after 1 hour of contact time was > 97 %. In the initial pH range of 2.9-10.2, the percentage of technetium sorption on chitosan/hydroxyapatite composites CH/HA(A), CH/HA(B), CH/HA 30:70, ZCH was > 98 % and on CH/HA 50:50 was > 94%. The competition effect of Fe 2+ towards TcO 4 :- sorption is stronger than competition effect of other observed cations for all examined composites with the same weight ratio. The percentage of the technetium sorption was the same for all composites with the weight ratio of 30:70. (authors)

  7. Advances in technetium chemistry towards 99mTc receptor imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Spies, H.

    1997-01-01

    The development of the chemistry of technetium and its non-radioactive surrogate rhenium has been prompted by the trends and needs of nuclear medicine, which predominantly uses 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals for a broad range of diagnostics. Technetium-99m is the ideal radioisotope for tomographic single-photon emission tomography (SPECT) imaging due to its nuclear properties (6.2 h, E γ 140 keV) and ready availability through generator systems. Transition metals offer many opportunities for designing molecules by modifying the environment around the core, allowing certain biological properties to be imposed upon the molecule. Whereas research in the past was mainly concerned with biological properties that allow relatively unspecific functional imaging, as in brain or myocardium perfusion studies, nuclear medicine is now requiring more and more biochemical information on low capacity, high specificity targets. Many research groups have become involved in the search for new technetium-based compounds, called the third generation of 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals, that employ the principles of modern pharmacology to achieve biochemical specificity. There has been considerable interest in imaging CNS and other receptors with 99m Tc receptor-binding ligands. Such a 99m Tc CNS receptor-imaging agent is currently not yet in use because of the significant hurdles to be overcome in attaining this ambitious goal. However, some Tc and Re complexes of remarkable affinity in vitro, and the first high-affinity 99m Tc probes able to label the dopamine transporter in the brain by SPECT imaging prove the feasibility of this approach. (Author)

  8. Synthesis, libelling and bio-distribution of cerebral radiopharmaceuticals with Technetium 99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek Saied, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of brain pathologies especially neurodegenerative diseases still increasing due to longer life expectancy and the age pyramid evolution that shows an increase in the proportion of the old persons. So, we count currently more than 30 million persons affected by a neuro-degenerative disease. It is estimated that this number will reach 100 million at 2050. Generally, these diseases are not fatal, but the intellectual handicap and/or the progressive physical deterioration which causes some of them (Alzheimer, Parkinson), may lead to the death. Despite the screening efforts, it remains difficult to establish an early and differential diagnosis. It is proposed that research provides new solutions for diagnostic to reduce the risk of mortality associated with these diseases and improve patient comfort. The first part of this presentation is dedicated to some definitions of the radiopharmaceuticals, the chemistry of technetium and rhenium and the strategies of labeling with Technetium. We propose first to give an overview concerning the target vectors and criteria for crossing of the hemato-encephalic barrier. In the second part we will present our results concerning the synthesis and the physico-chemical characterization of some ferrocenic ligands, radio-complex of the technetium-99 and their "rhenisted" analogues. We will expose some bio-distributions as well as the biochemical studies of certain cytectrenic molecules which showed a very interesting affinity for 5HT1A serotonergic receptors such as Tc-MP associated to the molecule of piperazine (2 - methoxyphenyl) as a vector of choice. This molecule allows an exceptional kinetic of extraction around (2.47 pou cent DI / g) in 5min pi. (Author)

  9. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi in the diagnosis of acute chest pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilleece, T.; Salehi, N.; Better, N.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: A 45-year-old male was admitted to coronary care with a two-day history of recurrent chest pain. Despite maximal medical therapy, pain persisted. Examination and ECG with pain, were normal, suspicion of ischaemia was moderately high but coronary angiography was not immediately available. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi was prepared at the start of the day according to the standard preparation protocol (Du Pont). Coronary Care informed the Nuclear Medicine Department immediately the patient experienced a further episode of chest pain. Technetium-99m-Sestamibi was administered in coronary care, 4.30 minutes after being advised of the onset of further chest pain. Images were acquired 60 minute post-injection; 15 minutes after the patient had been given 200 mL of milk. A triple-headed gamma camera was used to acquire SPECT images over a 1200 arc, 30 frames of 30 seconds using a 64 x 64 matrix. The patient was laying prone with arms raised out of the field of view. Images showed a normal distribution of technetium-99m -Sestamibi throughout the myocardium. Due to ongoing clinical suspicion by the treating physician, coronary angiography was subsequently performed. This showed normal coronary arteries. Medical therapy was ceased and the patient discharged the next day. We concluded that the chest pain at the time of injection was not ischaemic. Previous trials had shown a 95% sensitivity for this method of diagnosing ischaemia. This method permits a novel and simple technique for diagnosing myocardial ischaemia and obviating the need for cardiac catheterization in this group of patients

  10. Peculiarities of the introduction of technetium isotopes into protein molecules - of human serum albumin as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanko, V.I.; Ovsyannikov, N.N.; Zuykova, N.P.; Gouskov, A.F.; Kovalchouk, N.D.

    1978-07-01

    Pecularities of the introduction of the radioisotope technetium 99m into the molecules of human serum albumin have been investigated. Tin not only participates in the Tc(V11) reduction process, but is incorporated into the originating Tc albumin complex. It is shown that no more than four technetium atoms enter into bond with an albumin molecule. The authors express their opinion that in order to produce high-quality protein preparations, the albumin has to be modified through a polyfunctional complexing agent which forms an entirely saturated coordination complex with Tc(IV)

  11. Pecularities of the introduction of technetium isotopes into protein molecules using human serum albumin as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanko, V.I.; Ovsyannikov, N.N.; Sujkova, N.P.; Gus'kov, A.F.; Koval'chuk, N.D.

    1978-01-01

    Pecularities of the introduction of the radioisotope technetium 99m into the molecules of human serum albumin have been investigated. Tin not only participates in the Tc(VII) reduction process, but is incorporated into the originating Tc albumin complex. It is shown that no more than four technetium atoms enter into bond with an albumin molecule. The authors express their opinion that in order to produce high-quality protein preparations, the albumin has to be modified through a polyfunctional complexing agent which forms an entirely saturated coordination complex with Tc(IV). (author)

  12. Benzimidazolyl methyliminodiacetic acids: new bifunctional chelators of technetium for hepatobiliary scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, F.C.; Wilson, J.G.; Maddalena, D.J.

    1979-01-01

    Dimethyl- and chloro- substituted benzimidazolyl methyliminodiacetic acids have been synthesized and evaluated as new bifunctional chelators of /sup 99m/Tc. Stannous chelates of these compounds were prepared as freeze-dried kits and labeled with /sup 99m/Tc. The radiopharmaceuticals thus prepared were rapidly excreted by the hepatobiliary system of rats and rabbits with little urinary excretion. The chloro- compound had a higher biliary and lesser urinary excretion than the dimethyl- however both technetium complexes provided good scintigraphic images of the hepatobiliary system in animals. The compounds behaved similarly to the /sup 99m/Tc-lidocaine iminodiacetic acid [HIDA] complexes with respect to their biliary elimination

  13. Technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT in patients with hemiconvulsions followed by Todd`s paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M.; Sejima, Hitoshi; Ozasa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Seiji [Department of Pediatrics, Shimane Medical University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, Shimane 693 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    We performed technetium-99m-hexamethylpropylene- amineoxime (Tc-HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography in two patients with prolonged hemiconvulsions followed by transient hemiparesis (Todd`s paralysis). In both cases, a prolonged post-ictal cerebral hyperperfusion state of approximately 24 h was observed, even after the neurological deficits had resolved. The cerebral hyperperfusion in both cases was of much longer duration than that in previously reported cases of single and uncomplicated focal seizures. The prolonged cerebral hyperperfusion might have been due to impairment of the cerebrovascular autoregulation in seizures followed by Todd`s paralysis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 9 refs.

  14. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal

  15. Chemical Speciation of Long-lived Radionuclide Technetium-99 and its Environmental Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Keliang

    issue for understanding its fate and behaviour in ecosystem. This thesis aims to develop series of analytical methods for rapid and accurate determination of total 99Tc in environmental samples (e.g., seaweed, soil, and seawater), as well as speciation analysis of 99Tc in seaweeds. The application of 99...... - sorption at different concentrations of H+ was deduced. With the application of two small TEVA columns (1.5 mL for each), decontamination factors of >104 for molybdenum and >105 for ruthenium and recovery of 60-95% for technetium were achieved for different environmental samples. An absolute detection...

  16. Technetium-99m labeled somatostatin and analogs: synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amartey, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Technetium-99m complexes of somatostatin and analogs were synthesized following the introduction of sulfhydryl groups with 2-iminothiolane (Traut's Reagent). In rats the complex was taken up by the liver, kidneys, adrenals, lungs and the pancreas. Analysis of urine samples of treated rats showed that the radiochemicals have reasonably good in vivo stability. This implies that the complexes may be potentially useful for biochemical characterization of somatostatin receptors and also in scintigraphic detection of somatostatin receptor positive tumors, especially for metastatic deposits in patients on somatostatin therapy. (Author)

  17. Technetium phosphate bone scan in the diagnosis of septic arthritis in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundberg, S.B.; Savage, J.P.; Foster, B.K.

    1989-01-01

    The technetium phosphate bone scans of 106 children with suspected septic arthritis were reviewed to determine whether the bone scan can accurately differentiate septic from nonseptic arthropathy. Only 13% of children with proved septic arthritis had correct blind scan interpretation. The clinically adjusted interpretation did not identify septic arthritis in 30%. Septic arthritis was incorrectly identified in 32% of children with no evidence of septic arthritis. No statistically significant differences were noted between the scan findings in the septic and nonseptic groups and no scan findings correlated specifically with the presence or absence of joint sepsis

  18. Technetium-99m labeling anti-amastigote polyclonal antibodies of Leishmania amazonensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, J.G.V.C.; Toledo, V.P.C.P.; Guimaraes, T.M.P.D.; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Simal, C.J.R.; Mota, L.G.; Diniz, S.O.F.; Cardoso, V.N.

    2002-01-01

    Anti-amastigote polyclonal antibody (IgG) was incubated with solutions of stannous chloride and sodium borohidride. After that, 3.7 MBq of technetium-99m ( 99m Tc) was added. A labeling yield of the antibody about 84% was obtained. After filtration of 99m Tc-IgG, the radiochemical purity increased from 84 to 95%. The labeling of IgG with 99m Tc did not modify the immunoreactivity of the antibody, since it was able to identify in vitro and in vivo the specific antigen of Leishmania amazonensis

  19. Improved modification for in vitro labeling of red blood cells with Technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerson, B.; Ballinger, J.R.; Gulenchyn, K.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have tested a modification of Brookhaven method for in vitro labeling of red blood cells (RBCs) with technetium-99m by adding an initial centrifugation step and performing the labeling on packed RBCs. This results in reproducible, high labeling efficiencies (99.3% +/- 0.4%, n = 50) after 15 min of incubation. The use of packed RBCs also results in a higher concentration of labeled RBCs (smaller bolus for injection) and less radiation exposure to the technologist. This technique has proved useful for radionuclide angiography, venography, gastrointestinal bleeding studies, and red cell mass determinations. It is particularly advantageous for RBC labeling in patients receiving chemotherapy

  20. Radiation hazards from horses undergoing scintigraphy using technetium -{sup 99m}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitelock, R.G. [Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield (United Kingdom)

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the extent of the radiation hazard to personnel from horses undergoing scintigraphy using technetium{sup 99m} methylene diphosphonate ({sup 99m}Tc{sup m}-MDP). From the data produced it is possible to derive safe working protocols which are comfortably within the legislated limits for whole body doses as set out in the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985. Measurements were made of the surface and environmental activities which result from individuals undergoing scintigraphic evaluation and also from urine contaminated bedding. The use of both high and low activities in the assessment of the radiation hazard to personnel and owners is considered. (author).

  1. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate imaging in acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, R.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1986-10-01

    Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) imaging was performed in five patients with acute renal failure associated with nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis. Four patients had phencyclidine intoxication and one had viral pneumonia. During the acute phase, marked uptake of pyrophosphate was seen in all patients in several muscle groups, but always in the thigh adductors. The results show that phencyclidine intoxication can result in diffuse muscle uptake of Tc-PYP without overt evidence of muscle injury. Tc-PYP imaging may provide a clue to the cause of acute renal failure in patients with suspected rhabdomyolysis in whom elevations of serum creatine phosphokinase concentrations are equivocal.

  2. On the technetium abundance determination in the atmospheres of red giants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipper, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    Technetium abundance in the atmospheres of S- and C-stars are estimated by comparing the synthetic and observed spectra for the TcI λ5924.47 region. It was found that reliable estimates are possible only for the pure S-stars and SC-stars. For the late carbon stars only the upper limit for the Tc abundance can be fiound. For TX Psc (C6.5) this was found to be lgε Tc =0.5

  3. Efficient one-step direct labelling of recombinant antibodies with technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberatore, M.; Neri, D.; Neri, G.; Pini, A.; Lurilli, A.P.; Ponzo, F.; Spampinato, G.; Padula, F.; Pala, A.; Colella, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    High-affinity bacterially expressed antibody fragments can nowadays be cloned from established hybridomas or, more conveniently, isolated directly from antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage. Such antibodies can be tagged with C-terminal peptide tags containing one cysteine residue, which represents a convenient functionalisation site for a number of applications, including technetium-99m labelling. Here we describe a simple one-step method for 99m Tc labelling of cysteine-tagged recombinant antibodies with more than 50% radionuclide incorporation. The labelled antibodies displayed full retention of immuoreactivity and good stability. (orig.)

  4. Study of technetium uptake in vegetation in the vicinity of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acox, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Technetium-99 was measured in vegetation and soil collected on and near the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to obtain an estimate of the soil-to-vegetation concentration factors. The concentration factors appear to be lognormally distributed with a geometric mean of 3.4 (Bq/kg dry wt. tissue per Bq/kg dry wt. soil) and a geometric standard deviation of 4.7. A dose commitment was calculated using a hypothetical 3.7 x 10 10 Bq Tc-99/year release and the actual CY-1981 concentration release of Tc-99. The radiological significance of Tc-99 in the terrestial food chain is substantially less than previously believed

  5. Technical considerations in gastric ulcer localization using technetium-99m sucralfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, S.G.; Wcislo, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    After the completion and evaluation of 17 patients studies using technetium-99m-labeled sucralfate for the detection of ulcerated areas, the authors felt that the technical aspects of the studies should be evaluated. The factors for evaluation are: the time the patient is kept fasting; the time the patient is being imaged and rotated for various anatomic views; the technologist time and camera time that are involved in one study; and the cost factor of the testing procedure. Based on the findings of their small sample of patients, the sensitivity of the test is uncertain

  6. Technical considerations in gastric ulcer localization using technetium-99m sucralfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, S.G.; Wcislo, W.J.

    1985-09-01

    After the completion and evaluation of 17 patients studies using technetium-99m-labeled sucralfate for the detection of ulcerated areas, the authors felt that the technical aspects of the studies should be evaluated. The factors for evaluation are: the time the patient is kept fasting; the time the patient is being imaged and rotated for various anatomic views; the technologist time and camera time that are involved in one study; and the cost factor of the testing procedure. Based on the findings of their small sample of patients, the sensitivity of the test is uncertain.

  7. Efficient one-step direct labelling of recombinant antibodies with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberatore, M. [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Policlinico Umberto I, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy); Neri, D. [Cambridge Centre for Protein Engineering - MRC Centre (United Kingdom); Neri, G. [Dipartimento di Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Siena (Italy); Pini, A. [Dipartimento di Biologia Molecolare, Universita di Siena (Italy); Lurilli, A.P. [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Policlinico Umberto I, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy); Ponzo, F. [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Policlinico Umberto I, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy); Spampinato, G. [Laboratorio di Biochimica degli Ormoni Sessuali, Il Instituto di Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy); Padula, F. [Laboratorio di Biochimica degli Ormoni Sessuali, Il Instituto di Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy); Pala, A. [Laboratorio di Biochimica degli Ormoni Sessuali, Il Instituto di Clinica Ostetrica e Ginecologica, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy); Colella, A.C. [Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale, Sezione di Medicina Nucleare, Policlinico Umberto I, Universita di Roma `La Sapienza` (Italy)

    1995-11-01

    High-affinity bacterially expressed antibody fragments can nowadays be cloned from established hybridomas or, more conveniently, isolated directly from antibody libraries displayed on filamentous phage. Such antibodies can be tagged with C-terminal peptide tags containing one cysteine residue, which represents a convenient functionalisation site for a number of applications, including technetium-99m labelling. Here we describe a simple one-step method for {sup 99m}Tc labelling of cysteine-tagged recombinant antibodies with more than 50% radionuclide incorporation. The labelled antibodies displayed full retention of immuoreactivity and good stability. (orig.)

  8. Labelling of Klebsiella pneumoniae with technetium-99m: a preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo Filho, M.; Pereira, J.A.A.; Boasquevisque, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The labeling of Klebsiella pneumoniae with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) seems to depend on the stannous ion (Sn ++ ) concentration. Starting at 3μg/ml of this ion is the suspension fluid an uptake of Tc-99m close to 90% was observed. The labeling is apparently strong, since the eluation of Tc-99m, after incubation of the tagged culture, in a water-bath at 37 0 C for several hours, was very weak. The viability of the culture was unaltered after treatment with tin and Tc-99m. (Author) [pt

  9. Technetium-99m scintigraphy associated with spondylolysis of the lumbar spine in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Wataru; Sudo, Nariomi; Nakazima, Kiyonori; Nakamura, Mitsutaka

    1987-01-01

    Eight children with spondylolysis, aged from 10 to 18 years of age, underwent bone scanning with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonic acid. Radioisotope (RI) uptake was significantly observed in the site marked by the separation of the pars interarticularis, compared with the other sites between the articular processes. This showed the increase in metabolic activity of bones, providing supplementary information in the initial diagnosis. At the completion of conservative treatment, RI uptake decreased, being seemingly attributable to the improvement of subjective symptoms. Bone scanning may, however, be unhelpful in detecting synostosis. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Technetium-99m scintigraphy associated with spondylolysis of the lumbar spine in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, W.; Sudo, N.; Nakazima, K.; Nakamura, M.

    1987-02-01

    Eight children with spondylolysis, aged from 10 to 18 years of age, underwent bone scanning with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonic acid. Radioisotope (RI) uptake was significantly observed in the site marked by the separation of the pars interarticularis, compared with the other sites between the articular processes. This showed the increase in metabolic activity of bones, providing supplementary information in the initial diagnosis. At the completion of conservative treatment, RI uptake decreased, being seemingly attributable to the improvement of subjective symptoms. Bone scanning may, however, be unhelpful in detecting synostosis.

  11. Sensitivity of technetium-99m-d,1-HMPAO to radiolysis in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubergen, K.; Corlija, M.; Volkert, W.A.; Holmes, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of technetium-99m- (99mTc) d,l-HMPAO to radiolytically induced dissociation in aqueous solutions was investigated. It was found that cobalt-60 (60Co) gamma irradiation of solutions containing 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO with only 1600 cGy reduced the lipophilic chelates' radiochemical purity (RCP) to 50%-60%. The radiolytic sensitivity of 99mTc-meso-HMPAO is significantly lower. The results indicate that radiolytically produced intermediates limit the in vitro stability of 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO

  12. Comparative synergistic (technetium-actinide) extraction chemistry by tributylphosphate and some amide extractants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condamines, N.; Musikas, C.

    1993-01-01

    In nuclear fuel reprocessing, technetium (TcO 4 - ) leads to bad interferences in the extractions, being synergistically co-extracted with different actinide cations as Uranium (VI), Plutonium (IV) and Zirconium (IV). It destroys the hydrazine in the reductive partition of U and Pu, it decreases the decontamination of U and Pu from fission products. Thus, its extraction behaviour with new extractants as N,N-diakylamides is useful to be known. TcO 4 - extraction in nitric acid media is compared for TBP and different amides. The influence of nitric acidity is related to the amides formula

  13. Radioimmunoimaging of subacute infective endocarditis using a technetium-99m monoclonal granulocyte-specific antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munz, D L; Sandrock, D; Emrich, D [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Morguet, A J; Heim, A; Sold, G; Figulla, H R; Kreuzer, H [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Kardiologie und Pulmonologie

    1991-12-01

    Immunoscintigraphy with a technetium-99m murine monoclonal IgG{sub 1} antibody directed against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) and carcinoembryonic antigen was performed with 20 patients with suspected subacute infective endocarditis (SIE) and 6 controls with suspected inflammatory/infectious disease elsewhere in the body. Immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography localised SIE in 11 of 15 patients in whom the disease could be confirmed. In 4 patients with validated SIE, the immunoscan was abnormal, and the echocardiogram was normal. In another 4 patients, the result was exactly the opposite. These findings suggest that the combination of immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography improves diagnostic efficacy in patients with suspected SIE. (orig.).

  14. Radioimmunoimaging of subacute infective endocarditis using a technetium-99m monoclonal granulocyte-specific antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munz, D.L.; Sandrock, D.; Emrich, D.; Morguet, A.J.; Heim, A.; Sold, G.; Figulla, H.R.; Kreuzer, H.

    1991-01-01

    Immunoscintigraphy with a technetium-99m murine monoclonal IgG 1 antibody directed against non-specific cross-reacting antigen (NCA-95) and carcinoembryonic antigen was performed with 20 patients with suspected subacute infective endocarditis (SIE) and 6 controls with suspected inflammatory/infectious disease elsewhere in the body. Immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography localised SIE in 11 of 15 patients in whom the disease could be confirmed. In 4 patients with validated SIE, the immunoscan was abnormal, and the echocardiogram was normal. In another 4 patients, the result was exactly the opposite. These findings suggest that the combination of immunoscintigraphy and echocardiography improves diagnostic efficacy in patients with suspected SIE. (orig.)

  15. Labeling of Tannic Acid with Technetium-99m for Diagnosis of Stomach Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, I. T.; El-Tawoosy, M.; Talaat, H. M.

    2011-01-01

    Tannic acid is a polyphenolic compound that could be labeled with technetium-99m. To produce about 90% yield of  99mTc-tannic acid in acidic media (pH), the conditions required were 150  g tin chloride, 30 min reaction time, and 200  g of the substrate. 99mTc-tannic was stable for 6 h. Oral biodistribution of 99mTc-tannic showed that it concentrated in the stomach ulcer to reach about 50% of the total injected dose at 1 h after orall administration. This concentration of 99mTc-tannic in s...

  16. Substituent effect on redox potential of nitrido technetium complexes with Schiff base ligand. Theoretical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, T.; Sekine, T.; Kudo, H.

    2003-01-01

    Theoretical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) were performed to understand the effect of substituents on the molecular and electronic structures of technetium nitrido complexes with salen type Schiff base ligands. Optimized structures of these complexes are square pyramidal. The electron density on a Tc atom of the complex with electron withdrawing substituents is lower than that of the complex with electron donating substituents. The HOMO energy is lower in the complex with electron withdrawing substituents than that in the complex with electron donating substituents. The charge on Tc atoms is a good measure that reflects the redox potential of [TcN(L)] complex. (author)

  17. evaluation of some technetium-99m fluoroquinolones complexes as imaging agents for bacterial inflammatory lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Kawy, O.A.A.

    2007-01-01

    in this study, the labeling method of ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin with technetium-99m and their biological evaluation in man-induced inflammation models were described . in -vitro microbiological evaluation of both complexes was also performed in order to investigate the effect of labeling on the activity and spectrum of both antibiotics. all the gathered biological data support the usefulness of 99m Tc-fluoroquinolones as infection imaging agents that could discriminate between infections and sterile inflammations. the freeze-dried form of levofloxacin kits was prepared and found to meet all the radiochemical and biological tests

  18. Molecular localisation of americium, technetium and cesium in edible marine animals. Their metabolic behavior and their consequences; Localisation moleculaire de l'americium, du technetium et du cesium chez des animaux marins comestibles leur comportement metabolique et ses consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieri, J; Goudard, F; Milcent, M C [Laboratoire de Biochimie et Radiochimie, Faculte des Sciences et des Techniques, Nantes Cedex (France)

    1992-07-01

    We show the molecular behavior of americium, technetium and cesium on the chromatographic pattern of each cytosol in the digestive gland of eel and lobster. The contamination by cadmium seems to compete with americium in the fractions of MW 10,000. Cesium shows an ionic behavior. (author)

  19. Technetium electrodeposition from aqueous formate solutions: electrolysis kinetics and material balance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslennikov, A.; Peretroukhine, V.

    1998-01-01

    The kinetics of the Tc electrodeposition and the material balance of potentiostatic electrolysis of formate buffer solutions (pH = 1.79-8.5) containing 5*10 -4 - 1*10 -2 M Tc(VII) at graphite cathode has been studied. The deposition of Tc from the solution was found to become possible at E x *y H 2 O (x ≤ 2, 1.5 cath. ) towards more negative values and the augmentation of the electrolyte surface/volume ratio (S/V) were found to increase the yield of the electrolysis and the rate of the electrodeposition process. A maximum technetium recovery of 92-95% has been observed in the electrolysis of neutral HCOONa solutions (pH = 6.0-7.5, μ = 1.0) containing up to 5*10 -1 M Tc(VII) at potentials of the graphite cathode E 2 . A starting Tc concentration in the solution of [Tc(VII)] > 5 *10 -1 M and the presence of more than 0.05 M NO 3 - in the electrolyte were found to suppress the recovery of technetium from the solution. (orig.)

  20. Stripping voltammetry of technetium using a TOA modified carbon paste electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruf, H.; Schorb, K.

    1989-10-01

    Low concentrations of technetium have been measured DP-stripping-voltammetrically using a carbon paste electrode modified with tri-n-octylamine (TOA-CPE). Preconcentration of the metal ion on the electrode surface accomplished by dipping of the latter in the sample solution which is 2M in HCl, relies on the chemical reaction with the amine acting as a liquid anion exchanger. Both, Tc-IV occurring as the TcCl 6 2- ion in chloride solutions as well as Tc-VII hereby are deposited. Measurements following deposition yield voltammograms of essentially different shapes for the two Tc species. With Tc-IV a characteristic curve with a prominent current signal at -280 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) is obtained which can be evaluated for Tc quantitation. However, starting from Tc-VII, complex voltammograms are registered not allowing direct technetium assays. Nevertheless, after reduction to Tc-IV, e.g. by means of ascorbic acid, also Tc-VII can be quantified reliably by the method described, the lower detection limit for both oxidation states being about 4x10 -8 M. (orig.) [de