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Sample records for tdic isotopic signature

  1. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M.E.; Krol, M.C.; Hofmann, M.E.G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of

  2. Statistical clumped isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röckmann, T.; Popa, M. E.; Krol, M. C.; Hofmann, M. E. G.

    2016-01-01

    High precision measurements of molecules containing more than one heavy isotope may provide novel constraints on element cycles in nature. These so-called clumped isotope signatures are reported relative to the random (stochastic) distribution of heavy isotopes over all available isotopocules of a molecule, which is the conventional reference. When multiple indistinguishable atoms of the same element are present in a molecule, this reference is calculated from the bulk (≈average) isotopic composition of the involved atoms. We show here that this referencing convention leads to apparent negative clumped isotope anomalies (anti-clumping) when the indistinguishable atoms originate from isotopically different populations. Such statistical clumped isotope anomalies must occur in any system where two or more indistinguishable atoms of the same element, but with different isotopic composition, combine in a molecule. The size of the anti-clumping signal is closely related to the difference of the initial isotope ratios of the indistinguishable atoms that have combined. Therefore, a measured statistical clumped isotope anomaly, relative to an expected (e.g. thermodynamical) clumped isotope composition, may allow assessment of the heterogeneity of the isotopic pools of atoms that are the substrate for formation of molecules. PMID:27535168

  3. Isotopic signatures by bulk analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efurd, D.W.; Rokop, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a series of measurement techniques for identification of nuclear signatures by analyzing bulk samples. Two specific applications for isotopic fingerprinting to identify the origin of anthropogenic radioactivity in bulk samples are presented. The first example is the analyses of environmental samples collected in the US Arctic to determine the impact of dumping of radionuclides in this polar region. Analyses of sediment and biota samples indicate that for the areas sampled the anthropogenic radionuclide content of sediments was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. The anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. It can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected. The second example is isotopic fingerprinting of water and sediment samples from the Rocky Flats Facility (RFP). The largest source of anthropogenic radioactivity presently affecting surface-waters at RFP is the sediments that are currently residing in the holding ponds. One gram of sediment from a holding pond contains approximately 50 times more plutonium than 1 liter of water from the pond. Essentially 100% of the uranium in Ponds A-1 and A-2 originated as depleted uranium. The largest source of radioactivity in the terminal Ponds A-4, B-5 and C-2 was naturally occurring uranium and its decay product radium. The uranium concentrations in the waters collected from the terminal ponds contained 0.05% or less of the interim standard calculated derived concentration guide for uranium in waters available to the public. All of the radioactivity observed in soil, sediment and water samples collected at RFP was naturally occurring, the result of processes at RFP or the result of global fallout. No extraneous anthropogenic alpha, beta or gamma activities were detected. The plutonium concentrations in Pond C-2 appear to vary seasonally

  4. Isotope geochemistry. Biological signatures in clumped isotopes of O₂.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Laurence Y; Ash, Jeanine L; Young, Edward D

    2015-04-24

    The abundances of molecules containing more than one rare isotope have been applied broadly to determine formation temperatures of natural materials. These applications of "clumped" isotopes rely on the assumption that isotope-exchange equilibrium is reached, or at least approached, during the formation of those materials. In a closed-system terrarium experiment, we demonstrate that biological oxygen (O2) cycling drives the clumped-isotope composition of O2 away from isotopic equilibrium. Our model of the system suggests that unique biological signatures are present in clumped isotopes of O2—and not formation temperatures. Photosynthetic O2 is depleted in (18)O(18)O and (17)O(18)O relative to a stochastic distribution of isotopes, unlike at equilibrium, where heavy-isotope pairs are enriched. Similar signatures may be widespread in nature, offering new tracers of biological and geochemical cycling. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Copper isotope signatures in modern marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan H.; Vance, Derek; McManus, James; Severmann, Silke; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2017-09-01

    The development of metal stable isotopes as tools in paleoceanography requires a thorough understanding of their modern marine cycling. To date, no Cu isotope data has been published for modern sediments deposited under low oxygen conditions. We present data encompassing a broad spectrum of hydrographic and redox regimes, including continental margin and euxinic (sulphide-containing) settings. Taken together with previously published data from oxic settings, these data indicate that the modern oceanic sink for Cu has a surprisingly homogeneous isotopic composition of about +0.3‰ (δ65Cu, relative to NIST SRM976). We suggest that this signature reflects one of two specific water-column processes: (1) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between soluble, isotopically heavy, Cu complexed to strong organic ligands and an isotopically light pool sorbed to particles that deliver Cu to the sediment, or (2) an equilibrium isotope fractionation between the same isotopically heavy ligand-bound pool and the particle reactive free Cu2+ species, with the latter being scavenged by particulates and thereby delivered to the sediment. An output flux of about +0.3‰ into sediments is isotopically light relative to the known inputs to the ocean (at around +0.6‰) and the seawater value of +0.6 to +0.9‰, suggesting the presence of an as yet unidentified isotopically light source of Cu to the oceans. We hypothesize that this source may be hydrothermal, or may result from the partial dissolution of continentally derived particles.

  6. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Brand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (13C and 18O abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the δ18O signature of CO2 from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires, and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the 18O signature of the produced CO2 is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects on the order of up to 26%permil; became obvious in the derived CO2 from combustion of different kinds of material, a clear differentiation of about 7‰ was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent 18O signature, sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO2 and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original total 18O signature of the material appeared to have little influence, however, a contribution of specific bio

  7. Geochemical and isotopic signatures for the identification of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study is to identify the extent of seawater intruded area by major geochemical and isotopic signatures. A total of 102 groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major and minor ions. Groundwater samples with electrical conductivity (EC) greater than 5000 S/cm and a river mouth sample ...

  8. Isotopic signatures of anthropogenic CH4 sources in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M.; Sherwood, O. A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Kessler, R.; Giroux, L.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2017-09-01

    A mobile system was used for continuous ambient measurements of stable CH4 isotopes (12CH4 and 13CH4) and ethane (C2H6). This system was used during a winter mobile campaign to investigate the CH4 isotopic signatures and the C2H6/CH4 ratios of the main anthropogenic sources of CH4 in the Canadian province of Alberta. Individual signatures were derived from δ13CH4 and C2H6 measurements in plumes arriving from identifiable single sources. Methane emissions from beef cattle feedlots (n = 2) and landfill (n = 1) had δ13CH4 signatures of -66.7 ± 2.4‰ and -55.3 ± 0.2‰, respectively. The CH4 emissions associated with the oil or gas industry had distinct δ13CH4 signatures, depending on the formation process. Emissions from oil storage tanks (n = 5) had δ13CH4 signatures ranging from -54.9 ± 2.9‰ to -60.6 ± 0.6‰ and non-detectable C2H6, characteristic of secondary microbial methanogenesis in oil-bearing reservoirs. In contrast, CH4 emissions associated with natural gas facilities (n = 8) had δ13CH4 signatures ranging from -41.7 ± 0.7‰ to -49.7 ± 0.7‰ and C2H6/CH4 molar ratios of 0.10 for raw natural gas to 0.04 for processed/refined natural gas, consistent with thermogenic origins. These isotopic signatures and C2H6/CH4 ratios have been used for source discrimination in the weekly atmospheric measurements of stable CH4 isotopes over a two-month winter period at the Lac La Biche (LLB) measurement station, located in Alberta, approximately 200 km northeast of Edmonton. The average signature of -59.5 ± 1.4‰ observed at LLB is likely associated with transport of air after passing over oil industry sources located south of the station.

  9. Isotopic Signature of the Ancient Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, D. J.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The age distribution of 261 field localities, sampled for their well-preserved Archean and Proterozoic sedimentary rocks, revealed a 500-700 Ma episodicity. Assuming that the numbers of sites are a proxy for mass of sediments, the record of well-preserved sediments is more abundant in the intervals 3.5-3.3, 2.8-2.5, 2.1-1.8, 1.5-1.3, and 1.0-0.54 Ga than in the intervening intervals. It is proposed that the crustal inventory of photosynthetic organic carbon was modulated by the volume of sedimentation in sites favorable for the burial and long-term preservation of organic carbon. Tectonic processes controlled this sediment volume. Episodic increases in the organic inventory led to stepwise increases in oxidized reservoirs (e.g., O2, SO4(2-), Fe(3+). The interval 2.9-2.5 Ga recorded a large rise in seawater Sr-87/Sr-86, the oldest-known extensive banded iron formations, and the first evidence (C-13-depleted kerogens) of O2 use by methylotrophic bacteria. The interval 2.2-1.8 Ga has both carbon isotopic evidence for a stepwise increase in the organic reservoir and also paleosol evidence for an O2 increase. The interval 1.1-0.6 Ga shows isotopic evidence for another organic carbon increase. The interval 1.5-1.3 Ga revealed no such increases as yet, perhaps because incomplete rifting of the mid-Proterozoic supercontinent was associated with extensive sedimentation in oxidized continental basins, producing redbeds, coarse clastics, etc. Such sedimentation did not promote the burial of reduced carbon.

  10. Metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Jan G

    2015-03-03

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals in natural systems is often accompanied by stable isotope fractionation which can now be measured due to recent analytical advances. In consequence, a new research field has emerged over the last two decades, complementing the traditional stable isotope systems (H, C, O, N, S) with many more elements across the periodic table (Li, B, Mg, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, U) which are being explored and potentially applicable as novel geochemical tracers. This review presents the application of metal stable isotopes as source and process tracers in environmental studies, in particular by using mixing and Rayleigh model approaches. The most important concepts of mass-dependent and mass-independent metal stable isotope fractionation are introduced, and the extent of natural isotopic variations for different elements is compared. A particular focus lies on a discussion of processes (redox transformations, complexation, sorption, precipitation, dissolution, evaporation, diffusion, biological cycling) which are able to induce metal stable isotope fractionation in environmental systems. Additionally, the usefulness and limitations of metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry are discussed and future perspectives presented.

  11. Isotopic signatures: An important tool in today`s world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokop, D.J.; Efurd, D.W.; Benjamin, T.M.; Cappis, J.H.; Chamberlin, J.W.; Poths, H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1995-12-01

    High-sensitivity/high-accuracy actinide measurement techniques developed to support weapons diagnostic capabilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are now being used for environmental monitoring. The measurement techniques used are Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS), Alpha Spectrometry(AS), and High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry(HRGS). These techniques are used to address a wide variety of actinide inventory issues: Environmental surveillance, site characterizations, food chain member determination, sedimentary records of activities, and treaty compliance concerns. As little as 10 femtograms of plutonium can be detected in samples and isotopic signatures determined on samples containing sub-100 femtogram amounts. Uranium, present in all environmental samples, can generally yield isotopic signatures of anthropogenic origin when present at the 40 picogam/gram level. Solid samples (soils, sediments, fauna, and tissue) can range from a few particles to several kilograms in size. Water samples can range from a few milliliters to as much as 200 liters.

  12. Isotopic signatures in ancient bone collagen; Signatures isotopiques dans le collagene des os anciens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocherens, H. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS-INRA-UPMC, 75 - Paris (France). Laboratoire de Biogeochimie Isotopique

    1997-07-01

    Collagen can be preserved during tens of thousands of years in bones and teeth under favorable conditions. Natural isotopic abundances in carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) and in nitrogen ({sup 15}N/{sup 14}N) of ancients bone and tooth collagen correspond to those recorded during the biogenic synthesis and have not been significantly altered during fossilization. These isotopic abundances are linked to those of the proteic fraction of animal and human diets, and to physiological conditions. Three kinds of applications are made possible through these natural isotopic signatures: determination of subsistence strategies in ancient human populations, determination of the diet of extinct species and the analysis of past environmental changes. (author)

  13. Oxygen exchange with water alters the oxygen isotopic signature of nitrate in soil ecosystems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, D.M.; Wrage, N.; Oenema, O.; Kessel, van C.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Combined oxygen (O) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope analyses are commonly used in the source determination of nitrate . The source and fate of are studied based on distinct O and N isotopic signatures (d18O and d15N) of various sources and isotopic effects during transformation processes, which

  14. Stable isotope signatures of gases liberated from fluid inclusions in bedrock at Olkiluoto

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichinger, F.; Meier, D.; Haemmerli, J.; Diamond, L.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartzes of the Olkiluoto bedrock contain gaseous N 2 , CO 2 , H 2 , CH 4 , and higher hydrocarbons in varying proportions. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of the gas phases give valuable information on their origin and the formation conditions. In previous studies, a method to liberate and quantify the gases trapped in fluid inclusions was developed. It allowed determining the carbon isotope signatures of liberated CO 2 , CH 4 and higher hydrocarbons (HHC), but no hydrogen isotope data were acquired. The method was advanced and, in this study, also stable hydrogen isotopes of CH 4 and H 2 liberated from fluid inclusions could be analysed. The stable carbon signatures of methane and higher hydrocarbons, as well as the hydrogen isotope signatures of methane indicate a predominant thermogenic provenance for those gases. (orig.)

  15. Stable isotope deltas: tiny, yet robust signatures in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A; Coplen, Tyler B

    2012-09-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including (14)C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. (13)C, (2)H, and (18)O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as-25 per mil can be written as-25 mUr (or-2.5 cUr or-0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg 'units' are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  16. Stable isotope deltas: Tiny, yet robust signatures in nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Willi A.; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    Although most of them are relatively small, stable isotope deltas of naturally occurring substances are robust and enable workers in anthropology, atmospheric sciences, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, food and drug authentication, forensic science, geochemistry, geology, oceanography, and paleoclimatology to study a variety of topics. Two fundamental processes explain the stable isotope deltas measured in most terrestrial systems: isotopic fractionation and isotope mixing. Isotopic fractionation is the result of equilibrium or kinetic physicochemical processes that fractionate isotopes because of small differences in physical or chemical properties of molecular species having different isotopes. It is shown that the mixing of radioactive and stable isotope end members can be modelled to provide information on many natural processes, including 14C abundances in the modern atmosphere and the stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of the oceans during glacial and interglacial times. The calculation of mixing fractions using isotope balance equations with isotope deltas can be substantially in error when substances with high concentrations of heavy isotopes (e.g. 13C, 2H, and 18O ) are mixed. In such cases, calculations using mole fractions are preferred as they produce accurate mixing fractions. Isotope deltas are dimensionless quantities. In the International System of Units (SI), these quantities have the unit 1 and the usual list of prefixes is not applicable. To overcome traditional limitations with expressing orders of magnitude differences in isotope deltas, we propose the term urey (symbol Ur), after Harold C. Urey, for the unit 1. In such a manner, an isotope delta value expressed traditionally as−25 per mil can be written as−25 mUr (or−2.5 cUr or−0.25 dUr; the use of any SI prefix is possible). Likewise, very small isotopic differences often expressed in per meg ‘units’ are easily included (e.g. either+0.015 ‰ or+15 per meg

  17. Organic and Isotopic Signatures of Life: Lessons from the Early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, K. H.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; House, C. H.

    2002-12-01

    In the study of life on earth, isotopic analyses of organic biomarkers provide essential insight to their biological and environmental provenance. Isotopic analyses of organic materials on other planets present a number of challenges, both analytical and interpretive. Prebiotic planetary organic materials can derive from condensation reactions and by delivery through meteorites or interplanetary dust, with the relative importance of each influenced by the oxidation state of the atmosphere. Material delivered to planets can have an interstellar origin, although it is dominated by compounds influenced by the formation of the solar system. Each of these processes impact molecular isotopic signatures and must be considered in life-detection strategies. Pronounced effects are observed for hydrogen isotopes, with smaller fractionations observed for other elements. Theoretical, laboratory and observational studies of non-terrean materials are essential to further understand molecular isotopic heterogeneity associated with these exclusively abiotic processes. Studies of Archean-aged samples provide an important resource for interpreting molecular isotopic patterns as signatures of life processes. Carbon assimilation and biomass synthesis from simple precursor compounds typically discriminate against 13C. This generality, however, is complicated by the observations of a wide range of fractionation factors associated with important microbial carbon-uptake processes. Metabolic processes further distribute isotopic signatures, such that wide isotopic heterogeneity is observed among cellular biochemical constituents. In addition, preservation/contamination concerns dominate studies of very ancient organic matter, as they likely will in life-detection studies. However, both biochemical heterogeneity and sample integrity can be addressed by considering patterns from different paleoenvironments. Molecular results demonstrate that Late Archean microbial life on this planet was

  18. Competências do professor no uso das TDIC e de ambientes virtuais

    OpenAIRE

    Beraldo, Rossana Mary Fujarra; Maciel, Diva Albuquerque

    2016-01-01

    Resumo As dinâmicas criadas em torno das tecnologias digitais e da Internet têm impulsionado mudanças na educação e resultado na necessidade de profissionalização de professores para o uso de ambientes virtuais, em uma nova cultura escolar. Com o objetivo de identificar competências pelo uso das TDIC em práticas de ensino, realizamos um estudo com quatro professores do ensino médio de uma escola pública no Distrito Federal, que utilizam a plataforma Moodle desde 2006. Com base na psicologia c...

  19. Rapid Cenozoic ingrowth of isotopic signatures simulating "HIMU" in ancient lithospheric mantle: Distinguishing source from process

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy-West, Alex J.; Bennett, Vickie C.; Amelin, Yuri

    2016-08-01

    Chemical and isotopic heterogeneities in the lithospheric mantle are increasingly being recognised on all scales of examination, although the mechanisms responsible for generating this variability are still poorly understood. To investigate the relative behaviour of different isotopic systems in off-cratonic mantle, and specifically the origin of the regional southwest Pacific "HIMU" (high time integrated 238U/204Pb) Pb isotopic signature, we present the first U-Th-Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd and Re-Os isotopic dataset for spinel peridotite xenoliths sampling the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) beneath Zealandia. Strongly metasomatised xenoliths converge to a restricted range of Sr and Nd isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7028-0.7033; εNd ≈ +3-+6) reflecting pervasive overprinting of their original melt depletion signatures by carbonatite-rich melts. In contrast, rare, weakly metasomatised samples possess radiogenic Nd isotopic compositions (εNd > +15) and unradiogenic Sr isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr Zealandia argues for preservation of a significant mantle keel (⩾2 million km3) associated with a large-scale Paleoproterozoic melting event. Lead isotopic compositions are highly variable with 206Pb/204Pb = 17.3-21.3 (n = 34) and two further samples with more extreme compositions of 22.4 and 25.4, but are not correlated with other isotopic data or U/Pb and Th/Pb ratios in either strongly or weakly metasomatised xenoliths; this signature is thus a recent addition to the lithospheric mantle. Lead model ages suggest that this metasomatism occurred in the last 200 m.y., with errorchrons from individual localities providing ages younger than 116 Ma. When considered in the regional tectonic context the Pb isotopic signatures are best explained through interaction of the lithospheric mantle with a weak upwelling mantle plume that contained carbonatitic domains at ca. 110-115 Ma. Projection of the measured high U/Pb and Th/Pb signatures into the future predicts

  20. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman; Nor Afiqah Harun; Mohd Suhaimi Hamzah; Shamsiah Abdul Rahman; Md Suhaimi Elias; Salmah Moosa

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalization of food markets and the relative ease with which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents, means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are use as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  1. Isotopic source signatures: Impact of regional variability on the δ13CH4 trend and spatial distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Aryeh I.; Coulon, Ancelin; Stenke, Andrea; Schwietzke, Stefan; Peter, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The atmospheric methane growth rate has fluctuated over the past three decades, signifying variations in methane sources and sinks. Methane isotopic ratios (δ13CH4) differ between emission categories, and can therefore be used to distinguish which methane sources have changed. However, isotopic modelling studies have mainly focused on uncertainties in methane emissions rather than uncertainties in isotopic source signatures. We simulated atmospheric δ13CH4 for the period 1990-2010 using the global chemistry-climate model SOCOL. Empirically-derived regional variability in the isotopic signatures was introduced in a suite of sensitivity simulations. These simulations were compared to a baseline simulation with commonly used global mean isotopic signatures. We investigated coal, natural gas/oil, wetland, livestock, and biomass burning source signatures to determine whether regional variations impact the observed isotopic trend and spatial distribution. Based on recently published source signature datasets, our calculated global mean isotopic signatures are in general lighter than the commonly used values. Trends in several isotopic signatures were also apparent during the period 1990-2010. Tropical livestock emissions grew during the 2000s, introducing isotopically heavier livestock emissions since tropical livestock consume more C4 vegetation than midlatitude livestock. Chinese coal emissions, which are isotopically heavy compared to other coals, increase during the 2000s leading to higher global values of δ13CH4 for coal emissions. EDGAR v4.2 emissions disagree with the observed atmospheric isotopic trend for almost all simulations, confirming past doubts about this emissions inventory. The agreement between the modelled and observed δ13CH4 interhemispheric differences improves when regional source signatures are used. Even though the simulated results are highly dependent on the choice of methane emission inventories, they emphasize that the commonly used

  2. Application of Stable Isotope Signatures in Food Traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaratul Ashifa Abdullah Salim; Roslanzairi Mostapha; Zainon Othman

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis has widely been used to trace the origin of organic materials in various fields, such as geochemistry, biochemistry, archaeology and petroleum. In past a decade, it has also become an important tool for food traceability study. The globalisation of food markets and the relative ease which food commodities are transported through and between countries and continents means that consumers are increasingly concerned about the origin of the foods they eat. The natural abundance of stable isotope variation such as carbon, nitrogen, hydrogen and oxygen are used as geographic tracers or marker to determine the geographic origin of fruits, crop, vegetables and food products from animal. The isotopic compositions of plant materials reflect various factors such as isotopic compositions of source materials and their assimilation processes as well as growth environments. This paper will discuss on stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions in rice that been determined by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, advantages, limitations and potential of other analysis applications that can be incorporated in food traceability system. (author)

  3. Oxygen isotopic signature of CO2 from combustion processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, M.; Werner, R. A.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Brand, W. A.; Geilmann, H.; Neubert, R. E. M.; Kaiser, J.; Jansen, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope (C-13 and O-18) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta O-18

  4. Storage-discharge hysteresis and its impact on stream flow O-18 and D isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Carrer, Gwenael; Hissler, Christophe; Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Rodriguez, Nicolas; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2017-04-01

    Catchment storage-discharge relationships are known to be non-linear and to exhibit hysteretic patterns. Antecedent storage and catchment scale largely control the degree of the hysteresis - as a translation of differences in velocities and celerities differently in each individual catchment. Following up on recent calls in the literature for a more systematic combination of hydrograph and stable isotope investigations, here we focus on catchment storage dynamics and how these may be correlated with isotopic signatures of O-18 and D in stream flow. Our study area is located in the Alzette River basin and consists of 12 nested catchments, covering a wide range of physiographic settings with clean and mixed bedrock geology, landuse, soil types, and topography. First, we used daily water balance calculations over an 8-year period (2006-2014) to estimate daily storage deficits. The daily storage deficit-discharge pairs were found to evolve along an envelope line that is tangential to hysteretic loops of these same variables. Each catchment's envelope line was found to have a distinct slope - the variety of slopes being controlled by bedrock type and its subsequent permeability. Next, we investigated the dynamics of isotopic signatures of O-18 and D in stream flow along the complete range of observed daily discharge and storage deficit values. A common feature in most (but not all) of our study catchments is that isotopic signals became more and more depleted as storage deficits tended to zero (i.e. saturation). Likewise, isotopic depletion in streamflow O-18 and D was highest when storage deficits were smallest and discharge values highest. Our investigation of isotopic signatures in stream flow across 12 catchments through multiple wetting-up and drying cycles has revealed relationships between catchment bedrock geology, storage and isotopic signatures of O-18 and D in stream flow. These signatures are largely (but not exclusively) controlled by storage dynamics on a

  5. Determination of nitrate isotopic signature in waters of different sources by analysing the nitrogen and oxygen isotopic ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszelnik, Piotr; Gruca-Rokosz, Renata

    2013-04-01

    A reference study on both the nitrogen content in waters and nitrogen and oxygen isotopic signatures characterising nitrate from different sources was conducted within the San River catchment area. Three kinds of catchments were studied: (1) forested and uncultivated; (2) artificially fertilised with nitrate; and (3) fertilised with manure and sewage. Moreover, atmospheric water was studied. The obtained values were found to be similar to others in the literature, with the exception of nitrate from the atmosphere, in regard to which influence reflecting the local conditions was to be noted. The isotopic signature of nitrate in the studied water results from the biogeochemical transformation of nitrogen compounds rather than from the mixing of different sources. The obtained results were statistically distinct and can be used as end-member values in further modelling studies connected with the management of nitrate in river waters, especially under middle-eastern European conditions.

  6. Oxygen isotope signatures of transpired water vapor: the role of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration under natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Piayda, Arndt; Werner, Christiane

    2014-09-01

    The oxygen isotope signature of water is a powerful tracer of water movement from plants to the global scale. However, little is known about the short-term variability of oxygen isotopes leaving the ecosystem via transpiration, as high-frequency measurements are lacking. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a gas-exchange chamber directly estimating branch-level fluxes in order to evaluate the short-term variability of the isotopic composition of transpiration (δE ) and to investigate the role of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration under natural conditions in cork-oak trees (Quercus suber) during distinct Mediterranean seasons. The measured δ(18) O of transpiration (δE ) deviated from isotopic steady state throughout most of the day even when leaf water at the evaporating sites was near isotopic steady state. High agreement was found between estimated and modeled δE values assuming non-steady-state enrichment of leaf water. Isoforcing, that is, the influence of the transpirational δ(18) O flux on atmospheric values, deviated from steady-state calculations but daily means were similar between steady state and non-steady state. However, strong daytime isoforcing on the atmosphere implies that short-term variations in δE are likely to have consequences for large-scale applications, for example, partitioning of ecosystem fluxes or satellite-based applications. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Mercury isotope signatures in contaminated sediments as a tracer for local industrial pollution sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederhold, Jan G; Skyllberg, Ulf; Drott, Andreas; Jiskra, Martin; Jonsson, Sofi; Björn, Erik; Bourdon, Bernard; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2015-01-06

    Mass-dependent fractionation (MDF) and mass-independent fractionation (MIF) may cause characteristic isotope signatures of different mercury (Hg) sources and help understand transformation processes at contaminated sites. Here, we present Hg isotope data of sediments collected near industrial pollution sources in Sweden contaminated with elemental liquid Hg (mainly chlor-alkali industry) or phenyl-Hg (paper industry). The sediments exhibited a wide range of total Hg concentrations from 0.86 to 99 μg g(-1), consisting dominantly of organically-bound Hg and smaller amounts of sulfide-bound Hg. The three phenyl-Hg sites showed very similar Hg isotope signatures (MDF δ(202)Hg: -0.2‰ to -0.5‰; MIF Δ(199)Hg: -0.05‰ to -0.10‰). In contrast, the four sites contaminated with elemental Hg displayed much greater variations (δ(202)Hg: -2.1‰ to 0.6‰; Δ(199)Hg: -0.19‰ to 0.03‰) but with distinct ranges for the different sites. Sequential extractions revealed that sulfide-bound Hg was in some samples up to 1‰ heavier in δ(202)Hg than organically-bound Hg. The selectivity of the sequential extraction was tested on standard materials prepared with enriched Hg isotopes, which also allowed assessing isotope exchange between different Hg pools. Our results demonstrate that different industrial pollution sources can be distinguished on the basis of Hg isotope signatures, which may additionally record fractionation processes between different Hg pools in the sediments.

  8. Comparison of the Sr isotopic signatures in brines of the Canadian and Fennoscandian shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrel, Philippe; Casanova, Joel

    2005-01-01

    A synthesis of Sr isotope data from shallow and deep groundwaters, and brines from the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields is presented. A salinity gradient is evident in the water with concentrations varying from approximately 1-75 g L -1 below 1500 m depth in the Fennoscandian Shield and from 10 up to 300 g L -1 below 650 m depth in the Canadian Shield. Strontium isotope ratios were measured to assess the origin of the salinity and evaluate the degree of water-rock interaction in the systems. In both shields, the Sr concentrations are enriched relative to Cl, defining a positive trend parallel to the seawater dilution line and indicative of Sr addition through weathering processes. The depth distribution for Sr concentration increases strongly with increasing depth in both shields although the variation in Sr-isotope composition does not mirror that of Sr concentrations. Strontium-isotope compositions are presented for surface waters, and groundwaters in several sites in the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields. Numerous mixing lines can be drawn reflecting water-rock interaction. A series of calculated lines links the surface end-members (surface water and shallow groundwater) and the deep brines; these mixing lines define a range of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios for the deep brines in different selected sites. All sites show a specific 87 Sr/ 86 Sr signature and the occurrence of large 87 Sr/ 86 Sr variations is site specific in both shields. In Canadian Shield brines, the Sr isotope ratios clearly highlight large water rock interaction that increases the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio from water that could have been of marine origin. In contrast to the Canadian Shield, groundwater does not occur in closed pockets in the Fennoscandian, and the well-constrained 87 Sr/ 86 Sr signatures in deep brines should correspond to a large, well-mixed and homogeneous water reservoir, whose Sr isotope signature results from water-rock interaction

  9. Spatio-temporal variability in isotopic signatures of atmospheric NOx emissions from vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D. J.; Wojtal, P.; O'Connor, M.; Clark, S.; Hastings, M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) play key roles in atmospheric chemistry and radiative forcing. Their oxidation products, nitric acid or nitrate, have significant contributions to nitrogen (N) deposition, with implications for ecosystem health. On-road vehicle NOx sources currently dominate U.S. anthropogenic emission budgets, yet vehicle NOx emissions contributions to local and regional N deposition patterns are highly uncertain. NOx isotopic signatures offer a potentially valuable observational tool to trace source contributions to N deposition. We characterize the spatio-temporal variability of vehicle NOx emission isotopic signatures with a field and laboratory-verified technique for actively capturing NOx in solution to quantify the nitrogen isotopic composition (δ15N-NOx) to within ±1.5‰ (1σ) precision. We present a novel combination of on-road mobile and stationary urban δ15N-NOx measurements at minutes to hourly resolution along with NOx and CO2 concentration measurements. We evaluate spatial gradients of δ15N-NOx on U.S. Northeast and Midwest highways, including six urban metropolitan areas and rural interstate highways during summer and autumn. We also assess on-road diurnal δ15N-NOx variations over ~800 km driving distance in Providence, RI by targeting the upwind footprint of urban background measurements to distinguish background and source NOx. We observe on-road δ15N-NOx signatures range from -3 to -10‰ under different traffic conditions in the U.S. Northeast and Midwest. On-road δ15N-NOx daytime variations from -3 to -6‰ agree well with simultaneous urban background sampling in Providence, RI, suggesting that vehicles dominate NOx emissions in this region. We use these datasets to estimate the range of representative δ15N-NOx source signatures for U.S. vehicle fleet-integrated emission plumes. Our novel approach suggests that previously reported isotopic signatures for vehicle NOx are not necessarily representative. These

  10. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  11. Natural Radionuclides and Isotopic Signatures for Determining Carbonaceous Aerosol Sources, Aerosol Lifetimes, and Washout Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, Jeffrey [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-12-12

    This is the final technical report. The project description is as follows: to determine the role of aerosol radiative forcing on climate, the processes that control their atmospheric concentrations must be understood, and aerosol sources need to be determined for mitigation. Measurements of naturally occurring radionuclides and stable isotopic signatures allow the sources, removal and transport processes, as well as atmospheric lifetimes of fine carbonaceous aerosols, to be evaluated.

  12. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ (aq) 26Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  13. Competências do professor no uso das TDIC e de ambientes virtuais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Mary Fujarra Beraldo

    Full Text Available Resumo As dinâmicas criadas em torno das tecnologias digitais e da Internet têm impulsionado mudanças na educação e resultado na necessidade de profissionalização de professores para o uso de ambientes virtuais, em uma nova cultura escolar. Com o objetivo de identificar competências pelo uso das TDIC em práticas de ensino, realizamos um estudo com quatro professores do ensino médio de uma escola pública no Distrito Federal, que utilizam a plataforma Moodle desde 2006. Com base na psicologia cultural, reunimos dados a partir de entrevistas gravadas em áudio, análise documental, consulta aos planos de aula e avaliação dos recursos tecnológicos. A análise construtivo-interpretativa dos dados focalizou cinco categorias: Sou autodidata, Sou motivado, Faço a diferença, Construo o novo e Co-construo com o grupo. Os resultados indicaram que a aprendizagem coletiva, o estabelecimento de recursos simbólicos e os aspectos emocionais entre esses professores incidiram positivamente no desenvolvimento de novas competências para lidar com ambiente virtuais.

  14. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Haumann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2 over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb ppb−1 and an isotopic source signature of −280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2 / ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  15. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haumann, F. A.; Batenburg, A. M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M. C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço Atmosférico Regional de Carbono na Amazônia) aircraft campaign during the dry season. We derive a relative H2 emission ratio with respect to carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.31 ± 0.04 ppb ppb-1 and an isotopic source signature of -280 ± 41‰ in the air masses influenced by tropical biomass burning. In order to retrieve a clear source signal that is not influenced by the soil uptake of H2, we exclude samples from the atmospheric boundary layer. This procedure is supported by data from a global chemistry transport model. The ΔH2 / ΔCO emission ratio is significantly lower than some earlier estimates for the tropical rainforest. In addition, our results confirm the lower values of the previously conflicting estimates of the H2 isotopic source signature from biomass burning. These values for the emission ratio and isotopic source signatures of H2 from tropical biomass burning can be used in future bottom-up and top-down approaches aiming to constrain the strength of the biomass-burning source for H2. Hitherto, these two quantities relied only on combustion experiments or on statistical relations, since no direct signal had been obtained from in-situ observations.

  16. Modeling calcification periods of Cytheridella ilosvayi from Florida based on isotopic signatures and hydrological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Meyer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The isotopic signatures of ostracod shells are the result of the temperature and composition of their host water and the phenology and ecology of the target species. Investigations addressing the influence of site-specific environmental variations on the isotopic ranges of ostracod shells are still rare but can provide important information on habitat-dependent variations and may signify a seasonally restricted timing of calcification periods. Here we present isotopic signatures (δ18Oostr, δ13Costr of living Cytheridella ilosvayi (Ostracoda and physical, chemical, and isotopic (δD, δ18Owater, δ13CDIC compositions of 14 freshwater habitats (rivers, lakes, canals, marshes, sinkholes in South Florida from winter 2013 and summer 2014. We also present instrumental data of river temperatures and δ18O of precipitation (δ18Oprec from this region. The physicochemical and isotopic compositions of the selected sites characterize the different habitats and show the influence of the source water, biological activity, and duration of exposure to the surface. Mean δ18Oostr and δ13Costr signatures of C. ilosvayi shells correlate well with the isotopic composition of their host waters. Within-sample variabilities in repeated isotopic measurements of single ostracod shells reflect habitat-dependent ranges. The similarly high range of ostracod δ18O in rivers and one marsh sample indicates that both temperature and δ18Oprec are responsible for their variation in the whole study area. Rivers and canals, which are predominantly influenced by the input and mixing of inorganic carbon from the catchment, show smaller δ13Costr ranges than the marsh dominated by local fluctuations in biological activities. Based on these observations, background data of water temperatures and δ18Oprec were used to calculate monthly δ18O variations in a theoretical calcite formed in rivers in Florida assuming a direct reaction on precipitation changes. The calculated values

  17. SO2 photolysis as a source for sulfur mass-independent isotope signatures in stratospehric aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Whitehill

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Signatures of sulfur isotope mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF have been observed in stratospheric sulfate aerosols deposited in polar ice. The S-MIF signatures are thought to be associated with stratospheric photochemistry following stratospheric volcanic eruptions, but the exact mechanism responsible for the production and preservation of these signatures is debated. In order to identify the origin and the mechanism of preservation for these signatures, a series of laboratory photochemical experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of temperature and added O2 on the S-MIF produced by two absorption band systems of SO2: photolysis in the 190 to 220 nm region and photoexcitation in the 250 to 350 nm region. The SO2 photolysis (SO2 + hν → SO + O experiments showed S-MIF signals with large 34S/34S fractionations, which increases with decreasing temperature. The overall S-MIF pattern observed for photolysis experiments, including high 34S/34S fractionations, positive mass-independent anomalies in 33S, and negative anomalies in 36S, is consistent with a major contribution from optical isotopologue screening effects and data for stratospheric sulfate aerosols. In contrast, SO2 photoexcitation produced products with positive S-MIF anomalies in both 33S and 36S, which is different from stratospheric sulfate aerosols. SO2 photolysis in the presence of O2 produced SO3 with S-MIF signals, suggesting the transfer of the S-MIF anomalies from SO to SO3 by the SO + O2 + M → SO3 + M reaction. This is supported with energy calculations of stationary points on the SO3 potential energy surfaces, which indicate that this reaction occurs slowly on a single adiabatic surface, but that it can occur more rapidly through intersystem crossing. Based on our experimental results, we estimate a termolecular rate constant on the order of 10−37 cm6 molecule−2 s−1. This rate can explain the preservation of mass independent isotope signatures in

  18. Carbon isotopic signature of coal-derived methane emissions to the atmosphere: from coalification to alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zazzeri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the atmospheric methane burden is rising rapidly, but the extent to which shifts in coal production contribute to this rise is not known. Coalbed methane emissions into the atmosphere are poorly characterised, and this study provides representative δ13CCH4 signatures of methane emissions from specific coalfields. Integrated methane emissions from both underground and opencast coal mines in the UK, Australia and Poland were sampled and isotopically characterised. Progression in coal rank and secondary biogenic production of methane due to incursion of water are suggested as the processes affecting the isotopic composition of coal-derived methane. An averaged value of −65 ‰ has been assigned to bituminous coal exploited in open cast mines and of −55 ‰ in deep mines, whereas values of −40 and −30 ‰ can be allocated to anthracite opencast and deep mines respectively. However, the isotopic signatures that are included in global atmospheric modelling of coal emissions should be region- or nation-specific, as greater detail is needed, given the wide global variation in coal type.

  19. Opposing authigenic controls on the isotopic signature of dissolved iron in hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lough, A. J. M.; Klar, J. K.; Homoky, W. B.; Comer-Warner, S. A.; Milton, J. A.; Connelly, D. P.; James, R. H.; Mills, R. A.

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a scarce but essential micronutrient in the oceans that limits primary productivity in many regions of the surface ocean. The mechanisms and rates of Fe supply to the ocean interior are still poorly understood and quantified. Iron isotope ratios of different Fe pools can potentially be used to trace sources and sinks of the global Fe biogeochemical cycle if these boundary fluxes have distinct signatures. Seafloor hydrothermal vents emit metal rich fluids from mid-ocean ridges into the deep ocean. Iron isotope ratios have the potential to be used to trace the input of hydrothermal dissolved iron to the oceans if the local controls on the fractionation of Fe isotopes during plume dispersal in the deep ocean are understood. In this study we assess the behaviour of Fe isotopes in a Southern Ocean hydrothermal plume using a sampling program of Total Dissolvable Fe (TDFe), and dissolved Fe (dFe). We demonstrate that δ56Fe values of dFe (δ56dFe) within the hydrothermal plume change dramatically during early plume dispersal, ranging from -2.39 ± 0.05‰ to -0.13 ± 0.06‰ (2 SD). The isotopic composition of TDFe (δ56TDFe) was consistently heavier than dFe values, ranging from -0.31 ± 0.03‰ to 0.78 ± 0.05‰, consistent with Fe oxyhydroxide precipitation as the plume samples age. The dFe present in the hydrothermal plume includes stabilised dFe species with potential to be transported to the deep ocean. We estimate that stable dFe exported from the plume will have a δ56Fe of -0.28 ± 0.17‰. Further, we show that the proportion of authigenic iron-sulfide and iron-oxyhydroxide minerals precipitating in the buoyant plume exert opposing controls on the resultant isotope composition of dissolved Fe passed into the neutrally buoyant plume. We show that such controls yield variable dissolved Fe isotope signatures under the authigenic conditions reported from modern vent sites elsewhere, and so ought to be considered during iron isotope reconstructions of past

  20. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovaskainen, R

    1999-11-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 238}U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) and n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n({sup 235}U)/n({sup 238}U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n({sup 234}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n({sup 236}U)/n({sup 235}U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International

  1. The determination of minor isotope abundances in naturally occurring uranium materials. The tracing power of isotopic signatures for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovaskainen, R.

    1999-01-01

    The mass spectrometric determination of minor abundant isotopes, 234 U and 236 U in naturally occurring uranium materials requires instruments of high abundance sensitivity and the use of highly sensitive detection systems. In this study the thermal ionisation mass spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262RPQ was used. It was equipped with 6 Faraday cups and a Secondary Electron Multiplier (SEM), which was operated in pulse counting mode for the detection of extremely low ion currents. The dynamic measurement range was increased considerably combining these two different detectors. The instrument calibration was performed carefully. The linearity of each detector, the deadtime of the ion counting detector, the detector normalisation factor, the baseline of each detector and the mass discrimination in the ion source were checked and optimised. A measurement technique based on the combination of a Gas Source Mass Spectrometry (GSMS) and a Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) was developed for the accurate determination of isotopic composition in naturally occurring uranium materials. Because the expected ratio of n( 234 U)/n( 238 U) exceeded the dynamic measurement range of the Faraday detectors of the TIMS instrument, an experimental design using a combination of two detectors was developed. The n( 234 U)/n( 235 U) and n( 236 U)/n( 235 U) ratios were determined using ion counting in combination with the decelerating device. The n( 235 U)/n( 238 U) ratio was determined by the Faraday detector. This experimental design allowed the detector cross calibration to be circumvented. Precisions of less than 1 percent for the n( 234 U)/n( 235 U) ratios and 5-25 percent for the n( 236 U)/n( 235 U) ratios were achieved. The purpose of the study was to establish a register of isotopic signatures for natural uranium materials. The amount ratio, and isotopic composition of 18 ore concentrates, collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from uranium milling and mining

  2. Study of medical isotope production facility stack emissions and noble gas isotopic signature using automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Hoffmann, Emmy; Ungar, Kurt; Dolinar, George; Miley, Harry; Mekarski, Pawel; Schrom, Brian; Hoffman, Ian; Lawrie, Ryan; Loosz, Tom

    2013-04-01

    The nuclear industry emissions of the four CTBT (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty) relevant radioxenon isotopes are unavoidably detected by the IMS along with possible treaty violations. Another civil source of radioxenon emissions which contributes to the global background is radiopharmaceutical production companies. To better understand the source terms of these background emissions, a joint project between HC, ANSTO, PNNL and CRL was formed to install real-time detection systems to support 135Xe, 133Xe, 131mXe and 133mXe measurements at the ANSTO and CRL 99Mo production facility stacks as well as the CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) primary coolant monitoring system at CRL. At each site, high resolution gamma spectra were collected every 15 minutes using a HPGe detector to continuously monitor a bypass feed from the stack or CANDU primary coolant system as it passed through a sampling cell. HC also conducted atmospheric monitoring for radioxenon at approximately 200 km distant from CRL. A program was written to transfer each spectrum into a text file format suitable for the automatic gamma-spectra analysis platform and then email the file to a server. Once the email was received by the server, it was automatically analysed with the gamma-spectrum software UniSampo/Shaman to perform radionuclide identification and activity calculation for a large number of gamma-spectra in a short period of time (less than 10 seconds per spectrum). The results of nuclide activity together with other spectrum parameters were saved into the Linssi database. This database contains a large amount of radionuclide information which is a valuable resource for the analysis of radionuclide distribution within the noble gas fission product emissions. The results could be useful to identify the specific mechanisms of the activity release. The isotopic signatures of the various radioxenon species can be determined as a function of release time. Comparison of 133mXe and 133Xe activity

  3. From the Arctic Lake to the Arctic Ocean: Radiogenic Isotope Signature of Transitional Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, A.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Veron, A. J.; Stevenson, R.; Carignan, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean was once an enclosed basin with fresh surface water conditions during the Paleocene and most of the Eocene epochs (e.g. Moran et al. 2004), until a readjustment in high latitude plate tectonics allowed North Atlantic marine water to flow into the Arctic basin some 36 Ma ago (Poirier and Hillaire-Marcel, 2011). This first input was sufficient to overprint the earlier osmium isotopic composition in the basin (ibid.) and deposit marine sediments on the Lomonosov Ridge between 36 Ma and present day. Here, we present Sr and Pb isotope signatures in the transitional layers of the same ACEX sequence from Lomonosov Ridge (ca. 190 to 210 mcd). Bulk sediment samples were leached prior to total dissolution in order to remove the hydrogeneous Sr fraction of the sediment. The Sr isotopic signature of the residual fraction is thought to reflect the origin of the sedimentary load that was deposited before, during, and after the transition (source tracing). Leaching was not required for the Pb isotope analyses as leached residues and bulk sediments yielded similar isotopic composition for the oxic sediments. Moreover, correction for in-situ production is needed within the anoxic lacustrine section (see below), so bulk sediments were measured. Above and below the lacustrine/marine boundary, we note relatively constant source provenances (or mixture of sources). This implies that the relative contributions from regional detrital sedimentary sources, and thus relative erosion rates over surrounding continents, did not change much on the long term scale. On the other hand, a sharp change in the isotopic compositions highlights the transition level itself, with an abrupt shift to low 87Sr/88Sr isotope compositions and by a smaller excursion in all three 204Pb-normalised lead isotopes compositions (corrected for in-situ decay of U). In the light of the recently revised age of the transitional layer (~36 Ma at the lacustrine/marine transition), this isotopic excursion

  4. Cellulose and Lignin Carbon Isotope Signatures in Sphagnum Moss Reveal Complementary Environmental Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, J.; Nichols, J. E.; Kaiser, K.; Beilman, D. W.; Yu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    The carbon isotope signature (δ13C) of Sphagnum moss is increasingly used as a proxy for past surface wetness in peatlands. However, conflicting interpretations of these carbon isotope records have recently been published. While the water film hypothesis suggests that the presence of a thick (thin) water film around hollow (hummock) mosses leads to less (more) negative δ13C values, the carbon source hypothesis poses that a significant (insignificant) amount of CH4 assimilation by hollow (hummock) mosses leads to more (less) negative δ13C values. To evaluate these competing mechanisms and their impact on moss δ13C, we gathered 30 moss samples from 6 peatlands in southern Patagonia. Samples were collected along a strong hydrological gradient, from very dry hummocks (80 cm above water table depth) to submerged hollows (5 cm below water surface). These peat bogs have the advantage of being colonized by a single cosmopolitan moss species, Sphagnum magellanicum, limiting potential biases introduced by species-specific carbon discrimination. We measured δ13C from stem cellulose and leaf waxes on the same samples to quantify compound-specific carbon signatures. We found that stem cellulose and leaf-wax lipids were both strongly negatively correlated with moss water content, suggesting a primary role of water film thickness on carbon assimilation. In addition, isotopic fractionation during wax synthesis was greater than for cellulose. This offset decreases as conditions get drier, due to (i) a more effective carbon assimilation, or (ii) CH4 uptake through symbiosis with methanotrophic bacteria within the leaves of wet mosses. Biochemical analysis (carbohydrates, amino acids, hydrophenols, cutin acids) of surface moss are currently being conducted to characterize moss carbon allocation under different hydrological conditions. Overall, this modern calibration work should be of use for interpreting carbon isotope records from peatlands.

  5. Searching for signatures of life on Mars: an Fe-isotope perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, M; Russell, S S; Blackhurst, R L; Grady, M M

    2006-10-29

    Recent spacecraft and lander missions to Mars have reinforced previous interpretations that Mars was a wet and warm planet in the geological past. The role of liquid water in shaping many of the surface features on Mars has long been recognized. Since the presence of liquid water is essential for survival of life, conditions on early Mars might have been more favourable for the emergence and evolution of life. Until a sample return mission to Mars, one of the ways of studying the past environmental conditions on Mars is through chemical and isotopic studies of Martian meteorites. Over 35 individual meteorite samples, believed to have originated on Mars, are now available for lab-based studies. Fe is a key element that is present in both primary and secondary minerals in the Martian meteorites. Fe-isotope ratios can be fractionated by low-temperature processes which includes biological activity. Experimental investigations of Fe reduction and oxidation by bacteria have produced large fractionation in Fe-isotope ratios. Hence, it is considered likely that if there is/were any form of life present on Mars then it might be possible to detect its signature by Fe-isotope studies of Martian meteorites. In the present study, we have analysed a number of Martian meteorites for their bulk-Fe-isotope composition. In addition, a set of terrestrial analogue material has also been analysed to compare the results and draw inferences. So far, our studies have not found any measurable Fe-isotopic fractionation in bulk Martian meteorites that can be ascribed to any low-temperature process operative on Mars.

  6. Searching for isovector signatures in the neutron-rich oxygen and calcium isotopes

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    Wei-Chia Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We search for potential isovector signatures in the neutron-rich oxygen and calcium isotopes within the framework of a relativistic mean-field theory with an exact treatment of pairing correlations. To probe the isovector sector we calibrate a few relativistic density functionals using the same isoscalar constraints but with one differing isovector assumption. It is found that under certain conditions, the isotopic chain in oxygen can be made to terminate at the experimentally observed 24O isotope and in the case of the calcium isotopes at 60Ca. To produce such behavior, the resulting symmetry energy must be soft, with predicted values for the symmetry energy and its slope at saturation density being J=(30.92±0.47 MeV and L=(51.0±1.5 MeV, respectively. As a consequence, the neutron-skin thickness of 208Pb is rather small: Rskin208=(0.161±0.011 fm. This same model—labeled “FSUGarnet”—predicts R1.4=(13.0±0.1 km for the radius of a “canonical” 1.4M⊙ neutron star, yet is also able to support a two-solar-mass neutron star.

  7. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Scott, F.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2003-02-28

    Pearson, S.F., D.J. Levey, C.H. Greenberg, and C.M. del Rio. 2003. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird. Oecologia. 135:516-523. The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) to determine d15N and d13C turnover rates for blood, d15N and d13C diet-tissue discrimination factors, and diet-tissue relationships for blood and feathers. After 3 weeks on a common diet, 36 warblers were assigned to one of four diets differing in the relative proportion of fruit and insects. Plasma half-life estimates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 days for d13C and from 0.5 to 1.7 days for d15N. Half-life did not differ among diets. Whole blood half-life for d13C ranged from 3.9 to 6.1 days. Yellow-rumped warbler tissues were enriched relative to diet by 1.7.3.6% for nitrogen isotopes and by 1.2 to 4.3% for carbon isotopes, depending on tissue and diet. Consistent with previous studies, feathers were the most enriched and whole blood and plasma were the least enriched or, in the case of carbon, slightly depleted relative to diet. In general, tissues were more enriched relative to diet for birds with high percentages of insects. For all tissues, carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors increased with carbon and nitrogen concentrations of diets. The isotopic signature of plasma increased linearly with the sum of the isotopic signature of the diet and the discrimination factor. Because the isotopic signature of tissues depends on both elemental concentration and isotopic signature of the diet, attempts to reconstruct diet from stable isotope signatures

  8. Investigations into Pb isotope signatures in groundwater and sediments in a uranium-mineralized area

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    Adriana Mônica Dalla Vecchia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This work presents the investigation in an environment that contains uranium deposits by using Pb isotope signatures. The study area, southeast of Brazil, is characterized by the lack of surface water and, as a consequence, the groundwater plays an important role in the economy of the region, such as the supply to the uranium industry and, above all serving the needs of the local population. The objective of the present investigation is the determination of the signatures of Pb in groundwater and sediments as well as the identification of environments under influences of geogenic and/or anthropogenic sources. It was determined that the Pb in the majority of sediments was geogenic in origin. Although data from the literature, related to the environmental studies, consider 206Pb/207Pb isotopic ratio values below or close to 1.2 as an indicative of anthropogenic Pb, the 206Pb/ 207Pb determined for the majority of groundwater samples ranged from 1.14 to 1.19, and are similar to the data reported for rocks samples (1.09 to 1.96 from area with U mineralization. It was also determined that the anthropogenic influence of the uranium was restricted to a single sampling point within the mining area.

  9. Investigations into Pb isotope signatures in groundwater and sediments in a uranium-mineralized area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchia, Adriana Monica Dalla; Rodrigues, Paulo Cesar Horta; Rios, Francisco Javier; Ladeira, Ana Claudia Queiroz, E-mail: amdvc@cdtn.br, E-mail: acql@cdtn.br, E-mail: javier@cdtn.br, E-mail: pchr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    This work presents the investigation in an environment that contains uranium deposits by using Pb isotope signatures. The study area, southeast of Brazil, is characterized by the lack of surface water and, as a consequence, the groundwater plays an important role in the economy of the region, such as the supply to the uranium industry and, above all serving the needs of the local population. The objective of the present investigation is the determination of the signatures of Pb in groundwater and sediments as well as the identification of environments under influences of geogenic and/or anthropogenic sources. It was determined that the Pb in the majority of sediments was geogenic in origin. Although data from the literature, related to the environmental studies, consider {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb isotopic ratio values below or close to 1.2 as an indicative of anthropogenic Pb, the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb determined for the majority of groundwater samples ranged from 1.14 to 1.19, and are similar to the data reported for rocks samples (1.09 to 1.96) from area with U mineralization. It was also determined that the anthropogenic influence of the uranium was restricted to a single sampling point within the mining area. (author)

  10. Mobility of Pb in salt marshes recorded by total content and stable isotopic signature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caetano, Miguel [National Institute for Agronomy and Fisheries Research - IPIMAR, Av. Brasilia 1449-006, Lisbon (Portugal); Fonseca, Nuno [National Institute for Agronomy and Fisheries Research - IPIMAR, Av. Brasilia 1449-006, Lisbon (Portugal); Cesario Carlos Vale, Rute [National Institute for Agronomy and Fisheries Research - IPIMAR, Av. Brasilia 1449-006, Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: cvale@ipimar.pt

    2007-07-15

    Total lead and its stable isotopes were analysed in sediment cores, leaves, stem and roots of Sacorconia fruticosa and Spartina maritima sampled from Tagus (contaminated site) and Guadiana (low anthropogenic pressure) salt marshes. Lead concentration in vegetated sediments from the Tagus marsh largely exceeded the levels in non-vegetated sediments. Depth profiles of {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 206}Pb/{sup 208}Pb showed a decrease towards the surface ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.160-1.167) as a result of a higher proportion of pollutant Pb components. In contrast, sediments from Guadiana marsh exhibited low Pb concentrations and an uniform isotopic signature ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.172 {+-} 0.003) with depth. This suggests a homogeneous mixing of mine-derived particles and pre-industrial sediments with minor inputs of anthropogenic Pb. Lead concentrations in roots of plants from the two marshes were higher than in leaves and stems, indicating limited transfer of Pb to aerial parts. A similar Pb isotopic signature was found in roots and in vegetated sediments, indicating that Pb uptake by plants reflects the input in sediments as determined by a significant anthropogenic contribution of Pb at Tagus and by mineralogical Pb phases at Guadiana. The accumulation in roots from Tagus marsh (max. 2870 {mu}g g{sup -1} in S. fruticosa and max. 1755 {mu}g g{sup -1} in S. maritima) clearly points to the dominant role of belowground biomass in the cycling of anthropogenic Pb. The fraction of anthropogenic Pb in belowground biomass was estimated based on the signature of anthropogenic Pb components in sediments ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb = 1.154). Since no differences exist between Pb signature in roots and upper sediments, the background and anthropogenic levels of Pb in roots were estimated. Interestingly, both background and anthropogenic Pb in roots exhibited a maximum at the same depth, although the proportion of anthropogenic Pb was relatively constant with depth

  11. Stable carbon isotope signatures of methane from a Finnish subarctic wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sriskantharajah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Methane emissions from Lompolojänkkä, a Finnish aapa mire within the Arctic Circle, were studied by non-intrusive Keeling plot methods, to place better constraints on the seasonal variations in isotopic signature of methane (δ13CCH4 emitted from Arctic wetland. Air samples were collected in Tedlar bags over the wetland at heights of 42 and 280 cm between May and October 2009 and in August 2008. The mixing ratio and δ13C of the methane in the samples were incorporated into Keeling plot analyses to derive bulk δ13CCH4 signatures for the methane inputs to the air above the wetland. The results show an unexpected consistence in δ13CCH4 from early to late summer, clustered around −68.5±0.7‰, but during spring thaw and autumnal freezing, δ13CCH4 is enriched by approximately 2 and 4‰, respectively. The techniques reported in this paper are simple and economical to employ, and give a bulk source signature for the methane inputs to the air above the entire wetland that can be extrapolated to a larger regional area.

  12. Stable Isotope Signatures Suggest Different Feeding Strategies for Atlantic and Gulf Menhaden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Perez, N.; Smith, S. L.; Gonsalves, L. C.; Lamb, M.

    2016-02-01

    Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) is a keystone forage species that ranges on the Atlantic Coast from Nova Scotia to Florida. A related species, the Gulf menhaden (Brevoortia patronus) is found in the northern Gulf of Mexico from Florida to Texas. They each serve as prey for important recreational and commercial fish, such as blue fish, tuna and striped bass. Menhaden are filter feeders whose diets consist mostly of phytoplankton and zooplankton, and menhaden act as direct links between primary producers and larger valuable predators. In this study, we investigated and compared the isotopic signatures of water column nitrate (δ15N), bulk plankton and juvenile menhaden (δ 15N and δ 13C) collected from 5 sites in both the Choptank River, MD, and Apalachicola Bay, FL. We determined that menhaden inhabiting the temperate zone versus the sub-tropical region exhibited statistically different isotopic signatures, suggesting different feeding strategies. Choptank River menhaden were enriched 4‰ in δ 15N over Apalachicola Bay menhaden. Choptank River menhaden are mostly likely obtaining their diet from a higher trophic level (copepods, primary consumers) than Apalachicola Bay fish, who may consume more phytoplankton. The Choptank River menhaden also may be consuming more allochthonous material, and those from the Gulf area eat a more authochthonous diet. In addition, Atlantic menhaden collected from fresh water creeks versus those collected closer to the bay differed in their δ 13C compositions, depending on site collection, with creek fish being more depleted in the heavier carbon isotope. The δ 15N values of water column nitrate were similar at Choptank and Apalachicola sites.

  13. Measurement of the Isotopic Signature of Soil Carbon Dioxide: Methods Development and Initial Field Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayler, Z.; Rugh, W.; Mix, A. C.; Bond, B. J.; Sulzman, E. W.

    2005-12-01

    Soil respiration is a significant component of ecosystem respiration and its isotopic composition is likely to lend insight into ecosystem processes. We have designed probes to determine the isotopic signature of soil-respired CO2 using a two end-member mixing model approach (i.e., Keeling plot). Each probe consists of three 35 ml PVC chambers cased in fiberglass mesh and connected to the soil surface via stainless steel tubing with a septa-lined swagelok fitting. Chambers are vertically connected such that they sample gases at depth intervals centered on 5, 15, and 30 cm. Gases are sampled via a hand vacuum pump equipped with a two-way valve, which allows vials pre-filled with N2 gas in the laboratory to be evacuated and re-filled with only a single septa puncture in the field. Data indicate samples can be stored reliably for up to three days if punctured septa are coated in silicone sealant. To test whether this field sampling method was robust, we constructed a carbon-free sand column out of PVC pipe into which we plumbed a tank of known CO2 concentration and isotopic composition. We have tested the effects of wetting and flow rate on our ability to reproduce tank values. A linear model (geometric mean regression) yielded a more negative isotopic value than the actual gas, but a simple polynomial curve fit the tank value. After laboratory testing, the probes were established in a steep drainage in the H.J. Andrews LTER site in the Cascade Mountains of western Oregon (as part of the Andrews Airshed project). We established a transect of five 10 m2 plots with four soil probes and a companion respiration collar and measured soil CO2 efflux and soil δ13CO2 values biweekly from June-Sept. Results indicate there is a clear difference in isotopic and respiration flux patterns between the north- and south-facing slopes, with the north facing slope exhibiting higher fluxes and more 13C enriched respiration. The temporal pattern of respiration correlates well with

  14. Using Oxygen and Carbon Isotopic Signatures in Order to Infer Climatic and Dietary Information in Roman Edessa, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Dimitra-Ermioni; Dotsika, Elissavet

    2017-12-01

    Even though many isotopic studies have been conducted on ancient populations from Greece for the purpose of dietary reconstruction; mostly through carbon and nitrogen isotopic signals of bone collagen, less attention has been given to the utility of apatite signatures (oxygen and carbon) as dietary and palaeoenvironmental tools. Moreover, until recently the isotopic signal of tooth enamel for both the purposes of environmental and dietary reconstructions has been rarely assessed in ancient Greek societies. Therefore, the present study aims to provide with novel isotopic information regarding Edessa; a town in Northern Greece, during the Roman period. The current study primarily aims to explore the possible differentiation between the present climatic conditions in Edessa in relation to those occurring at the Roman period. Secondly, this study aims to reveal the significant utility of enamel isotopic signatures (carbon and oxygen) in palaeoenvironmental and palaeodietary studies regarding ancient human remains. The isotopic analyses have been conducted at the Stable Isotope and Radiocarbon Unit of INN, NCSR “Demokritos”. The population of Roman Edessa (2nd-4th c. AD) consists of 22 individuals, providing with 19 bone samples and 16 enamel ones. The mean enamel oxygen value is at -7.7 ±1.1 %0, the bone apatite mean oxygen value at -9.2 ±1.9 %0, and finally the mean carbon enamel value is at -11.7 ±1.2 %0. Oxygen values probably indicate that Edessa had a cooler climate during the Roman times in relation to present conditions, even though more research should be carried out in order to be more certain. In addition, the possible existence of non-local individuals has been revealed through the oxygen teeth enamel-bone apatite spacing. Finally, the carbon enamel signature has pointed out possible differentiations between the adult and the juvenile diet. Based on Edessa’s findings, the stated study strongly encourages the enamel oxygen and carbon isotopic signals

  15. Learning from soil gas change and isotopic signatures during 2012 Emilia seismic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Cantucci, Barbara; Coltorti, Massimo

    2017-10-27

    Soil surveys were performed in Medolla (Italy), a peculiar area characterized by spotty high soil temperature, gas vent, and lack of vegetation, to determine the migration mechanisms and spatial behavior of gas species. Hereby we present soil gas measurements and their isotopic ratios measured between 2008 and 2015, including the 2012 Emilia-Romagna seismic sequence. We found that soil gas concentrations markedly changed during the main shocks of May 20 and 29, 2012 (Mw 6.1 and 6.0, respectively), highlighting the presence of a buried fault intersecting the gas vents. We suggest that crustal dilation associated with seismic activity favored the uprising of geogas towards the surface. Changes in the isotopic signature highlight the contribution of two distinct sources, one deeper, thermogenic and another superficial related to organic-rich layer, whose relative contribution varied before, during and after the earthquake. We suppose an increase of microbial component likely due to the ground shaking of shallower layers linked to seismic sequence, which masks the thermogenic contribution. Although the changes we detect are specific for an alluvial plain, we deduce that analogous processes may be active elsewhere, and that soil gas geochemistry represents an useful tool to discriminate the gas migration related to seismic activity.

  16. Measurement of the Isotopic Signatures of Water on Mars: Implications for Studying Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, R. E.; Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.

    2010-01-01

    The recent discovery of methane on Mars has led to much discussion concerning its origin. On Earth, the isotopic signatures of methane vary with the nature of its production. Specifically, the ratios among 12CH4, 13CH4, and 12CH3D differ for biotic and abiotic origins. On Mars, measuring these ratios would provide insights into the origins of methane and measurements of water isotopologues co-released with methane would assist in testing their chemical relationship. Since 1997, we have been measuring HDO and H2O in Mars atmosphere and comparing their ratio to that in Earth s oceans. We recently incorporated a line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) into our analysis. Here, we present a map for [HDO]/[H2O] along the central meridian (1541W) for Ls 501. From these results, we constructed models to determine the observational conditions needed to quantify the isotopic ratios of methane in Mars atmosphere. Current ground-based instruments lack the spectral resolution and sensitivity needed to make these measurements. Measurements of the isotopologues of methane will likely require in situ sampling.

  17. Stable Isotope Signatures of Middle Palaeozoic Ahermatypic Rugose Corals – Deciphering Secondary Alteration, Vital Fractionation Effects, and Palaeoecological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, Michal; Berkowski, Blazej; López Correa, Matthias; Jarochowska, Emilia; Joachimski, Michael; Belka, Zdzislaw

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates stable isotope signatures of five species of Silurian and Devonian deep-water, ahermatypic rugose corals, providing new insights into isotopic fractionation effects exhibited by Palaeozoic rugosans, and possible role of diagenetic processes in modifying their original isotopic signals. To minimize the influence of intraskeletal cements on the observed signatures, the analysed specimens included unusual species either devoid of large intraskeletal open spaces ('button corals': Microcyclus, Palaeocyclus), or typified by particularly thick corallite walls (Calceola). The corals were collected at four localities in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland), Mader Basin (Morocco) and on Gotland (Sweden), representing distinct diagenetic histories and different styles of diagenetic alteration. To evaluate the resistance of the corallites to diagenesis, we applied various microscopic and trace element preservation tests. Distinct differences between isotopic compositions of the least-altered and most-altered skeleton portions emphasise a critical role of material selection for geochemical studies of Palaeozoic corals. The least-altered parts of the specimens show marine or near-marine stable isotope signals and lack positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O. In terms of isotopic fractionation mechanisms, Palaeozoic rugosans must have differed considerably from modern deep-water scleractinians, typified by significant depletion in both 18O and 13C, and pronounced δ13C-δ18O co-variance. The fractionation effects exhibited by rugosans seem similar rather to the minor isotopic effects typical of modern non-scleractinian corals (octocorals and hydrocorals). The results of the present study add to growing evidence for significant differences between Scleractinia and Rugosa, and agree with recent studies indicating that calcification mechanisms developed independently in these two groups of cnidarians. Consequently, particular caution is needed in using

  18. The stable isotopic signature of biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Biologically produced molecular hydrogen (H2 is characterised by a very strong depletion in deuterium. Although the biological source to the atmosphere is small compared to photochemical or combustion sources, it makes an important contribution to the global isotope budget of H2. Large uncertainties exist in the quantification of the individual production and degradation processes that contribute to the atmospheric budget, and isotope measurements are a tool to distinguish the contributions from the different sources. Measurements of δ D from the various H2 sources are scarce and for biologically produced H2 only very few measurements exist. Here the first systematic study of the isotopic composition of biologically produced H2 is presented. In a first set of experiments, we investigated δ D of H2 produced in a biogas plant, covering different treatments of biogas production. In a second set of experiments, we investigated pure cultures of several H2 producing microorganisms such as bacteria or green algae. A Keeling plot analysis provides a robust overall source signature of δ D = −712‰ (±13‰ for the samples from the biogas reactor (at 38 °C, δ DH2O= +73.4‰, with a fractionation constant ϵH2-H2O of −689‰ (±20‰ between H2 and the water. The five experiments using pure culture samples from different microorganisms give a mean source signature of δ D = −728‰ (±28‰, and a fractionation constant ϵH2-H2O of −711‰ (±34‰ between H2 and the water. The results confirm the massive deuterium depletion of biologically produced H2 as was predicted by the calculation of the thermodynamic fractionation factors for hydrogen exchange between H2 and water vapour. Systematic errors in the isotope scale are difficult to assess in the absence of international standards for δ D of H2. As expected for a thermodynamic equilibrium, the fractionation factor is temperature dependent, but largely independent of the

  19. Orbital Signals in Carbon Isotopes: Phase Distortion as a Signature of the Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Jiří; Rąžek, Bohuslav; Giorgioni, Martino

    2017-11-01

    Isotopic mass balance models are employed here to study the response of carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of the ocean-atmosphere system to amplitude-modulated perturbations on Milankovitch time scales. We identify a systematic phase distortion, which is inherent to a leakage of power from the carrier precessional signal to the modulating eccentricity terms in the global carbon cycle. The origin is partly analogous to the simple cumulative effect in sinusoidal signals, reflecting the residence time of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere reservoir. The details of origin and practical implications are, however, different. In amplitude-modulated signals, the deformation is manifested as a lag of the 405 kyr eccentricity cycle behind amplitude modulation (AM) of the short ( 100 kyr) eccentricity cycle. Importantly, the phase of AM remains stable during the carbon cycle transfer, thus providing a reference framework against which to evaluate distortion of the 405 kyr term. The phase relationships can help to (1) identify depositional and diagenetic signatures in δ13C and (2) interpret the pathways of astronomical signal through the climate system. The approach is illustrated by case studies of Albian and Oligocene records using a new computational tool EPNOSE (Evaluation of Phase in uNcertain and nOisy SEries). Analogous phase distortions occur in other components of the carbon cycle including atmospheric CO2 levels; hence, to fully understand the causal relationships on astronomical time scales, paleoclimate models may need to incorporate realistic, amplitude-modulated insolation instead of monochromatic sinusoidal approximations. Finally, detection of the lagged δ13C response can help to reduce uncertainties in astrochronological age models that are tuned to the 405 kyr cycle.

  20. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses suggest reef manta rays feed on demersal zooplankton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydie I E Couturier

    Full Text Available Assessing the trophic role and interaction of an animal is key to understanding its general ecology and dynamics. Conventional techniques used to elucidate diet, such as stomach content analysis, are not suitable for large threatened marine species. Non-lethal sampling combined with biochemical methods provides a practical alternative for investigating the feeding ecology of these species. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different zooplankton functional groups (i.e. near-surface zooplankton collected during manta ray feeding events and non-feeding periods, epipelagic zooplankton, demersal zooplankton and several different zooplankton taxa. Stable isotope δ(15N values confirmed that the reef manta ray is a secondary consumer. This species had relatively high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA indicating a flagellate-based food source in the diet, which likely reflects feeding on DHA-rich near-surface and epipelagic zooplankton. However, high levels of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and slightly enriched δ(13C values in reef manta ray tissue suggest that they do not feed solely on pelagic zooplankton, but rather obtain part of their diet from another origin. The closest match was with demersal zooplankton, suggesting it is an important component of the reef manta ray diet. The ability to feed on demersal zooplankton is likely linked to the horizontal and vertical movement patterns of this giant planktivore. These new insights into the habitat use and feeding ecology of the reef manta ray will assist in the effective evaluation of its conservation needs.

  1. Stable Isotope and Signature Fatty Acid Analyses Suggest Reef Manta Rays Feed on Demersal Zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Lydie I. E.; Rohner, Christoph A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Jaine, Fabrice R. A.; Bennett, Michael B.; Townsend, Kathy A.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Nichols, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the trophic role and interaction of an animal is key to understanding its general ecology and dynamics. Conventional techniques used to elucidate diet, such as stomach content analysis, are not suitable for large threatened marine species. Non-lethal sampling combined with biochemical methods provides a practical alternative for investigating the feeding ecology of these species. Stable isotope and signature fatty acid analyses of muscle tissue were used for the first time to examine assimilated diet of the reef manta ray Manta alfredi, and were compared with different zooplankton functional groups (i.e. near-surface zooplankton collected during manta ray feeding events and non-feeding periods, epipelagic zooplankton, demersal zooplankton and several different zooplankton taxa). Stable isotope δ15N values confirmed that the reef manta ray is a secondary consumer. This species had relatively high levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) indicating a flagellate-based food source in the diet, which likely reflects feeding on DHA-rich near-surface and epipelagic zooplankton. However, high levels of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and slightly enriched δ13C values in reef manta ray tissue suggest that they do not feed solely on pelagic zooplankton, but rather obtain part of their diet from another origin. The closest match was with demersal zooplankton, suggesting it is an important component of the reef manta ray diet. The ability to feed on demersal zooplankton is likely linked to the horizontal and vertical movement patterns of this giant planktivore. These new insights into the habitat use and feeding ecology of the reef manta ray will assist in the effective evaluation of its conservation needs. PMID:24167562

  2. Estimation of lake water - groundwater interactions in meromictic mining lakes by modelling isotope signatures of lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Anne; Dietz, Severine; Lessmann, Dieter; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-03-01

    A method is presented to assess lake water-groundwater interactions by modelling isotope signatures of lake water using meteorological parameters and field data. The modelling of delta(18)O and deltaD variations offers information about the groundwater influx into a meromictic Lusatian mining lake. Therefore, a water balance model is combined with an isotope water balance model to estimate analogies between simulated and measured isotope signatures within the lake water body. The model is operated with different evaporation rates to predict delta(18)O and deltaD values in a lake that is only controlled by weather conditions with neither groundwater inflow nor outflow. Comparisons between modelled and measured isotope values show whether the lake is fed by the groundwater or not. Furthermore, our investigations show that an adaptation of the Craig and Gordon model [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen-18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperature, Spoleto, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] to specific conditions in temperate regions seems necessary.

  3. Ontogeny and leaf gas exchange mediate the carbon isotopic signature of herbaceous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Yann; Barnard, Romain L; Buchmann, Nina

    2011-03-01

    Values (Δ(i)) predicted by a simplified photosynthetic discrimination model, based only on diffusion through air followed by carboxylation, are often used to infer ecological conditions from the ¹³C signature of plant organs (δ¹³C(p)). Recent studies showed that additional isotope discrimination (d that includes mesophyll conductance, photorespiration and day respiration, and post-carboxylation discrimination) can strongly affect δ¹³C(p); however, little is known about its variability during plant ontogeny for different species. Effect of ontogeny on leaf gas exchange rates, Δ(i) , observed discrimination (Δ(p)) and d in leaf, phloem and root of seven herbaceous species at three ontogenetic stages were investigated under controlled conditions. Functional group identity and ontogeny significantly affected Δ(i) and Δ(p). However, predicted Δ(i) did not match Δ(p). d, strongly affected by functional group identity and ontogeny, varied by up to 14 ‰. d scaled tightly with stomatal conductance, suggesting complex controls including changes in mesophyll conductance. The magnitude of the changes in δ¹³C(p) due to ontogeny was similar to that due to environmental factors reported in other studies. d and ontogeny should, therefore, be considered in ecosystem studies, integrated in ecosystem models using δ¹³C(p) and limit the applicability of δ¹³C(leaf) as a proxy for water-use efficiency in herbaceous plants. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Mass-defect filtering of isotope signatures to reveal the source of chlorinated palm oil contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, K; Sandoz, L; Craft, B D; Destaillats, F

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports new insights at the molecular level into the route of a worldwide problem of the food industry: the occurrence of monochloro-propanediol (MCPD) esters. The application of mass defect-driven workflows is described to generate a hypothesis on the identity and occurrence of those thermally labile, chlorinated contaminant precursors that may act as chlorine donors during the formation of MCPD esters. For the first time, holistic mass-defect filtering of isotope signatures is used to pinpoint completely unknown and unexpected chlorine-containing substances naturally present in various extracts of palm fruit and partially and fully refined oils. Supervised multivariate analysis showed the effective classification of samples from various stages of industrial processing, suggesting that these steps strongly impact a complex and dynamic pool of chlorinated substances. In-vitro experiments confirmed that several of these naturally occurring chlorinated plant constituents decompose upon heat treatment, thus potentially being a source of chlorine for further reactions with palm oil lipids in a subsequent chlorination cascade. It is hypothesised that during oil refining the organochlorines naturally present in palm fruits act as a 'chlorine source' for the generation MCPD diesters. This discovery implies that industrial efforts targeting the mitigation of chlorinated substances must intervene at the earliest possible production stage or preferably even prior to oil processing. Current performance and limitations of mass-defect filtering are discussed and future developments are outlined.

  5. Constraining recharge and groundwater flow processes in hard-rock aquifers in temperate maritime climate using stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilatova, Katarina; Ofterdinger, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Recharge estimates and in understanding flow process in hard rock aquifers pose significant challenges. These arise from structural complexities of the hardrock aquifers and are further complicated by variability of the superficial cover. A comparative study of three metamorphic catchments situated in the North of Ireland is presented in this study, each with contrasting geology, glaciation history and consequently superficial cover. The presented study focusses on two main strains. Firstly, due to lack of existing records, stable water isotopes in precipitation (δ18O and δ2H) were monitored at the research sites and their temporal and spatial variability was examined. Secondly, flow processes and dynamics of groundwater recharge based on continuous records of stable isotopes in groundwater, collected along catchment transects from various depths, and its variability in relation to the acquired precipitation signal were studied. Each precipitation station exhibited distinct isotopic signatures, where weather effect and proximity to coastline are the main controlling factors governing the isotope signatures. Moreover, in each of the stations the isotopic signature varied seasonally and thus stable isotopes proved a useful tool for assessing the dynamics of groundwater recharge. The analysis of isotope signatures in precipitation and groundwater from various depths within the hard rock aquifers allowed to evaluate the timescale of recharge, with rapid responses varying from few days up to several months. In general, the recharge appeared continuous over the hydrological year within wetter catchments with higher annual precipitation amounts purging the hardrock aquifers throughout the year. However, within comparatively dryer catchments recharge has a more seasonal character, predominantly taking place during the winter half of the year. Spatially, the recharge is highly localised within the elevated catchment areas, where superficial deposits are scarce and the

  6. Beyond temperature: Clumped isotope signatures in dissolved inorganic carbon species and the influence of solution chemistry on carbonate mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, Aradhna K.; Hill, Pamela S.; Eagle, Robert A.; Mosenfelder, Jed L.; Tang, Jianwu; Schauble, Edwin A.; Eiler, John M.; Zeebe, Richard E.; Uchikawa, Joji; Coplen, Tyler B.; Ries, Justin B.; Henry, Drew

    2015-01-01

    “Clumped-isotope” thermometry is an emerging tool to probe the temperature history of surface and subsurface environments based on measurements of the proportion of 13C and 18O isotopes bound to each other within carbonate minerals in 13C18O16O22- groups (heavy isotope “clumps”). Although most clumped isotope geothermometry implicitly presumes carbonate crystals have attained lattice equilibrium (i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium for a mineral, which is independent of solution chemistry), several factors other than temperature, including dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) speciation may influence mineral isotopic signatures. Therefore we used a combination of approaches to understand the potential influence of different variables on the clumped isotope (and oxygen isotope) composition of minerals.We conducted witherite precipitation experiments at a single temperature and at varied pH to empirically determine 13C-18O bond ordering (Δ47) and δ18O of CO32- and HCO3- molecules at a 25 °C equilibrium. Ab initio cluster models based on density functional theory were used to predict equilibrium 13C-18O bond abundances and δ18O of different DIC species and minerals as a function of temperature. Experiments and theory indicate Δ47 and δ18O compositions of CO32- and HCO3- ions are significantly different from each other. Experiments constrain the Δ47-δ18O slope for a pH effect (0.011 ± 0.001; 12 ⩾ pH ⩾ 7). Rapidly-growing temperate corals exhibit disequilibrium mineral isotopic signatures with a Δ47-δ18O slope of 0.011 ± 0.003, consistent with a pH effect.Our theoretical calculations for carbonate minerals indicate equilibrium lattice calcite values for Δ47 and δ18O are intermediate between HCO3− and CO32−. We analyzed synthetic calcites grown at temperatures ranging from 0.5 to 50 °C with and without the enzyme carbonic anhydrase present. This enzyme catalyzes oxygen isotopic exchange between DIC species and is present in many

  7. Trawling disturbance on the isotopic signature of a structure-building species, the sea urchin Gracilechinus acutus (Lamarck, 1816)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Irusta, José M.; Preciado, Izaskun; López-López, Lucia; Punzón, Antonio; Cartes, Joan E.; Serrano, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Bottom trawling is one of the main sources of anthropogenic disturbance in benthic habitats with important direct and indirect effects on the ecosystem functional diversity. In this study, the effect of this impact on a structure-building species, the sea urchin Gracilechinus acutus, was studied in the Central Cantabrian Sea (southern Bay of Biscay) comparing its isotopic signature and additional population descriptors across different trawling pressures. Trawling disturbance had a significant effect on the studied descriptors. In trawling areas, this urchin showed significantly lower values of biomass and mean size and significantly higher values of fullness index. Moreover, the trawling disturbance effect was also significant in the isotopic signature of G. acutus. Urchins inhabiting untrawled areas showed significant lower values of δ15N than urchins dwelling areas under trawling pressure. The urchins' isotopic enrichment increased along the species ontogeny regardless of the trawling effort level. Stable isotope analyses are a suitable tool to detect trawling disturbance on the trophic pathways but do not suffice to explain these changes, especially if there is a lack of baseline information.

  8. Bacterial sulphate reduction and mixing processes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory indicated by groundwater δ34S isotope signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, Bill

    2011-04-01

    This report includes data mostly obtained from δ 34 S isotope measurements of groundwater at the Aespoe Island and one sampling from the Laxemar site, southeastern Sweden, during tunnel construction. Early sampling at Aespoe (up to 1992), before tunnel excavation, indicates a groundwater system with multiple sulphur sources. The isotope changes over time in the dissolved sulphate were studied during a sampling campaign in the monitoring phase from 1993 to 1995. A total of 88 samples were collected by SKB between 1992 and 1995 from core-drilled surface boreholes and from boreholes drilled in the tunnel (34 of these samples were collected from the tunnel boreholes). The results of the analyses have been the focus of discussion of the isotope changes with time in the dissolved sulphate (SO 4 2- ). The results indicate that the sulphur isotope signatures in the dissolved sulphate of the groundwater and those from fracture-filling sulphides at Aespoe originate from multiple sulphur sources in the groundwater at Aespoe and Laxemar. The data may be grouped as follows: a) typically homogeneous marine signatures of dissolved SO 4 2- are observed, with δ 34 S values of approximately +21 per mille CDT at intermediate depths of approximately 100-250 m; b) dissolved sulphate in the groundwater at greater depths (below 600 m) with average values of approximately +10 per mille CDT; and c) a dissolved SO 4 2- originating from a mixture of these sulphur sources (100-600m), although there is a difference between a mixture and modification by reduction. Reduced sulphur with low δ 34 S values is also recorded in fracture-filling sulphides, with δ 34 S values of approximately 0 to -10 per mille CDT. This may contribute to small changes in the isotope signature of the dissolved SO 4 2- , probably by sulphide oxidation in the past. The changes in the δ 34 S isotope data for dissolved SO 4 2- over the 1992-1996 period suggest a complex situation, indicating both sulphate reduction by

  9. Biogenic processes in crystalline bedrock fractures indicated by carbon isotope signatures of secondary calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahlstedt, Elina; Karhu, Juha A.; Pitkänen, Petteri; Whitehouse, Martin

    2016-01-01

    34–54 m showed evidence of localized methanotrophic activity seen as anomalously 13 C depleted calcite, having δ 13 C values as low as −53.8‰. At depths of ∼60–400 m, positive δ 13 C values of up to +31.6‰ in late-stage calcite of Group 1–2 indicated methanogenesis. In comparison, high CH 4 concentrations in present day groundwaters are found at depths of >300 m. One sample at a depth of 111 m showed a transition from methanogenetic conditions (calcite bearing methanogenetic signature) to sulfate reducing (precipitation of pyrite on calcite surface), however, the timing of this transition is so far unclear. The results from this study gives indications of the complex nature of sulfur and carbon cycling in fractured crystalline environments and highlights the usefulness of in situ stable isotope analysis. - Highlights: • The carbon isotope variation in fracture calcite was measured in situ. • The δ 13 C values were used to investigate carbon sources and cycling in fractured rock. • Information on biogenic processes in the paleogroundwaters was gained.

  10. Physiochemical and environmental stable isotope profile of marine coastal water, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashiatullah, A.; Qureshi, R.M.; Javed, T.; Fazil, M.; Latif, Z.; Ahmad, N.

    2005-01-01

    Physiochemical and environmental stable isotope (delta /sup 13/C, delta /sup 18/O delta /sup 2/H, delta /sup 34/S) analysis of seawater samples collected from selected locations off Pakistan. Coast was performed to assess pollution scenario during 2002. Objective of the study was to establish a baseline data profile of Pakistan coastal waters. Coastal location includes: Indus Delta, Karachi Harbour, Southeast Coast Karachi, Northwest Coast Karachi, Sonmiani, Ormara. Pasni, Gwadar and Jiwani. In-situ physiochemical parameters such as: pH, electrical conductivity (E.C), salinity, turbidity and dissolved oxygen (DO) were performed with portable meters. Stable isotope of oxygen, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur was performed on GD -150 modified Mass Spectrometer. Values of delta /sup 18/O along the Sindh Coast (Indus Delta, Karachi Harbour High Tide, Karachi Harbour Low Tide, North West Coast South East Coast, Gadani), lie in range of -6.3 to -2.4 , -0.17 to -0.2, -0.13 to + 1.16, + 0.65 to + 1.25, + 0.88 to +0.93, and 1.14 %. SMOW respectively. The values of delta /sup 18/O along Baluchistan Coast (Sonmiani, Ormara, Pasni, Gwadar, and Jiwani) lie in the range of 0.74 to 1.08,0.77 to 0.82, 0.96 to + 1.07,0.38 to 1.23, and 0.45 to 0.83 % SMOW respectively. Values of delta /sup 13/ C of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) along Sindh Coast lie in the range of -2.7 to 0.55, -7.0 to -2.14, -11.48 to -2.98, -1.26 to 2.12, -2.91 to -0.56, and -1.31 to -0.28 % V- PDB. Values of delta /sup 13/ C of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) off Baluchistan Coast lie in the range of - 2.65 to -0.68, -8.5 to 0.07, -1.1 to 0.01, -1.3 to 0.47 and -5.2 to 0 % V-PDB respectively. Significantly depleted delta /sup 13/C (TDIC) values observed in water samples collected off Karachi coast, Indus Delta and Armor Coast indicate pollution inputs from industrial and domestic waste drains into shallow marine environment off these coasts. Carbon Isotope data shows that the Gwadar and Pasni are

  11. Impact of Leaf Traits on Temporal Dynamics of Transpired Oxygen Isotope Signatures and Its Impact on Atmospheric Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbert, Maren; Kübert, Angelika; Werner, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen isotope signatures of transpiration (δE) are powerful tracers of water movement from plant to global scale. However, a mechanistic understanding of how leaf morphological/physiological traits effect δE is missing. A laser spectrometer was coupled to a leaf-level gas-exchange system to measure fluxes and isotopic signatures of plant transpiration under controlled conditions in seven distinct species (Fagus sylvatica, Pinus sylvestris, Acacia longifolia, Quercus suber, Coffea arabica, Plantago lanceolata, Oxalis triangularis). We analyzed the role of stomatal conductance (gs) and leaf water content (W) on the temporal dynamics of δE following changes in relative humidity (rH). Changes in rH were applied from 60 to 30% and from 30 to 60%, which is probably more than covering the maximum step changes occurring under natural conditions. Further, the impact of gs and W on isotopic non-steady state isofluxes was analyzed. Following changes in rH, temporal development of δE was well described by a one-pool modeling approach for most species. Isofluxes of δE were dominantly driven by stomatal control on E, particularly for the initial period of 30 min following a step change. Hence, the deviation of isofluxes from isotopic steady state can be large, even though plants transpire near to isotopic steady state. Notably, not only transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but also the leaf traits stomatal density (as a measure of gmax) and leaf water content are significantly related to the time constant (τ) and non-steady-state isofluxes. This might provide an easy-to-access means of a priori assumptions for the impact of isotopic non-steady-state transpiration in various ecosystems. We discuss the implications of our results from leaf to ecosystem scale. PMID:28149303

  12. European isotopic signatures for lead in atmospheric aerosols: a source apportionment based upon 206Pb/207Pb ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, Pascal; Bertho, Marie-Laure; Deboudt, Karine; Véron, Alain; Puskaric, Emile

    2002-09-16

    To investigate the capability of the lead isotope signature technique to support a source apportionment study at a Continental scale, atmospheric particulate matter was collected at Cap Gris-Nez (Eastern Channel, northern France), over one year (1995-1996). Four days retrospective trajectories of air masses were available during each sampling experiment. Twenty-eight samples, for which the origin of aerosols was unambiguously determined, were selected for isotopic measurements. Considering the Enrichment Factors, EF(Crust) of lead and its size distribution, we show that lead is mostly from anthropogenic origin and mainly associated with [0.4 abundance in aerosols is exhibited by considering both the lead concentration and the origin of air masses. Lead concentration is higher by a factor of approximately seven, when air masses are derived from Continental Europe, by comparison with marine air masses. Taking into account these concentrations and the vertical movements of air masses, we compare the different isotopic compositions using a statistical non-parametric test (Kolmogorov-Smirnov). We produce evidence that, for most of the cases, air masses originating from Continental Europe exhibit a more radiogenic composition (1.134 metal in the air. Gasoline and industrial isotopic signatures could explain the origin of lead in our aerosol samples. A source apportionment based upon 206Pb/207Pb ratios, suggests that the difference between British (206Pb/207Pb = 1.122 +/- 0.038) and Continental (206Pb/207Pb = 1.155 +/- 0.022) signatures may be largely explained by differences in the petrol lead content of aerosols (23-62% in Great Britain vs. 10-36% in Continental Europe).

  13. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures indicate recovery of marine biota from sewage pollution at Moa Point, New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Karyne M

    2003-07-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been used to assess sewage contamination of a sewage outfall, discharging milli-screened effluent into Moa Point Bay, New Zealand, and monitor the recovery of flora and fauna after the outfall's closure. An initial study characterising the extent of the discharge and the effects on seaweed (Ulva lactuca L.), blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and limpets (Cellana denticulata) from the area, showed effects of the sewage discharge on flora and fauna were localised within in the bay. The immediate area surrounding the discharge area was found to contain limited biodiversity, with an abundance of Ulva lactuca, a bright green lettuce-like seaweed, typically found in areas with high nutrient input, limpets and small blue mussels. The nitrogen isotopic signature ({delta}{sup 15}N) is shown to be a good tracer of sewage pollution in seaweed and associated grazers (i.e. limpets) as a result of the increased contribution of urea and ammonia to seawater nitrogen derived from the effluent. The carbon isotopic signature ({delta}{sup 13}C) is suggested as a more appropriate sewage tracer for mussels, which filter feed the effluent's particulate organic matter from the water. Lower carbon:nitrogen ratios were found in Ulva lactuca sampled from around the outfall region compared to uncontaminated control sites. However carbon:nitrogen ratios do not vary significantly amongst shellfish species. After closure, monitoring continued for 9 months and showed that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of algae (Ulva lactuca L.) returned to similar control site levels within 3 months. Limpet and blue mussels (Cellana denticulata and Mytilus galloprovincialis) showed slower recovery times than the Ulva lactuca, with detectable levels of the sewage-derived carbon and nitrogen remaining in the animal's tissue for up to 9 months.

  14. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures indicate recovery of marine biota from sewage pollution at Moa Point, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Karyne M.

    2003-01-01

    Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes have been used to assess sewage contamination of a sewage outfall, discharging milli-screened effluent into Moa Point Bay, New Zealand, and monitor the recovery of flora and fauna after the outfall's closure. An initial study characterising the extent of the discharge and the effects on seaweed (Ulva lactuca L.), blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and limpets (Cellana denticulata) from the area, showed effects of the sewage discharge on flora and fauna were localised within in the bay. The immediate area surrounding the discharge area was found to contain limited biodiversity, with an abundance of Ulva lactuca, a bright green lettuce-like seaweed, typically found in areas with high nutrient input, limpets and small blue mussels. The nitrogen isotopic signature (δ 15 N) is shown to be a good tracer of sewage pollution in seaweed and associated grazers (i.e. limpets) as a result of the increased contribution of urea and ammonia to seawater nitrogen derived from the effluent. The carbon isotopic signature (δ 13 C) is suggested as a more appropriate sewage tracer for mussels, which filter feed the effluent's particulate organic matter from the water. Lower carbon:nitrogen ratios were found in Ulva lactuca sampled from around the outfall region compared to uncontaminated control sites. However carbon:nitrogen ratios do not vary significantly amongst shellfish species. After closure, monitoring continued for 9 months and showed that the carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of algae (Ulva lactuca L.) returned to similar control site levels within 3 months. Limpet and blue mussels (Cellana denticulata and Mytilus galloprovincialis) showed slower recovery times than the Ulva lactuca, with detectable levels of the sewage-derived carbon and nitrogen remaining in the animal's tissue for up to 9 months

  15. The influence of microclimates and fog on stable isotope signatures used in interpretation of regional hydrology: East Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M.A.; Gingerich, S.B.; Tribble, G.W.

    2002-01-01

    Stable isotopes of precipitation, ground water and surface water measured on the windward side of East Maui from 0 to 3055 m altitude were used to determine recharge sources for stream flow and ground water. Correct interpretation of the hydrology using rainfall ??18O gradients with altitude required consideration of the influence of fog, as fog samples had isotopic signatures enriched by as much as 3??? in ??18O and 21??? in ??D compared to volume-weighted average precipitation at the same altitude. The isotopic analyses suggested that fog drip was a major component of stream flow and shallow ground water at higher altitudes in the watershed. 18O/altitude gradients in rainfall were comparable for similar microclimates on Maui (this study) and Hawaii Island (1990-1995 study), however, East Maui ??18O values for rain in trade-wind and high-altitude microclimates were enriched compared to those from Hawaii Island. Isotopes were used to interpret regional hydrology in this volcanic island aquifer system. In part of the study area, stable isotopes indicate discharge of ground water recharged at least 1000 m above the sample site. This deep-flowpath ground water was found in springs from sea level up to 240 m altitude, indicating saturation to altitudes much higher than a typical freshwater lens. These findings help in predicting the effects of ground water development on stream flow in the area. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. 82 Kr (~11.58%), 83 Kr (~11.49%), 84 Kr (~57%) and 86 Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. 82 Kr, 86 Kr and 83 Kr, 86 Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of 86 Kr to 84 Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Can soil gas VOCs be related to groundwater plumes based on their isotope signature?

    OpenAIRE

    Jeannottat Simon; Hunkeler Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The isotope evolution of tetrachloroethene (PCE) during its transport from groundwater toward the soil surface was investigated using laboratory studies and numerical modeling. During air−water partitioning, carbon and chlorine isotope ratios evolved in opposite directions, with a normal isotope effect for chlorine (ε = −0.20‰) and an inverse effect for carbon (ε = +0.46‰). During the migration of PCE from groundwater to the unsaturated zone in a 2D laboratory system, small shifts of carbon a...

  18. Nitrate denitrification with nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products: Stoichiometry, kinetics and dynamics of stable isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, V A; Rytov, S V

    2015-09-01

    A kinetic analysis of nitrate denitrification by a single or two species of denitrifying bacteria with glucose or ethanol as a carbon source and nitrite or nitrous oxide as intermediate products was performed using experimental data published earlier (Menyailo and Hungate, 2006; Vidal-Gavilan et al., 2013). Modified Monod kinetics was used in the dynamic biological model. The special equations were added to the common dynamic biological model to describe how isotopic fractionation between N species changes. In contrast to the generally assumed first-order kinetics, in this paper, the traditional Rayleigh equation describing stable nitrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation in nitrate was derived from the dynamic isotopic equations for any type of kinetics. In accordance with the model, in Vidal-Gavilan's experiments, the maximum specific rate of nitrate reduction was proved to be less for ethanol compared to glucose. Conversely, the maximum specific rate of nitrite reduction was proved to be much less for glucose compared to ethanol. Thus, the intermediate nitrite concentration was negligible for the ethanol experiment, while it was significant for the glucose experiment. In Menyailo's and Hungate's experiments, the low value of maximum specific rate of nitrous oxide reduction gives high intermediate value of nitrous oxide concentration. The model showed that the dynamics of nitrogen and oxygen isotope signatures are responding to the biological dynamics. Two microbial species instead of single denitrifying bacteria are proved to be more adequate to describe the total process of nitrate denitrification to dinitrogen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Can soil gas VOCs be related to groundwater plumes based on their isotope signature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannottat, S; Hunkeler, D

    2013-01-01

    The isotope evolution of tetrachloroethene (PCE) during its transport from groundwater toward the soil surface was investigated using laboratory studies and numerical modeling. During air-water partitioning, carbon and chlorine isotope ratios evolved in opposite directions, with a normal isotope effect for chlorine (ε = -0.20‰) and an inverse effect for carbon (ε = +0.46‰). During the migration of PCE from groundwater to the unsaturated zone in a 2D laboratory system, small shifts of carbon and chlorine isotope ratios (+0.8‰) were observed across the capillary fringe. Numerical modeling showed that these shifts are due to isotope fractionation associated with air-water partitioning and gas-phase diffusion. Carbon and chlorine isotope profiles were constant throughout the unsaturated zone once a steady state was reached. However, depending on the thickness of the unsaturated zone and its lithology, depletion in heavy isotopes may occur with distance during the transient migration of contaminants. Additionally, variations of up to +1.5‰ were observed in the unsaturated zone for chlorine isotopes during water table fluctuations. However, at steady state, it is possible to link a groundwater plume to gas-phase contamination and/or to differentiate sources of contamination based on isotope ratios.

  20. Reconsideration of Methane Isotope Signature As a Criterion for the Genesis of Natural Gas: Influence of Migration on Isotopic Signatures Reconsidération de la signature isotopique du méthane comme critère pour la genèse du gaz naturel : influence de la migration sur les signatures isotopiques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernaton E.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed in the purpose of studying the isotopic consequences of the diffusional transport of hydrocarbon gases through sediment rocks. Linked to a numerical model, these gas diffusion experiments through a shale porous plug allowed us to correlate porosity and diffusivity of the migration medium. Significant isotopic fractionations (carbon and hydrogen of methane, and ethane at a lesser degree were observed. This is in contradiction with the actual dogma of isotope geochemistry of natural gases which claims that no fractionation occurs during gas migration. The genetic characterization of natural gases by using the isotopic signature of methane appears as an ambiguous method. Plusieurs expériences ont été réalisées dans le but d'étudier les conséquences isotopiques du transport par diffusion des gaz hydrocarbures au travers des roches sédimentaires. Associées à un modèle numérique, ces expériences de diffusion au travers d'une membrane d'argile reconstituée nous ont permis de corréler deux paramètres pétrophysiques du milieu de migration : la porosité et la diffusivité. D'importants fractionnements isotopiques ont été observés au cours de la diffusion du méthane et, à plus petite échelle, lors de la diffusion de l'éthane. Ces résultats remettent en cause le dogme actuel de la géochimie isotopique des gaz naturels qui stipule que la migration des gaz ne peut induire de fractionnements isotopiques. En conséquence, les méthodes de caractérisation génétique des gaz naturels utilisant la signature isotopique du méthane apparaissent comme insuffisantes.

  1. Bacterial sulphate reduction and mixing processes at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory indicated by groundwater delta34S isotope signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallin, Bill (Geokema AB (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    This report includes data mostly obtained from delta34S isotope measurements of groundwater at the Aespoe Island and one sampling from the Laxemar site, southeastern Sweden, during tunnel construction. Early sampling at Aespoe (up to 1992), before tunnel excavation, indicates a groundwater system with multiple sulphur sources. The isotope changes over time in the dissolved sulphate were studied during a sampling campaign in the monitoring phase from 1993 to 1995. A total of 88 samples were collected by SKB between 1992 and 1995 from core-drilled surface boreholes and from boreholes drilled in the tunnel (34 of these samples were collected from the tunnel boreholes). The results of the analyses have been the focus of discussion of the isotope changes with time in the dissolved sulphate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}). The results indicate that the sulphur isotope signatures in the dissolved sulphate of the groundwater and those from fracture-filling sulphides at Aespoe originate from multiple sulphur sources in the groundwater at Aespoe and Laxemar. The data may be grouped as follows: a) typically homogeneous marine signatures of dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} are observed, with delta34S values of approximately +21 per mille CDT at intermediate depths of approximately 100-250 m; b) dissolved sulphate in the groundwater at greater depths (below 600 m) with average values of approximately +10 per mille CDT; and c) a dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} originating from a mixture of these sulphur sources (100-600m), although there is a difference between a mixture and modification by reduction. Reduced sulphur with low delta34S values is also recorded in fracture-filling sulphides, with delta34S values of approximately 0 to -10 per mille CDT. This may contribute to small changes in the isotope signature of the dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, probably by sulphide oxidation in the past. The changes in the delta34S isotope data for dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} over the 1992-1996 period suggest a

  2. Cu isotopic signature in blood serum of liver transplant patients: a follow-up study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauwens, Sara; Costas-Rodríguez, Marta; van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2016-07-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is life-threatening and liver transplantation (LTx) is the definitive treatment with good outcomes. Given the essential role of hepatocytes in Cu homeostasis, the potential of the serum Cu isotopic composition for monitoring a patient’s condition post-LTx was evaluated. For this purpose, high-precision Cu isotopic analysis of blood serum of ESLD patients pre- and post-LTx was accomplished via multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The Cu isotopic composition of the ESLD patients was fractionated in favour of the lighter isotope (by about -0.50‰). Post-LTx, a generalized normalization of the Cu isotopic composition was observed for the patients with normal liver function, while it remained light when this condition was not reached. A strong decrease in the δ65Cu value a longer term post-LTx seems to indicate the recurrence of liver failure or cancer. The observed trend in favour of the heavier Cu isotopic composition post-LTx seems to be related with the restored biosynthetic capacity of the liver, the restored hepatic metabolism and/or the restored biliary secretion pathways. Thus, Cu isotopic analysis could be a valuable tool for the follow-up of liver transplant patients and for establishing the potential recurrence of liver failure.

  3. Geogenic lead isotope signatures from meat products in Great Britain: Potential for use in food authentication and supply chain traceability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Jane A.; Pashley, Vanessa [NIGL, BGS, Keyworth, NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Richards, Gemma J. [School of Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom); Brereton, Nicola [The Food and Environment Research Agency, Sand Hutton, York YO41 1LZ (United Kingdom); Knowles, Toby G. [School of Veterinary Science, University of Bristol, Bristol BS40 5DU (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents lead (Pb) isotope data from samples of farm livestock raised in three areas of Britain that have elevated natural Pb levels: Central Wales, the Mendips and the Derbyshire Peak District. This study highlights three important observations; that the Pb found in modern British meat from these three areas is geogenic and shows no clear evidence of modern tetraethyl anthropogenic Pb contribution; that the generally excellent match between the biological samples and the ore field data, particularly for the Mendip and Welsh data, suggests that this technique might be used to provenance biological products to specific ore sites, under favourable conditions; and that modern systems reflect the same process of biosphere averaging that is analogous to cultural focusing in human archaeological studies that is the process of biological averaging leading to an homogenised isotope signature with increasing Pb concentration. - Highlights: • Lead (Pb) isotopes measured in modern British meat were geogenic in origin. • The match indicates that this technique may be used to provenance biological products. • There was no evidence for a contribution from modern anthropogenic Pb sources.

  4. Geogenic lead isotope signatures from meat products in Great Britain: Potential for use in food authentication and supply chain traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Jane A.; Pashley, Vanessa; Richards, Gemma J.; Brereton, Nicola; Knowles, Toby G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents lead (Pb) isotope data from samples of farm livestock raised in three areas of Britain that have elevated natural Pb levels: Central Wales, the Mendips and the Derbyshire Peak District. This study highlights three important observations; that the Pb found in modern British meat from these three areas is geogenic and shows no clear evidence of modern tetraethyl anthropogenic Pb contribution; that the generally excellent match between the biological samples and the ore field data, particularly for the Mendip and Welsh data, suggests that this technique might be used to provenance biological products to specific ore sites, under favourable conditions; and that modern systems reflect the same process of biosphere averaging that is analogous to cultural focusing in human archaeological studies that is the process of biological averaging leading to an homogenised isotope signature with increasing Pb concentration. - Highlights: • Lead (Pb) isotopes measured in modern British meat were geogenic in origin. • The match indicates that this technique may be used to provenance biological products. • There was no evidence for a contribution from modern anthropogenic Pb sources.

  5. Digesting the data - Effects of predator ingestion on the oxygen isotopic signature of micro-mammal teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Milo; Blyth, Alison J.; Wallwork, Melinda D.; Joachimski, Michael M.; Martin, Laure; Evans, Noreen J.; Laming, Belinda; McDonald, Bradley J.

    2017-11-01

    Biogenic minerals such as dental apatite have become commonly analysed archives preserving geochemical indicators of past environmental conditions and palaeoecologies. However, post-mortem, biogenic minerals are modified due to the alteration/replacement of labile components, and recent moves to utilise micro-mammal tooth δ18O signatures for refined Cenozoic terrestrial palaeoclimate reconstructions has lacked consideration of the chemical effects of predator digestion. Here, the physical and chemical condition of laboratory-raised mouse (Mus musculus) teeth have been investigated in conjunction with their bulk phosphate and tissue-specific δ18O values prior, and subsequent, to ingestion and excretion by various predator species (owls, mammals and a reptile). Substantial variability (up to 2‰) in the δ18O values of both undigested teeth and those ingested by specific predators suggests significant natural heterogeneity of individual prey δ18O. Statistically distinct, lower δ18O values (∼0.7‰) are apparent in teeth ingested by barn owls compared to undigested controls as a result of the chemically and enzymatically active digestive and waste-pellet environments. Overall, dentine tissues preserve lower δ18O values than enamel, while the greatest modification of oxygen isotope signals is exhibited in the basal enamel of ingested teeth as a result of its incompletely mineralised state. However, recognition of 18O-depletion in chemically purified phosphate analyses demonstrates that modification of original δ18O values is not restricted to labile oxygen-bearing carbonate and organic phases. The style and magnitude of digestive-alteration varies with predator species and no correlation was identified between specific physical or minor/trace-element (patterns or concentrations) modification of ingested teeth and disruption of their primary oxygen isotope values. Therefore, there is a current lack of any screening tool for oxygen isotope disruption as a result

  6. Isotopic signatures for natural versus anthropogenic Pb in high-altitude Mt. Everest ice cores during the past 800 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Khanghyun; Hur, Soon Do [Korea Polar Research Institute, Songdo Techno Park, 7-50, Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hou, Shugui [State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Science, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Geographic and Oceanographic Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Burn-Nunes, Laurie J. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Hong, Sungmin, E-mail: smhong@inha.ac.kr [Department of Ocean Sciences, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Barbante, Carlo [Department of Environmental Sciences, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30 123 Venice (Italy); Institute for the Dynamics of Environmental Processes-CNR, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Dorsoduro 2137, 30 123 Venice (Italy); Boutron, Claude F. [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement (UMR Universite Joseph Fourier/CNRS 5183 ), 54 rue Moliere, BP 96, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Unite de Formation et de Recherche ' Physique, Ingenierie, Terre, Environnement, Mecanique' , Universite Joseph Fourier de Grenoble ( Institut Universitaire de France ), 715 rue de la Houille Blanche, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rosman, Kevin J.R. [Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    A long-term record, extending back 800 years (1205 to 2002 AD), of the Pb isotopic composition ({sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) as well as Pb concentrations from high altitude Mt. Everest ice cores has the potential to identify sources and source regions affecting natural and anthropogenic Pb deposition in central Asia. The results show that the regional natural background Pb isotope signature ({approx} 1.20 for {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {approx} 2.50 for {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb) in the central Himalayas was dominated by mineral dust over the last {approx} 750 years from 1205 to 1960s, mostly originating from local sources with occasional contributions of long-range transported dust probably from Sahara desert and northwestern India. Since the 1970s, the Pb isotope ratios are characterized by a continuous decline toward less radiogenic ratios with the least mean ratios of 1.178 for {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and 2.471 for {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb in the period 1990-1996. The depression of the {sup 206}Pb/{sup 207}Pb and {sup 208}Pb/{sup 207}Pb values during the corresponding periods is most likely due to an increasing influence of less radiogenic Pb of anthropogenic origin mainly from leaded gasoline used in South Asia (India as well as possibly Bangladesh and Nepal). From 1997 to 2002, isotopic composition tends to show a shift to slightly more radiogenic signature. This is likely attributed to reducing Pb emissions from leaded gasoline in source regions, coinciding with the nationwide reduction of Pb in gasoline and subsequent phase-out of leaded gasoline in South Asia since 1997. An interesting feature is the relatively high levels of Pb concentrations and enrichment factors (EF) between 1997 and 2002. Although the reason for this feature remains uncertain, it would be probably linked with an increasing influence of anthropogenic Pb emitted from other sources such as fossil fuel combustion and non-ferrous metal production.

  7. Carbon and Sulfur Isotopic Signatures of Ancient Life and Environment at the Microbial Scale: Neoarchean Shales and Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williford, K. H.; Ushikubo, T.; Lepot, K.; Kitajima, K.; Hallmann, C.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Kozdon, R.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Summons, R. E.; Valley, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    An approach to coordinated, spatially resolved, in situ carbon isotope analysis of organic matter and carbonate minerals, and sulfur three- and four-isotope analysis of pyrite with an unprecedented combination of spatial resolution, precision, and accuracy is described. Organic matter and pyrite from eleven rock samples of Neoarchean drill core express nearly the entire range of delta(sup 13)C, delta(sup 34)S, Delta(sup 33)S, and Delta(sup 36)S known from the geologic record, commonly in correlation with morphology, mineralogy, and elemental composition. A new analytical approach (including a set of organic calibration standards) to account for a strong correlation between H/C and instrumental bias in SIMS delta(sup 13)C measurement of organic matter is identified. Small (2-3 microns) organic domains in carbonate matrices are analyzed with sub-permil accuracy and precision. Separate 20- to 50-micron domains of kerogen in a single approx. 0.5 cu cm sample of the approx. 2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation have delta(sup 13)C = -52.3 +/- 0.1per mille and -34.4 +/- 0.1per mille, likely preserving distinct signatures of methanotrophy and photoautotrophy. Pyrobitumen in the approx. 2.6 Ga Jeerinah Formation and the approx. 2.5 Ga Mount McRae Shale is systematically 13C-enriched relative to co-occurring kerogen, and associations with uraniferous mineral grains suggest radiolytic alteration. A large range in sulfur isotopic compositions (including higher Delta(sup 33)S and more extreme spatial gradients in Delta(sup 33)S and Delta(sup 36)S than any previously reported) are observed in correlation with morphology and associated mineralogy. Changing systematics of delta(sup 34)S, Delta(sup 33)S, and Delta(sup 36)S, previously investigated at the millimeter to centimeter scale using bulk analysis, are shown to occur at the micrometer scale of individual pyrite grains. These results support the emerging view that the dampened signature of mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionation

  8. TDIC e formação docente: ampliação da sala de aula, consciência crítica e autonomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Aparecida Dantas de Oliveira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é compartilhar reflexões sobre experiências de incorporação das Tecnologias Digitais da Informação e Comunicação (TDIC no curso de Licenciatura em Letras-Português/Espanhol da Escola de Filosofia, Letras e Ciências Humanas da Universidade Federal de São Paulo. Tais reflexões decorrem de ações implementadas por algumas docentes do curso e se ancoram no compromisso de possibilitar aos futuros docentes vivenciar experiências práticas e reflexões teóricas que lhes proporcionem formação mais coerente com a circulação do conhecimento na sociedade contemporânea (M. Freire, 2009. Fundamentadas no desenvolvimento da capacidade reflexiva e crítica na formação docente (Freire, 1980, 1996; Dewey 1938/1963; Schön, 1992, e nas perspectivas apontadas por Buzato (2006, 2009, Valente e Silva (2006 e Masetto (2000 sobre o uso das TDIC no ensino e na formação de professores, discorremos sobre acertos, erros e necessidades de ajustes da experiência, seu impacto para os futuros docentes, bem como para as docentes ministrantes.

  9. Oxygen isotope signature of UV degradation of glyphosate and phosphonoacetate: Tracing sources and cycling of phosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandy, Edward H. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Sierra Leone, Freetown (Sierra Leone); Blake, Ruth E., E-mail: ruth.blake@yale.edu [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National “International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy”, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100084 (China); Chang, Sae Jung [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); Jun, Yao, E-mail: yaojun@ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National “International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy”, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Chan [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208109, New Haven, CT 06520-8109 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and National “International Cooperation Base on Environment and Energy”, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Phosphonate (phon) hydrolysis by UVR (1.2 kW) attained ≥90% completion in 84 h. • Isotope study reveals both ambient H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} involvements in phon C-P bond cleavage. • Mechanistic models proposed for phon C-P bond cleavage based on O-isotope analysis. • Model equations used to calculate δ{sup 18}O{sub P-org} of original phon P-moiety-useful as a tracer. • Study shows relevance in tracing phon sources and cycling in the environment. -- Abstract: The degradation of phosphonates in the natural environment constitutes a major route by which orthophosphate (Pi) is regenerated from organic phosphorus and recently implicated in marine methane production, with ramifications to environmental pollution issues and global climate change concerns. This work explores the application of stable oxygen isotope analysis in elucidating the C-P bond cleavage mechanism(s) of phosphonates by UV photo-oxidation and for tracing their sources in the environment. The two model phosphonates used, glyphosate and phosphonoacetic acid were effectively degraded after exposure to UV irradiation. The isotope results indicate the involvement of both ambient water and atmospheric oxygen in the C-P bond cleavage and generally consistent with previously posited mechanisms of UV-photon excitation reactions. A model developed to calculate the oxygen isotopic composition of the original phosphonate P-moiety, shows both synthetic phosphonates having distinctly lower values compared to naturally derived organophosphorus compounds. Such mechanistic models, based on O-isotope probing, are useful for tracing the sources and reactions of phosphonates in the environment.

  10. A stochastic approach to the reconstruction of prehistoric human diet in the Pacific region from bone isotope signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, B.F.; Quinn, C.J.; Lyon, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    A theoretical constraint on dietary reconstructions using isotope analyses of human bones is that for a given number of isotopes, N, one cannot calculate the proportions of more than N+1 food types. This strict algebraic limitation can be relaxed by adopting a stochastic approach, recommended by Mingawa (1992). This strategy is investigated for prehistoric diet in the South Pacific region, focusing on seven of the main food types available to these people: C3 plants, C4 plants, land herbivores, marine shellfish, coral reef fish, non-reef fish, and marine mammals. Sixty-three underlying assumptions were identified and examined in detail. These consist of the mean values for each food type of protein, energy δ 1 3C, δ 1 5N, 3 4S; the offset values for each isotope from the food to human bone collagen; fractionation effects from flesh to collagen in animals; and acceptable daily intake ranges for protein and energy in human diet. Because of the complexity of the environmental regimes in the Pacific it was also found necessary to tabulate these assumptions into tow groups: one set of assumptions relevant to prehistoric people whose environment is dominated by maritime conditions, such as atolls, and a second set where the land is the dominant influence. . A computer simulation algorithm is developed which is based on Mingawa's method. This was tested using a 'Reverse Experiment' procedure. By taking a diet of known percentage weight composition the isotope composition of human bone was forward calculated from this diet. The algorithm was then employed on this isotope signature to see if the original food composition could be calculated in reverse. The differences between real and calculated food weight percentages for the seven foods were 4.8, 0.1, 4.5, 1.8, 1.5, 1.8 and 1.4% respectively. These were all within aceptable statistical limits. Using the full set of assumptions it was then tested on isotope results for δ 1 3C, δ 1 5N and 3 4S for a prehistoric Pacific

  11. Multi-isotopic signatures of organic and conventional Italian pasta along the production chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bontempo, L.; Camin, F.; Paolini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The variability of stable isotope ratios (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N, δ18O and δ34S) along the production chain of pasta (durum wheat, flour and pasta) produced by using both conventional and organic farming systems in four Italian regions in 2 years was investigated. The aim was to evaluate if and how...... the farming system and geographical origin affect stable isotope ratios determined along the production chain. Irrespective of the processing technology, 65% of the samples were correctly classified according to the farming system and 98% were correctly classified regarding the geographical region. When...

  12. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally

  13. Food choice of Antarctic soil arthropods clarified by stable isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, S.F.; Ronfort, C.; Huiskes, A.H.L.; Convey, P.; Aerts, R.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Antarctic soil ecosystems are amongst the most simplified on Earth and include only few soil arthropod species, generally believed to be opportunistic omnivorous feeders. Using stable isotopic analyses, we investigated the food choice of two common and widely distributed Antarctic soil arthropod

  14. Chromium-isotope signatures in scleractinian corals from the Rocas Atoll, Tropical South Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Natan S.; Vögelin, Andrea Regula; Paulukat, Cora Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Chromium-isotope compositions (expressed as δ53Cr) of recent and ancient skeletal and non-skeletal carbonates are currently explored as a (paleo-) redox-proxy for shallow seawater. The idea behind this approach is that biogenic and non-biogenic carbonates could potentially be used as archives rec...

  15. Time for cotton to uptake water of a known isotopic signature as measured in leaf petioles

    Science.gov (United States)

    While stable isotopes of water have been used to study nutrient cycling, nitrogen fixation and other environmental studies they generally have not been used to examine shorter, more transient events, such as disposition of rainfall into soil water evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). With the deve...

  16. Can δ15N and δ13C stable isotopes and fatty acid signatures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temporal changes in fatty acid composition and δ15N, δ13C stable isotope values of the phytobenthos growing on artificial clay substrates under natural conditions over a 28-day period at an upstream and a downstream site in the Kowie River near Grahamstown were investigated in 2012. High concentrations of diatom ...

  17. Reconstruction of prehistoric pottery use from fatty acid carbon isotope signatures using Bayesian inference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fernandes, R.; Eley, Y.; Brabec, Marek; Lucquin, A.; Millard, A.; Craig, O.E.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 117, March (2018), s. 31-42 ISSN 0146-6380 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Fatty acids * carbon isotopes * pottery use * Bayesian mixing models * FRUITS Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.081, year: 2016

  18. Budgetary and biogeochemical implications of N sub(2)O isotope signatures in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Yoshinari, T.; Jayakumar, D.A.; Altabet, M.A.; Narvekar, P.V.; Devols, A.H.; Brandes, J.A.; Codispoti, L.A

    , 105-114 (1996). 12. de Wilde, H. P. J. & Helder, W. Nitrous oxide in the Somali Basin: the role of upwelling. Deep-Sea Res. II 44, 1319-1340 (1997). | ISI | 13. Kim, K.-R. & Craig, H. Two isotope characterisation of N2O in the Pacific Ocean...

  19. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haumann, F.A.; Batenburg, A.M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C.; Krol, M.C.; Rockmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H-2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H-2 and several other species as well as the H-2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA

  20. Emission ratio and isotopic signatures of molecular hydrogen emissions from tropical biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haumann, F.A.; Batenburg, A.M.; Pieterse, G.; Gerbig, C; Krol, M.C.; Röckmann, T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we identify a biomass-burning signal in molecular hydrogen (H2) over the Amazonian tropical rainforest. To quantify this signal, we measure the mixing ratios of H2 and several other species as well as the H2 isotopic composition in air samples that were collected in the BARCA (Balanço

  1. Ni Isotope Signatures in Banded Iron Formations Before, During, and After the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenki, L.; Wang, S.

    2016-12-01

    We have measured the Ni isotope compositions of banded iron formations (BIF) in an effort to test the hypothesis of Konhauser et al. that a decrease in supply of Ni to the Late Archean oceans may have triggered a decline in methanogen productivity [1,2]. These microorganisms are critically dependent on Ni, and their decline may have triggered a drop in atmospheric CH4 that allowed the first sustained rise of free O2 in the atmosphere at 2.4 Ga. While simultaneously considering other processes that may have controlled the Ni isotope composition of Precambrian seawater, and in turn the BIF, we are looking for a shift in δ60/58Ni over time that correlates with the decrease in BIF Ni/Fe ratios documented previously [1,2] and that possibly reflects a dramatic change in methanogen Ni status over that same time interval (2.7-2.4 Ga). Our preliminary results indicate that the ocean's Ni isotope composition has varied considerably over geologic time. Using results from an accompanying experimental study of Ni fractionation during incorporation into ferric oxyhydroxides/oxides, we can reconstruct the Ni isotope compositions of seawater from which BIF precipitated. We observe that Precambrian seawater was generally considerably enriched in light isotopes of Ni relative to modern seawater. So far we observe the widest range of δ60/58Ni values in those BIF samples aged 2.7-2.4 Ga, implying significant changes in the controls on δ60/58Ni in the Late Archean Eon and possibly much greater sensitivity of the biogeochemical cycle of Ni to perturbations in Ni sources, such as oxidative weathering of sulfides, input/output fluxes, or biological uptake. [1] Konhauser et al. (2009) Nature 458,750; [2] Konhauser et al. (2015) Astrobiology 15,804.

  2. C and N stable isotope signatures reveal constraints to nutritional modes in orchids from the Mediterranean and Macaronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Heiko T; Bidartondo, Martin I; Preiss, Katja; Segreto, Rossana; Stöckel, Marcus; Rodda, Michele; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2010-06-01

    We compared the nutritional modes and habitats of orchids (e.g., autotrophic, partially or fully mycoheterotrophic) of the Mediterranean region and adjacent islands of Macaronesia. We hypothesized that ecological factors (e.g., relative light availability, surrounding vegetation) determine the nutritional modes of orchids and thus impose restrictions upon orchid distribution. Covering habitats from dark forests to open sites, orchid samples of 35 species from 14 genera were collected from 20 locations in the Mediterranean and Macaronesia to test for mycoheterotrophy. Mycorrhizal fungi were identified via molecular analyses, and stable isotope analyses were applied to test whether organic nutrients are gained from the fungal associates. Our results show that orchids with partial or full mycoheterotrophy among the investigated species are found exclusively in Neottieae thriving in light-limited forests. Neottioid orchids are missing in Macaronesia, possibly because mycoheterotrophy is constrained by the lack of suitable ectomycorrhizal fungi. Furthermore, most adult orchids of open habitats in the Mediterranean and Macaronesia show weak or no N gains from fungi and no C gain through mycoheterotrophy. Instead isotope signatures of some of these species indicate net plant-to-fungus C transfer.

  3. Isotopic signatures of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) as bioindicator of anthropogenic nutrient input in the western Baltic Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, Philipp R.; Karez, Rolf; Reusch, Thorsten B.H.; Dierking, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs are a global problem, but difficult to quantify. • We tested the use of eelgrass δ 15 N as proxy of such inputs in the Baltic Sea. • The method revealed distinct spatial patterns in sewage N across a eutrophic bay. • Traditional eutrophication measures corroborated the results from δ 15 N values. • Eelgrass δ 15 N ratios have high potential as proxy of sewage-derived N in the Baltic. -- Abstract: Eutrophication is a global environmental problem. Better management of this threat requires more accurate assessments of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs to coastal systems than can be obtained with traditional measures. Recently, primary producer N isotopic signatures have emerged as useful proxy of such inputs. Here, we demonstrated for the first time the applicability of this method using the widespread eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the highly eutrophic Baltic Sea. Spatial availability of sewage N across a bay with one major sewage outflow predicted by eelgrass δ 15 N was high near and downstream of the outflow compared to upstream, but returned to upstream levels within 4 km downstream from the outfall. General conclusions were corroborated by traditional eutrophication measures, but in contrast to these measures were fully quantitative. Eelgrass N isotope ratios therefore show high potential for coastal screens of eutrophication in the Baltic Sea, and in other areas with eelgrass meadows

  4. Seawater pollution studies of the Pakistan coast using stable carbon isotope technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, R.M.; Mashiatullah, A.; Fazil, M.; Ahmad, E.; Khan, H.A.; Sajjad, M.I.

    2002-01-01

    Environmentally by stable carbon isotope ratios (delta C/sup 13/ % PDB) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) have been used as a natural tracer of domestic and industrial pollution inventory in shallow seawater off the Pakistan Coast. Shallow seawater samples (sea depth range approx. equal to 2-20 meters) were collected from five locations off the Baluchistan Coast (Jiwani, Gawadar, Pasni, Ormara, Sonmiani) and two locations off the Sindh Coast (Karachi and Indus Delta). Physiochemical parameters, such as pH, electrical conductivity, and Salinity, were measured in situ. Delta C/sup 13/ values of TDIC were measured, using gas source mass spectrometry. Significantly depleted delta C/sup 13/ TDIC values (as low as -7 per mill. PDB) coupled with measurable depletion in pH, electrical conductivity and salinity are observed in samples of seawater collected off the Indus Delta, Karachi coast, Gawadar coast and Sonmiani Bay. This is indicative of considerable inputs of pollution from industrial and/or domestic waste drains into the marine environment off these coasts. The mangrove ecosystem is also found to strongly control the delta C/sup 13/TDIC composition of seawater in the narrow channels of Jiawani Bay, Sonmiani Bay and in the backwaters of semi closed Manora Channel. (author)

  5. New perspectives on the Li isotopic composition of the upper continental crust and its weathering signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzéat, Lucie; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Chauvel, Catherine; Garçon, Marion; Tang, Ming

    2015-10-01

    Lithium isotopes are increasingly used to trace both present-day and past weathering processes at the surface of the Earth, and could potentially be used to evaluate the average degree of past weathering recorded by the upper continental crust (UCC). Yet the previous estimate of average δ7Li of the UCC has a rather large uncertainty, hindering the use of Li isotopes for this purpose. New δ7Li for desert and periglacial loess deposits (windblown dust) from several parts of the world (Europe, Argentina, China and Tajikistan) demonstrate that the former are more homogeneous than the latter, and may therefore serve as excellent proxies of the average composition of large tracts of the UCC. The Li isotopic compositions and concentrations of desert loess samples are controlled by eolian sorting that can be quantified by a binary mixing between a weathered, fine-grained end-member, dominated by phyllosilicates and having low δ7Li, and an unweathered, coarse-grained end-member, that is a mixture of quartz and plagioclase having higher δ7Li. We use correlations between insoluble elements (REE, Nd/Hf and Fe2O3/SiO2), Li concentrations (henceforth referred as [Li]), and δ7Li to estimate a new, more precise, average Li isotopic composition and concentration for the UCC: [ Li ] = 30.5 ± 3.6 (2 σ) ppm, and δ7Li = + 0.6 ± 0.6 (2 σ). The δ7Li for desert loess deposits is anti-correlated with the chemical index of alteration (CIA). Using this relationship, along with our average δ7Li, we infer that (1) the present-day CIA of the average UCC is 61-2+4 (2 σ), higher than the common reference value of 53, and (2) the average proportion of chemically weathered components is as high as 37-10+17 (2 σ)% at the surface of the Earth.

  6. Cloud water in windward and leeward mountain forests: The stable isotope signature of orographic cloud water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, M.A.; Giambelluca, T.W.; Gingerich, S.B.; Nullet, M.A.; Loope, L.L.

    2007-01-01

    Cloud water can be a significant hydrologic input to mountain forests. Because it is a precipitation source that is vulnerable to climate change, it is important to quantify amounts of cloud water input at watershed and regional scales. During this study, cloud water and rain samples were collected monthly for 2 years at sites on windward and leeward East Maui. The difference in isotopic composition between volume‐weighted average cloud water and rain samples was 1.4‰ δ18O and 12‰ δ2H for the windward site and 2.8‰ δ18O and 25‰ δ2H for the leeward site, with the cloud water samples enriched in 18O and 2H relative to the rain samples. A summary of previous literature shows that fog and/or cloud water is enriched in 18O and 2H compared to rain at many locations around the world; this study documents cloud water and rain isotopic composition resulting from weather patterns common to montane environments in the trade wind latitudes. An end‐member isotopic composition for cloud water was identified for each site and was used in an isotopic mixing model to estimate the proportion of precipitation input from orographic clouds. Orographic cloud water input was 37% of the total precipitation at the windward site and 46% at the leeward site. This represents an estimate of water input to the forest that could be altered by changes in cloud base altitude resulting from global climate change or deforestation.

  7. Os and U-Th isotope signatures of arc magmatism near Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Shirey, Steven B.; Hart, Garret L.; Bacon, Charles R.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of mantle melts with the continental crust can have significant effects on the composition of the resulting melts as well as on the crust itself, and tracing this interaction is key to our understanding of arc magmatism. Lava flows and pyroclastic deposits erupted from ∼50 to 7.7 ka at Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake, Oregon) were analyzed for their Re/Os and U-Th isotopic compositions. Mafic lavas from monogenetic vents around Mt. Mazama that erupted during the buildup to its climactic eruption have lower 187Os/188Os ratios (0.1394 to 0.1956) and high 230Th excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 1.180 to 1.302), whereas dacites and rhyodacites tend to have higher 187Os/188Os ratios (0.2292 to 0.2788) and significant 238U excess ((230Th/238U)0 of 0.975 to 0.989). The less radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the mafic lavas can be modeled by assimilation of young (∼2.5 to 7 Ma), mafic lower crust that was modified during regional extension, whereas the more radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the dacites and rhyodacites can be attributed to assimilation of older (∼10 to 16 Ma), mid to upper crust that acquired its composition during an earlier period of Cascade magmatism. Production of Th excesses in the lower crust requires very young garnet formation accompanying dehydration melting in the lower crust at less than a few 100 ka by heat from recent basaltic magma injection. The results from this study suggest that the combination of Os and Th isotopes may be used to provide insights into the timescales of evolution of the continental crust in arc settings, as well as the influence of the crust on erupted magmas, and suggest a link between the age and composition of the lower and upper crust to regional tectonic extension and/or earlier Cascade magmatism.

  8. Insect outbreaks produce distinctive carbon isotope signatures in defensive resins and fossiliferous ambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Ryan C; Wolfe, Alexander P; Muehlenbachs, Karlis; Tappert, Ralf; Engel, Michael S; Cheng, Tao; Sánchez-Azofeifa, G Arturo

    2011-11-07

    Despite centuries of research addressing amber and its various inclusions, relatively little is known about the specific events having stimulated the production of geologically relevant volumes of plant resin, ultimately yielding amber deposits. Although numerous hypotheses have invoked the role of insects, to date these have proven difficult to test. Here, we use the current mountain pine beetle outbreak in western Canada as an analogy for the effects of infestation on the stable isotopic composition of carbon in resins. We show that infestation results in a rapid (approx. 1 year) (13)C enrichment of fresh lodgepole pine resins, in a pattern directly comparable with that observed in resins collected from uninfested trees subjected to water stress. Furthermore, resin isotopic values are shown to track both the progression of infestation and instances of recovery. These findings can be extended to fossil resins, including Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic and Late Cretaceous New Jersey amber, revealing similar carbon-isotopic patterns between visually clean ambers and those associated with the attack of wood-boring insects. Plant exudate δ(13)C values constitute a sensitive monitor of ecological stress in both modern and ancient forest ecosystems, and provide considerable insight concerning the genesis of amber in the geological record.

  9. Strontium isotopic signatures of oil-field waters: Applications for reservoir characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaby, R.J.; Oetting, G.C.; Gao, G.

    2004-01-01

    The 87Sr/86Sr compositions of formation waters that were collected from 71 wells producing from a Pennsylvanian carbonate reservoir in New Mexico display a well-defined distribution, with radiogenic waters (up to 0.710129) at the updip western part of the reservoir, grading downdip to less radiogenic waters (as low as 0.708903 to the east. Salinity (2800-50,000 mg/L) displays a parallel trend; saline waters to the west pass downdip to brackish waters. Elemental and isotopic data indicate that the waters originated as meteoric precipitation and acquired their salinity and radiogenic 87Sr through dissolution of Upper Permian evaporites. These meteoric-derived waters descended, perhaps along deeply penetrating faults, driven by gravity and density, to depths of more than 7000 ft (2100 m). The 87 Sr/86Sr and salinity trends record influx of these waters along the western field margin and downdip flow across the field, consistent with the strong water drive, potentiometric gradient, and tilted gas-oil-water contacts. The formation water 87Sr/86Sr composition can be useful to evaluate subsurface flow and reservoir behavior, especially in immature fields with scarce pressure and production data. In mature reservoirs, Sr Sr isotopes can be used to differentiate original formation water from injected water for waterflood surveillance. Strontium isotopes thus provide a valuable tool for both static and dynamic reservoir characterization in conjunction with conventional studies using seismic, log, core, engineering, and production data. Copyright ??2004. The American Association of Petroleum Geologist. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of bat guanos as record of past environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Hiroshi; Kabaya, Yuko; McFarlane, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were measured for various ecogeochemical samples relevant to bat guano ecosystems. In particular, ca. 800-year-old subfossil guano from Jackson's Bay Cave Compex, Jamaica, yielded ratios similar to the modern guano from other Jamaican bat caves but quite different from modern guano of the same area. Diagenetic change and differences in bat food habits were unlikely explanations for the observation. Instead, insects that feed on C 4 and CAM plants were the main prey for the bats in present Jackson's Bay area, while the ultimate source of organic matter for bats in other Jamaican caves and for the bats that deposited guano in Jackson's Bay Great Cave ca. 800 years ago were C 3 photosynthesis. We suggests that the isotopic data indicate that the surrounding environment experienced a significant mesic episode in the recent past. This mesic climate would have supported a large population of bats, which in turn would have accumulated significant quantities of guano. The subsequent return to the more xeric conditions prevailing today would have caused a drastic reduction in bat population size and effectively ended significant guano accumulation. Fossil guano from Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico, U.S.A., suggested that native C 3 plants might have been more abundant in Wisconsinan than today. Isotope analyses of old guanos from Bat Cave in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, U.S.A., found a possible implication that C 4 photosynthesis might have had contributed a little more to the bats' diet in the cave before the construction of Glen Canyon Dam. (author)

  11. Search for isotopic signatures of a supernova explosion close to the solar system in marine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, Caroline

    2006-06-01

    The recent observation of a 60 Fe peak in a deep-sea ferro-manganese crust has been interpreted as due to a supernova explosion relatively close to the solar system 2.8 ± 0.4 Myr ago. To confirm this interpretation with better time-resolved measurements, and the simultaneous access, on the same sample, to other isotopes and geochemical phases, marine sediments seem to be a tool of choice. The objective of this work was to search for isotopic anomalies which would be characteristic for residues of this supernova. More specifically, 129 I, 60 Fe, and 26 Al have been investigated, being measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Quantifying these nuclides' fluxes would help constrain stellar nucleosynthesis models. These residues are isotopes initially produced during hydrostatic and/or explosive nucleosynthesis. The physical conditions during the explosion (temperature, neutron density) are such that supernovae are thought to be good candidates for the astrophysical site of the r-process. The 129 I study showed that measurement of pre-anthropogenic 129 I/ 127 I ratios need a very strict control of the various potential 129 I sources, especially when working with small quantities (micrograms) of iodine. This study revealed that the expected pre-anthropogenic 129 I/ 127 I ratio for pre-nuclear samples in the marine environment shows a large discrepancy between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. 60 Fe and 26 Al measurements allow us to conclude that, in the authigenic phase of the marine sediments, there is no 60 Fe anomaly in the time interval defined by the signal found on the Fe-Mn crust (from 2.4 to 3.2 Myr), and no 26 Al anomaly from 2.6 to 3.2 Myr. (author)

  12. Interplay of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on the hydrogen isotope signatures of lipid biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Ladd

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H of lipid biomarkers has diverse applications in the fields of paleoclimatology, biogeochemistry, and microbial community dynamics. Large changes in hydrogen isotope fractionation have been observed among microbes with differing core metabolisms, while environmental factors including temperature and nutrient availability can affect isotope fractionation by photoautotrophs. Much effort has gone into studying these effects under laboratory conditions with single species cultures. Moving beyond controlled environments and quantifying the natural extent of these changes in freshwater lacustrine settings and identifying their causes is essential for robust application of δ2H values of common short-chain fatty acids as a proxy of net community metabolism and of phytoplankton-specific biomarkers as a paleohydrologic proxy. This work targets the effect of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on 2H∕1H fractionation in lipid biomarkers through a comparative time series in two central Swiss lakes: eutrophic Lake Greifen and oligotrophic Lake Lucerne. Particulate organic matter was collected from surface waters at six time points throughout the spring and summer of 2015, and δ2H values of short-chain fatty acids, as well as chlorophyll-derived phytol and the diatom biomarker brassicasterol, were measured. We paired these measurements with in situ incubations conducted with NaH13CO3, which were used to calculate the production rates of individual lipids in lake surface water. As algal productivity increased from April to June, net discrimination against 2H in Lake Greifen increased by as much as 148 ‰ for individual fatty acids. During the same time period in Lake Lucerne, net discrimination against 2H increased by as much as 58 ‰ for individual fatty acids. A large portion of this signal is likely due to a greater proportion of heterotrophically derived fatty acids in the winter and early

  13. Interplay of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on the hydrogen isotope signatures of lipid biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemiah Ladd, S.; Dubois, Nathalie; Schubert, Carsten J.

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen isotopic composition (δ2H) of lipid biomarkers has diverse applications in the fields of paleoclimatology, biogeochemistry, and microbial community dynamics. Large changes in hydrogen isotope fractionation have been observed among microbes with differing core metabolisms, while environmental factors including temperature and nutrient availability can affect isotope fractionation by photoautotrophs. Much effort has gone into studying these effects under laboratory conditions with single species cultures. Moving beyond controlled environments and quantifying the natural extent of these changes in freshwater lacustrine settings and identifying their causes is essential for robust application of δ2H values of common short-chain fatty acids as a proxy of net community metabolism and of phytoplankton-specific biomarkers as a paleohydrologic proxy. This work targets the effect of community dynamics, temperature, and productivity on 2H/1H fractionation in lipid biomarkers through a comparative time series in two central Swiss lakes: eutrophic Lake Greifen and oligotrophic Lake Lucerne. Particulate organic matter was collected from surface waters at six time points throughout the spring and summer of 2015, and δ2H values of short-chain fatty acids, as well as chlorophyll-derived phytol and the diatom biomarker brassicasterol, were measured. We paired these measurements with in situ incubations conducted with NaH13CO3, which were used to calculate the production rates of individual lipids in lake surface water. As algal productivity increased from April to June, net discrimination against 2H in Lake Greifen increased by as much as 148 ‰ for individual fatty acids. During the same time period in Lake Lucerne, net discrimination against 2H increased by as much as 58 ‰ for individual fatty acids. A large portion of this signal is likely due to a greater proportion of heterotrophically derived fatty acids in the winter and early spring, which are displaced by

  14. Boron and chlorine isotopic signatures of seawater in the Central Indian Ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Xiao, Y.K.; Hai, L

    and then through the Dowex resin to remove all cations and co n vert Cl ? ions to HCl and finally through the Cs - resin bed to convert HCl to CsCl. Nearly 0.5 to 1.0 ml of CsCl sample was co l lected for the isotopic measurements of chlorine by mass spe c... measured by positive thermal ionization mass spe c- trometry of Cs 2 BO 4 + and Cs 2 Cl + ions 17,18 using VG 354 model mass spectrometer. Sample solutions (3 ? 6 ?l) co n- taining 1 ?g of boron per ?l and 5 ?g of chlorine per ?l solution...

  15. Isotopic signatures suggest important contributions from recycled gasoline, road dust and non-exhaust traffic sources for copper, zinc and lead in PM10 in London, United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuofei; Ochoa Gonzalez, Raquel; Harrison, Roy M.; Green, David; North, Robin; Fowler, Geoff; Weiss, Dominik

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to improve our understanding of what controls the isotope composition of Cu, Zn and Pb in particulate matter (PM) in the urban environment and to develop these isotope systems as possible source tracers. To this end, isotope ratios (Cu, Zn and Pb) and trace element concentrations (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Sb, Ba, Pb, Cr, Ni and V) were determined in PM10 collected at two road sites with contrasting traffic densities in central London, UK, during two weeks in summer 2010, and in potential sources, including non-combustion traffic emissions (tires and brakes), road furniture (road paint, manhole cover and road tarmac surface) and road dust. Iron, Ba and Sb were used as proxies for emissions derived from brake pads, and Ni, and V for emissions derived from fossil fuel oil. The isotopic composition of Pb (expressed using 206Pb/207Pb) ranged between 1.1137 and 1.1364. The isotope ratios of Cu and Zn expressed as δ65CuNIST976 and δ66ZnLyon ranged between -0.01‰ and +0.51‰ and between -0.21‰ and +0.33‰, respectively. We did not find significant differences in the isotope signatures in PM10 over the two weeks sampling period and between the two sites, suggesting similar sources for each metal at both sites despite their different traffic densities. The stable isotope composition of Pb suggests significant contribution from road dust resuspension and from recycled leaded gasoline. The Cu and Zn isotope signatures of tires, brakes and road dust overlap with those of PM10. The correlation between the enrichments of Sb, Cu, Ba and Fe in PM10 support the previously established hypothesis that Cu isotope ratios are controlled by non-exhaust traffic emission sources in urban environments (Ochoa Gonzalez et al., 2016). Analysis of the Zn isotope signatures in PM10 and possible sources at the two sites suggests significant contribution from tire wear. However, temporary additional sources, likely high temperature industrial emissions, need to be invoked

  16. Signatures of octupole correlations in neutron-rich odd-mass barium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, K.; Nikšić, T.; Vretenar, D.

    2018-02-01

    Octupole deformation and the relevant spectroscopic properties of neutron-rich odd-mass barium isotopes are investigated in a theoretical framework based on nuclear density functional theory and the particle-core coupling scheme. The interacting-boson Hamiltonian that describes the octupole-deformed even-even core nucleus, as well as the single-particle energies and occupation probabilities of an unpaired nucleon, are completely determined by microscopic axially symmetric (β2,β3) -deformation constrained self-consistent mean-field calculations for a specific choice of the energy density functional and pairing interaction. A boson-fermion interaction that involves both quadrupole and octupole degrees of freedom is introduced, and their strength parameters are determined to reproduce selected spectroscopic data for the odd-mass nuclei. The model reproduces recent experimental results for both even-even and odd-mass Ba isotopes. In particular, for Ba,147145 our results indicate, in agreement with recent data, that octupole deformation does not determine the structure of the lowest states in the vicinity of the ground state, and only becomes relevant at higher excitation energies.

  17. Composition of Hydrothermal Vent Microbial Communities as Revealed by Analyses of Signature Lipids, Stable Carbon Isotopes and Aquificales Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Linda L.; Edger, Wolfgang; Huber, Robert; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Hayes, John M.; DesMarais, David J.; Cady, Sherry; Hope, Janet M.; Summons, Roger E.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extremely thermophilic microbial communities associated with the siliceous vent walls and outflow channel of Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, have been examined for lipid biomarkers and carbon isotopic signatures. These data were compared with that obtained from representatives of three Aquificales genera. Thermocrinis ruber. "Thermocrinis sp. HI", Hydrogenobacter thermophilus TK-6, Aquifex pyrophilus and Aquifex aeolicus all contained phospholipids composed not only of the usual ester-linked fatty acids, but also ether-linked alkyls. The fatty acids of all cultured organisms were dominated by a very distinct pattern of n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21 compounds. The alkyl glycerol ethers were present primarily as CIS() monoethers with the expection of the Aquifex spp. in which dialkyl glycerol ethers with a boarder carbon-number distribution were also present. These Aquificales biomarker lipids were the major constituents in the lipid extracts of the Octopus Spring microbial samples. Two natural samples, a microbial biofilm growing in association with deposition of amorphous silica on the vent walls at 92 C, and the well-known 'pink-streamers community' (PSC), siliceous filaments of a microbial consortia growing in the upper outflow channel at 87 C were analyzed. Both the biofilm and PSC samples contained mono and dialkyl glycerol ethers with a prevalence of C-18 and C-20 alkyls. Phospholipid fatty acids were comprised of both the characteristic Aquificales n-C-20:1 and cy-C-21, and in addition, a series of iso-branched fatty acids from i-C-15:0 to i-C-21:0, With i-C-17:0 dominant in the PSC and i-C-19:0 in the biofilm, suggesting the presence of two major bacterial groups. Bacteriohopanepolyols were absent and the minute quantities of archaeol detected showed that Archaea were only minor constituents. Carbon isotopic compositions of the PSC yielded information about community structure and likely physiology. Biomass was C-13-depleted (10.9%) relative to available

  18. Tracing estuarine organic matter sources into the southern North Sea using C and N isotopic signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bristow, Laura A.; Jickells, Timothy D.; Weston, Keith

    2013-01-01

    organic matter pool offshore out of the estuaries. These results indicate that estuarine derived organic matter from marsh plants, seagrasses and/or macroalgae contributes to the southern North Sea organic matter pool and is therefore likely to contribute to winter-time shelf sea carbon and nitrogen......Sources and distribution of particulate organic matter in surface waters of the Humber and Thames estuaries and in the East Anglian plume in the southern North Sea were investigated in winter 2006/2007. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotopes provided evidence for the presence of three......Euro degrees) and elevated C:N ratio (> 12.7). Particulate organic matter with enriched C-13 values were observed throughout the Humber estuary and at the marine end-member of the Thames estuary. While bacterial cycling of organic carbon undoubtedly takes place within these estuaries, these processes...

  19. Climate dependent diatom production is preserved in biogenic Si isotope signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Sun

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reconstruct diatom production in the subarctic northern tip of the Baltic Sea, Bothnian Bay, based on down-core analysis of Si isotopes in biogenic silica (BSi. Dating of the sediment showed that the samples covered the period 1820 to 2000. The sediment core record can be divided into two periods, an unperturbed period from 1820 to 1950 and a second period affected by human activities (from 1950 to 2000. This has been observed elsewhere in the Baltic Sea. The shift in the sediment core record after 1950 is likely caused by large scale damming of rivers. Diatom production was inferred from the Si isotope composition which ranged between δ30Si −0.18‰ and +0.58‰ in BSi, and assuming fractionation patterns due to the Raleigh distillation, the production was shown to be correlated with air and water temperature, which in turn were correlated with the mixed layer (ML depth. The sedimentary record showed that the deeper ML depth observed in colder years resulted in less production of diatoms. Pelagic investigations in the 1990's have clearly shown that diatom production in the Baltic Sea is controlled by the ML depth. Especially after cold winters and deep water mixing, diatom production was limited and dissolved silicate (DSi concentrations were not depleted in the water column after the spring bloom. Our method corroborates these findings and offers a new method to estimate diatom production over much longer periods of time in diatom dominated aquatic systems, i.e. a large part of the world's ocean and coastal seas.

  20. Stable silicon isotope signatures of marine pore waters - Biogenic opal dissolution versus authigenic clay mineral formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Claudia; Doering, Kristin; Wallmann, Klaus; Scholz, Florian; Sommer, Stefan; Grasse, Patricia; Geilert, Sonja; Frank, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved silicon isotope compositions have been analysed for the first time in pore waters (δ30SiPW) of three short sediment cores from the Peruvian margin upwelling region with distinctly different biogenic opal content in order to investigate silicon isotope fractionation behaviour during early diagenetic turnover of biogenic opal in marine sediments. The δ30SiPW varies between +1.1‰ and +1.9‰ with the highest values occurring in the uppermost part close to the sediment-water interface. These values are of the same order or higher than the δ30Si of the biogenic opal extracted from the same sediments (+0.3‰ to +1.2‰) and of the overlying bottom waters (+1.1‰ to +1.5‰). Together with dissolved silicic acid concentrations well below biogenic opal saturation, our collective observations are consistent with the formation of authigenic alumino-silicates from the dissolving biogenic opal. Using a numerical transport-reaction model we find that approximately 24% of the dissolving biogenic opal is re-precipitated in the sediments in the form of these authigenic phases at a relatively low precipitation rate of 56 μmol Si cm-2 yr-1. The fractionation factor between the precipitates and the pore waters is estimated at -2.0‰. Dissolved and solid cation concentrations further indicate that off Peru, where biogenic opal concentrations in the sediments are high, the availability of reactive terrigenous material is the limiting factor for the formation of authigenic alumino-silicate phases.

  1. Compound-specific stable carbon isotopic signature of carbohydrate pyrolysis products from C3 and C4 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, José A; Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T; de la Rosa, José M; Almendros, Gonzalo; González-Vila, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Pyrolysis-compound specific isotopic analysis (Py-CSIA: Py-GC-(FID)-C-IRMS) is a relatively novel technique that allows on-line quantification of stable isotope proportions in chromatographically separated products released by pyrolysis. Validation of the Py-CSIA technique is compulsory for molecular traceability in basic and applied research. In this work, commercial sucrose from C4 (sugarcane) and C3 (sugarbeet) photosystem plants and admixtures were studied using analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS), bulk δ(13)C IRMS and δ(13)C Py-CSIA. Major pyrolysis compounds were furfural (F), furfural-5-hydroxymethyl (HMF) and levoglucosan (LV). Bulk and main pyrolysis compound δ(13)C (‰) values were dependent on plant origin: C3 (F, -24.65 ± 0.89; HMF, -22.07 ± 0.41‰; LV, -21.74 ± 0.17‰) and C4 (F, -14.35 ± 0.89‰; HMF, -11.22 ± 0.54‰; LV, -11.44 ± 1.26‰). Significant regressions were obtained for δ(13)C of bulk and pyrolysis compounds in C3 and C4 admixtures. Furfural (F) was found (13)C depleted with respect to bulk and HMF and LV, indicating the incorporation of the light carbon atom in position 6 of carbohydrates in the furan ring after pyrolysis. This is the first detailed report on the δ(13)C signature of major pyrolytically generated carbohydrate-derived molecules. The information provided by Py-CSIA is valuable for identifying source marker compounds of use in food science/fraud detection or in environmental research. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Methane isotopic signature of gas bubbles in permafrost winter lake ice: a tool for quantifying variable oxidation levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapart, C. J.; Boereboom, T.; Roeckmann, T.; Tison, J.-L.

    2012-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is a strong greenhouse gas and its atmospheric mixing ratio has strongly increased since pre-industrial times. This increase was primarily due to emissions from anthropogenic sources, but there is growing concern about possible feedbacks of natural sources in a changing climate. Thawing of permafrost areas in the Arctic is considered as an important feedback, since the Arctic region undergoes the fastest climate change and hosts large carbon stocks. Subarctic lakes are considered as "hotspots" for CH4 emissions, but the role of the ice cover during the winter period is not well understood to date. Here, we present measurements of CH4 mixing ratio and δ13C-CH4 in 4 types of bubbles identified in subarctic lake ice covers located in a sporadic or discontinuous permafrost area. Our analysis reveals that different bubble types contain CH4 with different, specific isotopic signatures. The evolution of mixing ratio and δ13C-CH4 suggest that oxidation of dissolved CH4 is the most important process determining the isotopic composition of CH4 in bubbles. This results from gas exsolution occurring during the ice growth process. A first estimate of the CH4 oxidation budget (mean = 0.12 mg CH4 m-2 d-1) enables to quantify the impact of the ice cover on CH4 emissions from subartic lakes. The increased exchange time between gases coming from the sediments and the water column, due to the capping effect of the lake ice cover, reduces the amount of CH4 released "as is" and favours its oxidation into carbon dioxide; the latter being further added to the HCO3- pool through the carbonate equilibration reactions.

  3. Impact of seaweed beachings on dynamics of δ15N isotopic signatures in marine macroalgae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemesle, Stéphanie; Mussio, Isabelle; Rusig, Anne-Marie; Menet-Nédélec, Florence; Claquin, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Two coastal sites (COU, GM) in the Bay of Seine affected by summer seaweed beachings. • The same temporal dynamics of the algal δ 15 N at the two sites. • N and P concentrations in seawater of the two sites dominated by riverine sources. • A coupling between seaweed beachings and N sources of intertidal macroalgae. - Abstract: A fine-scale survey of δ 15 N, δ 13 C, tissue-N in seaweeds was conducted using samples from 17 sampling points at two sites (Grandcamp-Maisy (GM), Courseulles/Mer (COU)) along the French coast of the English Channel in 2012 and 2013. Partial triadic analysis was performed on the parameter data sets and revealed the functioning of three areas: one estuary (EstA) and two rocky areas (GM ∗ , COU ∗ ). In contrast to oceanic and anthropogenic reference points similar temporal dynamics characterized δ 15 N signatures and N contents at GM ∗ and COU ∗ . Nutrient dynamics were similar: the N-concentrations in seawater originated from the River Seine and local coastal rivers while P-concentrations mainly from these local rivers. δ 15 N at GM ∗ were linked to turbidity suggesting inputs of autochthonous organic matter from large-scale summer seaweed beachings made up of a mixture of Rhodophyta, Phaeophyta and Chlorophyta species. This study highlights the coupling between seaweed beachings and nitrogen sources of intertidal macroalgae

  4. Understanding wetland sub-surface hydrology using geologic and isotopic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sahu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to utilize hydrogeology and isotope composition of groundwater to understand the present hydrological processes prevalent in a freshwater wetland, source of wetland groundwater, surface water/groundwater interaction and mixing of groundwater of various depth zones in the aquifer. This study considers East Calcutta Wetlands (ECW – a freshwater peri-urban inland wetland ecosystem located at the lower part of the deltaic alluvial plain of South Bengal Basin and east of Kolkata city. This wetland is well known over the world for its resource recovery systems, developed by local people through ages, using wastewater of the city. Geological investigations reveal that the sub-surface geology is completely blanketed by the Quaternary sediments comprising a succession of silty clay, sand of various grades and sand mixed with occasional gravels and thin intercalations of silty clay. At few places the top silty clay layer is absent due to scouring action of past channels. In these areas sand is present throughout the geological column and the areas are vulnerable to groundwater pollution. Groundwater mainly flows from east to west and is being over-extracted to the tune of 65×103 m3/day. δ18O and δD values of shallow and deep groundwater are similar indicating resemblance in hydrostratigraphy and climate of the recharge areas. Groundwater originates mainly from monsoonal rain with some evaporation prior to or during infiltration and partly from bottom of ponds, canals and infiltration of groundwater withdrawn for irrigation. Relatively high tritium content of the shallow groundwater indicates local recharge, while the deep groundwater with very low tritium is recharged mainly from distant areas. At places the deep aquifer has relatively high tritium, indicating mixing of groundwater of shallow and deep aquifers. Metals such as copper, lead, arsenic, cadmium, aluminium, nickel and chromium are also

  5. Understanding wetland sub-surface hydrology using geologic and isotopic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, P. K.; Sahu, P.

    2009-07-01

    This paper attempts to utilize hydrogeology and isotope composition of groundwater to understand the present hydrological processes prevalent in a freshwater wetland, source of wetland groundwater, surface water/groundwater interaction and mixing of groundwater of various depth zones in the aquifer. This study considers East Calcutta Wetlands (ECW) - a freshwater peri-urban inland wetland ecosystem located at the lower part of the deltaic alluvial plain of South Bengal Basin and east of Kolkata city. This wetland is well known over the world for its resource recovery systems, developed by local people through ages, using wastewater of the city. Geological investigations reveal that the sub-surface geology is completely blanketed by the Quaternary sediments comprising a succession of silty clay, sand of various grades and sand mixed with occasional gravels and thin intercalations of silty clay. At few places the top silty clay layer is absent due to scouring action of past channels. In these areas sand is present throughout the geological column and the areas are vulnerable to groundwater pollution. Groundwater mainly flows from east to west and is being over-extracted to the tune of 65×103 m3/day. δ18O and δD values of shallow and deep groundwater are similar indicating resemblance in hydrostratigraphy and climate of the recharge areas. Groundwater originates mainly from monsoonal rain with some evaporation prior to or during infiltration and partly from bottom of ponds, canals and infiltration of groundwater withdrawn for irrigation. Relatively high tritium content of the shallow groundwater indicates local recharge, while the deep groundwater with very low tritium is recharged mainly from distant areas. At places the deep aquifer has relatively high tritium, indicating mixing of groundwater of shallow and deep aquifers. Metals such as copper, lead, arsenic, cadmium, aluminium, nickel and chromium are also present in groundwater of various depths. Therefore

  6. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopes in Fastfood: Signatures of Corn and Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahren, H.; Kraft, R.

    2008-12-01

    Americans spend more than one hundred billion dollars on restaurant fastfood each year; fastfood meals comprise a disproportionate amount of both meat and calories within the U.S. diet. Frustrated by futile attempts to gain information about the origin and production of fastfood from the companies themselves, we used carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes to infer the source of feed to meat animals, the source of fat within fries, and the extent of fertilization and confinement inherent to production. We sampled food from McDonald's, Burger King and Wendy's chains, purchasing more than 480 servings of hamburgers, chicken sandwiches and fries within geographically-distributed U.S. cities: Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver, Detroit, Boston and Baltimore. From the entire sample set of beef and chicken, only 12 servings of beef had δ13C food source other than corn possible. We observed remarkably invariant values of δ15N in both beef and chicken, reflecting uniform confinement and exposure to heavily fertilized feed for all animals. The δ13C value of fries differed significantly among restaurants indicating that the chains employed different protocols for deep- frying: Wendy's clearly employed only corn oil, while McDonald's and Burger King favored other vegetable oils; this differed from ingredient reports. Our results highlighted the overwhelming importance of corn agriculture within virtually every aspect of fastfood manufacture.

  7. Lipid Biomarkers and Stable Isotope Signatures of Microbial Mats in Hot Springs of Kamchatka, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C. S.; Mills, G. L.; Jones, M. E.; Paddock, L.; Li, Y.; Zhang, C. L.; Wiegel, J.

    2004-12-01

    Various hot springs of the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka, were analyzed for their chemical and stable isotope composition to better understand the relationship(s) between thermophilic microorganisms and the environments in which they live. The springs had water temperatures ranging from 40-90\\deg C and pH ranging from 5.6-5.9. Gases that emanated from the springs were composed predominantly of CO2 (20 to 90%), with lesser amounts of CH4, (Archaea. Results of PLFA showed 16:0 as the most abundant fatty acid (33-44%), which is universal in all living organisms. Other significant biomarkers included 18:1ω (19 to 24%), 18:2ω (5 to 13%), 16:1ω (3 to 12%), and 18:0 (2 to 7%). These biomarkers are characteristic of cyanobacteria, green-sulfur bacteria, and green non-sulfur bacteria, respectively, which are common autotrophic organisms in terrestrial hot springs. On the other hand, biomarkers of heterotrophic bacteria, such as iso- and anteiso-15:0 were low (2-8%), indicating that the bacterial carbon cycle was dominated by autotrophic organisms. Analogous archaeal constituents were present in significant abundance in the ether lipids fraction.

  8. Microbial isotopic signatures in calcareous tufa from Punta Mita coastal vents, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, C.; Prol-Ledesma, R. M.; Melgarejo, J. C.; Reyes, A.

    2002-12-01

    Numerous small calcareous mounds accompanied by Ba, Hg and Tl mineralization occur in shallow submarine hydrothermal manifestations on the sea bottom, at 10 m depth, in Punta Mita (Western coast of Mexico). The formation of calcite mounds in these coastal vents provides an uncommon example of calcareous tufa deposits in a submarine hydrothermal environment. The hydrothermal activity consists in water and gas (essentially nitrogen and methane) venting at 85°C, through a 100 m fissure hosted in basaltic rocks and partially covered by unconsolidated sediments. The mounds consist of travertine-like metre-sized calcite aggregates that develop around the main submarine hot springs. Barite, sulphides (mostly pyrite and cinnabar) and phosphates (carbonate-hydroxylapatite) are also present in these mounds. Two main calcite types are texturally distinguished: firstly an earlier radial-fibrous generation, and a later fine-grained calcite generation that cements the detrital grains and fills the pore spaces. Stable isotope analyses were performed in calcite from these mounds. The δ13C measured values show a strong depletion in 13C, with values as low as -39.2 per mil (PDB). These values agree with a microbially mediated calcite mineralization process, by means of bacterial oxidation of vent derived methane. In contrast to most known cases of microbial methane oxidation, in Punta Mita this process took place under hydrothermal conditions.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures and nitrogen profile to identify adulteration in organic fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenitch, Sergei; Mazumder, Asit

    2012-08-29

    Recently it has been shown that stable isotopes of nitrogen can be used to discriminate between organic and synthetic fertilizers, but the robustness of the approach is questionable. This work developed a comprehensive method that is far more robust in identifying an adulteration of organic nitrogen fertilizers. Organic fertilizers of various types (manures, composts, blood meal, bone meal, fish meal, products of poultry and plant productions, molasses and seaweed based, and others) available on the North American market were analyzed to reveal the most sensitive criteria as well as their quantitative ranges, which can be used in their authentication. Organic nitrogen fertilizers of known origins with a wide δ(15)N range between -0.55 and 28.85‰ (n = 1258) were characterized for C and N content, δ(13)C, δ(15)N, viscosity, pH, and nitrogen profile (urea, ammonia, organic N, water insoluble N, and NO3). A statistically significant data set of characterized unique organic nitrogen fertilizers (n = 335) of various known origins has been assembled. Deliberately adulterated samples of different types of organic fertilizers mixed with synthetic fertilizers at a wide range of proportions have been used to develop the quantitative critical characteristics of organic fertilizers as the key indicators of their adulteration. Statistical analysis based on the discriminant functions of the quantitative critical characteristics of organic nitrogen fertilizers from 14 different source materials revealed a very high average rate of correct classification. The developed methodology has been successfully used as a source identification tool for numerous commercial nitrogen fertilizers available on the North American market.

  10. Mercury and stable isotope signatures in caged marine fish and fish feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Chen, Min; Ke, Caihuan [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Wen-Xiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury concentrations in caged fish were closely related to Hg concentrations in fish feeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The trophic transfer factor of methylmercury was dependent on fish feeds, and was the highest for fish fed on pellet feeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because Hg levels can be carefully controlled. - Abstract: Total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in four species of marine caged carnivorous fish, one species of herbivorous fish and three types of fish feeds (dried pellet feed, forage fish and fish viscera), collected from five cage sites in the rural areas along Fujian coastline, China. For the carnivorous fish, the concentrations of THg and MeHg ranged from 0.03 to 0.31 {mu}g/g and from 0.02 to 0.30 {mu}g/g on wet weight basis, respectively. The concentrations were lower for the herbivorous fish with both within the range of 0.01-0.03 {mu}g/g. Out of the three tested fish feeds, tuna viscera contained the highest level of mercury (0.20 {mu}g/g THg and 0.13 {mu}g/g MeHg), with pellet feed containing the lowest level (0.05 {mu}g/g THg and 0.01 {mu}g/g MeHg). The calculated trophic transfer factor of MeHg was the highest (12-64) for fish fed on pellet feeds, and was the lowest for fish fed on tuna viscera. A significant relationship was found between Hg concentrations in caged fish and in fish feeds, thus Hg was primarily accumulated from the diet. Furthermore, the stable isotope {delta}{sup 15}N was positively correlated with the Hg concentration in two caged sites, indicating that {delta}{sup 15}N may be a suitable tool for tracking mercury in caged fish. We conclude that fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because mercury levels can be carefully controlled in such farming systems.

  11. Mercury and stable isotope signatures in caged marine fish and fish feeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Chen, Min; Ke, Caihuan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mercury concentrations in caged fish were closely related to Hg concentrations in fish feeds. ► The trophic transfer factor of methylmercury was dependent on fish feeds, and was the highest for fish fed on pellet feeds. ► Fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because Hg levels can be carefully controlled. - Abstract: Total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in four species of marine caged carnivorous fish, one species of herbivorous fish and three types of fish feeds (dried pellet feed, forage fish and fish viscera), collected from five cage sites in the rural areas along Fujian coastline, China. For the carnivorous fish, the concentrations of THg and MeHg ranged from 0.03 to 0.31 μg/g and from 0.02 to 0.30 μg/g on wet weight basis, respectively. The concentrations were lower for the herbivorous fish with both within the range of 0.01–0.03 μg/g. Out of the three tested fish feeds, tuna viscera contained the highest level of mercury (0.20 μg/g THg and 0.13 μg/g MeHg), with pellet feed containing the lowest level (0.05 μg/g THg and 0.01 μg/g MeHg). The calculated trophic transfer factor of MeHg was the highest (12–64) for fish fed on pellet feeds, and was the lowest for fish fed on tuna viscera. A significant relationship was found between Hg concentrations in caged fish and in fish feeds, thus Hg was primarily accumulated from the diet. Furthermore, the stable isotope δ 15 N was positively correlated with the Hg concentration in two caged sites, indicating that δ 15 N may be a suitable tool for tracking mercury in caged fish. We conclude that fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because mercury levels can be carefully controlled in such farming systems.

  12. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in molluscan shells under ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, K.; Hayashi, M.; Suzuki, A.; Sato, M.; Nojiri, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions (δ13C, δ18O) of biogenic carbonate have been widely used for many paleoclimate, paleoecological, and biomineralization studies. δ13C of molluscan shells reflects the mixing of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of seawater and respiratory carbon. Previous studies reported physiological effects on molluscs by ocean acidification, and thus the metabolic changes could potentially appear in shell δ13C as changes in a fraction of two carbon sources. In addition, shell δ18O, a commonly used proxy of seawater temperature and seawater δ18O, is also affected by seawater carbonate chemistry. As changes in the marine carbonate system, such as pH and pCO2, have occurred in the past 300 million years, to estimate pH effect on paleotemperature reconstruction is important. Here, we experimentally examined acidification effects on shell δ13C and δ18O of two species of clams for understanding of environmental and physiological proxies. Juvenile specimens of bloody clam Scapharca broughtonii and Japanese surf clam Pseudocardium sachalinense were cultured at five (400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 µatm, P. sachalinense) or six (280, 400, 600, 800, 1000, and 1200 µatm, S. broughtonii) different pCO2 levels using CO2 control system of the Demonstration Laboratory, MERI, Japan. Significant negative correlations between shell δ13C and pH appeared in S. broughtonii, which showed non-significant pH effects on calcification, and the slope of the relationship of shell carbonate was lower than that of seawater DIC. On the other hand, in P. sachalinense which showed a decrease in calcification at low-pH treatment, the slopes of the relationship between shell δ13C and pH was roughly the same as that of seawater DIC. Thus, the extrapallial fluid of P. sachalinense might more strongly affected by acidified seawater than S. broughtonii. The results of two species might be attributable to differences in physiological responses to

  13. Source apportionment of atmospheric ammonia before, during, and after the 2014 APEC summit in Beijing using stable nitrogen isotope signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stable nitrogen isotope composition (δ15N offers new opportunities to address the long-standing and ongoing controversy regarding the origins of ambient ammonia (NH3, a vital precursor of PM2.5 (particulate matters with aerodynamic diameter equal or less than 2.5 µm inorganic components, in the urban atmosphere. In this study, the δ15N values of NH3 samples collected from various sources were constrained using a novel and robust chemical method coupled with standard elemental analysis procedures. Independent of the wide variation in mass concentrations (ranging from 33 (vehicle to over 6000 (human excreta µg m−3, different NH3 sources have generally different δ15N values (ranging from −52.0 to −9.6 ‰. Significantly high δ15N values are seen as a characteristic feature of all vehicle-derived NH3 samples (−14.2 ± 2.8 ‰, which can be distinguished from other sources emitted at environmental temperature (−29.1 ± 1.7, −37.8 ± 3.6, and −50.0 ± 1.8 ‰ for livestock, waste, and fertilizer, respectively. The isotope δ15N signatures for a range of NH3 emission sources were used to evaluate the contributions of the different sources within measured ambient NH3 in Beijing, using an isotope mixing model (IsoSource. The method was used to quantify the sources of ambient NH3 before, during and after the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC summit, when a set of stringent air quality control measures were implemented. Results show that the average NH3 concentrations (the overall contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer during the three periods were 9.1 (20.3, 28.3, 23.6, and 27.7 %, 7.3 (8.8, 24.9, 14.3, and 52.0 %, and 12.7 (29.4, 23.6, 31.7, and 15.4 % µg m−3, respectively, representing a 20.0 % decrease first and then a 74.5 % increase in overall NH3 mass concentrations. During (after the summit, the contributions of traffic, waste, livestock, and fertilizer

  14. A protocol to correct for intra- and interspecific variation in tail hair growth to align isotope signatures of segmentally cut tail hair to a common time line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnik Šturm, Martina; Pukazhenthi, Budhan; Reed, Dolores; Ganbaatar, Oyunsaikhan; Sušnik, Stane; Haymerle, Agnes; Voigt, Christian C; Kaczensky, Petra

    2015-06-15

    In recent years, segmental stable isotope analysis of hair has been a focus of research in animal dietary ecology and migration. To correctly assign tail hair segments to seasons or even Julian dates, information on tail hair growth rates is a key parameter, but is lacking for most species. We (a) reviewed the literature on tail hair growth rates in mammals; b) made own measurements of three captive equid species; (c) measured δ(2)H, δ(13)C and δ(15)N values in sequentially cut tail hairs of three sympatric, free-ranging equids from the Mongolian Gobi, using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS); and (d) collected environmental background data on seasonal variation by measuring δ(2)H values in precipitation by IRMS and by compiling pasture productivity measured by remote sensing via the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Tail hair growth rates showed significant inter- and intra-specific variation making temporal alignment problematic. In the Mongolian Gobi, high seasonal variation of δ(2)H values in precipitation results in winter lows and summer highs of δ(2)H values of available water sources. In water-dependent equids, this seasonality is reflected in the isotope signatures of sequentially cut tails hairs. In regions which are subject to strong seasonal patterns we suggest identifying key isotopes which show strong seasonal variation in the environment and can be expected to be reflected in the animal tissue. The known interval between the maxima and minima of these isotope values can then be used to correctly temporally align the segmental stable isotope signature for each individual animal. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Leaf oxygen and Carbon Isotopic Signatures Reflect Drought Resistance and Water Use Efficiency in the C4 Grass, Setaria viridis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, P.; Cousins, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Low water availability is a major constraint in crop production, especially as agriculture is pushed to marginal lands. Therefore, improving drought resistance such as increasing water use efficiency (WUE) through plant breeding is needed to expand the range of soil water availability adequate for food production. With the goal of finding the genomic basis for WUE in C4 grasses, Setaria viridis makes an ideal model species because of its small size, short lifespan, and sequenced genome. Also it is part of the panicoid grass clade, which is one of the most important clades for food and biofuel production. In plant breeding programs, large numbers of genotypes must be quickly screened for drought resistance traits, but there is no well-defined method of screening for WUE in C4 grasses. However, bulk leaf oxygen (Δ18OBL) and carbon (δ13C) isotopic signatures have shown potential as recorders of transpiration rate (E) and stomatal conductance (gs), and combined with biomass production potentially serve as a measure of WUE. Values of Δ18OBL record differences in transpiration rate because leaf water becomes more enriched as transpiration rate decreases, and leaf tissue records the isotopic composition of leaf water in which it is synthesized. Additionally, in C4 plants δ13C values decrease as gs decreases but the change in δ13C in response to gs may not be adequate to tease apart differences in WUE. In this study, we grew S. viridis plants under well-watered and water-limited conditions to determine if Δ18OBL and δ13C could be used as proxies for E and gs, and be used to screen S. viridis for differences in WUE in breeding programs. The Δ18OBL and δ13C were significantly different between well-watered and water-limited plants and correlated with each other and with E, gs, and instantaneous water use efficiency (Anet/gs). Therefore, Δ18OBL and δ13C can be useful proxies to screen genotypes for drought resistance by recording differences in E, gs, and WUE

  16. Biogeochemical controls and isotopic signatures of nitrous oxide production by a marine ammonia-oxidizing bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. Frame

    2010-09-01

    medium also increased N2O yields by an average of 70% to 87% depending on O2 concentration. We made stable isotopic measurements on N2O from these cultures to identify the biochemical mechanisms behind variations in N2O yield. Based on measurements of δ15Nbulk, site preference (SP = δ15Nα−δ15Nβ, and δ18O of N2O (δ18O-N2O, we estimate that nitrifier-denitrification produced between 11% and 26% of N2O from cultures grown under 20% O2 and 43% to 87% under 0.5% O2. We also demonstrate that a positive correlation between SP and δ18O-N2O is expected when nitrifying bacteria produce N2O. A positive relationship between SP and δ18O-N2O has been observed in environmental N2O datasets, but until now, explanations for the observation invoked only denitrification. Such interpretations may overestimate the role of heterotrophic denitrification and underestimate the role of ammonia oxidation in environmental N2O production.

  17. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (δ13C and δ15N.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine J Briand

    Full Text Available A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef, different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰ and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰. Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰ whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰. The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that δ13C was a more useful fingerprint than δ15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is

  18. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott F. Pearson; Douglas J. Levey; Cathryn H. Greenberg; Carlos Martinez del Rio

    2003-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped...

  19. First real-time measurements of N2O isotopic signatures above intensively managed grassland: analytical performance, validation and illustrative examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Benjamin; Tuzson, Béla; Merbold, Lutz; Decock, Charlotte; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Measurement of the four main N2O isotopic species (14N15N16O / 15N14N16O / 14N14N18O / 14N14N16O) has been suggested as a powerful tool to trace the biogeochemical cycle of N2O and to allocate its emission sources. Studies carried out with microbial pure cultures and mixed population systems (Wunderlin et al. 2012) allowed the determination of characteristic isotopic signatures for the most important production processes. These characteristic signatures have been applied to identify relevant sources at different scales (Park et al. 2012). However, current studies suffer from limited spatial and temporal resolution due to the combination of discrete flask sampling in conjunction with laboratory-based mass spectrometric analysis. We recently demonstrated that a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based absorption spectrometer is capable of simultaneously measuring the three main N2O isotopomers at trace levels (Waechter et al. 2008). Furthermore, its potential for in-situ measurements in conjunction with a liquid nitrogen-free preconcentration unit has been proven (Mohn et al. 2012). Here we present results from the first long-term field measurement campaign conducted on intensively managed grassland in central Switzerland during three months. A modified state-of-the-art laser spectrometer (Aerodyne Research, Inc.) employing a mid-infrared cw-QCL (4.54 μm) and a novel astigmatic multipass cell with 204 m optical path-length was connected to a N2O preconcentration unit. High analytical performance in combination with the applied calibration strategy resulted in excellent long-term precision of 0.20, 0.12 and 0.11o for δ15Nα, δ15Nβ and δ18O which was determined from repeated preconcentration and measurement of target gas from a compressed air tank. This instrumental setup allowed investigating responses of isotopic composition in soil-emitted N2O to management events and weather influences. The accompanying measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, ammonia

  20. Mercury isotope signatures of seawater discharged from a coal-fired power plant equipped with a seawater flue gas desulfurization system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haiying; Peng, Jingji; Yuan, Dongxing; Lu, Bingyan; Lin, Kunning; Huang, Shuyuan

    2016-07-01

    Seawater flue gas desulfurization (SFGD) systems are commonly used to remove acidic SO2 from the flue gas with alkaline seawater in many coastal coal-fired power plants in China. However, large amount of mercury (Hg) originated from coal is also transferred into seawater during the desulfurization (De-SO2) process. This research investigated Hg isotopes in seawater discharged from a coastal plant equipped with a SFGD system for the first time. Suspended particles of inorganic minerals, carbon residuals and sulfides are enriched in heavy Hg isotopes during the De-SO2 process. δ(202)Hg of particulate mercury (PHg) gradually decreased from -0.30‰ to -1.53‰ in study sea area as the distance from the point of discharge increased. The results revealed that physical mixing of contaminated De-SO2 seawater and uncontaminated fresh seawater caused a change in isotopic composition of PHg isotopes in the discharging area; and suggested that both De-SO2 seawater and local background contributed to PHg. The impacted sea area predicted with isotopic tracing technique was much larger than that resulted from a simple comparison of pollutant concentration. It was the first attempt to apply mercury isotopic composition signatures with two-component mixing model to trace the mercury pollution and its influence in seawater. The results could be beneficial to the coal-fired plants with SFGD systems to assess and control Hg pollution in sea area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Paleogeographic and paleo-oceanographic influences on carbon isotope signatures: Implications for global and regional correlation, Middle-Upper Jurassic of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltom, Hassan A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Hasiotis, Stephen T.; Rankey, Eugene C.; Cantrell, Dave L.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon isotope data (δ13C) can provide an essential means for refining paleogeographic and paleo-oceanographic reconstructions, and interpreting stratigraphic architecture within complex carbonate strata. Although the primary controls on global δ13C signatures of marine carbonates are well understood, understanding their latitudinal and regional variability is poor. To better constrain the nature and applications of δ13C stratigraphy, this study: 1) presents a new high-resolution δ13C stratigraphic curve from Middle to Upper Jurassic carbonates in the upper Tuwaiq Mountain, Hanifa, and lower Jubaila formations in central Saudi Arabia; 2) explores their latitudinal and regional variability; and 3) discusses their implications for stratigraphic correlations. Analysis of δ13C data identified six mappable units with distinct δ13C signatures (units 1-6) between up-dip and down-dip sections, and one unit (unit 7) that occurs only in the down-dip section of the study succession. δ13C data from the upper Tuwaiq Mountain Formation and the lower Hanifa Formation (units 1, 2), which represent Upper Callovian to Middle Oxfordian strata, and record two broad positive δ13C excursions. In the upper part of the Hanifa Formation (units 3-6, Early Oxfordian-Late Kimmeridgian), δ13C values decreased upward to unit 7, which showed a broad positive δ13C excursion. Isotopic data suggest similar δ13C trends between the southern margin of the Tethys Ocean (Arabian Plate; low latitude, represented by the study succession) and northern Tethys oceans (high latitude), despite variations in paleoclimatic, paleogeographic, and paleoceanographic conditions. Variations in the δ13C signal in this succession can be attributed to the burial of organic matter and marine circulation at the time of deposition. Our study uses δ13C signatures to provide independent data for chronostratigraphic constraints which help in stratigraphic correlations within heterogeneous carbonate successions.

  2. Modern rather than Mesoarchaean oxidative weathering responsible for the heavy stable Cr isotopic signatures of the 2.95 Ga old Ijzermijn iron formation (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albut, Gülüm; Babechuk, Michael G.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Benger, Manuela; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Steinhilber, Bernd; Smith, Albertus J. B.; Kruger, Stephanus J.; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-05-01

    Previously reported stable Cr isotopic fractionation in Archaean paleosols and iron formations (IFs) have been interpreted as a signature of oxidative weathering of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in soils, and delivery of isotopically heavy Cr(VI) into the oceans. One of the oldest reported fingerprints of this process is isotopically heavy Cr preserved in the 2.95 Ga old Ijzermijn IF, Sinqeni Formation of the Mozaan Group (Pongola Supergroup), South Africa and could suggest that atmospheric free oxygen was present ca. 600 million years earlier than the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). However, fractionated stable Cr isotopic signatures have only been found to date in surface outcrop samples of the White Mfolozi Inlier exposed along the White Mfolozi River Gorge. In this study, the latter outcrop was resampled along with two drill cores of the Ijzermijn IF and a drill core of the Scotts Hill IF to represent multiple exposures of Mozaan Group IFs with different states of preservation. A detailed geochemical comparison on bulk samples of different units was undertaken using stable Cr isotopes coupled with trace and major elements. Outcrop iron-rich mudstones (Fe - lutites) show very low LOI [wt] %, and very low Fe(II)/Fetot ratios, and lower Ca and Mg relative to equivalent facies in drill cores, indicating the effects that oxidative recent surface weathering had on Fe/Mn-rich carbonate minerals of the IF. Overall rare earth element and yttrium (REE + Y) mixing models agree well with previous studies, confirming that they were minimally disturbed by weathering and are consistent with a high magnitude of continental solutes delivered in a near-shore depositional environment, with a minor contribution of hydrothermally derived fluids that upwelled into shallower depositional setting. Importantly, all drill core samples of this study revealed δ53/52Cr values within the igneous inventory, despite variable amounts of detrital Cr input that includes nearly detritus-free, chert

  3. The isotopic signature of planktonic foraminifera from the NE Atlantic surface sediments: implications for the reconstruction of past oceanic conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganssen, G.M.; Kroon, D.

    2000-01-01

    The stable isotope compositions of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides ruber (white and pink varieties), Globigerinoides trilobus, Globorotalia inflata and Globorotalia truncatulinoides (right- and left-coiling types) were examined as recorders of North Atlantic

  4. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15)N and (13)C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Valentin H; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15)N and δ(13)C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15)N (δ(15)N plant - δ(15)N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13)C in hay and δ(15)N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13)C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15)N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13)C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently

  5. Organic vs. conventional grassland management: do (15N and (13C isotopic signatures of hay and soil samples differ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin H Klaus

    Full Text Available Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ(15N and δ(13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ(15N (δ(15N plant - δ(15N soil to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ(13C in hay and δ(15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ(13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ(15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ(13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be

  6. Organic vs. Conventional Grassland Management: Do 15N and 13C Isotopic Signatures of Hay and Soil Samples Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Valentin H.; Hölzel, Norbert; Prati, Daniel; Schmitt, Barbara; Schöning, Ingo; Schrumpf, Marion; Fischer, Markus; Kleinebecker, Till

    2013-01-01

    Distinguishing organic and conventional products is a major issue of food security and authenticity. Previous studies successfully used stable isotopes to separate organic and conventional products, but up to now, this approach was not tested for organic grassland hay and soil. Moreover, isotopic abundances could be a powerful tool to elucidate differences in ecosystem functioning and driving mechanisms of element cycling in organic and conventional management systems. Here, we studied the δ15N and δ13C isotopic composition of soil and hay samples of 21 organic and 34 conventional grasslands in two German regions. We also used Δδ15N (δ15N plant - δ15N soil) to characterize nitrogen dynamics. In order to detect temporal trends, isotopic abundances in organic grasslands were related to the time since certification. Furthermore, discriminant analysis was used to test whether the respective management type can be deduced from observed isotopic abundances. Isotopic analyses revealed no significant differences in δ13C in hay and δ15N in both soil and hay between management types, but showed that δ13C abundances were significantly lower in soil of organic compared to conventional grasslands. Δδ15N values implied that management types did not substantially differ in nitrogen cycling. Only δ13C in soil and hay showed significant negative relationships with the time since certification. Thus, our result suggest that organic grasslands suffered less from drought stress compared to conventional grasslands most likely due to a benefit of higher plant species richness, as previously shown by manipulative biodiversity experiments. Finally, it was possible to correctly classify about two third of the samples according to their management using isotopic abundances in soil and hay. However, as more than half of the organic samples were incorrectly classified, we infer that more research is needed to improve this approach before it can be efficiently used in practice

  7. Moisture source in the Hyblean Mountains region (south-eastern Sicily, Italy): Evidence from stable isotopes signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassa, Fausto; Favara, Rocco; Valenza, Mariano

    2006-01-01

    Here the authors present results of an isotope study on precipitation collected during a 2-a period from a rain-gauge network consisting of 6 stations located at different elevations in the Hyblean Mountains (HM) region, in south-eastern Sicily. The slope of the local meteoric water line (δD = 6.50 δ 18 O + 9.87) obtained for the region suggests that precipitation is affected by evaporation during rainfall events. The main variations in rainwater isotope composition are due to seasonal effects and elevation. An average 2 H excess value of +21.2 per mille was found for precipitation events less affected by evaporation (i.e. when the rainfall was >65 mm/month). The spatial distribution of O isotope composition of precipitation shows a negative gradient from east and south to the inner areas. The depositional rate of Cl, used as a tracer of the origin of air masses, is highest at the coastal rain-gauges (SR and MRG stations) and lowest on the northern flank of the HM region (SC station). Based on these findings, a model is proposed for the origin of precipitation in the HM region, which assumes that a Mediterranean-derived component is the main source of moisture in the studied area. D/H and 18 O/ 16 O ratios of inferred meteoric recharge waters were also compared with the isotope composition of waters collected from the main local springs and wells. The best linear fit of the δ 18 O vs δD relationship for Hyblean groundwater is δD = 4.85 δ 18 O-2.01. The enrichment of heavy isotopes in Hyblean groundwater is probably due to evaporation occurring after precipitation events or to a recharging contribution from surface waters (lakes or rivers) enriched in heavy isotopes

  8. Moisture source in the Hyblean Mountains region (south-eastern Sicily, Italy): Evidence from stable isotopes signature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassa, Fausto [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy)]. E-mail: f.grassa@pa.ingv.it; Favara, Rocco [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione di Palermo, Via Ugo La Malfa, 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Valenza, Mariano [Dipartimento CFTA, Universita di Palermo, Palermo, Via Archirafi, 36, 90123, Palermo (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    Here the authors present results of an isotope study on precipitation collected during a 2-a period from a rain-gauge network consisting of 6 stations located at different elevations in the Hyblean Mountains (HM) region, in south-eastern Sicily. The slope of the local meteoric water line ({delta}D = 6.50 {delta} {sup 18}O + 9.87) obtained for the region suggests that precipitation is affected by evaporation during rainfall events. The main variations in rainwater isotope composition are due to seasonal effects and elevation. An average {sup 2}H excess value of +21.2 per mille was found for precipitation events less affected by evaporation (i.e. when the rainfall was >65 mm/month). The spatial distribution of O isotope composition of precipitation shows a negative gradient from east and south to the inner areas. The depositional rate of Cl, used as a tracer of the origin of air masses, is highest at the coastal rain-gauges (SR and MRG stations) and lowest on the northern flank of the HM region (SC station). Based on these findings, a model is proposed for the origin of precipitation in the HM region, which assumes that a Mediterranean-derived component is the main source of moisture in the studied area. D/H and {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratios of inferred meteoric recharge waters were also compared with the isotope composition of waters collected from the main local springs and wells. The best linear fit of the {delta} {sup 18}O vs {delta}D relationship for Hyblean groundwater is {delta}D = 4.85 {delta} {sup 18}O-2.01. The enrichment of heavy isotopes in Hyblean groundwater is probably due to evaporation occurring after precipitation events or to a recharging contribution from surface waters (lakes or rivers) enriched in heavy isotopes.

  9. Quantifying the signature of the industrial revolution from Pb and Cd isotopes in the Susquehanna Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, L.; Herndon, E.; Jin, L.; Sanchez, D.; Brantley, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic forcings have dominated metal cycling in many environments. During the period of the industrial revolution, mining and smelting of ores and combustion of fossil fuels released non-negligible amounts of potentially toxic metals such as Pb, Cd, Mn, and Zn into the environment. The extent and fate of these metal depositions in soils during that period however, have not been adequately evaluated. Here, we combine Pb isotopes with Cd isotopes to trace the sources of metal pollutants in a small temperate watershed (Shale Hills) in Pennsylvania. Previous work has shown that Mn additions to soils in central PA was caused by early iron production, as well as coal burning and steel making upwind. Comparison of the Pb and Cd concentrations in the bedrock and soils from this watershed show that Pb and Cd in soils at Shale Hills are best characterized by addition profiles, consistent with atmospheric additions. Three soil profiles at Shale Hills on the same hillslope have very similar anthropogenic Pb inventories. Pb isotope results further reveal that the extensive use of local coals during iron production in early 19th century in Pennsylvania is most likely the anthropogenic Pb source for the surface soils at Shale Hills. Pb concentrations and isotope ratios were used to calculate mass balance and diffusive transport models in soil profiles. The model results further reveal that during the 1850s to 1920s, coal burning in local iron blasting furnaces significantly increased the Pb deposition rates to 8-14 μg cm-2 yr-1, even more than modern Pb deposition rates derived from the use of leaded gasoline in the 1940s to 1980s. Furthermore, Cd has a low boiling point (~760 °C) and easily evaporates and condenses. The evaporation and condensation processes could generate systematic mass-dependent isotope fractionation between Cd in coal burning products and the naturally occurring Cd in the sulfide minerals of coals. This fractionation indicates that Cd isotopes can

  10. Carbon monoxide isotopic measurements in Indianapolis constrain urban source isotopic signatures and support mobile fossil fuel emissions as the dominant wintertime CO source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac J. Vimont

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of CO mole fraction and CO stable isotopes (δ13CO and δC18O in air during the winters of 2013–14 and 2014–15 at tall tower sampling sites in and around Indianapolis, USA. A tower located upwind of the city was used to quantitatively remove the background CO signal, allowing for the first unambiguous isotopic characterization of the urban CO source and yielding 13CO of –27.7 ± 0.5‰ VPDB and C18O of 17.7 ± 1.1‰ VSMOW for this source. We use the tower isotope measurements, results from a limited traffic study, as well as atmospheric reaction rates to examine contributions from different sources to the Indianapolis CO budget. Our results are consistent with earlier findings that traffic emissions are the dominant source, suggesting a contribution of 96% or more to the overall Indianapolis wintertime CO emissions. Our results are also consistent with the hypothesis that emissions from a small fraction of vehicles without functional catalytic systems dominate the Indianapolis CO budget.

  11. Petrogenesis of Miocene alkaline volcanic suites from western Bohemia. Whole rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ulrych, Jaromír; Krmíček, Lukáš; Tomek, Č.; Lloyd, F. E.; Ladenberger, A.; Ackerman, Lukáš; Balogh, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1 (2016), s. 77-93 ISSN 0009-2819 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * Cenozoic alkaline volcanism * Geochemistry * K-Ar ages * Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 1.380, year: 2016

  12. Oxygen Isotopic Signature of 4.4-3.9 Ga Zircons as a Monitor of Differentiation Processes on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Pidgeon, R. T.; Meyer, C.

    2006-01-01

    We report oxygen isotopic compositions for 14 zircon grains from a sample of sawdust from lunar breccia 14321. The zircons range in age from approx.4.4 to 3.9 Ga and in U and Th content from a few to several hundred ppm. As such these grains represent a range of possible source rocks, from granophyric to mafic composition, and cover the total age range of the major initial lunar bombardment. Nevertheless, results show that the oxygen isotopic compositions of the zircons fall within a narrow range of (delta18)O of about 1 per mil and have (delta18)O values indistinguishable from those observed for terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalts confirming the coincidence of lunar and Earth oxygen isotopic compositions. In the (delta17)O vs. (delta18)O, coordinates data form a tight group with a limited trend on the terrestrial fractionation line. The zircon oxygen isotopes show minimal evidence of the extreme and variable mineral differentiation and element fractionation that have contributed to the formation of their parent rocks.

  13. Calcium isotope signature: new proxy for net change in bone volume for chronic kidney disease and diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yu-Ki; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Yusuke; Yamato, Hideyuki; Hirata, Takafumi

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we measure the Ca isotope ratios ( 44 Ca/ 42 Ca and 43 Ca/ 42 Ca) in serum and bone samples collected from rats with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes mellitus (DM). For the serum samples, the isotope ratios are lower for the CKD (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = 0.16 ± 0.11‰; 2SD, n = 6) and the DM (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = -0.11 ± 0.25‰; 2SD, n = 7) rats than that for the control rats (δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca serum = 0.25 ± 0.04‰; 2SD, n = 7). Bone samples from two distinct positions of 20 rats in total, namely, the center and proximal parts of the tibial diaphysis, are subject to Ca isotope analysis. The resulting δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values for the bone of the proximal part are about 0.3‰ lower than that for the serum samples from the same rats. The larger isotope fractionations between the serum and bone are consistent with previously reported data for vertebrate animals (e.g., Skulan and DePaolo, 1999), which suggests the preferential incorporation of lighter Ca isotopes through bone formation. For the bones from the control and CKD rats, there were no differences in the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values between the positions of the bone. In contrast, the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values of the bone for the DM rats were different between the positions of the bone. Due to the lower bone turnover rate for the DM rats, the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca for the middle of the diaphysis can reflect the Ca isotopes in the bone formed prior to the progression of DM states. Thus, the resulting δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca values show a clear correlation with bone mineral density (BMD). This can be due to the release of isotopically lighter Ca from the bone to the serum. In the present study, our data demonstrate that the δ 44 Ca/ 42 Ca value for serum can be used as a new biomarker for evaluating changes in bone turnover rate, followed by changes in bone volume.

  14. Isotopic Pu, Am and Cm signatures in environmental samples contaminated by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Sakaguchi, A.; Ochiai, S.; Takada, T.; Hamataka, K.; Murakami, T.; Nagao, S.

    2014-01-01

    Dust samples from the sides of roads (black substances) have been collected together with litter and soil samples at more than 100 sites contaminated heavily in the 20-km exclusion zones around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) (Minamisoma City, and Namie, Futaba and Okuma Towns), in Iitate Village located from 25 to 45 km northwest of the plant and in southern areas from the plant. Isotopes of Pu, Am and Cm have been measured in the samples to evaluate their total releases into the environment from the FDNPP and to get the isotopic compositions among these nuclides. For black substances and litter samples, in addition to Pu isotopes, 241 Am, 242 Cm and 243,244 Cm were determined for most of samples examined, while for soil samples, only Pu isotopes were determined. The results provided a coherent data set on 239,240 Pu inventories and isotopic composition among these transuranic nuclides. When these activity ratios were compared with those for fuel core inventories in the FDNPP accident estimated by a group at JAEA, except 239,240 Pu/ 137 Cs activity ratios, fairly good agreements were found, indicating that transuranic nuclides, probably in the forms of fine particles, were released into the environment without their large fractionations. The obtained data may lead to more accurate information about the on-site situation (e.g., burn-up, conditions of fuel during the release phase, etc.), which would be difficult to get otherwise, and more detailed information on the dispersion and deposition processes of transuranic nuclides and the behavior of these nuclides in the environment

  15. Effect on a long-term afforestation of pine in a beech domain in NE-Spain as reflected in soil C and N isotopic signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girona García, Antonio; Badía-Villas, David; González-Pérez, José Antonio; Tomás Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio; Martí-Dalmau, Clara

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of native beech forests (Fagus sylvatica) by Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) afforestation may exert changes in soil properties, particularly in soil organic matter (SOM) (Carceller and Vallejo, 1996). Stable isotopic signatures of light elements (d13C, d15N) in soils and plants are valuable proxies for the identification of biogeochemical processes and their rates in the pedosphere (Andreeva et al., 2013 and refs therein). In this work the C and N stable isotopic analysis is used as a proxy to detect changes in SOM surrogated to the effect of centennial replacement of beech by the Scots pinewood. Two acid soil profiles, developed on quartzites under a humid climate at an altitude of 1400-1500 masl, have been sampled in Moncayo (Iberian range, NE-Spain). For each soil profile three O-layers (litter: OL, fragmented litter OF and humified litter OH) and mineral soil horizons (Ah, E, Bhs and C) were sampled. Content and bulk isotopic signature of light elements (C and N) were analysed in a Flash 2000 elemental micro-analyser coupled via a ConFlo IV interface to a Delta V Advantage isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS) (Thermo Scientific, Bremen, Germany). Isotopic ratios are reported as parts per thousand deviations from appropriate standards. The standard deviations of d13C and d15N were typically less than ± 0.05 per thousand, ± 0.2 per thousand, respectively. After 100 years since the pine afforestation, no differences on C content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 30-47% in pine soils and 37-47 % in beech soils. Similarly, no differences on N content were observed in the O-layers, ranging from 1.24-1.86 % in pine soils and 1.70-1.71 % in beech soils. C and N contents decrease progressively in depth with the exception of E-horizons where the lowest C and N content values were found. C/N ratio is higher in pine soil (20.7-38.1) than in beech O soil horizons (21.8-27.5), showing similar behavior with soil depth. Pine biomass was slightly

  16. Carbon isotopic signature reveals the geographical trend in methane consumption and production pathways in alpine ecosystems over the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Tomomichi; Yamada, Keita; Tang, Yanhong; Yoshida, Naohiro; Wada, Eitaro

    2017-12-01

    On the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, isotopic signatures in soil-atmosphere CH 4 fluxes were investigated in nine grasslands and three wetlands. In the grasslands, the fractionation factor for soil CH 4 uptake, α soil , was much smaller than the usually reported value of 0.9975-1.0095. Stepwise multiple variation analysis indicates that α soil is higher for higher soil water contents but is lower for higher C/N ratios of soil surface biomass. In the three wetlands, the soil-emitted δ 13 C-CH 4 was similar (-55.3 ± 5.5 ‰ and -53.0 ± 5.5 ‰) in two bogs separated by >1000 km but was lower (-63.4 ± 6.3 ‰) in a marsh. Environmental factors related to intrasite variations in soil-emitted δ 13 C-CH 4 include the soil C/N ratio, oxidation-reduction potential, soil C concentration and soil water contents. Geographical isotopic surveys revealed environmental constraints on the CH 4 consumption pathways in grasslands and the biome type-specific consistency in CH 4 production pathways in wetlands.

  17. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, M. E.; Beulig, F.; von Fischer, J.; Muhr, J.; Küsel, K.; Trumbore, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    -Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle, as indicated from quantification of cbbL/cbbM marker genes encoding for RubisCO by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and by acetogenic and methanogenic microorganisms, shown present in the mofettes by previous studies. Combined Δ14C and δ13C isotope mass balances indicated that microbially derived carbon accounted for 8-27 % of bulk SOM in this soil layer. The findings imply that autotrophic microorganisms can recycle significant amounts of carbon in wetland soils and might contribute to observed radiocarbon reservoir effects influencing Δ14C signatures in peat deposits.

  18. Lead isotopic signatures of saprotrophic macrofungi of various origins: Tracing for lead sources and possible applications in geomycology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovička, Jan; Mihaljevič, M.; Gryndler, Milan; Kubrová, Jaroslava; Žigová, Anna; Hršelová, Hana; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, APR (2014), s. 114-120 ISSN 0883-2927 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0484 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:67985831 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : macrofungi * Pb isotopic ratio * soils Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry; DD - Geochemistry (GLU-S); EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 2.268, year: 2014

  19. Stable isotope signatures reflect competitiveness between trees under changed CO{sub 2}/O{sub 3} regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grams, T.E.E., E-mail: grams@tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, R. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Sciences, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Here we synthesize key findings from a series of experiments to gain new insight on inter-plant competition between juvenile beech (Fagus sylvatica) and spruce (Picea abies) under the influence of increased O{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} concentrations. Competitiveness of plants was quantified and mechanistically interpreted as space-related resource investments and gains. Stable isotopes were addressed as temporal integrators of plant performance, such as photosynthesis and its relation to water use and nitrogen uptake. In the weaker competitor, beech, efficiency in space-related aboveground resource investment was decreased in competition with spruce and positively related to DELTA{sup 13}C, as well as stomatal conductance, but negatively related to delta{sup 18}O. Likewise, our synthesis revealed that strong belowground competition for water in spruce was paralleled in this species by high N assimilation capacity. We suggest combining the time-integrative potential of stable isotopes with space-related investigations of competitiveness to accomplish mechanistic understanding of plant competition for resources. - Combination of space-related concepts of competitiveness with stable isotopes has potential to clarify mechanisms of competition.

  20. Stable Isotopic signatures of Adélie penguin remains provide long-term paleodietary records in Northern Victoria Land (Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Sandra; Baroni, Carlo; Fallick, Anthony Edward; Baneschi, Ilaria; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Dallai, Luigi

    2010-05-01

    The stable isotopes geochemistry of carbon and nitrogen provides a powerful tools for investigating in animal dietary patterns and shifts during the past. The signature of C and N isotopes provide direct information about the diet of an individual and its dietary patterns, especially when the dietary sources consist of prey from different trophic levels (i.e. different C and N isotopic composition) (DeNiro and Epstein 1978, Minawaga and Wada 1984, Koch et al. 1994, Hobson 1995). By analyzing the isotopic composition of penguin remains, we present a new detailed Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) paleodietary record for the area of Terra Nova Bay (Victoria Land, Ross Sea). Adélie penguins primarily feed on fish (mainly the silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and krill (Euphausia superba, Euphausia cristallorophias) (Ainley 2002, Lorenzini et al. 2009) that belonging to two different trophic levels. Consequently, they are characterized by different isotopic signatures. Specifically, we analyzed 13C/12C and 15N/14N ratios of more than one thousand of modern and fossil Adélie penguin eggshell and guano samples collected from ornithogenic soils (penguin guano-formed) dated back to ≈7,200 years BP (Baroni and Orombelli 1994, Lambert et al. 2002, Baroni and Hall 2004, Hall et al. 2006). The expanded database of stable isotope values obtained from Adélie penguin remains define a detailed paleodietary record with an excellent temporal continuity over all the investigated time period. Our data indicate a significant dietary shift between fish and krill, with a gradual decrease from past to present time in the proportion of fish compared to krill in Adélie penguin diet. From 7200 yrs BP to 2000 yrs BP, δ13C and δ15N values indicate fish as the most eaten prey. The dietary contribution of lower-trophic prey in penguin diet started becoming evident not earlier than 2000 yrs BP, when the δ13C values reveal a mixed diet based on fish and krill consumption. Modern

  1. Impact of diagenetic alteration on sea urchin (Echinodermata) magnesium isotope signatures: Comparison of experimental and fossil data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechelmann, Sylvia; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Buhl, Dieter; Dietzel, Martin; Hoffmann, René; Jöns, Niels; Eisenhauer, Anton; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Due to their thermodynamically instable high-Mg calcite mineralogy, the skeletal elements of echinoderms are often regarded as unreliable archives of Phanerozoic marine climate dynamics. Nevertheless, traditional and non-traditional isotope and elemental proxy data from echinoderms have been used to reconstruct global changes in palaeoseawater composition (Sandberg-cycles). Recently, these data and the interpretation have been controversially discussed in context with ancient seawater properties. This paper tests the sensitivity of echinoderm skeletal hardparts, specifically sea urchin spines to diagenetic alteration based on magnesium isotope data. We apply a dual approach by: (i) performing hydrothermal alteration experiments using meteoric, marine, and burial reactive fluids; and (ii) comparing these data with fossil sea urchin hardparts. The degree of alteration of experimentally altered and fossil sea urchin hardparts is assessed by a combination of optical (fluorescence, cathodoluminescence (CL), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)) and geochemical tools (elemental distribution, carbon, oxygen and magnesium isotopes). Although initial fluid chemistry of the experiments did not allow the detection of diagenetic overprint by elemental distribution (Fe, Mn) and cathodoluminescence, other tools such as fluorescence, SEM, delta18O, Mg concentration and delta26Mg display alteration effects, which respond to differential fluid temperature, chemistry, and experiment duration time. At experiments run under meteoric conditions with no Mg in the initial fluid, the solid is enriched in the heavier Mg isotopomer due to preferential dissolution of the lighter isotope. In contrast, initial burial and marine fluids have medium to high Mg concentrations. There, the Mg concentration and the delta26Mg values of the altered sea urchin spines increase. Fossil sea urchin hardparts display partly very strong diagenetic overprint as observed by their elemental distribution

  2. Differences in the stable isotope signatures of seabird egg membrane and albumen--implications for non-invasive studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillfeldt, Petra; McGill, Rona A R; Masello, Juan F; Poisbleau, Maud; van Noordwijk, Hendrika; Demongin, Laurent; Furness, Robert W

    2009-12-01

    In many bird species, egg membranes can be obtained non-invasively after the chicks have hatched, and stable isotope analysis of egg membranes can be used to study the diet and foraging distribution of these birds during egg formation. It has been suggested that the enrichment factors of albumen and egg membranes differ for 13C, but are similar for 15N. In this study, we compared carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of the membranes and albumen of individual eggs of three wild seabird species, the Southern Rockhopper penguin Eudyptes chrysocome, the Imperial shag Phalacrocorax atriceps albiventer, and the Thin-billed prion Pachyptila belcheri. We also included chicken eggs for comparison. Egg membranes were generally enriched in 13C, compared with albumen. The difference varied between species, with 2.1 per thousand in Rockhopper penguins, 1.6 per thousand in Imperial shags, but only 0.5 per thousand in Thin-billed prions and 0.4 per thousand in chicken eggs. Egg membranes were slightly enriched in 15N in Imperial shags (0.9 per thousand) and chickens (0.5 per thousand), compared with albumen, while there was no difference for Thin-billed prions and Rockhopper penguins. The isotopic values of carbon and nitrogen were correlated between albumen and egg membranes of individual eggs, suggesting that egg membranes can be used reliably to investigate trophic differences between individuals, seasons or colonies. Species-specific mathematical corrections could be used to compare results across studies that use different egg components. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Ecologically and Geologically Relevant Isotope Signatures of C, N, and S in Okenone Producing Purple Sulfur Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.; Steele, A.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and sulfur (S) cycles are linked in euxinic environments by purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). PSB could be responsible for the isotopic enrichments that have been observed in both fresh and marine anoxic basins. Okenane, the only recognized molecular fossil unique to PSB, is derived from okenone, a carotenoid pigment unique to Chromatiaceae. Since PSB have this exclusive molecular fossil and are fundamental components in the overall ecology of euxinic environments, a comprehensive study was undertaken to assess the C, N, and S metabolisms PSB carryout under precise laboratory conditions. The consequential isotopic fractionations that may be documented in modern environments and geologic record were examined. Autotrophic cultures of Marichromatium purpuratum DSMZ 1591 (Mpurp1591) were observed to have a fractionation between CO2 and biomass (Δ13Cbiomass - CO2), ranging from -16.1 to -37.6‰, dependent on growth stage. This rather large range of CO2 fractionation expands previously reported values for RuBisCO in PSB. Ammonium assimilation, controlled by glutamate dehydrogenase, was shown to have a fractionation (Δ15Nbiomass - NH4) of -15‰ in autotrophic cultures of Mpurp1591 and Thiocapsa marina 5653, documented for the first time in PSB. While it has been previously shown that phototrophic sulfur oxidizing bacteria connect sulfur and carbon cycling in euxinic ecosystems, the percentage of elemental sulfur and bulk biomass δ34S values of Mpurp1591 cells were contingent upon their carbon metabolisms. Here we show that the isotopic enrichments of S and N observed in freshwater and marine anoxic basins could be explained by the prevalence of PSB.

  4. Isotopic signatures of otoliths and the stock structure of canary rockfish along the Washington and Oregon coast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yongwen; Svec, Russell A.; Wallace, Farron R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Otoliths of 120 canary rockfish were analyzed for δ 18 O and δ 13 C. ► δ 18 O and δ 13 C values of the otoliths ranged from −0.2‰ to +1.7‰ and −5.4‰ to −1.4‰. ► No separation was observed from the isotopic data and δ 18 O vs. δ 13 C correlation. ► No significant difference was computed between WA and OR samples especially in δ 13 C. ► Canary rockfish may belong to a single spawning stock or population coast-wide. - Abstract: Canary rockfish are one of the commercially important rockfish species along the US Pacific coast. Yet little is known about their life history and stock structure. In this study 120 canary rockfish otoliths were collected from waters off the Washington and Oregon coast and subjected to stable O and C isotope (δ 18 O and δ 13 C) analyses. One powder sample was taken from the nucleus of each otolith, and the other from the 5th annual ring. Data from otolith nuclei can provide information on the natal sources and spawning stock separations, while data from age-1 to age-5 may indicate changes in fish habitat. Overall the δ 18 O values in otoliths of canary rockfish ranged from −0.2‰ to +1.7‰, whereas δ 13 C values of the same samples ranged from −5.4‰ to −1.4‰. The isotopic data and correlation of δ 18 O versus δ 13 C did not show clear separation between Washington and Oregon samples, similar to those for a previous study on yelloweye rockfish from the same region. These results suggest that canary rockfish may belong to a single spawning stock or population along the Washington and Oregon coast

  5. The impact of Great Cormorants on biogenic pollution of land ecosystems: Stable isotope signatures in small mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balčiauskas, Linas, E-mail: linasbal@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Skipitytė, Raminta, E-mail: raminta.skipityte@ftmc.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jasiulionis, Marius, E-mail: mjasiulionis@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Trakimas, Giedrius, E-mail: giedrius.trakimas@gf.vu.lt [Center for Ecology and Environmental Research, Vilnius University, Vilnius (Lithuania); Institute of Life Sciences and Technology, Daugavpils University, Parades Str. 1a, Daugavpils, LV-5401 (Latvia); Balčiauskienė, Laima, E-mail: laiba@ekoi.lt [Nature Research Centre, Akademijos 2, LT-08412 Vilnius (Lithuania); Remeikis, Vidmantas, E-mail: vidrem@fi.lt [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanorių 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2016-09-15

    Studying the isotopic composition of the hair of two rodent species trapped in the territories of Great Cormorant colonies, we aimed to show that Great Cormorants transfer biogens from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems, and that these substances reach small mammals through the trophic cascade, thus influencing the nutrient balance in the terrestrial ecosystem. Analysis of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N was performed on two dominant species of small mammals, Apodemus flavicollis and Myodes glareolus, inhabiting the territories of the colonies. For both species, the values of δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N were higher in the animals trapped in the territories of the colonies than those in control territories. In the hair of A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, the highest values of δ{sup 15}N (16.31 ± 3.01‰ and 17.86 ± 2.76‰, respectively) were determined in those animals trapped in the biggest Great Cormorant colony. δ{sup 15}N values were age dependent, highest in adult A. flavicollis and M. glareolus and lowest in juvenile animals. For δ{sup 13}C values, age-dependent differences were not registered. δ{sup 15}N values in both small mammal species from the biggest Great Cormorant colony show direct dependence on the intensity of influence. Biogenic pollution is at its strongest in the territories of the colonies with nests, significantly diminishing in the ecotones of the colonies and further in the control zones, where the influence of birds is negligible. Thus, Great Cormorant colonies alter ecosystem functioning by enrichment with biogens, with stable isotope values in small mammals significantly higher in the affected territories. - Highlights: • Cormorants transport nutrients from water to land ecosystems and pollute biogenically. • We studied stable isotope composition of small mammal hair in 3 cormorant colonies. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N were measured using elemental analyzer–isotope ratio mass spectrometer. • δ{sup 13}C and

  6. Methods in the use of GC/C/IRMS for the analysis of biochemical and pollutant isotope signatures of compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macko, S.A.; Engel, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The potential for application of GC/C/IRMS analysis to any multitude of environmental, ecological or biochemical research areas is only beginning to be realized. Extension of compound-specific isotope analytical data derived from modern organisms and settings to yield interpretations of ancient depositional environments certainly appears possible. Further application of GC/C/IRMS approaches to understand the cycling of carbon and nitrogen, the identification and alteration of pollutants, or resolve metabolic relationships between compounds in living or extinct organisms are all within the scope of future research. (author)

  7. Seasonal and spatial trends in production and stable isotope signatures of primary producers in Alberta oil sands reclamation wetlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutsivongsakd, M; Chen, H.; Legg, A.; Farwell, A.; Dixon, G.

    2010-01-01

    Oil sands processing produces large amounts of waste water that contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and naphthenic acids (NAs). This study investigated the effects of exposure to PAHs and NA in aquatic organisms. The carbon and nitrogen dynamics in primary producers using stable isotopes in process-affected and reference wetlands were studied. Plankton and periphytic samples from artificial wetland substrates were collected and analyzed. Periphyton was collected in 14 to 20 day intervals for 5 different time periods in 2007 and 2008 in order to analyze seasonal trends in isotopic composition. Results of the study showed d15N enriched values for some consolidated tailings (CT) at sites in 2008. Other sites with mature fine tailings (MFT) as well as non-MFT sites did not have enriched d15N values. The study suggested that there are variations in ammonia levels in the CTs of different oil sands operators. Differences in the quality of the CT resulted in differences in d15N values of the periphyton-dominated by algae as well as in the periphyton dominated by microbes.

  8. Seasonal and spatial trends in production and stable isotope signatures of primary producers in Alberta oil sands reclamation wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutsivongsakd, M; Chen, H.; Legg, A.; Farwell, A.; Dixon, G. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Oil sands processing produces large amounts of waste water that contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and naphthenic acids (NAs). This study investigated the effects of exposure to PAHs and NA in aquatic organisms. The carbon and nitrogen dynamics in primary producers using stable isotopes in process-affected and reference wetlands were studied. Plankton and periphytic samples from artificial wetland substrates were collected and analyzed. Periphyton was collected in 14 to 20 day intervals for 5 different time periods in 2007 and 2008 in order to analyze seasonal trends in isotopic composition. Results of the study showed d15N enriched values for some consolidated tailings (CT) at sites in 2008. Other sites with mature fine tailings (MFT) as well as non-MFT sites did not have enriched d15N values. The study suggested that there are variations in ammonia levels in the CTs of different oil sands operators. Differences in the quality of the CT resulted in differences in d15N values of the periphyton-dominated by algae as well as in the periphyton dominated by microbes.

  9. Interactive Effects of CO2 Concentration and Water Regime on Stable Isotope Signatures, Nitrogen Assimilation and Growth in Sweet Pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serret, María D.; Yousfi, Salima; Vicente, Rubén; Piñero, María C.; Otálora-Alcón, Ginés; del Amor, Francisco M.; Araus, José L.

    2018-01-01

    Sweet pepper is among the most widely cultivated horticultural crops in the Mediterranean basin, being frequently grown hydroponically under cover in combination with CO2 fertilization and water conditions ranging from optimal to suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model, based on the analysis of plant stable isotopes in their natural abundance, gas exchange traits and N concentration, to assess sweet pepper growth. Plants were grown in a growth chamber for near 6 weeks. Two [CO2] (400 and 800 μmol mol−1), three water regimes (control and mild and moderate water stress) and four genotypes were assayed. For each combination of genotype, [CO2] and water regime five plants were evaluated. Water stress applied caused significant decreases in water potential, net assimilation, stomatal conductance, intercellular to atmospheric [CO2], and significant increases in water use efficiency, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon isotope composition, while the relative water content, the osmotic potential and the content of anthocyanins did change not under stress compared to control conditions support this statement. Nevertheless, water regime affects plant growth via nitrogen assimilation, which is associated with the transpiration stream, particularly at high [CO2], while the lower N concentration caused by rising [CO2] is not associated with stomatal closure. The stable isotope composition of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen (δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N) in plant matter are affected not only by water regime but also by rising [CO2]. Thus, δ18O increased probably as response to decreases in transpiration, while the increase in δ15N may reflect not only a lower stomatal conductance but a higher nitrogen demand in leaves or shifts in nitrogen metabolism associated with decreases in photorespiration. The way that δ13C explains differences in plant growth across water regimes within a given [CO2], seems to be mediated through its direct relationship with N

  10. Interactive Effects of CO2 Concentration and Water Regime on Stable Isotope Signatures, Nitrogen Assimilation and Growth in Sweet Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María D. Serret

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet pepper is among the most widely cultivated horticultural crops in the Mediterranean basin, being frequently grown hydroponically under cover in combination with CO2 fertilization and water conditions ranging from optimal to suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model, based on the analysis of plant stable isotopes in their natural abundance, gas exchange traits and N concentration, to assess sweet pepper growth. Plants were grown in a growth chamber for near 6 weeks. Two [CO2] (400 and 800 μmol mol−1, three water regimes (control and mild and moderate water stress and four genotypes were assayed. For each combination of genotype, [CO2] and water regime five plants were evaluated. Water stress applied caused significant decreases in water potential, net assimilation, stomatal conductance, intercellular to atmospheric [CO2], and significant increases in water use efficiency, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon isotope composition, while the relative water content, the osmotic potential and the content of anthocyanins did change not under stress compared to control conditions support this statement. Nevertheless, water regime affects plant growth via nitrogen assimilation, which is associated with the transpiration stream, particularly at high [CO2], while the lower N concentration caused by rising [CO2] is not associated with stomatal closure. The stable isotope composition of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen (δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N in plant matter are affected not only by water regime but also by rising [CO2]. Thus, δ18O increased probably as response to decreases in transpiration, while the increase in δ15N may reflect not only a lower stomatal conductance but a higher nitrogen demand in leaves or shifts in nitrogen metabolism associated with decreases in photorespiration. The way that δ13C explains differences in plant growth across water regimes within a given [CO2], seems to be mediated through its direct

  11. Isotopic signature of Tian-Shan mountain soils as a record of climatic changes of the Late Pleistocene and Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, N. O.

    2018-01-01

    Specific features of the polygenetic mountain soils of the Tian-Shan (Kyrgystan) are due to the action of present-day and relict soil processes that vary in age and intensity under the influence of glacier movements and climatic fluctuations. These properties can be used as indicators of paleoclimatic changes. The diagnosis of ancient pedogenesis was based on criteria with the longest response time, namely, soil morphology, characteristics of organic matter, 13C-NMR spectra of soil humic acids, isotope composition of humus and carbonates, and the soil age. The results indicate a glacial climate of the Late Pleistocene, a dry and cold climate during the Early Holocene, warm and dry conditions of soil formation in the Middle Holocene, and humidity climate of the Late Holocene.

  12. The use of multiple isotope signatures in reconstructing prehistoric human diet from archaeological bone from the Pacific and New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, F.; Quinn, C.; Morrison, J.; Lyon, G.L.

    2001-01-01

    The isotopes δ 13 C, δ 15 N and δ 34 S were determined in a wide range of modern plants and the flesh of animals of relevance to prehistoric archaeological studies in the tropical Pacific and New Zealand. This was followed by similar analyses of collagen extract from both animal and human bones. Twenty-one human groups throughout the Pacific and New Zealand were examined, five from New Zealand in some detail. A stochastic simulation technique was used to estimate the relative dietary proportions of five basic groups of food: land plants, land animals, marine shellfish, marine fish, marine mammals. The contribution of both food weight and caloric energy from each of these foods is estimated in the diet of the communities examined. Finally, estimates are provided for the proportions of caloric energy deriving from protein, fat and carbohydrate in the diet. (author). 125 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs

  13. Tracking the oxygen isotopic signature from the rainfall to the speleothems in Ortigosa de Cameros caves (La Rioja, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osácar, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A one-year monitoring survey has been carried out in La Paz and La Viña Caves in the Ortigosa de Cameros Cave System (NE Iberian Peninsula, in order to track the oxygen isotope signal from rainfall to speleothem calcite, assessing the ability of this signal to retain environmental information. Oxygen isotope signals of rainfall events, drip water —sampled every three months—, and speleothem calcite, precipitated over three-months, are compared. Water dripping follows precipitation events in winter, spring and summer, more closely in the near-surface drip points than in the deeper ones. In autumn, dripping is delayed with respect to rainfall, suggesting that water stays in the epikarst before dripping resumes after summer. This delay causes a deviation of the total drip water signal (average δ18O=−8.39‰ V-SMOW from the rainfall signal (average δ18O=−7.41‰ V-SMOW. On the contrary, in winter the isotopic signal of drip water keeps the rainfall signal. Calcite isotopic signal (total average δ18O=−6.83‰ V-PDB shows a small offset (0.62–0.75% with respect to the signal predicted by drip water oxygen composition; this points to a limited kinetic effect in calcite precipitation, therefore calcite retains the signal of rainfall, especially in winter.Durante un año se han monitorizado las cuevas de La Paz y La Viña en el Sistema de Cuevas de Ortigosa de Cameros (NE de la Península Ibérica para rastrear la señal isotópica del oxígeno desde la lluvia a la calcita espeleotémica, y así valorar la capacidad de esta señal para conservar información medioambiental. Se han comparado las señales isotópicas del oxígeno de los eventos de la lluvia, el agua de goteo (muestreada trimestralmente y la calcita espeleotémica, precipitada también durante cada trimestre. El goteo en las cuevas responde a la precipitación en invierno, primavera y verano, más estrechamente en los puntos más próximos a la superficie que en los

  14. The impact of Great Cormorants on biogenic pollution of land ecosystems: Stable isotope signatures in small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balčiauskas, Linas; Skipitytė, Raminta; Jasiulionis, Marius; Trakimas, Giedrius; Balčiauskienė, Laima; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2016-09-15

    Studying the isotopic composition of the hair of two rodent species trapped in the territories of Great Cormorant colonies, we aimed to show that Great Cormorants transfer biogens from aquatic ecosystems to terrestrial ecosystems, and that these substances reach small mammals through the trophic cascade, thus influencing the nutrient balance in the terrestrial ecosystem. Analysis of δ(13)C and δ(15)N was performed on two dominant species of small mammals, Apodemus flavicollis and Myodes glareolus, inhabiting the territories of the colonies. For both species, the values of δ(13)C and δ(15)N were higher in the animals trapped in the territories of the colonies than those in control territories. In the hair of A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, the highest values of δ(15)N (16.31±3.01‰ and 17.86±2.76‰, respectively) were determined in those animals trapped in the biggest Great Cormorant colony. δ(15)N values were age dependent, highest in adult A. flavicollis and M. glareolus and lowest in juvenile animals. For δ(13)C values, age-dependent differences were not registered. δ(15)N values in both small mammal species from the biggest Great Cormorant colony show direct dependence on the intensity of influence. Biogenic pollution is at its strongest in the territories of the colonies with nests, significantly diminishing in the ecotones of the colonies and further in the control zones, where the influence of birds is negligible. Thus, Great Cormorant colonies alter ecosystem functioning by enrichment with biogens, with stable isotope values in small mammals significantly higher in the affected territories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An analysis of diet quality, how it controls fatty acid profiles, isotope signatures and stoichiometry in the malaria mosquito Anopheles arabiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hood-Nowotny

    Full Text Available Knowing the underlying mechanisms of mosquito ecology will ensure effective vector management and contribute to the overall goal of malaria control. Mosquito populations show a high degree of population plasticity in response to environmental variability. However, the principle factors controlling population size and fecundity are for the most part unknown. Larval habitat and diet play a crucial role in subsequent mosquito fitness. Developing the most competitive insects for sterile insect technique programmes requires a "production" orientated perspective, to deduce the most effective larval diet formulation; the information gained from this process offers us some insight into the mechanisms and processes taking place in natural native mosquito habitats.Fatty acid profiles and de-novo or direct assimilation pathways, of whole-individual mosquitoes reared on a range of larval diets were determined using pyrolysis gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry. We used elemental analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to measure individual-whole-body carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous values and to assess the impact of dietary quality on subsequent population stoichiometry, size, quality and isotopic signature. Diet had the greatest impact on fatty acid (FA profiles of the mosquitoes, which exhibited a high degree of dietary routing, characteristic of generalist feeders. De-novo synthesis of a number of important FAs was observed. Mosquito C:N stoichiometry was fixed in the teneral stage. Dietary N content had significant influence on mosquito size, and P was shown to be a flexible pool which limited overall population size.Direct routing of FAs was evident but there was ubiquitous de-novo synthesis suggesting mosquito larvae are competent generalist feeders capable of survival on diet with varying characteristics. It was concluded that nitrogen availability in the larval diet controlled teneral mosquito size and that teneral CN ratio is a sex- and

  16. Oxygen and sulfur isotope geochemistry revealing a significant crustal signature in the genesis of the post-collisional granitoids in central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boztuğ, Durmuş; Arehart, Greg B.

    2007-04-01

    Late Cretaceous granitoid rocks from central Anatolia comprise S-I-A-type plutons derived from the collisional stages of the Neo-Tethyan convergence system in central Turkey. These granitoids intrude the tectonic imbrication zone consisting of blocks of supra-subduction zone-type (SSZ-type) central Anatolian ophiolite and crustal metasediments which are present in the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone. The plutons are overlain by Late Palaeocene-Early Eocene or younger detrital sediments. Granitoid formation is thought to be related to magma generation processes occurring in a post-collisional lithospheric detachment-related geodynamic setting that resulted from slab break-off or lithospheric delamination. Whole-rock S and quartz/feldspar O isotope data from these plutons yields a broad range of values, and both parameters indicate a nearly exclusively supracrustal origin for the S-type granites, as well as a significant crustal contribution in the genesis of the hybrid I-type and A-type granitoids. The more mafic I-type and A-type granitoid rocks of any given suite have lower S and O values, indicative of their larger degree of mantle component. The combined stable isotope geochemical compositions, when coupled with major, trace and REE geochemistry and regional geology, provide evidence that the significant crustal contribution originated from a metasomatized mantle layer which was affected by earlier SSZ-derived fluids, and then accreted into the subcontinental lithosphere as collision occurred. The partial melting of such a metasomatized mantle layer in a post-collisional extensional geodynamic setting, supplied either by the slab break-off or lithospheric delamination mechanisms, provided the significant crustal signature in the hybrid magmas of the Late Cretaceous I-type and A-type granitoids in central Anatolia, Turkey.

  17. Geochemistry and isotopic signatures of Paleogene plutonic and detrital rocks of the Northern Andes of Colombia: A record of post-collisional arc magmatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Camilo; Cardona, Agustín; Archanjo, Carlos J.; Bayona, Germán; Lara, Mario; Valencia, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Between the Late Cretaceous and Paleogene, the Northern Andes experienced subduction and collision due to the convergence between the oceanic Caribbean Plate and the continental margin of Ecuador and Colombia. Subduction-related calc-alkaline plutonic rocks form stocks of limited areal expression or local batholiths that consist mostly of diorites and granodiorites. We investigated two stocks (Hatillo and Bosque) exposed in the Central Cordillera of Colombia that had U-Pb zircon crystallization ages between 60 and 53 Ma. Relatively low radiogenic Sr, Nd and Pb isotopes from selected samples account for a heterogeneous crustal source, whereas negative anomalies of Nb and Ti, high LREE/HREE and Sr/Y > 28 ratios indicate that the magmas were emplaced in a continental magmatic arc setting. ƐHf(i) values of the dated zircons were between - 4 and + 7 and suggest some contamination of the magmas during their ascent through the crust. The high Sr/Y ratios recorded both in the investigated plutons as well as in other Paleogene plutons in the Central Cordillera suggest that the magmas differentiate in high-pressure conditions (garnet stability field). This differentiation probably occurred at the base of a thickened crust through the Mesozoic subduction and accretion of oceanic arcs to the continental margin during the Lower Cretaceous and Paleocene. The existence of other Paleogene granitoids with evidence of shallower differentiation signatures may be also an inheritance of along strike variations in the Northern Andean continental crust due to Cretaceous to Paleogene oblique convergence. The Hf isotope results from Paleogene detrital zircons from volcanoclastic rocks of the eastern Colombian basins reinforce the possibility of a distal magmatic focus.

  18. Highly siderophile elements and Os isotope signatures in the K-Pg transition of the Chicxulub peak-ring rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H.; Ishikawa, A.; Ferrière, L.; Morgan, J. V.; Gulick, S. P. S.

    2017-12-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure, located in the northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, formed 66 My ago, was drilled by IODP-ICDP 364 expedition in April-May, 2016. A continuous core was successfully recovered from the peak ring from depth between 505.7 and 1334.7 mbsf. In order to determine the distribution and abundance of the projectile component in the Chicxulub peak-ring rocks, we determined highly siderophile elements (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re) concentrations and Os isotope ratio (187Os/188Os) in five samples of Unit 1G from a 75 cm-thick transitional layer between the impactites and early Paleogene rocks (616.59-617.34 mbsf interval). HSE concentrations and 187Os/188Os ratios show systematic variations across the transitional layer. The upper part (616.59-616.63 mbsf) is characterized by about one order of magnitude higher Os, Ir, and Ru contents compared to the average continental crust abundances, but much lower than for the typical Ir-enriched Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary sites (e.g., Gubbio and Caravaca). Relatively flat CI chondrite-normalized HSE patterns are observed in the upper part of the layer. Meanwhile, the HSE concentrations in the lower part of the transitional layer (617.315-617.34 mbsf) are almost equivalent to those of upper continental crust showing pronounced step CI chondrite-normalized HSE patterns (low Ir, and high Pt and Pd). 187Os/188Os and Re/Os ratios in the transitional layer gradually decrease from 0.33 to 0.25 and 35.45 to 1.14, respectively, from bottom to top. These results suggest that the projectile component, with chondritic composition, is enriched in the uppermost part of the transitional layer just below carbonate rocks that are early Paleogene in age, but could be distributed over a thicker interval than for the typical Ir-enriched sites. Further detailed studies of HSE and Os isotope compositions through the stratigraphic sequence will reveal the distribution and dilution effect of the projectile component.

  19. Isotopic signatures associated with growth and metabolic activities of chemosynthetic nitrate-reducing microbes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, I. M.; Foustoukos, D.; Fogel, M. L.; Sievert, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Epsilonproteobacteria and Aquificaceae have been identified as dominant members of microbial communities at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Cultured representatives from these two groups appear to be mostly genetically wired to perform chemosynthesis at moderate-to-high temperatures (45 - 80oC) under anaerobic and sulfidic conditions. In this study we used Caminibacter mediatlanticus and Thermovibrio ammonificans as model organisms to constrain physiological parameters associated with dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) in deep-sea vent Epsilonproteobacteria and Aquificaceae. We postulate that nitrate-based metabolic processes are of relevance for understanding primary production as well as nitrate mobilization in deep-sea vents. By constraining growth and respiration rates during DNRA, we observed that C. mediatlanticus achieved higher cell densities than T. ammonificans while exhibiting similar growth rates. DNRA kinetic rate constants and cell-specific nitrate reduction rates (csNRR) obtained from our data showed that within similar time frames T. ammonificans used 2.5 to 3 times as much nitrate than C. mediatlanticus and it did so ~3 times faster. However, the increased consumption of nitrate in T. ammonificans did not translate into higher growth yield. This is suggestive of either differential efficiencies in energy generating pathways or differential organic matter production (cell biomass versus extracellular organic material) associated with DNRA in these microorganisms. Nitrogen isotope fractionation for nitrate was similar for both organisms, with discrimination factors of ~ -5 to -6‰ for C. mediatlanticus and ~ -7 to -8‰ for T. ammonificans. Similar experiments performed under high hydrostatic pressure conditions (50 and 200 bar) showed that changes in pressure greatly affected both growth rates and DNRA kinetic rate constants in both microorganisms, however, δ15N discrimination factors for nitrate were not affected. This study provides

  20. Century-long source apportionment of PAHs in Athabasca oil sands region lakes using diagnostic ratios and compound-specific carbon isotope signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jautzy, Josué; Ahad, Jason M E; Gobeil, Charles; Savard, Martine M

    2013-06-18

    Evaluating the impact that airborne contamination associated with Athabasca oil sands (AOS) mining operations has on the surrounding boreal forest ecosystem requires a rigorous approach to source discrimination. This study presents a century-long historical record of source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dated sediments from two headwater lakes located approximately 40 and 55 km east from the main area of open pit mining activities. Concentrations of the 16 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) priority PAHs in addition to retene, dibenzothiophene (DBT), and six alkylated groups were measured, and both PAH molecular diagnostic ratios and carbon isotopic signatures (δ(13)C) of individual PAHs were used to differentiate natural from anthropogenic inputs. Although concentrations of PAHs in these lakes were low and below the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) guidelines, diagnostic ratios pointed to an increasingly larger input of petroleum-derived (i.e., petrogenic) PAHs over the past 30 years concomitant with δ(13)C values progressively shifting to the value of unprocessed AOS bitumen. This petrogenic source is attributed to the deposition of bitumen in dust particles associated with wind erosion from open pit mines.

  1. Iron and oxygen isotope signatures of the Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite deposits, southeast Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Tristan; Simon, Adam C.; Day, Warren C.; Lundstrom, Craig C.; Bindeman, Ilya N.

    2016-01-01

    New O and Fe stable isotope ratios are reported for magnetite samples from high-grade massive magnetite of the Mesoproterozoic Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite ore deposits and these results are compared with data for other iron oxide-apatite deposits to shed light on the origin of the southeast Missouri deposits. The δ18O values of magnetite from Pea Ridge (n = 12) and Pilot Knob (n = 3) range from 1.0 to 7.0 and 3.3 to 6.7‰, respectively. The δ56Fe values of magnetite from Pea Ridge (n = 10) and Pilot Knob (n = 6) are 0.03 to 0.35 and 0.06 to 0.27‰, respectively. These δ18O and the δ56Fe values suggest that magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt (typical igneous δ56Fe ranges 0.06–0.49‰) and grew in equilibrium with a magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. We propose that the δ18O and δ56Fe data for the Pea Ridge and Pilot Knob magnetite-apatite deposits are consistent with the flotation model recently proposed by Knipping et al. (2015a), which invokes flotation of a magmatic magnetite-fluid suspension and offers a plausible explanation for the igneous (i.e., up to ~15.9 wt % TiO2 in magnetite) and hydrothermal features of the deposits.

  2. Isotopic signature of Pan-African rejuvenation in the Kerala Khondalite belt, southern India: implications for east Gondwana reassembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan Warrier, C.

    1997-01-01

    Sm-Nd isotope systematics on mineral separates from sillimanite-and cordierite-bearing metapelite (khondalite), and garnet-and biotite-bearing gneiss (leptynite) from the Kerala Khondalite Belt (KKB), southern India, yielded mineral isochron ages (wr-feld-bio-gar) of 537±27 Ma (MSWD=0.9) and 534±26 Ma (MSWD=1.23) respectively. Rb-Sr systematics in the same samples gave wr-feld-bio mineral isochron ages of 437±9 Ma (MSWD=0.67) and 467±9 Ma (MSWD=0.76). These results provide the first mineral isochron ages for the regional metasedimentaries in the KKB. The ε (Nd T) values at 550 Ma for khondalite and leptynite are -22.7 and -21.8 respectively. These results demonstrate a complete rejuvenation of the crust during Pan-African times. Coeval alkaline plutons emplaced along fault-lineaments in this area suggest an extensional tectonic regime. Geochronologic correlations with the Lutzow-Holm bay complexes in east Antarctica, and the highland and southwestern complex of Sri Lanka show that a similar Pan-African tectono-thermal event manifested in all the east Gondwana crustal fragments. (author)

  3. The Abundance and Isotopic Signature of Chlorine in UrKREEP: Implications for the Early Degassing of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, J. W.; Kanee, S.; McCubbin, F. M.; Barnes, J. J.; Bricker, H.; Treiman. A. H.

    2017-01-01

    Initally, the elevated delta-37 Cl values of lunar materials were attributed to volcanic degassing[1]. However, chlorine isotope ratios of apatite in lunarmare basalts appear to reflect mixing between two reservoirs.One component, with elevated delta-37 Cl is greater than or equal to + (25%) ([2] may represent the urKREEP--the final product of the crystallization of the lunar magma ocean. The second component, with delta-37 Cl is approximately (0%), is inferred to represent either a mare basalt reservoir or meteoritic materials. The idea that high delta-37 Cl is related to urKREEP suggest a global enrichment that occurred earlier in the lunar history [2,3]. Here we test this urKREEP-mixing hypothesis more rigorously, and report the observed limits of the model. We then use the results to calculate the Cl content of the urKREEP component and use those results to update estimates of the bulk Cl content of the Moon. This allows us to speculate on the mechanisms of loss of Cl from the lunar magma ocean.

  4. Determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy products by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry based on tryptic signature peptides employing an isotope-labeled winged peptide as internal standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jingshun; Lai, Shiyun; Cai, Zengxuan; Chen, Qi; Huang, Baifen; Ren, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A UHPLC–MS/MS method for quantification of bovine lactoferrin was developed. • Tryptic fragment LRPVAAEIYGTK was chosen as signature peptide of bovine lactoferrin. • A winged peptide containing isotopically-labeled signature peptide was designed as internal standard. • The method for determining lactoferrin does not discriminate between the different forms of lactoferrin. • Meet the growing demand to quantify bovine lactoferrin in different dairy products. - Abstract: A new and sensitive determination method was developed for bovine lactoferrin in dairy products including infant formulas based on the signature peptide by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The simple pretreatment procedures included the addition of a winged peptide containing the isotope-labeled signature peptide as internal standard, followed by an enzymatic digestion with trypsin. The signature peptide was chosen and identified from the tryptic hydrolyzates of bovine lactoferrin by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry based on sequence database search. Analytes were separated on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH 300 C18 column and monitored by MS/MS in seven minutes. Quantitative result bias due to matrix effect and tryptic efficiency was corrected through the use of synthetic isotope-labeled standards. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.3 mg/100 g and 1.0 mg/100 g, respectively. Bovine lactoferrin within the concentration range of 10–1000 nmol L −1 showed a strong linear relationship with a linear correlation coefficient (r) of >0.998. The intra- and inter-day precision of the method were RSD < 6.5% and RSD < 7.1%, respectively. Excellent repeatability (RSD < 6.4%) substantially supported the application of this method for the determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy samples. The present

  5. Determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy products by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry based on tryptic signature peptides employing an isotope-labeled winged peptide as internal standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingshun [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Lai, Shiyun [Beingmate Research Institute, Beingmate Baby and Child Food Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310007 (China); Cai, Zengxuan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Chen, Qi [Beingmate Research Institute, Beingmate Baby and Child Food Co., Ltd., Hangzhou 310007 (China); Huang, Baifen [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Ren, Yiping, E-mail: renyiping@263.net [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 310051 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • A UHPLC–MS/MS method for quantification of bovine lactoferrin was developed. • Tryptic fragment LRPVAAEIYGTK was chosen as signature peptide of bovine lactoferrin. • A winged peptide containing isotopically-labeled signature peptide was designed as internal standard. • The method for determining lactoferrin does not discriminate between the different forms of lactoferrin. • Meet the growing demand to quantify bovine lactoferrin in different dairy products. Abstract: A new and sensitive determination method was developed for bovine lactoferrin in dairy products including infant formulas based on the signature peptide by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry under the multiple reaction monitoring mode. The simple pretreatment procedures included the addition of a winged peptide containing the isotope-labeled signature peptide as internal standard, followed by an enzymatic digestion with trypsin. The signature peptide was chosen and identified from the tryptic hydrolyzates of bovine lactoferrin by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry based on sequence database search. Analytes were separated on an ACQUITY UPLC BEH 300 C18 column and monitored by MS/MS in seven minutes. Quantitative result bias due to matrix effect and tryptic efficiency was corrected through the use of synthetic isotope-labeled standards. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.3 mg/100 g and 1.0 mg/100 g, respectively. Bovine lactoferrin within the concentration range of 10–1000 nmol L⁻¹ showed a strong linear relationship with a linear correlation coefficient (r) of >0.998. The intra- and inter-day precision of the method were RSD < 6.5% and RSD < 7.1%, respectively. Excellent repeatability (RSD < 6.4%) substantially supported the application of this method for the determination of bovine lactoferrin in dairy samples. The present method

  6. Determination of underivatized amino acid delta(13)C by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for nutritional studies: the effect of dietary non-essential amino acid profile on the isotopic signature of individual amino acids in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James; Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert

    2008-06-01

    This study provides data for the effect of dietary non-essential amino acid composition on the delta(13)C values of individual amino acids in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS). In this experiment, trout were reared either on a control diet or on three experimental diets, differing in the composition of non-essential/conditionally essential amino acids, for a period of 6 weeks. The control diet was a commercial trout starter feed with fish meal as the main protein source. The experimental diets contained no protein, only synthetic amino acids. Diet 1 resembled the composition of fish meal in both essential and non-essential amino acids, Diet 2 had all essential amino acids, but cysteine, glycine, proline and tyrosine were replaced by the corresponding amounts of their precursors, and in Diet 3 all non-essential amino acids were replaced by glutamate. LC/IRMS was used for the determination of delta(13)C values of individual amino acids from diets and tissues without derivatization. Diet affected the delta(13)C of individual amino acids in fish. For fish on Diets 1-3 amino acid delta(13)C values showed a similar trend: phenylalanine showed very little change from diet to body tissue. Arginine, lysine, tyrosine and proline showed strong depletion from diet to body tissue and glycine, alanine, aspartate and serine all showed variable but strong enrichment in (13)C. Improvements are necessary before all amino acid delta(13)C values can be determined; however, this study demonstrates that measuring amino acid isotopic signatures by LC/IRMS is a promising new technique for nutritional physiologists.

  7. Biomarker and stable carbon isotopic signatures for 100–200 year sediment record in the Chaihe catchment in southwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Hao; Zhang, Jixiang; Xu, Meina; Wu, Changbin

    2015-01-01

    Natural inputs and anthropogenic influences on lakes and their catchments are reflected in the sediment record. In the present study, the extractable organic compounds from sediments in the Chaihe catchment of the Dianchi watershed were analyzed to characterize source inputs. Results show that the sediments are dominated by odd numbered n-alkanes (n-C 16 –n-C 33 ), maximizing at n-C 17 , n-C 29 and n-C 31 . Aliphatic hydrocarbon may be composed of terrestrial plants and bacteria. The values of δ 13 C 27 , δ 13 C 29 and δ 13 C 31 of n-alkanes exhibit a range from − 33.27‰ to − 25.46‰, from − 35.76‰ to − 28.47‰ and from − 33.67‰ to − 27.42‰, respectively and three records strongly covary with depth, falling within the range of C 3 plants in the study area. An isotopic model revealed C 3 plant contribution to sedimentary organic matter (OM) ranging from 40.75% to 97.22%. The values of ACL 27–33 , CPI 27–33 , OEP, Paq, Pr/Ph, (C 27 + C 29 )/2C 31 , (C 21 + C 23 + C 25 )/3C 17 and nC 26 − /nC 27 + are consistent with the C 3 plant predominance. A constant CRS model gave the accumulation rates ranging from 2.69 to 8.46 mm a −1 spanning 1885–2010. It was concluded that OM transport in the Chaihe catchment was influenced strongly by human activities resulting in enhanced eutrophication. - Highlights: • Strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes maximized at n-C 17 , n-C 29 and n-C 31 • Sedimentary OM in the Chaihe catchment was deduced mainly from C 3 plants. • Human activities enhanced OM transport, resulting in worse ecosystem

  8. Climate and root proximity as dominant drivers of enzyme activity and C and N isotopic signature in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Svenja; Köster, Moritz; Dippold, Michaela; Boy, Jens; Matus, Francisco; Merino, Carolina; Nájera, Francisco; Spielvogel, Sandra; Gorbushina, Anna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    The Chilean ecosystems provide a unique study area to investigate biotic controls on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and mineral weathering depending on climate (from hyper arid to temperate humid). Microorganisms play a crucial role in the SOM decomposition, nutrient release and cycling. By means of extracellular enzymes microorganisms break down organic compounds and provide nutrients for plants. Soil moisture (abiotic factor) and root carbon (biotic factor providing easily available energy source for microorganisms), are important factors for microbial decomposition of SOM and show strong gradients along the investigated climatic gradient. A high input of root carbon increases microbial activity and enzyme production, and facilitates SOM breakdown and nutrient release The aim of this study was to determine the potential enzymatic SOM decomposition and nutrient release depending on root proximity and precipitation. C and N contents, δ13C and δ15N values, and kinetics (Vmax, Km) of six extracellular enzymes, responsible for C, N, and P cycles, were quantified in vertical (soil depth) and horizontal (from roots to bulk soil) gradients in two climatic regions: within a humid temperate forest and a semiarid open forest. The greater productivity of the temperate forest was reflected by higher C and N contents compared to the semiarid forest. Regression lines between δ13C and -[ln(%C)] showed a stronger isotopic fractionation from top- to subsoil at the semiarid open forest, indicating a faster SOM turnover compared to the humid temperate forest. This is the result of more favorable soil conditions (esp. temperature and smaller C/N ratios) in the semiarid forest. Depth trends of δ15N values indicated N limitation in both soils, though the limitation at the temperate site was stronger. The activity of enzymes degrading cellulose and hemicellulose increased with C content. Activity of enzymes involved in C, N and P cycles decreased from top- to subsoil and

  9. Biomarker and stable carbon isotopic signatures for 100–200 year sediment record in the Chaihe catchment in southwest China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanhua, E-mail: wangyanhua@njnu.edu.cn [School of Geography Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Qixia, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application (China); Yang, Hao [School of Geography Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Qixia, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control (China); Zhang, Jixiang [College of Economics and Management, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 29 Yudao Street, Baixia, Nanjing 210016 (China); Xu, Meina; Wu, Changbin [School of Geography Science, Nanjing Normal University, 1 Wenyuan Road, Qixia, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-01-01

    Natural inputs and anthropogenic influences on lakes and their catchments are reflected in the sediment record. In the present study, the extractable organic compounds from sediments in the Chaihe catchment of the Dianchi watershed were analyzed to characterize source inputs. Results show that the sediments are dominated by odd numbered n-alkanes (n-C{sub 16}–n-C{sub 33}), maximizing at n-C{sub 17}, n-C{sub 29} and n-C{sub 31}. Aliphatic hydrocarbon may be composed of terrestrial plants and bacteria. The values of δ{sup 13}C{sub 27}, δ{sup 13}C{sub 29} and δ{sup 13}C{sub 31} of n-alkanes exhibit a range from − 33.27‰ to − 25.46‰, from − 35.76‰ to − 28.47‰ and from − 33.67‰ to − 27.42‰, respectively and three records strongly covary with depth, falling within the range of C{sub 3} plants in the study area. An isotopic model revealed C{sub 3} plant contribution to sedimentary organic matter (OM) ranging from 40.75% to 97.22%. The values of ACL{sub 27–33}, CPI{sub 27–33}, OEP, Paq, Pr/Ph, (C{sub 27} + C{sub 29})/2C{sub 31}, (C{sub 21} + C{sub 23} + C{sub 25})/3C{sub 17} and nC{sub 26}{sup −}/nC{sub 27}{sup +} are consistent with the C{sub 3} plant predominance. A constant CRS model gave the accumulation rates ranging from 2.69 to 8.46 mm a{sup −1} spanning 1885–2010. It was concluded that OM transport in the Chaihe catchment was influenced strongly by human activities resulting in enhanced eutrophication. - Highlights: • Strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes maximized at n-C{sub 17}, n-C{sub 29} and n-C{sub 31} • Sedimentary OM in the Chaihe catchment was deduced mainly from C{sub 3} plants. • Human activities enhanced OM transport, resulting in worse ecosystem.

  10. Differentiated stable isotopes signatures between pre- and post-flexion larvae of Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) and of its associated tuna species of the Balearic Sea (NW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alberto; Laiz-Carrión, Raúl; Uriarte, Amaya; Quintanilla, José M.; Morote, Elvira; Rodríguez, José M.; Alemany, Francisco

    2017-06-01

    The trophic ecology of bluefin tuna larvae (Thunnus thynnus) from the Balearic Sea, together with its co-existing tuna species such as albacore (T. alalunga), bullet (Auxis rochei) and little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus) were examined by nitrogen and carbon stable isotope analyses. A total of 286 larvae were analyzed for this study, of which 72 larvae corresponded to bluefin, 57 to albacore, 81 to bullet tuna and 76 to little tunny. Tuna larvae were separated into the pre-flexion and post-flexion developmental stages. Within the size 3-9 mm standard length (SL), the stable isotope of nitrogen (δ15N) showed significant differences between species where bluefin tuna larvae ranked highest. Pre-flexion bluefin tuna and little tunny larvae showed significantly higher δ15N signatures than the post-flexion larvae. This effect is attributed to a biochemical trace of maternal δ15N signatures. However, neither albacore nor bullet tuna larvae showed this pattern in δ15N signatures, possibly owing to a compensation effect between lower maternal δ15N values transmitted to pre-flexion larvae and the early increase of δ15N values in post-flexion stages. One way ANOVA showed significant differences between species in the stable isotope ratio of carbon (δ13C) values, which suggests specific differences of carbon sources. Furthermore, a similar significant ontogenic effect between δ13C signatures of pre-flexion and post-flexion larvae is also evidenced in all four species. At pre-flexion stages, all species except bullet tuna larvae showed significant negative relationships between δ15N and larval standard length. At post-flexion stages, a significant linear relationship with larval size was only observed in albacore and bullet tuna larvae indicating a possible trophic shift towards early piscivory. With respect to δ13C values with larval size, all four species showed significant linear decreases. It may be explained by the metabolism of growth of somatic mass subject to

  11. Comment on "Changes in atmospheric CO2 levels recorded by the isotopic signature of n-alkanes from plants" from K.S. Machado and S. Froehner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Peter; Nehrbass-Ahles, Christoph; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2017-09-01

    The recently published invited research article by Machado and Froehner (2017) is presenting δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter (n-alkane), measured on samples collected in the Barigui watershed (Brazil) covering the last 400 years. The derived δ13C time series based on C27n-alkane, beginning approximately in the calendar year 1600 (or 1600 CE; with CE for Common Era) until recent times is subsequently - in their Fig. 3 - compared with a record, which is believed to be a representative reconstruction of atmospheric CO2 concentrations covering approximately the last 650 years (with respect to the year 2005 CE). The final conclusion of this article, as reflected in its title, is that changes in atmospheric CO2 levels are recorded in isotopic signatures on n-alkane from plants. We argue, that this conclusion can not be drawn from the study of Machado and Froehner (2017), since what is shown in their Fig. 3 is not a time series of atmospheric CO2 concentration of the last 650 years. The authors show reconstructions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations based on Antarctic ice cores over the past 650,000 years and use them for the past 650 years by ignoring the fact that the time scale in IPCC (2007), from which, according to the caption of their Fig. 3, they took this CO2 time series, is in kyr (1 kyr = 1 kilo year = 1000 years). This is wrong and any conclusion based on this comparison is incorrect. Instead they should have used for a correct CO2 time series for the comparison with their measurements.

  12. Structural Controls on Helium, Nitrogen and Carbon Isotope Signatures in Geothermal Fluids Along the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System, Southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, D.; Reich, M.; Roulleau, E.; Sano, Y.; Takahata, N.; Perez-Flores, P.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.; Cembrano, J. M.; Arancibia, G.

    2016-12-01

    There is a general agreement that fault-fracture meshes exert a primary control on fluid flow in both volcanic/magmatic and geothermal/hydrothermal systems. In the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Chilean Andes, both volcanism and hydrothermal activity are spatially controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), an intra-arc, strike-slip fault, and by the Arc-oblique Long-lived Basement Fault System (ALFS), a set of transpressive NW-striking faults. However, the role that principal and subsidiary fault systems exert on magma degassing, hydrothermal fluid flow and fluid compositions remains poorly constrained. In this study we report new helium, carbon and nitrogen isotope data (3He/4He, d13C-CO2 and d15N) of a suite of fumarole and hot spring gas samples from 23 volcanic/geothermal localities that are spatially associated with either the LOFS or the ALFS in the central part of the SVZ. The dataset is characterized by a wide range of 3He/4He ratios (3.39 Ra to 7.53 Ra, where Ra = (3He/4He)air), d13C-CO2 values (-7.44‰ to -49.41‰) and d15N values (0.02‰to 4.93‰). The regional variations in 3He/4He, d13C-CO2 and d15N values are consistent with those reported for 87Sr/86Sr in lavas along the studied segment, which are controlled by the regional faults distribution. Two samples associated with the northern transtensional termination of the LOFS are the only datapoints showing pure MORB-like helium signatures. Whereas, towards the south the mantle-derived helium mixed with radiogenic component derived from magmatic assimilation of 4He-rich country rocks or contamination during the passage of the fluids through the upper crust. The degree of 4He contamination is related with the faults controlling the occurrence of volcanic and geothermal systems, with the most contaminated values associated with NW-striking structures. This is confirmed by d15N values that show increased mixing with crustal sediments and meteoric waters along NW faults (AFLS), while d13

  13. Exploring the structural controls on helium, nitrogen and carbon isotope signatures in hydrothermal fluids along an intra-arc fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardani, Daniele; Reich, Martin; Roulleau, Emilie; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Sánchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Cembrano, José; Arancibia, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    There is a general agreement that fault-fracture meshes exert a primary control on fluid flow in both volcanic/magmatic and geothermal/hydrothermal systems. For example, in geothermal systems and epithermal gold deposits, optimally oriented faults and fractures play a key role in promoting fluid flow through high vertical permeability pathways. In the Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) of the Chilean Andes, both volcanism and hydrothermal activity are strongly controlled by the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), an intra-arc, strike-slip fault, and by the Arc-oblique Long-lived Basement Fault System (ALFS), a set of transpressive NW-striking faults. However, the role that principal and subsidiary fault systems exert on magma degassing, hydrothermal fluid flow and fluid compositions remains poorly constrained. In this study we report new helium, carbon and nitrogen isotope data (3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N) of a suite of fumarole and hot spring gas samples from 23 volcanic/geothermal localities that are spatially associated with either the LOFS or the ALFS in the central part of the SVZ. The dataset is characterized by a wide range of 3He/4He ratios (3.39 Ra to 7.53 Ra, where Ra = (3He/4He)air), δ13C-CO2 values (-7.44‰ to -49.41‰) and δ15N values (0.02‰ to 4.93‰). The regional variations in 3He/4He, δ13C-CO2 and δ15N values are remarkably consistent with those reported for 87Sr/86Sr in lavas along the studied segment, which are strongly controlled by the regional spatial distribution of faults. Two fumaroles gas samples associated with the northern ;horsetail; transtensional termination of the LOFS are the only datapoints showing uncontaminated MORB-like 3He/4He signatures. In contrast, the dominant mechanism controlling helium isotope ratios of hydrothermal systems towards the south appears to be the mixing between mantle-derived helium and a radiogenic component derived from, e.g., magmatic assimilation of 4He-rich country rocks or contamination during the

  14. Tissue and size-related changes in the fatty acid and stable isotope signatures of the deep sea grenadier fish Coryphaenoides armatus from the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone region of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Sharples, Caroline J.; Webster, Lynda; Walsham, Pamela; Lacaze, Jean-Pierre; Cousins, Nicola J.

    2013-12-01

    Coryphaenoides armatus is a cosmopolitan deep-sea fish that plays a major role in the ecology of abyssal ecosystems. We investigated the trophic ecology and physiology of this species by determining the δ13C, δ15N and fatty acid signatures of muscle, liver and ovary tissues of individuals collected from ∼2700 m to the north and south of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, NE Atlantic. Fatty acid and δ13C data both suggested that C. armatus shows an ontogenetic dietary shift, with the relative contributions of benthic and pelagic prey decreasing and increasing respectively as the animals grow. They also indicated that dietary overlap between animals living to the north and south of the CGFZ increases as they grow, suggesting that larger animals forage over greater distances and are not hindered by the presence of the CGFZ. Comparison of tissue-specific fatty acid signatures with previously published data suggests compositional homeostasis of the fatty acids 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) in the muscle, and 18:1(n-9) in the liver tissues. We ascribe this primarily to strict physiological requirements for these compounds, rather than simply to their abundance in the diet. We pose several speculative mechanisms to explain the observed trends in tissue-specific δ13C and δ15N values, illustrating some of the numerous processes that can influence the isotopic signatures of bulk tissues.

  15. Correlated carbon and oxygen isotope signatures in eclogitic diamonds with coesite inclusions: A SIMS investigation of diamonds from Guaniamo, Argyle and Orapa mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, D. J.; Page, Z.; Harte, B.; Valley, J.; Channer, D.; Jaques, L.

    2006-12-01

    Using ion microprobes and secondary-ion mass spectrometry we have analyzed the carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of eclogite-suite diamonds and their coesite inclusions, respectively, from three suites of diamonds of Proterozoic age. Extremely high (for the mantle) oxygen isotope values (delta 18O of +10.2 to +16.9 per mil VSMOW) are preserved in coesites included in eclogitic diamonds from Guaniamo, Venezuela (Schulze et al., Nature, 2003), providing compelling evidence for an origin of their eclogite hosts by subduction of sea water altered ocean floor basalts. In situ SIMS analyses of their host diamonds yield carbon isotope values (delta 13C) of -12 to -18 per mil PDB. SIMS analyses of coesite inclusions from Argyle, Australia diamonds previously analyzed by combustion methods for d13C composition (Jaques et al., Proc. 4th Kimb. Conf, 1989), also yield anomalously high d18O values (+6.8 to +16.0 per mil VSMOW), that correlate with the anomalously low carbon isotope values (-10.3 to -14.1 per mil PDB). One coesite-bearing diamond from Orapa, Botswana analyzed in situ by SIMS has a d18O value of the coesite of +8.5 per mil VSMOW and a d13C value of the adjacent diamond host of -9.0 per mil PDB. A second Orapa stone has a SIMS carbon isotope compositional range of d13C = -14 to -16 per mil PDB, but the coesite is too small for ion probe analysis. At each of these localities, carbon isotope values of coesite-bearing diamonds that are lower than typical of mantle carbon are correlated with oxygen isotope compositions of included coesites that are substantially above the common mantle oxygen isotope range. Such results are not in accord with diamond genesis models involving formation of eclogitic diamonds from igneous melts undergoing fractionation in the mantle or by crystallization from primordial inhomogeneities in Earth's mantle. By analogy with the oxygen isotope compositions of altered ocean floor basalts and Alpine (subduction zone) eclogites they are

  16. Search for isotopic signatures of a supernova explosion close to the solar system in marine sediments; Recherche de signatures isotopiques dans les sediments marins de l'explosion d'une supernova proche du systeme solaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitoussi, Caroline [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, (CSNSM) IN2P3/CNRS, Campus d' Orsay, Bat 108, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2006-06-15

    The recent observation of a {sup 60}Fe peak in a deep-sea ferro-manganese crust has been interpreted as due to a supernova explosion relatively close to the solar system 2.8 {+-} 0.4 Myr ago. To confirm this interpretation with better time-resolved measurements, and the simultaneous access, on the same sample, to other isotopes and geochemical phases, marine sediments seem to be a tool of choice. The objective of this work was to search for isotopic anomalies which would be characteristic for residues of this supernova. More specifically, {sup 129}I, {sup 60}Fe, and {sup 26}Al have been investigated, being measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). Quantifying these nuclides' fluxes would help constrain stellar nucleosynthesis models. These residues are isotopes initially produced during hydrostatic and/or explosive nucleosynthesis. The physical conditions during the explosion (temperature, neutron density) are such that supernovae are thought to be good candidates for the astrophysical site of the r-process. The {sup 129}I study showed that measurement of pre-anthropogenic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios need a very strict control of the various potential {sup 129}I sources, especially when working with small quantities (micrograms) of iodine. This study revealed that the expected pre-anthropogenic {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratio for pre-nuclear samples in the marine environment shows a large discrepancy between theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al measurements allow us to conclude that, in the authigenic phase of the marine sediments, there is no {sup 60}Fe anomaly in the time interval defined by the signal found on the Fe-Mn crust (from 2.4 to 3.2 Myr), and no {sup 26}Al anomaly from 2.6 to 3.2 Myr. (author)

  17. Lipid biomarkers for anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulphate reduction in cold seep sediments of Nyegga pockmarks (Norwegian margin): discrepancies in contents and carbon isotope signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevalier, N.; Bouloubassi, I.; Stadnitskaia, A.; Taphanel, M.H.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions and carbon isotopic compositions of microbial lipid biomarkers were investigated in sediment cores from the G11 and G12 pockmarks in the Nyegga sector of the Storegga Slide on the mid-Norwegian margin to explore differences in depth zonation, type and carbon assimilation mode of

  18. Sources, migration and transformation of antimony contamination in the water environment of Xikuangshan, China: Evidence from geochemical and stable isotope (S, Sr) signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Bing [Geological Survey, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Lumo Rd 388, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Lumo Rd 388, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Zhou, Jianwei, E-mail: jw.zhou@cug.edu.cn [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Lumo Rd 388, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Zhou, Aiguo; Liu, Cunfu [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Lumo Rd 388, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Xie, Lina [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Lumo Rd 388, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences (Wuhan), Lumo Rd 388, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China)

    2016-11-01

    The Xikuangshan (XKS) mine in central China is the largest antimony (Sb) mine in the world. The mining activity has seriously contaminated the waters in the area. To determine the sources, migration and transformation of Sb contamination, 32 samples from groundwater (aquifer water), surface water and mine water were collected for water chemistry, trace element and S{sub SO4} and Sr stable isotope analyses. The results showed that the groundwater and surface water were in an oxidized environment. The S{sub SO4} and Sr isotope compositions in the water indicated that dissolved Sb and SO{sub 4}{sup 2} originated from sulfide mineral (Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3}) oxidation, whereas radiogenic Sr may have been sourced from silicified limestone and stibnite in the Shetianqiao aquifer. Furthermore, a positive correlation between δ{sup 34}S{sub SO4} and δ{sup 87}Sr values revealed that the Sr, S and Sb in the waters had a common contamination source, i.e., silicified limestone and stibnite, whereas the Sr, S and Sb in rock and ore were sourced from Proterozoic basement clastics. The analysis also indicated that the isotope composition of dissolved SO{sub 4}{sup 2} {sup −} had been influenced by slight bacterial SO{sub 4} reduction in the Magunao aquifer. Mining or rock collapse may have caused Shetianqiao aquifer water to contaminate the Magunao aquifer water via mixing. This study has demonstrated that the stable isotopes of {sup 34}S{sub SO4} and {sup 87}Sr, combined with hydrochemical methods, are effective in tracking the sources, migration and transformation of Sb contamination. - Highlights: • Mining activities at XKS mine have caused serious water contamination. • The characteristics of Sb contamination in water environment are still unclear. • Combine S isotopes of sulfate and Sr isotopes with hydrochemical methods. • Sr, S, and Sb in natural water had a common source: silicified limestone and stibnite. • Shetianqiao aquifer water contaminated the Magunao

  19. Hydrogeochemical and isotopic signature of surface and groundwater in a highly industrialized sector of the Rio de la Plata coastal plain (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, L; Carol, E; Borzi, G; García, M G

    2017-07-15

    The coastal plain of the middle estuary of the Río de la Plata is a highly industrialized area and is densely populated by sectors. The main human activity in the sector encompassed between the cities of Ensenada and Berisso is associated with the petrochemical industry. In this work, hydrogeochemical and isotopic characteristics of surface and groundwater in the impacted area are analyzed and the results are contrasted with those obtained in an undisturbed protected area. Major and trace elements were determined using standardized methods while the stable isotopes δ 18 O y δ 2 H were analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Human impact is evidenced by the occurrence of large variations in the major chemical composition of water, and also by the elevated concentrations of some trace elements that are not contributed from natural sources. These results may contribute to the understanding of chemical processes and pollutants distribution in highly industrialized coastal plain areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Did an extensive forest ever develop on the Chinese Loess Plateau during the past 130 ka?: a test using soil carbon isotopic signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weiguo; Yang Hong; Cao Yunning; Ning Youfeng; Li Li; Zhou Jie; An Zhisheng

    2005-01-01

    Pleistocene vegetation history on the Chinese Loess Plateau has been traditionally investigated using palynological methods, and questions remain regarding whether an extensive broadleaf deciduous forest ever developed on the loess table under favorable climatic conditions. The authors have employed a C isotope approach to address this question by comparing δ 13 C values in soil organic matter from different loess ecological domains with known source vegetation to the C isotope values obtained from a paleosol section that can be dated back to 130 ka. The C isotopic compositions of modern soils from the loess table and the loess-desert transition gave δ 13 C values of -24.5 per mille to -18.2 per mille and -25.7 per mille to -20.7 per mille, respectively. These C isotopic ratios are consistent with the standing modern vegetation that is dominated by a mixture of C 3 and C 4 plants and can be distinguished from that in the patchy forest areas where exclusive C 3 trees yield a narrow δ 13 C value range from -26.9 per mille to -25 per mille (average -26.1 per mille). Obtained δ 13 C compositions from paleosols and loess sediments in the Lantian and the Luochuan profiles vary from -24 per mille to -16.9 per mille, indicating a grass-dominated steppe with shifting C 3 and C 4 contributions controlled mainly by paleoclimatic changes during the late Pleistocene. The present results suggest no extensive forest coverage on the loess table during the past 130 ka even under the most suitable conditions for forest development. This conclusion supports the explanation of natural causes for the development of only patchy forests on the modern loess table and provides critical historical information toward the vegetation restoration project that is currently underway on the Chinese Loess Plateau

  1. Carbon and oxygen isotopic signature of tooth enamel as a proxy for the Pliocene paleoenvironment and paleoclimate from Mt. Galili Formation, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedaso, Z. K.; Wynn, J. G.; Hujer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Analyses of the isotope ratios of naturally existing materials have increasingly been used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic conditions. In this study carbon (C) and oxygen (O) isotopic composition of bioapatite from fossil tooth enamel is used to reconstruct Pliocene environmental and climatic changes at Galili, in the Awash valley of Ethiopia. Enamel samples were obtained from 15 different mammalian taxa. The samples were collected from multiple localities at different stratigraphic levels spanning between >5.29 Ma and ~3.6 Ma. The wide range of samples helps to develop both spatial and temporal framework of mammalian dietary adaptation, habitat distribution, and climate change and variability within the Galili Formation. The mammalian dietary adaptations at Galili indicate the presence of a variety of vegetation, which includes gallery forest, closed woodland, open woodland and grasslands with a heterogeneous habitat structure on the landscape. However, the temporal change indicates a general tendency towards more open habitat (i.e., grassland to wooded grassland). It is also worth noting the significance of C4 grasses on the paleolandscape by Late Miocene or early Pliocene at the latest as it could have an important implication on hominin morphological adaptation (e.g., bipedalism). The oxygen isotopic composition of tooth enamel indicates a variable temporal climatic condition, where the middle Pliocene (~4.38 Ma - ~3.6 Ma) was wetter than the early Pliocene (>5.29 Ma - ~4.38 Ma). Similarly, estimated δ18O of meteoric water based on the most 18O-depleted hippo tooth enamel, displays range of values between -1.8% (VSMOW) and -5.24% (VSMOW), which elucidate changes in the isotopic composition of source water and hence precipitation. In general, by comparing the result of this study with data from younger localities in the region, it is evident that there is a major shift in the isotopic composition of water at ~ 3.0 Ma, which was accompanied

  2. Deciphering human-climate interactions in an ombrotrophic peat record: REE, Nd and Pb isotope signatures of dust supplies over the last 2500 years (Misten bog, Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagel, N.; Allan, M.; Le Roux, G.; Mattielli, N.; Piotrowska, N.; Sikorski, J.

    2014-06-01

    A high-resolution peat record from Eastern Belgium reveals the chronology of dust deposition for the last 2500 years. REE and lithogenic elements in addition to Nd and Pb isotopes were measured in a 173 cm age-dated peat profile and provide a continuous chronology of dust source and intensity. Calculated dust flux show pronounced increases c. 300 BC, 600 AD, 1000 AD, 1200 AD and from 1700 AD, corresponding to local and regional human activities combined with climate change. The Industrial Revolution samples (1700-1950 AD) are characterised by a significant enrichment in Sc-normalised REE abundance (sum REE/Sc > 25) due to intensive coal combustion. For the pre-Industrial Revolution samples, the Sc-normalised REE abundance (10 periods characterised by dominant-distal sources (c. 320 AD, 1000 AD and 1700 AD) are consistent with local wetter-than-average intervals as indicated by a lower degree of peat humification. Local erosion prevails during the drier (higher humification) intervals (100 AD, 600 AD). On a global scale, more distal supplies are driven during colder periods, in particular during the Oort and Maunder minima, suggesting a potential link between dust deposition and global climate. Combining REE abundance, fractionation between Light REE and Heavy REE and Nd isotope data in ombrotrophic peat allows one to distinguish between dust flux changes related to human and climate forcings.

  3. Lignite deposits of the Kutch Basin, western India: Carbon isotopic and palynological signatures of the early Eocene hyperthermal event ETM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shailesh; Verma, Poonam; Rao, M. R.; Garg, Rahul; Kapur, Vivesh V.; Bajpai, Sunil

    2017-09-01

    This study presents new results of combined palynological and stable carbon isotope (δ13C) investigations carried out in the well known lignite sequence at Panandhro, District Kutch, in the Gujarat state of western India. Dinoflagellate cysts and associated spore-pollen assemblage assign an early Eocene (Ypresian) age to the lignitic succession at Panandhro. Furthermore, a pronounced negative Carbon Isotope Excursion (CIE) of about 2.7‰, correlated to the Second Eocene Thermal Maximum (53.7 Ma), a globally recognized hyperthermal event, was discovered in the middle part of the succession, consistent with the palynological constraints. This is the first record of an Eocene hyperthermal event (ETM2) from the Kutch Basin. Our data has regional implications for the age of the lignitic sequences across western India as it demonstrates that there is no significant age difference between the lignite deposits of the Kutch and Cambay basins. Our results also support a Lutetian age for the previously described vertebrate fossils, including whales, from the Panandhro mine section.

  4. Isotopic signature and nano-texture of cesium-rich micro-particles: Release of uranium and fission products from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Junpei; Ochiai, Asumi; Furuki, Genki; Suetake, Mizuki; Ikehara, Ryohei; Horie, Kenji; Takehara, Mami; Yamasaki, Shinya; Nanba, Kenji; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Law, Gareth T W; Grambow, Bernd; Ewing, Rodney C; Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    2017-07-14

    Highly radioactive cesium-rich microparticles (CsMPs) released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) provide nano-scale chemical fingerprints of the 2011 tragedy. U, Cs, Ba, Rb, K, and Ca isotopic ratios were determined on three CsMPs (3.79-780 Bq) collected within ~10 km from the FDNPP to determine the CsMPs' origin and mechanism of formation. Apart from crystalline Fe-pollucite, CsFeSi 2 O 6  · nH 2 O, CsMPs are comprised mainly of Zn-Fe-oxide nanoparticles in a SiO 2 glass matrix (up to ~30 wt% of Cs and ~1 wt% of U mainly associated with Zn-Fe-oxide). The 235 U/ 238 U values in two CsMPs: 0.030 (±0.005) and 0.029 (±0.003), are consistent with that of enriched nuclear fuel. The values are higher than the average burnup estimated by the ORIGEN code and lower than non-irradiated fuel, suggesting non-uniform volatilization of U from melted fuels with different levels of burnup, followed by sorption onto Zn-Fe-oxides. The nano-scale texture and isotopic analyses provide a partial record of the chemical reactions that occurred in the fuel during meltdown. Also, the CsMPs were an important medium of transport for the released radionuclides in a respirable form.

  5. Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates : carbon sources and trophic relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawke, D.J.; Clark, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primary interface between the sea and the land. This study involved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13 C/ 12 C and 15 N/ 14 N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13 C/ 12 C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantially increased their 13 C/ 12 C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13 C/ 12 C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13 C/ 12 C , indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15 N/ 14 N and marine 13 C/ 12 C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards. (author). 45 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. High Frequency Monitoring of Isotopic Signatures Elucidates Potential Effects of Restoring Floodplain Habitat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, B. J.; Fogel, M. L.; Jeffres, C.; Viers, J. H.

    2017-12-01

    Increasing the quality and quantity of habitat for native species in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a high priority for California water managers. The McCormack-Williamson Tract (MWT) is a subsided island (38.253° N -121.284° W) situated at the confluence of the Cosumnes and Mokelumne rivers, near the inland extent of tidal influence. MWT experienced unexpected levee failure on February 11, 2017, during the wettest year of record for the Mokelumne-Cosumnes river system, which provided a unique opportunity to examine the potential trajectory of future restoration actions within the Delta. We carried out high frequency sampling (n=32, 13% of days) of suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) and waters in the Mokelumne and Cosumnes river systems, including nearby sloughs, and the post-failure, flooded interior of MWT. Carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes in SPOM and δ2H and δ18O of waters were analyzed and in situ water quality data were collected in tandem, thus contextualizing isotopic data. Sampling was confined to an 8 km2 region surrounding MWT (6.7 km2 interior). This unintentional flooding provided a natural before-after-control-impact experiment to study the effect that sudden inundation of a Delta island can have on food web development and ecosystem function. Source waters were isotopically distinct (p0.9), providing a semi-conservative tracer of mixing. The δ13C values of SPOM varied between -37.3 and -23.9‰ and were significantly more negative on the flooded island by 1.2‰ (p<.01), possibly due to increased recycling of organic carbon concomitant with accelerated ecosystem metabolism. Concurrently, δ15N values varied between 1.0 and 12.4‰ and were not significantly different between riverine and flooded island sites. Our data indicate that this river system is highly dynamic over short periods of flood inundation (13 weeks) with new freshwater habitats exhibiting higher productivity than their riverine counterparts and could

  7. Different isotopic composition as a signature for different processes leading to fragment production in midperipheral 58Ni/+58Ni collisions at 30 MeV//nucleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, P. M.; Vannini, G.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; Coniglione, R.; D'Agostino, M.; Del Zoppo, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Mastinu, P. F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Sisto, M.

    2002-05-01

    We report on the results of experiments performed to investigate the 58Ni+ 58Ni 30 MeV/nucleon reaction. In midperipheral collisions a massive fragment (4⩽ Z⩽12) production has been observed. The emission patterns exhibit features consistent with dynamical fragmentation of a neck zone between the interacting nuclei, while in addition and at the same time, the projectile-like and target-like residues are subject to statistical decay. The nature of the fragments produced via the two different mechanisms differ both for what concerns charge distribution and isotopic composition. In particular, neutron rich fragments can be produced in dynamical processes, even if the starting nuclear matter presents a N/ Z ratio close to the unity.

  8. Different isotopic composition as a signature for different processes leading to fragment production in midperipheral 58Ni+58Ni collisions at 30 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milazzo, P.M.; Vannini, G.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; Coniglione, R.; D'Agostino, M.; Del Zoppo, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Mastinu, P.F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Sisto, M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the results of experiments performed to investigate the 58 Ni+ 58 Ni 30 MeV/nucleon reaction. In midperipheral collisions a massive fragment (4≤Z≤12) production has been observed. The emission patterns exhibit features consistent with dynamical fragmentation of a neck zone between the interacting nuclei, while in addition and at the same time, the projectile-like and target-like residues are subject to statistical decay. The nature of the fragments produced via the two different mechanisms differ both for what concerns charge distribution and isotopic composition. In particular, neutron rich fragments can be produced in dynamical processes, even if the starting nuclear matter presents a N/Z ratio close to the unity

  9. Autotrophic fixation of geogenic CO2 by microorganisms contributes to soil organic matter formation and alters isotope signatures in a wetland mofette

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beulig, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the contribution of autotrophic microorganisms to organic matter (OM) formation in soils, we investigated natural CO2 vents (mofettes) situated in a wetland in northwest Bohemia (Czech Republic). Mofette soils had higher soil organic matter (SOM) concentrations than reference soils due...... of radiocarbon and enriched in 13C compared to atmospheric CO2. Together, these isotopic signals allow us to distinguish C fixed by plants from C fixed by autotrophic microorganisms using their differences in 13C discrimination. We can then estimate that up to 27 % of soil organic matter in the 0–10 cm layer...... ranged up to 1.59 ± 0.16 μg gdw−1 d−1. We inferred that the negative δ13C shift was caused by the activity of autotrophic microorganisms using the Calvin–Benson–Bassham (CBB) cycle, as indicated from quantification of cbbL/cbbM marker genes encoding for RubisCO by quantitative polymerase chain reaction...

  10. Stable isotope and fluid inclusion signatures of hydrothermal fluids in transcrustal fault zones: significance for orogenic, Archean lode-gold mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumayr, P.; Hagemann, S.G.; Groves, D.I.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Large to giant (>1t) gold deposits are typically hosted in second- and third-order structures adjacent to largely barren, transcrustal fault zones. Gold-bearing hydrothermal fluids have been channelled within the transcrustal fault zones from mantle and deep crustal sources into the second- and third-order structures, where gold has been deposited. Transcrustal fault zones are long-lived structures with specific deformation events relating to gold deposition in the second- and third-order structures. For example the Archaean Perseverance Fault in the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia evolved from a wide (5km) ductile shear zone during D2 to a narrow ( 2 -CH 4 -dominated compositions with minor H 2 O and H 2 S components, whereas there are H 2 O-dominated H 2 O-CO 2 +CH 4 fluids with a significant H 2 S component in the second- and third-order shear zones at the Sigma gold deposit, a major gold deposit 5km to the north of the CTZ. These differences can be explained by continuous phase separation, with CO 2 -vapour escape into the upper portions of the ductile uncapped CTZ, contrasting with in-situ phase separation of the gold-bearing fluids in crack-seal veins in the second-order shear zones at Sigma, with trapping of both the episodic vapour and liquid components in individual sealed veins. Gold mineralization in the second- and third-order structures appears to be controlled by the high H 2 S activity of the aqueous hydrothermal fluids. because gold was likely carried in a bisulphide complex and was deposited during sulfidation reactions in the wallrock and phase separation in the quartz vein. In contrast, the carbonic fluids in the CTZ lacked the ability to carry significant metal ligands due to their low H 2 S activity. Oxygen isotopes from hydrothermal quartz within the CTZ (13.3 to 15.6 per mil, av. 14.0 per mil; VSMOW) are heavier than those from mineralized quartz veins in second- and third-order shear zones (11.8 to 19.6 per mil, av. 12.2 per

  11. Radiation signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGlynn, S.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1992-01-01

    A new concept for modelling radiation risk is proposed. This concept is based on the proposal that the spectrum of molecular lesions, which we dub ''the radiation signature'', can be used to identify the quality of the causal radiation. If the proposal concerning radiation signatures can be established then, in principle, both prospective and retrospective risk determination can be assessed on an individual basis. A major goal of biophysical modelling is to relate physical events such as ionization, excitation, etc. to the production of radiation carcinogenesis. A description of the physical events is provided by track structure. The track structure is determined by radiation quality, and it can be considered to be the ''physical signature'' of the radiation. Unfortunately, the uniqueness characteristics of this signature are dissipated in biological systems in ∼10 -9 s. Nonetheless, it is our contention that this physical disturbance of the biological system eventuates later, at ∼10 0 s, in molecular lesion spectra which also characterize the causal radiation. (author)

  12. The evolution of magma during continental rifting: New constraints from the isotopic and trace element signatures of silicic magmas from Ethiopian volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, William; Mather, Tamsin A.; Pyle, David M.; Boyce, Adrian J.; Gleeson, Matthew L. M.; Yirgu, Gezahegn; Blundy, Jon D.; Ferguson, David J.; Vye-Brown, Charlotte; Millar, Ian L.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Finch, Adrian A.

    2018-05-01

    Magma plays a vital role in the break-up of continental lithosphere. However, significant uncertainty remains about how magma-crust interactions and melt evolution vary during the development of a rift system. Ethiopia captures the transition from continental rifting to incipient sea-floor spreading and has witnessed the eruption of large volumes of silicic volcanic rocks across the region over ∼45 Ma. The petrogenesis of these silicic rocks sheds light on the role of magmatism in rift development, by providing information on crustal interactions, melt fluxes and magmatic differentiation. We report new trace element and Sr-Nd-O isotopic data for volcanic rocks, glasses and minerals along and across active segments of the Main Ethiopian (MER) and Afar Rifts. Most δ18 O data for mineral and glass separates from these active rift zones fall within the bounds of modelled fractional crystallization trajectories from basaltic parent magmas (i.e., 5.5-6.5‰) with scant evidence for assimilation of Pan-African Precambrian crustal material (δ18 O of 7-18‰). Radiogenic isotopes (εNd = 0.92- 6.52; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7037-0.7072) and incompatible trace element ratios (Rb/Nb Pan-African crust. However, there are important regional variations in melt evolution revealed by incompatible elements (e.g., Th and Zr) and peralkalinity (molar Na2 O +K2 O /Al2O3). The most chemically-evolved peralkaline compositions are associated with the MER volcanoes (Aluto, Gedemsa and Kone) and an off-axis volcano of the Afar Rift (Badi). On-axis silicic volcanoes of the Afar Rift (e.g., Dabbahu) generate less-evolved melts. While at Erta Ale, the most mature rift setting, peralkaline magmas are rare. We find that melt evolution is enhanced in less mature continental rifts (where parental magmas are of transitional rather than tholeiitic composition) and regions of low magma flux (due to reduced mantle melt productivity or where crustal structure inhibits magma ascent). This has important

  13. The Interrelationship of pCO2, Soil Moisture Content, and Biomass Fertilization Expressed in the Carbon Isotope Signature of C3 Plant Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, A. H.

    2017-12-01

    Hundreds of chamber and field experiments have shown an increase in C3 plant biomass in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (pCO2); however, secondary water and nutrient deficits are thought to limit this response. Some have hypothesized that secondary limitation might be self-alleviating under elevated pCO2 as greater root biomass imparts enhanced access to water and nutrients. Here we present results of growth chamber experiments designed to test this hypothesis: we grew 206 Arabidopsis thaliana plants within 5 growth chambers, each set at a different level of pCO2: 390, 685, 1075, 1585, and 2175 ppmv. Within each growth chamber, soil moisture content (θm) was maintained across a spectrum: 1.50, 0.83, 0.44, and 0.38 g g-1. After 3 weeks of total growth, tissues were analyzed for both biomass and net carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C) value. From these values, we calculated Δresidual, which represents the residual effect of water stress after subtraction of the effect of pCO2 due to photorespiration. Across the full range of moisture content, Δresidual displayed a significant 2.5‰ increase with increasing pCO2. This further implies a 0.1 unit increase in ci/ca, consistent with decreased water stress at elevated pCO2. The influence of CO2 fertilization on the alleviation of water stress was further evidenced in a positive correlation between percent biomass change and Δresidual, such that a doubling of plant biomass yielded a 1.85‰ increase in carbon isotope discrimination. In addition to providing new insight into water uptake in plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, these data underscore the importance of separating the effects of increased pCO2 (via photorespiration) and altered ci/ca (via stomatal conductance) when considering changes in the Δ13C value of C3 land plants during the Anthropocene, or across any geological period that includes a marked change in global carbon cycling.

  14. Contribution of the ear and the flag leaf to grain filling in durum wheat inferred from the carbon isotope signature: genotypic and growing conditions effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Bragado, Rut; Elazab, Abdelhalim; Zhou, Bangwei; Serret, Maria Dolors; Bort, Jordi; Nieto-Taladriz, Maria Teresa; Araus, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    The ear, together with the flag leaf, is believed to play a major role as a source of assimilates during grain filling in C3 cereals. However, the intrusive nature of most of the available methodologies prevents reaching conclusive results in this regard. This study compares the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) in its natural abundance in the water-soluble fractions of the flag leaf blade and the ear with the δ(13)C of mature kernels to assess the relative contribution of both organs to grain filling in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The relative contribution of the ear was higher in landraces compared to modern cultivars, as well as in response to nitrogen fertilization and water stress. Such genotypic and environmentally driven differences were associated with changes in harvest index (HI), with the relative contribution of the ear being negatively associated with HI. In the case of the genotypic differences, the lower relative contribution of the ear in modern cultivars compared with landraces is probably associated with the appearance in the former of a certain amount of source limitation driven by a higher HI. In fact, the relative contribution of the ear was far more responsive to changes in HI in modern cultivars compared with landraces. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  15. A common Pan-African Lithospheric Mantle (PALM) source for HIMU-like Pb-isotope signatures in circum-Mediterranean magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H. P.; Wang, Z.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic compositions of widely distributed basaltic rocks of Europe and North Africa are clustered around a point that is displaced from modern MORB in 208Pb/204Pb vs. 206Pb/204Pb, pointing to the 'HIMU' component proposed by Zindler and Hart (1986). This observation was originally highlighted in an abstract by Cebria and Wilson (1995), who suggested that a reservoir of unknown origin exists in the convecting upper mantle of the Mediterranean and coin it the 'European asthenospheric reservoir' or EAR in order to distinguish it from the apparent influence of an additional 'lithospheric' component having a Sr-Nd isotope composition similar to continental crust that is observed in some, but not all, Cenozoic igneous rocks. While this study and most authors agree that the 'lithospheric' component in the model of Cebria and Wilson (1995) is crustal material associated with Cenozoic subduction, explanations for the origin of the HIMU-like EAR reservoir, however, are diverse, ranging from deep plumes to recently subducted slabs. These explanations are problematic. For example, neither plumes nor recent subduction are spatially broad enough to explain all of the EAR occurrences. Alternatively, we argue that both components (lithospheric and EAR) observed by Cebria and Wilson are lithospheric in origin. We propose that the origin of the HIMU-like Pb component is metasomatized sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). Comparison with synthetic evolution models of a veined mantle show the HIMU-like composition of European Cenozoic igneous rocks can be generated after ~500 Ma (Pilet et al., 2011). Major and trace element compositions of the European alkalic-basalts are similar to experimental melts of amphibole-pyroxenite veins in peridotite (a common feature of the SCLM) (Médard et al., 2006). A likely candidate for a veined 500 Ma SCLM in this region is the 'Pan-African' age terrane that is currently widely distributed from England to the Sahara as well as on the

  16. Fit for purpose validated method for the determination of the strontium isotopic signature in mineral water samples by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brach-Papa, Christophe; Van Bocxstaele, Marleen; Ponzevera, Emmanuel [European Commission - Joint Research Centre - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111 - 2440 Geel (Belgium); Quetel, Christophe R. [European Commission - Joint Research Centre - Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, Retieseweg 111 - 2440 Geel (Belgium)], E-mail: christophe.quetel@ec.europa.eu

    2009-03-15

    A robust method allowing the routine determination of n({sup 87}Sr)/n({sup 86}Sr) with at least five significant decimal digits for large sets of mineral water samples is described. It is based on 2 consecutive chromatographic separations of Sr associated to multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) measurements. Separations are performed using commercial pre-packed columns filled with 'Sr resin' to overcome isobaric interferences affecting the determination of strontium isotope ratios. The careful method validation scheme applied is described. It included investigations on all parameters influencing both chromatographic separations and MC-ICPMS measurements, and also the test on a synthetic sample made of an aliquot of the NIST SRM 987 certified reference material dispersed in a saline matrix to mimic complex samples. Correction for mass discrimination was done internally using the n({sup 88}Sr)/n({sup 86}Sr) ratio. For comparing mineral waters originating from different geological backgrounds or identifying counterfeits, calculations involved the well known consensus value (1/0.1194) {+-} 0 as reference. The typical uncertainty budget estimated for these results was 40 'ppm' relative (k = 2). It increased to 150 'ppm' (k = 2) for the establishment of stand alone results, taking into account a relative difference of about 126 'ppm' systematically observed between measured and certified values of the NIST SRM 987. In case there was suspicion of a deviation of the n({sup 88}Sr)/n({sup 86}Sr) ratio (worst case scenario) our proposal was to use the NIST SRM 987 value 8.37861 {+-} 0.00325 (k = 2) as reference, and assign a typical relative uncertainty budget of 300 'ppm' (k = 2). This method is thus fit for purpose and was applied to eleven French samples.

  17. Carbon (δ13C and Nitrogen (δ15N Stable Isotope Signatures in Bat Fur Indicate Swarming Sites Have Catchment Areas for Bats from Different Summering Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi L Segers

    Full Text Available Migratory patterns of bats are not well understood and traditional methods to study this, like capture-mark-recapture, may not provide enough detail unless there are many records. Stable isotope profiles of many animal species have been used to make inferences about migration. Each year Myotis lucifugus and M. septentrionalis migrate from summering roosts to swarming caves and mines in the fall, but the pattern of movement between them is not well understood. In this study, fur δ13C and δ15N values of 305 M. lucifugus and 200 M. septentrionalis were analyzed to make inferences about migration patterns between summering areas and swarming sites in Nova Scotia, Canada. We expected that there would be greater variability in δ13C and δ15N among individuals at swarming sites because it was believed that these sites are used by individuals originating from many summering areas. There was extensive overlap in the standard ellipse area, corrected for small sample sizes (SEAc, of bats at swarming sites and much less overlap in SEAc among groups sampled at summering areas. Meaningful inference could not be made on M. septentrionalis because their low variation in SEAc may have been the result of sampling only 3 summering areas. However, for M. lucifugus, swarming sites had larger SEAc than summering areas and predictive discriminant analysis assigned swarming bats to multiple summering areas, supporting the contention that swarming bats are mixed aggregations of bats from several summering areas. Together, these data support the contention that swarming sites have catchment areas for bats from multiple summering areas and it is likely that the catchment areas for swarming sites overlap. These data suggest that δ13C and δ15N profiling of bat fur offer some potential to make inferences about regional migration in bats.

  18. Understanding the role of soil erosion on co{sub 2}-c loss using {sup 13}c isotopic signatures in abandoned Mediterranean agricultural land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novara, Agata, E-mail: agata.novara@unipa.it [Department of Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, University of Palermo, viale delle Scienze, ed.4, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Keesstra, Saskia, E-mail: saskia.keesstra@wur.nl [Soil Physics and Land Management Group, Wageningen University, Droevendaalsesteeg 4, 6708PB Wageningen (Netherlands); Cerdà, Artemio, E-mail: artemio.cerda@uv.es [Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Group, Department of Geography, University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Pereira, Paulo, E-mail: paulo@mruni.eu [Environmental Management Centre, Mykolas Romeris University, Vilnius (Lithuania); Gristina, Luciano [Department of Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, University of Palermo, viale delle Scienze, ed.4, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Understanding soil water erosion processes is essential to evaluate the redistribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) within a landscape and is fundamental to assess the role of soil erosion in the global carbon (C) budget. The main aim of this study was to estimate the C redistribution and losses using {sup 13}C natural abundance. Carbon losses in soil sediment, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and CO{sub 2} emission were determined. Four bounded parallel plots were installed on a 10% slope. In the upper part of the plots, C{sub 3}soil was replaced with C{sub 4}soil. The SOC and δ{sup 13}C were measured after 145.2 mm rainfall in the upper (2 m far from C{sub 4}strip), middle (4 m far from C{sub 4}strip) lower (6 m far from C{sub 4}strip) trams of the plot and in the sediments collected in the Gerlach collector at the lower part of the plot. A laboratory incubation experiment was performed to evaluate the CO{sub 2} emission rate of soils in each area. OC was mainly lost in the sediments as 2.08 g{sup −2} of C was lost after 145.2 mm rainfall. DOC losses were only 5.61% of off-site OC loss. Three months after the beginning of the experiment, 15.90% of SOC in the upper tram of the plot had a C{sub 4} origin. The C{sub 4}-SOC content decreased along the 6 m length of the plot, and in the sediments collected by the Gerlach collector. CO{sub 2} emission rate was high in the upper plot tram due to the high SOC content. The discrimination of CO{sub 2} in C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} portion permitted to increase our level of understanding on the stability of SOC and its resilience to decomposition. The transport of sediments along the plot increased SOC mineralization by 43%. Our study underlined the impact of rainfall in C losses in soil and water in abandoned Mediterranean agriculture fields and the consequent implications on the C balance. - Highlights: • The soil C isotopic difference is a useful tracer for erosion processes studies. • The main loss of Carbon was

  19. Late Paleozoic to Triassic magmatism in the north-central High Andes, Chile: New insights from SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology and O-Hf isotopic signatures in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández González, Álvaro; Deckart, Katja; Fanning, Mark; Arriagada, César

    2014-05-01

    The Chilean High Andes (28o- 31oS) comprises a vast number of late Paleozoic - Triassic granitoids which give information about the last stages of Gondwana assemblage. Particularly, previous studies determined two tectonic configurations during this time: subduction related compressional setting (late Carboniferous - Late Permian) and non-subduction post-collisional extensional setting (Late Permian - Triassic), as the last stage of Gondwana assemblage. However, new O-Hf isotopic data along new U-Pb SHRIMP ages in zircon have shown that this model should be modified and updated to the new analytical data available. δ18O values indicate a strong change in the tectonic configuration approximately 270 Ma (earliest middle Permian) and thus, units can be divided into 2 mayor groups: late Carboniferous to earliest middle Permian and middle Permian to Triassic. The oldest group shows slightly low values of ɛHfi (ca. +1 to -4) with high δ18O (ca. >6.5 o/oo), indicating an elevated supracrustal component and the addition of less radiogenic continental-like material, which along significant residence time (TDM2: Mesoproterozoic) can be interpreted as magmas formed at depth in a subduction-related continental arc, and contaminated with supracrustal material and/or oceanic sediments transported through the subducted slab to the mantle-wedge. Subsequently, middle Permian - Triassic rocks show a wider range of ɛHfi values (ca. +3 to -3) with relatively low, mantle-like δ18O (ca. 4.5-6.5 o/oo), indicating a source of magmas without the addition of supracrustal material for some plutons, whilst for others, a slight input. The higher positive values of ɛHfi can be related to the influence of new juvenile material in the source of some magmas. This isotopic data can be interpreted as rocks formed as the result of melting of an old thinned mafic crust (with mantle-like δ18O values characteristic of this type of rocks) with limited addition of supracrustal material; in

  20. The origin of high-Mg magmas in Mt Shasta and Medicine Lake volcanoes, Cascade Arc (California): higher and lower than mantle oxygen isotope signatures attributed to current and past subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Bindeman, I.; Grove, T. L.

    2011-11-01

    We report the oxygen isotope composition of olivine and orthopyroxene phenocrysts in lavas from the main magma types at Mt Shasta and Medicine Lake Volcanoes: primitive high-alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT), basaltic andesites (BA), primitive magnesian andesites (PMA), and dacites. The most primitive HAOT (MgO > 9 wt%) from Mt. Shasta has olivine δ18O (δ18OOl) values of 5.9-6.1‰, which are about 1‰ higher than those observed in olivine from normal mantle-derived magmas. In contrast, HAOT lavas from Medicine Lake have δ18OOl values ranging from 4.7 to 5.5‰, which are similar to or lower than values for olivine in equilibrium with mantle-derived magmas. Other magma types from both volcanoes show intermediate δ18OOl values. The oxygen isotope composition of the most magnesian lavas cannot be explained by crustal contamination and the trace element composition of olivine phenocrysts precludes a pyroxenitic mantle source. Therefore, the high and variable δ18OOl signature of the most magnesian samples studied (HAOT and BA) comes from the peridotitic mantle wedge itself. As HAOT magma is generated by anhydrous adiabatic partial melting of the shallow mantle, its 1.4‰ range in δ18OOl reflects a heterogeneous composition of the shallow mantle source that has been influenced by subduction fluids and/or melts sometime in the past. Magmas generated in the mantle wedge by flux melting due to modern subduction fluids, as exemplified by BA and probably PMA, display more homogeneous composition with only 0.5‰ variation. The high-δ18O values observed in magnesian lavas, and principally in the HAOT, are difficult to explain by a single-stage flux-melting process in the mantle wedge above the modern subduction zone and require a mantle source enriched in 18O. It is here explained by flow of older, pre-enriched portions of the mantle through the slab window beneath the South Cascades.

  1. Geochemical and isotopic tracers of recharge and reclamation of stormwater in an urban aquifer: Adelaide, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, A.L.; Rattray, K.J.; Dillon, P.J.; Pavelic, P.C.; Barry, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    Artificial recharge and reclamation of stormwater into groundwater is a newly developing strategy to augment water resources in the Adelaide metropolitan area of South Australia. Mixing between injected storm water and native groundwater can be most effectively using naturally occurring chloride ion. Stable isotopes of the water molecule are used more effectively during short term tests (i.e., immediately following injection events), and requires frequent monitoring of the surface water end-member. Biogeochemical processes involving geochemical reactions such as organic matter oxidation, carbonate mineral dissolution and sulfide mineral oxidation are very effectively traced by δ 13 C and 14 C (of TDIC) and δ 34 S (of SO 4 2- ). The most important processes occurring in the Tertiary limestone aquifer in Adelaide were carbonate mineral dissolution which is induced largely by CO 2 production during organic matter oxidation. Sulfide mineral oxidation is a minor process, and is accompanied by an equivalent amount of sulfate reduction after injection of the stormwater. (author)

  2. New constraints on the Paleoarchean meteorite bombardment of the Earth - Geochemistry and Re-Os isotope signatures of spherule layers in the BARB5 ICDP drill core from the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Toni; Koeberl, Christian; Luguet, Ambre; van Acken, David; Mohr-Westheide, Tanja; Ozdemir, Seda; Reimold, Wolf Uwe

    2017-08-01

    Archean spherule layers, resulting from impacts by large extraterrestrial objects, to date represent the only remnants of the early meteorite, asteroid, and comet bombardment of the Earth. Only few Archean impact debris layers have been documented, all of them embedded in the 3.23-3.47 billion year old successions of the Barberton Greenstone Belt (BGB) in South Africa and the Pilbara Craton in Western Australia. Some of them might be correlated with each other. Given the scarcity of Archean spherule deposits, four spherule layer intersections from the recently recovered BARB5 drill core from the central Barberton Greenstone Belt, analyzed in this study, provide an opportunity to gain new insight into the early terrestrial impact bombardment. Despite being hydrothermally overprinted, siderophile element abundance signatures of spherule-rich samples from the BARB5 drill core, at least in part, retained a meteoritic fingerprint. The impact hypothesis for the generation of the BARB5 spherule layers is supported by correlations between the abundances of moderately (Cr, Co, Ni) and highly siderophile (Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Ru and Pd) elements, whose peak concentrations and interelement ratios are within the range of those for chondrites. Rhenium-Osmium isotope evidence further support the impact hypothesis. Collectively, this study provides evidence for extraterrestrial admixtures ranging between ∼40 and up to 100% to three of the four analyzed BARB5 spherule layers, and a scenario for their genesis involving (i) impact of a chondritic bolide into a sedimentary target, (ii) varying admixtures of meteoritic components to target materials, (iii) spherule formation via condensation in an impact vapor plume, (iv) transportation of the spherules and sedimentation under submarine conditions, followed by (v) moderate post-impact remobilization of transition metals and highly siderophile elements.

  3. Global Isotopic Signatures of Oceanic Island Basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    of mathematics and his Apollo terminal, Debbie Smith who provided a little disk space when it was needed and Warren Sass who was there to answer that...DUNCAN and M. R. FISK. 1989. Hawaiian style volcanic evolution on Tahaa, Societies Islands. EOS 70:1385. WOODHEAD, J. D. and M. T. MCCULLOCH . 1989. Ancient

  4. Geochemistry and Nd-Sr isotopic signatures of the Pensamiento Granitoid Complex, Rondonian-San Ignacio Province, eastern precambrian shield of Bolivia: petrogenetic constraints for a mesoproterozoic magmatic arc setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Ramiro; Teixeira, Wilson; Bettencourt, Jorge Silva; Geraldes, Mauro Cesar

    2009-01-01

    show ε Nd(1330) signatures varying from +1.5 to +2.7, in agreement with a plutonic arc setting as is suggested for the Diamantina pluton. Integrated interpretation of the geochemical and isotopic data coupled with new geologic correlations of the PGC with contemporary units in the Brazilian counterpart establishes one Mesoproterozoic magmatic arc in the evolution of the Rondonian-San Ignacio province. (author)

  5. Panorama das pesquisas sobre TDIC e formação de professores de língua inglesa em LA: um levantamento bibliográfico a partir da base de dissertações/teses da CAPES Overview of the researches about DICT and English Teacher Education in Al: a bibliographical study based on CAPES database of theses and dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Moreira dos Anjos Santos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho tem por objetivo apresentar um panorama das pesquisas sobre Tecnologias Digitais de Informação e Comunicação (TDIC e formação de professores de língua inglesa desenvolvidas no âmbito da Linguística Aplicada no Brasil entre os anos de 2000 a 2009. A fim de atingir o objetivo, foi realizada uma busca bibliográfica no banco de teses e dissertações da CAPES a partir de termos chaves no campo assunto. Como resultados, apontamos uma ampla variedade de estudos que se voltam para tal área evidenciando diferentes focos: na transposição de políticas públicas, no uso de ferramentas digitais para formação (inicial e continuada de professores, na apropriação de ferramentas digitais pelo professor na sua prática pedagógica, nas crenças e representações construídas a partir do uso de ferramentas tecnológicas, dentre outros. Esperamos contribuir para um mapeamento da literatura já desenvolvida na área de formação de professores de língua inglesa e TDIC para a realização de futuras pesquisas.This paper aims at presenting an overview of the researches about Digital Information and Communication Technologies (DICT and English teacher education carried in Applied Linguistics in Brazil from 2000 to 2009. In order to do so, a bibliographical search was carried out at the CAPES database of theses and dissertations according to some key words related to this subject. The results point out a number of varied studies developed in this field with different focus such as: public policies and its implementation, use of digital tools in pre and in service teacher education, appropriation of digital tools by teachers into their work, believes and representations concerning the use of digital tools, among others. We hope to contribute to those who further wish to develop more studies under the theme English teacher education and DICT.

  6. Environmental isotope and chemical characterization of groundwater in Islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, T.; Qureshi, R.M.; Mashiatullah, A.; Ahmad, N.; Akram, W.; Tasneem, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    52 groundwater samples were collected from tube-wells and hand-pumps installed in the jurisdiction of Islamabad city. Samples were analyzed for various pollution parameters such as the physiochemical parameters (E.C., redox, pH, dissolved oxygen), stable isotope parameters (/sup 13/C/sub TDIC/ and /sup 18/O, /sup 2/H of water), as well as major cation and anion (HCO/sub 3//sup -2/. SO/sub 4//sup -2/. Cl/sup -/, Na/sup +l/, K/sup +1/, Ca/sup +2/, and Mg/sup +1/. Electrical conductivity of a majority of these samples was found to lie in the range of 429- 950 micro S/cm. Most of the groundwater samples have nearly neutral pH values. Concentration of anions and cation in shallow groundwater lies in range of HCO/sub 3/ (259-345 ppm), SO/sub 4/ (8-26 ppm), Cl (16-43 ppm), Na (19-33 ppm), K (0.3-2.1 ppm), Ca (65-93 ppm) and Mg (14-22 ppm) respectively. For deep groundwater samples, these values are in range HCO/sub 3/(218-356 ppm), SO/sub 4/ (9-41 ppm), Cl (13-58 ppm), Na (9-58 ppm), K (0.8-6.1 ppm), Ca (62-102 ppm), and Mg (10-26 ppm) respectively. The delta /sup 13/C values lie in the range of -6.2 to -2.0 % V- SMOW for deep groundwater and -5.3 to -3.6 % V- SMOW for shallow groundwater. The delta /sup 13/C values of Total dissolved Inorganic Carbon (TDIC) lie in the range of -8.2 to- 1.18 % PDB for tube well samples and -7.3 to -1.8 % PDB for shallow wells. Depleted values of delta sup 13/C indicate domestic waste input in groundwater. Delta /sup 13/C values in the range of -3 plus minus 2 % PDB represent limestone dissolution as the main source of dissolved inorganic carbon. In view of the neutral pH range (pH=7 plus minus 0.5) of water samples collected in the Islamabad area, bicarbonate is the main dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) specie in groundwater with delta /sup 13/C values up to -8.3 % PDB. In general most of the water samples are suitable for drinking with respect to physiochemical and major cation and anion. (author)

  7. Low Signature Tent Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cox, Randy

    1998-01-01

    .... Modeling shows that visual, near infrared, thermal, and radar signatures should be reduced when compared to other current tent designs. A brief treatise on the role of tent signatures and their results is included.

  8. The application of stable carbon isotope ratios as water quality indicators in coastal areas of Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, R.M.; Mashiatullah, A.; Javed, T.; Tasneem, M.A.; Sajjad, M.I.; Saleem, M.; Khan, S.H.; Rizvi, S.H.N.; Siddiqui, S.A.; Qari, R.

    1998-01-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (δ 13 C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC), total inorganic and organic carbon in bottom sediments, as well as sea plants in polluted water sources, non-polluted Karachi Sea water and pollution recipients are used to elaborate pollution scenario of shallow marine environment off Karachi coast. These results are supplemented with stable isotope composition of nitrogen (δ 15 N) in seaweeds and mangroves, toxic/trace metal concentration in sea-bottom sediments, total Coliform bacterial population, electrical conductivity, temperature and turbidity. Isotopic data shows that the mangrove ecosystem and the tidal fluctuations play a key role in controlling contamination inventories in shallow sea water off Karachi coast, specifically the Manora Channel. The Karachi harbour zone is found to be the most heavily polluted marine site in Manora channel during high as well as low tide regimes. Significant concentrations of toxic metals such as Pb, Ni, Cr, Zn, V, U are observed in off-shore sediments of Karachi coast. The results show that sewage and industrial wastes are the main sources of heavy metal pollution in Karachi harbour, Manora Channel exit zone and the southeast coast. However, as compared to other coastal areas, the Karachi coast is moderately polluted. Studies suggest incorporation of quick remedial measures to combat pollution in shallow marine environments off Karachi Coast. (author)

  9. Variation of δ2H, δ18O & δ13C in crude palm oil from different regions in Malaysia: Potential of stable isotope signatures as a key traceability parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Syahidah Akmal; Seow, Eng-Keng; Mohd Omar, A K; Rodhi, Ainolsyakira Mohd; Mat Hassan, Hasnuri; Lalung, Japareng; Lee, Sze-Chi; Ibrahim, Baharudin

    2018-01-01

    A total of 33 crude palm oil samples were randomly collected from different regions in Malaysia. Stable carbon isotopic composition (δ 13 C) was determined using Flash 2000 elemental analyzer while hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ 2 H and δ 18 O) were analyzed by Thermo Finnigan TC/EA, wherein both instruments were coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The bulk δ 2 H, δ 18 O and δ 13 C of the samples were analyzed by Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (OPLS-DA). Unsupervised HCA and PCA methods have demonstrated that crude palm oil samples were grouped into clusters according to respective state. A predictive model was constructed by supervised OPLS-DA with good predictive power of 52.60%. Robustness of the predictive model was validated with overall accuracy of 71.43%. Blind test samples were correctly assigned to their respective cluster except for samples from southern region. δ 18 O was proposed as the promising discriminatory marker for discerning crude palm oil samples obtained from different regions. Stable isotopes profile was proven to be useful for origin traceability of crude palm oil samples at a narrower geographical area, i.e. based on regions in Malaysia. Predictive power and accuracy of the predictive model was expected to improve with the increase in sample size. Conclusively, the results in this study has fulfilled the main objective of this work where the simple approach of combining stable isotope analysis with chemometrics can be used to discriminate crude palm oil samples obtained from different regions in Malaysia. Overall, this study shows the feasibility of this approach to be used as a traceability assessment of crude palm oils. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential

  11. Unconditionally Secure Quantum Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Amiri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Signature schemes, proposed in 1976 by Diffie and Hellman, have become ubiquitous across modern communications. They allow for the exchange of messages from one sender to multiple recipients, with the guarantees that messages cannot be forged or tampered with and that messages also can be forwarded from one recipient to another without compromising their validity. Signatures are different from, but no less important than encryption, which ensures the privacy of a message. Commonly used signature protocols—signatures based on the Rivest–Adleman–Shamir (RSA algorithm, the digital signature algorithm (DSA, and the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm (ECDSA—are only computationally secure, similar to public key encryption methods. In fact, since these rely on the difficulty of finding discrete logarithms or factoring large primes, it is known that they will become completely insecure with the emergence of quantum computers. We may therefore see a shift towards signature protocols that will remain secure even in a post-quantum world. Ideally, such schemes would provide unconditional or information-theoretic security. In this paper, we aim to provide an accessible and comprehensive review of existing unconditionally securesecure signature schemes for signing classical messages, with a focus on unconditionally secure quantum signature schemes.

  12. Radar Signature Calculation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: The calculation, analysis, and visualization of the spatially extended radar signatures of complex objects such as ships in a sea multipath environment and...

  13. Infrared signatures for remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, R.S.; Sharpe, S.W.; Kelly, J.F.

    1994-04-01

    PNL`s capabilities for infrared and near-infrared spectroscopy include tunable-diode-laser (TDL) systems covering 300--3,000 cm{sup {minus}1} at <10-MHz bandwidth; a Bruker Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for the near- to far-infrared at 50-MHz resolution; and a stable line-tunable, 12-w cw CO{sub 2} laser. PNL also has a beam expansion source with a 12-cm slit, which provides a 3-m effective path for gases at {approximately}10 K, giving a Doppler width of typically 10 MHz; and long-path static gas cells (to 100 m). In applying this equipment to signatures work, the authors emphasize the importance of high spectral resolution for detecting and identifying atmospheric interferences; for identifying the optimum analytical frequencies; for deriving, by spectroscopic analysis, the molecular parameters needed for modeling; and for obtaining data on species and/or bands that are not in existing databases. As an example of such spectroscopy, the authors have assigned and analyzed the C-Cl stretching region of CCl{sub 4} at 770--800 cm{sup {minus}1}. This is an important potential signature species whose IR absorption has remained puzzling because of the natural isotopic mix, extensive hot-band structure, and a Fermi resonance involving a nearby combination band. Instrument development projects include the IR sniffer, a small high-sensitivity, high-discrimination (Doppler-limited) device for fence-line or downwind monitoring that is effective even in regions of atmospheric absorption; preliminary work has achieved sensitivities at the low-ppb level. Other work covers trace species detection with TDLs, and FM-modulated CO{sub 2} laser LIDAR. The authors are planning a field experiment to interrogate the Hanford tank farm for signature species from Rattlesnake Mountain, a standoff of ca. 15 km, to be accompanied by simultaneous ground-truthing at the tanks.

  14. Multi-isotope tracing of CO2 leakage and water-rock interaction in a natural CCS analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Gemeni, Vasiliki; Lions, Julie; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Humez, Pauline; Vasilatos, Charalampos; Millot, Romain; Pauwels, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    interaction with carbonates and silicates. Both δ11B and δ7Li show a very large range of variation and fairly good correlation, between -29.7 o and +24o vs. NBS951 for boron and -11o and +20.4o vs. L-SVEC for lithium. The negative δ11B and δ7Li values are among the lowest reported in literature for groundwaters, comparable only to values observed for boron in case of geothermal fluids interaction with clay minerals (Pennisi et al., 2009) or in some amphiboles (e.g. Gillis et al., 2003) or lithium in ultramafic rocks (Nishio et al., 2004). Those variations reflect water-rock interaction with the silicate fraction of the highly heterogeneous graben filling but no clear indication of enhanced reactions due to CO2 intrusion has been found. The δ13C values of TDIC are also strongly variable (-10.5 to +15 o vs. PDB), reflecting biogenic inputs (e.g. from lignite layers), dissolution of carbonates and, potentially, methanogenesis through CO2 reduction. D' Alessandro W., Bellomo S., Brusca L., Karakazanis S., Kyriakopoulos K., and Liotta M. (2011) The impact on water quality of the high carbon dioxide contents of the groundwater in the area of Florina (N. Greece), Advances in the Research of Aquatic Environment. Springer. Gillis K. M., Coogan L. A., and Chaussidon M. (2003) Volatile element (B, Cl, F) behaviour in the roof of an axial magma chamber from the East Pacific Rise. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 213, 447-462. Hatziyannis G. and Arvanitits A. (2011) Natural analogues of CO2 leakage in Florina area, N. Greece., 2nd CGS Europe Knowledge Sharing Workshop Natural Analogues, Maria Laach, Germany, October 17-19, 2011, pp. Humez P., Negrel P., Lagneau V., Lions J., Kloppmann W., Gal F., Millot R., Guerrot C., Flehoc C., Widory D., and Girard J. F. (2014) CO2-water-mineral reactions during CO2 leakage: Geochemical and isotopic monitoring of a CO2 injection field test. Chem. Geol. 368, 11-30. Lions J., Humez P., Pauwels H., Kloppmann W., and Czernichowski-Lauriol I. (2014

  15. Digital Signature Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  16. Technical Report on the Behavior of Trace Elements, Stable Isotopes, and Radiogenic Isotopes During the Processing of Uranium Ore to Uranium Ore Concentrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Borg, L. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eppich, G. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gaffney, A. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Genneti, V. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hutcheon, I. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kristo, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lindvall, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramon, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Robel, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, S. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schorzman, K. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sharp, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Singleton, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Williams, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-09

    The goals of this SP-1 effort were to understand how isotopic and elemental signatures behave during mining, milling, and concentration and to identify analytes that might preserve geologic signatures of the protolith ores. The impurities that are preserved through the concentration process could provide useful forensic signatures and perhaps prove diagnostic of sample origin.

  17. Stable isotope markers differentiate between mass-reared and wild Lepidoptera in sterile insect technique programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this comprehensive study a number of Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) target moth species were identified and the feasibility was assessed of using isotope signatures to distinguish mass reared from wild moth species as a marking tool. Large natural differences in the isotopic signatures of commer...

  18. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  19. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, Jean

    1978-11-01

    Separation of isotopes is treated in a general way, with special reference to the production of enriched uranium. Uses of separated isotopes are presented quickly. Then basic definitions and theoretical concepts are explained: isotopic effects, non statistical and statistical processes, reversible and irreversible processes, separation factor, enrichment, cascades, isotopic separative work, thermodynamics. Afterwards the main processes and productions are reviewed. Finally the economical and industrial aspects of uranium enrichment are resumed [fr

  20. UV Signature Mutations †

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  1. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  2. Isotopic geochemistry of calcretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiquet, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sr, C, O, U and Th isotopes have been studied in calcium carbonates accumulated in soils of semi-arid regions (calcretes). We have investigated 1) the role of in-situ weathering and climatic conditions in the genesis of calcretes from Central Spain (Toledo) and Atlantic Morocco (Sidi Ifni), 2) the origin of Ca, and 3) the age of these accumulations. Our results show that calcium carbonates replace the parent rock (granite) and preserve the bulk-volume. Sr isotopic data suggest that 90 % of Ca in the spanish calcretes is allochthonous and related to atmospheric input. O and C isotopic compositions of the carbonates are compatible with soil temperatures and respiration rates during the beginning of the summer season. U-series disequilibrium in the carbonates suggests ages ranging between 40 to 270 ky, commensurate with the climatic cycle. The Sr isotopic signatures of spanish and moroccan calcretes are similar to those of the Quaternary marine carbonates. Assuming that only Ca-rich aerosols have been the source for calcretes of the studied regions, we propose that the wide continental plateaus exposed during glacial periods (low sea level) provided a major part of the calcic input to the soils. Semi-arid conditions of Spain and Morocco allowed the percolation and precipitation in the soil profiles to form calcretes. (author)

  3. Machine Fault Signature Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratesh Jayaswal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present recent developments in the field of machine fault signature analysis with particular regard to vibration analysis. The different types of faults that can be identified from the vibration signature analysis are, for example, gear fault, rolling contact bearing fault, journal bearing fault, flexible coupling faults, and electrical machine fault. It is not the intention of the authors to attempt to provide a detailed coverage of all the faults while detailed consideration is given to the subject of the rolling element bearing fault signature analysis.

  4. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  5. Intra-lake stable isotope ratio variation in selected fish species and their possible carbon sources in Lake Kyoga (Uganda): implications for aquatic food web studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mbabazi, D.; Makanga, B.; Orach-Meza, F.; Hecky, R.E.; Balirwa, J.S.; Ogutu-Ohwayo, R.; Verburg, P.H.; Chapman, L.; Muhumuza, E.

    2010-01-01

    The stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta 15N) and carbon (delta 13C) provide powerful tools for quantifying trophic relationships and carbon flow to consumers in food webs; however, the isotopic signatures of organisms vary within a lake. Assessment of carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures in a

  6. Different isotopic composition as a signature for different processes leading to fragment production in midperipheral {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni collisions at 30 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milazzo, P.M. E-mail: milazzo@trieste.infn.it; Vannini, G.; Agodi, C.; Alba, R.; Bellia, G.; Bruno, M.; Colonna, M.; Colonna, N.; Coniglione, R.; D' Agostino, M.; Del Zoppo, A.; Fabbietti, L.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gramegna, F.; Iori, I.; Loukachine, K.; Maiolino, C.; Margagliotti, G.V.; Mastinu, P.F.; Migneco, E.; Moroni, A.; Piattelli, P.; Rui, R.; Santonocito, D.; Sapienza, P.; Sisto, M

    2002-05-20

    We report on the results of experiments performed to investigate the {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni 30 MeV/nucleon reaction. In midperipheral collisions a massive fragment (4{<=}Z{<=}12) production has been observed. The emission patterns exhibit features consistent with dynamical fragmentation of a neck zone between the interacting nuclei, while in addition and at the same time, the projectile-like and target-like residues are subject to statistical decay. The nature of the fragments produced via the two different mechanisms differ both for what concerns charge distribution and isotopic composition. In particular, neutron rich fragments can be produced in dynamical processes, even if the starting nuclear matter presents a N/Z ratio close to the unity.

  7. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  8. Molybdenum isotope variations in calc-alkaline lavas from the Banda arc, Indonesia: Assessing the effect of crystal fractionation in creating isotopically heavy continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wille, Martin; Nebel, Oliver; Pettke, Thomas; Vroon, Pieter Z.; König, Stephan; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies report a large Mo isotope variability of up to 1‰ (expressed in δ98/95MoNIST3134) in convergent margin lavas. These isotopic variations have been associated with subduction zone processes and ultimately may account for heavy and variable isotope signatures in evolved continental

  9. Sulphur isotope variations in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, L.; Krouse, H.R.; Grinenko, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of the isotope ratios of sulphur and oxygen can in principal be used to assess sulphur inputs into, transformation within, and removal from the atmosphere. Major inputs arise from both anthropogenic and biogenic activities. Transformations arise from oxidation, neutralization, and other chemical reactions. Advection causes dilution and the main removal processes are dry deposition (governed by gravitation and diffusion) and rain. The admixture of sources can be discerned from their isotopic signatures whereas transformations and removal can be followed from the isotopic fractionation that might occur. In this chapter, the atmospheric sulphur cycle and the associated chemistry are summarized. Also presented is information on natural isotopic variations and fundamental concepts relating to the use of isotopic data to delineate anthropogenic S in the atmosphere. Examples of successful applications of these concepts are given. Finally, consideration is given to the potential of using isotopically enriched sulphur to study transport and transformation of atmospheric S compounds. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Temporal variations in the concentration and isotopic signature of ammonium- and nitrate-nitrogen in soils under a breeding colony of Black-tailed Gulls (Larus crassirostris) on Kabushima Island, northeastern Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizota, C.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal variations in the concentration and N isotopic ratios of inorganic N (NH 4 - and NO 3 -N) as affected by the soil temperature regime together with the input of bird excreta were analyzed in a sedentary soil under a dense colony (1.6 nests/m 2 ) of breeding Black-tailed Gulls (Laruscrassirostris: a ground-nesting seabird). Surface soil samples were taken monthly from mid-March to late July 2005 from Kabushima Island, Hachinohe, northeastern Japan. The spatial concentration of inorganic N in the soils varied considerably on all sampling dates. There may be a statistically significant trend, showing increased NH 4 -N content from settlement up to early June when the input of fecal N attains its maximum, and then decreases towards the end of breeding activity (early August). Abundant NO 3 -N was observed in all soils, particularly in the later stage of breeding (up to 3800 mg-N/kg dry soil), refuting earlier claims that nitrification is unimportant in the soils. δ 15 N values of NH 4 in the soils showed unusually high values up to +51 per mille , reflecting N isotope fractionation due to volatilization of NH 3 during the mineralization. Mean δ 15 N values of the monthly collected totals of NH 4 and NO 3 were not significantly different at the 5% level based on ANOVA and significant differences were observed only among the three means of NO 3 -N collected in mid-March (settlement of colony: δ 15 N = -0.2 ± 3.5 per mille ) and late July (later stages of breeding: δ 15 N = +22.1 ± 7.0 per mille, +23.3 ± 7.8 per mille) at the 1% and 5% levels by t-test, respectively. Such an observation of significantly increased δ 15 N values for NO 3 -N in soils from the fledgling stage indicates the integration of denitrification coupled with nitrification under a limited supply of fecal N

  11. Isotope enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbuny, M.

    1979-01-01

    The invention discloses a method for deriving, from a starting material including an element having a plurality of isotopes, derived material enriched in one isotope of the element. The starting material is deposited on a substrate at less than a critical submonatomic surface density, typically less than 10 16 atoms per square centimeter. The deposit is then selectively irradiated by a laser (maser or electronic oscillator) beam with monochromatic coherent radiation resonant with the one isotope causing the material including the one istope to escape from the substrate. The escaping enriched material is then collected. Where the element has two isotopes, one of which is to be collected, the deposit may be irradiated with radiation resonant with the other isotope and the residual material enriched in the one isotope may be evaporated from the substrate and collected

  12. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartlett, R.J.; Morrey, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated

  13. Starry messages: Searching for signatures of interstellar archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology. The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archaeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is used to evaluate the relative challenges of finding various sources. With few exceptions interstellar archaeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  14. Metallophore mapping in complex matrices by metal isotope coded profiling of organic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deicke, Michael; Mohr, Jan Frieder; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe; Wichard, Thomas

    2014-12-07

    Metal isotope coded profiling (MICP) introduces a universal discovery platform for metal chelating natural products that act as metallophores, ion buffers or sequestering agents. The detection of cation and oxoanion complexing ligands is facilitated by the identification of unique isotopic signatures created by the application of isotopically pure metals.

  15. Practical quantum digital signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-03-01

    Guaranteeing nonrepudiation, unforgeability as well as transferability of a signature is one of the most vital safeguards in today's e-commerce era. Based on fundamental laws of quantum physics, quantum digital signature (QDS) aims to provide information-theoretic security for this cryptographic task. However, up to date, the previously proposed QDS protocols are impractical due to various challenging problems and most importantly, the requirement of authenticated (secure) quantum channels between participants. Here, we present the first quantum digital signature protocol that removes the assumption of authenticated quantum channels while remaining secure against the collective attacks. Besides, our QDS protocol can be practically implemented over more than 100 km under current mature technology as used in quantum key distribution.

  16. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    Isotopic species in an isotopic mixture including a first species having a first isotope and a second species having a second isotope are separated by selectively exciting the first species in preference to the second species and then reacting the selectively excited first species with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product having a mass different from the original species and separating the product from the balance of the mixture in a centrifugal separating device such as centrifuge or aerodynamic nozzle. In the centrifuge the isotopic mixture is passed into a rotor where it is irradiated through a window. Heavier and lighter components can be withdrawn. The irradiated mixture experiences a large centrifugal force and is separated in a deflection area into lighter and heavier components. (UK)

  17. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castle, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to molecular and atomic isotope separation and is particularly applicable to the separation of 235 U from other uranium isotopes including 238 U. In the method described a desired isotope is separated mechanically from an atomic or molecular beam formed from an isotope mixture utilising the isotropic recoil momenta resulting from selective excitation of the desired isotope species by radiation, followed by ionization or dissociation by radiation or electron attachment. By forming a matrix of UF 6 molecules in HBr molecules so as to collapse the V 3 vibrational mode of the UF 6 molecule the 235 UF 6 molecules are selectively excited to promote reduction of UF 6 molecules containing 235 U and facilitate separation. (UK)

  18. Signatures of the Invisible

    CERN Multimedia

    Strom, D

    2003-01-01

    On the Net it is possible to take a look at art from afar via Virtual Museums. One such exhibition was recently in the New York Museum of Modern Art's branch, PS1. Entitled 'Signatures of the Invisible' it was a collaborative effort between artists and physicists (1/2 page).

  19. Massively parallel signature sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daixing; Rao, Mahendra S; Walker, Roger; Khrebtukova, Irina; Haudenschild, Christian D; Miura, Takumi; Decola, Shannon; Vermaas, Eric; Moon, Keith; Vasicek, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing is an ultra-high throughput sequencing technology. It can simultaneously sequence millions of sequence tags, and, therefore, is ideal for whole genome analysis. When applied to expression profiling, it reveals almost every transcript in the sample and provides its accurate expression level. This chapter describes the technology and its application in establishing stem cell transcriptome databases.

  20. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, J.H.; Marks, T.J.

    1981-01-01

    A process for separating uranium isotopes is described which includes: preparing a volatile compound U-T, in which U is a mixture of uranium isotopes and T is a chemical moiety containing at least one organic or deuterated borohydride group, and which exhibits for at least one isotopic species thereof a fundamental, overtone or combination vibrational absorption excitation energy level at a frequency between 900 and 1100 cm -1 ; and irradiating the compound in the vapour phase with energy emitted by a radiation source at a frequency between 900 and 1100 cm -1 (e.g. a CO 2 laser). (author)

  1. R-process signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kratz, K.L.; Pfeiffer, B.

    2003-01-01

    We compare r-process calculations with recent astronomical observations from the solar system and from ultra-metal-poor, neutron-capture-rich halo stars. These measurements include elemental as well as isotopic r-abundances. We deduce astrophysical conditions under which the observed r-patterns can be obtained, and derive criteria to determine Th/U chronometric ages. (orig.)

  2. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  3. Isotope laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report from the Dutch Ministry of Health is an advisory document concerned with isotope laboratories in hospitals, in connection with the Dutch laws for hospitals. It discusses which hospitals should have isotope laboratories and concludes that as many hospitals as possible should have small laboratories so that emergency cases can be dealt with. It divides the Netherlands into regions and suggests which hospitals should have these facilities. The questions of how big each lab. is to be, what equipment each has, how each lab. is organised, what therapeutic and diagnostic work should be carried out by each, etc. are discussed. The answers are provided by reports from working groups for in vivo diagnostics, in vitro diagnostics, therapy, and safety and their results form the criteria for the licences of isotope labs. The results of a questionnaire for isotope labs. already in the Netherlands are presented, and their activities outlined. (C.F.)

  4. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  5. Deciphering the iron isotope message of the human body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczyk, Thomas; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2005-04-01

    Mass-dependent variations in isotopic composition are known since decades for the light elements such as hydrogen, carbon or oxygen. Multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and double-spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) permit us now to resolve small variations in isotopic composition even for the heavier elements such as iron. Recent studies on the iron isotopic composition of human blood and dietary iron sources have shown that lighter iron isotopes are enriched along the food chain and that each individual bears a certain iron isotopic signature in blood. To make use of this finding in biomedical research, underlying mechanisms of isotope fractionation by the human body need to be understood. In this paper available iron isotope data for biological samples are discussed within the context of isotope fractionation concepts and fundamental aspects of human iron metabolism. This includes evaluation of new data for body tissues which show that blood and muscle tissue have a similar iron isotopic composition while heavier iron isotopes are concentrated in the liver. This new observation is in agreement with our earlier hypothesis of a preferential absorption of lighter iron isotopes by the human body. Possible mechanisms for inducing an iron isotope effect at the cellular and molecular level during iron uptake are presented and the potential of iron isotope effects in human blood as a long-term measure of dietary iron absorption is discussed.

  6. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  7. Role of stable isotope mass spectroscopy in hydrological sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keesari, Tirumalesh

    2017-01-01

    Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is a specialized technique used to provide information about a given sample about its geographic, chemical, physical and biological origin. The ability to determine the source of water molecule stems from the relative isotopic abundances of its constituent elements, viz., hydrogen and oxygen or sometimes through its dissolved elements such as carbon, nitrogen and sulphur etc. Since the isotope ratios of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and nitrogen can become locally enriched or depleted through a variety of kinetic and thermodynamic factors, measurement of the isotope ratios can be used to unravel the processes and differentiate water samples which otherwise exhibit similar chemical signatures. For brevity, this article focuses mainly on measurement of water isotopes, common notation for expressing isotope data and standards, theory of isotope hydrology, field applications and advances

  8. Carbon isotope fractionation by anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in euxinic Lake Cadagno

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole Rita Elisabeth; Bristow, L. A.; Cox, R. P.

    2017-01-01

    in the chemocline. We sought to determine whether a distinct isotopic signature of GSB and PSB in the chemocline persists in the settling fraction and in the sediment. To answer these questions, we also sought investigated C-isotope fractionation in the water column, settling material, and sediment of Lake Cadagno......, compared these values to C-isotope fractionation of isolated anoxygenic phototroph cultures, and took a mass balance approach to investigate relative contributions to the bulk fractionation signature. We found a large C-isotope fractionation between dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and particulate organic...

  9. Variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in flight feathers of a moulting White-bellied Sunbird Cinnyris talatala

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Symes, CT

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors measured d13C and d15N isotope signatures in flight feathers of a White-bellied Sunbird to assess the value of using stable isotopes of feathers in avian dietary studies. Significant variation in d13C and d15N isotope values of flight...

  10. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  11. Signatures of topological superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Yang

    2017-07-19

    The prediction and experimental discovery of topological insulators brought the importance of topology in condensed matter physics into the limelight. Topology hence acts as a new dimension along which more and more new states of matter start to emerge. One of these topological states of matter, namely topological superconductors, comes into the focus because of their gapless excitations. These gapless excitations, especially in one dimensional topological superconductors, are Majorana zero modes localized at the ends of the superconductor and exhibit exotic nonabelian statistics, which can be potentially applied to fault-tolerant quantum computation. Given their highly interesting physical properties and potential applications to quantum computation, both theorists and experimentalists spend great efforts to realize topological supercondoctors and to detect Majoranas. In two projects within this thesis, we investigate the properties of Majorana zero modes in realistic materials which are absent in simple theoretical models. We find that the superconducting proximity effect, an essential ingredient in all existing platforms for topological superconductors, plays a significant role in determining the localization property of the Majoranas. Strong proximity coupling between the normal system and the superconducting substrate can lead to strongly localized Majoranas, which can explain the observation in a recent experiment. Motivated by experiments in Molenkamp's group, we also look at realistic quantum spin Hall Josephson junctions, in which charge puddles acting as magnetic impurities are coupled to the helical edge states. We find that with this setup, the junction generically realizes an exotic 8π periodic Josephson effect, which is absent in a pristine Josephson junction. In another two projects, we propose more pronounced signatures of Majoranas that are accessible with current experimental techniques. The first one is a transport measurement, which uses

  12. Signature CERN-URSS

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschke,W

    1975-01-01

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  13. LBA-ECO CD-02 Oxygen Isotopes of Plant Tissue Water and Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set reports the oxygen isotope signatures of water extracted from plant tissue (xylem from the stems and leaf tissue) and of atmospheric water vapor from...

  14. LBA-ECO CD-02 Oxygen Isotopes of Plant Tissue Water and Atmospheric Water Vapor

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set reports the oxygen isotope signatures of water extracted from plant tissue (xylem from the stems and leaf tissue) and of atmospheric water...

  15. LBA-ECO CD-08 Carbon Isotopes in Belowground Carbon Pools, Amazonas and Para, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains carbon isotope signatures from soil organic matter collected from the following sites: the forests of the ZF-2 INPA reserve...

  16. LBA-ECO CD-08 Carbon Isotopes in Belowground Carbon Pools, Amazonas and Para, Brazil

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains carbon isotope signatures from soil organic matter collected from the following sites: the forests of the ZF-2 INPA reserve approximately 80...

  17. Isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Dewi M.

    1995-01-01

    Some 2 0% of patients using radiopharmaceuticals receive injections of materials produced by cyclotrons. There are over 200 cyclotrons worldwide; around 35 are operated by commercial companies solely for the production of radio-pharmaceuticals with another 25 accelerators producing medically useful isotopes. These neutron-deficient isotopes are usually produced by proton bombardment. All commonly used medical isotopes can be generated by 'compact' cyclotrons with energies up to 40 MeV and beam intensities in the range 50 to 400 microamps. Specially designed target systems contain gram-quantities of highly enriched stable isotopes as starting materials. The targets can accommodate the high power densities of the proton beams and are designed for automated remote handling. The complete manufacturing cycle includes large-scale target production, isotope generation by cyclotron beam bombardment, radio-chemical extraction, pharmaceutical dispensing, raw material recovery, and labelling/packaging prior to the rapid delivery of these short-lived products. All these manufacturing steps adhere to the pharmaceutical industry standards of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Unlike research accelerators, commercial cyclotrons are customized 'compact' machines usually supplied by specialist companies such as IBA (Belgium), EBCO (Canada) or Scanditronix (Sweden). The design criteria for these commercial cyclotrons are - small magnet dimensions, power-efficient operation of magnet and radiofrequency systems, high intensity extracted proton beams, well defined beam size and automated computer control. Performance requirements include rapid startup and shutdown, high reliability to support the daily production of short-lived isotopes and low maintenance to minimize the radiation dose to personnel. In 1987 a major step forward in meeting these exacting industrial requirements came when IBA, together with the University of Louvain-La-Neuve in Belgium, developed the

  18. Zinc Isotope Variability in Three Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Predictive Model for Determining Isotopic Fractionation during Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Gonzalez, R; Weiss, D

    2015-10-20

    The zinc (Zn) isotope compositions of feed materials and combustion byproducts were investigated in three different coal-fired power plants, and the results were used to develop a generalized model that can account for Zn isotopic fractionation during coal combustion. The isotope signatures in the coal (δ(66)ZnIRMM) ranged between +0.73 and +1.18‰, values that fall well within those previously determined for peat (+0.6 ±2.0‰). We therefore propose that the speciation of Zn in peat determines the isotope fingerprint in coal. All of the bottom ashes collected in these power plants were isotopically depleted in the heavy isotopes relative to the coals, with δ(66)ZnIRMM values ranging between +0.26‰ and +0.64‰. This suggests that the heavy isotopes, possibly associated with the organic matter of the coal, may be preferentially released into the vapor phase. The fly ash in all of these power plants was, in contrast, enriched in the heavy isotopes relative to coal. The signatures in the fly ash can be accounted for using a simple unidirectional fractionation model with isotope fractionation factors (αsolid-vapor) ranging between 1.0003 and 1.0007, and we suggest that condensation is the controlling process. The model proposed allows, once the isotope composition of the feed coal is known, the constraining of the Zn signatures in the byproducts. This will now enable the integration of Zn isotopes as a quantitative tool for the source apportionment of this metal from coal combustion in the atmosphere.

  19. Stable isotope signatures reflect dietary diversity in Euroepan forest moths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adams, M.-O.; Seifert, Carlo Lutz; Lehner, L.; Truxa, T.; Wanek, W.; Fiedler, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2016), č. článku 37. ISSN 1742-9994 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : delta C-13 * delta N-15 * larval diet Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.781, year: 2016 https://frontiersinzoology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12983-016-0170-0

  20. Geochemical and isotopic signatures for the identification of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Groundwater division of Public Works Depart- ment, Government of Tamil Nadu in collabora- tion with .... rotation and Ward's method respectively, in which five parameters including EC, TDS, Na, Cl and Br ..... FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization) 1997 Seawa- ter intrusion in coastal aquifers: Guidelines for study,.

  1. Geochemical and isotopic signatures for the identification of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seawater intrusion is one of the alarming processes that reduces the water quality and imperils the supply of freshwater in coastal aquifers. The region, north of the Chennai city, India is one such site affected by seawater intrusion. The objective of this study is to identify the extent of seawater intruded area by major ...

  2. Electronic Signature (eSig)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Beginning with the Government Paperwork Elimination Act of 1998 (GPEA), the Federal government has encouraged the use of electronic / digital signatures to enable...

  3. Expressiveness considerations of XML signatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Meiko; Meyer, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    XML Signatures are used to protect XML-based Web Service communication against a broad range of attacks related to man-in-the-middle scenarios. However, due to the complexity of the Web Services specification landscape, the task of applying XML Signatures in a robust and reliable manner becomes...... more and more challenging. In this paper, we investigate this issue, describing how an attacker can still interfere with Web Services communication even in the presence of XML Signatures. Additionally, we discuss the interrelation of XML Signatures and XML Encryption, focussing on their security...

  4. Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronic Warfare Signature Measurement Facility contains specialized mobile spectral, radiometric, and imaging measurement systems to characterize ultraviolet,...

  5. Isotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The patent describes an isotope generator incorporating the possibility of stopping elution before the elution vessel is completely full. Sterile ventilation of the whole system can then occur, including of both generator reservoir and elution vessel. A sterile, and therefore pharmaceutically acceptable, elution fluid is thus obtained and the interior of the generator is not polluted with non-sterile air. (T.P.)

  6. Multisensors signature prediction workbench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latger, Jean; Cathala, Thierry

    2015-10-01

    Guidance of weapon systems relies on sensors to analyze targets signature. Defense weapon systems also need to detect then identify threats also using sensors. The sensors performance is very dependent on conditions e.g. time of day, atmospheric propagation, background ... Visible camera are very efficient for diurnal fine weather conditions, long wave infrared sensors for night vision, radar systems very efficient for seeing through atmosphere and/or foliage ... Besides, multi sensors systems, combining several collocated sensors with associated algorithms of fusion, provide better efficiency (typically for Enhanced Vision Systems). But these sophisticated systems are all the more difficult to conceive, assess and qualify. In that frame, multi sensors simulation is highly required. This paper focuses on multi sensors simulation tools. A first part makes a state of the Art of such simulation workbenches with a special focus on SE-Workbench. SEWorkbench is described with regards to infrared/EO sensors, millimeter waves sensors, active EO sensors and GNSS sensors. Then a general overview of simulation of targets and backgrounds signature objectives is presented, depending on the type of simulation required (parametric studies, open loop simulation, closed loop simulation, hybridization of SW simulation and HW ...). After the objective review, the paper presents some basic requirements for simulation implementation such as the deterministic behavior of simulation, mandatory to repeat it many times for parametric studies... Several technical topics are then discussed, such as the rendering technique (ray tracing vs. rasterization), the implementation (CPU vs. GP GPU) and the tradeoff between physical accuracy and performance of computation. Examples of results using SE-Workbench are showed and commented.

  7. Signatures de l'invisible

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Press Office. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    "Signatures of the Invisible" is an unique collaboration between contemporary artists and contemporary physicists which has the potential to help redefine the relationship between science and art. "Signatures of the Invisible" is jointly organised by the London Institute - the world's largest college of art and design and CERN*, the world's leading particle physics laboratory. 12 leading visual artists:

  8. Noble Gas signatures of Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, P. H.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Tyne, R. L.; Hillegonds, D.; Byrne, D. J.; Landon, M. K.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Noble gases are powerful tracers of fluids from various oil and gas production activities in hydrocarbon reservoirs and nearby groundwater. Non-radiogenic noble gases are introduced into undisturbed oil and natural gas reservoirs through exchange with formation waters [1-3]. Reservoirs with extensive hydraulic fracturing, injection for enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and/or waste disposal also show evidence for a component of noble gases introduced from air [4]. Isotopic and elemental ratios of noble gases can be used to 1) assess the migration history of the injected and formation fluids, and 2) determine the extent of exchange between multiphase fluids in different reservoirs. We present noble gas isotope and abundance data from casing, separator and injectate gases of the Lost Hills and Fruitvale oil fields in the San Joaquin basin, California. Samples were collected as part of the California State Water Resource Control Board's Oil and Gas Regional Groundwater Monitoring Program. Lost Hills (n=7) and Fruitvale (n=2) gases are geochemically distinct and duplicate samples are highly reproducible. Lost Hills casing gas samples were collected from areas where EOR and hydraulic fracturing has occurred in the past several years, and from areas where EOR is absent. The Fruitvale samples were collected from a re-injection port. All samples are radiogenic in their He isotopes, typical of a crustal environment, and show enrichments in heavy noble gases, resulting from preferential adsorption on sediments. Fruitvale samples reflect air-like surface conditions, with higher air-derived noble gas concentrations. Lost Hills gases show a gradation from pristine crustal signatures - indicative of closed-system exchange with formation fluids - to strongly air-contaminated signatures in the EOR region. Pristine samples can be used to determine the extent of hydrocarbon exchange with fluids, whereas samples with excess air can be used to quantify the extent of EOR. Determining noble

  9. Isotope hydrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drost, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Symposium on Isotope Hydrology was jointly organized by the IAEA and UNESCO, in co-operation with the National Committee of the Federal Republic of Germany for the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) and the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF). Upon the invitation of the Federal Republic of Germany the Symposium was held from 19-23 June 1978 in Neuherberg on the GSF campus. The Symposium was officially opened by Mr. S. Eklund, Director General of the IAEA. The symposium - the fifth meeting held on isotope hydrology - was attended by over 160 participants from 44 countries and four international organizations and by about 30 observers from the Federal Republic of Germany. Due to the absence of scientists from the USSR five papers were cancelled and therefore only 46 papers of the original programme were presented in ten sessions

  10. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, G.H.; Bett, R.; Cuninghame, J.G.; Sims, H.

    1982-01-01

    In the separation of short-lived isotopes for medical usage, a solution containing sup(195m)Hg is contacted with vicinal dithiol cellulose which adsorbs and retains the sup(195m)Hg. sup(195m)Au is eluted from the vicinal dithiol cellulose by using a suitable elutant. The sup(195m)Au arises from the radioactive decay of the sup(195m)Hg. The preferred elutant is a solution containing CN - ion. (author)

  11. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  12. Sr-Nd ISOTOPES IN MOSSES FROM ROMAGNA (ITALY AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Castorina

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sr-Nd isotopes were applied for the first time to the study of several moss samples from a transect stretching through Romagna from the Apennines to the Adriatic sea coast. The isotopic data suggest that the mosses uptake Sr and Nd via atmospheric depositions from both marine carbonates and old siliceous crustal rocks. Anthropic pollution cannot be precisely evaluated because of the lack of univocal isotopic signature of the sources.

  13. Xenon adsorption on geological media and implications for radionuclide signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, M J; Biegalski, S R; Haas, D A; Jiang, H; Daigle, H; Lowrey, J D

    2018-07-01

    The detection of radioactive noble gases is a primary technology for verifying compliance with the pending Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. A fundamental challenge in applying this technology for detecting underground nuclear explosions is estimating the timing and magnitude of the radionuclide signatures. While the primary mechanism for transport is advective transport, either through barometric pumping or thermally driven advection, diffusive transport in the surrounding matrix also plays a secondary role. From the study of primordial noble gas signatures, it is known that xenon has a strong physical adsorption affinity in shale formations. Given the unselective nature of physical adsorption, isotherm measurements reported here show that non-trivial amounts of xenon adsorb on a variety of media, in addition to shale. A dual-porosity model is then discussed demonstrating that sorption amplifies the diffusive uptake of an adsorbing matrix from a fracture. This effect may reduce the radioxenon signature down to approximately one-tenth, similar to primordial xenon isotopic signatures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Implications of isotope data for the origin of the moon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, D.L.; Kellogg, L.H.

    1986-01-01

    Lunar isotope data are studied in terms of lunar reservoir models. An analysis is performed to determine how the samarium-neodymium and rubidium-strontium systems evolve in terms of a two-reservoir model. Isotope data from lunar rocks show much more variability than similar data from terrestrial rocks. The midocean ridge basalts yield consistent isotope signatures on a worldwide basis suggesting that vigorous mantle convection has mixed and homogeneized the upper mantle beneath the lithosphere plates. The variability of the lunar data is taken as evidence for distinct source regions which in effect support a relatively cool origin of the moon. 59 references

  15. Geochemistry and Nd-Sr isotopic signatures of the Pensamiento Granitoid Complex, Rondonian-San Ignacio Province, eastern precambrian shield of Bolivia: petrogenetic constraints for a mesoproterozoic magmatic arc setting;Geoquimica e assinaturas Nd-Sr do Complexo Granitoide Pensamiento, provincia Rondoniana-San Ignacio, pre-cambriano de Bolivia Oriental: caracterizacao petrogenetica de um arco magmatico no mesoproterozoico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Ramiro, E-mail: rmatoss@igc.usp.b [Universidad Mayor de San Andre (UMSA), La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of). Inst. de Investigaciones Geologicas y del Medio Ambiente; Teixeira, Wilson; Bettencourt, Jorge Silva, E-mail: wteixeir@usp.b, E-mail: jsbetten@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IGC/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias. Dept. de Mineralogia e Geotectonica; Geraldes, Mauro Cesar, E-mail: geraldes@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FG/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Geologia

    2009-07-01

    plutons. The Porvenir, San Cristobal and Piso Firme plutons show {epsilon}{sub Nd(1330)} signatures varying from +1.5 to +2.7, in agreement with a plutonic arc setting as is suggested for the Diamantina pluton. Integrated interpretation of the geochemical and isotopic data coupled with new geologic correlations of the PGC with contemporary units in the Brazilian counterpart establishes one Mesoproterozoic magmatic arc in the evolution of the Rondonian-San Ignacio province. (author)

  16. Retail applications of signature verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Thomas G.; Russell, Gregory F.; Heilper, Andre; Smith, Barton A.; Hu, Jianying; Markman, Dmitry; Graham, Jon E.; Drews, Clemens

    2004-08-01

    The dramatic rise in identity theft, the ever pressing need to provide convenience in checkout services to attract and retain loyal customers, and the growing use of multi-function signature captures devices in the retail sector provides favorable conditions for the deployment of dynamic signature verification (DSV) in retail settings. We report on the development of a DSV system to meet the needs of the retail sector. We currently have a database of approximately 10,000 signatures collected from 600 subjects and forgers. Previous work at IBM on DSV has been merged and extended to achieve robust performance on pen position data available from commercial point of sale hardware, achieving equal error rates on skilled forgeries and authentic signatures of 1.5% to 4%.

  17. Password-based digital signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Sivagnanasuntharam, Sangeepan

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about implementing a digital signature scheme proposed by associate professor Kristian Gjøsteen and Oystein Thuen.The thesis explains the implementation, the challenges met and a security assessment of the implementation.

  18. Initial Semantics for Strengthened Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Hirschowitz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We give a new general definition of arity, yielding the companion notions of signature and associated syntax. This setting is modular in the sense requested by Ghani and Uustalu: merging two extensions of syntax corresponds to building an amalgamated sum. These signatures are too general in the sense that we are not able to prove the existence of an associated syntax in this general context. So we have to select arities and signatures for which there exists the desired initial monad. For this, we follow a track opened by Matthes and Uustalu: we introduce a notion of strengthened arity and prove that the corresponding signatures have initial semantics (i.e. associated syntax. Our strengthened arities admit colimits, which allows the treatment of the λ-calculus with explicit substitution.

  19. Relationships between tree height and carbon isotope discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nate G. McDowell; Barbara J. Bond; Lee T. Dickman; Michael G. Ryan; David Whitehead

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how tree size impacts leaf- and crown-level gas exchange is essential to predicting forest yields and carbon and water budgets. The stable carbon isotope ratio of organic matter has been used to examine the relationship of gas exchange to tree size for a host of species because it carries a temporally integrated signature of foliar photosynthesis and...

  20. Using stable isotope analysis to study the diet of Gilchristella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using stable isotope analysis to study the diet of Gilchristella aestuaria larvae: preliminary insights into the foodwebs of six South African estuaries. ... We found a high similarity among the Kariega, Gamtoos, Great Fish and Sundays estuaries in terms of consumers and potential sources for both δ13C and δ15N signatures.

  1. Landscape cultivation alters δ30Si signature in terrestrial ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandevenne, Floor; Delvaux, Claire; Hughes, Harold; Ronchi, Benedicta; Clymans, Wim; Barao, Ana Lucia; Govers, Gerard; Cornelis, Jean Thomas; André, Luc; Struyf, Eric

    2015-04-01

    Despite increasing recognition of the importance of biological Si cycling in controlling dissolved Si (DSi) in soil and stream water, effects of human cultivation on the Si cycle remain poorly understood. Sensitive tracer techniques to identify and quantify Si in the soil-plant-water system could be highly relevant in addressing these uncertainties. Stable Si isotopes are promising tools to define Si sources and sinks along the ecosystem flow path, as intense fractionation occurs during chemical weathering and uptake of dissolved Si in plants. Yet they remain underexploited in the end product of the soil-plant system: the soil water. Here, stable Si isotope ratios (δ30Si) of dissolved Si in soil water were measured along a land use gradient (continuous forest, continuous pasture, young cropland and continuous cropland) with similar parent material (loess) and homogenous bulk mineralogical and climatological (Belgium). Soil water δ30Si signatures are clearly separated along the gradient, with highest average signatures in continuous cropland (+1.61%), intermediate in pasture (+1.05%) and young cropland (+0.89%) and lowest in forest soil water (+0.62%). Our data do not allow distinguishing biological from pedogenic/lithogenic processes, but point to a strong interaction of both. We expect that increasing export of light isotopes in disturbed land uses (i.e. through agricultural harvest), and higher recycling of 28Si and elevated weathering intensity (including clay dissolution) in forest systems will largely determine soil water δ30Si signatures of our systems. Our results imply that soil water δ30Si signature is biased through land management before it reaches rivers and coastal zones, where other fractionation processes take over (e.g. diatom uptake and reverse weathering in floodplains). In particular, a direct role of agriculture systems in lowering export Si fluxes towards rivers and coastal systems has been shown. Stable Si isotopes have a large potential

  2. A first isotopic dietary study of the Greenlandic Thule Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, D.E.; Lynnerup, Niels; Arneborg, J.

    2012-01-01

    The isotopic dietary method has been applied to samples of some 65 Thule Culture individuals from existing archaeological collections of Greenlandic human skeletal material. The aim was to use the Greenlandic Thule Culture as a test of the isotopic method, in that we know they were heavily...... dependent on marine resources, and should thus provide a direct measure of the isotopic values for humans consuming almost entirely marine protein. The sites from which the material was originally obtained encompass almost the entire periphery of Greenland. Isotopic data from a study of animals of Greenland...... was used as the basis for analysis. As expected, the results indicate that these people were almost entirely dependent on the marine biosphere for their protein. An exception is those from Northeast Greenland, whose isotopic signatures show evidence for consumption of terrestrial protein as well...

  3. Identification of High Confidence Nuclear Forensics Signatures. Results of a Coordinated Research Project and Related Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-08-01

    The results of a Coordinated Research Project and related research on the identification of high confidence nuclear forensic isotopic, chemical and physical data characteristics, or signatures, provides information on signatures that can help identify the origin and history of nuclear and other radioactive material encountered out of regulatory control. This research report compiles findings from investigations of materials obtained from throughout the nuclear fuel cycle to include radioactive sources. The report further provides recent results used to identify, analyse in the laboratory, predict and interpret these signatures relative to the requirements of a nuclear forensics examination. The report describes some of the controls on the incorporation and persistence of these signatures in these materials as well as their potential use in a national system of identification to include a national nuclear forensics library.

  4. SIGNATURE: A workbench for gene expression signature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jeffrey T

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological phenotype of a cell, such as a characteristic visual image or behavior, reflects activities derived from the expression of collections of genes. As such, an ability to measure the expression of these genes provides an opportunity to develop more precise and varied sets of phenotypes. However, to use this approach requires computational methods that are difficult to implement and apply, and thus there is a critical need for intelligent software tools that can reduce the technical burden of the analysis. Tools for gene expression analyses are unusually difficult to implement in a user-friendly way because their application requires a combination of biological data curation, statistical computational methods, and database expertise. Results We have developed SIGNATURE, a web-based resource that simplifies gene expression signature analysis by providing software, data, and protocols to perform the analysis successfully. This resource uses Bayesian methods for processing gene expression data coupled with a curated database of gene expression signatures, all carried out within a GenePattern web interface for easy use and access. Conclusions SIGNATURE is available for public use at http://genepattern.genome.duke.edu/signature/.

  5. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  6. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  7. Isotopic niche reflects stress-induced variability in physiological status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlson, Agnes M L; Reutgard, Martin; Garbaras, Andrius; Gorokhova, Elena

    2018-02-01

    The isotopic niche has become an established concept in trophic ecology. However, the assumptions behind this approach have rarely been evaluated. Evidence is accumulating that physiological stress can affect both magnitude and inter-individual variability of the isotopic signature in consumers via alterations in metabolic pathways. We hypothesized that stress factors (inadequate nutrition, parasite infestations, and exposure to toxic substances or varying oxygen conditions) might lead to suboptimal physiological performance and altered stable isotope signatures. The latter can be misinterpreted as alterations in isotopic niche. This hypothesis was tested by inducing physiological stress in the deposit-feeding amphipod Monoporeia affinis exposed to either different feeding regimes or contaminated sediments. In the amphipods, we measured body condition indices or reproductive output to assess growth status and δ 13 C and δ 15 N values to derive isotope niche metrics. As hypothesized, greater isotopic niche estimates were derived for the stressed animals compared to the control groups. Moreover, the δ 15 N values were influenced by body size, reproductive status and parasite infestations, while δ 13 C values were influenced by body size, oxygen conditions and survival. Using regression analysis with isotope composition and growth variables as predictors, we were able to discriminate between the amphipods exposed to nutritionally or chemically stressful conditions and those in the control groups. Thus, interpretation of isotopic niche can be confounded by natural or anthropogenic stressors that may induce an apparent change in isotopic niche. These findings stress the importance of including measures of growth and health status when evaluating stable isotope data in food web studies.

  8. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bett, R.; Sims, H.E.; Cuninghame, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    sup(195m)Au is separated from sup(195m)Hg in a solution containing ions of sup(195m)Hg, wherein sup(195m)Au is generated by radioactive decay of the sup(195m)Hg, by contacting the solution with an adsorbing agent to adsorb the sup(195m)Hg as Hg ++ ions followed by elution of sup(195m)Au arising from said radioactive decay. The adsorbing agent is 3-thio-2-hydroxypropyl-ether-Sepharose (R.T.M.); sup(195m)Au may be prepared in this way in a medical isotope generator and is suitable for use in gamma-scan studies of heart action. (author)

  9. Natural isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    14 C dates between 600 and 900 AD were obtained for early Iron Age sites in Natal, and from 1300 to 1450 AD for rock engraving sites in Bushmanland. Palaeoenvironmental data derived from the dating of samples related to sedimentary and geomorphic features in the central and northern Namib Desert enabled the production of a tentative graph for the changes in humidity in the region over the past 40000 years. These results suggest that relatively humid conditions came to an end in the Namib at ±25000 BP (before present). The increased precision of the SIRA mass spectrometer enabled the remeasurement of 13 C and 18 O in the Cango stalagmite. This data confirmed that the environmental temperatures in the Southern Cape remained constant to within ±1 o C during the past 5500 years. Techniques and applications for environmental isotopes in hydrology were developed to determine the origin and movement of ground water. Isotopic fractionation effects in light elements in nature were investigated. The 15 N/ 14 N ratio in bones of animals and humans increases in proportion to the aridity of the environment. This suggests that 15 N in bone from dated archaeological sites could be used to detect changes in past climatic conditions as naturally formed nitrate minerals are higly soluble and are only preserved in special, very dry environments. The sources and sinks of CO 2 on the South African subcontinent were also determined. The 13 C/ 12 C ratios of air CO 2 obtained suggest that the vegetation provides the major proportion of respired CO 2 . 9 refs., 1 fig

  10. Signature molecular descriptor : advanced applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN)

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the development of the Signature Molecular Descriptor (or Signature) for use in the solution of inverse design problems as well as in highthroughput screening applications. The ultimate goal of using Signature is to identify novel and non-intuitive chemical structures with optimal predicted properties for a given application. We demonstrate this in three studies: green solvent design, glucocorticoid receptor ligand design and the design of inhibitors for Factor XIa. In many areas of engineering, compounds are designed and/or modified in incremental ways which rely upon heuristics or institutional knowledge. Often multiple experiments are performed and the optimal compound is identified in this brute-force fashion. Perhaps a traditional chemical scaffold is identified and movement of a substituent group around a ring constitutes the whole of the design process. Also notably, a chemical being evaluated in one area might demonstrate properties very attractive in another area and serendipity was the mechanism for solution. In contrast to such approaches, computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) looks to encompass both experimental and heuristic-based knowledge into a strategy that will design a molecule on a computer to meet a given target. Depending on the algorithm employed, the molecule which is designed might be quite novel (re: no CAS registration number) and/or non-intuitive relative to what is known about the problem at hand. While CAMD is a fairly recent strategy (dating to the early 1980s), it contains a variety of bottlenecks and limitations which have prevented the technique from garnering more attention in the academic, governmental and industrial institutions. A main reason for this is how the molecules are described in the computer. This step can control how models are developed for the properties of interest on a given problem as well as how to go from an output of the algorithm to an actual chemical structure. This report

  11. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  12. The isotopic contamination in electromagnetic isotope separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassignol, Ch.

    1959-01-01

    In the early years of isotope separation, and in particular electromagnetic isotope separation, needs for rapid results have conducted to empiric research. This paper describes fundamental research on the electromagnetic isotope separation to a better understanding of isotope separators as well as improving the performances. Focus has been made on the study of the principle of isotope contamination and the remedial action on the separator to improve the isotope separation ratio. In a first part, the author come back to the functioning of an electromagnetic separator and generalities on isotope contamination. Secondly, it describes the two stages separation method with two dispersive apparatus, an electromagnetic separation stage followed by an electrostatic separation stage, both separated by a diaphragm. The specifications of the electrostatic stage are given and its different settings and their consequences on isotope separation are investigated. In a third part, mechanisms and contamination factors in the isotope separation are discussed: natural isotope contamination, contamination by rebounding on the collector, contamination because of a low resolution, contamination by chromatism and diffusion effect, breakdown of condenser voltage. Analysis of experimental results shows the diffusion as the most important contamination factor in electromagnetic isotope separation. As contamination factors are dependent on geometric parameters, sector angle, radius of curvature in the magnetic field and clearance height are discussed in a fourth part. The better understanding of the mechanism of the different contamination factors and the study of influential parameters as pressure and geometric parameters lead to define a global scheme of isotope contamination and determinate optima separator design and experimental parameters. Finally, the global scheme of isotope contamination and hypothesis on optima specifications and experimental parameters has been checked during a

  13. Position-specific carbon isotope analysis of trichloroacetic acid by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breider, Florian; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2011-12-30

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is an important environmental contaminant present in soils, water and plants. A method for determining the carbon isotope signature of the trichloromethyl position in TCAA using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) was developed and tested with TCAA from different origins. Position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide direct information on the kinetic isotope effect for isotope substitution at a specific position in the molecule and/or help to distinguish different sources of a compound. The method is based on the degradation of TCAA into chloroform (CF) and CO₂ by thermal decarboxylation. Since thermal decarboxylation is associated with strong carbon isotope fractionation (ε = -34.6 ± 0.2‰) the reaction conditions were optimized to ensure full conversion. The combined isotope ratio of CF and CO₂ at the end of the reaction corresponded well to the isotope ratio of TCAA, confirming the reliability of the method. A method quantification limit (MQL) for TCAA of 18.6 µg/L was determined. Samples of TCAA produced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic chlorination of natural organic matter (NOM) and some industrially produced TCAA were used as exemplary sources. Significant different PSIA isotope ratios were observed between industrial TCAA and TCAA samples produced by chlorination of NOM. This highlights the potential of the method to study the origin and the fate of TCAA in the environment.

  14. Forensic Applications of Light-Element Stable Isotope Ratios of Ricinus communis Seeds and Ricin Preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; West, Jason B.; Ehleringer, James

    2013-01-01

    Seeds of the castor plant Ricinus communis, also known as castor beans, are of forensic interest because they are the source of the poison ricin. We have tested whether stable isotope ratios of castor seeds and ricin prepared by various methods can be used as a forensic signature. We collected over 300 castor seed samples from locations around the world and measured the C, N, O, and H stable isotope ratios of the whole seeds, oil, and three types of ricin preparations. Our results demonstrate that N isotope ratios can be used to correlate ricin prepared by any of these methods to source seeds. Further, stable isotope ratios distinguished >99% of crude and purified ricin protein samples in pair-wise comparison tests. Stable isotope ratios therefore constitute a valuable forensic signature for ricin preparations.

  15. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as 228 Ac, 214 Bi and 214 Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  16. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes, E-mail: gilberto.costa@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cgomes@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Controle de Rejeitos e Transporte de Materiais Radioativos

    2017-07-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as {sup 228}Ac, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  17. Five Guidelines for Selecting Hydrological Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, H. K.; Westerberg, I.; Branger, F.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological signatures are index values derived from observed or modeled series of hydrological data such as rainfall, flow or soil moisture. They are designed to extract relevant information about hydrological behavior, such as to identify dominant processes, and to determine the strength, speed and spatiotemporal variability of the rainfall-runoff response. Hydrological signatures play an important role in model evaluation. They allow us to test whether particular model structures or parameter sets accurately reproduce the runoff generation processes within the watershed of interest. Most modeling studies use a selection of different signatures to capture different aspects of the catchment response, for example evaluating overall flow distribution as well as high and low flow extremes and flow timing. Such studies often choose their own set of signatures, or may borrow subsets of signatures used in multiple other works. The link between signature values and hydrological processes is not always straightforward, leading to uncertainty and variability in hydrologists' signature choices. In this presentation, we aim to encourage a more rigorous approach to hydrological signature selection, which considers the ability of signatures to represent hydrological behavior and underlying processes for the catchment and application in question. To this end, we propose a set of guidelines for selecting hydrological signatures. We describe five criteria that any hydrological signature should conform to: Identifiability, Robustness, Consistency, Representativeness, and Discriminatory Power. We describe an example of the design process for a signature, assessing possible signature designs against the guidelines above. Due to their ubiquity, we chose a signature related to the Flow Duration Curve, selecting the FDC mid-section slope as a proposed signature to quantify catchment overall behavior and flashiness. We demonstrate how assessment against each guideline could be used to

  18. Iron isotope fractionation during pyrite formation in a sulfidic Precambrian ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Gault-Ringold, Melanie; George, Ejin; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2018-04-01

    The chemical response of the Precambrian oceans to rising atmospheric O2 levels remains controversial. The iron isotope signature of sedimentary pyrite is widely used to trace the microbial and redox states of the ocean, yet the iron isotope fractionation accompanying pyrite formation in nature is difficult to constrain due to the complexity of the pyrite formation process, difficulties in translating the iron isotope systematics of experimental studies to natural settings, and insufficient iron isotope datasets for natural euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) marine basins where pyrite formation occurs. Herein we demonstrate, that a large, permil-level shift in the isotope composition of dissolved iron occurs in the Black Sea euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. Specifically, iron removal to syngenetic pyrite gives rise to an iron isotope fractionation factor between Fe(II) and FeS2 of 2.75 permil (‰), the largest yet reported for reactions under natural conditions that do not involve iron redox chemistry. These iron isotope systematics offer the potential to generate permil-level shifts in the sedimentary pyrite iron isotope record due to partial drawdown of the oceanic iron inventory. The implication is that the iron stable isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrites may record fundamental regime shifts between pyrite formation under sulfur-limited conditions and pyrite formation under iron-limited conditions. To this end, the iron isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite may best represent the extent of euxinia in the past global ocean, rather than its oxygenation state. On this basis, the reinterpreted sedimentary pyrite Fe isotope record suggests a fundamental shift towards more sulfidic oceanic conditions coincident with the 'Great Oxidation Event' around 2.3 billion years ago. Importantly, this does not require the chemical state of the ocean to shift from mainly de-oxygenated to predominantly oxygenated in parallel with the permanent rise

  19. Multispectral dual isotope and NMR image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannier, M.W.; Beihn, R.M.; Butterfield, R.L.; De Land, F.H.

    1985-05-01

    Dual isotope scintigraphy and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging produce image data that is intrinsically multispectral. That is multiple images of the same anatomic region are generated with different gray scale distribution and morphologic content that is largely redundant. Image processing technology, originally developed by NASA for satellite imaging, is available for multispectral analysis. These methods have been applied to provide tissue characterization. Tissue specific information encoded in the grapy scale data from dual isotope and NMR studies may be extracted using multispectral pattern recognition methods. The authors used table lookup minimum distance, maximum likelihood and cluster analysis techniques with data sets from Ga-67 / Tc-99m, 1-131 labeled antibodies / Tc-99m, Tc-99m perfusion / Xe-133 ventilation, and NMR studies. The results show; tissue characteristic signatures exist in dual isotope and NMR imaging, and these spectral signatures are identifiable using multispectral image analysis and provide tissue classification maps with scatter diagrams that facilitate interpretation and assist in elucidating subtle changes.

  20. Use of stable isotopes of water (d and o-18) in hydrological studies in the Jonkershoek valley

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Midgley, JJ

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Stable isotopes of water in rainfall and streams in the Jonkershoek Valley were used to determine the relative contribution of new water (i.e. rain) during storm flow conditions. Significant differences between rain and stream isotopic signatures...

  1. The geographic distribution of strontium isotopes in Danish surface waters - A base for provenance studies in archaeology, hydrology and agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Karin Margarita; Frei, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper Sr isotope signatures are reported for 192 surface water (lakes/ponds and rivers/creeks) samples from within Denmark and an isotope distribution map is presented that may serve as a base for provenance applications, including archaeological migration studies, ground water – surface ...

  2. Motif signatures of transcribed enhancers

    KAUST Repository

    Kleftogiannis, Dimitrios

    2017-09-14

    In mammalian cells, transcribed enhancers (TrEn) play important roles in the initiation of gene expression and maintenance of gene expression levels in spatiotemporal manner. One of the most challenging questions in biology today is how the genomic characteristics of enhancers relate to enhancer activities. This is particularly critical, as several recent studies have linked enhancer sequence motifs to specific functional roles. To date, only a limited number of enhancer sequence characteristics have been investigated, leaving space for exploring the enhancers genomic code in a more systematic way. To address this problem, we developed a novel computational method, TELS, aimed at identifying predictive cell type/tissue specific motif signatures. We used TELS to compile a comprehensive catalog of motif signatures for all known TrEn identified by the FANTOM5 consortium across 112 human primary cells and tissues. Our results confirm that distinct cell type/tissue specific motif signatures characterize TrEn. These signatures allow discriminating successfully a) TrEn from random controls, proxy of non-enhancer activity, and b) cell type/tissue specific TrEn from enhancers expressed and transcribed in different cell types/tissues. TELS codes and datasets are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/TELS.

  3. Signature simulation of mixed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Tyler D.; Salvaggio, Carl

    2015-05-01

    Soil target signatures vary due to geometry, chemical composition, and scene radiometry. Although radiative transfer models and function-fit physical models may describe certain targets in limited depth, the ability to incorporate all three signature variables is difficult. This work describes a method to simulate the transient signatures of soil by first considering scene geometry synthetically created using 3D physics engines. Through the assignment of spectral data from the Nonconventional Exploitation Factors Data System (NEFDS), the synthetic scene is represented as a physical mixture of particles. Finally, first principles radiometry is modeled using the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model. With DIRSIG, radiometric and sensing conditions were systematically manipulated to produce and record goniometric signatures. The implementation of this virtual goniometer allows users to examine how a target bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) will change with geometry, composition, and illumination direction. By using 3D computer graphics models, this process does not require geometric assumptions that are native to many radiative transfer models. It delivers a discrete method to circumnavigate the significant cost of time and treasure associated with hardware-based goniometric data collections.

  4. Epigenetic Signatures of Cigarette Smoking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Joehanes (Roby); Just, A.C. (Allan C.); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); L.C. Pilling (Luke); L.M. Reynolds (Lindsay); Mandaviya, P.R. (Pooja R.); W. Guan (Weihua); Xu, T. (Tao); C.E. Elks (Cathy); Aslibekyan, S. (Stella); H. Moreno-Macías (Hortensia); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J. Brody (Jennifer); Dhingra, R. (Radhika); P. Yousefi (Paul); J.S. Pankow (James); Kunze, S. (Sonja); Shah, S.H. (Sonia H.); A.F. McRae (Allan F.); K. Lohman (Kurt); Sha, J. (Jin); D. Absher (Devin); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); Zhao, W. (Wei); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); J. Bressler (Jan); M.L. Grove (Megan); T. Huan (Tianxiao); C. Liu (Chunyu); Mendelson, M.M. (Michael M.); C. Yao (Chen); D.P. Kiel (Douglas P.); A. Peters (Annette); R. Wang-Sattler (Rui); P.M. Visscher (Peter); N.R. Wray (Naomi); J.M. Starr (John); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); Rodriguez, C.J. (Carlos J.); N.J. Wareham (Nick); Irvin, M.R. (Marguerite R.); Zhi, D. (Degui); M. Barrdahl (Myrto); P. Vineis (Paolo); Ambatipudi, S. (Srikant); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); Schwartz, J. (Joel); Colicino, E. (Elena); Hou, L. (Lifang); Vokonas, P.S. (Pantel S.); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Singleton (Andrew); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); S.T. Turner (Stephen); E.B. Ware (Erin B.); Smith, A.K. (Alicia K.); T. Klengel (Torsten); E.B. Binder (Elisabeth B.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K.D. Taylor (Kent); S.A. Gharib (Sina); Swenson, B.R. (Brenton R.); Liang, L. (Liming); D.L. Demeo (Dawn L.); G.T. O'Connor (George); Z. Herceg (Zdenko); Ressler, K.J. (Kerry J.); K.N. Conneely (Karen N.); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); Kardia, S.L.R. (Sharon L. R.); D. Melzer (David); A.A. Baccarelli (Andrea A.); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); I. Romieu (Isabelle); D.K. Arnett (Donna); Ong, K.K. (Ken K.); Y. Liu (YongMei); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); M. Fornage (Myriam); D. Levy (Daniel); S.J. London (Stephanie J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground-DNA methylation leaves a long-term signature of smoking exposure and is one potential mechanism by which tobacco exposure predisposes to adverse health outcomes, such as cancers, osteoporosis, lung, and cardiovascular disorders. Methods and Results-To comprehensively determine

  5. Signature Pedagogy in Theatre Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornetsky, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Critique in undergraduate theatre programs is at the heart of training actors at all levels. It is accepted as the signature pedagogy and is practiced in multiple ways. This essay defines critique and presents the case for why it is used as the single most important way that performers come to understand the language, values, and discourse of the…

  6. Galaxy interactions : The HI signature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sancisi, R; Barnes, JE; Sanders, DB

    1999-01-01

    HI observations are an excellent tool for investigating tidal interactions. Ongoing major and minor interactions which can lead to traumatic mergers or to accretion and the triggering of star formation, show distinct HI signatures. Interactions and mergers in the recent past can also be recognized

  7. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2014-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author)

  9. Stable isotope geochemistry: definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2015-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  10. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2012-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 89 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2008-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2009-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeolimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteroic waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 56 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2016-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author).

  14. Stable isotope geochemistry : definitions, terminology, measurement and some applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, K.

    2013-01-01

    In 1936, Alfred Nier produced the first precise measurement of isotope abundance ratios and his design still remains the basis of stable isotope mass spectrometry. With this gift from the physicists for routine measurement of isotope ratios, earth scientists began to explore the natural variations of isotopes. Thus began a new era in geoscience research with the hydrological cycle and marine palaeoclimatic research being the first topics to be investigated. Stable isotope measurements have been applied to many fundamental problems in geochemistry, petrology, and paleoclimatology, as well as related fields in archaeology, anthropology, physical chemistry, biology and forensic sciences. These applications can be broadly classified into four main types: 1. Thermometry: Formation temperatures of rock and mineral systems are determined on the basis of temperature-dependent fractionations of the isotopic ratios between two or more cogenetic phases. 2. Tracers: Reservoirs like the ocean, the mantle, meteoric waters and organic matter have distinct stable isotope signatures that can be used to trace the origin of rocks, fluids, contaminants etc. 3. Reaction mechanism: Distinctions can be made between diffusion and recrystallization, open and closed systems and bacterial and thermogenic processes. 4. Chemostratigraphy: Abrupt changes (excursions) in the stable isotope ratios of ocean sediments and certain terrestrial materials can be used as stratigraphic markers. (author). 91 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Silicon isotopes in angrites and volatile loss in planetesimals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Emily A; Moynier, Frédéric; Savage, Paul S; Badro, James; Barrat, Jean-Alix

    2014-12-02

    Inner solar system bodies, including the Earth, Moon, and asteroids, are depleted in volatile elements relative to chondrites. Hypotheses for this volatile element depletion include incomplete condensation from the solar nebula and volatile loss during energetic impacts. These processes are expected to each produce characteristic stable isotope signatures. However, processes of planetary differentiation may also modify the isotopic composition of geochemical reservoirs. Angrites are rare meteorites that crystallized only a few million years after calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions and exhibit extreme depletions in volatile elements relative to chondrites, making them ideal samples with which to study volatile element depletion in the early solar system. Here we present high-precision Si isotope data that show angrites are enriched in the heavy isotopes of Si relative to chondritic meteorites by 50-100 ppm/amu. Silicon is sufficiently volatile such that it may be isotopically fractionated during incomplete condensation or evaporative mass loss, but theoretical calculations and experimental results also predict isotope fractionation under specific conditions of metal-silicate differentiation. We show that the Si isotope composition of angrites cannot be explained by any plausible core formation scenario, but rather reflects isotope fractionation during impact-induced evaporation. Our results indicate planetesimals initially formed from volatile-rich material and were subsequently depleted in volatile elements during accretion.

  16. Isotopic insights into biological regulation of zinc in contaminated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanty, Richard B.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Wesner, Jeff S.; Walter, W. David; Schmidt, Travis S.; Podda, Francesca; De Giudici, G.; Stricker, Craig A.; Kraus, Johanna M.; Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Wolf, Ruth E.; Cidu, R.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic organisms use a variety of biogeochemical reactions to regulate essential and non-essential trace metals. Many of these mechanisms can lead to isotopic fractionation, thus measurement of metal isotopes may yield insights into the processes by which organisms respond to metal exposure. We illustrate these concepts with two case studies, one involving an intra- and the other an extra-cellular mechanism of Zn sequestration. In the first study, the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer was grown in the laboratory, and fed a diet of Zn-doped diatoms at Zn levels exceeding the requirements for normal mayfly life functions. The N. triangulifer larvae consumed the diatoms and retained their Zn isotopic signature. Upon metamorphosis, the subimago life stage lost Zn mass either in the exuvia or by excretion, and the Zn retained was isotopically enriched. Thus, Zn uptake is nonfractionating, but Zn regulation favors the lighter isotope. Thus the Zn remaining in the subimago was isotopically heavier. In the second study, Zn was adsorbed on the cell walls and exopolysaccharide secretions of cyanobacteria, which favored the heavier Zn isotope. Continued adsorption eventually resulted in nucleation and biomineralization of hydrozincite {Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6}. These case studies demonstrate the utility of Zn isotopes to provide insights into how aquatic insects respond to metal exposure.

  17. Role of stable isotope analyses in reconstructing past life-histories and the provenancing human skeletal remains: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehrawat Jagmahender Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the present scenario of use of stable isotopes (mainly δ13C, δ15N, δ18O, 87Sr to trace past life behaviours like breast feeding and weaning practices, the geographic origin, migration history, paleodiet and subsistence patterns of past populations from the chemical signatures of isotopes imprinted in human skeletal remains. This approach is based on the state that food-web isotopic signatures are seen in the human bones and teeth and such signatures can change parallely with a variety of biogeochemical processes. By measuring δ13C and δ15N isotopic values of subadult tissues of different ages, the level of breast milk ingestion at particular ages and the components of the complementary foods can be assessed. Strontium and oxygen isotopic analyses have been used for determining the geographic origins and reconstructing the way of life of past populations as these isotopes can map the isotopic outline of the area from where the person acquired water and food during initial lifetime. The isotopic values of strontium and oxygen values are considered specific to geographical areas and serve as reliable chemical signatures of migration history of past human populations (local or non-local to the site. Previous isotopic studies show that the subsistence patterns of the past human populations underwent extensive changes from nomadic to complete agricultural dependence strategies. The carbon and nitrogen isotopic values of local fauna of any archaeological site can be used to elucidate the prominence of freshwater resources in the diet of the past human populations found near the site. More extensive research covering isotopic descriptions of various prehistoric, historic and modern populations is needed to explore the role of stable isotope analysis for provenancing human skeletal remains and assessing human migration patterns/routes, geographic origins, paleodiet and subsistence practices of past populations.

  18. Use of lead isotopes to identify sources of metal and metalloid contaminants in atmospheric aerosol from mining operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Omar I; Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Rine, Kyle P; Sáez, A Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A

    2015-03-01

    Mining operations are a potential source of metal and metalloid contamination by atmospheric particulate generated from smelting activities, as well as from erosion of mine tailings. In this work, we show how lead isotopes can be used for source apportionment of metal and metalloid contaminants from the site of an active copper mine. Analysis of atmospheric aerosol shows two distinct isotopic signatures: one prevalent in fine particles (atmospheric dust. The results validate the use of lead isotope signatures for source apportionment of metal and metalloid contaminants transported by atmospheric particulate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Investigation of Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites and their Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jesper Christian

    variable degrees of processing in the disk that are potentially recorded in their detailed chemical and isotopic signatures. The substantial advances in analytical precision, mainly via the use of modern plasma source mass spectrometry (ICPMS) has allowed the detailed characterization of the formation...... and earliest evolution of the solar system through the chemical and isotopic study of meteorites. One area of cosmochemistry that has benefited from high-precision mass spectrometry is that of early solar system chronology. Several radioactive isotopes with short and long half-lives are known to have been...... in which our Sun formed. Moreover, the decay of these isotopes (e.g. 26Al (T½ 0.7 Myr) and 182Hf (T½ 8.9 Myr)) allows cosmochemists to probe their initial solar system abundances and the temporal evolution of solid formation in the protoplanetary disk. Hence, it is possible to establish a relative...

  20. Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, A., E-mail: anton.wallner@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights (Australia); Melber, K. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Merchel, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Ott, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Joh.-J.-Becherweg 27, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, VERA Laboratory, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-15

    Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of {sup 198}Pt/{sup 195}Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction.

  1. Stable platinum isotope measurements in presolar nanodiamonds by TEAMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.; Melber, K.; Merchel, S.; Ott, U.; Forstner, O.; Golser, R.; Kutschera, W.; Priller, A.; Steier, P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanodiamonds are stardust grains commonly found in primitive meteorites. They survived the formation of the solar system and kept their own individuality. Measurements of trace-element isotopic signatures in these grains will help understanding heavy element nucleosynthesis in massive stars and dust formation from their ejecta. We have continued previous attempts to search for stable Pt isotope anomalies in nanodiamonds via trace element accelerator mass spectrometry (TEAMS). The installation of a new injector beam line at the VERA facility allowed studying low traces of stable elements in different materials. Moreover, recent experiments showed that VERA provides the required measurement precision together with a low Pt machine background. Here, we observed for the first time an indication for enhancements of 198 Pt/ 195 Pt isotope ratios in two diamond residues prepared by different chemical separation techniques from the Allende meteorite. Variations in other isotopic ratios were within analytical uncertainty, and no anomaly was identified in a third diamond fraction.

  2. Online Signature Verification on MOBISIG Finger-Drawn Signature Corpus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Antal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present MOBISIG, a pseudosignature dataset containing finger-drawn signatures from 83 users captured with a capacitive touchscreen-based mobile device. The database was captured in three sessions resulting in 45 genuine signatures and 20 skilled forgeries for each user. The database was evaluated by two state-of-the-art methods: a function-based system using local features and a feature-based system using global features. Two types of equal error rate computations are performed: one using a global threshold and the other using user-specific thresholds. The lowest equal error rate was 0.01% against random forgeries and 5.81% against skilled forgeries using user-specific thresholds that were computed a posteriori. However, these equal error rates were significantly raised to 1.68% (random forgeries case and 14.31% (skilled forgeries case using global thresholds. The same evaluation protocol was performed on the DooDB publicly available dataset. Besides verification performance evaluations conducted on the two finger-drawn datasets, we evaluated the quality of the samples and the users of the two datasets using basic quality measures. The results show that finger-drawn signatures can be used by biometric systems with reasonable accuracy.

  3. Development and Applications of Thallium isotopes: a new proxy tracking the extent of manganese oxide burial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.; Ostrander, C.; Peterson, L. C.; Anbar, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) isotopes are a new and potential powerful paleoredox proxy with the possibility to track bottom water oxygen conditions based on the burial flux of manganese oxides. Thallium has a residence time of ~20 thousand years, which is long enough to render modern oxic seawater conservative with respect to concentration and isotopes. The isotopic signature of Tl in the global ocean is driven mainly by two outputs (1) adsorption onto manganese oxides and (2) low temperature oceanic crust alteration. Importantly, the isotopic inputs of Tl are all nearly the same value; thus, the isotopic composition and flux of the outputs almost exclusively set the seawater signature. For relatively short term redox events it is reasonable to assume that the dominant isotope fractionation process is associated with manganese oxide precipitation because low temperature alteration is controlled by long-term average ocean crust production rates. We present a broad range of modern samples that span several open ocean profiles combined with water column and sediment profiles from the permanently anoxic basins of the Black Sea and Cariaco Basins. The open ocean shows no variation in depth profiles that encompass most of the major water masses in the Atlantic and Southern Oceans. The anoxic basins, however, reveal Tl isotope signatures closer to their inputs, which is likely due to basinal restriction. The authigenic fraction of organic-rich sediments from the Black Sea and Cariaco Basin capture the Tl isotope value of the overlying water column, which shows that Tl isotopes could be applied as a faithful deep time redox proxy. For the first time, we will present new data showing that Tl isotopes is tracking bottom water ocean oxygenation. We are applying this isotope system to ancient samples, testing the spatial and temporal variability of ocean oxygenation coinciding with major biogeochemical events.

  4. TATP isotope ratios as influenced by worldwide acetone variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howa, John D; Barnette, Janet E; Chesson, Lesley A; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2018-05-01

    Isotope ratio analysis has been shown to discriminate samples of forensic interest and to link many synthesized and natural materials to their precursors when traditional chemical and physical analyses cannot. Successful application of stable isotope analysis to chemicals of interest requires a background of likely variations in stable isotope ratios; often, this background population can be generated from analysis of possible precursors and the relationships of stable isotopes of precursor(s) to product(s), which may depend on synthesis techniques. Here we measured the carbon ( 13 C/ 12 C) and hydrogen ( 2 H/ 1 H) isotope ratios of the oft-illicitly manufactured explosive triacetone triperoxide, TATP, and one of its precursors, acetone. As acetone is the sole source of carbon and hydrogen to TATP, a survey of acetone from 12 countries was conducted to explore the breadth of 13 C/ 12 C and 2 H/ 1 H variation in the precursor, and therefore, its product. Carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios were measured using continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) techniques. We observed greater ranges in both C and H isotope ratios of acetone than previously published; we also found that country-of-purchase was a large contributing factor to the observed variation, larger than acetone grade and brand. Following clandestine production methods, we observed that the stable isotope ratios of TATP retained the stable isotope signatures of acetone used in synthesis. We confirmed the robustness of TATP carbon isotope ratios to both recrystallization and time-dependent sublimation, important considerations when faced with the task of practical sampling of potential unexploded TATP from a crime scene. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Isotopically exchangeable phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, N.O.

    1984-01-01

    A critique revision of isotope dilution is presented. The concepts and use of exchangeable phosphorus, the phosphate adsorption, the kinetics of isotopic exchange and the equilibrium time in soils are discussed. (M.A.C.) [pt

  6. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE LAND SNAIL LIMICOLARIA KAMBEUL CHUDEAUI GERMAIN. IN THE ETHIOPIAN RIFT VALLEY: HABITAT, ECOLOGY AND. SHELL ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY. Melanie J. Lengl, Henry F. Lamb',. Mohammed Umer Mohammed''* and Elias Dadebo4. 'NERC Isotope Geosciences Laboratory, Keyworth, Nottingham, ...

  7. Biogeochemical signatures in the lichen Hypogymnia physodes in the mid Urals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, O.W.; Longden, J.; Shaw, G.; Chimonides, P.D.J.; Jeffries, T.E.; Jones, G.C.; Mikhailova, I.N.; Williamson, B.J.

    2006-01-01

    Multi-element content and uranium (U) isotopes were investigated in the lichen Hypogymnia physodes (native and transplants) sampled across a 60-km transect, centred on Karabash smelter town, from Turgoyak Lake (SW) to Kyshtym (NE) to investigate the origin of U. Kyshtym was the site of a major nuclear accident in 1957. 234 U/ 238 U activity ratios in native thalli sampled during July 2001 were within the natural isotopic ratio in minerals. Uranium/thorium (U/Th) ratios were higher in native thalli towards the NE (average 0.73) than those in the SW (average 0.57). Element signatures in native thalli and transplants suggest U was derived from fossil fuel combustion from Karabash and sources lying further to the east. Systematic and significant U enrichment indicative of a nuclear fuel cycle source was not detected in any sample. Element signatures in epiphytic lichen transplants and native thalli provide a powerful method to evaluate U deposition

  8. Optical isotope shifts for unstable samarium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Walker, P.M.; Griffith, J.A.R.; Evans, D.E.; Grant, I.S.; England, J.G.; Fawcett, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using a tunable dye laser beam intersecting a thermal atomic beam, optical isotope shifts and hyperfine splittings have been measured for the four unstable samarium isotopes between 144 Sm and 154 Sm, covering the well known transition region from spherical to deformed shapes. (orig.)

  9. Aphids alter host-plant nitrogen isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alex C. C.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.; Hurley, Katherine B.

    2011-01-01

    Plant sap-feeding insects and blood-feeding parasites are frequently depleted in 15N relative to their diet. Unfortunately, most fluid-feeder/host nitrogen stable-isotope studies simply report stable-isotope signatures, but few attempt to elucidate the mechanism of isotopic trophic depletion. Here we address this deficit by investigating the nitrogen stable-isotope dynamics of a fluid-feeding herbivore-host plant system: the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae, feeding on multiple brassicaceous host plants. M. persicae was consistently more than 6‰ depleted in 15N relative to their hosts, although aphid colonized plants were 1.5‰ to 2.0‰ enriched in 15N relative to uncolonized control plants. Isotopic depletion of aphids relative to hosts was strongly related to host nitrogen content. We tested whether the concomitant aphid 15N depletion and host 15N enrichment was coupled by isotopic mass balance and determined that aphid 15N depletion and host 15N enrichment are uncoupled processes. We hypothesized that colonized plants would have higher nitrate reductase activity than uncolonized plants because previous studies had demonstrated that high nitrate reductase activity under substrate-limiting conditions can result in increased plant δ15N values. Consistent with our hypothesis, nitrate reductase activity in colonized plants was twice that of uncolonized plants. This study offers two important insights that are likely applicable to understanding nitrogen dynamics in fluid-feeder/host systems. First, isotopic separation of aphid and host depends on nitrogen availability. Second, aphid colonization alters host nitrogen metabolism and subsequently host nitrogen stable-isotope signature. Notably, this work establishes a metabolic framework for future hypothesis-driven studies focused on aphid manipulation of host nitrogen metabolism. PMID:21646532

  10. Nonlinear control of magnetic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemoczynski, Bogdan

    Magnetic properties of ferrite structures are known to cause fluctuations in Earth's magnetic field around the object. These fluctuations are known as the object's magnetic signature and are unique based on the object's geometry and material. It is a common practice to neutralize magnetic signatures periodically after certain time intervals, however there is a growing interest to develop real time degaussing systems for various applications. Development of real time degaussing system is a challenging problem because of magnetic hysteresis and difficulties in measurement or estimation of near-field flux data. The goal of this research is to develop a real time feedback control system that can be used to minimize magnetic signatures for ferrite structures. Experimental work on controlling the magnetic signature of a cylindrical steel shell structure with a magnetic disturbance provided evidence that the control process substantially increased the interior magnetic flux. This means near field estimation using interior sensor data is likely to be inaccurate. Follow up numerical work for rectangular and cylindrical cross sections investigated variations in shell wall flux density under a variety of ambient excitation and applied disturbances. Results showed magnetic disturbances could corrupt interior sensor data and magnetic shielding due to the shell walls makes the interior very sensitive to noise. The magnetic flux inside the shell wall showed little variation due to inner disturbances and its high base value makes it less susceptible to noise. This research proceeds to describe a nonlinear controller to use the shell wall data as an input. A nonlinear plant model of magnetics is developed using a constant tau to represent domain rotation lag and a gain function k to describe the magnetic hysteresis curve for the shell wall. The model is justified by producing hysteresis curves for multiple materials, matching experimental data using a particle swarm algorithm, and

  11. Principles and limitations of stable isotopes in differentiating organic and conventional foodstuffs: 2. Animal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Caio T; Chalk, Phillip M

    2017-01-02

    In this review, we examine the variation in stable isotope signatures of the lighter elements (δ 2 H, δ 13 C, δ 15 N, δ 18 O, and δ 34 S) of tissues and excreta of domesticated animals, the factors affecting the isotopic composition of animal tissues, and whether stable isotopes may be used to differentiate organic and conventional modes of animal husbandry. The main factors affecting the δ 13 C signatures of livestock are the C3/C4 composition of the diet, the relative digestibility of the diet components, metabolic turnover, tissue and compound specificity, growth rate, and animal age. δ 15 N signatures of sheep and cattle products have been related mainly to diet signatures, which are quite variable among farms and between years. Although few data exist, a minor influence in δ 15 N signatures of animal products was attributed to N losses at the farm level, whereas stocking rate showed divergent findings. Correlations between mode of production and δ 2 H and δ 18 O have not been established, and only in one case of an animal product was δ 34 S a satisfactory marker for mode of production. While many data exist on diet-tissue isotopic discrimination values among domesticated animals, there is a paucity of data that allow a direct and statistically verifiable comparison of the differences in the isotopic signatures of organically and conventionally grown animal products. The few comparisons are confined to beef, milk, and egg yolk, with no data for swine or lamb products. δ 13 C appears to be the most promising isotopic marker to differentiate organic and conventional production systems when maize (C4) is present in the conventional animal diet. However, δ 13 C may be unsuitable under tropical conditions, where C4 grasses are abundant, and where grass-based husbandry is predominant in both conventional and organic systems. Presently, there is no universal analytical method that can be applied to differentiate organic and conventional animal products.

  12. Source tracing of natural organic matter bound mercury in boreal forest runoff with mercury stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Martin; Wiederhold, Jan G; Skyllberg, Ulf; Kronberg, Rose-Marie; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2017-10-18

    Terrestrial runoff represents a major source of mercury (Hg) to aquatic ecosystems. In boreal forest catchments, such as the one in northern Sweden studied here, mercury bound to natural organic matter (NOM) represents a large fraction of mercury in the runoff. We present a method to measure Hg stable isotope signatures of colloidal Hg, mainly complexed by high molecular weight or colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) in natural waters based on pre-enrichment by ultrafiltration, followed by freeze-drying and combustion. We report that Hg associated with high molecular weight NOM in the boreal forest runoff has very similar Hg isotope signatures as compared to the organic soil horizons of the catchment area. The mass-independent fractionation (MIF) signatures (Δ 199 Hg and Δ 200 Hg) measured in soils and runoff were in agreement with typical values reported for atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (Hg 0 ) and distinctly different from reported Hg isotope signatures in precipitation. We therefore suggest that most Hg in the boreal terrestrial ecosystem originated from the deposition of Hg 0 through foliar uptake rather than precipitation. Using a mixing model we calculated the contribution of soil horizons to the Hg in the runoff. At moderate to high flow runoff conditions, that prevailed during sampling, the uppermost part of the organic horizon (Oe/He) contributed 50-70% of the Hg in the runoff, while the underlying more humified organic Oa/Ha and the mineral soil horizons displayed a lower mobility of Hg. The good agreement of the Hg isotope results with other source tracing approaches using radiocarbon signatures and Hg : C ratios provides additional support for the strong coupling between Hg and NOM. The exploratory results from this study illustrate the potential of Hg stable isotopes to trace the source of Hg from atmospheric deposition through the terrestrial ecosystem to soil runoff, and provide a basis for more in-depth studies investigating the

  13. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  14. Estimating Niche Width Using Stable Isotopes in the Face of Habitat Variability: A Modelling Case Study in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David O.; Buhl, Jerome; Lee, Raymond W.; Simpson, Stephen J.; Holmes, Sebastian P.

    2012-01-01

    Distributions of stable isotopes have been used to infer an organism's trophic niche width, the ‘isotopic niche’, and examine resource partitioning. Spatial variation in the isotopic composition of prey may however confound the interpretation of isotopic signatures especially when foragers exploit resources across numerous locations. In this study the isotopic compositions from marine assemblages are modelled to determine the role of variation in the signature of prey items and the effect of dietary breadth and foraging strategies on predator signatures. Outputs from the models reveal that isotopic niche widths can be greater for populations of dietary specialists rather than for generalists, which contravenes what is generally accepted in the literature. When a range of different mixing models are applied to determine if the conversion from δ to p-space can be used to improve model accuracy, predator signature variation is increased rather than model precision. Furthermore the mixing models applied failed to correctly identify dietary specialists and/or to accurately estimate diet contributions that may identify resource partitioning. The results presented illustrate the need to collect sufficiently large sample sizes, in excess of what is collected under most current studies, across the complete distribution of a species and its prey, before attempts to use stable isotopes to make inferences about niche width can be made. PMID:22876280

  15. Water isotope partitioning and ecohydrologic separation in mixed conifer forest explored with a centrifugation water extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, W.; Mercer, J.; Pleasants, M.; Williams, D. G.

    2017-12-01

    Isotopic partitioning of water within soil into tightly and loosely bound fractions has been proposed to explain differences between isotopic water sources used by plants and those that contribute to streams and ground water, the basis for the "two water worlds" hypothesis. We examined the isotope ratio values of water in trees, bulk soil, mobile water collected from soil lysimeters, stream water, and GW at three different hillslopes in a mixed conifer forest in southeastern Wyoming, USA. Hillslopes differed in aspect and topographic position with corresponding differences in surface energy balance, snowmelt timing, and duration of soil moisture during the dry summer. The isotopic results support the partitioning of water within the soil; trees apparently used a different pool of water for transpiration than that recovered from soil lysimeters and the source was not resolved with the isotopic signature of the water that was extracted from bulk soil via cryogenic vacuum distillation. Separating and measuring the isotope ratios values in these pools would test the assumption that the tightly bound water within the soil has the same isotopic signature as the water transpired by the trees. We employed a centrifugation approach to separate water within the soil held at different tensions by applying stepwise increases in rotational velocity and pressures to the bulk soil samples. Effluent and the remaining water (cryogenically extracted) at each step were compared. We first applied the centrifugation method in a simple lab experiment using sandy loam soil and separate introductions of two isotopically distinct waters. We then applied the method to soil collected from the montane hillslopes. For the lab experiment, we predicted that effluents would have distinct isotopic signatures, with the last effluent and extracted water more closely representing the isotopic signature of the first water applied. For our field samples, we predicted that the isotopic signature of the

  16. Time Series Based for Online Signature Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Gede Darma Putra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Signature verification system is to match the tested signature with a claimed signature. This paper proposes time series based for feature extraction method and dynamic time warping for match method. The system made by process of testing 900 signatures belong to 50 participants, 3 signatures for reference and 5 signatures from original user, simple imposters and trained imposters for signatures test. The final result system was tested with 50 participants with 3 references. This test obtained that system accuracy without imposters is 90,44897959% at threshold 44 with rejection errors (FNMR is 5,2% and acceptance errors (FMR is 4,35102%, when with imposters system accuracy is 80,1361% at threshold 27 with error rejection (FNMR is 15,6% and acceptance errors (average FMR is 4,263946%, with details as follows: acceptance errors is 0,391837%, acceptance errors simple imposters is 3,2% and acceptance errors trained imposters is 9,2%.

  17. Spectral signature selection for mapping unvegetated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, G. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data covering the wavelength interval from 0.40-2.60 microns were collected at an altitude of 1000 m above the terrain in southeastern Pennsylvania. Uniform training areas were selected within three sites from this flightline. Soil samples were collected from each site and a procedure developed to allow assignment of scan line and element number from the multispectral scanner data to each sampling location. These soil samples were analyzed on a spectrophotometer and laboratory spectral signatures were derived. After correcting for solar radiation and atmospheric attenuation, the laboratory signatures were compared to the spectral signatures derived from these same soils using multispectral scanner data. Both signatures were used in supervised and unsupervised classification routines. Computer-generated maps using the laboratory and multispectral scanner derived signatures resulted in maps that were similar to maps resulting from field surveys. Approximately 90% agreement was obtained between classification maps produced using multispectral scanner derived signatures and laboratory derived signatures.

  18. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  19. Stable isotope evidence of long-term changes in North Sea food web structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2008-01-01

    coast. Porpoises collected after ~1960 had significantly lower d15N than porpoises collected earlier. This change in d15N implies that fundamental changes in food web structure in, or nutrient availability to, the North Sea have taken place over the last ~150 yr and that most of the change occurred over...... reported here may be a reflection of a change in the isotope signature of nitrogen entering the food web. Regardless of its underlying cause, the recorded change in isotopic signature in harbour porpoises is noteworthy as it represents the first fisheries-independent documentation of a long-term temporal...

  20. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  1. Secondary hydrogen isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melander, L.; Sonders, U.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary isotope effects can be produced by isotopes of elements heavier than hydrogen, but secondary isotope effects of hydrogen are of greater interest, because they are larger and can be measured easier. Such aspects of the problem as solvolytic reactions (in the case of α-position and β-position in organic compounds), reactions of compounds with deuterium remoted from reaction centre, with deuterium in nonsaturated compounds, participation of neighbouring groups in the reaction, are considered. Besides, steric isotope effects and inductive isotope effects are considered

  2. Applications of stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letolle, R.; Mariotti, A.; Bariac, T.

    1991-06-01

    This report reviews the historical background and the properties of stable isotopes, the methods used for their measurement (mass spectrometry and others), the present technics for isotope enrichment and separation, and at last the various present and foreseeable application (in nuclear energy, physical and chemical research, materials industry and research; tracing in industrial, medical and agronomical tests; the use of natural isotope variations for environmental studies, agronomy, natural resources appraising: water, minerals, energy). Some new possibilities in the use of stable isotope are offered. A last chapter gives the present state and forecast development of stable isotope uses in France and Europe

  3. Can Biomass Burning Explain Isotopically Light Fe in Marine Aerosols?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, A. M.; Anbar, A. D.; Herckes, P.; Romaniello, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) is an important micronutrient that limits primary productivity in large parts of the ocean. In these regions, atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of Fe to the surface ocean and thus has a critical impact on ocean biogeochemistry. Fe-bearing aerosols originate from many sources with potentially distinct Fe isotopic compositions. Consequently, Fe isotopes may provide a new tool to trace the sources of aerosol Fe to the oceans. Mead et al. (2013) first discovered that Fe in the fine fraction of Bermuda aerosols is often isotopically lighter than Fe from known anthropogenic and crustal sources. 1 These authors suggested that this light isotopic signature was likely the result of biomass burning, since Fe in plants is the only known source of isotopically light Fe. More recently, Conway et al. found that Fe in the soluble fraction of aerosols collected during 2010-2011 North Atlantic GEOTRACES cruises also showed light isotope values, which they likewise attributed to biomass burning.2 These studies are further supported by new modeling work which suggests that biomass burning aerosols should contribute significant amounts of soluble Fe to tropical and southern oceans.3To test if biomass burning releases aerosols with a light Fe isotope composition, we are conducting lab-scale biomass burning experiments using natural samples of vegetation and leaf litter. Burn aerosols were collected on cellulose filters, then digested and analyzed for trace metal concentrations using inductively-coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Fe isotopes were determined by using multiple collector ICP-MS following separation and purification of Fe using anion exchange chromatography. We will discuss metal concentration and isotope data from these experiments with implications for the interpretation of Fe isotope signals in aerosol samples. 1Mead, C et al. GRL, 2013, 40, 5722-5727. 2 Conway, T et al. Goldschmidt Abs 2015 593. 3Ito, A. ES&T Lett, 2015, 2, 70-75.

  4. A quantum cascade laser infrared spectrometer for CO2 stable isotope analysis: Field implementation at a hydrocarbon contaminated site under bio-remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimbaud, Christophe; Noel, Cécile; Chartier, Michel; Catoire, Valéry; Blessing, Michaela; Gourry, Jean Christophe; Robert, Claude

    2016-02-01

    Real-time methods to monitor stable isotope ratios of CO2 are needed to identify biogeochemical origins of CO2 emissions from the soil-air interface. An isotope ratio infra-red spectrometer (IRIS) has been developed to measure CO2 mixing ratio with δ(13)C isotopic signature, in addition to mixing ratios of other greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O). The original aspects of the instrument as well as its precision and accuracy for the determination of the isotopic signature δ(13)C of CO2 are discussed. A first application to biodegradation of hydrocarbons is presented, tested on a hydrocarbon contaminated site under aerobic bio-treatment. CO2 flux measurements using closed chamber method is combined with the determination of the isotopic signature δ(13)C of the CO2 emission to propose a non-intrusive method to monitor in situ biodegradation of hydrocarbons. In the contaminated area, high CO2 emissions have been measured with an isotopic signature δ(13)C suggesting that CO2 comes from petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation. This first field implementation shows that rapid and accurate measurement of isotopic signature of CO2 emissions is particularly useful in assessing the contribution of contaminant degradation to the measured CO2 efflux and is promising as a monitoring tool for aerobic bio-treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Isotopic constraints on global atmospheric methane sources and sinks: a critical assessment of recent findings and new data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwietzke, S.; Sherwood, O.; Michel, S. E.; Bruhwiler, L.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Tans, P. P.

    2017-12-01

    Methane isotopic data have increasingly been used in recent studies to help constrain global atmospheric methane sources and sinks. The added scientific contributions to this field include (i) careful comparisons and merging of atmospheric isotope measurement datasets to increase spatial coverage, (ii) in-depth analyses of observed isotopic spatial gradients and seasonal patterns, and (iii) improved datasets of isotopic source signatures. Different interpretations have been made regarding the utility of the isotopic data on the diagnosis of methane sources and sinks. Some studies have found isotopic evidence of a largely microbial source causing the renewed growth in global atmospheric methane since 2007, and underestimated global fossil fuel methane emissions compared to most previous studies. However, other studies have challenged these conclusions by pointing out substantial spatial variability in isotopic source signatures as well as open questions in atmospheric sinks and biomass burning trends. This presentation will review and contrast the main arguments and evidence for the different conclusions. The analysis will distinguish among the different research objectives including (i) global methane budget source attribution in steady-state, (ii) source attribution of recent global methane trends, and (iii) identifying specific methane sources in individual plumes during field campaigns. Additional comparisons of model experiments with atmospheric measurements and updates on isotopic source signature data will complement the analysis.

  6. Stable isotopes in juvenile marine fishes and their invertebrate prey from the Thames Estuary, UK, and adjacent coastal regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leakey, Chris D. B.; Attrill, Martin J.; Jennings, Simon; Fitzsimons, Mark F.

    2008-04-01

    Estuaries are regarded as valuable nursery habitats for many commercially important marine fishes, potentially providing a thermal resource, refuge from predators and a source of abundant prey. Stable isotope analysis may be used to assess relative resource use from isotopically distinct sources. This study comprised two major components: (1) development of a spatial map and discriminant function model of stable isotope variation in selected invertebrate groups inhabiting the Thames Estuary and adjacent coastal regions; and (2) analysis of stable isotope signatures of juvenile bass ( Dicentrarchus labrax), sole ( Solea solea) and whiting ( Merlangius merlangus) for assessment of resource use and feeding strategies. The data were also used to consider anthropogenic enrichment of the estuary and potential energetic benefits of feeding in estuarine nursery habitat. Analysis of carbon (δ 13C), nitrogen (δ 15N) and sulphur (δ 34S) isotope data identified significant differences in the 'baseline' isotopic signatures between estuarine and coastal invertebrates, and discriminant function analysis allowed samples to be re-classified to estuarine and coastal regions with 98.8% accuracy. Using invertebrate signatures as source indicators, stable isotope data classified juvenile fishes to the region in which they fed. Feeding signals appear to reflect physiological (freshwater tolerance) and functional (mobility) differences between species. Juvenile sole were found to exist as two isotopically-discrete sub-populations, with no evidence of mixing between the two. An apparent energetic benefit of estuarine feeding was only found for sole.

  7. Metabolic signatures of bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Morgan, Martin T; Fiedler, Tina L; Djukovic, Danijel; Hoffman, Noah G; Raftery, Daniel; Marrazzo, Jeanne M; Fredricks, David N

    2015-04-14

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is characterized by shifts in the vaginal microbiota from Lactobacillus dominant to a microbiota with diverse anaerobic bacteria. Few studies have linked specific metabolites with bacteria found in the human vagina. Here, we report dramatic differences in metabolite compositions and concentrations associated with BV using a global metabolomics approach. We further validated important metabolites using samples from a second cohort of women and a different platform to measure metabolites. In the primary study, we compared metabolite profiles in cervicovaginal lavage fluid from 40 women with BV and 20 women without BV. Vaginal bacterial representation was determined using broad-range PCR with pyrosequencing and concentrations of bacteria by quantitative PCR. We detected 279 named biochemicals; levels of 62% of metabolites were significantly different in women with BV. Unsupervised clustering of metabolites separated women with and without BV. Women with BV have metabolite profiles marked by lower concentrations of amino acids and dipeptides, concomitant with higher levels of amino acid catabolites and polyamines. Higher levels of the signaling eicosanoid 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), a biomarker for inflammation, were noted in BV. Lactobacillus crispatus and Lactobacillus jensenii exhibited similar metabolite correlation patterns, which were distinct from correlation patterns exhibited by BV-associated bacteria. Several metabolites were significantly associated with clinical signs and symptoms (Amsel criteria) used to diagnose BV, and no metabolite was associated with all four clinical criteria. BV has strong metabolic signatures across multiple metabolic pathways, and these signatures are associated with the presence and concentrations of particular bacteria. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common but highly enigmatic condition that is associated with adverse outcomes for women and their neonates. Small molecule metabolites in the

  8. Degradation and Isotope Source Tracking of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Joshi, Sunendra R; Jaisi, Deb P

    2016-01-27

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine], an active ingredient of the herbicide Roundup, and its main metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), have been frequently reported to be present in soils and other environments and thus have heightened public concerns on their potential adverse effects. Understanding the fate of these compounds and differentiating them from other naturally occurring compounds require a toolbox of methods that can go beyond conventional methods. Here, we applied individual isotope labeling technique whereby each compound or mineral involved in the glyphosate and AMPA degradation reaction was either synthesized or chosen to have distinct (18)O/(16)O ratios so that the source of incorporated oxygen in the orthophosphate generated and corresponding isotope effect during C-P bond cleavage could be identified. Furthermore, we measured original isotope signatures of a few commercial glyphosate sources to identify their source-specific isotope signatures. Our degradation kinetics results showed that the rate of glyphosate degradation was higher than that of AMPA in all experimental conditions, and both the rate and extent of degradation were lowest under anoxic conditions. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)OP) of orthophosphate generated from glyphosate and AMPA degradation suggested that one external oxygen atom from ambient water, not from dissolved oxygen or mineral, was incorporated into orthophosphate with the other three oxygen atoms inherited from the parent molecule. Interestingly, δ(18)OP values of all commercial glyphosate products studied were found to be the lightest among all orthophosphates known so far. Furthermore, isotope composition was found to be unaffected due to variable degradation kinetics, light/dark, and oxic/anoxic conditions. These results highlight the importance of phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a nonconventional tool to potentially distinguish glyphosate sources and products from other organophosphorus compounds

  9. The isotopic fingerprint of the pre-industrial and the anthropogenic N2O source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Röckmann

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We have performed high-precision measurements of the 18O and position dependent 15N isotopic composition of N2O from Antarctic firn air samples. By comparing these data to simulations carried out with a firn air diffusion model, we have reconstructed the temporal evolution of the N2O isotope signatures since pre-industrial times. The heavy isotope content of atmospheric N2O is presently decreasing for all signatures at rates of about -0.038 %o yr -1 for 1d15N, -0.046 %o yr -1 for 2d 15N and -0.025 %o yr -1 for d18O. The total decrease since pre-industrial times is estimated to be about -1.8%o for 1d15N at both positions and -2.2%o for 2d15N. Isotope budget calculations using these trends and recent stratospheric measurements allow to isotopically characterize the present and the pre-industrial global average N2O source, as well as the additional N2O emissions that have caused the global N2O increase since pre-industrial times. The increased fluxes from the depleted surface sources alone are insufficient to explain the inferred temporal isotope changes. In addition, the global average N2O source signature is calculated to be significantly depleted today relative to the pre-industrial value, in agreement with recent indications from soil emission measurements.

  10. Isotopic variability of cave bears (δ15N, δ13C) across Europe during MIS 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcarz, Magdalena; Pacher, Martina; Krajcarz, Maciej T.; Laughlan, Lana; Rabeder, Gernot; Sabol, Martin; Wojtal, Piotr; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, the organic fraction of bone, records the isotopic parameters of consumed food for carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). This relationship of isotopic signature between diet and tissue is an important tool for the study of dietary preferences of modern and fossil animal species. Since the first information on the isotopic signature of cave bear was reported, numerous data from Europe have become available. The goal of this work is to track the geographical variation of cave bear collagen isotopic values in Europe during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (about 60,000-25,000 yr BP). In this study the results of new δ13C and δ15N isotopic analyses of cave bear collagen from four Central-Eastern European sites are presented, as well as a review of all published isotopic data for cave bears of the same period. The main conclusion is a lack of geographical East-West pattern in the variations of δ13C and δ15N values of cave bear collagen. Moreover, no relationship was found between cave bear taxonomy and isotopic composition. The cave bears from Central-Eastern Europe exhibit δ13C and δ15N values near the average of the range of Central, Western and Southern European cave bears. Despite the fact that most cave bear sites follow an altitudinal gradient, separate groups of sites exhibit shift in absolute values of δ13C, what disturbs an altitude-related isotopic pattern. The most distinct groups are: high Alpine sites situated over 1500 m a.s.l. - in terms of δ13C; and two Romanian sites Peştera cu Oase and Urşilor - in case of δ15N. Although the cave bear isotopic signature is driven by altitude, the altitudinal adjustment of isotopic data is not enough to explain the isotopic dissimilarity of these cave bears. The unusually high δ15N signature of mentioned Romanian sites is an isolated case in Europe. Cave bears from relatively closely situated Central-Eastern European sites and other Romanian sites are more similar to Western European than to Romanian

  11. Tracking nitrous oxide emission processes at a suburban site with semicontinuous, in situ measurements of isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Eliza; Henne, Stephan; Hüglin, Christoph; Zellweger, Christoph; Tuzson, Béla; Ibraim, Erkan; Emmenegger, Lukas; Mohn, Joachim

    2017-02-01

    The isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) was measured semicontinuously, at ˜35 min frequency in intermittent periods of 1-6 days over one and a half years, using preconcentration coupled to a quantum cascade laser spectrometer at the suburban site of Dübendorf, Switzerland. The achieved measurement repeatability was 0.08‰, 0.11‰, and 0.10‰ for δ18O, site preference, and δ15Nbulk respectively, which is better than or equal to standard flask sampling-based isotope ratio mass spectrometry performance. The observed mean diurnal cycle reflected the buildup of N2O from isotopically light sources on an isotopically heavy tropospheric background. The measurements were used to determine the source isotopic composition, which varied significantly compared to chemical and meteorological parameters monitored at the site. FLEXPART-COSMO transport modeling in combination with modified Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research inventory emissions was used to model N2O mole fractions at the site. Additionally, isotopic signatures were estimated for different source categories using literature data and used to simulate N2O isotopic composition over the measurement period. The model was able to capture variability in N2O mole fraction well, but simulations of isotopic composition showed little agreement with observations. In particular, measured source isotopic composition exhibited one magnitude larger variability than simulated, clearly indicating that the range of isotopic source signatures estimated from literature significantly underestimates true variability of source signatures. Source δ18O signature was found to be the most sensitive tracer for urban/industry versus agricultural N2O. δ15Nbulk and site preference may provide more insight into microbial and chemical emission processes than partitioning of anthropogenic source categories.

  12. Characterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement and interpretation of the isotopic signal of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary E. Kayler; Elizabeth W. Sulzman; William D. Rugh; Alan C. Mix; Barbara J. Bond

    2010-01-01

    By measuring the isotopic signature of soil respiration, we seek to learn the isotopic composition of the carbon respired in the soil (δ13CR-S) so that we may draw inferences about ecosystem processes. Requisite to this goal is the need to understand how (δ13CR-S) is affected by...

  13. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2015-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet, and infrared spectra, as well as other properties, of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. Quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication have been employed to optimize molecular geometries, compute unscaled vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase species. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A full statistical analysis and reliability assessment of computational results is currently underway. A comparison of theoretical results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess any affects of functional choice and basis set on calculation accuracy. The status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, DoD HPCMP, and USMA.

  14. Isotope enrichment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spevak, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    This invention provides a system in which both phases of the countercurrent contact isotope exchange concentration process are recycled continuously and an isotope depleted liquid phase substance thereof has its prior content of the desired isotope of hydrogen and/or oxygen replenished in an isotope regenerator by direct contact isotope exchange with a flow of steam from a source external to the concentrating process, whereby such replenished liquid serves as the feed liquid for the concentration process. As the supply of steam is gaseous, all problems incident to mineral solids in solution in liquid water are eliminated. As the elevated temperature corresponds to that of the steam, the isotope replenishment of the process feed liquid may be conducted without materially altering the characteristics of the steam for use as an energy source in any system

  15. Process for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emile, B.F.M.

    1983-11-01

    A process is claimed for isotopic separation applied to isotopes of elements that can be placed in at least a physicochemical form in which the isotopic atoms or the molecules containing these atoms can be easily displaced and for which there are selective radiations preferentially absorbed by the isotopes of a certain type or by the molecules containing them, said absorption substantially increasing the probability of ionization of said atoms or molecules relative to the atoms or molecules that did not absorb the radiation. The process consists of placing the isotopic mixture in such a form, subjecting it in a separation zone to selective radiations and to an electrical field that produces migration of positive ions toward the negative electrodes and negative ions toward the positive electrodes, and withdrawing from certain such zones the fractions thus enriched in certain isotopes

  16. Intrusion signature creation via clustering anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Gilbert R.; Yang, Shanchieh J.

    2008-03-01

    Current practices for combating cyber attacks typically use Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) to detect and block multistage attacks. Because of the speed and impacts of new types of cyber attacks, current IDSs are limited in providing accurate detection while reliably adapting to new attacks. In signature-based IDS systems, this limitation is made apparent by the latency from day zero of an attack to the creation of an appropriate signature. This work hypothesizes that this latency can be shortened by creating signatures via anomaly-based algorithms. A hybrid supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithm is proposed for new signature creation. These new signatures created in real-time would take effect immediately, ideally detecting new attacks. This work first investigates a modified density-based clustering algorithm as an IDS, with its strengths and weaknesses identified. A signature creation algorithm leveraging the summarizing abilities of clustering is investigated. Lessons learned from the supervised signature creation are then leveraged for the development of unsupervised real-time signature classification. Automating signature creation and classification via clustering is demonstrated as satisfactory but with limitations.

  17. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge...

  18. On reliable discovery of molecular signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkegren Johan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular signatures are sets of genes, proteins, genetic variants or other variables that can be used as markers for a particular phenotype. Reliable signature discovery methods could yield valuable insight into cell biology and mechanisms of human disease. However, it is currently not clear how to control error rates such as the false discovery rate (FDR in signature discovery. Moreover, signatures for cancer gene expression have been shown to be unstable, that is, difficult to replicate in independent studies, casting doubts on their reliability. Results We demonstrate that with modern prediction methods, signatures that yield accurate predictions may still have a high FDR. Further, we show that even signatures with low FDR may fail to replicate in independent studies due to limited statistical power. Thus, neither stability nor predictive accuracy are relevant when FDR control is the primary goal. We therefore develop a general statistical hypothesis testing framework that for the first time provides FDR control for signature discovery. Our method is demonstrated to be correct in simulation studies. When applied to five cancer data sets, the method was able to discover molecular signatures with 5% FDR in three cases, while two data sets yielded no significant findings. Conclusion Our approach enables reliable discovery of molecular signatures from genome-wide data with current sample sizes. The statistical framework developed herein is potentially applicable to a wide range of prediction problems in bioinformatics.

  19. An Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme without Entanglement"*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hui-Ran; Luo Ming-Xing; Peng Dai-Yuan; Wang Xiao-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Several quantum signature schemes are recently proposed to realize secure signatures of quantum or classical messages. Arbitrated quantum signature as one nontrivial scheme has attracted great interests because of its usefulness and efficiency. Unfortunately, previous schemes cannot against Trojan horse attack and DoS attack and lack of the unforgeability and the non-repudiation. In this paper, we propose an improved arbitrated quantum signature to address these secure issues with the honesty arbitrator. Our scheme takes use of qubit states not entanglements. More importantly, the qubit scheme can achieve the unforgeability and the non-repudiation. Our scheme is also secure for other known quantum attacks . (paper)

  20. An Arbitrated Quantum Signature Scheme without Entanglement*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Ran; Luo, Ming-Xing; Peng, Dai-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Jun

    2017-09-01

    Several quantum signature schemes are recently proposed to realize secure signatures of quantum or classical messages. Arbitrated quantum signature as one nontrivial scheme has attracted great interests because of its usefulness and efficiency. Unfortunately, previous schemes cannot against Trojan horse attack and DoS attack and lack of the unforgeability and the non-repudiation. In this paper, we propose an improved arbitrated quantum signature to address these secure issues with the honesty arbitrator. Our scheme takes use of qubit states not entanglements. More importantly, the qubit scheme can achieve the unforgeability and the non-repudiation. Our scheme is also secure for other known quantum attacks.

  1. Individual-specific transgenerational marking of fish populations based on a barium dual-isotope procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelga-Suarez, Gonzalo; Moldovan, Mariella; Garcia-Valiente, America; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva; Alonso, J Ignacio Garcia

    2012-01-03

    The present study focuses on the development and evaluation of an individual-specific transgenerational marking procedure using two enriched barium isotopes, (135)Ba and (137)Ba, mixed at a given and selectable molar ratio. The method is based on the deconvolution of the isotope patterns found in the sample into four molar contribution factors: natural xenon (Xe nat), natural barium (Ba nat), Ba135, and Ba137. The ratio of molar contributions between Ba137 and Ba135 is constant and independent of the contribution of natural barium in the sample. This procedure was tested in brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) kept in captivity. Trout were injected with three different Ba137/Ba135 isotopic signatures ca. 7 months and 7 days before spawning to compare the efficiency of the marking procedure at long and short term, respectively. The barium isotopic profiles were measured in the offspring by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Each of the three different isotopic signatures was unequivocally identified in the offspring in both whole eggs and larvae. For 9 month old offspring, the characteristic barium isotope signatures could also be detected in the otoliths even in the presence of a high and variable amount of barium of natural isotope abundance. In conclusion, it can be stated that the proposed dual-isotope marking is inheritable and can be detected after both long-term and short-term marking. Furthermore, the dual-isotope marking can be made individual-specific, so that it allows identification of offspring from a single individual or a group of individuals within a given fish group. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. In one embodiment, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by selective dissociation of said excited molecules by the absorption of a single photon of visible or ultraviolet light. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 11 Claims, 2 Drawing Figures

  3. Using pattern classification and nuclear forensic signatures to link UOC to source rocks and purification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.; Robel, M.; Borg, M.; Hutcheon, I.; Kristo, M.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is a scientific discipline interfacing law enforcement, nuclear science and nonproliferation. Information on the history and on the potential origin of unknown nuclear material can be obtained through nuclear forensic analysis. Using commonly available techniques of mass spectrometry, microscopy and x-ray diffraction, we have gained insight into the processing and origin of a suite of uranium ore concentrate (UOC) samples. We have applied chemometric techniques to investigate the relationships between uranium ore deposits and UOC samples in order to identify chemical and isotopic signatures of nuclear forensic importance. We developed multivariate signatures based on elemental concentrations and isotope ratios using a database of characteristics of UOC originating throughout the world. By introducing detailed and specific information about the source rock geology for each sample, we improved our understanding of the preservation of forensic signatures in UOC. Improved characterization of sample processing and provenance allows us to begin to assess the statistical significance of different groupings of samples and identify underlying patterns. Initial results indicate the concentration of uranium in the ore body, the geochemical conditions associated with uranium emplacement, and host rock petrogenesis exert controlling influences on the impurities preserved in UOC. Specific ore processing techniques, particularly those related to In-Situ Recovery, are also reflected in UOC impurity signatures. Stable and radiogenic isotope geochemistry can be used in conjunction with rare earth element patterns and other characteristics to link UOCs to specific geologic deposits of origin. We will present a number of case studies illustrating the ways in which nuclear forensic analysis can provide insight into the ore geology and production and purification processes used to produce UOC. (author)

  4. Non-traditional Stable Isotope Systematics of Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, O. J.

    2009-05-01

    Seafloor hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridges is one of the fundamental processes controlling the chemistry of the oceans and the altered oceanic crust. Past studies have demonstrated the complexity and diversity of seafloor hydrothermal systems and have highlighted the importance of subsurface environments in controlling the composition of hydrothermal fluids and mineralization types. Traditionally, the behavior of metals in seafloor hydrothermal systems have been investigated by integrating results from laboratory studies, theoretical models, mineralogy and fluid and mineral chemistry. Isotope ratios of various metals and metalloids, such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd and Sb have recently provided new approaches for the study of seafloor hydrothermal systems. Despite these initial investigations, the cause of the isotopic variability of these elements remains poorly constrained. We have little understanding of the isotope variations between vent types (black or white smokers) as well as the influence of source rock composition (basalt, felsic or ultrabasic rocks) and alteration types. Here, I will review and present new results of metal isotope systematics of seafloor hydrothermal systems, in particular: (1) determination of empirical isotope fractionation factors for Zn, Fe and Cu-isotopes through isotopic analysis of mono-mineralic sulfide grains lining the internal chimney wall in contact with hydrothermal fluid; (2) comparison of Fe- and Cu-isotope signatures of vent fluids from mid- oceanic and back-arc hydrothermal fields, spanning wide ranges of pH, temperature, metal concentrations and contributions of magmatic fluids enriched in SO2. Ultimately, the use of complementary non-traditional stable isotope systems may help identify and constrain the complex interactions between fluids,minerals, and organisms in seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  5. Stable Isotope Mapping of Alaskan Grasses and Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, A. L.; Wooller, M. J.

    2008-12-01

    The spatial variation of isotope signatures in organic material is a useful forensic tool, particularly when applied to the task of tracking the production and distribution of plant-derived illicit drugs. In order to identify the likely grow-locations of drugs such as marijuana from unknown locations (i.e., confiscated during trafficking), base isotope maps are needed that include measurements of plants from known grow-locations. This task is logistically challenging in remote, large regions such as Alaska. We are therefore investigating the potential of supplementing our base (marijuana) isotope maps with data derived from other plants from known locations and with greater spatial coverage in Alaska. These currently include >150 samples of modern C3 grasses (Poaceae) as well as marijuana samples (n = 18) from known grow-locations across the state. We conducted oxygen, carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analyses of marijuana and grasses (Poaceae). Poaceae samples were obtained from the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Museum of the North herbarium collection, originally collected by field botanists from around Alaska. Results indicate that the oxygen isotopic composition of these grasses range from 10‰ to 30‰, and broadly mirror the spatial pattern of water isotopes in Alaska. Our marijuana samples were confiscated around the state of Alaska and supplied to us by the UAF Police Department. δ13C, δ15N and δ18O values exhibit geographic patterns similar to the modern grasses, but carbon and nitrogen isotopes of some marijuana plants appear to be influenced by additional factors related to indoor growing conditions (supplementary CO2 sources and the application of organic fertilizer). As well as providing a potential forensic resource, our Poaceae isotope maps could serve additional value by providing resources for studying ecosystem nutrient cycling, for tracing natural ecological processes (i.e., animal migration and food web dynamics) and providing

  6. Chemical and isotopic fingerprinting of ancient Chinese porcelains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.-X.; Li, B.-P.; Greig, A.; Collerson, K.D.; Feng, Y.-X.

    2005-01-01

    We have obtained unequivocal fingerprinting for many Chinese porcelains of utmost significance, based on high-precision multi-element and isotopic analysis by inductively-coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) in our laboratory. As most ancient Chinese kilns used raw materials mined from local areas, differences in the geochemistry and mineralogy of these raw materials are expected to be preserved as distinctive geochemical and isotopic signatures in finished products and this may be useful for identifying their sources. Production techniques, such as purifying and mixing of different raw materials, may also vary from kiln to kiln, or may even change over time. All of that could also potentially leave a characteristic chemical and isotopic signature in a kiln's finished products. Using a tiny amount (often a few tens milligrams) of porcelain material, more than 40 element concentrations and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions can be rapidly and precisely determined on the ICP-MS and TIMS, respectively. The analytical results show that visibly similar Chinese porcelains made in different places and/or dynasties are strikingly distinctive. The data also allow modern fakes to be readily distinguished from antique porcelains. (author). 4 refs., 7 figs

  7. Forensic isotope ratio mass spectrometry of packaging tapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, James F; Grundy, Polly L; Hill, Jenny C; Ronan, Neil C; Titterton, Emma L; Sleeman, Richard

    2004-12-01

    Pressure sensitive adhesive tape (brown parcel tape) is employed in a great many criminal activities such as the restraint of individuals during robbery and offences against the person, the enclosure of explosive devices and the packaging and concealment of controlled drugs. Packaging materials are ubiquitous in modern society and are produced in such vast quantities that it is increasingly difficult to distinguish between different products or to link materials to a common source. This study demonstrates the potential of stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry to characterise parcel tapes based on a number of properties. The carbon isotopic signature, derived from the substrate polymer, associated additives and adhesive is highly characteristic of a particular tape and allows samples from different sources to be readily distinguished. Further discrimination may be achieved by the incorporation of deuterium and oxygen isotopic data and by analysis of the isolated backing polymer. Recovery of intact tape from simulated forensic samples proved straightforward and the isotopic signature of the tape did not appear to be affected by adverse storage conditions.

  8. Chemical and Isotopic Thresholds in Charring: Implications for the Interpretation of Charcoal Mass and Isotopic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Lacey A; Hockaday, William C; Boutton, Thomas; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Kinney, Timothy J; Masiello, Caroline A

    2015-12-15

    Charcoal plays a significant role in the long-term carbon cycle, and its use as a soil amendment is promoted as a C sequestration strategy (biochar). One challenge in this research area is understanding the heterogeneity of charcoal properties. Although the maximum reaction temperature is often used as a gauge of pyrolysis conditions, pyrolysis duration also changes charcoal physicochemical qualities. Here, we introduce a formal definition of charring intensity (CI) to more accurately characterize pyrolysis, and we document variation in charcoal chemical properties with variation in CI. We find two types of responses to CI: either linear or threshold relationships. Mass yield decreases linearly with CI, while a threshold exists across which % C, % N, and δ(15)N exhibit large changes. This CI threshold co-occurs with an increase in charcoal aromaticity. C isotopes do not change from original biomass values, supporting the use of charcoal δ(13)C signatures to infer paleoecological conditions. Fractionation of N isotopes indicates that fire may be enriching soils in (15)N through pyrolytic N isotope fractionation. This influx of "black N" could have a significant impact on soil N isotopes, which we show theoretically using a simple mass-balance model.

  9. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  10. Discovery of the cadmium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, S.; Thoennessen, M.

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes have been observed so far and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Aberrant water homeostasis detected by stable isotope analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P O'Grady

    Full Text Available While isotopes are frequently used as tracers in investigations of disease physiology (i.e., 14C labeled glucose, few studies have examined the impact that disease, and disease-related alterations in metabolism, may have on stable isotope ratios at natural abundance levels. The isotopic composition of body water is heavily influenced by water metabolism and dietary patterns and may provide a platform for disease detection. By utilizing a model of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes as an index case of aberrant water homeostasis, we demonstrate that untreated diabetes mellitus results in distinct combinations, or signatures, of the hydrogen (delta2H and oxygen (delta18O isotope ratios in body water. Additionally, we show that the delta2H and delta18O values of body water are correlated with increased water flux, suggesting altered blood osmolality, due to hyperglycemia, as the mechanism behind this correlation. Further, we present a mathematical model describing the impact of water flux on the isotopic composition of body water and compare model predicted values with actual values. These data highlight the importance of factors such as water flux and energy expenditure on predictive models of body water and additionally provide a framework for using naturally occurring stable isotope ratios to monitor diseases that impact water homeostasis.

  12. Isotopic Fingerprint for Phosphorus in Drinking Water Supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooddy, Daren C; Lapworth, Dan J; Ascott, Matthew J; Bennett, Sarah A; Heaton, Timothy H E; Surridge, Ben W J

    2015-08-04

    Phosphate dosing of drinking water supplies, coupled with leakage from distribution networks, represents a significant input of phosphorus to the environment. The oxygen isotope composition of phosphate (δ(18)OPO4), a novel stable isotope tracer for phosphorus, offers new opportunities to understand the importance of phosphorus derived from sources such as drinking water. We report the first assessment of δ(18)OPO4 within drinking water supplies. A total of 40 samples from phosphate-dosed distribution networks were analyzed from across England and Wales. In addition, samples of the source orthophosphoric acid used for dosing were also analyzed. Two distinct isotopic signatures for drinking water were identified (average = +13.2 or +19.7‰), primarily determined by δ(18)OPO4 of the source acid (average = +12.4 or +19.7‰). Dependent upon the source acid used, drinking water δ(18)OPO4 appears isotopically distinct from a number of other phosphorus sources. Isotopic offsets from the source acid ranging from -0.9 to +2.8‰ were observed. There was little evidence that equilibrium isotope fractionation dominated within the networks, with offsets from temperature-dependent equilibrium ranging from -4.8 to +4.2‰. While partial equilibrium fractionation may have occurred, kinetic effects associated with microbial uptake of phosphorus or abiotic sorption and dissolution reactions may also contribute to δ(18)OPO4 within drinking water supplies.

  13. Rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masanori; Poulson, Simon R

    2012-04-17

    The rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water was investigated at conditions of 10 to 80 °C and pH -0.6 to 4.4. Oxygen isotope exchange proceeds as a first-order reaction, and the exchange rate is strongly affected by reaction temperature and pH, with increased rates of isotope exchange at higher temperature and lower pH. Selenate speciation (HSeO(4)(-) vs SeO(4)(2-)) also has a significant effect on the rate of isotope exchange. The half-life for isotope exchange at example natural conditions (25 °C and pH 7) is estimated to be significantly in excess of 10(6) years. The very slow rate of oxygen isotope exchange between selenate and water under most environmental conditions demonstrates that selenate-δ(18)O signatures produced by biogeochemical processes will be preserved and hence that it will be possible to use the value of selenate-δ(18)O to investigate the biogeochemical behavior of selenate, in an analogous fashion to the use of sulfate-δ(18)O to study the biogeochemical behavior of sulfate.

  14. Evolution of triaxial shapes at large isospin: Rh isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navin, A.; Rejmund, M.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Palit, R.; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.; Lemasson, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Caamaño, M.; Clément, E.; Delaune, O.; Farget, F.; de France, G.; Jacquot, B.

    2017-04-01

    The rotational response as a function of neutron-proton asymmetry for the very neutron-rich isotopes of Rh (116-119Rh) has been obtained from the measurement of prompt γ rays from isotopically identified fragments, produced in fission reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The measured energy ;signature; splitting of the yrast bands, when compared with the Triaxial Projected Shell Model (TPSM) calculations, shows the need for large, nearly constant, triaxial deformations. The present results are compared with global predictions for the existence of non axial shapes in the periodic table in the case of very neutron-rich nuclei Rh isotopes. The predicted trend of a second local maximum for a triaxial shape around N ∼ 74 is not found.

  15. Advances in isotopic analysis for food authenticity testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Kristian Holst; Bontempo, L.; Camin, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stable isotope analysis has been used for food authenticity testing for more than 30 years and is today being utilized on a routine basis for a wide variety of food commodities. During the past decade, major analytical method developments have been made and the fundamental understanding...... of fractionation processes resulting in isotopic signatures suitable for food authentication has improved. In combination with an increasing use of multivariate statistics, development of new reference materials, establishment of reference sample databases, and complementation with other analytical methods, food...... authenticity testing is currently developing even further. In this chapter, we aim to provide an overview of the latest developments in stable isotope analysis for food authenticity testing. As several review articles and book chapters have recently addressed this topic, we will primarily focus on relevant...

  16. Signature spectrale des grains interstellaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, A.

    Notre connaissance de la nature des grains interstellaires reposait sur un nombre très restreint de signatures spectrales dans la courbe d'extinction du milieu interstellaire. Une information considérable est contenue dans les 40 bandes interstellaires diffuses dans le visible, mais reste inexploitée. L'interprétation récente des cinq bandes IR en émission, en terme de molécules d'hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques, est développée. Elle permet l'utilisation d'une information spectroscopique comparable, à elle seule, à ce sur quoi était basée jusqu'alors notre connaissance de la matière interstellaire condensée. Différentes implications de cette mise en évidence sont proposées.

  17. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  18. Isotopic studies of beach rock carbonates from Konkan, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, B.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Gujar, A.R.

    .7% (PDB) and delta sup(18)O signatures lie in a narrow range of +27.5 to +28.6% (SMOW), respectively. Isotopic data obtained in this study show that cementation of beach rock carbonates might have taken place in a shallow vadose zone. The large variations...

  19. Stable isotope fingerprinting: a novel method for identifying plant, fungal, or bacterial origins of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Larsen; D. Lee Taylor; Mary Beth Leigh; Diane M. O' Brien

    2009-01-01

    Amino acids play an important role in ecology as essential nutrients for animals and as currencies in symbiotic associations. Here we present a new approach to tracing the origins of amino acids by identifying unique patterns of carbon isotope signatures generated by amino acid synthesis in plants, fungi, and bacteria ("13C fingerprints...

  20. Prediction of soil effects on GPR signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, J.B.; Lensen, H.A.; Wijk, C.V. van; Hendrickx, J.M.H.; Dam, R. van; Borchers, B.

    2004-01-01

    In previous work we have shown that GPR signatures are affected by soil texture and soil water content. In this contribution we will use a three dimensional electromagnetic model and a hydrological soil model to explore in more detail the relationships between GPR signatures, soil physical

  1. Measuring ship acoustic signatures against mine threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.F. de; Quesson, B.A.J.; Ainslie, M.A.; Vermeulen, R.C.N.

    2012-01-01

    The NATO standard ‘AMP-15’ [1] provides procedures for the measurement and reporting of the acoustic signature of ships and for the establishment of acoustic signature goals to counter the naval mine threat. Measurements are carried out at dedicated shallow water acoustic ranges. Measurements

  2. The Pedagogic Signature of the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Ewald; Lerche, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Markus; Oubaid, Viktor; Weiss, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lee S. Shulman deplores that the field of education as a profession does not have a pedagogic signature, which he characterizes as a synthesis of cognitive, practical and moral apprenticeship. In this context, the following study has three goals: 1) In the first theoretical part, the basic problems of constructing a pedagogic signature are…

  3. Infrared ship signature analysis and optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.

    2005-01-01

    The last decade has seen an increase in the awareness of the infrared signature of naval ships. New ship designs show that infrared signature reduction measures are being incorporated, such as exhaust gas cooling systems, relocation of the exhausts and surface cooling systems. Hull and

  4. Quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taewan; Lee, Hyang-Sook

    2015-01-01

    When we want to sign a quantum message that we create, we can use arbitrated quantum signature schemes which are possible to sign for not only known quantum messages but also unknown quantum messages. However, since the arbitrated quantum signature schemes need the help of a trusted arbitrator in each verification of the signature, it is known that the schemes are not convenient in practical use. If we consider only known quantum messages such as the above situation, there can exist a quantum signature scheme with more efficient structure. In this paper, we present a new quantum signature scheme for known quantum messages without the help of an arbitrator. Differing from arbitrated quantum signature schemes based on the quantum one-time pad with the symmetric key, since our scheme is based on quantum public-key cryptosystems, the validity of the signature can be verified by a receiver without the help of an arbitrator. Moreover, we show that our scheme provides the functions of quantum message integrity, user authentication and non-repudiation of the origin as in digital signature schemes. (paper)

  5. Analysis of signature wrapping attacks and countermeasures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajek, Sebastian; Jensen, Meiko; Liao, Lijun

    2009-01-01

    In recent research it turned out that Boolean verification, of digital signatures in the context of WSSecurity, is likely to fail: If parts of a SOAP message, are signed and the signature verification applied to, the whole document returns true, then nevertheless the, document may have been...

  6. Aerosol carbon isotope composition over Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaras, Andrius; Pabedinskas, Algirdas; Masalaite, Agne; Petelski, Tomasz; Gorokhova, Elena; Sapolaite, Justina; Ezerinskis, Zilvinas; Remeikis, Vidmantas

    2017-04-01

    Particulate carbonaceous matter is significant contributor to ambient particulate matter originating from intervening sources which contribution is difficult to quantify due to source diversity, chemical complexity and processes during atmospheric transport. Carbon isotope analysis can be extremely useful in source apportionment of organic matter due to the unique isotopic signatures associated with anthropocentric (fossil fuel), continental (terrestrial plants) and marine sources, and is particularly effective when these sources are mixed (Ceburnis et al., 2011;Ceburnis et al., 2016). We will present the isotope ratio measurement results of aerosol collected during the cruise in the Baltic Sea. Sampling campaign of PM10 and size segregated aerosol particles was performed on the R/V "Oceania" in October 2015. Air mass back trajectories were prevailing both from the continental and marine areas during the sampling period. The total carbon concentration varied from 1 µg/m3 to 8 µg/m3. Two end members (δ13C = -25‰ and δ13C = -28 ‰ ) were established from the total stable carbon isotope analysis in PM10 fraction. δ13C analysis in size segregated aerosol particles revealed δ13C values being highest in the 1 - 2.5 µm range (δ13C = -24.9 ‰ ) during continental transport, while lowest TC δ13C values (δ13C ≈ -27 ‰ ) were detected in the size range D50 marine environment. Additionally, concentration of bacteria and fungi were measured in size segregated and PM10 aerosol fraction. We were able to relate aerosol source δ13C end members with the abundance of bacteria and fungi over Baltic Sea combining air mass trajectories, stable isotope data, fungi and bacteria concentrations. Ceburnis, D., Garbaras, A., Szidat, S., Rinaldi, M., Fahrni, S., Perron, N., Wacker, L., Leinert, S., Remeikis, V., and Facchini, M.: Quantification of the carbonaceous matter origin in submicron marine aerosol by 13 C and 14 C isotope analysis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  7. Laser assisted aerodynamic isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H. van den

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of conventional aerodynamic isotope seperation can be improved by two orders of magnitude with the aid of a relatively weak cw infrared laser which is used to induce isotopically selective condensation. Overall isotope enrichment factors in excess of 2 are obtained as compared to about 1.02 in the conventional seperation. Sulphur isotopes in SF 6 as well as Silicon isotopes in SiF 4 and Bromine isotopes in CF 3 Br are seperated on a laboratory scale. Infrared vibrational predissociation by itself and in combination with isotopically selective condensation are also shown to be effective new ways of isotope separation. (orig.) [de

  8. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption after which more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  9. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  10. Isotopic research in Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, H.

    1983-01-01

    Since 1978 scientists of the Central Institute of Isotope- and Radiation Research of the Academy of Sciences of the GDR have participated in antarctic research. Substantial results have been achieved in research on isotope ratios, on the dynamics of water resources, on concentration of deuterium in lichens, and on age determination of a mummified seal and a penguin colony

  11. Isotope research materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Preparation of research isotope materials is described. Topics covered include: separation of tritium from aqueous effluents by bipolar electrolysis; stable isotope targets and research materials; radioisotope targets and research materials; preparation of an 241 Am metallurgical specimen; reactor dosimeters; ceramic and cermet development; fission-fragment-generating targets of 235 UO 2 ; and wire dosimeters for Westinghouse--Bettis

  12. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  13. Redactable signatures for signed CDA Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen-Yu; Hsueh, Chih-Wen; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lai, Feipei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Chung, Yufang

    2012-06-01

    The Clinical Document Architecture, introduced by Health Level Seven, is a XML-based standard intending to specify the encoding, structure, and semantics of clinical documents for exchange. Since the clinical document is in XML form, its authenticity and integrity could be guaranteed by the use of the XML signature published by W3C. While a clinical document wants to conceal some personal or private information, the document needs to be redacted. It makes the signed signature of the original clinical document not be verified. The redactable signature is thus proposed to enable verification for the redacted document. Only a little research does the implementation of the redactable signature, and there still not exists an appropriate scheme for the clinical document. This paper will investigate the existing web-technologies and find a compact and applicable model to implement a suitable redactable signature for the clinical document viewer.

  14. A "DUPAL" Geochemical Signature in Gakkel Ridge MORB and Relationship to Cenozoic Arctic Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S. L.; Langmuir, C. H.; Soffer, G.; Lehnert, K.; Cai, Y.; Graham, D. W.; Michael, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    The western 850 km of the ultra-slow spreading Gakkel Ridge is composed of three tectonic segments, with robust Western and Eastern volcanic zones (WVZ and EVZ) separated by a magma-starved "sparsely magmatic zone" (SMZ). Sr-Nd-Pb isotope ratios of axial lavas from this Arctic small region cover a large portion of the global-scale variability of the MORB. We find distinct mantle compositions beneath the EVZ and WVZ, and a sharp boundary in the middle of the SMZ, resolvable to within ~40 km. In scatter plots, the fields formed by plotting isotope ratios of lavas from different sides of the boundary do not overlap, showing that the mantle sources in the eastern and western zones are distinct. EVZ and eastern SMZ lavas, closer to the continent and where the spreading rate is slower, sample normal depleted "Atlantic-Pacific" oceanic mantle, and display the lowest Sr isotope ratios (0.7025-0.7027) among the ridges north of Iceland. In contrast, isotope ratios of WVZ and the western SMZ lavas reflecting greater time-integrated incompatible element enrichment and strong affinities to the "DUPAL anomaly" of the Southern Hemisphere, including the distinctive high 208Pb/204Pb signature and a steep slope on Pb-Sr isotope plots. The Gakkel WVZ is the only ocean ridge outside of the Southern Hemisphere DUPAL province to display such a signature, and the SMZ shows remarkable similarities to the Australian Antarctic Discordance as a ridge section characterized by great depths, low magma production, and containing a major mantle isotopic boundary. The generation of the DUPAL signature in the WVZ, and the long-term history of the mantle beneath the EVZ and WVZ, can be understood in the context of regional magmatism and Arctic tectonic history. Holocene lavas from Spitsbergen form the "enriched endmember" for WVZ lavas in all isotope scatter plots, and in plots of isotopes vs incompatible trace element ratios such as Th/La and U/La. However, if Th or U are replaced by elements

  15. Utilization of intrinsic boron isotopes as co-migrating tracers for identifying potential nitrate contamination sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leenhouts, J.M.; Bassett, R.L.; Maddock, T. III.

    1998-01-01

    The stable isotopes of the conservative element boron, 11B and 10B, have been employed as co-migrating isotopic tracers to trace potential sources of nitrate observed in ground water pumped from a large capacity 0.167 m3/s irrigation well in the Avra Valley of southeastern Arizona. The isotopic ratios provided an identifying signature for two nitrogen carrying source waters: municipal waste water and agricultural return flow. Additional chemical parameters were also examined to corroborate the isotopic indications. Boron isotopes provided a superior delineation of mixing processes in the system compared to the general inorganic chemical parameters. Findings of this investigation indicate that the water pumped by the study well at the beginning of the 1993 irrigation season was composed of a mixture of approximately 25% municipal waste water and 75% background ground water. As the irrigation season progressed, an increasing proportion of water was contributed by irrigation return flow from neighboring agricultural fields

  16. {sup 37}Cl, {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C isotopic analysis of common agro-chemicals for identifying non-point source agricultural contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annable, W.K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: wkannabl@uwaterloo.ca; Frape, S.K. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Shouakar-Stash, O. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Shanoff, T. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Drimmie, R.J. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Harvey, F.E. [School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588-0517 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The isotopic compositions of commercially available herbicides were analyzed to determine their respective {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C and {sup 37}Cl signatures for the purposes of developing a discrete tool for tracing and identifying non-point source contaminants in agricultural watersheds. Findings demonstrate that of the agrochemicals evaluated, chlorine stable isotopes signatures range between {delta}{sup 37}Cl = -4.55 per mille and +3.40 per mille , whereas most naturally occurring chlorine stable isotopes signatures, including those of road salt, sewage sludge and fertilizers, vary in a narrow range about the Standard Mean Ocean Chloride (SMOC) between -2.00 per mille and +1.00 per mille . Nitrogen stable isotope values varied widely from {delta}{sup 15}N = -10.86 per mille to +1.44 per mille and carbon stable isotope analysis gave an observed range between {delta}{sup 13}C = -37.13 per mille and -21.35 per mille for the entire suite of agro-chemicals analyzed. When nitrogen, carbon and chlorine stable isotope analyses were compared in a cross-correlation analysis, statistically independent isotopic signatures exist suggesting a new potential tracer tool for identifying herbicides in the environment.

  17. Maximizing biomarker discovery by minimizing gene signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of gene signatures can potentially be of considerable value in the field of clinical diagnosis. However, gene signatures defined with different methods can be quite various even when applied the same disease and the same endpoint. Previous studies have shown that the correct selection of subsets of genes from microarray data is key for the accurate classification of disease phenotypes, and a number of methods have been proposed for the purpose. However, these methods refine the subsets by only considering each single feature, and they do not confirm the association between the genes identified in each gene signature and the phenotype of the disease. We proposed an innovative new method termed Minimize Feature's Size (MFS based on multiple level similarity analyses and association between the genes and disease for breast cancer endpoints by comparing classifier models generated from the second phase of MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC-II, trying to develop effective meta-analysis strategies to transform the MAQC-II signatures into a robust and reliable set of biomarker for clinical applications. Results We analyzed the similarity of the multiple gene signatures in an endpoint and between the two endpoints of breast cancer at probe and gene levels, the results indicate that disease-related genes can be preferably selected as the components of gene signature, and that the gene signatures for the two endpoints could be interchangeable. The minimized signatures were built at probe level by using MFS for each endpoint. By applying the approach, we generated a much smaller set of gene signature with the similar predictive power compared with those gene signatures from MAQC-II. Conclusions Our results indicate that gene signatures of both large and small sizes could perform equally well in clinical applications. Besides, consistency and biological significances can be detected among different gene signatures, reflecting the

  18. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana, E-mail: zuzana.grolmusova@geology.sk [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Rapčanová, Anna [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter [State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia); Veis, Pavel [Comenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics, Department of Experimental Physics, Mlynská dolina F2, 842 48 Bratislava (Slovakia); State Geological Institute of Dionýz Štúr, Laboratory of Isotope Geology, Mlynská dolina 1, 817 04 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values. These data were compared to previously published δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. - Highlights: • This study deals with stable isotope analyses of fingernails from Slovak volunteers. • δ{sup 13}C and δ{sup 15}N values of vegetarian and omnivore fingernails were compared. • Influence of sex, diet and smoking was studied.

  19. Water vapor stable isotope observations from tropical Australia

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The response of the tropical hydrological cycle to anthropogenically induced changes in radiative forcing is one of the largest discrepancies between climate models. Paleoclimate archives of the stable isotopic composition of precipitation in the tropics indicate a relationship with precipitation amount that could be exploited to study past hydroclimate and improve our knowledge of how this region responds to changes in climate forcing. Recently modelling studies of convective parameterizations fitted with water isotopes and remote sensing of water vapor isotopes in the tropics have illustrated uncertainty in the assumed relationship with rainfall amount. Therefore there is a need to collect water isotope data in the tropics that can be used to evaluate these models and help identify the relationships between the isotopic composition of meteoric waters and rainfall intensity. However, data in this region is almost non-existent. Here we present in-situ water vapor isotopic measurements and the HDO retrievals from the co-located Total Column Carbon Observing Network (TCCON) site at Darwin in Tropical Australia. The Darwin site is interestingly placed within the tropical western pacific region and is impacted upon by a clear monsoonal climate, and key climate cycles including ENSO and Madden Julian Oscillations. The analysis of the data illustrated relationships between water vapor isotopes and humidity which demonstrated the role of precipitation processes in the wet season and air mass mixing during the dry season. Further the wet season observations show complex relationships between humidity and isotopes. A simple Rayleigh distillation model was not obeyed, instead the importance of rainfall re-evaporation in generating the highly depleted signatures was demonstrated. These data potentially provide a useful tool for evaluating model parameterizations in monsoonal regions as they demonstrate relationships with precipitation processes that cannot be observed with

  20. Stable isotope composition of human fingernails from Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolmusová, Zuzana; Rapčanová, Anna; Michalko, Juraj; Čech, Peter; Veis, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope composition of human fingernails has proven to be useful for documenting human dietary information and geographical patterns in archeological, forensic, anthropological and biological studies. Therefore, it is of interest to detect all factors influencing the stable isotopic composition in the certain regions in the world. Carbon and nitrogen isotope data of human fingernail keratin from 52 individuals from Slovakia were reported in this study. The online combustion and continuous flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometer Delta V Advantage was used for δ 13 C and δ 15 N analysis of fingernail keratin samples from 24 vegetarian and 28 omnivorous individuals. A group of people with frequent meat consumption showed enrichment in 13 C and 15 N isotopes in fingernails. A similar trend was observed with increasing seafood in an individual's diet. Moreover a significant difference was revealed between smokers and nonsmokers for both δ 13 C and δ 15 N values. These data were compared to previously published δ 13 C and δ 15 N fingernail values from across the globe. This study brings new information on the stable isotope signature of individuals from Slovakia and characterizes the Central European region for the first time. The stable isotope composition of fingernails is influenced by the frequency of meat and seafood consumption as well as smoking. - Highlights: • This study deals with stable isotope analyses of fingernails from Slovak volunteers. • δ 13 C and δ 15 N values of vegetarian and omnivore fingernails were compared. • Influence of sex, diet and smoking was studied

  1. Earth's Coming of Age: Isotopically Tracking the Global Transformation from the Hadean to the Geologically Modern Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, V. C.; Nutman, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    Some of the strongest direct evidence that documents fundamental changes in the chemistry and organisation of Earth's interior derives from radiogenic isotopic compositions that include both long-lived (particularly 176Lu-176Hf and 147Sm-143Nd) and short-lived, i.e., now extinct parent isotope, systems (182Hf-182W, 146Sm-142Nd). Changes in patterns of isotopic evolution are linked to changes in mantle dynamics such that tracking these signatures in geologically well-characterised rocks can be used to discover the the nature and evolution of tectonic processes. Over the past decade, intensive geochemical investigations by various groups focussing on the oldest (> 4.0 Ga to 3.6 Ga) rock record, as preserved in several localities, have revealed isotopic distinctions in the early Earth compared with those in Proterozoic and younger rocks. For example, whilst the major and trace element compositions of Eoarchean gneisses have analogs in younger rocks in accord with a continuum of crust formation processes, radiogenic isotopic signatures from both long and short half-life decay schemes record an image of the Earth in transition from early differentiation processes, likely associated with planetary accretion and formation, to more modern style characterised by plate tectonics. The emerging image is that many Eoarchean rocks possess extinct nuclide anomalies in the form of 142Nd and 182Hf isotopic signatures that are absent in modern terrestrial samples; these signatures are evidence of chemical fractionation processes occuring within the first ca. 10-300 million years of Solar System history. In addition, viewing the global database, patterns of long-half life isotope signatures i.e., 143Nd and 176Hf differ from those seen in younger (modern Earth.

  2. Stable isotope anatomy of tropical cyclone Ita, North-Eastern Australia, April 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, Niels C; Zwart, Costijn; Kurita, Naoyuki; Bass, Adrian; Nott, Jon; Bird, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    The isotope signatures registered in speleothems during tropical cyclones (TC) provides information about the frequency and intensity of past TCs but the precise relationship between isotopic composition and the meteorology of TCs remain uncertain. Here we present continuous δ18O and δ2H data in rainfall and water vapour, as well as in discrete rainfall samples, during the passage of TC Ita and relate the evolution in isotopic compositions to local and synoptic scale meteorological observations. High-resolution data revealed a close relationship between isotopic compositions and cyclonic features such as spiral rainbands, periods of stratiform rainfall and the arrival of subtropical and tropical air masses with changing oceanic and continental moisture sources. The isotopic compositions in discrete rainfall samples were remarkably constant along the ~450 km overland path of the cyclone when taking into account the direction and distance to the eye of the cyclone at each sampling time. Near simultaneous variations in δ18O and δ2H values in rainfall and vapour and a near-equilibrium rainfall-vapour isotope fractionation indicates strong isotopic exchange between rainfall and surface inflow of vapour during the approach of the cyclone. In contrast, after the passage of spiral rainbands close to the eye of the cyclone, different moisture sources for rainfall and vapour are reflected in diverging d-excess values. High-resolution isotope studies of modern TCs refine the interpretation of stable isotope signatures found in speleothems and other paleo archives and should aim to further investigate the influence of cyclone intensity and longevity on the isotopic composition of associated rainfall.

  3. Thermal equilibration of iron meteorite and pallasite parent bodies recorded at the mineral scale by Fe and Ni isotope systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernonozhkin, Stepan M.; Weyrauch, Mona; Goderis, Steven; Oeser, Martin; McKibbin, Seann J.; Horn, Ingo; Hecht, Lutz; Weyer, Stefan; Claeys, Philippe; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2017-11-01

    In this work, a femtosecond laser ablation (LA) system coupled to a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS) was used to obtain laterally resolved (30-80 μm), high-precision combined Ni and Fe stable isotope ratio data for a variety of mineral phases (olivine, kamacite, taenite, schreibersite and troilite) composing main group pallasites (PMG) and iron meteorites. The stable isotopic signatures of Fe and Ni at the mineral scale, in combination with the factors governing the kinetic or equilibrium isotope fractionation processes, are used to interpret the thermal histories of small differentiated asteroidal bodies. As Fe isotopic zoning is only barely resolvable within the internal precision level of the isotope ratio measurements within a single olivine in Esquel PMG, the isotopically lighter olivine core relative to the rim (Δ56/54Ferim-core = 0.059‰) suggests that the olivines were largely thermally equilibrated. The observed hint of an isotopic and concentration gradient for Fe of crudely similar width is interpreted here to reflect Fe loss from olivine in the process of partial reduction of the olivine rim. The ranges of the determined Fe and Ni isotopic signatures of troilite (δ56/54Fe of -0.66 to -0.09‰) and schreibersite (δ56/54Fe of -0.48 to -0.09‰, and δ62/60Ni of -0.64 to +0.29‰) may result from thermal equilibration. Schreibersite and troilite likely remained in equilibrium with their enclosing metal to temperatures significantly below their point of crystallization. The Ni isotopic signatures of bulk metal and schreibersite correlate negatively, with isotopically lighter Ni in the metal of PMGs and isotopically heavier Ni in the metal of the iron meteorites analyzed. As such, the light Ni isotopic signatures previously observed in PMG metal relative to chondrites may not result from heterogeneity in the Solar Nebula, but rather reflect fractionation in the metal-schreibersite system. Comparison between

  4. Genomic Signatures of Sexual Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimatis, Katja R; Nelson, Thomas C; Phillips, Patrick C

    2017-10-30

    Sexual conflict is a specific class of intergenomic conflict that describes the reciprocal sex-specific fitness costs generated by antagonistic reproductive interactions. The potential for sexual conflict is an inherent property of having a shared genome between the sexes and, therefore, is an extreme form of an environment-dependent fitness effect. In this way, many of the predictions from environment-dependent selection can be used to formulate expected patterns of genome evolution under sexual conflict. However, the pleiotropic and transmission constraints inherent to having alleles move across sex-specific backgrounds from generation to generation further modulate the anticipated signatures of selection. We outline methods for detecting candidate sexual conflict loci both across and within populations. Additionally, we consider the ability of genome scans to identify sexually antagonistic loci by modeling allele frequency changes within males and females due to a single generation of selection. In particular, we highlight the need to integrate genotype, phenotype, and functional information to truly distinguish sexual conflict from other forms of sexual differentiation. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Signature geometry and quantum engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samociuk, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    As the operating frequency of electromagnetic based devices increase, physical design geometry is playing an ever more important role. Evidence is considered in support of a relationship between the dimensionality of primitive geometric forms, such as transistors, and corresponding electromagnetic coupling efficiency. The industry of electronics is defined as the construction of devices by the patterning of primitive forms to physical materials. Examples are given to show the evolution of these primitives, down to nano scales, are requiring exacting geometry and three dimensional content. Consideration of microwave monolithic integrated circuits,(MMIC), photonics and metamaterials,(MM), support this trend and also add new requirements of strict geometric periodicity and multiplicity. Signature geometries,(SG), are characterized by distinctive attributes and examples are given. The transcendent form transcode algorithm, (TTA) is introduced as a multi dimensional SG and its use in designing photonic integrated circuits and metamaterials is discussed . A creative commons licensed research database, TRANSFORM, containing TTA geometries in OASIS file formats is described. An experimental methodology for using the database is given. Multidimensional SG and extraction of three dimensional cross sections as primitive forms is discussed as a foundation for quantum engineering and the exploitation of phenomena other than the electromagnetic.

  6. UTEX modeling of xenon signature sensitivity to geology and explosion cavity characteristics following an underground nuclear explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrey, J. D.; Haas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) produce anthropogenic isotopes that can potentially be used in the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Several isotopes of radioactive xenon gas have been identified as radionuclides of interest within the International Monitoring System (IMS) and in an On-Site Inspection (OSI). Substantial research has been previously undertaken to characterize the geologic and atmospheric mechanisms that can drive the movement of radionuclide gas from a well-contained UNE, considering both sensitivities on gas arrival time and signature variability of xenon due to the nature of subsurface transport. This work further considers sensitivities of radioxenon gas arrival time and signatures to large variability in geologic stratification and generalized explosion cavity characteristics, as well as compares this influence to variability in the shallow surface.

  7. Laboratory and field methods for stable isotope analysis in human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitsema, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis (SIA; carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen) of human tissues offers a means for assessing diet among living humans. Stable isotope ratios of broad categories of food and drink food vary systematically, and stable isotope ratios in consumer tissues represent a composite of the isotopic ratios of food and drink consumed during an individual's life. Isotopic evidence for diet is independent of errors in informant recall, and accrues during time periods when researchers are absent. Beyond diet reconstruction, tissue stable isotope ratios are sensitive to excursions from homeostasis, such as starvation and rapid growth. Because of their relationship to diet, geographic location, hydration, and nutritional status, stable isotope signatures in human tissues offer a window into human biocultural adaptations, past and present. This article describes methods for SIA that may be usefully applied in studies of living humans, with emphasis placed on carbon and nitrogen. Some of the ecological, physiological, and evolutionary applications of stable isotope data among living humans are discussed. By incorporating SIA in research, human biologists facilitate a productive dialog with bioarchaeologists, who routinely use stable isotope evidence, mingling different perspectives on human biology and behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Natural abundance variations in stable isotopes and their potential uses in animal physiological ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannes, L Z; Martínez del Rio, C; Koch, P

    1998-03-01

    Chemical, biological, and physical processes lead to distinctive "isotopic signatures" in biological materials that allow tracing of the origins of organic substances. Isotopic variation has been extensively used by plant physiological ecologists and by paleontologists, and recently ecologists have adopted the use of stable isotopes to measure ecosystem patterns and processes. To date, animal physiological ecologists have made minimal use of naturally occurring stable isotopes as tracers. Here we provide a review of the current and potential uses of naturally occurring stable isotopes in animal physiological ecology. We outline the physical and biological processes that lead to variation in isotopic abundance in plants and animals. We summarize current uses in animal physiological ecology (diet reconstruction and animal movement patterns), and suggest areas of research where the use of stable isotopes can be fruitful (protein balance and turnover and the allocation of dietary nutrients). We argue that animal physiological ecologists can benefit from including the measurement of naturally occurring stable isotopes in their battery of techniques. We also argue that animal physiologists can make an important contribution to the emerging field of stable isotopes in biology by testing experimentally the plethora of assumptions upon which the techniques rely.

  9. DIGITAL SIGNATURE IN THE WAY OF LAW

    OpenAIRE

    Ruya Samlı

    2013-01-01

    Signature can be defined as a person’s name or special signs that he/she writes when he/she wants to indicate he/she wrote or confirm that writing. A person signs many times in his/her life. A person’s signature that is used for thousands of times for many things from formal documents to exams has importance for that person. Especially, signing in legal operations is an operation that can build important results. If a person’s signature is imitated by another person, he/she can be...

  10. Arbitrated quantum signature scheme using Bell states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qin; Chan, W. H.; Long Dongyang

    2009-01-01

    In an arbitrated quantum signature scheme, the signatory signs the message and the receiver verifies the signature's validity with the assistance of the arbitrator. We present an arbitrated quantum signature scheme using two-particle entangled Bell states similar to the previous scheme using three-particle entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states [G. H. Zeng and C. H. Keitel, Phys. Rev. A 65, 042312 (2002)]. The proposed scheme can preserve the merits in the original scheme while providing a higher efficiency in transmission and reducing the complexity of implementation.

  11. Reduction of a Ship's Magnetic Field Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, John

    2008-01-01

    Decreasing the magnetic field signature of a naval vessel will reduce its susceptibility to detonating naval influence mines and the probability of a submarine being detected by underwater barriers and maritime patrol aircraft. Both passive and active techniques for reducing the magnetic signatures produced by a vessel's ferromagnetism, roll-induced eddy currents, corrosion-related sources, and stray fields are presented. Mathematical models of simple hull shapes are used to predict the levels of signature reduction that might be achieved through the use of alternate construction materials. Al

  12. Signature verification with writing posture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsu-Yung; Yu, Chih-Chang

    2013-07-01

    A video-based handwritten signature verification framework is proposed in this paper. Using a camera as the sensor has the advantage that the entire writing processes can be captured along with the signatures. The main contribution of this work is that writing postures are analyzed to achieve the verification purpose because the writing postures cannot be easily imitated or forged. The proposed system is able to achieve low false rejection rates while maintaining low false acceptance rates for database containing both unskilled and skilled imitation signatures.

  13. Molecular signatures of thyroid follicular neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, R.; Rossing, M.; Henao, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The molecular pathways leading to thyroid follicular neoplasia are incompletely understood, and the diagnosis of follicular tumors is a clinical challenge. To provide leads to the pathogenesis and diagnosis of the tumors, we examined the global transcriptome signatures of follicular thyroid...... a mechanism for cancer progression, which is why we exploited the results in order to generate a molecular classifier that could identify 95% of all carcinomas. Validation employing public domain and cross-platform data demonstrated that the signature was robust and could diagnose follicular nodules...... and robust genetic signature for the diagnosis of FA and FC. Endocrine-Related Cancer (2010) 17 691-708...

  14. Arctic herbivore diet can be inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in C3 plants, faeces and wool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ditte; Kristensen, Erik; Forchhammer, Mads C.

    2011-01-01

    The use of stable isotopes in diet analysis usually relies on the different photosynthetic pathways of C3 and C4 plants, and the resulting difference in carbon isotope signature. In the Arctic, however, plant species are exclusively C3, and carbon isotopes alone are therefore not suitable......% graminoids and up to 20% willows. In conclusion, the diet composition of an arctic herbivore can indeed be inferred from stable isotopes in arctic areas, despite the lack of C4 plants...... for studying arctic herbivore diets. In this study, we examined the potential of both stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct the diet of an arctic herbivore, here the muskox (Ovibos moschatus (Zimmermann, 1780)), in northeast Greenland. The isotope composition of plant communities and functional...

  15. Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotope Values for Plants and Mammals in a Semi-Desert Region of Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Davie

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information exists on the isotopic signatures of plants and animals in Mongolia, limiting the application of stable isotope analysis to wildlife biology studies. Here we present plant and mammal carbon (δ 13 C and nitrogen (δ 15 N isotope values from a desert-steppe region of southeastern Mongolia. We analyzed 11 samples from 11 plant species and 93 samples from 24 mammal species across Ikh Nart Nature Reserve, and compared these numbers to isotope values reported from other areas of Mongolia. Our plant and mammal 13 C and 15 N values were similar to those from a similar arid steppe region and more enriched than those from less arid habitats. Habitat variation within and between study sites has an important infl uence on δ 13 C and δ 15 N variation. Our results supplement current knowledge of isotopic variation in Mongolia and provide a reference for future stable isotope research in Mongolia and similar Asian steppe ecosystems.

  16. Provenance validation of polished rice samples using nuclear and isotopic analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, P.C.B.; Sucgang, R.J.; Mendoza, N.D.S.; Ebihara, M.; Peña, M.

    2015-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) has been considered the best staple food among all cereals and is the staple food for over 3 billion people, constituting over half of the world’s population. Elemental and isotopic analysis revealed variance between Philippine and Japanese rice. Rice samples collected in Japan and in the Philippines (market survey samples from Metro Manila, and farm harvests from Aklan province and Central Luzon) were washed, dried and ground to fine powder. Elemental analyses of the samples were carried out using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) while isotopic signatures of the samples were determined using the isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Results show that compared with the unpolished rice standard NIES CRM10b, the polished Japanese and Philippine rice sampled show reduced concentrations of elements by as much as 1/10. 1/4 , 1/5 and 1/3 for Mg, Mn, K and Na, respectively. Levels of Ca and Zn are not greatly affected. Arsenic, probably introduced from fertilizers used in rice fields is found in all the Japanese rice tested at an average concentration of 0.103 μg/g and three out of four of the Philippine rice at an average concentration of 0.70μg/g. Higher levels of Br seen in two of the Philippine rice at 14 and 34μg/g indicated probable contamination source from the pesticide methyl bromide during quarantine. Good correlation of isotopic signatures with geographical location of polished, but not for unpolished, rice samples from Central Luzon and Aklan indicated that provenance studies are best done on polished rice samples. Isotopic with of ω’”13C show signature that of a C3 plant with possible narrow distinguishable signature with Japanese rice falling within -27.5 to -28.5 while Philippine rice within -29 to -30. Rice provenance can be ascertained using elemental analysis and isotopic abundance determination as shown by the study.(author)

  17. NOx and ammonium isotopic fingerprints of anammox in natural and engineered systems: Implications for N isotope budgets and the use of NOx isotopes to diagnose process stability in wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, M. F.; Stöcklin, N.; Brunner, B.; Frame, C. H.; Joss, A.; Kipf, M.; Kuhn, T.; Wunderlin, P.

    2014-12-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of ammonium with nitrite (anammox) has been identified as a very important fixed nitrogen (N) sink, accounting for a large fraction of global fixed N loss in marine, freshwater, and semi-terrestrial environments. In engineered systems, combined nitritation-anammox is an efficient process to remove N from ammonium-rich wastewater, with nitrite as the central intermediate. During the anammox process, nitrate is being produced, providing reducing equivalents for carbon fixation. Measuring the N isotope ratios in fixed N species (i.e., ammonium, nitrite, nitrate) has proven to be a valuable tool to track N cycling in freshwater and marine ecosystems, yet its application in wastewater treatment as a tool to diagnose nitrate production pathways is novel. In this presentation we will elucidate, and compare, the N isotope effects associated with anammox 1) in vitro, 2) in a lacustrine setting, and 3) in a small-scale batch reactor for wastewater treatment. We demonstrate that the anammox nitrite/nitrate isotopic signatures are modulated by the superposition of strong kinetic (normal and inverse) and equilibrium (nitrite-nitrate) N isotope fractionation. The ammonium N isotope effect is driven by kinetic N isotope fractionation, and is similar to that of nitrification. We will discuss the possible controls on the expression of the anammox N isotope effects in the natural environment. We will also evaluate the use of nitrate/nitrite N (and O) isotope signatures to distinguish between nitrate production by anammox versus nitrite oxidation, which is important for optimizing process efficiency during wastewater treatment.

  18. Elemental and isotopic characterization of Japanese and Philippine polished rice samples using instrumental neutron activation analysis and isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sucgang, Raymond J.; Mendoza, Norman dS.; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Rice is a staple food for most Asian countries such as the Philippines and Japan and as such its elemental and isotopic content are of interest to the consumers. Its elemental content may reflect the macro nutrient reduction during milling or probable toxic elements uptake. Three Japanese and four Philippine polished rice samples in his study mostly came from rice bought from supermarkets.These rice samples were washed, dried and ground to fine powder. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), a very sensitive non-destructive multi-element analytical technique, was used for the elemental analysis of the samples and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to obtain the isotopic signatures of the samples. Results show that compared with the unpolished rice standard NIES CRM10b, the polished Japanese and Philippine rice sampled show reduced concentrations of elements by as much as 1/3 to 1/10 of Mg, Mn, K and Na. Levels of Ca and Zn are not greatly affected. Arsenic is found in all the Japanese rice tested at an average concentration of 0.103 μg/g and three out of four of the Philippine rice at an average concentration of 0.070 μg/g. Arsenic contamination may have been introduced from the fertilizer used in rice fields. Higher levels of Br are seen in two of the Philippine rice at 14 and 34 μg/g with the most probable source being the pesticide methyl bromide. Isotopic ratio of ae 13 C show signature of a C3 plant with possible narrow distinguishable signature of Japanese rice within -27.5 to -28.5 while Philippine rice within -29 to -30. More rice samples will be analyzed to gain better understanding of isotopic signatures to distinguish inter-varietal and/or geographical differences. Elemental composition of soil samples of rice samples sources will be determined for better understanding of uptake mechanisms. (author)

  19. Use of Lead Isotopes to Identify Sources of Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Atmospheric Aerosol from Mining Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Félix, Omar I.; Csavina, Janae; Field, Jason; Rine, Kyle P.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; Betterton, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are a potential source of metal and metalloid contamination by atmospheric particulate generated from smelting activities, as well as from erosion of mine tailings. In this work, we show how lead isotopes can be used for source apportionment of metal and metalloid contaminants from the site of an active copper mine. Analysis of atmospheric aerosol shows two distinct isotopic signatures: one prevalent in fine particles (< 1 μm aerodynamic diameter) while the other corresponds...

  20. High mass isotope separation arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to the isotope separation art and, more particularly, to a selectively photon-induced energy level transition of an isotopic molecule containing the isotope to be separated and a chemical reaction with a chemically reactive agent to provide a chemical compound containing atoms of the isotope desired. In particular a description is given of a method of laser isotope separation applied to the separation of 235 UF 6 from 238 UF 6 . (U.K.)

  1. Isotope Production Facility (IPF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced radioactive isotopes for medicine and research since the mid 1970s, when targets were first irradiated using the 800...

  2. Calcium stable isotope geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gausonne, Nikolaus [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mineralogie; Schmitt, Anne-Desiree [Strasbourg Univ. (France). LHyGeS/EOST; Heuser, Alexander [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Steinmann-Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Palaeontologie; Wombacher, Frank [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie und Mineralogie; Dietzel, Martin [Technische Univ. Graz (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte Geowissenschaften; Tipper, Edward [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Schiller, Martin [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Natural History Museum of Denmark

    2016-08-01

    This book provides an overview of the fundamentals and reference values for Ca stable isotope research, as well as current analytical methodologies including detailed instructions for sample preparation and isotope analysis. As such, it introduces readers to the different fields of application, including low-temperature mineral precipitation and biomineralisation, Earth surface processes and global cycling, high-temperature processes and cosmochemistry, and lastly human studies and biomedical applications. The current state of the art in these major areas is discussed, and open questions and possible future directions are identified. In terms of its depth and coverage, the current work extends and complements the previous reviews of Ca stable isotope geochemistry, addressing the needs of graduate students and advanced researchers who want to familiarize themselves with Ca stable isotope research.

  3. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    The instant invention relates to a process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same material in said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by a step wherein more of the excited molecules than nonexcited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium. 15 claims, 1 figure

  4. Isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, W.R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The instant invention relates to an improved process for separating a material into two or more parts in each of which the abundances of the isotopes of a given element differ from the abundances of the isotopes of the same element in said material. More particularly, the invention relates to a method for the isotopically selective excitation of gas phase molecules by multiple infrared photon absorption followed by a step wherein more of the excited molecules than non-excited molecules are converted to a chemically different form which may be separated by means known in the art. This invention is useful for, but not limited to, the separation of the principal isotopes of uranium

  5. Perchlorate isotope forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, J.K.; Sturchio, N.C.; Gu, B.; Horita, J.; Brown, G.M.; Jackson, W.A.; Batista, J.; Hatzinger, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Perchlorate has been detected recently in a variety of soils, waters, plants, and food products at levels that may be detrimental to human health. These discoveries have generated considerable interest in perchlorate source identification. In this study, comprehensive stable isotope analyses ( 37Cl/35Cl and 18O/17O/ 16O) of perchlorate from known synthetic and natural sources reveal systematic differences in isotopic characteristics that are related to the formation mechanisms. In addition, isotopic analyses of perchlorate extracted from groundwater and surface water demonstrate the feasibility of identifying perchlorate sources in contaminated environments on the basis of this technique. Both natural and synthetic sources of perchlorate have been identified in water samples from some perchlorate occurrences in the United States by the isotopic method. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  6. Isotopically controlled semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, E.E.

    2004-11-15

    A review of recent research involving isotopically controlled semiconductors is presented. Studies with isotopically enriched semiconductor structures experienced a dramatic expansion at the end of the Cold War when significant quantities of enriched isotopes of elements forming semiconductors became available for worldwide collaborations. Isotopes of an element differ in nuclear mass, may have different nuclear spins and undergo different nuclear reactions. Among the latter, the capture of thermal neutrons which can lead to neutron transmutation doping, can be considered the most important one for semiconductors. Experimental and theoretical research exploiting the differences in all the properties has been conducted and will be illustrated with selected examples. Manuel Cardona, the longtime editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications has been and continues to be one of the major contributors to this field of solid state physics and it is a great pleasure to dedicate this review to him.

  7. Nonequilibrium clumped isotope signals in microbial methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David T.; Gruen, Danielle S.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Stewart, Lucy C.; Holden, James F.; Hristov, Alexander N.; Pohlman, John W.; Morrill, Penny L.; Könneke, Martin; Delwiche, Kyle B.; Reeves, Eoghan P.; Sutcliffe, Chelsea N.; Ritter, Daniel J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hemond, Harold F.; Kubo, Michael D.; Cardace, Dawn; Hoehler, Tori M.; Ono, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Methane is a key component in the global carbon cycle with a wide range of anthropogenic and natural sources. Although isotopic compositions of methane have traditionally aided source identification, the abundance of its multiply-substituted “clumped” isotopologues, e.g., 13CH3D, has recently emerged as a proxy for determining methane-formation temperatures; however, the impact of biological processes on methane’s clumped isotopologue signature is poorly constrained. We show that methanogenesis proceeding at relatively high rates in cattle, surface environments, and laboratory cultures exerts kinetic control on 13CH3D abundances and results in anomalously elevated formation temperature estimates. We demonstrate quantitatively that H2 availability accounts for this effect. Clumped methane thermometry can therefore provide constraints on the generation of methane in diverse settings, including continental serpentinization sites and ancient, deep groundwaters.

  8. DESIGN OF LSDS FOR ISOTOPIC FISSILE ASSAY IN SPENT FUEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YONGDEOK LEE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A future nuclear energy system is being developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI, the system involves a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR linked with the pyro-process. The pyro-process produces a source material to fabricate a SFR fuel rod. Therefore, an isotopic fissile content assay is very important for fuel rod safety and SFR economics. A new technology for an analysis of isotopic fissile content has been proposed using a lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS. The new technology has several features for a fissile analysis from spent fuel: direct isotopic fissile assay, no background interference, and no requirement from burnup history information. Several calculations were done on the designed spectrometer geometry: detection sensitivity, neutron energy spectrum analysis, neutron fission characteristics, self shielding analysis, and neutron production mechanism. The spectrum was well organized even at low neutron energy and the threshold fission chamber was a proper choice to get prompt fast fission neutrons. The characteristic fission signature was obtained in slowing down neutron energy from each fissile isotope. Another application of LSDS is for an optimum design of the spent fuel storage, maximization of the burnup credit and provision of the burnup code correction factor. Additionally, an isotopic fissile content assay will contribute to an increase in transparency and credibility for the utilization of spent fuel nuclear material, as internationally demanded.

  9. Stable Isotope Systematics of Coalbed Gas during Desorption and Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Niemann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The stable carbon isotope ratios of coalbed methane (CBM demonstrate diagnostic changes that systematically vary with production and desorption times. These shifts can provide decisive, predictive information on the behaviour and potential performance of CBM operations. Samples from producing CBM wells show a general depletion in 13C-methane with increasing production times and corresponding shifts in δ13C-CH4 up to 35.8‰. Samples from canister desorption experiments show mostly enrichment in 13C for methane with increasing desorption time and isotope shifts of up to 43.4‰. Also, 13C-depletion was observed in some samples with isotope shifts of up to 32.1‰. Overall, the magnitudes of the observed isotope shifts vary considerably between different sample sets, but also within samples from the same source. The δ13C-CH4 values do not have the anticipated signature of methane generated from coal. This indicates that secondary processes, including desorption and diffusion, can influence the values. It is also challenging to deconvolute these various secondary processes because their molecular and isotope effects can have similar directions and/or magnitudes. In some instances, significant alteration of CBM gases has to be considered as a combination of secondary alteration effects.

  10. Water isotope tracers of tropical hydroclimate in a warming world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konecky, B. L.; Noone, D.; Nusbaumer, J. M.; Cobb, K. M.; Di Nezio, P. N.; Otto-Bliesner, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    The tropical water cycle is projected to undergo substantial changes under a warming climate, but direct meteorological observations to contextualize these changes are rare prior to the 20th century. Stable oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios (δ18O, δD) of environmental waters preserved in geologic archives are increasingly being used to reconstruct terrestrial rainfall over many decades to millions of years. However, a rising number of new, modern-day observations and model simulations have challenged previous interpretations of these isotopic signatures. This presentation systematically evaluates the three main influences on the δ18O and δD of modern precipitation - rainfall amount, cloud type, and moisture transport - from terrestrial stations throughout the tropics, and uses this interpretive framework to understand past changes in terrestrial tropical rainfall. Results indicate that cloud type and moisture transport have a larger influence on modern δ18O and δD of tropical precipitation than previously believed, indicating that isotope records track changes in cloud characteristics and circulation that accompany warmer and cooler climate states. We use our framework to investigate isotopic records of the land-based tropical rain belt during the Last Glacial Maximum, the period of warming following the Little Ice Age, and the 21st century. Proxy and observational data are compared with water isotope-enabled simulations with the Community Earth System Model in order to discuss how global warming and cooling may influence tropical terrestrial hydroclimate.

  11. Design of LSDS for Isotopic Fissile Assay in Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yongdeok; Park, Changje; Kim, Hodong; Song, Kee Chan

    2013-01-01

    A future nuclear energy system is being developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), the system involves a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) linked with the pyro-process. The pyro-process produces a source material to fabricate a SFR fuel rod. Therefore, an isotopic fissile content assay is very important for fuel rod safety and SFR economics. A new technology for an analysis of isotopic fissile content has been proposed using a lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS). The new technology has several features for a fissile analysis from spent fuel: direct isotopic fissile assay, no background interference, and no requirement from burnup history information. Several calculations were done on the designed spectrometer geometry: detection sensitivity, neutron energy spectrum analysis, neutron fission characteristics, self shielding analysis, and neutron production mechanism. The spectrum was well organized even at low neutron energy and the threshold fission chamber was a proper choice to get prompt fast fission neutrons. The characteristic fission signature was obtained in slowing down neutron energy from each fissile isotope. Another application of LSDS is for an optimum design of the spent fuel storage, maximization of the burnup credit and provision of the burnup code correction factor. Additionally, an isotopic fissile content assay will contribute to an increase in transparency and credibility for the utilization of spent fuel nuclear material, as internationally demanded

  12. ΔI = 1 Signature Splitting in Signature Partners of Odd Mass Superdeformed Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalaf A. M.,

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The spins, transition energies, rotational frequencies, kinematic and dynamic moment of inertia of rotational bands of signature partners pairs of odd–A superdeformed bands in A190 region were calculated by proposing a simple model based on collective rotational model. Simulated search program was written to determine the model parameters. The calculated results agree with experimental data for fourteen signature partner pairs in Hg/Tl/Pb/Bi/nuclei. We investigated the ∆I=1 signature splitting by extracted the difference between the average transitions I+2 ! I and I ! I-2 energies in one band and the transition I+1 ! I-1 energies in its signature partner. Most of the signature partners in this region show large amplitude staggering. The signature splitting has the effect of increasing dynamical moment of inertia J 2 for favored band and decreasing J 2 for the unfavored band.

  13. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  14. Breakthrough Listen: Searching for Signatures of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, H. T.; Siemion, A. P. V.

    2017-11-01

    Breakthrough Listen is searching for signals of extra-terrestrial technologies using radio and optical telescopes. Very nearby stars of all types. Stars across the HR diagram and galaxies are all of interest in the search for techno-signatures.

  15. Magnetic signature surveillance of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernatowicz, H.; Schoenig, F.C.

    1981-01-01

    Typical nuclear fuel material contains tramp ferromagnetic particles of random size and distribution. Also, selected amounts of paramagnetic or ferromagnetic material can be added at random or at known positions in the fuel material. The fuel material in its non-magnetic container is scanned along its length by magnetic susceptibility detecting apparatus whereby susceptibility changes along its length are obtained and provide a unique signal waveform of the container of fuel material as a signature thereof. The output signature is stored. At subsequent times in its life the container is again scanned and respective signatures obtained which are compared with the initially obtained signature, any differences indicating alteration or tampering with the fuel material. If the fuel material includes a paramagnetic additive by taking two measurements along the container the effects thereof can be cancelled out. (author)

  16. Magnetic Signature of Brushless Electric Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, David

    2006-01-01

    Brushless electric motors are used in a number of underwater vehicles. When these underwater vehicles are used for mine clearance operations the magnetic signature of the brushless motors is important...

  17. UWIS isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtasiewicz, A.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1995 the University of Warsaw Isotope Separator group has participated in the ISOL/IGISOL project at the Heavy Ion Cyclotron. This project consists in installation of an isotope separator (on line with cyclotron heavy ion beam) with a hot plasma ion source (ISOL system) and/or with an ion guide source (IGISOL system). In the report the short description of the present status of the project is presented

  18. Isotope toolbox turns 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenander, Fredrik; Riisager, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes.......REX-ISOLDE, one of CERN’s most compact accelerators, has just celebrated its 10th anniversary. The machine’s versatility provides radioactive ion beams across the range of nuclear isotopes....

  19. Isotopes in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, G.; Rozanski, K.; Vose, P.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive and stable isotopes have long been considered a very efficient tool for studying physical and biological aspects of how the global ecosystem functions. Their applications in environmental research are numerous, embracing research at all levels. This article looks at only a few of the approaches to environmental problems that involve the use of isotopes. Special attention is given to studies of the Amazon Basin. Environmental isotopes are very efficient tools in water cycle studies. Tritium, a radioactive tracer, is especially useful in studying dynamics of water movement in different compartments of the hydrosphere, both on the local and global scales. Heavy stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen (deuterium and oxygen-18) provide information about steady-state characteristics of the water cycle. Isotope methods, some relatively new, have a major role in site-specific studies. Some indicative examples include: Studying turnover of organic matter. Changes in the carbon-13/carbon-12 isotopic ratio of organic matter were used to determine the respective contributions of organic carbon derived from forest and pasture. Studying biological nitrogen fixation. One of the ways nitrogen levels in soil can be maintained for productivity is by biological nitrogen fixation. Studying nitrogen availability and losses. The experimental use of nitrogen-15 is invaluable for defining losses of soil nitrogen to the atmosphere and to groundwater. Studies can similarly be done with stable and radioactive sulphur isotopes. This article indicates some potential uses of isotopes in environmental research. While the major problem of global climate change has not been specifically addressed here, the clearing of the Amazon forest, one focus of the IAEA's environmental programme, may have serious consequences for the global climate. These include substantial reduction of the amount of latent heat transported to the regions outside the tropics and acceleration of the greenhouse

  20. Laser isotope separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaldor, A.

    1976-01-01

    The claimed invention is a method of isotope separation based on the unimolecular decomposition of vibrationally excited negative ions which are produced in the reaction of thermal electrons and molecules which have been vibrationally excited in an isotope selective manner. This method is especially applicable to molecules represented by the formula MF 6 wherein M is selected from the group consisting of U, S, W, Se, Te, Mo, Re, and Tc. 9 claims, 1 drawing figure

  1. Isotopes in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seligman, H.; Gillen, V.A.

    1990-12-01

    Isotopes represent a tool which can do certain jobs better, easier, quicker, more simply and cheaper than competitive methods. Some measurements could not be done at all without the use of isotopes as there are no alternative methods available. A short review of these tools of science in their different fields is given: food and agriculture, human health applications, industry, hydrology, geology, geochemistry, geophysics and dating, environment, basic scientific research

  2. International Isotopes Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislaw Z. Zhiznin; Vladimir M. Timohov

    2016-01-01

    The paper studies world markets of stable and radioactive isotopes. Isotopes have found various applications in science, industry, agriculture and other sectors of the economy, but especially - in medicine. Nuclear medicine is developing intensively all over the world thanks to the success in the treatment of various diseases with the help of radioactive pharmaceuticals (radiopharmaceuticals). The article uses empirical data from a forecast study of the global radiopharmaceuticals market made...

  3. LSDS Development for Isotopic Fissile Assay in Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Park, Chang Je; Park, Geun Il; Lee, Jung Won; Song, Kee Chan

    2011-01-01

    As an option to reduce a spent fuel and reuse an existing fissile material in spent fuel, sodium fast reactor SFR program linked with pyro-processing is under development in KAERI. A uranium-TRU mixture through a pyro-process is used to fabricate SFR fuel. An assay of isotopic fissile content plays an important role in an optimum design of storage site and reuse of fissile materials of spent fuel. Lead slowing down spectrometer LSDS is being developed in KAERI to analyze isotopic fissile material content. LSDS has several features: direct fissile assay, near real time fissile assay, no influence from radiation background, fissile isotopic assay and applicable to spent fuel and recycled fuel. Based on the designed geometry, neutron energy resolution was investigated. The neutron energy spectrum was analyzed as well. Spent fuel emits large number of neutrons by spontaneous fission. Neutron generator must overcome the neutron background to get the pure fission signals from fissile materials. Neutron generator is planned to have compact system with one section electron linac which is easy maintenance, less cost and high neutron yield. The LSD has the power to resolve the fission characteristics from each fissile material. This feature can analyze the content of isotopic fissile. From 1keV to 0.1eV energy range, the energy resolution is enough to get the individual fissile fission signatures. The dominant fission signature is shown below 1eV for each fissile isotope. The neutron generation system with target was designed to get fission signals by fissile materials. The system was decided to overcome neutron backgrounds and to get good counting statistics. Finally, an accurate fissile material content will contribute to safety of spent fuel reuse in future nuclear energy system and optimum design of spent fuel storage site. Additionally, an accurate fissile material content will increase international transparence and credibility for the reuse of PWR spent fuel

  4. Signature for the shape of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomero, G.I.; Reboucas, M.J.; Teixeira, A.F.F.

    2001-03-01

    If the universe has a nontrival shape (topology) the sky may show multiple correlated images of cosmic objects. These correlations can be counched in terms of distance correlations. We propose a statistical quantity which can be used to reveal the topological signature of any Roberston-Walker (RW) spacetime with nontrivial topology. We also show through computer-aided simulations how one can extract the topological signatures of flat elliptic and hyperbolic RW universes with nontrivial topology. (author)

  5. Signature-based store checking buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  6. Tightly Secure Signatures From Lossy Identification Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdalla , Michel; Fouque , Pierre-Alain; Lyubashevsky , Vadim; Tibouchi , Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present three digital signature schemes with tight security reductions in the random oracle model. Our first signature scheme is a particularly efficient version of the short exponent discrete log-based scheme of Girault et al. (J Cryptol 19(4):463–487, 2006). Our scheme has a tight reduction to the decisional short discrete logarithm problem, while still maintaining the non-tight reduction to the computational version of the problem upon which the or...

  7. International Isotopes Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Z. Zhiznin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies world markets of stable and radioactive isotopes. Isotopes have found various applications in science, industry, agriculture and other sectors of the economy, but especially - in medicine. Nuclear medicine is developing intensively all over the world thanks to the success in the treatment of various diseases with the help of radioactive pharmaceuticals (radiopharmaceuticals. The article uses empirical data from a forecast study of the global radiopharmaceuticals market made in 2015 by a research company «Markets and Markets» for the European, North American and global markets. The paper also analyzes the statistical data on the global export and import of natural uranium, enriched and depleted uranium, plutonium, thorium and some stable isotopes of non-medical purposes, presented by a company «Trend economy» in 2014. Despite a unique industrial base for the production of isotopes created in the Soviet Union Russia occupies a modest position on the world market of nuclear medicine except for certain areas. More than 80% of isotopes, produced in USSR were consumed domestically, the export of the stable and radioactive isotopes was in equal proportions. Now the country's domestic radiopharmaceuticals market is poorly developed. To radically change the situation, it is necessary to carry out reforms that stimulate the development of nuclear medicine.

  8. Isotope separation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, R.K.; Eisner, P.N.; Thomas, W.R.I.

    1983-01-01

    This application discloses a method for and an apparatus in which isotopes of an element in a compared are separated from each other while that compound, i.e., including a mixture of such isotopes, flows along a predetermined path. The apparatus includes a flow tube having a beginning and an end. The mixture of isotopes is introduced into the flow tube at a first introduction point between the beginning and the end thereof to flow the mixture toward the end thereof. A laser irradiates the flow tube dissociating compounds of a preselected one of said isotopes thereby converting the mixture in an isotopically selective manner. The dissociation products are removed from the tube at a first removal point between the first introduction point and the end. The dissociation product removed at the the first removal point are reconverted back into the comound thereby providing a first stage enriched compound. This first stage enriched compound is reintroduced into the flow tube at a second introduction point between the beginning thereof and the first introduction point. Further product is removed from the flow tube at a second removal point between the second introduction point and the first introduction point. The second introduction point is chosen so that the isotope composition of the first stage enriched compound is approximately the same as that of the compound in the flow tube

  9. Identification of the nitrate contamination sources of the Brusselian sands groundwater body (Belgium) using a dual-isotope approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Samuel; Sebilo, Mathieu; Vanclooster, Marnik

    2011-09-01

    Isotopic fingerprinting is an advanced technique allowing the classification of the nitrate source pollution of groundwater, but needs further development and validation. In this study, we performed measurements of natural stable isotopic composition of nitrate ((15)N and (18)O) in the groundwater body of the Brussels sands (Belgium) and studied the spatial and temporal dynamics of the isotope signature of this aquifer. Potential nitrogen sources sampled in the region had isotopic signatures that fell within the corresponding typical ranges found in the literature. For a few monitoring stations, the isotopic data strongly suggest that the sources of nitrate are from mineral fertiliser origin, as used in agriculture and golf courses. Other stations suggest that manure leaching from unprotected stockpiles in farms, domestic gardening practices, septic tanks and probably cemeteries contribute to the nitrate pollution of this groundwater body. For most monitoring stations, nitrate originates from a mixing of several nitrogen sources. The isotopic signature of the groundwater body was poorly structured in space, but exhibited a clear temporal structure. This temporal structure could be explained by groundwater recharge dynamics and cycling process of nitrogen in the soil-nitrogen pool.

  10. Isotopic modeling of the sub-cloud evaporation effect in precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamalikis, V; Argiriou, A A; Dotsika, E

    2016-02-15

    In dry and warm environments sub-cloud evaporation influences the falling raindrops modifying their final stable isotopic content. During their descent from the cloud base towards the ground surface, through the unsaturated atmosphere, hydrometeors are subjected to evaporation whereas the kinetic fractionation results to less depleted or enriched isotopic signatures compared to the initial isotopic composition of the raindrops at cloud base. Nowadays the development of Generalized Climate Models (GCMs) that include isotopic content calculation modules are of great interest for the isotopic tracing of the global hydrological cycle. Therefore the accurate description of the underlying processes affecting stable isotopic content can improve the performance of iso-GCMs. The aim of this study is to model the sub-cloud evaporation effect using a) mixing and b) numerical isotope evaporation models. The isotope-mixing evaporation model simulates the isotopic enrichment (difference between the ground and the cloud base isotopic composition of raindrops) in terms of raindrop size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) at ground level. The isotopic enrichment (Δδ) varies linearly with the evaporated raindrops mass fraction of the raindrop resulting to higher values at drier atmospheres and for smaller raindrops. The relationship between Δδ and RH is described by a 'heat capacity' model providing high correlation coefficients for both isotopes (R(2)>80%) indicating that RH is an ideal indicator of the sub-cloud evaporation effect. Vertical distribution of stable isotopes in falling raindrops is also investigated using a numerical isotope-evaporation model. Temperature and humidity dependence of the vertical isotopic variation is clearly described by the numerical isotopic model showing an increase in the isotopic values with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. At an almost saturated atmosphere (RH=95%) sub-cloud evaporation is negligible and the isotopic

  11. Decoding mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in modern atmosphere using cosmogenic 35S: A five-isotope approach and possible implications for Archean sulfur isotope records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Thiemens, M. H.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, X.; Huang, X.; Chen, K.; Zhang, Z.; Tao, J.

    2017-12-01

    The signature of sulfur isotopic mass-independent fractionation (S-MIF) observed in Archean sediments have been interpreted as a proxy of the origins and evolution of atmospheric oxygen and early life on Earth [1]. Photochemistry of SOx in the short (reactions of elemental sulfur [6], and relevant experiments are being conducted to test the isotope effect. Although combustion is unlikely in Archean, recombination reactions may occur in other previously unappreciated processes such as volcanism and may contribute in part to the heavily depleted 36S in some Paleoarchean records [5,7]. The roles of both photochemical and non-photochemical reactions in the variability of Archean S-MIF records require further analysis in the future. Refs: [1] Farquhar et al., Science 2000; [2] Shaheen et al., PNAS 2014; [3] Lin et al., PNAS 2016; [4] Wacey et al., Precambrian Res 2015; [5] Muller et al., PNAS 2016; [6] Babikov, PNAS 2017; [7] Shen et al., EPSL, 2009.

  12. Establishing the potential of Ca isotopes as proxy for consumption of dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, N.-C.; Henderson, Gideon M.; Belshaw, Nick S.; Hedges, Robert E.M.

    2006-01-01

    A procedure has been developed which allows precise determination of Ca isotope ratios in natural and organic samples such as bones, milk and other biological materials. In this study the procedure is used to determine Ca isotope ratios in modern dietary systems and to establish the potential of Ca isotopes as a paleodiet tracer by analysis of bones. Multi-sampling across a 5 cm portion of a red deer jawbone shows invariant Ca isotope ratios and suggests negligible isotopic effect during bone remodelling. The difference between Ca isotopes in red deer diet and bones from one location was 0.65 per mille , in agreement with a previous study of diet/bone offsets. Similar values for modern deer-bone δ 44/42 Ca from four geographically diverse populations demonstrate that geological/environmental conditions do not cause large variability and suggest that diet is the major cause for variations in bone δ 44/42 Ca. δ 44/42 Ca of herbivore milk is found to be ∼0.5 to 0.6 higher than the corresponding diet. Modern human milk has a δ 44/42 Ca of -1.15 (n = 4) and is isotopically the lightest material reported in this study. This suggests that, for these samples, a significant portion of Ca intake was from dairy sources, and that human milk has Ca which is, again, ∼0.6 per mille isotopically lighter than dietary Ca intake. Finally, Ca isotope ratios are presented from a variety of samples formed during fermentation processes (e.g., curds, whey, etc.) which indicate that these processes do not fractionate Ca isotopes significantly. Together, the data in this paper indicate that, because milk is an important dietary source of Ca with a distinctive signature, Ca isotope ratios should provide a tracer for past dairy consumption. A simplified model is outlined to demonstrate the ability to quantify dairy consumption by the analysis o