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Sample records for tcr tg single

  1. Analysis of the paired TCR α- and β-chains of single human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-Min Kim

    Full Text Available Analysis of the paired i.e. matching TCR α- and β-chain rearrangements of single human T cells is required for a precise investigation of clonal diversity, tissue distribution and specificity of protective and pathologic T-cell mediated immune responses. Here we describe a multiplex RT-PCR based technology, which for the first time allows for an unbiased analysis of the complete sequences of both α- and β-chains of TCR from single T cells. We validated our technology by the analysis of the pathologic T-cell infiltrates from tissue lesions of two T-cell mediated autoimmune diseases, psoriasis vulgaris (PV and multiple sclerosis (MS. In both disorders we could detect various T cell clones as defined by multiple T cells with identical α- and β-chain rearrangements distributed across the tissue lesions. In PV, single cell TCR analysis of lesional T cells identified clonal CD8(+ T cell expansions that predominated in the epidermis of psoriatic plaques. An MS brain lesion contained two dominant CD8(+ T-cell clones that extended over the white and grey matter and meninges. In both diseases several clonally expanded T cells carried dual TCRs composed of one Vβ and two different Vα-chain rearrangements. These results show that our technology is an efficient instrument to analyse αβ-T cell responses with single cell resolution in man. It should facilitate essential new insights into the mechanisms of protective and pathologic immunity in many human T-cell mediated conditions and allow for resurrecting functional TCRs from any αβ-T cell of choice that can be used for investigating their specificity.

  2. Single TCR-Vβ2 evaluation discloses the circulating T cell clone in Sezary syndrome: one family fits all!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Enrico; Abeni, Damiano; Pomponi, Debora; Russo, Nicoletta; Russo, Giandomenico; Narducci, Maria Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Sézary Syndrome (SS/L-CTCL) is a rare but aggressive variant of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL), characterized by erythroderma, lymphadenopathy, and the presence of a circulating memory CD4(+) T cell malignant clone with a skin homing behavior, lacking CD26 and CD49d and over-expressing CD60. The availability of a panel of monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct TCR-Vβ families, allows to typify the clone by flow cytometry in about 70 % of cases. The TCR-Vβ repertoire of 533 individuals, comprising 308 patients affected by CTCL, 50 healthy donors, and subjects affected by various non-neoplastic dermatological affections was evaluated by flow cytometry. Statistical analyses were performed using the SPSS statistical software package for Microsoft Windows (SPSS, version 21, Chicago, IL). TCR-Vβ2 levels below 5.4 % or above 39.5 %, within total CD4(+) T cells, showed the best balance between sensitivity (98.1 %) and specificity (96 %) to identify the presence of a clone in the peripheral blood of patients affected by SS. Based on this observation, a "two-step" procedure in the detection of the malignant T cell clone in CTCLs is herein suggested. TCR-Vβ2 assessment in all cases (first step). In the case of TCR-Vβ2 levels above 39.5 %, the presence of a clonal expansion of this family is suggested, deserving further confirmation by means of T cell gene rearrangement evaluation. In patients having a TCR-Vβ2 reactivity below 5.4 % (second step), the entire TCR-Vβ repertoire should be evaluated to typify the expanded clone. In conclusion, the single TCR-Vβ2 expression check, instead of the entire repertoire assessment, represents an easy and cost-effective method for the recognition of CTCL aggressive leukemic variant.

  3. An optimized single chain TCR scaffold relying on the assembly with the native CD3-complex prevents residual mispairing with endogenous TCRs in human T-cells

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    Knies, Diana; Klobuch, Sebastian; Xue, Shao-An; Birtel, Matthias; Echchannaoui, Hakim; Yildiz, Oezlem; Omokoko, Tana; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Stauss, Hans; Sahin, Ugur; Herr, Wolfgang; Theobald, Matthias; Thomas, Simone; Voss, Ralf-Holger

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer envisions the adoptive transfer of T-cells genetically engineered with tumor-specific heterodimeric α/β T-cell receptors (TCRα/β). However, potential mispairing of introduced TCRα/β-chains with endogenous β/α-ones may evoke unpredictable autoimmune reactivities. A novel single chain (sc)TCR format relies on the fusion of the Vα-Linker-Vβ-fragment to the TCR Cβ-domain and coexpression of the TCR Cα-domain capable of recruiting the natural CD3-complex for full and hence, native T-cell signaling. Here, we tested whether such a gp100(280-288)- or p53(264-272) tumor antigen-specific scTCR is still prone to mispairing with TCRα. In a human Jurkat-76 T-cell line lacking endogenous TCRs, surface expression and function of a scTCR could be reconstituted by any cointroduced TCRα-chain indicating mispairing to take place on a molecular basis. In contrast, transduction into human TCRα/β-positive T-cells revealed that mispairing is largely reduced. Competition experiments in Jurkat-76 confirmed the preference of dcTCR to selfpair and to spare scTCR. This also allowed for the generation of dc/scTCR-modified cytomegalovirus/tumor antigen-bispecific T-cells to augment T-cell activation in CMV-infected tumor patients. Residual mispairing was prevented by strenghtening the Vα-Li-Vβ-fragment through the design of a novel disulfide bond between a Vα- and a linker-resident residue close to Vβ. Multimer-stainings, and cytotoxicity-, IFNγ-secretion-, and CFSE-proliferation-assays, the latter towards dendritic cells endogenously processing RNA-electroporated gp100 antigen proved the absence of hybrid scTCR/TCRα-formation without impairing avidity of scTCR/Cα in T-cells. Moreover, a fragile cytomegalovirus pp65(495-503)-specific scTCR modified this way acquired enhanced cytotoxicity. Thus, optimized scTCR/Cα inhibits residual TCR mispairing to accomplish safe adoptive immunotherapy for bulk endogenous TCRα/β-positive T-cells. PMID:27028870

  4. Propensity of a single-walled carbon nanotube-peptide to mimic a KK10 peptide in an HLA-TCR complex

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    Feng, Mei; Bell, David R.; Zhou, Ruhong

    2017-12-01

    The application of nanotechnology to improve disease diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and prevention is the goal of nanomedicine. We report here a theoretical study of a functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) mimic binding to a human leukocyte antigen-T cell receptor (HLA-TCR) immune complex as a first attempt of a potential nanomedicine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine development. The carbon nanotube was coated with three arginine residues to imitate the HIV type 1 immunodominant viral peptide KK10 (gag 263-272: KRWIILGLNK), named CNT-peptide hereafter. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the CNT-peptide and KK10 binding to an important HLA-TCR complex. Our results suggest that the CNT-peptide and KK10 bind comparably to the HLA-TCR complex, but the CNT-peptide forms stronger interactions with the TCR. Desorption simulations highlight the innate flexibility of KK10 over the CNT-peptide, resulting in a slightly higher desorption energy required for KK10 over the CNT-peptide. Our findings indicate that the designed CNT-peptide mimic has favorable propensity to activate TCR pathways and should be further explored to understand therapeutic potential.

  5. TCR/CD3 ligation of a TCR-transgenic T lymphoma blocks its proliferation in vitro but does not affect its growth in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, J; Rudolphi, A; Tcherepnev, G

    1994-01-01

    A backcrossed mouse line was established homozygous for the autosomal recessive mutation scid (severe combined immunodeficiency) and carrying T cells which express transgenic (tg) T cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains that mediate H-2 class I (Db)-restricted recognition of a male (H...... of TL1 cells resembled that of small-to-medium lymphoblasts. The cells had the following phenotype: CD3 + TCR alpha T+TCR beta T+CD4-CD8- CD44-CD45RB+LECAM-1 + IL-2R- and low H-2 expression. Exposure of TL1 cells to TCR-binding monoclonal antibodies or lectins blocked in their in vitro proliferation...

  6. Ceramide-induced TCR up-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, C; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Dietrich, J

    2000-01-01

    to increase T cell responsiveness. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize potential pathways for TCR up-regulation. We found that ceramide affected TCR recycling dynamics and induced TCR up-regulation in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Experiments applying phosphatase......The TCR is a constitutively recycling receptor meaning that a constant fraction of TCR from the plasma membrane is transported inside the cell at the same time as a constant fraction of TCR from the intracellular pool is transported to the plasma membrane. TCR recycling is affected by protein...... kinase C activity. Thus, an increase in protein kinase C activity affects TCR recycling kinetics leading to a new TCR equilibrium with a reduced level of TCR expressed at the T cell surface. Down-regulation of TCR expression compromises T cell activation. Conversely, TCR up-regulation is expected...

  7. Monoclonal TCR-redirected tumor cell killing.

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    Liddy, Nathaniel; Bossi, Giovanna; Adams, Katherine J; Lissina, Anna; Mahon, Tara M; Hassan, Namir J; Gavarret, Jessie; Bianchi, Frayne C; Pumphrey, Nicholas J; Ladell, Kristin; Gostick, Emma; Sewell, Andrew K; Lissin, Nikolai M; Harwood, Naomi E; Molloy, Peter E; Li, Yi; Cameron, Brian J; Sami, Malkit; Baston, Emma E; Todorov, Penio T; Paston, Samantha J; Dennis, Rebecca E; Harper, Jane V; Dunn, Steve M; Ashfield, Rebecca; Johnson, Andy; McGrath, Yvonne; Plesa, Gabriela; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Price, David A; Vuidepot, Annelise; Williams, Daniel D; Sutton, Deborah H; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-06-01

    T cell immunity can potentially eradicate malignant cells and lead to clinical remission in a minority of patients with cancer. In the majority of these individuals, however, there is a failure of the specific T cell receptor (TCR)–mediated immune recognition and activation process. Here we describe the engineering and characterization of new reagents termed immune-mobilizing monoclonal TCRs against cancer (ImmTACs). Four such ImmTACs, each comprising a distinct tumor-associated epitope-specific monoclonal TCR with picomolar affinity fused to a humanized cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3)-specific single-chain antibody fragment (scFv), effectively redirected T cells to kill cancer cells expressing extremely low surface epitope densities. Furthermore, these reagents potently suppressed tumor growth in vivo. Thus, ImmTACs overcome immune tolerance to cancer and represent a new approach to tumor immunotherapy.

  8. Multi-valued logic circuits using hybrid circuit consisting of three gates single-electron transistors (TG-SETs) and MOSFETs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, SeungJun; Yu, YunSeop; Choi, JungBum

    2008-10-01

    New multi-valued logic (MVL) families using the hybrid circuits consisting of three gates single-electron transistors (TG-SETs) and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) are proposed. The use of SETs offers periodic literal characteristics due to Coulomb oscillation of SET, which allows a realization of binary logic (BL) circuits as well as multi-valued logic (MVL) circuits. The basic operations of the proposed MVL families are successfully confirmed through SPICE circuit simulation based on the physical device model of a TG-SET. The proposed MVL circuits are found to be much faster, but much larger power consumption than a previously reported MVL, and they have a trade-off between speed and power consumption. As an example to apply the newly developed MVL families, a half-adder is introduced.

  9. Rapid and selective expansion of nonclonotypic T cells in regulatory T cell-deficient, foreign antigen-specific TCR-transgenic scurfy mice: antigen-dependent expansion and TCR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rahul; Ju, Angela Chiao-Ying; Kung, John T; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2008-11-15

    Foreign Ag-specific TCR-transgenic (Tg) mice contain a small fraction of T cells bearing the endogenous Vbeta and Valpha chains as well as a population expressing an intermediate level of Tg TCR. Importantly, these minor nonclonotypic populations contain > or = 99% of the CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) and, despite low overall Treg expression, peripheral tolerance is maintained. In the OT-II TCR (OVA-specific, Vbeta5(high)Valpha2(high)) Tg scurfy (Sf) mice (OT-II Sf) that lack Treg, nonclonotypic T cells markedly expanded in the periphery but not in the thymus. Expanded T cells expressed memory/effector phenotype and were enriched in blood and inflamed lungs. In contrast, Vbeta5(high)Valpha2(high) clonotypic T cells were not expanded, displayed the naive phenotype, and found mainly in the lymph nodes. Importantly, Vbeta5(neg) T cells were able to transfer multiorgan inflammation in Rag1(-/-) recipients. T cells bearing dual TCR (dual Vbeta or dual Valpha) were demonstrated frequently in the Vbeta5(int) and Valpha2(int) populations. Our study demonstrated that in the absence of Treg, the lack of peripheral expansion of clonotypic T cells is due to the absence of its high-affinity Ag OVA. Thus, the rapid expansion of nonclonotypic T cells in OT-II Sf mice must require Ag (self and foreign) with sufficient affinity. Our study has implications with respect to the roles of Ag and dual TCR in the selection and regulation of Treg and Treg-controlled Ag-dependent T cell expansion in TCR Tg and TCR Tg Sf mice, respectively.

  10. Constitutive and ligand-induced TCR degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Siersma, Volkert

    2004-01-01

    Modulation of TCR expression levels is a central event during T cell development and activation, and it probably plays an important role in adjusting T cell responsiveness. Conflicting data have been published on down-regulation and degradation rates of the individual TCR subunits, and several di...... to the lysosomes. Similar results were obtained in studies of primary human Vbeta8+ T cells stimulated with superantigen. Based on these results, the simplest model for TCR internalization, sorting, and degradation is proposed.......Modulation of TCR expression levels is a central event during T cell development and activation, and it probably plays an important role in adjusting T cell responsiveness. Conflicting data have been published on down-regulation and degradation rates of the individual TCR subunits, and several...... divergent models for TCR down-regulation and degradation have been suggested. The aims of this study were to determine the rate constants for constitutive and ligand-induced TCR degradation and to determine whether the TCR subunits segregate or are processed as an intact unit during TCR down...

  11. Modulation of immunoglobulin production by invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR-bearing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michio Shimamura

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR(+ (Vα19i T cells suppress the disease progress in some models for organ specific autoimmune diseases and type IV allergy that deteriorate along with decline to excess in Th1- or Th17- immunity. In this study, we examined the effects of over-generation of Vα19i T cells on the Th2-controlled immunoglobulin isotype production in the models for type I allergy. IgE production by invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR transgenic (Tg mice was suppressed compared with that by non-Tg controls following administration with goat anti-mouse IgD antiserum or OVA, while IgG2a production was not influenced by the introduction of the transgene into the recipients. IgE production by wild type mice was similarly reduced when they were subjected to adoptive transfer with invariant Vα19-Jα33 TCR Tg(+ but not Tg(- cells prior to immunization. Furthermore, the suppression of IgE production by these recipients was enhanced when they were previously administered with a Vα19i T cell activator, one of the modified α-mannosyl ceramides. In summary, it is suggested that Vα19i T cells have potential to participate in the homeostasis of immunity and that they suppress disease progression resulting from not only Th1- but also Th2- immunity excess.

  12. TCR as supervisor of technical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Laeger, H

    1998-01-01

    Our Technical Control Room (TCR) provides continuous supervision of CERN's technical infrastructure. It also serves the inhabitants of CERN's premises as a contact point in case of problems. Every year we initiate eleven thousand recorded corrective interventions; about half subsequent to user phone calls, the other half to automatic alarms. TCR tasks are essentially fourfold: collect and distribute information on abnormal operation states; supervise those technical systems for which we have a mandate; initiate corrective interventions; and perform corrective on-site interventions outside normal working hours. A TCR operator normally has an education corresponding to a French BTS and initially little professional experience. He holds short-term contracts, up to a maximum of six years. This paper outlines TCR tasks and presents some statistical data. It also indicates relations between users, equipment groups, contract firms and the TCR as go-between. Finally, it gives an account of our seven years experience ...

  13. TCR industrial system integration strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomé, R; Sollander, P; Martini, R; Vercoutter, B; Trebulle, M

    1999-01-01

    New turnkey data acquisition systems purchased from industry are being integrated into CERN's Technical Data Server. The short time available for system integration and the large amount of data per system require a standard and modular design. Four different integration layers have been defined in order to easily 'plug in' industrial systems. The first layer allows the integration of the equipment at the digital I/O port or fieldbus (Profibus-DP) level. A second layer permits the integration of PLCs (Siemens S5, S7 and Telemecanique); a third layer integrates equipment drivers. The fourth layer integrates turnkey mimic diagrams in the TCR operator console. The second and third layers use two new event-driven protocols based on TCP/IP. Using this structure, new systems are integrated in the data transmission chain, the layer at which they are integrated depending only on their integration capabilities.

  14. TCR tuning of T cell subsets.

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    Cho, Jae-Ho; Sprent, Jonathan

    2018-05-01

    After selection in the thymus, the post-thymic T cell compartments comprise heterogenous subsets of naive and memory T cells that make continuous T cell receptor (TCR) contact with self-ligands bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. T cell recognition of self-MHC ligands elicits covert TCR signaling and is particularly important for controlling survival of naive T cells. Such tonic TCR signaling is tightly controlled and maintains the cells in a quiescent state to avoid autoimmunity. Here, we review how naive and memory T cells are differentially tuned and wired for TCR sensitivity to self and foreign ligands. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The autoimmunity risk variant LYP-W620 cooperates with CSK in the regulation of TCR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa de la Puerta

    Full Text Available The protein tyrosine phosphatase LYP, a key regulator of TCR signaling, presents a single nucleotide polymorphism, C1858T, associated with several autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus. This polymorphism changes an R by a W in the P1 Pro rich motif of LYP, which binds to CSK SH3 domain, another negative regulator of TCR signaling. Based on the analysis of the mouse homologue, Pep, it was proposed that LYP and CSK bind constitutively to inhibit LCK and subsequently TCR signaling. The detailed study of LYP/CSK interaction, here presented, showed that LYP/CSK interaction was inducible upon TCR stimulation, and involved LYP P1 and P2 motifs, and CSK SH3 and SH2 domains. Abrogating LYP/CSK interaction did not preclude the regulation of TCR signaling by these proteins.

  16. Normalized Synergy Predicts That CD8 Co-Receptor Contribution to T Cell Receptor (TCR and pMHC Binding Decreases As TCR Affinity Increases in Human Viral-Specific T Cells

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    Chad M. Williams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of naturally occurring T cell receptors (TCRs that confer specific, high-affinity recognition of pathogen and cancer-associated antigens remains a major goal in cellular immunotherapies. The contribution of the CD8 co-receptor to the interaction between the TCR and peptide-bound major histocompatibility complex (pMHC has previously been correlated with the activation and responsiveness of CD8+ T cells. However, these studies have been limited to model systems of genetically engineered hybridoma TCRs or transgenic mouse TCRs against either a single epitope or an array of altered peptide ligands. CD8 contribution in a native human antigen-specific T cell response remains elusive. Here, using Hepatitis C Virus-specific precursor CTLs spanning a large range of TCR affinities, we discovered that the functional responsiveness of any given TCR correlated with the contribution of CD8 to TCR/pMHC binding. Furthermore, we found that CD8 contribution to TCR/pMHC binding in the two-dimensional (2D system was more accurately reflected by normalized synergy (CD8 cooperation normalized by total TCR/pMHC bonds rather than synergy (total CD8 cooperation alone. While synergy showed an increasing trend with TCR affinity, normalized synergy was demonstrated to decrease with the increase of TCR affinity. Critically, normalized synergy was shown to correlate with CTL functionality and peptide sensitivity, corroborating three-dimensional (3D analysis of CD8 contribution with respect to TCR affinity. In addition, we identified TCRs that were independent of CD8 for TCR/pMHC binding. Our results resolve the current discrepancy between 2D and 3D analysis on CD8 contribution to TCR/pMHC binding, and demonstrate that naturally occurring high-affinity TCRs are more capable of CD8-independent interactions that yield greater functional responsiveness even with CD8 blocking. Taken together, our data suggest that addition of the normalized synergy parameter to our

  17. High frequency of a single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene associated with phenobarbital-resistant idiopathic epilepsy in Border Collie dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9%) in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies.

  18. High Frequency of a Single Nucleotide Substitution (c.-6-180T>G of the Canine MDR1/ABCB1 Gene Associated with Phenobarbital-Resistant Idiopathic Epilepsy in Border Collie Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keijiro Mizukami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type, T/G heterozygote, and G/G mutant homozygote to be 60.0%, 30.3%, and 9.8%, respectively, indicating that the frequency of the mutant G allele is extremely high (24.9% in Border Collies. The results suggest that this high mutation frequency of the mutation is likely to cause a high prevalence of phenobarbital-resistant epilepsy in Border Collies.

  19. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2005-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 α1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  20. High Frequency of a Single Nucleotide Substitution (c.-6-180T>G) of the Canine MDR1/ABCB1 Gene Associated with Phenobarbital-Resistant Idiopathic Epilepsy in Border Collie Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Yabuki, Akira; Chang, Hye-Sook; Uddin, Mohammad Mejbah; Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubur; Kushida, Kazuya; Kohyama, Moeko; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    A single nucleotide substitution (c.-6-180T>G) associated with resistance to phenobarbital therapy has been found in the canine MDR1/ABCB1 gene in Border Collies with idiopathic epilepsy. In the present study, a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay was developed for genotyping this mutation, and a genotyping survey was carried out in a population of 472 Border Collies in Japan to determine the current allele frequency. The survey demonstrated the frequencies of the T/T wild type...

  1. Thyroglobulin (Tg) Testing Revisited: Tg Assays, TgAb Assays, and Correlation of Results With Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netzel, Brian C; Grebe, Stefan K G; Carranza Leon, B Gisella; Castro, M Regina; Clark, Penelope M; Hoofnagle, Andrew N; Spencer, Carole A; Turcu, Adina F; Algeciras-Schimnich, Alicia

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of thyroglobulin (Tg) by mass spectrometry (Tg-MS) is emerging as a tool for accurate Tg quantification in patients with anti-Tg autoantibodies (TgAbs). The objective of the study was to perform analytical and clinical evaluations of two Tg-MS assays in comparison with immunometric Tg assays (Tg-IAs) and Tg RIAs (Tg-RIAs) in a cohort of thyroid cancer patients. A total of 589 samples from 495 patients, 243 TgAb-/252 TgAb+, were tested by Beckman, Roche, Siemens-Immulite, and Thermo-Brahms Tg and TgAb assays, two Tg-RIAs, and two Tg-MS assays. The frequency of TgAb+ was 58%, 41%, 27%, and 39% for Roche, Beckman, Siemens-Immulite, and Thermo-Brahms, respectively. In TgAb- samples, clinical sensitivities and specificities of 100% and 74%-100%, respectively, were observed across all assays. In TgAb+ samples, all Tg-IAs demonstrated assay-dependent Tg underestimation, ranging from 41% to 86%. In TgAb+ samples, the use of a common cutoff (0.5 ng/mL) for the Tg-MS, three Tg-IAs, and the USC-RIA improved the sensitivity for the Tg-MSs and Tg-RIAs when compared with the Tg-IAs. In up to 20% of TgAb+ cases, Tg-IAs failed to detect Tg that was detectable by Tg-MS. In Tg-RIAs false-high biases were observed in TgAb+ samples containing low Tg concentrations. Tg-IAs remain the method of choice for Tg quantitation in TgAb- patients. In TgAb+ patients with undetectable Tg by immunometric assay, the Tg-MS will detect Tg in up to 20% additional cases. The Tg-RIA will detect Tg in approximately 35% cases, but a significant proportion of these will be clinical false-positive results. The undetectable Tg-MS seen in approximately 40% of TgAb+ cases in patients with disease need further evaluation.

  2. Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin E in Complex with TCR Defines the Role of TCR Loop Positioning in Superantigen Recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin E J Rödström

    Full Text Available T cells are crucial players in cell-mediated immunity. The specificity of their receptor, the T cell receptor (TCR, is central for the immune system to distinguish foreign from host antigens. Superantigens are bacterial toxins capable of inducing a toxic immune response by cross-linking the TCR and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II and circumventing the antigen specificity. Here, we present the structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin E (SEE in complex with a human T cell receptor, as well as the unligated T cell receptor structure. There are clear structural changes in the TCR loops upon superantigen binding. In particular, the HV4 loop moves to circumvent steric clashes upon complex formation. In addition, a predicted ternary model of SEE in complex with both TCR and MHC class II displays intermolecular contacts between the TCR α-chain and the MHC, suggesting that the TCR α-chain is of importance for complex formation.

  3. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  4. The requirement for pre-TCR during thymic differentiation enforces a developmental pause that is essential for V-DJβ rearrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S Hathcock

    Full Text Available T cell development occurs in the thymus and is critically dependent on productive TCRβ rearrangement and pre-TCR expression in DN3 cells. The requirement for pre-TCR expression results in the arrest of thymocytes at the DN3 stage (β checkpoint, which is uniquely permissive for V-DJβ recombination; only cells expressing pre-TCR survive and develop beyond the DN3 stage. In addition, the requirement for TCRβ rearrangement and pre-TCR expression enforces suppression of TCRβ rearrangement on a second allele, allelic exclusion, thus ensuring that each T cell expresses only a single TCRβ product. However, it is not known whether pre-TCR expression is essential for allelic exclusion or alternatively if allelic exclusion is enforced by developmental changes that can occur in the absence of pre-TCR. We asked if thymocytes that were differentiated without pre-TCR expression, and therefore without pause at the β checkpoint, would suppress all V-DJβ rearrangement. We previously reported that premature CD28 signaling in murine CD4(-CD8(- (DN thymocytes supports differentiation of CD4(+CD8(+ (DP cells in the absence of pre-TCR expression. The present study uses this model to define requirements for TCRβ rearrangement and allelic exclusion. We demonstrate that if cells exit the DN3 developmental stage before TCRβ rearrangement occurs, V-DJβ rearrangement never occurs, even in DP cells that are permissive for D-Jβ and TCRα rearrangement. These results demonstrate that pre-TCR expression is not essential for thymic differentiation to DP cells or for V-DJβ suppression. However, the requirement for pre-TCR signals and the exclusion of alternative stimuli such as CD28 enforce a developmental "pause" in early DN3 cells that is essential for productive TCRβ rearrangement to occur.

  5. Differential TCR signals for T helper cell programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Penelope A

    2018-05-02

    Upon encounter with their cognate antigen naïve CD4 T cells become activated and are induced to differentiate into several possible T helper (Th) cell subsets. This differentiation depends on a number of factors including antigen presenting cells, cytokines and costimulatory molecules. The strength of the T cell receptor (TCR) signal, related to the affinity of TCR for antigen and antigen dose, has emerged as a dominant factor in determining Th cell fate. Recent studies have revealed that TCR signals of high or low strength do not simply induce quantitatively different signals in the T cells, but rather qualitatively distinct pathways can be induced based on TCR signal strength. This review examines the recent literature in this area and highlights important new developments in our understanding of Th cell differentiation and TCR signal strength. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Thyroglobulin (Tg) recovery testing with quantitative Tg antibody measurement for determining interference in serum Tg assays in differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, ACM; Links, TP; Wilde, J; Sluiter, WJ; Wolffenbuttel, BHR; van den Ouweland, JMW

    Background: Thyroglobulin (Tg) measurements are complicated by interference from Tg autoantibodies (TgAbs) or heterophilic antibodies (HAMAs). We used a new automated immunochemiluminometric assay (ICMA) with Tg recovery (TgR) on the Nichols Advantage (R) platform to reassess the clinical utility of

  7. TCR¿ is transported to and retained in the Golgi apparatus independently of other TCR chains: implications for TCR assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst

    1999-01-01

    . This study focused on the intracellular localization and transport of partially assembled TCR complexes as determined by confocal microscopy analyses. We found that none of the TCR chains except for TCRzeta were allowed to exit the ER in T cell variants in which the hexameric CD3gammaepsilonTi alphabetaCD3...... deltaepsilon complex was not formed. Interestingly, TCRzeta was exported from the ER independently of other TCR chains and was predominantly located in a compartment identified as the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, in the TCRzeta-negative cell line MA5.8, the hexameric CD3gammaepsilonTi alphabetaCD3...... the ER to the Golgi apparatus independently of each other and that these partial TCR complexes are unable to be efficiently expressed at the cell surface suggest that final TCR assembly occurs in the Golgi apparatus....

  8. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz / TCR Responsible

    2000-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number 72201. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the tec...

  9. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Document Server

    Mario Batz

    2002-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  10. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz (TCR Responsible)

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  11. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Document Server

    Mario Batz

    2002-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate CERN equipment services or contractors. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity covers the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, and buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaur...

  12. CERN's Technical Control Room (TCR) A Central Service for Everyone

    CERN Document Server

    Mario Batz

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  13. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRAL SERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz (TCR Responsible)

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number 72201. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the tec...

  14. CERN'S TECHNICAL CONTROL ROOM (TCR) A CENTRALSERVICE FOR EVERYONE

    CERN Multimedia

    Mario Batz / TCR Responsible

    2001-01-01

    The Technical Control Room (TCR) monitors and operates the entire technical infrastructure of CERN 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It registers and dispatches troubleshooting requests to the appropriate equipment services. In addition, the TCR executes first-line interventions on the entire CERN site. Troubleshooting requests are transmitted to the TCR either via a computerised control system or via the phone number '72201'. More than 10'000 such requests are dispatched and dealt with every year. The TCR's diverse field of activity concerns the following systems: electrical and fluid distribution networks, heating, cooling, ventilation, air-conditioning and gas equipment, safety and communication installations, electromechanical systems (e.g. lifts, cranes, machine tools, motorised doors), sanitary systems (leaks, sewage), control and monitoring infrastructure equipment, buildings. These systems can either be part of the administrative infrastructure, such as offices or restaurants, or part of the t...

  15. Rag Deletion in Peripheral T Cells Blocks TCR Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, J. Scott; Ames, Kristina T.; Boursalian, Tamar E.; Fink, Pamela J.

    2010-01-01

    Mature CD4+Vβ5+ T cells that recognize a peripherally expressed endogenous superantigen are tolerized either by deletion or T cell receptor (TCR) revision. In Vβ5 transgenic mice, this latter tolerance pathway results in the appearance of CD4+Vβ5−TCRβ+ T cells, coinciding with Rag1, Rag2, and TdT expression and the accumulation of Vβ-DJβ recombination intermediates in peripheral CD4+ T cells. Because post-thymic RAG-dependent TCR rearrangement has remained controversial, we sought to definitively determine whether TCR revision is an extrathymic process that occurs in mature peripheral T cells. We now show that Rag deletion in post-positive selection T cells in Vβ5 transgenic mice blocks TCR revision in vivo, and that mature peripheral T cells sorted to remove cells bearing endogenous TCRβ chains can express newly generated TCRβ molecules in adoptive hosts. These findings unambiguously demonstrate post-thymic, RAG-dependent TCR rearrangement and define TCR revision as a tolerance pathway that targets mature peripheral CD4+ T cells. PMID:20435935

  16. Organization of the resting TCR in nanoscale oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamel, Wolfgang W A; Alarcón, Balbino

    2013-01-01

    Despite the low affinity of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) for its peptide/major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand, T cells are very sensitive to their antigens. This paradox can be resolved if we consider that the TCR may be organized into pre-existing oligomers or nanoclusters. Such structures could improve antigen recognition by increasing the functional affinity (avidity) of the TCR-pMHC interaction and by allowing cooperativity between individual TCRs. Up to approximately 20 TCRs become tightly apposed in these nanoclusters, often in a linear manner, and such structures could reflect a relatively generalized phenomenon: the non-random concentration of membrane receptors in specific areas of the plasma membrane known as protein islands. The association of TCRs into nanoclusters can explain the enhanced kinetics of the pMHC-TCR interaction in two dimensional versus three dimensional systems, but also their existence calls for a revision of the TCR triggering models based on pMHC-induced TCR clustering. Interestingly, the B-cell receptor and the FcεRI have also been shown to form nanoclusters, suggesting that the formation of pre-existing receptor oligomers could be widely used in the immune system. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Functionally important amino acids in the TCR revealed by immunoselection of membrane TCR-negative T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspar-Bauguil, S; Arnaud, J; Gouaillard, C

    1994-01-01

    A spontaneous TCR cell surface variant (3P11) of the Jurkat T cell line is described and characterized. 3P11 was selected by incubation of Jurkat cells with anti-TCR mAb followed by passage through Ig anti-Ig columns and cloning. 3P11 contained mRNA for both Ti alpha and Ti beta and CD3 gamma, de...

  18. Inverted repeats in the promoter as an autoregulatory sequence for TcrX in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, Monolekha; Das, Amit Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The regulatory sequences recognized by TcrX have been identified. ► The regulatory region comprises of inverted repeats segregated by 30 bp region. ► The mode of binding of TcrX with regulatory sequence is unique. ► In silico TcrX–DNA docked model binds one of the inverted repeats. ► Both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated TcrX binds regulatory sequence in vitro. -- Abstract: TcrY, a histidine kinase, and TcrX, a response regulator, constitute a two-component system in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. tcrX, which is expressed during iron scarcity, is instrumental in the survival of iron-dependent M. tuberculosis. However, the regulator of tcrX/Y has not been fully characterized. Crosslinking studies of TcrX reveal that it can form oligomers in vitro. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) show that TcrX recognizes two regions in the promoter that are comprised of inverted repeats separated by ∼30 bp. The dimeric in silico model of TcrX predicts binding to one of these inverted repeat regions. Site-directed mutagenesis and radioactive phosphorylation indicate that D54 of TcrX is phosphorylated by H256 of TcrY. However, phosphorylated and unphosphorylated TcrX bind the regulatory sequence with equal efficiency, which was shown with an EMSA using the D54A TcrX mutant.

  19. A highly conserved phenylalanine in the alpha, beta-T cell receptor (TCR) constant region determines the integrity of TCR/CD3 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspar-Bauguil, S; Arnaud, J; Huchenq, A

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated the importance of a phenylalanine (phe195) in the Tcr-C alpha region on Tcr-alpha,beta/CD3 membrane expression. An exchange of phe195 with a tyrosine residue does not affect Tcr/CD3 membrane expression; however, exchange with aspartic acid, histidine or ...

  20. Quantifying Distribution of Flow Cytometric TCR-Vβ Usage with Economic Statistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelis S M van der Geest

    Full Text Available Measuring changes of the T cell receptor (TCR repertoire is important to many fields of medicine. Flow cytometry is a popular technique to study the TCR repertoire, as it quickly provides insight into the TCR-Vβ usage among well-defined populations of T cells. However, the interpretation of the flow cytometric data remains difficult, and subtle TCR repertoire changes may go undetected. Here, we introduce a novel means for analyzing the flow cytometric data on TCR-Vβ usage. By applying economic statistics, we calculated the Gini-TCR skewing index from the flow cytometric TCR-Vβ analysis. The Gini-TCR skewing index, which is a direct measure of TCR-Vβ distribution among T cells, allowed us to track subtle changes of the TCR repertoire among distinct populations of T cells. Application of the Gini-TCR skewing index to the flow cytometric TCR-Vβ analysis will greatly help to gain better understanding of the TCR repertoire in health and disease.

  1. T-cell synapse formation depends on antigen recognition but not CD3 interaction: studies with TCR:ζ, a candidate transgene for TCR gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszik, János; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Govers, Coen; Guri, Yakir; Szöor, Arpád; Pályi-Krekk, Zsuzsanna; Vereb, György; Nagy, Peter; Szöllosi, János; Debets, Reno

    2011-05-01

    T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be genetically modified to improve gene-engineered T-cell responses, a strategy considered critical for the success of clinical TCR gene therapy to treat cancers. TCR:ζ, which is a heterodimer of TCRα and β chains each coupled to complete human CD3ζ, overcomes issues of mis-pairing with endogenous TCR chains, shows high surface expression and mediates antigen-specific T-cell functions in vitro. In the current study, we further characterized TCR:ζ in gene-engineered T cells and assessed whether this receptor is able to interact with surface molecules and drive correct synapse formation in Jurkat T cells. The results showed that TCR:ζ mediates the formation of synaptic areas with antigen-positive target cells, interacts closely with CD8α and MHC class I (MHCI), and co-localizes with CD28, CD45 and lipid rafts, similar to WT TCR. TCR:ζ did not closely associate with endogenous CD3ε, despite its co-presence in immune synapses, and TCR:ζ showed enhanced synaptic accumulation in T cells negative for surface-expressed TCR molecules. Notably, synaptic TCR:ζ demonstrated lowered densities when compared with TCR in dual TCR T cells, a phenomenon that was related to both extracellular and intracellular CD3ζ domains present in the TCR:ζ molecule and responsible for enlarged synapse areas. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. PJA-BP expression and TCR delta deletion during human T cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.M. Verschuren (Martie); B. Blom (Bianca); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); H. Spits (Hergen); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractRecombination of deltaRec to psiJalpha will delete the TCR delta gene, which is thought to play an important role in the bifurcation of the TCR alphabeta versus TCR gammadelta differentiation lineages. We recently detected a DNA-binding protein in human

  3. TCR remote monitoring for the LHC technical infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, D; Morodo-Testa, M C; Poulsen, S; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

    2003-01-01

    The remote monitoring of the LHC technical infrastructure will mainly be done in CERN’s Technical Control Room (TCR). The technical infrastrucure consists of specialised equipment from different groups and divisions, mainly cooling and ventilation and electrical equipment. The responsibility for the definition, operation and maintenance of the equipment is covered by the relevant equipment group. However the monitoring and alerting for action in case of equipment failure is initiated by the TCR and is based on alarms that are sent by the equipment. This implies the correct integration of the equipment and the establishment of rules to follow during the commissioning and start-up of the equipment in order to ensure proper operation. This paper shows the integration possibilities and the different tasks and steps to follow by the different parties for smooth equipment integration and avoiding organizational problems.

  4. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    TCR and cytokine receptor signaling play key roles in the complex homeostatic mechanisms that maintain a relative stable number of T cells throughout life. Despite the homeostatic mechanisms, a slow decline in naive T cells is typically observed with age. The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif...... controls TCR down-regulation and plays a central role in fine-tuning TCR expression and signaling in T cells. In this study, we show that the age-associated decline of naive T cells is strongly accelerated in CD3gammaLLAA knock-in mice homozygous for a double leucine to alanine mutation in the CD3gamma di......-leucine-based motif, whereas the number of memory T cells is unaffected by the mutation. This results in premature T cell population senescence with a severe dominance of memory T cells and very few naive T cells in middle-aged to old CD3gamma mutant mice. The reduced number of naive T cells in CD3gamma mutant mice...

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray structural studies of a Melan-A pMHC–TCR complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Fang; Georgiou, Theonie; Hillon, Theresa; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Moysey, Ruth; Gavarret, Jessie; Vuidepot, Annelise; Sami, Malkit; Bell, John I.; Gao, George F.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Jakobsen, Bent K.

    2007-01-01

    A preliminary X-ray crystal structural study of a soluble cognate T-cell receptor (TCR) in complex with a pMHC presenting the Melan-A peptide (ELAGIGILTV) is reported. The TCR and pMHC were refolded, purified and mixed together to form complexes, which were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single TCR–pMHC complex crystals were cryocooled and used for data collection. Melanocytes are specialized pigmented cells that are found in all healthy skin tissue. In certain individuals, diseased melanocytes can form malignant tumours, melanomas, which cause the majority of skin-cancer-related deaths. The melanoma-associated antigenic peptides are presented on cell surfaces via the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Among the melanoma-associated antigens, the melanoma self-antigen A/melanoma antigen recognized by T cells (Melan-A/MART-1) has attracted attention because of its wide expression in primary and metastatic melanomas. Here, a preliminary X-ray crystal structural study of a soluble cognate T-cell receptor (TCR) in complex with a pMHC presenting the Melan-A peptide (ELAGIGILTV) is reported. The TCR and pMHC were refolded, purified and mixed together to form complexes, which were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. Single TCR–pMHC complex crystals were cryocooled and used for data collection. Diffraction data showed that these crystals belonged to space group P4 1 /P4 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.4, c = 81.6 Å. A complete data set was collected to 3.1 Å and the structure is currently being analysed

  6. TCR's genetically linked to CD28 and CD3e do not mispair with endogous TCR chains and mediate enhanced T cell persistance and anti-melanoma activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govers, C.C.F.M.; Sebestyen, Z.; Roszik, J.; Brakel, van M.; Berrevoets, C.; Szoor, A.; Panoutsopoulou, K.; Broertjes, M.; Van, T.; Vereb, G.; Szollosi, J.; Debets, R.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells that are gene engineered to express a defined TCR represents a feasible and promising therapy for patients with tumors. However, TCR gene therapy is hindered by the transient presence and effectiveness of transferred T cells, which are anticipated to be improved by

  7. TCR comodulation of nonengaged TCR takes place by a protein kinase C and CD3 gamma di-leucine-based motif-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Rasmussen, B. A.; Lauritsen, J P

    2003-01-01

    of comodulation. Like internalization of engaged TCR, comodulation was dependent on protein tyrosine kinase activity. Finally, we found that in contrast to internalization of engaged TCR, comodulation was highly dependent on protein kinase C activity and the CD3 gamma di-leucine-based motif. Based...

  8. Troca do cristalino com finalidade refrativa (TCR Refractive lens exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Rezende

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo foi reunir estudos de resultados e segurança da técnica de troca do cristalino com finalidade refrativa (TCR disponíveis na literatura científica, considerando suas vantagens, desvantagens e riscos, analisando separadamente a sua indicação em cada tipo de ametropia.The purpose of this article is to review the data on the scientific literature on refractive lens exchange considering the advantages, disadvantages and the risks involved on this procedure, taking under consideration each type of ametropia.

  9. Radioresistance of intermediate TCR cells and their localization in the body of mice revealed by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Motohiko; Watanabe, Hisami; Ohtsuka, Kazuo; Iiai, Tsuneo; Tsuchida, Masanori; Sato, Shotaro; Abo, Toru

    1993-01-01

    Extrathymic generation of T cells in the liver and in the intestine was recently demonstrated. We investigated herein whether such T cells, especially those in the liver, are present in other organs of mice. This investigation is possible employing our recently introduced method with which even a minor proportion of extrathymic, intermediate T-cell receptor (TCR) cells in organs other than the liver can be identified. Intermediate TCR cells expressed higher levels of IL-2Rβ and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) than bright TCR cells (i.e., T cells of thymic origin) as revealed by two-color staining. Although intermediate TCR cells were present at a small proportion in the spleen and thymus, they predominated in these organs after irradiation (9 Gy) and bone marrow reconstitution, or after low dose irradiation (6 Gy). This was due to that intermediate TCR cells were relatively radioresistant, whereas bright TCR cells were radiosensitive. Microscopic observation and immunochemical staining showed that intermediate TCR cells in the spleen localized in the red pulp and those in the thymus localized in the medulla. These intermediate TCR cells displayed a large light scatter, similar to such cells in the liver. The present results suggest that intermediate TCR cells may proliferate at multiple sites in the body. (author)

  10. CD8 T Cell Sensory Adaptation Dependent on TCR Avidity for Self-Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquez, M.-E.; Ellmeier, W.; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa Maria

    2005-01-01

    dephosphorylation of linker for activation of T cells and ERK upon activation. Normal TCR levels and cytokine production were restored by culturing cells in the absence of TCR/spMHC interaction, demonstrating dynamic tuning of peripheral T cell responses. The effect of avidity for self-ligand(s) on this sensory...... ZAP-YEEI cells were enhanced. Our data provide support for central and peripheral sensory T cell adaptation induced as a function of TCR avidity for self-ligands and signaling level. This may contribute to buffer excessive autoreactivity while optimizing TCR repertoire usage....

  11. 72201 - Temporary reduction of resources for technical infrastructure (TI) operation (ex TCR)

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Sollander

    2005-01-01

    For a period of two years starting on 1 April 2005, the technical infrastructure will be supervised by a single TI operator rather than two. Initially, this operator will not be able to leave the control room for on-site interventions. Only stand-by staff will be available for breakdown repairs and, as a result, intervention times outside normal working hours are liable to increase. Response times on the 72201 phone number may similarly increase. All requests for breakdown repairs may be sent to the new e-mail address: service-ti@cern.ch; the old address - tcr@cern.ch - will stay in operation. Thank you for your understanding. Peter Sollander AB/OP/TI

  12. 72201 - Temporary reduction of resources for the technical infrastructure service - TI (ex TCR)

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    For a period of two years starting on 1 April 2005, the technical infrastructure will be supervised by a single TI operator rather than two. Initially, this operator will not be able to leave the control room for on-site interventions. Only stand-by staff will be available for breakdown repairs and, as a result, intervention times outside normal working hours are liable to increase. Response times on the 72201 phone number may similarly increase. All requests for breakdown repairs may be sent to the new e-mail address: service-ti@cern.ch; the old address - tcr@cern.ch - will stay in operation. Thank you for your understanding. Peter Sollander AB/OP/TI

  13. Mechanism and function of Vav1 localisation in TCR signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksionda, Olga; Saveliev, Alexander; Köchl, Robert; Rapley, Jonathan; Faroudi, Mustapha; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Wülfing, Christoph; Rittinger, Katrin; Carter, Tom; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2012-11-15

    The antigen-specific binding of T cells to antigen presenting cells results in recruitment of signalling proteins to microclusters at the cell-cell interface known as the immunological synapse (IS). The Vav1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor plays a critical role in T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling, leading to the activation of multiple pathways. We now show that it is recruited to microclusters and to the IS in primary CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, we show that this recruitment depends on the SH2 and C-terminal SH3 (SH3(B)) domains of Vav1, and on phosphotyrosines 112 and 128 of the SLP76 adaptor protein. Biophysical measurements show that Vav1 binds directly to these residues on SLP76 and that efficient binding depends on the SH2 and SH3(B) domains of Vav1. Finally, we show that the same two domains are critical for the phosphorylation of Vav1 and its signalling function in TCR-induced calcium flux. We propose that Vav1 is recruited to the IS by binding to SLP76 and that this interaction is critical for the transduction of signals leading to calcium flux.

  14. Structure of the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B in complex with TCR and peptide-MHC demonstrates absence of TCR-peptide contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rödström, Karin E J; Elbing, Karin; Lindkvist-Petersson, Karin

    2014-08-15

    Superantigens are immune-stimulatory toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus, which are able to interact with host immune receptors to induce a massive release of cytokines, causing toxic shock syndrome and possibly death. In this article, we present the x-ray structure of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in complex with its receptors, the TCR and MHC class II, forming a ternary complex. The structure, in combination with functional analyses, clearly shows how SEB adopts a wedge-like position when binding to the β-chain of TCR, allowing for an interaction between the α-chain of TCR and MHC. Furthermore, the binding mode also circumvents contact between TCR and the peptide presented by MHC, which enables SEB to initiate a peptide-independent activation of T cells. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Accumulation of raft lipids in T-cell plasma membrane domains engaged in TCR signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zech, Tobias; Ejsing, Christer S.; Gaus, Katharina

    2009-01-01

    Activating stimuli for T lymphocytes are transmitted through plasma membrane domains that form at T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signalling foci. Here, we determined the molecular lipid composition of immunoisolated TCR activation domains. We observed that they accumulate cholesterol, sphingomyelin...... and saturated phosphatidylcholine species as compared with control plasma membrane fragments. This provides, for the first time, direct evidence that TCR activation domains comprise a distinct molecular lipid composition reminiscent of liquid-ordered raft phases in model membranes. Interestingly, TCR activation...... domains were also enriched in plasmenyl phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine. Modulating the T-cell lipidome with polyunsaturated fatty acids impaired the plasma membrane condensation at TCR signalling foci and resulted in a perturbed molecular lipid composition. These results correlate...

  16. A new VME timing module: TG8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beetham, C.G.; Daems, G.; Lewis, J.; Puccio, B.

    1992-01-01

    The two accelerator divisions of CERN, namely PS and SL, are defining a new common control system based on PC, VME and Workstations. This has provided an opportunity to review both central timing systems and to come up with common solutions. The result was, amongst others, the design of a unique timing module, called TG8. The TG8 is a multipurpose VME module, which receives messages distributed over a timing network. These messages include timing information, clock plus calendar and telegrams instructing the CERN accelerators on the characteristics of the next beam to be produced. The TG8 compares incoming messages with up to 256 programmed actions. An action consists of two parts, a trigger which matches an incoming message and what to do when the match occurs. The latter part may optionally create an output pulse on one of the eight output channels and/or a bus interrupt, both with programmable delay and telegram conditioning. (author)

  17. Transglutaminase (TG) involvement in early embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maccioni, R.B.; Arechaga, J.

    1986-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) has been examined in different stages of preimplantation mouse embryogenesis. The specific activity of this enzyme in the soluble cellular fraction increases 2-fold from 2-cell embryos to 8-cell morulae and 4-fold from 2-cell embryos to blastocyst. The same developmental profile was seen when either N,N-dimethylcasein or endogenous substrates were used in the TG assay. Using high-speed supernatants from different stage embryos as a source of enzyme and [ 3 H]putrescine as acyl acceptor, the major acyl donor components were tubulin and a high molecular weight (HMW) cross-linkage product, as assessed by electrophoresis and immunoblotting. When either assembled or monomeric cytoskeleton proteins were compared as subtrates, microtubules were the best acyl donors. These studies indicate that TG activity is modulated during the changing demands of blastomeres for microtubule cytoskeleton in early embryogenesis

  18. An invitation to design LHC systems for TCR supervision

    CERN Document Server

    Bätz, M

    1999-01-01

    With the LHC technical infrastructure in place, one of the main concerns is to achieve maximum availability and reliability through, for example, appropriate operation and supervision. This paper is intended to draw the attention of the experts to the shortcomings of the existing remote supervision of the technical infrastructure. These reduce the efficiency of the Technical Control Room (TCR) due to the large number of alarms. There are alarms generated by maintenance or shutdown activities, those connected to disused hardware and others not indicating an intervention or without sufficient documentation. Systems optimized not only for nominal load but also for operation modes such as accelerator shutdown and system maintenance could significantly decrease the number of alarms and thus reduce system downtime and operational costs. Additionally more sophisticated local and remote control systems could improve the supervision and the analysis of Repetitive Alarms.

  19. Visualization of the human CD4+ T-cell response in humanized HLA-DR4-expressing NOD/Shi-scid/γcnull (NOG) mice by retrogenic expression of the human TCR gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeshi; Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Ito, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) specific TCR genes were introduced to human HSC by retrovirus. • Human HSC with BLG-specific TCR were transplanted into NOG-HLA-DR4 I-A −/− mice. • BLG-specific TCR induced positive selection of thymocytes. • BLG-specific TCR positive CD4 + T cells mediated immune responses in humanized mice. - Abstract: The development of severe immunodeficient mouse strains containing various human genes, including cytokines or HLA, has enabled the reconstitution of functional human immune systems after transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Accumulating evidence has suggested that HLA-restricted antigen-specific human T-cell responses can be generated in these humanized mice. To directly monitor immune responses of human CD4 + T cells, we introduced β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes derived from CD4 + T-cell clones of cow-milk allergy patients into HSCs, and subsequently transplanted them into NOG-HLA-DR4 transgenic/I-Aβ deficient mice (NOG-DR4/I-A o ). In the thymus, thymocytes with BLG-specific TCR preferentially differentiated into CD4 + CD8 − single-positive cells. Adoptive transfer of mature CD4 + T cells expressing the TCR into recipient NOG-DR4/I-A o mice demonstrated that human CD4 + T cells proliferated in response to antigenic stimulation and produced IFN-γ in vivo, suggesting that functional T-cell reactions (especially Th1-skewed responses) were induced in humanized mice

  20. Visualization of the human CD4{sup +} T-cell response in humanized HLA-DR4-expressing NOD/Shi-scid/γc{sup null} (NOG) mice by retrogenic expression of the human TCR gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi-takahashi@ciea.or.jp; Katano, Ikumi; Ito, Ryoji; Ito, Mamoru

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) specific TCR genes were introduced to human HSC by retrovirus. • Human HSC with BLG-specific TCR were transplanted into NOG-HLA-DR4 I-A{sup −/−} mice. • BLG-specific TCR induced positive selection of thymocytes. • BLG-specific TCR positive CD4{sup +} T cells mediated immune responses in humanized mice. - Abstract: The development of severe immunodeficient mouse strains containing various human genes, including cytokines or HLA, has enabled the reconstitution of functional human immune systems after transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Accumulating evidence has suggested that HLA-restricted antigen-specific human T-cell responses can be generated in these humanized mice. To directly monitor immune responses of human CD4{sup +} T cells, we introduced β-lactoglobulin (BLG)-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes derived from CD4{sup +} T-cell clones of cow-milk allergy patients into HSCs, and subsequently transplanted them into NOG-HLA-DR4 transgenic/I-Aβ deficient mice (NOG-DR4/I-A{sup o}). In the thymus, thymocytes with BLG-specific TCR preferentially differentiated into CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} single-positive cells. Adoptive transfer of mature CD4{sup +} T cells expressing the TCR into recipient NOG-DR4/I-A{sup o} mice demonstrated that human CD4{sup +} T cells proliferated in response to antigenic stimulation and produced IFN-γ in vivo, suggesting that functional T-cell reactions (especially Th1-skewed responses) were induced in humanized mice.

  1. Aging of Dielectric Properties below Tg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Niels Boye; Dyre, Jeppe; Christensen, Tage Emil

    The dielectric loss at 1Hz in TPP is studied during a temperature step from one equilibrium state to another. In the applied cryostate the temperature can be equilibrated on a timescale of 1 second. The aging time dependence of the dielectric loss is studied below Tg applying temperature steps...

  2. Antigen Specificity of Type I NKT Cells Is Governed by TCR β-Chain Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Garth; Pellicci, Daniel G; Uldrich, Adam P; Besra, Gurdyal S; Illarionov, Petr; Williams, Spencer J; La Gruta, Nicole L; Rossjohn, Jamie; Godfrey, Dale I

    2015-11-15

    NKT cells recognize lipid-based Ags presented by CD1d. Type I NKT cells are often referred to as invariant owing to their mostly invariant TCR α-chain usage (Vα14-Jα18 in mice, Vα24-Jα18 in humans). However, these cells have diverse TCR β-chains, including Vβ8, Vβ7, and Vβ2 in mice and Vβ11 in humans, joined to a range of TCR Dβ and Jβ genes. In this study, we demonstrate that TCR β-chain composition can dramatically influence lipid Ag recognition in an Ag-dependent manner. Namely, the glycolipids α-glucosylceramide and isoglobotrihexosylceramide were preferentially recognized by Vβ7(+) NKT cells from mice, whereas the α-galactosylceramide analog OCH, with a truncated sphingosine chain, was preferentially recognized by Vβ8(+) NKT cells from mice. We show that the influence of the TCR β-chain is due to a combination of Vβ-, Jβ-, and CDR3β-encoded residues and that these TCRs can recapitulate the selective Ag reactivity in TCR-transduced cell lines. Similar observations were made with human NKT cells where different CDR3β-encoded residues determined Ag preference. These findings indicate that NKT TCR β-chain diversity results in differential and nonhierarchical Ag recognition by these cells, which implies that some Ags can preferentially activate type I NKT cell subsets. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. NKT Cell-TCR Expression Activates Conventional T Cells in Vivo, but Is Largely Dispensable for Mature NKT Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahl, J. Christoph; Heger, Klaus; Knies, Nathalie; Hein, Marco Y.; Boon, Louis; Yagita, Hideo; Polic, Bojan; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cell development depends on recognition of self-glycolipids via their semi-invariant Vα14i-TCR. However, to what extent TCR-mediated signals determine identity and function of mature NKT cells remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain allowing conditional Vα14i-TCR expression from within the endogenous Tcrα locus. We demonstrate that naïve T cells are activated upon replacement of their endogenous TCR repertoire with Vα14i-restricted TCRs, but they do not differentiate into NKT cells. On the other hand, induced TCR ablation on mature NKT cells did not affect their lineage identity, homeostasis, or innate rapid cytokine secretion abilities. We therefore propose that peripheral NKT cells become unresponsive to and thus are independent of their autoreactive TCR. PMID:23853545

  4. NKT cell-TCR expression activates conventional T cells in vivo, but is largely dispensable for mature NKT cell biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christoph Vahl

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cell development depends on recognition of self-glycolipids via their semi-invariant Vα14i-TCR. However, to what extent TCR-mediated signals determine identity and function of mature NKT cells remains incompletely understood. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain allowing conditional Vα14i-TCR expression from within the endogenous Tcrα locus. We demonstrate that naïve T cells are activated upon replacement of their endogenous TCR repertoire with Vα14i-restricted TCRs, but they do not differentiate into NKT cells. On the other hand, induced TCR ablation on mature NKT cells did not affect their lineage identity, homeostasis, or innate rapid cytokine secretion abilities. We therefore propose that peripheral NKT cells become unresponsive to and thus are independent of their autoreactive TCR.

  5. TG 220 MW hydraulic control system diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svabcik, A.

    1996-01-01

    The TG power output control system comprises a hydraulic and an electronic part. TG speed, power output or the main steam header pressure (HPK) depend on the steam flow at the turbine inlet. The steam admission into the turbine is controlled by four control valves and one by-pass valve in case of the HP part and by four capture flap valves in case of the LP part. The task of the SKODA K-220 MW turbine protection and control systems is to provide both the turbine speed and power output control to the setpoint value. Diagnostic measurements were aimed at getting an overview of both technical and functional states of all power output control elements. Principally, it can be stated that some deficiencies of a design nature originating from the manufacturer's factory were revealed and some other deficiencies related to hydraulic control elements functionality were identified more closely by the new method. 5 figs

  6. TG 220 MW hydraulic control system diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svabcik, A [Atomova Elektraren Bohunice, Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    The TG power output control system comprises a hydraulic and an electronic part. TG speed, power output or the main steam header pressure (HPK) depend on the steam flow at the turbine inlet. The steam admission into the turbine is controlled by four control valves and one by-pass valve in case of the HP part and by four capture flap valves in case of the LP part. The task of the SKODA K-220 MW turbine protection and control systems is to provide both the turbine speed and power output control to the setpoint value. Diagnostic measurements were aimed at getting an overview of both technical and functional states of all power output control elements. Principally, it can be stated that some deficiencies of a design nature originating from the manufacturer`s factory were revealed and some other deficiencies related to hydraulic control elements functionality were identified more closely by the new method. 5 figs.

  7. TG-FTIR analysis of biomass pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassilakis, R.; Carangelo, R.M.; Wojtowicz, M.A. [Advanced Fuel Research Inc., Hartford, CT (United States)

    2001-10-09

    A great need exists for comprehensive biomass-pyrolysis models that could predict yields and evolution patterns of selected volatile products as a function of feedstock characteristics and process conditions. A thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with Fourier transform infrared analysis of evolving products (TG-FTIR) can provide useful input to such models in the form of kinetic information obtained under low heating rate conditions. In this work, robust TG-FTIR quantification routes were developed for infrared analysis of volatile products relevant to biomass pyrolysis. The analysis was applied to wheat straw, three types of tobacco (Burley, Oriental, and Bright) and three biomass model compounds (xylan, chlorogenic acid, and D-glucose). Product yields were compared with literature data, and species potentially quantifiable by FT-IR are reviewed. Product-evolution patterns are reported for all seven biomass samples. 41 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Clinical electron beam dosimetry: transition from AAPM TG-25 to AAPM TG-70

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailidis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    The absolute calibration of clinical electron beams is increasingly based on TG-51 protocol. In addition, recently published dosimetry data on electrons beams bring up the question of how would one need to modify the widely used TG-25 that originally was based on TG-21 calibration protocol? The answer to the question is given by the recently published TG-70. This new protocol operates as supplement and update to TG-25 on issues that need to be modified because of TG-51 approach to electron dosimetry and because of newer data on clinical electron beams. It describes in detail the procedure of converting measured depth-ionization curves with ion chambers into depth-dose curves, making use of recently published stopping-power ratios and other conversion factors. It also describes the use of water equivalent phantoms to perform relative electron dosimetry based on recently published conversions factors. The report discusses small and irregularly shaped electron field dosimetry using the concept of lateral buildup ratio (LBR) as an avenue to evaluate electronic equilibrium and compute dose per MU for those fields. Finally, it gives some common clinical examples where electron beam dosimetry are applied

  9. Lck, membrane microdomains, and TCR triggering machinery: defining the new rules of engagement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filipp, Dominik; Ballek, Ondřej; Manning, Jasper

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 3, June (2012), s. 155 ISSN 1664-3224 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Lck * Fyn * membrane microdomains * heavy and light DRMs * TCR triggering Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Cish actively silences TCR signaling in CD8+ T cells to maintain tumor tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Douglas C; Guittard, Geoffrey C; Franco, Zulmarie; Crompton, Joseph G; Eil, Robert L; Patel, Shashank J; Ji, Yun; Van Panhuys, Nicholas; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Clever, David; Chichura, Anna; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Varma, Rajat; Wang, Ena; Gattinoni, Luca; Marincola, Francesco M; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-11-16

    Improving the functional avidity of effector T cells is critical in overcoming inhibitory factors within the tumor microenvironment and eliciting tumor regression. We have found that Cish, a member of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) family, is induced by TCR stimulation in CD8(+) T cells and inhibits their functional avidity against tumors. Genetic deletion of Cish in CD8(+) T cells enhances their expansion, functional avidity, and cytokine polyfunctionality, resulting in pronounced and durable regression of established tumors. Although Cish is commonly thought to block STAT5 activation, we found that the primary molecular basis of Cish suppression is through inhibition of TCR signaling. Cish physically interacts with the TCR intermediate PLC-γ1, targeting it for proteasomal degradation after TCR stimulation. These findings establish a novel targetable interaction that regulates the functional avidity of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells and can be manipulated to improve adoptive cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayla K Shorter

    Full Text Available T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL, have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4 are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant.

  12. Micro–adhesion rings surrounding TCR microclusters are essential for T cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Machie; Yokosuka, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The immunological synapse (IS) formed at the interface between T cells and antigen-presenting cells represents a hallmark of initiation of acquired immunity. T cell activation is initiated at T cell receptor (TCR) microclusters (MCs), in which TCRs and signaling molecules assemble at the interface before IS formation. We found that each TCR-MC was transiently bordered by a ring structure made of integrin and focal adhesion molecules in the early phase of activation, which is similar in structure to the IS in microscale. The micro–adhesion ring is composed of LFA-1, focal adhesion molecules paxillin and Pyk2, and myosin II (MyoII) and is supported by F-actin core and MyoII activity through LFA-1 outside-in signals. The formation of the micro–adhesion ring was transient but especially sustained upon weak TCR stimulation to recruit linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and SLP76. Perturbation of the micro–adhesion ring induced impairment of TCR-MC development and resulted in impaired cellular signaling and cell functions. Thus, the synapse-like structure composed of the core TCR-MC and surrounding micro–adhesion ring is a critical structure for initial T cell activation through integrin outside-in signals. PMID:27354546

  13. Coronin-1A links cytoskeleton dynamics to TCR alpha beta-induced cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte Mugnier

    Full Text Available Actin polymerization plays a critical role in activated T lymphocytes both in regulating T cell receptor (TCR-induced immunological synapse (IS formation and signaling. Using gene targeting, we demonstrate that the hematopoietic specific, actin- and Arp2/3 complex-binding protein coronin-1A contributes to both processes. Coronin-1A-deficient mice specifically showed alterations in terminal development and the survival of alpha beta T cells, together with defects in cell activation and cytokine production following TCR triggering. The mutant T cells further displayed excessive accumulation yet reduced dynamics of F-actin and the WASP-Arp2/3 machinery at the IS, correlating with extended cell-cell contact. Cell signaling was also affected with the basal activation of the stress kinases sAPK/JNK1/2; and deficits in TCR-induced Ca2+ influx and phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitor of NF-kappaB (I kappa B. Coronin-1A therefore links cytoskeleton plasticity with the functioning of discrete TCR signaling components. This function may be required to adjust TCR responses to selecting ligands accounting in part for the homeostasis defect that impacts alpha beta T cells in coronin-1A deficient mice, with the exclusion of other lympho/hematopoietic lineages.

  14. A Novel Form of Compensation in the Tg2576 Amyloid Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Attila; Katonai, Zoltán; Alpár, Alán; Wolf, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    One century after its first description, pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still poorly understood. Amyloid-related dendritic atrophy and membrane alterations of susceptible brain neurons in AD, and in animal models of AD are widely recognized. However, little effort has been made to study the potential effects of combined morphological and membrane alterations on signal transfer and synaptic integration in neurons that build up affected neural networks in AD. In this study spatial reconstructions and electrophysiological measurements of layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) overexpressing Tg2576 mice were used to build faithful segmental cable models of these neurons. Local synaptic activities were simulated in various points of the dendritic arbors and properties of subthreshold dendritic impulse propagation and predictors of synaptic input pattern recognition ability were quantified and compared in modeled WT and TG neurons. Despite the widespread dendritic degeneration and membrane alterations in mutant mouse neurons, surprisingly little, or no change was detected in steady-state and 50 Hz sinusoidal voltage transfers, current transfers, and local and propagation delays of PSPs traveling along dendrites of TG neurons. Synaptic input pattern recognition ability was also predicted to be unaltered in TG neurons in two different soma-dendritic membrane models investigated. Our simulations predict the way how subthreshold dendritic signaling and pattern recognition are preserved in TG neurons: amyloid-related membrane alterations compensate for the pathological effects that dendritic atrophy has on subthreshold dendritic signal transfer and integration in layer II/III somatosensory neurons of this hAPP mouse model for AD. Since neither propagation of single PSPs nor integration of multiple PSPs (pattern recognition) changes in TG neurons, we conclude that AD

  15. Membranes of activated CD4+ T cells expressing T cell receptor (TcR) alpha beta or TcR gamma delta induce IgE synthesis by human B cells in the presence of interleukin-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gascan, H.; Aversa, G. G.; Gauchat, J. F.; van Vlasselaer, P.; Roncarolo, M. G.; Yssel, H.; Kehry, M.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    In the present study it is demonstrated that human B cells can be induced to switch to IgE production following a contact-mediated signal provided by activated T cell receptor (TcR) gamma delta+, CD4+ and TcR alpha beta+, CD4+ T cell clones and interleukin (IL)-4. The signal provided by these T cell

  16. A functional and structural basis for TCR cross-resctivity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lang, Heather L.E.; Jacobsen, Helle; Ikemizu, S.

    2002-01-01

    influence susceptibility to MS. We demonstrate that a T cell receptor (TCR) from an MS patient recognized both a DRB1*1501-restricted myelin basic protein (MBP) and DRB5*0101-restricted Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) peptide. Crystal structure determination of the DRB5*0101-EBV peptide complex revealed a marked......-associated diseases....

  17. Reactive Power Control in Eight Bus System Using FC-TCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavelu Vijayakumar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the simulation of eight bus system having fixed capacitor and thyristor controlled reactor. The system is modeled and simulated using MATLAB.The simulation results are presented. The power and control circuits are simulated. The current drawn by the TCR varies with the variation in the firing angle. The simulation results are compared with the theoretical results.

  18. Karakteristik Tcr Dan Vcr Resistor Pasta Resistor Pada Substrat Alumina Dengan Teknologi Film Tebal

    OpenAIRE

    Raden Arief Setyawan, ST., MT., Rhezananta Arya H., Ir. M. Julius St., MS

    2014-01-01

    Resistor merupakan komponen yang sangat berperan dalam rangkaian film tebal. Resistor berteknologi film tebal mempunyai karakteristik yang terdiri dari TCR (Temperature Coefficient of Resistance) dan VCR (Voltage Coefficient of Resistance). Dari alasan di atas maka perlu untuk mengetahui bagaimana pembuatan resistor film tebal dan mengetahui karakteristiknya.Penelitian ini menggunakan proses screen printing dalam pembuatan resistor yang kemudian melalui proses pengendapan (15 menit), drying (...

  19. Public TCR Use by Herpes Simplex Virus-2-Specific Human CD8 CTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, Lichun; Li, Penny; Oenema, Tjitske; McClurkan, Christopher L.; Koelle, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Recombination of germline TCR alpha and beta genes generates polypeptide receptors for MHC peptide. Ag exposure during long-term herpes simplex infections may shape the T cell repertoire over time. We investigated the CD8 T cell response to HSV-2 in chronically infected individuals by sequencing the

  20. Rab11-FIP3 Regulation of Lck Endosomal Traffic Controls TCR Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Jérôme; Del Río-Iñiguez, Iratxe; Vázquez-Chávez, Elena; Lasserre, Rémi; Agüera-González, Sonia; Cuche, Céline; McCaffrey, Mary W; Di Bartolo, Vincenzo; Alcover, Andrés

    2017-04-01

    The role of endosomes in receptor signal transduction is a long-standing question, which remains largely unanswered. The T cell Ag receptor and various components of its proximal signaling machinery are associated with distinct endosomal compartments, but how endosomal traffic affects T cell signaling remains ill-defined. In this article, we demonstrate in human T cells that the subcellular localization and function of the protein tyrosine kinase Lck depends on the Rab11 effector FIP3 (Rab11 family interacting protein-3). FIP3 overexpression or silencing and its ability to interact with Rab11 modify Lck subcellular localization and its delivery to the immunological synapse. Importantly, FIP3-dependent Lck localization controls early TCR signaling events, such as tyrosine phosphorylation of TCRζ, ZAP70, and LAT and intracellular calcium concentration, as well as IL-2 gene expression. Interestingly, FIP3 controls both steady-state and poststimulation phosphotyrosine and calcium levels. Finally, our findings indicate that FIP3 modulates TCR-CD3 cell surface expression via the regulation of steady-state Lck-mediated TCRζ phosphorylation, which in turn controls TCRζ protein levels. This may influence long-term T cell activation in response to TCR-CD3 stimulation. Therefore, our data underscore the importance of finely regulated endosomal traffic in TCR signal transduction and T cell activation leading to IL-2 production. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Pervasive and stochastic changes in the TCR repertoire of regulatory T-cell-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingjie; Sharma, Rahul; Kung, John T; Deshmukh, Umesh S; Jarjour, Wael N; Fu, Shu Man; Ju, Shyr-Te

    2008-04-01

    We hypothesize that regulatory T-cell (Treg)-deficient strains have an altered TCR repertoire in part due to the expansion of autoimmune repertoire by self-antigen. We compared the Vbeta family expression profile between B6 and Treg-lacking B6.Cg-Foxp3(sf)(/Y) (B6.sf) mice using fluorescent anti-Vbeta mAbs and observed no changes. However, while the spectratypes of 20 Vbeta families among B6 mice were highly similar, the Vbeta family spectratypes of B6.sf mice were remarkably different from B6 mice and from each other. Significant spectratype changes in many Vbeta families were also observed in Treg-deficient IL-2 knockout (KO) and IL-2Ralpha KO mice. Such changes were not observed with anti-CD3 mAb-treated B6 mice or B6 CD4+CD25- T cells. TCR transgenic (OT-II.sf) mice displayed dramatic reduction of clonotypic TCR with concomitant increase in T cells bearing non-transgenic Vbeta and Valpha families, including T cells with dual receptors expressing reduced levels of transgenic Valpha and endogenous Valpha. Collectively, the data demonstrate that Treg deficiency allows polyclonal expansion of T cells in a stochastic manner, resulting in widespread changes in the TCR repertoire.

  2. Scaffold protein JLP mediates TCR-initiated CD4+T cell activation and CD154 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Yang, Cheng; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Shan; Fu, Dou; Rahman, Rahmat N; Nakazato, Ryota; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Kung, Sam K P; Ding, Guohua; Wang, Huiming

    2017-07-01

    CD4 + T-cell activation and its subsequent induction of CD154 (CD40 ligand, CD40L) expression are pivotal in shaping both the humoral and cellular immune responses. Scaffold protein JLP regulates signal transduction pathways and molecular trafficking inside cells, thus represents a critical component in maintaining cellular functions. Its role in regulating CD4 + T-cell activation and CD154 expression, however, is unclear. Here, we demonstrated expression of JLP in mouse tissues of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, and also CD4 + T cells. Using CD4+ T cells from jlp-deficient and jlp-wild-type mice, we demonstrated that JLP-deficiency impaired T-cell proliferation, IL-2 production, and CD154 induction upon TCR stimulations, but had no impacts on the expression of other surface molecules such as CD25, CD69, and TCR. These observed impaired T-cell functions in the jlp-/- CD4 + T cells were associated with defective NF-AT activation and Ca 2 + influx, but not the MAPK, NF-κB, as well as AP-1 signaling pathways. Our findings indicated that, for the first time, JLP plays a critical role in regulating CD4 + T cells response to TCR stimulation partly by mediating the activation of TCR-initiated Ca 2+ /NF-AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the antiapoptotic...

  4. Compound list: cisplatin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cisplatin CSP 00132 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_v...itro/cisplatin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/cisplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/...in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/cisplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienced...bc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/cisplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ft

  5. Compound list: carboplatin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available carboplatin CBP 00133 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vitro/carboplatin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo.../Liver/Single/carboplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATES...T/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/carboplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bio...sciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/carboplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp:

  6. Compound list: cephalothin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cephalothin CLT 00141 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vitro/cephalothin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo.../Liver/Single/cephalothin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATES...T/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/cephalothin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bio...sciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/cephalothin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp:

  7. Compound list: triamterene [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available triamterene TRI 00101 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vitro/triamterene.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo.../Liver/Single/triamterene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATES...T/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/triamterene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bio...sciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/triamterene.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp:

  8. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  9. TG Grammar's Implications for the Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷彩

    2009-01-01

    Chomsky's Transformational-Generative (TG) grammar is another revolution to linguistics after Saussure's strueturalism, and it plays an important role in the modem linguistics. Introducing the research perspective and method of TG grammar, this paper analyses its implications for the foreign language teaching.

  10. Compound list: caffeine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available caffeine CAF 00097 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/caffeine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/caffeine....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/caffeine...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/caffeine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/ar...chive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/caffeine.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscie

  11. Compound list: methyltestosterone [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available methyltestosterone MTS 00041 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/methyltes...LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/methyltestosterone.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggate...s/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/methyltestosterone.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip... ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/methyltestosterone.Rat.in_v...ivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/methyltest

  12. Compound list: thioacetamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thioacetamide TAA 00017 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/thioacetamide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp:...//ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/thioacetam..._vivo/Liver/Single/thioacetamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/thioacetamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:...//ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/thioacetamide.Rat.in_vivo.Kidne

  13. Compound list: gentamicin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gentamicin GMC 00147 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/gentam...icin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/gentam...at/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/gentamicin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bioscie...ncedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/gentamicin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp...://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Repeat/gentamicin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Repeat.zip ...

  14. Compound list: ketoconazole [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ketoconazole KC 00047 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/ketoco...nazole.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/ketoco...nazole.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/ketoco...jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ketoconazole.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp....biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/ketoconazole.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Singl

  15. Compound list: lomustine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lomustine LS 00049 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/lomustine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/lomustine....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/lomustine...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/lomustine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.j...p/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/lomustine.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bi

  16. Compound list: ethionine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethionine ET 00013 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/ethionine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/ethionine....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/ethionine...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ethionine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.j...p/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/ethionine.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bi

  17. Compound list: bromoethylamine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bromoethylamine BEA 00134 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/bromoethylam...ine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST...Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/bromoethylamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.b...iosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/bromoethylamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repea...t.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/bromoethylamine.Rat.i

  18. Compound list: acetazolamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acetazolamide ACZ 00108 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/acetazolam...ide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/acetazolam..._vivo/Liver/Single/acetazolamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/acetazolamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:...//ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/acetazolamide.Rat.in_vivo.Kidne

  19. Compound list: chlorpheniramine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chlorpheniramine CHL 00090 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/chlorpheni...ramine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATE...ST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/chlorpheniramine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://f...tp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/chlorpheniramine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  20. Compound list: chloramphenicol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chloramphenicol CMP 00064 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/chlorampheni...col.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST...Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/chloramphenicol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.b...iosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/chloramphenicol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  1. Compound list: TNFα [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TNFα TNF 00A08 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitr...o/TNFa.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/TNFa.Rat....in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/TNFa.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  2. Compound list: LPS [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LPS LPS 00A07 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro.../LPS.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/LPS.Rat.in..._vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/LPS.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  3. Compound list: acetamidofluorene [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acetamidofluorene AAF 00144 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/acetam...idofluorene.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/acetam...ATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/acetamidofluorene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp...://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/acetamidofluorene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  4. Compound list: meloxicam [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available meloxicam MLX 00124 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/meloxicam.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/meloxicam.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/meloxicam.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  5. Compound list: famotidine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available famotidine FAM 00085 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/famotidine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/famotidine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/famotidine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  6. Compound list: disopyramide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available disopyramide DIS 00102 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/disopyramide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/i...n_vitro/disopyramide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...vo/Liver/Single/disopyramide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc

  7. Compound list: nifedipine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nifedipine NIF 00091 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/nifedipine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/nifedipine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/nifedipine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  8. Compound list: perhexiline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available perhexiline PH 00045 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/perhexiline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_v...itro/perhexiline.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/L...iver/Single/perhexiline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/a

  9. Compound list: ethionamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethionamide ETH 00135 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/ethionamide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/ethionamide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/ethionamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  10. Compound list: tetracycline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tetracycline TC 00048 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/tetracycline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vitro/tetracycline.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_viv...o/Liver/Single/tetracycline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.

  11. Compound list: colchicine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available colchicine COL 00113 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/colchicine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/colchicine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/colchicine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  12. Compound list: diclofenac [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available diclofenac DFNa 00019 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/diclofenac.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_v...itro/diclofenac.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Li...ver/Single/diclofenac.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arc

  13. Compound list: ranitidine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ranitidine RAN 00086 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/ranitidine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/ranitidine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/ranitidine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  14. Compound list: theophylline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available theophylline TEO 00096 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/theophylline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/i...n_vitro/theophylline.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...vo/Liver/Single/theophylline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc

  15. Compound list: phenobarbital [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phenobarbital PB 00004 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/phenobarbital.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/...in_vitro/phenobarbital.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vivo/Liver/Single/phenobarbital.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscience

  16. Compound list: sulfasalazine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sulfasalazine SS 00034 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/sulfasalazine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/...in_vitro/sulfasalazine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vivo/Liver/Single/sulfasalazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscience

  17. Compound list: griseofulvin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available griseofulvin GF 00043 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/griseofulvin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vitro/griseofulvin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_viv...o/Liver/Single/griseofulvin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.

  18. Compound list: propylthiouracil [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available propylthiouracil PTU 00029 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/H...uman/in_vitro/propylthiouracil.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATE...ST/Rat/in_vitro/propylthiouracil.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATE...ST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/propylthiouracil.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://f

  19. Compound list: carbamazepine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available carbamazepine CBZ 00018 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Huma...n/in_vitro/carbamazepine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vitro/carbamazepine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vivo/Liver/Single/carbamazepine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  20. Compound list: methapyrilene [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available methapyrilene MP 00025 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/methapyrilene.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/...in_vitro/methapyrilene.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vivo/Liver/Single/methapyrilene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscience

  1. Compound list: benziodarone [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available benziodarone BZD 00130 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/benziodarone.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/i...n_vitro/benziodarone.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...vo/Liver/Single/benziodarone.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc

  2. Compound list: quinidine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available quinidine QND 00074 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/quinidine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/quinidine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/quinidine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  3. Compound list: nimesulide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nimesulide NIM 00136 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/nimesulide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/nimesulide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/nimesulide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  4. Compound list: nitrofurazone [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nitrofurazone NFZ 00065 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Huma...n/in_vitro/nitrofurazone.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vitro/nitrofurazone.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vivo/Liver/Single/nitrofurazone.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  5. Compound list: trimethadione [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available trimethadione TMD 00122 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Huma...n/in_vitro/trimethadione.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vitro/trimethadione.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vivo/Liver/Single/trimethadione.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  6. Compound list: ticlopidine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ticlopidine TCP 00146 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/ticlopidine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/ticlopidine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/ticlopidine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  7. Compound list: dantrolene [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available dantrolene DTL 00119 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/dantrolene.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/dantrolene.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/dantrolene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  8. Compound list: moxisylyte [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available moxisylyte MXS 00061 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/moxisylyte.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/moxisylyte.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/moxisylyte.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  9. Compound list: hydroxyzine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hydroxyzine HYZ 00071 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/hydroxyzine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/hydroxyzine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/hydroxyzine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  10. Compound list: ibuprofen [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ibuprofen IBU 00072 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/ibuprofen.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/ibuprofen.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/ibuprofen.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  11. Compound list: iproniazid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iproniazid IPA 00062 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/iproniazid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/iproniazid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/iproniazid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  12. Compound list: chlormezanone [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chlormezanone CMN 00052 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Huma...n/in_vitro/chlormezanone.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vitro/chlormezanone.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vivo/Liver/Single/chlormezanone.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  13. Compound list: chlorpropamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chlorpropamide CPP 00080 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/chlorpropamide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R...at/in_vitro/chlorpropamide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/chlorpropamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc

  14. Compound list: azathioprine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available azathioprine AZP 00046 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/azathioprine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/i...n_vitro/azathioprine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...vo/Liver/Single/azathioprine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc

  15. Compound list: simvastatin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available simvastatin SST 00117 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/simvastatin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/simvastatin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/simvastatin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  16. Compound list: methyldopa [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available methyldopa MDP 00056 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/methyldopa.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/methyldopa.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/methyldopa.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  17. Compound list: phenytoin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phenytoin PHE 00026 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/phenytoin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/phenytoin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/phenytoin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  18. Compound list: mexiletine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mexiletine MEX 00103 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/mexiletine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/mexiletine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/mexiletine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  19. Compound list: metformin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available metformin MFM 00053 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/metformin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/metformin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/metformin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  20. Compound list: lornoxicam [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available lornoxicam LNX 00125 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/lornoxicam.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/lornoxicam.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/lornoxicam.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  1. Compound list: methimazole [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available methimazole MTZ 00057 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/methimazole.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/methimazole.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/methimazole.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  2. Compound list: sulpiride [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sulpiride SLP 00115 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/sulpiride.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/sulpiride.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/sulpiride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  3. Compound list: phalloidin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phalloidin PHA 00A11 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/phalloidin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/phalloidin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/phalloidin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  4. Compound list: cimetidine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cimetidine CIM 00035 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/cimetidine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/cimetidine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/cimetidine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch

  5. Compound list: fenofibrate [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fenofibrate FFB 00079 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/fenofibrate.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/fenofibrate.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/fenofibrate.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  6. Compound list: thioridazine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thioridazine TRZ 00038 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human.../in_vitro/thioridazine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/i...n_vitro/thioridazine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...vo/Liver/Single/thioridazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc

  7. Compound list: isoniazid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available isoniazid INAH 00002 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/isoniazid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vit...ro/isoniazid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver.../Single/isoniazid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive

  8. Compound list: labetalol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available labetalol LBT 00040 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in..._vitro/labetalol.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitr...o/labetalol.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/...Single/labetalol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/

  9. Compound list: chlorpromazine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chlorpromazine CPZ 00016 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/chlorpromazine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/chlorpromazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc...iencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/chlorpromazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  10. Compound list: clomipramine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available clomipramine CPM 00121 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/clomipramine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/clomipramine...vo/Liver/Single/clomipramine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc....jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/clomipramine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  11. Compound list: galactosamine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available galactosamine GaN 00A06 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/galactosamine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/galactosamine....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/galactosamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  12. Compound list: promethazine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available promethazine PMZ 00110 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/promethazine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/promethazine...vo/Liver/Single/promethazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc....jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/promethazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  13. Compound list: penicillamine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available penicillamine PEN 00099 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/penicillamine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/penicillamine..._vivo/Liver/Single/penicillamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/penicillamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  14. Compound list: ajmaline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ajmaline AJM 00118 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/ajmaline....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/ajmaline....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/ajmaline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bi...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ajmaline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  15. Compound list: glibenclamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available glibenclamide GBC 00042 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/glibenclam...ide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/glibenclam..._vivo/Liver/Single/glibenclamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/glibenclamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  16. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.); (Melbourne)

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  17. The follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer and undetectable thyroglobulin (Tg) and Tg antibodies during ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan, Ha T. T.; Jager, Pieter L.; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Plukker, John T. M.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Links, Thera P.

    Objective: This retrospective study describes the rote of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) in relation to tumor characteristics in the prediction of persistent/recurrent disease in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) with negative Tg at the time of ablation. Design: Between 1989 and 2006, 94

  18. Selective T-cell Ablation with Bismuth-213 Labeled Anti-TCR Alpha Beta as Nonmyeloablative Conditioning for Allogeneic Canine Marrow Transplantion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethge, W. A.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Storb, R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Santos, E. B.; Brechbiel, M. W.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Sandmaier, B. M.

    2003-01-01

    Two major immunological barriers, the host versus graft (HVG) and the graft versus host (GVH) reaction, must be overcome for successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. T-cells are involved in these barriers in the major histocompatibility complex-identical settings. We hypothesized that selective ablation of T-cells using radioimmunotherapy, together with postgrafting immunosuppression, would ensure stable allogeneic engraftment. We developed a canine model of nonmyeloablative marrow transplantation in which host immune reactions are impaired by a single dose of 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and where both GVH and residual HVG reactions are controlled by postgrafting immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporine (CSP). We substituted the alpha-emitter bismuth-213 linked to a monoclonal antibody against TCR(alpha,beta)using the metal-binding chelate CHX-A-DTPA, for 2 Gy TBI. Biodistribution studies using a gamma-emitting indium-111-labeled anti-TCR mAb showed uptake primarily in blood, marrow, lymph nodes, spleen and liver. In a dosimetry study, 4 dogs were treated with 0.13-0.46 mg/kg TCR mAb labeled with 3.7-5.6 mCi/kg (137-207 MBq/kg) Bi-213. The treatment was administered in 6 injections on days -3 and -2 followed by transplantion of dog leukocyte antigen-identical marrow on day 0 and postgrafting immunosuppression with MMF and CSP. Therapy was well tolerated except for elevations of transaminases, which were transient in all but one dog. No other organ toxicities or signs of graft-versus-host-disease were noted. The dogs had prompt allogeneic hematopoietic engraftment and achieved stable mixed donor-host hematopoietic chimerism with donor contributions ranging from 5-55 % with >30 weeks follow up

  19. Selective T-cell Ablation with Bismuth-213 Labeled Anti-TCR Alpha Beta as Nonmyeloablative Conditionaing for Allogeneic Canine Marrow Transplantion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethge, W. A.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Storb, R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Santos, E. B.; Brechbiel, M. W.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Sandmaier, B. M.

    2003-06-15

    Two major immunological barriers, the host versus graft (HVG) and the graft versus host (GVH) reaction, must be overcome for successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. T-cells are involved in these barriers in the major histocompatibility complex-identical settings. We hypothesized that selective ablation of T-cells using radioimmunotherapy, together with postgrafting immunosuppression, would ensure stable allogeneic engraftment. We developed a canine model of nonmyeloablative marrow transplantation in which host immune reactions are impaired by a single dose of 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and where both GVH and residual HVG reactions are controlled by postgrafting immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporine (CSP). We substituted the alpha-emitter bismuth-213 linked to a monoclonal antibody against TCR(alpha,beta)using the metal-binding chelate CHX-A”-DTPA, for 2 Gy TBI. Biodistribution studies using a gamma-emitting indium-111-labeled anti-TCR mAb showed uptake primarily in blood, marrow, lymph nodes, spleen and liver. In a dosimetry study, 4 dogs were treated with 0.13-0.46 mg/kg TCR mAb labeled with 3.7-5.6 mCi/kg (137-207 MBq/kg) Bi-213. The treatment was administered in 6 injections on days -3 and -2 followed by transplantion of dog leukocyte antigen-identical marrow on day 0 and postgrafting immunosuppression with MMF and CSP. Therapy was well tolerated except for elevations of transaminases, which were transient in all but one dog. No other organ toxicities or signs of graft-versus-host-disease were noted. The dogs had prompt allogeneic hematopoietic engraftment and achieved stable mixed donor-host hematopoietic chimerism with donor contributions ranging from 5-55 % with >30 weeks follow up.

  20. Compound list: aspirin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available aspirin ASA 00014 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/aspirin....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/aspirin....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/aspirin....Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/aspirin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  1. Compound list: hexachlorobenzene [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hexachlorobenzene HCB 00022 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/...Human/in_vitro/hexachlorobenzene.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LA...TEST/Rat/in_vitro/hexachlorobenzene.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/L...ATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/hexachlorobenzene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp...://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/hexachlorobenzene.Rat.in_vivo.L

  2. Compound list: nitrosodiethylamine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nitrosodiethylamine DEN 00145 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATES...s/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/nitrosodiethylamine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tgg...ates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/nitrosodiethylamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single....zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/nitrosodiethylamine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ... ...T/Human/in_vitro/nitrosodiethylamine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggate

  3. Compound list: cyclophosphamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cyclophosphamide CPA 00024 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/H...uman/in_vitro/cyclophosphamide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATE...ST/Rat/in_vitro/cyclophosphamide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATE...ST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/cyclophosphamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://f...tp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/cyclophosphamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.

  4. Compound list: phenacetin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available phenacetin PCT 00138 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/phenacetin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/phenacetin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/phenacetin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch...ive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/phenacetin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  5. Compound list: imipramine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imipramine IMI 00069 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/imipramine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/imipramine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/imipramine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch...ive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/imipramine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  6. Compound list: bucetin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bucetin BCT 00139 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_v...itro/bucetin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/bu...cetin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single.../bucetin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tgg...ates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/bucetin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive

  7. Compound list: doxorubicin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available doxorubicin DOX 00149 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/doxorubicin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/doxorubicin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/doxorubicin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/...archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/doxorubicin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bios

  8. Compound list: ethinylestradiol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethinylestradiol EE 00055 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hu...man/in_vitro/ethinylestradiol.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATES...T/Rat/in_vitro/ethinylestradiol.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATES...T/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/ethinylestradiol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ft...p.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ethinylestradiol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:

  9. Compound list: ethanol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ethanol ETN 00137 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_v...itro/ethanol.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/et...hanol.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single.../ethanol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ethanol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  10. Compound list: adapin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available adapin ADP 00039 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vi...tro/adapin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/adap...in.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/ad...apin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/adapin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  11. Compound list: danazol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available danazol DNZ 00127 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_v...itro/danazol.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/da...nazol.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single.../danazol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/danazol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  12. Compound list: allopurinol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available allopurinol APL 00028 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/allopurinol.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/allopurinol.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/allopurinol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/...archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/allopurinol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bios

  13. Compound list: omeprazole [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available omeprazole OPZ 00012 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/i...n_vitro/omeprazole.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vi...tro/omeprazole.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liv...er/Single/omeprazole.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arch...ive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/omeprazole.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc

  14. Compound list: ciprofloxacin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ciprofloxacin CPX 00050 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Huma...n/in_vitro/ciprofloxacin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vitro/ciprofloxacin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vivo/Liver/Single/ciprofloxacin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/ciprofloxacin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:

  15. Compound list: nitrofurantoin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nitrofurantoin NFT 00020 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/nitrofurantoin.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R...at/in_vitro/nitrofurantoin.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/nitrofurantoin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc...iencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/nitrofurantoin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:

  16. Compound list: tacrine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tacrine TAC 00060 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_v...itro/tacrine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/ta...crine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single.../tacrine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/tacrine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  17. Compound list: monocrotaline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available monocrotaline MCT 00058 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Huma...n/in_vitro/monocrotaline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vitro/monocrotaline.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in..._vivo/Liver/Single/monocrotaline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscienc...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/monocrotaline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:

  18. Non-shoring construction for T/G pedestal beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.

    1992-01-01

    The T/G pedestal construction work has been the critical path within the T/B construction work of BWR type nuclear power plant. In order to meet the requirement of shortening the construction period and improved in safety on a Turbine Building (T/B) construction work, Non-soring construction for T/G Pedestal Beams was developed. By applying this method to T/G pedestal construction work, we succeeded in shortening the T/B construction period and improvement in safety significantly. (author)

  19. Immune selection of tumor cells in TCR β-chain transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silaeva, Yulia Yu; Grinenko, Tatyana S; Vagida, Murad S; Kalinina, Anastasia A; Khromykh, Ludmila M; Kazansky, Dmitry B

    2014-10-01

    The concept of immunological surveillance implies that immunogenic variants of tumor cells arising in the organism can be recognized by the immune system. Tumor progression is provided by somatic evolution of tumor cells under the pressure of the immune system. The loss of MHC Class I molecules on the surface of tumor cells is one of the most known outcomes of immune selection. This study developed a model of immune selection based on the immune response of TCR 1d1 single β-chain transgenic B10.D2(R101) (K(d)I(d)D(b)) mice to allogeneic EL4 (H-2(b)) thymoma cells. In wild-type B10.D2(R101) mice, immunization with EL4 cells induced a vigorous CTL response targeted to the H-2K(b) molecule and results in full rejection of the tumor cells. In contrast, transgenic mice developed a compromised proliferative response in mixed-lymphocyte response assays and were unable to reject transplanted allogeneic EL4 cells. During the immune response to EL4 cells, CD8(+) T-lymphocytes with endogenous β-chains accumulated predominantly in the spleen of transgenic mice and only a small part of the T-lymphocytes expressing transgenic β-chains became CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effectors. Then, instead of a full elimination of tumor cells as in wild-type mice, a reproducible prolonged equilibrium phase and subsequent escape was observed in transgenic mice that resulted in death of 90% of the mice in 40-60 days after grafting. Prolonged exposure of tumor cells to the pressure of the immune system in transgenic mice in vivo resulted in a stable loss of H-2K(b) molecules on the EL4 cell surface. Genetic manipulation of the T-lymphocyte repertoire was sufficient to reproduce the classic pattern of interactions between tumor cells and the immune system, usually observed in reliable syngeneic models of anti-tumor immunity. This newly-developed model could be used in further studies of immunoregulatory circuits common for transplantational and anti-tumor immune responses.

  20. An altered gp100 peptide ligand with decreased binding by TCR and CD8alpha dissects T cell cytotoxicity from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eSchaft

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered peptide ligands (APLs provide useful tools to study T cell activation and potentially direct immune responses to improve treatment of cancer patients. To better understand and exploit APLs, we studied the relationship between APLs and T cell function in more detail. Here, we tested a broad panel of gp100(280-288 APLs with respect to T cell cytotoxicity, production of cytokines and activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT by human T cells gene-engineered with a gp100-HLA-A2-specific TCRalpha/beta. We demonstrated that gp100-specific cytotoxicity, production of cytokines, and activation of NFAT were not affected by APLs with single amino acid substitutions, except for an APL with an amino acid substitution at position 3 (APL A3, which did not elicit any T cell response. A gp100 peptide with a double amino acid mutation (APL S4S6 elicited T cell cytotoxicity and production of IFNgamma, and to a lesser extent TNFalpha, IL-4, and IL-5, but not production of IL-2 and IL-10, or activation of NFAT. Notably, TCR-mediated functions showed decreases in sensitivities for S4S6 versus gp100 wt peptide, which were minor for cytotoxicity but at least a 1000-fold more prominent for the production of cytokines. TCR-engineered T cells did not bind A3-HLA-A2, but did bind S4S6-HLA-A2 although to a lowered extent compared to wt peptide-HLA-A2. Moreover, S4S6-induced T cell function demonstrated an enhanced dependency on CD8alpha. Taken together, most gp100 APLs functioned as agonists, but A3 and S4S6 peptides acted as a null ligand and partial agonist, respectively. Our results further suggest that TCR-mediated cytotoxicity can be dissected from production of cytokines and activation of NFAT, and that the agonist potential of peptide mutants relates to the extent of binding by TCR and CD8alpha. These findings may facilitate the design of APLs to advance the study of T cell activation and their use for therapeutic applications.

  1. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy ( w,m ) and dose to medium (D m,m ), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D 90 to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%–15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. Conclusions: TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study highlights the importance of backscatter to peak skin dose. Tissue heterogeneities, applicator, and patient geometries demonstrate the need for a more robust dose calculation method for low energy brachytherapy sources

  2. Compound list: fluphenazine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fluphenazine FP 00037 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/flu...phenazine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/flu...phenazine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/flu...jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/fluphenazine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  3. Compound list: diltiazem [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available diltiazem DIL 00092 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/diltia...zem.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/diltia...zem.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/diltia...open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/diltiazem.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  4. Compound list: amitriptyline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available amitriptyline AMT 00070 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/amit...riptyline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/amit...riptyline.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/amit...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/amitriptyline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  5. Compound list: furosemide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available furosemide FUR 00078 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/furose...mide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/furose...mide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/furose...ive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/furosemide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  6. Compound list: benzbromarone [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available benzbromarone BBr 00021 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/benz...bromarone.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/benz...bromarone.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/benz...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/benzbromarone.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  7. Compound list: haloperidol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available haloperidol HPL 00036 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/haloperidol....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/haloperidol....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/haloperidol...archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/haloperidol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  8. Compound list: flutamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available flutamide FT 00044 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/flutam...ide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/flutam...ide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/flutam...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/flutamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  9. Compound list: tamoxifen [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tamoxifen TMX 00054 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/tam...oxifen.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/tam...oxifen.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/tam...open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/tamoxifen.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  10. Compound list: tolbutamide [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tolbutamide TLB 00114 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/tolbutam...ide.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/tolbutam...ide.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/tolbutam...archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/tolbutamide.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  11. Compound list: pemoline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pemoline PML 00051 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_...vitro/pemoline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/...pemoline.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sin...gle/pemoline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open

  12. Compound list: naproxen [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available naproxen NPX 00073 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_...vitro/naproxen.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/...naproxen.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sin...gle/naproxen.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open

  13. Compound list: sulindac [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sulindac SUL 00100 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_...vitro/sulindac.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/...sulindac.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sin...gle/sulindac.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open

  14. Compound list: bendazac [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available bendazac BDZ 00129 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_...vitro/bendazac.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/...bendazac.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sin...gle/bendazac.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open

  15. Compound list: acarbose [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acarbose ACA 00116 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_...vitro/acarbose.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/...acarbose.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sin...gle/acarbose.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open

  16. Compound list: diazepam [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available diazepam DZP 00023 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/diaz...epam.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/diaz...epam.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/diaz...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/diazepam.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  17. Compound list: gemfibrozil [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available gemfibrozil GFZ 00031 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/gemfibrozil....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/gemfibrozil....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/gemfibrozil...archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/gemfibrozil.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  18. Compound list: papaverine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available papaverine PAP 00098 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/papaverine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp....biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/papa...verine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/papa...ive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/papaverine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  19. Compound list: coumarin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available coumarin CMA 00027 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/coumari...n.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/coumari...n.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/coumari...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/coumarin.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  20. Compound list: terbinafine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available terbinafine TBF 00123 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/terbinafine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/terbinafine....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/terbinafine...archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/terbinafine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  1. Compound list: triazolam [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available triazolam TZM 00120 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/triazolam.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.bi...osciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/triazolam....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/triazolam...open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/triazolam.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  2. Extraordinary TCR in Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites and Device Implications in Bolometric Infrared Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-24

    uncooled mid-infrared photovoltaic responses arising in heterojunction diodes of reduced graphene oxide with p-Si. This study was initially motivated...NUMBER(S) 14. ABSTRACT _ The development of high TCR materials, such as vanadium oxide (VOx), has enabled the introduction of bolometric infrared... oxide -Si contact. Our analysis of the current-voltage characteristics at various temperatures suggest that the two materials form a type-11 (broken

  3. TCR Down-Regulation Controls Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... in mice with a mutated CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif. The CD3gamma mutation did not impair early TCR signaling, nor did it compromise recruitment or proliferation of virus-specific T cells, but it increased the apoptosis rate of the activated T cells by increasing down-regulation of the antiapoptotic...... molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus...

  4. A Sensitive Tg Assay or rhTSH Stimulated Tg : What's the Best in the Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, Adrienne C. M.; Jager, Pieter L.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Plukker, John T. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Links, Thera P.

    2007-01-01

    Sensitivity of thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement in the follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) can be optimized by using a sensitive Tg assay and rhTSH stimulation. We evaluated the diagnostic yield of a sensitive Tg assay and rhTSH stimulated Tg in the detection of recurrences in the

  5. Diagnostic value of Tg and TgAb for metastasis following ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma coexistent with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Hong; Zhu, Zhao-Jin; Chen, Ze-Quan; Yu, Yong-Li

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to investigate the clinical value of serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and antithyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) measurements and the cutoff value after ablation in differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) complicated by Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) with metastasis. We measured serum Tg and TgAb levels and evaluated the disease status in 164 cases of DTC coexistent with HT in pathologically confirmed patients after surgery and post-remnant ablation during a 3-year follow-up. All Tg and TgAb levels were assessed by chemiluminescent immunoassay (IMA). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to evaluate the prognostic value of Tg and TgAb for disease metastasis. The relationship between Tg and TgAb was analyzed using the scatter diagram distribution method. We found that the cutoff values of Tg and TgAb were 1.48 µg/L and 45 kIU/L, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of Tg and TgAb was 0.907 and 0.650, respectively. In DTC coexistent with HT patients, the optimal cutoff value correlated with metastasis in Tg and TgAb was 1.48 µg/L and 45 kIU/L, respectively.

  6. Compound list: acetaminophen [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available acetaminophen APAP 00001 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/acetam...inophen.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/acetam...inophen.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/i...cedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/acetaminophen.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp...://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/acetaminophen.Rat.in_vivo.Kidn

  7. Interaction Pattern of Arg 62 in the A-Pocket of Differentially Disease-Associated HLA-B27 Subtypes Suggests Distinct TCR Binding Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Valentina; Caristi, Silvana; Sorrentino, Rosa; Böckmann, Rainer A.; Fiorillo, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The single amino acid replacement Asp116His distinguishes the two subtypes HLA-B*2705 and HLA-B*2709 which are, respectively, associated and non-associated with Ankylosing Spondylitis, an autoimmune chronic inflammatory disease. The reason for this differential association is so far poorly understood and might be related to subtype-specific HLA:peptide conformations as well as to subtype/peptide-dependent dynamical properties on the nanoscale. Here, we combine functional experiments with extensive molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular dynamics and function of the conserved Arg62 of the α1-helix for both B27 subtypes in complex with the self-peptides pVIPR (RRKWRRWHL) and TIS (RRLPIFSRL), and the viral peptides pLMP2 (RRRWRRLTV) and NPflu (SRYWAIRTR). Simulations of HLA:peptide systems suggest that peptide-stabilizing interactions of the Arg62 residue observed in crystal structures are metastable for both B27 subtypes under physiological conditions, rendering this arginine solvent-exposed and, probably, a key residue for TCR interaction more than peptide-binding. This view is supported by functional experiments with conservative (R62K) and non-conservative (R62A) B*2705 and B*2709 mutants that showed an overall reduction in their capability to present peptides to CD8+ T cells. Moreover, major subtype-dependent differences in the peptide recognition suggest distinct TCR binding modes for the B*2705 versus the B*2709 subtype. PMID:22403718

  8. The CD3-zeta chimeric antigen receptor overcomes TCR Hypo-responsiveness of human terminal late-stage T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunter Rappl

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells showed remarkable efficacy in recent trials. Repetitive T cell receptor (TCR engagement of target antigen, however, inevitably ends up in hypo-responsive cells with terminally differentiated KLRG-1(+ CD57(+ CD7(- phenotype limiting their therapeutic efficacy. We here revealed that hypo-responsiveness of CMV-specific late-stage CD8(+ T cells is due to reduced TCR synapse formation compared to younger cells. Membrane anchoring of TCR components contributes to T cell hypo-responsiveness since dislocation of galectin-3 from the synapse by swainsonine restored both TCR synapse formation and T cell response. Transgenic expression of a CD3-zeta signaling chimeric antigen receptor (CAR recovered hypo-responsive T cells to full effector functions indicating that the defect is restricted to TCR membrane components while synapse formation of the transgenic CAR was not blocked. CAR engineered late-stage T cells released cytokines and mediated redirected cytotoxicity as efficiently as younger effector T cells. Our data provide a rationale for TCR independent, CAR mediated activation in the adoptive cell therapy to avoid hypo-responsiveness of late-stage T cells upon repetitive antigen encounter.

  9. IMRT Commissioning: application of the AAPM's TG-119; Comissionamento de IMRT: aplicacao do TG-119 da AAPM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeppellini, Caroline; Furnari, Laura, E-mail: laurafurnari@hotmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Inst. de Radiologia

    2013-08-15

    In order to verify the commissioning of the planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy system (IMRT), the TG-119 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) was applied. Using pre defined targets and normal structures, plans were realized, absolute and relative dose were measured with an ionizing chamber and films, and the results were compared with planned values. The maximum deviation of the measurements with the ionization chamber was 3,6%, but, in the total eleven measurements, only two were bigger than the tolerance limit of 3%, recommended by TG-119. The number of points which passed criteria gamma 3% to 3 mm ranged between 96.36% and 99.92%, all measurements were within the recommended 95%. The confidence limits found for both film and for chamber were lower than those achieved in the TG-119. Our results showed a good concordance with TG-119, what means that the system is adequate for clinical applications. (author)

  10. The binding affinity of a soluble TCR-Fc fusion protein is significantly improved by crosslinkage with an anti-C{beta} antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Kobayashi, Eiji [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Jin, Aishun [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Harbin Medical University, 157 Baojian Road, Nangang District, Harbin 150081 (China); Kishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: immkishi@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Muraguchi, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel soluble TCR composed of TCR V and C regions with Ig Fc region is generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody bound to a p/MHC tetramer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding affinity of TCR-Fc was markedly increased by binding with anti-C{beta} antibody. -- Abstract: The identification and cloning of tumor antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) and the production of the soluble form of the TCR (sTCR) contributed to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools for cancer. Recently, several groups have reported the development of technologies for the production of sTCRs. The native sTCR has a very low binding affinity for the antigenic peptide/MHC (p/MHC) complex. In this study, we established a technology to produce high affinity, functional sTCRs. We generated a novel sTCR-Fc fusion protein composed of the TCR V and C regions of the TCR linked to the immunoglobulin (Ig) Fc region. A Western blot analysis revealed that the molecular weight of the fusion protein was approximately 60 kDa under reducing conditions and approximately 100-200 kDa under non-reducing conditions. ELISAs using various antibodies showed that the structure of each domain of the TCR-Fc protein was intact. The TCR-Fc protein immobilized by an anti-C{beta} antibody effectively bound to a p/MHC tetramer. An SPR analysis showed that the TCR-Fc protein had a low binding affinity (KD; 1.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M) to the p/MHC monomer. Interestingly, when the TCR-Fc protein was pre-incubated with an anti-C{beta} antibody, its binding affinity for p/MHC increased by 5-fold (2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M). We demonstrated a novel method for constructing a functional soluble TCR using the Ig Fc region and showed that the binding affinity of the functional sTCR-Fc was markedly increased by an anti-C{beta} antibody, which is probably due to the stabilization of the V

  11. A meta-analysis of adiponectin gene rs22411766 T>G polymorphism and ischemic stroke susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuju Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have investigated the correlation between adiponectin gene rs22411766 T>G polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk. However, the results were not conclusive with each other. Therefore, to overcome this obstacle, we performed this meta-analysis to further explicate the adiponectin gene rs22411766 T>G polymorphism and ischemic stroke susceptibility. Case-control or cohort studies focused on adiponectin gene rs22411766 T>G polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk were electronic searched in the databases of Medline, Pubmed, Cochrane library, Excerpta Medica database(EMBASE and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI. All the potentially relevant studies were included in this meta-analysis. The association between adiponectin gene rs22411766 T>G polymorphism and ischemic stroke was expressed by odds ratio with its confidence interval. Publication bias has been assessed by begg’s funnel plot. All the analyses have been performed by Revman 5.1 statistical software. Finally, a total of six studies with 1,345 cases and 1,421 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Our results demonstrated that there was a significant association between adiponectin gene rs22411766 T>G polymorphism and ischemic stroke risk (p<0.05. People with G single nucleotide of adiponectin gene have the increased risk of developing ischemic stroke compared to T single nucleotide.

  12. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.reniers@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN, The Netherlands and Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo CP 11049, 05422-970 (Brazil); Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas [Xoft, A Subsidiary of iCAD, Sunnyvale, California 94085-4115 (United States); Beaulieu, Luc [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Université Laval, Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie de l’Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 Canada (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC), Maastricht 6201 BN, The Netherlands and Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (<50 kV) brachytherapy system used in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Breast tissue is a heterogeneous tissue in terms of density and composition. Dosimetric calculations of seven APBI patients treated with Axxent were made using a model-based Monte Carlo platform for a number of tissue models and dose reporting methods and compared to TG-43 based plans. Methods: A model of the Axxent source, the S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (D{sub w,m}) and dose to medium (D{sub m,m}), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D{sub 90} to PTV was reduced by between ∼4% and ∼40%, depending on the

  13. A Novel Form of Compensation in the Tg2576 Amyloid Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Attila; Katonai, Zoltán; Alpár, Alán; Wolf, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    One century after its first description, pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is still poorly understood. Amyloid-related dendritic atrophy and membrane alterations of susceptible brain neurons in AD, and in animal models of AD are widely recognized. However, little effort has been made to study the potential effects of combined morphological and membrane alterations on signal transfer and synaptic integration in neurons that build up affected neural networks in AD. In this study spatial reconstructions and electrophysiological measurements of layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) overexpressing Tg2576 mice were used to build faithful segmental cable models of these neurons. Local synaptic activities were simulated in various points of the dendritic arbors and properties of subthreshold dendritic impulse propagation and predictors of synaptic input pattern recognition ability were quantified and compared in modeled WT and TG neurons. Despite the widespread dendritic degeneration and membrane alterations in mutant mouse neurons, surprisingly little, or no change was detected in steady-state and 50 Hz sinusoidal voltage transfers, current transfers, and local and propagation delays of PSPs traveling along dendrites of TG neurons. Synaptic input pattern recognition ability was also predicted to be unaltered in TG neurons in two different soma-dendritic membrane models investigated. Our simulations predict the way how subthreshold dendritic signaling and pattern recognition are preserved in TG neurons: amyloid-related membrane alterations compensate for the pathological effects that dendritic atrophy has on subthreshold dendritic signal transfer and integration in layer II/III somatosensory neurons of this hAPP mouse model for AD. Since neither propagation of single PSPs nor integration of multiple PSPs (pattern recognition) changes in TG neurons, we conclude that AD

  14. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Shane A; Landry, Guillaume; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Holt, Randy; Rusch, Thomas; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2014-06-01

    The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (Dw,m) and dose to medium (Dm,m), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D90 to PTV was reduced by between ~4% and ~40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%-15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study

  15. Enhanced clinical-scale manufacturing of TCR transduced T-cells using closed culture system modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jianjian; Gkitsas, Nikolaos; Fellowes, Vicki S; Ren, Jiaqiang; Feldman, Steven A; Hinrichs, Christian S; Stroncek, David F; Highfill, Steven L

    2018-01-24

    Genetic engineering of T-cells to express specific T cell receptors (TCR) has emerged as a novel strategy to treat various malignancies. More widespread utilization of these types of therapies has been somewhat constrained by the lack of closed culture processes capable of expanding sufficient numbers of T-cells for clinical application. Here, we evaluate a process for robust clinical grade manufacturing of TCR gene engineered T-cells. TCRs that target human papillomavirus E6 and E7 were independently tested. A 21 day process was divided into a transduction phase (7 days) and a rapid expansion phase (14 days). This process was evaluated using two healthy donor samples and four samples obtained from patients with epithelial cancers. The process resulted in ~ 2000-fold increase in viable nucleated cells and high transduction efficiencies (64-92%). At the end of culture, functional assays demonstrated that these cells were potent and specific in their ability to kill tumor cells bearing target and secrete large quantities of interferon and tumor necrosis factor. Both phases of culture were contained within closed or semi-closed modules, which include automated density gradient separation and cell culture bags for the first phase and closed GREX culture devices and wash/concentrate systems for the second phase. Large-scale manufacturing using modular systems and semi-automated devices resulted in highly functional clinical-grade TCR transduced T-cells. This process is now in use in actively accruing clinical trials and the NIH Clinical Center and can be utilized at other cell therapy manufacturing sites that wish to scale-up and optimize their processing using closed systems.

  16. Definition of APC presentation of phosphoantigen (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate to Vgamma2Vdelta 2 TCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huiyong; Huang, Dan; Lai, Xiaomin; Chen, Meiling; Zhong, Weihua; Wang, Richard; Chen, Zheng W

    2008-10-01

    Although microbial (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP) can activate primate Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells, molecular mechanisms by which HMBPP interacts with Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells remain poorly characterized. Here, we developed soluble, tetrameric Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR of rhesus macaques to define HMBPP/APC interaction with Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR. While exogenous HMBPP was associated with APC membrane in an appreciable affinity, the membrane-associated HMBPP readily bound to the Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR tetramer. The Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR tetramer was shown to bind stably to HMBPP presented on membrane by various APC cell lines from humans and nonhuman primates but not those from mouse, rat, or pig. The Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR tetramer also bound to the membrane-associated HMBPP on primary monocytes, B cells and T cells. Consistently, endogenous phosphoantigen produced in Mycobacterium-infected dendritic cells was transported and presented on membrane, and bound stably to the Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR tetramer. The capability of APC to present HMBPP for recognition by Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR was diminished after protease treatment of APC. Thus, our studies elucidated an affinity HMBPP-APC association conferring stable binding to the Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR tetramer and the protease-sensitive nature of phosphoantigen presentation. The findings defined APC presentation of phosphoantigen HMBPP to Vgamma2Vdelta2 TCR.

  17. TCR-Engineered, Customized, Antitumor T Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy: Advantages and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Chhabra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of the traditional adoptive cancer immunotherapy approaches involving the administration of donor-derived immune effectors, expanded ex vivo, has not met expectations. This could be attributed, in part, to the lack of sufficient high-avidity antitumor T-cell precursors in most cancer patients, poor immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the technological limitations to generate a sufficiently large number of tumor antigen-specific T cells. In addition, the host immune regulatory mechanisms and immune homeostasis mechanisms, such as activation-induced cell death (AICD, could further limit the clinical efficacy of the adoptively administered antitumor T cells. Since generation of a sufficiently large number of potent antitumor immune effectors for adoptive administration is critical for the clinical success of this approach, recent advances towards generating customized donor-specific antitumor-effector T cells by engrafting human peripheral blood-derived T cells with a tumor-associated antigen-specific transgenic T-cell receptor (TCR are quite interesting. This manuscript provides a brief overview of the TCR engineering-based cancer immunotherapy approach, its advantages, and the current limitations.

  18. TCR-engineered, customized, antitumor T cells for cancer immunotherapy: advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Arvind

    2011-01-05

    The clinical outcome of the traditional adoptive cancer immunotherapy approaches involving the administration of donor-derived immune effectors, expanded ex vivo, has not met expectations. This could be attributed, in part, to the lack of sufficient high-avidity antitumor T-cell precursors in most cancer patients, poor immunogenicity of cancer cells, and the technological limitations to generate a sufficiently large number of tumor antigen-specific T cells. In addition, the host immune regulatory mechanisms and immune homeostasis mechanisms, such as activation-induced cell death (AICD), could further limit the clinical efficacy of the adoptively administered antitumor T cells. Since generation of a sufficiently large number of potent antitumor immune effectors for adoptive administration is critical for the clinical success of this approach, recent advances towards generating customized donor-specific antitumor-effector T cells by engrafting human peripheral blood-derived T cells with a tumor-associated antigen-specific transgenic T-cell receptor (TCR) are quite interesting. This manuscript provides a brief overview of the TCR engineering-based cancer immunotherapy approach, its advantages, and the current limitations.

  19. Unique ζ-chain motifs mediate a direct TCR-actin linkage critical for immunological synapse formation and T-cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klieger, Yair; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Ish-Shalom, Eliran; Pato, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Barda-Saad, Mira; Wang, Lynn; Baniyash, Michal

    2014-01-01

    TCR-mediated activation induces receptor microclusters that evolve to a defined immune synapse (IS). Many studies showed that actin polymerization and remodeling, which create a scaffold critical to IS formation and stabilization, are TCR mediated. However, the mechanisms controlling simultaneous TCR and actin dynamic rearrangement in the IS are yet not fully understood. Herein, we identify two novel TCR ζ-chain motifs, mediating the TCR's direct interaction with actin and inducing actin bundling. While T cells expressing the ζ-chain mutated in these motifs lack cytoskeleton (actin) associated (cska)-TCRs, they express normal levels of non-cska and surface TCRs as cells expressing wild-type ζ-chain. However, such mutant cells are unable to display activation-dependent TCR clustering, IS formation, expression of CD25/CD69 activation markers, or produce/secrete cytokine, effects also seen in the corresponding APCs. We are the first to show a direct TCR-actin linkage, providing the missing gap linking between TCR-mediated Ag recognition, specific cytoskeleton orientation toward the T-cell-APC interacting pole and long-lived IS maintenance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The TCR ligand-inducible expression of CD73 marks γδ lineage commitment and a metastable intermediate in effector specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coffey, Francis; Lee, Sang-Yun; Buus, Terkild B

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that γδ T cell receptor (γδTCR) expression alone does not reliably mark commitment of early thymic progenitors to the γδ fate. This raises the possibility that the γδTCR is unable to intrinsically specify fate and instead requires additional environmental factors, includ...

  1. Selective activation of TCR-γδ+ cells in endemic Burkitt's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hviid Lars

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overlap in geographical distribution of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL – an aggressive Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated B-cell tumour occurring almost exclusively in the tropics – strongly suggests a link between the two diseases. It is suspected that the polyclonal B-cell activation in P. falciparum malaria may precipitate a breakdown in homeostatic T-cell control of EBV-immortalized B-cell proliferation. Previous studies have suggested that a particular T-cell subset, characterized by expression of Vδ1+ γδ T-cell receptors, is important for maintaining B-cell homeostasis, both in P. falciparum- exposed populations and in individuals subject to polyclonal B-cell activation of other aetiology. The objective of the present study was, therefore, to characterize lymphocyte phenotypes and to investigate possible differences in T-cell subset composition and activation status in P. falciparum-exposed Ghanaian children with and without eBL. Methods Venous blood samples in heparin from 21 eBL patients (mean age: 7.0 years; range: 3–11 years, referred to the Burkitt's Tumour Centre at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra and 15 healthy, age and sex matched children, were stained with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-, phycoerythrin (PE-, R-phycoerythrin (RPE- and RPE-Cy5-conjugated antibodies (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25, CD69, CD95, HLA-DR, TCR-γδ, Vδ1, Vδ3, Vγ9 and B-cells and acquired on a flow cytometer. Results A reduction in the proportion of CD3+ cells in eBL patients, due mainly to perturbations among TCR-γδ+ cells was observed. In contrast, the proportions of CD4+ or CD8+ cells were relatively unaffected, as were the mean numbers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Conclusion Selective changes in numbers and activation status of TCR-γδ+ cells occurs in Ghanaian children with eBL, a pattern which is similar to P. falciparum-induced changes. The data supports the hypothesis of

  2. Report of AAPM TG 135: quality assurance for robotic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich, Sonja; Cavedon, Carlo; Chuang, Cynthia F; Cohen, Alan B; Garrett, Jeffrey A; Lee, Charles L; Lowenstein, Jessica R; d'Souza, Maximian F; Taylor, David D; Wu, Xiaodong; Yu, Cheng

    2011-06-01

    The task group (TG) for quality assurance for robotic radiosurgery was formed by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine's Science Council under the direction of the Radiation Therapy Committee and the Quality Assurance (QA) Subcommittee. The task group (TG-135) had three main charges: (1) To make recommendations on a code of practice for Robotic Radiosurgery QA; (2) To make recommendations on quality assurance and dosimetric verification techniques, especially in regard to real-time respiratory motion tracking software; (3) To make recommendations on issues which require further research and development. This report provides a general functional overview of the only clinically implemented robotic radiosurgery device, the CyberKnife. This report includes sections on device components and their individual component QA recommendations, followed by a section on the QA requirements for integrated systems. Examples of checklists for daily, monthly, annual, and upgrade QA are given as guidance for medical physicists. Areas in which QA procedures are still under development are discussed.

  3. Thermal behaviors of mechanically activated pyrites by thermogravimetry (TG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Huiping; Chen Qiyuan; Yin Zhoulan; Zhang Pingmin

    2003-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of mechanically activated and non-activated pyrites were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) at the heating rate of 10 K min -1 in argon. Results indicate that the initial temperature of thermal decomposition (T di ) in TG curves for mechanically activated pyrites decreases gradually with increasing the grinding time. The specific granulometric surface area (S G ), the structural disorder of mechanically activated pyrites were analyzed by X-ray diffraction laser particle size analyzer, and X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. The results show that the S G of mechanically activated pyrites remains almost constant after a certain grinding time, and lattice distortions (ε) rise but the crystallite sizes (D) decrease with increasing the grinding time. All these results imply that the decrease of T di in TG curves of mechanically activated pyrites is mainly caused by the increase of lattice distortions ε and the decrease of the crystallite sizes D of mechanically activated pyrite with increasing the grinding time. The differences in the reactivity between non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites were observed using characterization of the products obtained from 1 h treatment of non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites at 713 K under inert atmosphere and characterization of non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites exposed to ambient air for a certain period

  4. EuroClonality/BIOMED-2 guidelines for interpretation and reporting of Ig/TCR clonality testing in suspected lymphoproliferations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langerak, A. W.; Groenen, P. J. T. A.; Brüggemann, M.; Beldjord, K.; Bellan, C.; Bonello, L.; Boone, E.; Carter, G. I.; Catherwood, M.; Davi, F.; Delfau-Larue, M.-H.; Diss, T.; Evans, P. A. S.; Gameiro, P.; Garcia Sanz, R.; Gonzalez, D.; Grand, D.; Håkansson, A.; Hummel, M.; Liu, H.; Lombardia, L.; Macintyre, E. A.; Milner, B. J.; Montes-Moreno, S.; Schuuring, E.; Spaargaren, M.; Hodges, E.; van Dongen, J. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    PCR-based immunoglobulin (Ig)/T-cell receptor (TCR) clonality testing in suspected lymphoproliferations has largely been standardized and has consequently become technically feasible in a routine diagnostic setting. Standardization of the pre-analytical and post-analytical phases is now essential to

  5. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin disrupts TCR signaling in CD1d-restricted NKT cells leading to functional anergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Joshi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous CD1d-binding glycolipid (alpha-Galactosylceramide, alpha-GC stimulates TCR signaling and activation of type-1 natural killer-like T (NKT cells. Activated NKT cells play a central role in the regulation of adaptive and protective immune responses against pathogens and tumors. In the present study, we tested the effect of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT on NKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. LT is a binary toxin known to suppress host immune responses during anthrax disease and intoxicates cells by protective antigen (PA-mediated intracellular delivery of lethal factor (LF, a potent metalloprotease. We observed that NKT cells expressed anthrax toxin receptors (CMG-2 and TEM-8 and bound more PA than other immune cell types. A sub-lethal dose of LT administered in vivo in C57BL/6 mice decreased expression of the activation receptor NKG2D by NKT cells but not by NK cells. The in vivo administration of LT led to decreased TCR-induced cytokine secretion but did not affect TCR expression. Further analysis revealed LT-dependent inhibition of TCR-stimulated MAP kinase signaling in NKT cells attributable to LT cleavage of the MAP kinase kinase MEK-2. We propose that Bacillus anthracis-derived LT causes a novel form of functional anergy in NKT cells and therefore has potential for contributing to immune evasion by the pathogen.

  6. TCR Signal Strength Regulates Akt Substrate Specificity To Induce Alternate Murine Th and T Regulatory Cell Differentiation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawse, William F; Boggess, William C; Morel, Penelope A

    2017-07-15

    The Akt/mTOR pathway is a key driver of murine CD4 + T cell differentiation, and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells results from low TCR signal strength and low Akt/mTOR signaling. However, strong TCR signals induce high Akt activity that promotes Th cell induction. Yet, it is unclear how Akt controls alternate T cell fate decisions. We find that the strength of the TCR signal results in differential Akt enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, the Akt substrate networks associated with T cell fate decisions are qualitatively different. Proteomic profiling of Akt signaling networks during Treg versus Th induction demonstrates that Akt differentially regulates RNA processing and splicing factors to drive T cell differentiation. Interestingly, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) L or hnRNP A1 are Akt substrates during Treg induction and have known roles in regulating the stability and splicing of key mRNAs that code for proteins in the canonical TCR signaling pathway, including CD3ζ and CD45. Functionally, inhibition of Akt enzymatic activity results in the dysregulation of splicing during T cell differentiation, and knockdown of hnRNP L or hnRNP A1 results in the lower induction of Treg cells. Together, this work suggests that a switch in substrate specificity coupled to the phosphorylation status of Akt may lead to alternative cell fates and demonstrates that proteins involved with alternative splicing are important factors in T cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Direct molecular mimicry enables off-target cardiovascular toxicity by an enhanced affinity TCR designed for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Marine C C; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Simmons, Ruth; Donnellan, Zoe; Dukes, Joseph; Bossi, Giovanna; Le Provost, Gabrielle S; Todorov, Penio; Baston, Emma; Hickman, Emma; Mahon, Tara; Hassan, Namir; Vuidepot, Annelise; Sami, Malkit; Cole, David K; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2016-01-13

    Natural T-cell responses generally lack the potency to eradicate cancer. Enhanced affinity T-cell receptors (TCRs) provide an ideal approach to target cancer cells, with emerging clinical data showing significant promise. Nevertheless, the risk of off target reactivity remains a key concern, as exemplified in a recent clinical report describing fatal cardiac toxicity, following administration of MAGE-A3 specific TCR-engineered T-cells, mediated through cross-reactivity with an unrelated epitope from the Titin protein presented on cardiac tissue. Here, we investigated the structural mechanism enabling TCR cross-recognition of MAGE-A3 and Titin, and applied the resulting data to rationally design mutants with improved antigen discrimination, providing a proof-of-concept strategy for altering the fine specificity of a TCR towards an intended target antigen. This study represents the first example of direct molecular mimicry leading to clinically relevant fatal toxicity, mediated by a modified enhanced affinity TCR designed for cancer immunotherapy. Furthermore, these data demonstrate that self-antigens that are expressed at high levels on healthy tissue should be treated with extreme caution when designing immuno-therapeutics.

  8. Regulatory T cells expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals maintain phenotype, TCR repertoire and suppressive capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Angin

    Full Text Available While modulation of regulatory T cell (Treg function and adoptive Treg transfer are being explored as therapeutic modalities in the context of autoimmune diseases, transplantation and cancer, their role in HIV-1 pathogenesis remains less well defined. Controversy persists regarding their beneficial or detrimental effects in HIV-1 disease, which warrants further detailed exploration. Our objectives were to investigate if functional CD4(+ Tregs can be isolated and expanded from HIV-1-infected individuals for experimental or potential future therapeutic use and to determine phenotype and suppressive capacity of expanded Tregs from HIV-1 positive blood and tissue. Tregs and conventional T cell controls were isolated from blood and gut-associated lymphoid tissue of individuals with HIV-1 infection and healthy donors using flow-based cell-sorting. The phenotype of expanded Tregs was assessed by flow-cytometry and quantitative PCR. T-cell receptor ß-chain (TCR-β repertoire diversity was investigated by deep sequencing. Flow-based T-cell proliferation and chromium release cytotoxicity assays were used to determine Treg suppressive function. Tregs from HIV-1 positive individuals, including infants, were successfully expanded from PBMC and GALT. Expanded Tregs expressed high levels of FOXP3, CTLA4, CD39 and HELIOS and exhibited a highly demethylated TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region, characteristic of Treg lineage. The TCRß repertoire was maintained following Treg expansion and expanded Tregs remained highly suppressive in vitro. Our data demonstrate that Tregs can be expanded from blood and tissue compartments of HIV-1+ donors with preservation of Treg phenotype, function and TCR repertoire. These results are highly relevant for the investigation of potential future therapeutic use, as currently investigated for other disease states and hold great promise for detailed studies on the role of Tregs in HIV-1 infection.

  9. GADS is required for TCR-mediated calcium influx and cytokine release, but not cellular adhesion, in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Mahmood Y; Zhang, Elizabeth Y; Dinkel, Brittney; Hardy, Daimon; Yankee, Thomas M; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-04-01

    GRB2 related adaptor protein downstream of Shc (GADS) is a member of the GRB2 family of adaptors and is critical for TCR-induced signaling. The current model is that GADS recruits SLP-76 to the LAT complex, which facilitates the phosphorylation of SLP-76, the activation of PLC-γ1, T cell adhesion and cytokine production. However, this model is largely based on studies of disruption of the GADS/SLP-76 interaction and murine T cell differentiation in GADS deficient mice. The role of GADS in mediating TCR-induced signals in human CD4+ T cells has not been thoroughly investigated. In this study, we have suppressed the expression of GADS in human CD4+ HuT78 T cells. GADS deficient HuT78 T cells displayed similar levels of TCR-induced SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 phosphorylation but exhibited substantial decrease in TCR-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ release. The defect in cytokine production occurred because of impaired calcium mobilization due to reduced recruitment of SLP-76 and PLC-γ1 to the LAT complex. Surprisingly, both GADS deficient HuT78 and GADS deficient primary murine CD8+ T cells had similar TCR-induced adhesion when compared to control T cells. Overall, our results show that GADS is required for calcium influx and cytokine production, but not cellular adhesion, in human CD4+ T cells, suggesting that the current model for T cell regulation by GADS is incomplete. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Long term aging of selenide glasses: evidence of sub-Tg endotherms and pre-Tg exotherms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Boolchand, P.; Georgiev, D. G.

    2010-02-01

    Long term aging, extending from months to several years, is studied on several families of chalcogenide glasses including the Ge-Se, As-Se, and Ge-As-Se systems. Special attention is given to the As-Se binary, a system that displays a rich variety of aging behavior intimately tied to sample synthesis conditions and the ambient environment in which samples are aged. Calorimetric (modulated DSC) and Raman scattering experiments are undertaken. Our results show all samples display a sub-Tg endotherm typically 10-70 °C below Tg in glassy networks possessing a mean coordination number r in the 2.25 < r < 2.45 range. Two sets of AsxSe100-x samples aged for eight years were compared, set A consisted of slow cooled samples aged in the dark, and set B consisted of melt-quenched samples aged at laboratory environment. Samples of set B in the As concentration range, 35% < x < 60%, display a pre-Tg exotherm, but the feature is not observed in samples of set A. The aging behavior of set A presumably represents intrinsic aging in these glasses, while that of set B is extrinsic due to the presence of light. The reversibility window persists in both sets of samples, but is less well defined in set B. These findings contrast with a recent study by Golovchak et al (2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 014202), which finds the onset of the reversibility window moved up to the stoichiometric composition (x = 40%). Here we show that the up-shifted window is better understood as resulting due to demixing of As4Se4 and As4Se3 molecules from the backbone, i.e., nanoscale phase separation (NSPS). We attribute sub-Tg endotherms to compaction of the flexible part of the networks upon long term aging, while the pre-Tg exotherm is to NSPS. The narrowing and sharpening of the reversibility window upon aging is interpreted as the slow 'self-organizing' stress relaxation of the phases just outside the intermediate phase, which itself is stress free and displays little aging.

  11. Re-examining TG-142 recommendations in light of modern techniques for linear accelerator based radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Austin M; Trager, Michael; Yin, Fang-Fang; Kirkpatrick, John; Adamson, Justus

    2016-10-01

    The recent development of multifocal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) using a single isocenter volumetric modulated arc theory (VMAT) technique warrants a re-examination of the quality assurance (QA) tolerances for routine mechanical QA recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report Number 142. Multifocal SRS can result in targets with small volumes being at a large off-axis distance from the treatment isocenter. Consequently, angular errors in the collimator, patient support assembly (PSA), or gantry could have an increased impact on target coverage. The authors performed a retrospective analysis of dose deviations caused by systematic errors in PSA, collimator, and gantry angle at the tolerance level for routine linear accelerator QA as recommended by TG-142. Dosimetric deviations from multifocal SRS plans (N = 10) were compared to traditional single target SRS using dynamic conformal arcs (N = 10). The chief dosimetric quantities used in determining clinical impact were V 100% and D 99% of the individual planning target volumes and V 12Gy of the healthy brain. Induced errors at tolerance levels showed the greatest change in multifocal SRS target coverage for collimator rotations (±1.0°) with the average changes to V 100% and D 99% being 5% and 6%, respectively, with maximum changes of 33% and 20%. A reduction in the induced error to half the TG-142 tolerance (±0.5°) demonstrated similar changes in coverage loss to traditional single target SRS assessed at the recommended tolerance level. The observed change in coverage for multifocal SRS was reduced for gantry errors (±1.0°) at 2% and 4.5% for V 100% and D 99% , respectively, with maximum changes of 18% and 12%. Minimal change in coverage was noted for errors in PSA rotation. This study indicates that institutions utilizing a single isocenter VMAT technique for multifocal disease should pay careful attention to the angular mechanical tolerances in designing a robust and

  12. Intrathymic selection of NK1.1+α/β T cell antigen receptor (TCR)+ cells in transgenic mice bearing TCR specific for chicken ovalbumin and restricted to I-Ad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Chikako; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Nakagawa, Ken-ichi; Takayanagi, Toshiaki; Nishihori, Hiroki; Tone, Saori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Good, Robert A.; Onoé, Kazunori

    1998-01-01

    Generation and negative selection of NK1.1+α/β T cell receptor (TCR)+ thymocytes were analyzed using TCR-transgenic (B10.D2 × DO10)F1 and (C57BL/6 × DO10)F1 mice and Rag-1−/−/DO10 mice, which had been established by breeding and backcrossing between Rag-1−/− and DO10 mice. Almost all T cells from these mice were shown to bear Vα13/Vβ8.2 that is specific for chicken ovalbumin (cOVA) and restricted to I-Ad. A normal proportion of the NK1.1+ Vα13/Vβ8.2+ thymocytes was generated in these mice. However, the actual cell number of both NK1.1+ and NK1.1− thymocytes in I-Ad/d mice (positive selecting background) was larger than that in I-Ab/d mice (negative selecting background). Markedly low but significant proportions of NK1.1+ Vα13/Vβ8.2+ cells were detected in the spleens from I-Ad/d and I-Ab/d mice. It was shown that the splenic NK1.1+ T cells of the I-Ab/d mice were anergized against stimulation through TCR. When (B10.D2 × DO10)F1 and (C57BL/6 × DO10)F1 mice were given cOVA, extensive or intermediate elimination of NK1.1+α/βTCR+ thymocytes was induced in I-Ad/d or I-Ab/d mice, respectively. However, the clonal elimination was not as complete as that seen in the major NK1.1− thymocyte population. The present findings indicate that normal generation of NK1.1+α/βTCR+ thymocytes occurs in the absence of Vα14-Jα281 and that substantial negative selection operates on the NK1.1+α/βTCR+ cells. PMID:9653164

  13. Innate signals overcome acquired TCR signaling pathway regulation and govern the fate of human CD161(hi) CD8α⁺ semi-invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Delrow, Jeff; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Swanson, Hillary M; Basom, Ryan; Tabellini, Laura; Delaney, Colleen; Heimfeld, Shelly; Hansen, John A; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-09-08

    Type 17 programmed CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells contribute to mucosal immunity to bacteria and yeast. In early life, microbial colonization induces proliferation of CD161(hi) cells that is dependent on their expression of a semi-invariant Vα7.2(+) TCR. Although prevalent in adults, CD161(hi)CD8α(+) cells exhibit weak proliferative and cytokine responses to TCR ligation. The mechanisms responsible for the dichotomous response of neonatal and adult CD161(hi) cells, and the signals that enable their effector function, have not been established. We describe acquired regulation of TCR signaling in adult memory CD161(hi)CD8α(+) T cells that is absent in cord CD161(hi) cells and adult CD161(lo) cells. Regulated TCR signaling in CD161(hi) cells was due to profound alterations in TCR signaling pathway gene expression and could be overcome by costimulation through CD28 or innate cytokine receptors, which dictated the fate of their progeny. Costimulation with IL-1β during TCR ligation markedly increased proinflammatory IL-17 production, while IL-12-induced Tc1-like function and restored the response to TCR ligation without costimulation. CD161(hi) cells from umbilical cord blood and granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukaphereses differed in frequency and function, suggesting future evaluation of the contribution of CD161(hi) cells in hematopoietic stem cell grafts to transplant outcomes is warranted.

  14. AIR QUALITY IN THE CITY OF TG JIU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina TĂTAR

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems of the modern age is the air pollution. Within this work I realized a description of Tgjiu City: geographic location, climate, hydrographical network, variations in temperature, terrain, sources of pollution. On the basis of registered values for the air quality indicator, sedimentable powders, and interpretation of results on the basis of the provisions of the standards in force, the comments were made in relation to particulate air pollution in the city area of sedimentableTg Jiu, identifying the polluters in the area, the proposed solutions for the reduction of pollution.

  15. CD25 and CD69 induction by α4β1 outside-in signalling requires TCR early signalling complex proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimo, Ann-Marie; Ahmed, Zamal; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Ladbury, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Distinct signalling pathways producing diverse cellular outcomes can utilize similar subsets of proteins. For example, proteins from the TCR (T-cell receptor) ESC (early signalling complex) are also involved in interferon-α receptor signalling. Defining the mechanism for how these proteins function within a given pathway is important in understanding the integration and communication of signalling networks with one another. We investigated the contributions of the TCR ESC proteins Lck (lymphocyte-specific kinase), ZAP-70 (ζ-chain-associated protein of 70 kDa), Vav1, SLP-76 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa] and LAT (linker for activation of T-cells) to integrin outside-in signalling in human T-cells. Lck, ZAP-70, SLP-76, Vav1 and LAT were activated by α4β1 outside-in signalling, but in a manner different from TCR signalling. TCR stimulation recruits ESC proteins to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase). α4β1 outside-in-mediated ERK activation did not require TCR ESC proteins. However, α4β1 outside-in signalling induced CD25 and co-stimulated CD69 and this was dependent on TCR ESC proteins. TCR and α4β1 outside-in signalling are integrated through the common use of TCR ESC proteins; however, these proteins display functionally distinct roles in these pathways. These novel insights into the cross-talk between integrin outside-in and TCR signalling pathways are highly relevant to the development of therapeutic strategies to overcome disease associated with T-cell deregulation. PMID:23758320

  16. NSOM/QD-Based Visualization of GM1 Serving as Platforms for TCR/CD3 Mediated T-Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct molecular imaging of nanoscale relationship between T-cell receptor complexes (TCR/CD3 and gangliosidosis GM1 before and after T-cell activation has not been reported. In this study, we made use of our expertise of near-field scanning optical microscopy(NSOM/immune-labeling quantum dots- (QD-based dual-color imaging system to visualize nanoscale profiles for distribution and organization of TCR/CD3, GM1, as well as their nanospatial relationship and their correlation with PKCθ signaling cascade during T-cell activation. Interestingly, after anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Ab co-stimulation, both TCR/CD3 and GM1 were clustered to form nanodomains; moreover, all of TCR/CD3 nanodomains were colocalized with GM1 nanodomains, indicating that the formation of GM1 nanodomains was greatly correlated with TCR/CD3 mediated signaling. Specially, while T-cells were pretreated with PKCθ signaling inhibitor rottlerin to suppress IL-2 cytokine production, no visible TCR/CD3 nanodomains appeared while a lot of GM1 nanodomains were still observed. However, while T-cells are pretreated with PKCαβ signaling inhibitor GÖ6976 to suppress calcium-dependent manner, all of TCR/CD3 nanodomains were still colocalized with GM1 nanodomains. These findings possibly support the notion that the formation of GM1 nanodomains indeed serves as platforms for the recruitment of TCR/CD3 nanodomains, and TCR/CD3 nanodomains are required for PKCθ signaling cascades and T-cell activation

  17. Intrathymic selection of NK1.1+α/β T cell antigen receptor (TCR)+ cells in transgenic mice bearing TCR specific for chicken ovalbumin and restricted to I-Ad

    OpenAIRE

    Iwabuchi, Chikako; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Nakagawa, Ken-ichi; Takayanagi, Toshiaki; Nishihori, Hiroki; Tone, Saori; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Good, Robert A.; Onoé, Kazunori

    1998-01-01

    Generation and negative selection of NK1.1+α/β T cell receptor (TCR)+ thymocytes were analyzed using TCR-transgenic (B10.D2 × DO10)F1 and (C57BL/6 × DO10)F1 mice and Rag-1−/−/DO10 mice, which had been established by breeding and backcrossing between Rag-1−/− and DO10 mice. Almost all T cells from these mice were shown to bear Vα13/Vβ8.2 that is specific for chicken ovalbumin (cOVA) and restricted to I-Ad. A normal proportion of the NK1.1+ Vα13/Vβ8.2+ thymocytes was generated in these mice. Ho...

  18. Open TG-GATEs: a large-scale toxicogenomics database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Yoshinobu; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Yamashita, Tomoya; Ono, Atsushi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Toxicogenomics focuses on assessing the safety of compounds using gene expression profiles. Gene expression signatures from large toxicogenomics databases are expected to perform better than small databases in identifying biomarkers for the prediction and evaluation of drug safety based on a compound's toxicological mechanisms in animal target organs. Over the past 10 years, the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project consortium (TGP) has been developing a large-scale toxicogenomics database consisting of data from 170 compounds (mostly drugs) with the aim of improving and enhancing drug safety assessment. Most of the data generated by the project (e.g. gene expression, pathology, lot number) are freely available to the public via Open TG-GATEs (Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System). Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of the database, including both gene expression data and metadata, with a description of experimental conditions and procedures used to generate the database. Open TG-GATEs is available from http://toxico.nibio.go.jp/english/index.html. PMID:25313160

  19. TH-EF-BRC-00: TG-100 Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    This Hands-on Workshop will be focused on providing participants with experience with the principal tools of TG 100 and hence start to build both competence and confidence in the use of risk-based quality management techniques. The three principal tools forming the basis of TG 100’s risk analysis: Process mapping, Failure-Modes and Effects Analysis and fault-tree analysis will be introduced with a 5 minute refresher presentation and each presentation will be followed by a 30 minute small group exercise. An exercise on developing QM from the risk analysis follows. During the exercise periods, participants will apply the principles in 2 different clinical scenarios. At the conclusion of each exercise there will be ample time for participants to discuss with each other and the faculty their experience and any challenges encountered. Learning Objectives: To review the principles of Process Mapping, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis and Fault Tree Analysis. To gain familiarity with these three techniques in a small group setting. To share and discuss experiences with the three techniques with faculty and participants. Director, TreatSafely, LLC. Director, Center for the Assessment of Radiological Sciences. Occasional Consultant to the IAEA and Varian.

  20. TH-EF-BRC-00: TG-100 Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This Hands-on Workshop will be focused on providing participants with experience with the principal tools of TG 100 and hence start to build both competence and confidence in the use of risk-based quality management techniques. The three principal tools forming the basis of TG 100’s risk analysis: Process mapping, Failure-Modes and Effects Analysis and fault-tree analysis will be introduced with a 5 minute refresher presentation and each presentation will be followed by a 30 minute small group exercise. An exercise on developing QM from the risk analysis follows. During the exercise periods, participants will apply the principles in 2 different clinical scenarios. At the conclusion of each exercise there will be ample time for participants to discuss with each other and the faculty their experience and any challenges encountered. Learning Objectives: To review the principles of Process Mapping, Failure Modes and Effects Analysis and Fault Tree Analysis. To gain familiarity with these three techniques in a small group setting. To share and discuss experiences with the three techniques with faculty and participants. Director, TreatSafely, LLC. Director, Center for the Assessment of Radiological Sciences. Occasional Consultant to the IAEA and Varian.

  1. Blot hybridization analysis of TCR genes of T cells for five people exposed in a radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Rui; Liu Benti; Cheng Tianmin; Yang Rujun; Meng Xiangshun; Xiao Jinsong

    1996-01-01

    Human lymphocyte total DNA was prepared in agarose plug by mixing cells with low melting agarose, and two restriction endonucleases were used for digestion of the total DNA with human α and β TCR cDNA probes. The total digested DNA from five people who were whole body exposed to 2.0-2.5 Gy ionizing radiation in an accident 4.5 years ago was hybridized by Southern blot method. The results showed that no obvious difference in hybridization bands was found between controls and the five victims when hybridizations were fulfilled in the total DNA which was digested by Hind III restriction endonuclease with both α and β probes. However, when the total DNA was digested with restriction endonuclease EcoR I and was hybridized with TCR α probe, four of the five exposed people showed a different hybridizing band pattern compared with the controls. The results are also discussed

  2. TU-B-304-00: The Aftermath of TG-142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Although published in 2009, the AAPM TG-142 report on accelerator quality assurance still proves a challenge for full clinical implementation. The choice of methodologies to satisfy TG-142 requirements is critical to a successful application. Understanding the philosophy of TG-142 can help in creating an institution-specific QA practice that is both efficient and effective. The concept of maintaining commissioned beam profiles is still found confusing. The physicist must also consider technologies not covered by TG-142 (i.e. arc therapy techniques). On the horizon is TG-198 report on implementing TG-142. Although the community still lacks a final TG-100 report, performing a failure-mode -and-effects analysis and statistical process control analysis to determine the institution-specific clinical impact of each TG-142 test may be useful for identifying trends for pro-active surveillance. Learning Objectives: To better understand the confusing and controversial aspects of TG-142. To understand what is still missing from TG-142 and how to account for these tests in clinical practice To describe which QA tests in TG-142 yield the largest potential clinical result if not discovered.

  3. TU-B-304-01: The Aftermath of TG-142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, E. [Washington University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Although published in 2009, the AAPM TG-142 report on accelerator quality assurance still proves a challenge for full clinical implementation. The choice of methodologies to satisfy TG-142 requirements is critical to a successful application. Understanding the philosophy of TG-142 can help in creating an institution-specific QA practice that is both efficient and effective. The concept of maintaining commissioned beam profiles is still found confusing. The physicist must also consider technologies not covered by TG-142 (i.e. arc therapy techniques). On the horizon is TG-198 report on implementing TG-142. Although the community still lacks a final TG-100 report, performing a failure-mode -and-effects analysis and statistical process control analysis to determine the institution-specific clinical impact of each TG-142 test may be useful for identifying trends for pro-active surveillance. Learning Objectives: To better understand the confusing and controversial aspects of TG-142. To understand what is still missing from TG-142 and how to account for these tests in clinical practice To describe which QA tests in TG-142 yield the largest potential clinical result if not discovered.

  4. TU-B-304-02: Quantitative FMEA of TG-142

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Daniel, J. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Although published in 2009, the AAPM TG-142 report on accelerator quality assurance still proves a challenge for full clinical implementation. The choice of methodologies to satisfy TG-142 requirements is critical to a successful application. Understanding the philosophy of TG-142 can help in creating an institution-specific QA practice that is both efficient and effective. The concept of maintaining commissioned beam profiles is still found confusing. The physicist must also consider technologies not covered by TG-142 (i.e. arc therapy techniques). On the horizon is TG-198 report on implementing TG-142. Although the community still lacks a final TG-100 report, performing a failure-mode -and-effects analysis and statistical process control analysis to determine the institution-specific clinical impact of each TG-142 test may be useful for identifying trends for pro-active surveillance. Learning Objectives: To better understand the confusing and controversial aspects of TG-142. To understand what is still missing from TG-142 and how to account for these tests in clinical practice To describe which QA tests in TG-142 yield the largest potential clinical result if not discovered.

  5. Comparison of Thyroglobulin Measurements Using Three Different Immunoassay Kits: A BRAMHS Tg-Plus RIA Kit, a BRAMHS hTg Sensitive Kryptor Kit, and a Beckman Coulter ACCESS Immunoassay Kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijin Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSecond-generation thyroglobulin immunometric assays (Tg-IMAs have been developed with improved sensitivity. Our aim was to compare the diagnostic value of Tg-IMA measurements using a Kryptor (BRAHMS AG kit (Tg-K and an ACCESS (Beckman Coulter kit (Tg-A with that of the first-generation Tg measurement using a Tg-plus (BRAHMS AG kit (Tg+.MethodsWe enrolled 82 differentiated thyroid cancer patients who underwent total thyroidectomy with radioactive iodine remnant ablation and who underwent diagnostic whole body scan using recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH. The Tg+, Tg-K, and Tg-A were measured before rhTSH administration during levothyroxine treatment (suppressed Tg from the same sample. Serum Tg+ was measured after rhTSH stimulation (stimulated Tg.ResultsSuppressed Tg+ was more significantly correlated with suppressed Tg-K (R2=0.919, P<0.001 than with suppressed Tg-A (R2=0.536, P<0.001. The optimal cut-off values of suppressed Tg+, Tg-K, and Tg-A for predicting stimulated Tg+ of 1 ng/mL were 0.3, 0.2, and 0.2 ng/mL, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of suppressed Tg+ were 67%, 100%, and 90%, respectively; those of suppressed Tg-K were 83%, 90%, and 88%; those of suppressed Tg-A were 96%, 82%, and 87%, respectively. The positive predictive and negative predictive values of Tg+ were 100% and 87%, respectively; those of Tg-K were 79% and 92%; and those of Tg-A were 73% and 98%.ConclusionWe could not clearly demonstrate which kit had better diagnostic performance after comparison of first-generation Tg measurements with Tg-IMA measurements. Also, there were kit-to-kit variations between Tg-IMA kits. Suppressed Tg measured by Tg-IMA was insufficient to completely substitute for a stimulated Tg measurement.

  6. TET proteins regulate the lineage specification and TCR-mediated expansion of iNKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagaratou, Ageliki; González-Avalos, Edahí; Rautio, Sini; Scott-Browne, James P; Togher, Susan; Pastor, William A; Rothenberg, Ellen V; Chavez, Lukas; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Rao, Anjana

    2017-01-01

    TET proteins oxidize 5-methylcytosine in DNA to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and other oxidation products. We found that simultaneous deletion of Tet2 and Tet3 in mouse CD4 + CD8 + double-positive thymocytes resulted in dysregulated development and proliferation of invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). Tet2-Tet3 double-knockout (DKO) iNKT cells displayed pronounced skewing toward the NKT17 lineage, with increased DNA methylation and impaired expression of genes encoding the key lineage-specifying factors T-bet and ThPOK. Transfer of purified Tet2-Tet3 DKO iNKT cells into immunocompetent recipient mice resulted in an uncontrolled expansion that was dependent on the nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein CD1d, which presents lipid antigens to iNKT cells. Our data indicate that TET proteins regulate iNKT cell fate by ensuring their proper development and maturation and by suppressing aberrant proliferation mediated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR).

  7. Chimeric Antigen Receptor- and TCR-Modified T Cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, David M; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2015-08-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)- and TCR-engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and it holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology, and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. In this overview, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Analysis of the form vault temple bearing by the laser apparatus LEICA TCR 305

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ľudovít Kovanič, jr.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available As an object of mapping we choosed some of churches as an object of mapping. Ve determined the aisle of Rozalia church in Košice by means using the apparatus Leica TCR 305. The oblique transverse profile was measured. Making use horizontal and vertical lenght components we selected those that defined the beggining, course and the end of the oblique ceilling arch. On the basis of five paired data into a rectangular coordinate system of the vertical plane with the begining in the point of arch origin. The coordinate xi defined the stationing and the coordinate yi defined the height, resp. the superelevation from the apparatus horizont to the arch points securing that the whole course of the arch is retained regularly. First we considered the possibility of circle. The aisle of Rozalia church in Košice. We determined different radiuses using connecting lines of selected points (cords, however it is not important, for the arch. Therefore we considered the solution of the arch shape through a parabola.The comparison of results was realized by the mathematic-statistical methods. Parameters of regression were calculated by the method of least squares .We tried to analyze the curve of this arch using also the method of mathematically defined second grade, curves , namely circles and elipses.

  9. TCR Triggering Induces the Formation of Lck-RacK1-Actinin-1 Multiprotein Network Affecting Lck Redistribution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ballek, Ondřej; Valečka, Jan; Dobešová, Martina; Broučková, Adéla; Manning, Jasper; Řehulka, P.; Stulík, J.; Filipp, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, podzim (2016), č. článku 449. ISSN 1664-3224 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : TCR triggering * RACK 1 * Lck * membrane microdomains * adapter protein * tyrosine phosphorylation * scaffolding protein * migrating cell s Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.429, year: 2016

  10. High-Tg TOPAS microstructured polymer optical fiber for fiber Bragg grating strain sensing at 110 degrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio; Nielsen, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in an endlessly single-mode microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) made of humidity-insensitive high-Tg TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer. The mPOF is the first made from grade 5013 TOPAS with a glass transition...... temperature of Tg = 135°C and we experimentally demonstrate high strain operation (2.5%) of the FBG at 98°C and stable operation up to a record high temperature of 110°C. The Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are around 860 nm, where the propagation loss is 5.1dB/m, close to the fiber loss minimum of 3.67d...

  11. Fine-tuning of T-cell development by the CD3γ di-leucine-based TCR-sorting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst; Boding, Lasse; Buus, Terkild B

    2015-01-01

    The CD3γ di-leucine-based (diL) receptor-sorting motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation and in clonal expansion of virus-specific T cells. However, the role of the CD3γ diL motif in T-cell development is not known. In this study, we show that protein kinase C-induced TCR down-regulatio......The CD3γ di-leucine-based (diL) receptor-sorting motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation and in clonal expansion of virus-specific T cells. However, the role of the CD3γ diL motif in T-cell development is not known. In this study, we show that protein kinase C-induced TCR down...

  12. The effect of intracellular trafficking of CD1d on the formation of TCR repertoire of NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Park, Se-Ho

    2014-05-01

    CD1 molecules belong to non-polymorphic MHC class I-like proteins and present lipid antigens to T cells. Five different CD1 genes (CD1a-e) have been identified and classified into two groups. Group 1 include CD1a-c and present pathogenic lipid antigens to αβ T cells reminiscence of peptide antigen presentation by MHC-I molecules. CD1d is the only member of Group 2 and presents foreign and self lipid antigens to a specialized subset of αβ T cells, NKT cells. NKT cells are involved in diverse immune responses through prompt and massive production of cytokines. CD1d-dependent NKT cells are categorized upon the usage of their T cell receptors. A major subtype of NKT cells (type I) is invariant NKT cells which utilize invariant Vα14-Jα18 TCR alpha chain in mouse. The remaining NKT cells (type II) utilize diverse TCR alpha chains. Engineered CD1d molecules with modified intracellular trafficking produce either type I or type II NKT cell-defects suggesting the lipid antigens for each subtypes of NKT cells are processed/generated in different intracellular compartments. Since the usage of TCR by a T cell is the result of antigen-driven selection, the intracellular metabolic pathways of lipid antigen are a key in forming the functional NKT cell repertoire.

  13. Alternative splicing of T cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain transcripts containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahotka, C; Hansen-Hagge, T E; Bartram, C R

    1995-10-01

    Human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines represent valuable tools to investigate distinct steps of the complex regulatory pathways underlying T cell receptor recombination and expression. A case in point are V delta 2D delta 3 and subsequent V delta 2D delta 3J alpha rearrangements observed in human leukemic pre-B cells as well as in normal lymphopoiesis. The functional expression of these unusual (VD) delta (JC) alpha hybrids is almost exclusively prevented by alternative splicing events. In this report we show that alternative splicing at cryptic splice donor sites within V elements is not a unique feature of hybrid TCR delta/alpha transcripts. Among seven V alpha families analyzed by RT-PCR, alternatively spliced products were observed in TCR alpha recombinations containing V alpha 1 or V alpha 14 elements. In contrast to normal peripheral blood cells and thymocytes, the leukemia cell line JM expressing functional V alpha 1J alpha 3C alpha transcripts lacked evidence of aberrant TCR alpha RNA species.

  14. Evolutionarily Conserved TCR Binding Sites, Identification of T Cells in Primary Lymphoid Tissues, and Surprising Trans-Rearrangements in Nurse Shark

    OpenAIRE

    Criscitiello, Michael F.; Ohta, Yuko; Saltis, Mark; McKinney, E. Churchill; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2010-01-01

    Cartilaginous fish are the oldest animals that generate RAG-based Ag receptor diversity. We have analyzed the genes and expressed transcripts of the four TCR chains for the first time in a cartilaginous fish, the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum). Northern blotting found TCR mRNA expression predominantly in lymphoid and mucosal tissues. Southern blotting suggested translocon-type loci encoding all four chains. Based on diversity of V and J segments, the expressed combinatorial diversity fo...

  15. Evolutionarily conserved TCR binding sites, identification of T cells in primary lymphoid tissues, and surprising trans-rearrangements in nurse shark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscitiello, Michael F; Ohta, Yuko; Saltis, Mark; McKinney, E Churchill; Flajnik, Martin F

    2010-06-15

    Cartilaginous fish are the oldest animals that generate RAG-based Ag receptor diversity. We have analyzed the genes and expressed transcripts of the four TCR chains for the first time in a cartilaginous fish, the nurse shark (Ginglymostoma cirratum). Northern blotting found TCR mRNA expression predominantly in lymphoid and mucosal tissues. Southern blotting suggested translocon-type loci encoding all four chains. Based on diversity of V and J segments, the expressed combinatorial diversity for gamma is similar to that of human, alpha and beta may be slightly lower, and delta diversity is the highest of any organism studied to date. Nurse shark TCRdelta have long CDR3 loops compared with the other three chains, creating binding site topologies comparable to those of mammalian TCR in basic paratope structure; additionally, nurse shark TCRdelta CDR3 are more similar to IgH CDR3 in length and heterogeneity than to other TCR chains. Most interestingly, several cDNAs were isolated that contained IgM or IgW V segments rearranged to other gene segments of TCRdelta and alpha. Finally, in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate a conservation of both alpha/beta and gamma/delta T cell localization in the thymus across 450 million years of vertebrate evolution, with gamma/delta TCR expression especially high in the subcapsular region. Collectively, these data make the first cellular identification of TCR-expressing lymphocytes in a cartilaginous fish.

  16. Making the Tg-Confinement Effect Disappear in Thin Polystyrene Films: Good Physics vs. Inappropriate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkelson, John; Chen, Lawrence

    2013-03-01

    The Tg-confinement effect in polymers was first characterized in supported polystyrene (PS) films by Keddie et al. in 1994. Since then, many researchers have shown that (pseudo-)thermodynamic Tg measurements of supported PS films taken on cooling consistently yield the same qualitative results, with a decrease from bulk Tg beginning at 40-60 nm thickness and becoming very strong below 20 nm thickness. Some quantitative differences have been noted between studies, which may be ascribed to measurement method or the analysis employed. In 2004, we showed that the Tg-confinement effect in PS may be suppressed by adding several wt% of small-molecule diluents such as dioctyl phthalate. Recently, Kremer and co-workers (Macromolecules 2010, 43, 9937) reported that there was no Tg-confinement in supported PS films based on an analysis of the second derivative of ellipsometry data and use of a ninth order polynomial fit. Here, we demonstrate a new method for suppressing the Tg-confinement effect. In particular, PS made by emulsion polymerization yields no Tg-confinement effect as measured by ellipsometry or fluorescence, while PS made by anionic or conventional free radical polymerization yield strong Tg-confinement effects. The difference is hypothesized to result from surfactant in the emulsion polymerized PS. We also show that the absence of the Tg-confinement effect reported by Kremer is due to inappropriate analysis of ellipsometry data and that correct analysis yields Tg-confinement effects.

  17. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Interact with Dietary Fat Intakes to Modulate the Plasma TG Response to a Fish Oil Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208) participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9–2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA). Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187) and ACOX1 (rs17583163) genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation. PMID:24647074

  18. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Interact with Dietary Fat Intakes to Modulate the Plasma TG Response to a Fish Oil Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Bouchard-Mercier

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208 participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9–2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA. Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187 and ACOX1 (rs17583163 genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation.

  19. Compound list: imatinib, methanesulfonate salt [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available imatinib, methanesulfonate salt IMA 00186 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-t...ggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/imatinib%2C_methanesulfonate_salt.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  20. Comparative study by TG and DSC Of membranes polyamide66/bentonite clay nanocomposite; Estudo comparativo por TG e DSC de membranas de nanocompositos poliamida66/argila bentonitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, K.M. de; Kojuch, L R; Araujo, E M; Lira, H.L., E-mail: keilamm@ig.com.b [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Lima, F [Universidade Estadual da Paraiba (UEPB), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    In this study, it was obtained membranes of nanocomposites polyamide66 with 3 and 5% bentonite clay consists of silicates in layers from the interior of Paraiba. The clay was treated with a quaternary ammonium salt in order to make it organophilic. The membranes were prepared by phase inversion technique from the nanocomposites in solution. The clays were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetry (TG). Also the membranes were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and TG. The XRD and TG confirmed the presence of salt in the clay and thermal stability of the treated clay. For DSC, it was observed that there was no change in melting temperature of the membranes of nanocomposites compared to membrane pure polyamide66. By TG, it was found that the decomposition of the membranes of polyamide66 with treated clay were higher compared with the untreated clay. (author)

  1. Altered expression of the TCR signaling related genes CD3 and FcεRIγ in patients with aplastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aplastic anemia (AA is characterized by pancytopenia and bone marrow hypoplasia, which results from immune-mediated hematopoiesis suppression. Understanding the pathophysiology of the immune system, particularly T cells immunity, has led to improved AA treatment over the past decades. However, primary and secondary failure after immunosuppressive therapy is frequent. Thus, knowledge of the immune mechanisms leading to AA is crucial to fundamentally understand the disease. Findings To elucidate the T cell receptor (TCR signal transduction features in AA, the expression levels of CD3γ, δ, ε and ζ chain and FcεRIγ genes, which are involved in TCR signal transduction, and the negative correlation of the expression levels between the CD3ζ and FcεRIγ genes in T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were analyzed. Real-time RT-PCR using the SYBR Green method was used to detect the expression level of these genes in PBMCs from 18 patients with AA and 14 healthy individuals. The β2microglobulin gene (β2M was used as an endogenous reference. The expression levels of the CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ε and CD3ζ genes in patients with AA were significantly increased compared to a healthy control group, whereas the FcεRIγ gene expression level was significantly decreased in patients with AA in comparison with the healthy control group. Moreover, the negative correlation of the expression levels between the CD3ζ and FcεRIγ genes was lost. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of the CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ε, CD3ζ and FcεRIγ gene expression in patients with AA. The abnormally expressed TCR signaling related genes may relate to T cells dysfunction in AA.

  2. WC1 is a hybrid γδ TCR coreceptor and pattern recognition receptor for pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Haoting; Chen, Chuang; Nenninger, Ariel; Holz, Lauren; Baldwin, Cynthia L; Telfer, Janice C

    2015-03-01

    WC1 proteins are uniquely expressed on γδ T cells and belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. While present in variable, and sometimes high, numbers in the genomes of mammals and birds, in cattle there are 13 distinct genes (WC1-1 to WC1-13). All bovine WC1 proteins can serve as coreceptors for the TCR in a tyrosine phosphorylation dependent manner, and some are required for the γδ T cell response to Leptospira. We hypothesized that individual WC1 receptors encode Ag specificity via coligation of bacteria with the γδ TCR. SRCR domain binding was directly correlated with γδ T cell response, as WC1-3 SRCR domains from Leptospira-responsive cells, but not WC1-4 SRCR domains from Leptospira-nonresponsive cells, bound to multiple serovars of two Leptospira species, L. borgpetersenii, and L. interrogans. Three to five of eleven WC1-3 SRCR domains, but none of the eleven WC1-4 SRCR domains, interacted with Leptospira spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi, but not with Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. Mutational analysis indicated that the active site for bacterial binding in one of the SRCR domains is composed of amino acids in three discontinuous regions. Recombinant WC1 SRCR domains with the ability to bind leptospires inhibited Leptospira growth. Our data suggest that WC1 gene arrays play a multifaceted role in the γδ T cell response to bacteria, including acting as hybrid pattern recognition receptors and TCR coreceptors, and they may function as antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Kinetic analysis of dechlorination and oxidation of PrOCl by using a non-isothermal TG method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.C.; Eun, H.C.; Cho, Y.Z.; Lee, H.S.; Kim, I.T.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal dechlorination and oxidation process of praseodymium oxychloride, PrOCl, was studied from the view point of reaction kinetics. On the basis of data of thermogravimetry under different oxygen partial pressures at various heating rates, a kinetic analysis was performed using an isoconversional method and a master plot method. The results of the isoconversional method of TG data suggested that the dechlorination and oxidation of PrOCl followed a single step with activation energy of 112.6 ± 3.4 kJ mol -1 , and from master plot methods, the reaction was described by a linear-contracting phase boundary reaction

  4. Compound list: amphotericin B [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available amphotericin B AMB 00157 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/amphotericin_B.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R...at/in_vivo/Liver/Single/amphotericin_B.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-...tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/amphotericin_B.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:...//ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/amphotericin_B.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp:

  5. TCR triggering induces the formation of Lck-RACK1-actinin-1 multiprotein network affecting Lck redistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Ballek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of T-cell signaling is critically dependent on the function of the member of Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs, Lck. Upon TCR triggering, Lck kinase activity induces the nucleation of signal-transducing hubs that regulate the formation of complex signaling network and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In addition, the delivery of Lck function requires rapid and targeted membrane redistribution, but the mechanism underpinning this process is largely unknown. To gain insight into this process, we considered previously described proteins that could assist in this process via their capacity to interact with kinases and regulate their intracellular translocations. An adaptor protein, Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1, was chosen as a viable option and its capacity to bind Lck and aid the process of activation-induced redistribution of Lck was assessed. Our microscopic observation showed that T-cell activation induces a rapid, concomitant and transient co-redistribution of Lck and RACK1 into the forming immunological synapse. Consistent with this observation, the formation of transient RACK1-Lck complexes were detectable in primary CD4+ T-cells with their maximum levels peaking 10 seconds after TCR-CD4 co-aggregation. Moreover, RACK1 preferentially binds to a pool of kinase active pY394Lck which co-purifies with high molecular weight cellular fractions. The formation of RACK1-Lck complexes depends on functional SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck and includes several other signaling and cytoskeletal elements that transiently bind the complex. Notably, the F-actin-crosslinking protein, α-actinin-1, binds to RACK1 only in the presence of kinase active Lck suggesting that the formation of RACK1-pY394Lck-α-actinin-1 complex serves as a signal module coupling actin cytoskeleton bundling with productive TCR/CD4 triggering. In addition, the treatment of CD4+ T-cells with nocodazole, which disrupts the microtubular network, also blocked the formation

  6. TCR Gene Transfer: MAGE-C2/HLA-A2 and MAGE-A3/HLA-DP4 Epitopes as Melanoma-Specific Immune Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudy Straetemans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with TCR gene-engineered T cells provides an attractive and feasible treatment option for cancer patients. Further development of TCR gene therapy requires the implementation of T-cell target epitopes that prevent “on-target” reactivity towards healthy tissues and at the same time direct a clinically effective response towards tumor tissues. Candidate epitopes that meet these criteria are MAGE-C2336-344/HLA-A2 (MC2/A2 and MAGE-A3243-258/HLA-DP4 (MA3/DP4. We molecularly characterized TCRαβ genes of an MC2/A2-specific CD8 and MA3/DP4-specific CD4 T-cell clone derived from melanoma patients who responded clinically to MAGE vaccination. We identified MC2/A2 and MA3/DP4-specific TCR-Vα3/Vβ28 and TCR-Vα38/Vβ2 chains and validated these TCRs in vitro upon gene transfer into primary human T cells. The MC2 and MA3 TCR were surface-expressed and mediated CD8 T-cell functions towards melanoma cell lines and CD4 T-cell functions towards dendritic cells, respectively. We intend to start testing these MAGE-specific TCRs in phase I clinical trial.

  7. Compound list: 2-nitrofluorene [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2-nitrofluorene 2NF 00160 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/2-nitroflu...orene.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/2-nitrofluorene.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  8. Compound list: N-nitrosomorpholine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available N-nitrosomorpholine NMOR 00163 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATE...es/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/N-nitrosomorpholine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ... ...ST/Human/in_vitro/N-nitrosomorpholine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggat

  9. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2 activity regulates osteoblast differentiation and mineralization in the SAOS-2 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxue Yin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue transglutaminase (type II, TG2 has long been postulated to directly promote skeletal matrix calcification and play an important role in ossification. However, limited information is available on the expression, function and modulating mechanism of TG2 during osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. To address these issues, we cultured the well-established human osteosarcoma cell line SAOS-2 with osteo-inductive conditioned medium and set up three time points (culture days 4, 7, and 14 to represent different stages of SAOS-2 differentiation. Osteoblast markers, mineralization, as well as TG2 expression and activity, were then assayed in each stage. Furthermore, we inhibited TG activity with cystamine and then checked SAOS-2 differentiation and mineralization in each stage. The results showed that during the progression of osteoblast differentiation SAOS-2 cells presented significantly high levels of osteocalcin (OC mRNA, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 and collagen I, significantly high alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, and the increased formation of calcified matrix. With the same tendency, TG2 expression and activity were up-regulated. Furthermore, inhibition of TG activity resulted in a significant decrease of OC, collagen I, and BMP-2 mRNA and of ALP activity and mineralization. This study demonstrated that TG2 is involved in osteoblast differentiation and may play a role in the initiation and regulation of the mineralization processes. Moreover, the modulating effects of TG2 on osteoblasts may be related to BMP-2.

  10. Endogenous murine tau promotes neurofibrillary tangles in 3xTg-AD mice without affecting cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Kitazawa, Masashi; Le, Elaine J; Estrada-Hernandez, Tatiana; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Green, Kim N; LaFerla, Frank M

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies on tauopathy animal models suggest that the concomitant expression of the endogenous murine tau delays the pathological accumulation of human tau, and interferes with the disease progression. To elucidate the role of endogenous murine tau in a model with both plaques and tangles, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model by crossing 3xTg-AD with mtauKO mice (referred to as 3xTg-AD/mtauKO mice). Therefore, this new model allows us to determine the pathological consequences of the murine tau. Here, we show that 3xTg-AD/mtauKO mice have lower tau loads in both soluble and insoluble fractions, and lower tau hyperphosphorylation level in the soluble fraction relative to 3xTg-AD mice. In the 3xTg-AD model endogenous mouse tau is hyperphosphorylated and significantly co-aggregates with human tau. Despite the deletion of the endogenous tau gene in 3xTg-AD/mtauKO mice, cognitive dysfunction was equivalent to 3xTg-AD mice, as there was no additional impairment on a spatial memory task, and thus despite increased tau phosphorylation, accumulation and NFTs in 3xTg-AD mice no further effects on cognition are seen. These findings provide better understanding about the role of endogenous tau to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and for developing new AD models. © 2013.

  11. Compound list: cyclosporine A [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cyclosporine A CSA 00142 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/cyclosporine..._A.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/cyclosporine.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/cyclosporine_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc...iencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/cyclosporine_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip... ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/cyclosporine_A.Rat.in_vivo

  12. The Cish SH2 domain is essential for PLC-γ1 regulation in TCR stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittard, Geoffrey; Dios-Esponera, Ana; Palmer, Douglas C; Akpan, Itoro; Barr, Valarie A; Manna, Asit; Restifo, Nicholas P; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2018-03-28

    Cish, participates within a multi-molecular E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which ubiquitinates target proteins. It has an inhibitory effect on T cell activation mediated by PLC-γ1 regulation, and it functions as a potent checkpoint in CD8 + T cell tumor immunotherapy. To study the structural and functional relationships between Cish and PLC-γ1 during CD8 + T cell activation, we tested mutants of the Cish-SH2 (R107K) and D/BC (L222Q, C226Q) domains. We confirmed that Cish-SH2-specific binding was essential for PLC-γ1 ubiquitination and degradation. This domain was essential for the Cish-mediated inhibition of Ca 2+ release upon TCR stimulation. No effect on inhibition of cytokine release was observed with SH2 or D/BC mutants, although the absence of Cish led to an increased release of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Using imaging we showed that Cish was expressed mostly in the cytoplasm and we did not see any Cish clustering at the plasma membrane upon stimulation. We conclude that the Cish-SH2 domain is essential for PLC-γ1 regulation in TCR-stimulated CD8 + T cells.

  13. Association of CD147 and Calcium Exporter PMCA4 Uncouples IL-2 Expression from Early TCR Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supper, Verena; Schiller, Herbert B; Paster, Wolfgang; Forster, Florian; Boulègue, Cyril; Mitulovic, Goran; Leksa, Vladimir; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Schatzlmaier, Philipp; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-02-01

    The Ig superfamily member CD147 is upregulated following T cell activation and was shown to serve as a negative regulator of T cell proliferation. Thus, Abs targeting CD147 are being tested as new treatment strategies for cancer and autoimmune diseases. How CD147 mediates immunosuppression and whether association with other coreceptor complexes is needed have remained unknown. In the current study, we show that silencing of CD147 in human T cells increases IL-2 production without affecting the TCR proximal signaling components. We mapped the immunosuppressive moieties of CD147 to its transmembrane domain and Ig-like domain II. Using affinity purification combined with mass spectrometry, we determined the domain specificity of CD147 interaction partners and identified the calcium exporter plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform 4 (PMCA4) as the interaction partner of the immunosuppressive moieties of CD147. CD147 does not control the proper membrane localization of PMCA4, but PMCA4 is essential for the CD147-dependent inhibition of IL-2 expression via a calcium-independent mechanism. In summary, our data show that CD147 interacts via its immunomodulatory domains with PMCA4 to bypass TCR proximal signaling and inhibit IL-2 expression. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. TCR-contacting residues orientation and HLA-DRβ* binding preference determine long-lasting protective immunity against malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, Martha P.; Suarez, Carlos F.; Varela, Yahson; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Bermudez, Adriana; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Fully-protective, long-lasting, immunological (FPLLI) memory against Plasmodium falciparum malaria regarding immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) vaccinated into monkeys previously challenged and re-challenged 60 days later with a lethal Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum strain was found to be associated with preferential high binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1* allelic molecules of the major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II), rather than HLA-DRβ3*, β4*, β5* alleles. Complete PPII L 3D structure, a longer distance (26.5 Å ± 1.5 Å) between residues perfectly fitting into HLA-DRβ1*PBR pockets 1 and 9, a gauche − rotamer orientation in p8 TCR-contacting polar residue and a larger volume of polar p2 residues was also found. This data, in association with previously-described p3 and p7 apolar residues having gauche + orientation to form a perfect MHC-II-peptide-TCR complex, determines the stereo-electronic and topochemical characteristics associated with FPLLI immunological memory. - Highlights: • Stereo-electronic and topochemical rules associated with FPLLI immunological memory. • Presence of very high long-lasting antibody titres against Plasmodium falciparum Spz. • Protective memory induction associated with a binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1*. • gauche − rotamer orientation in p8 polar residue is related to is related to immunological memory.

  15. TCR-contacting residues orientation and HLA-DRβ* binding preference determine long-lasting protective immunity against malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, Martha P.; Suarez, Carlos F. [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas y Ambientales (UDCA), Bogotá (Colombia); Varela, Yahson [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia)

    2016-09-02

    Fully-protective, long-lasting, immunological (FPLLI) memory against Plasmodium falciparum malaria regarding immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) vaccinated into monkeys previously challenged and re-challenged 60 days later with a lethal Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum strain was found to be associated with preferential high binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1* allelic molecules of the major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II), rather than HLA-DRβ3*, β4*, β5* alleles. Complete PPII{sub L} 3D structure, a longer distance (26.5 Å ± 1.5 Å) between residues perfectly fitting into HLA-DRβ1*PBR pockets 1 and 9, a gauche{sup −} rotamer orientation in p8 TCR-contacting polar residue and a larger volume of polar p2 residues was also found. This data, in association with previously-described p3 and p7 apolar residues having gauche{sup +} orientation to form a perfect MHC-II-peptide-TCR complex, determines the stereo-electronic and topochemical characteristics associated with FPLLI immunological memory. - Highlights: • Stereo-electronic and topochemical rules associated with FPLLI immunological memory. • Presence of very high long-lasting antibody titres against Plasmodium falciparum Spz. • Protective memory induction associated with a binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1*. • gauche{sup −} rotamer orientation in p8 polar residue is related to is related to immunological memory.

  16. Optimal Design of TCR/FC in Electric Arc Furnaces for Power Quality Improvement in Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi TORABIAN ESFAHANI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric Arc Furnaces (EAFs are unbalanced, nonlinear and time varying loads, which can cause many problems in the power system quality. As the use of arc furnace loads increases in industry, the importance of the power quality problems also increase. So in order to optimize the usages of electric power in EAFs, it is necessary to minimize the effects of arc furnace loads on power quality in power systems as much as possible. Therefore, in this paper, design and simulation of an electric plant supplying an arc furnace is considered. For this purpose, a three phase arc furnace model, which can simulate all the mentioned power quality indices, is developed based on Hyperbolic -Exponential model (V-I model. Then by considering the high changes of reactive power and voltage flicker of nonlinear furnace load, a thyristor controlled reactor compensation with fixed capacitor (TCR/FC are designed and simulated. In this procedure, the reactive power is measured so that maximum speed and accuracy are achieved. Finally, simulation results verify the accuracy of the load modelling and show the effectiveness of the proposed TCR/FC model for reactive compensating of the EAF.

  17. Compound list: diethyl maleate [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available diethyl maleate DEM 00A05 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/diethyl_male.../Rat/in_vitro/diethyl_maleate.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/diethyl_maleate.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ... ...ate.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST

  18. Compound list: butylated hydroxyanisole [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available butylated hydroxyanisole BHA 00156 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/...LATEST/Human/in_vitro/butylated_hydroxyanisole.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/o...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/butylated_hydroxyanisole.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp....biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/butylated_hydroxyanisole.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  19. Compound list: buthionine sulfoximine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available buthionine sulfoximine BSO 00A04 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LA...TEST/Human/in_vitro/buthionine_sulfoximine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-...tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/buthionine_sulfoximine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive.../open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/buthionine_sulfoximine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  20. Compound list: methylene dianiline [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available methylene dianiline DAPM 00155 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/methyle...es/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/methylene_dianiline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc....jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/methylene_dianiline.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ... ...ne_dianiline.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggat

  1. Compound list: tannic acid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tannic acid TAN 00093 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/...in_vitro/tannic_acid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_...vitro/tannic_acid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/...Liver/Single/tannic_acid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/

  2. Compound list: mefenamic acid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mefenamic acid MEF 00084 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/mefenamic_acid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R...at/in_vitro/mefenamic_acid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/mefenamic_acid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc

  3. Compound list: nicotinic acid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nicotinic acid NIC 00081 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Hum...an/in_vitro/nicotinic_acid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/R...at/in_vitro/nicotinic_acid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat.../in_vivo/Liver/Single/nicotinic_acid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosc

  4. Compound list: fluoxetine hydrochloride [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available fluoxetine hydrochloride FLX 00158 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/...LATEST/Human/in_vitro/fluoxetine_hydrochloride.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/o...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/fluoxetine_hydrochloride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp....biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/fluoxetine_hydrochloride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  5. Thought about ICRP TG84 report. What beyond it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2013-01-01

    Explained was the ICRP TG84 Report (Report of ICRP Task Group 84 on Initial Lessons Learned from the Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Japan vis-a-vis the ICRP System of Radiological Protection: Issues Identified from the NPP Accident in Japan and Recommendations to Improve the System of Radiation Protection; presented in October, 2012), together with author's thought about it. The Report contained 18 items and their related proposals: Inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients), Attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures, Quantifying radiation exposure, Assessing the importance of internal exposures, Managing emergency crisis, Protecting rescuers and volunteers, Responding with medical aid, Justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions, Transiting from an emergency to an existing situation, Rehabilitating evacuated areas, Categorizing public exposures due to an accident, Restricting individual doses of members of the public, Caring for infants and children, Considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos, Monitoring public protection, Dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues, and consumer products, Recognizing the importance of psychological consequences, and Fostering the sharing of information. The Report also contained 11 Recommendations of actions for the Commission to take. The author had been installed as the Chair of Radiation Council in February, 2011, just before the Accident in March, and had had to concern the definition of various post-Accident dose limits in Japan, having had often faced the inefficiency of measures. He thought the ICRP protecting system was difficult to understand due to 2 reasons: one was that the system had been written aiming at experts of radiological protection and the other, that the system had been composed not only from science but also from an incorporated standard of social values, which resulted in inconsiderateness to the general

  6. TCR-CXCR4 signaling stabilizes cytokine mRNA transcripts via a PREX1-Rac1 pathway: implications for CTCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Kimberly N; Dinkel, Brittney A; Sterner, Rosalie M; Osborne, Douglas G; Jevremovic, Dragan; Hedin, Karen E

    2017-08-24

    As with many immunopathologically driven diseases, the malignant T cells of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs), such as Sézary syndrome, display aberrant cytokine secretion patterns that contribute to pathology and disease progression. Targeting this disordered release of cytokines is complicated by the changing cytokine milieu that drives the phenotypic changes of CTCLs. Here, we characterize a novel signaling pathway that can be targeted to inhibit the secretion of cytokines by modulating either CXCR4 or CXCR4-mediated signaling. We demonstrate that upon ligation of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR), the TCR associates with and transactivates CXCR4 via phosphorylation of S339-CXCR4 in order to activate a PREX1-Rac1-signaling pathway that stabilizes interleukin-2 (IL-2) , IL-4 , and IL-10 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts. Pharmacologic inhibition of either TCR-CXCR4 complex formation or PREX1-Rac1 signaling in primary human T cells decreased mRNA stability and inhibited secretion of IL-2, IL-4, and IL-10. Applying this knowledge to Sézary syndrome, we demonstrate that targeting various aspects of this signaling pathway blocks both TCR-dependent and TCR-independent cytokine secretion from a Sézary syndrome-derived cell line and patient isolates. Together, these results identify multiple aspects of a novel TCR-CXCR4-signaling pathway that could be targeted to inhibit the aberrant cytokine secretion that drives the immunopathogenesis of Sézary syndrome and other immunopathological diseases. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Transplantation of mouse HSCs genetically modified to express a CD4-restricted TCR results in long-term immunity that destroys tumors and initiates spontaneous autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sung P; Klemen, Nicholas D; Kinnebrew, Garrett H; Brandmaier, Andrew G; Marsh, Jon; Hangoc, Giao; Palmer, Douglas C; Restifo, Nicholas P; Cornetta, Kenneth; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Touloukian, Christopher E

    2010-12-01

    The development of effective cancer immunotherapies has been consistently hampered by several factors, including an inability to instigate long-term effective functional antitumor immunity. This is particularly true for immunotherapies that focus on the adoptive transfer of activated or genetically modified mature CD8+ T cells. In this study, we sought to alter and enhance long-term host immunity by genetically modifying, then transplanting, mouse HSCs. We first cloned a previously identified tumor-reactive HLA-DR4-restricted CD4+ TCR specific for the melanocyte differentiation antigen tyrosinase-related protein 1 (Tyrp1), then constructed both a high-expression lentivirus vector and a TCR-transgenic mouse expressing the genes encoding this TCR. Using these tools, we demonstrated that both mouse and human HSCs established durable, high-efficiency TCR gene transfer following long-term transplantation into lethally irradiated mice transgenic for HLA-DR4. Recipients of genetically modified mouse HSCs developed spontaneous autoimmune vitiligo that was associated with the presence of a Th1-polarized memory effector CD4+ T cell population that expressed the Tyrp1-specific TCR. Most importantly, large numbers of CD4+ T cells expressing the Tyrp1-specific TCR were detected in secondary HLA-DR4-transgenic transplant recipients, and these mice were able to destroy subcutaneously administered melanoma cells without the aid of vaccination, immune modulation, or cytokine administration. These results demonstrate the creation of what we believe to be a novel translational model of durable lentiviral gene transfer that results in long-term effective immunity.

  8. The CD3 gamma leucine-based receptor-sorting motif is required for efficient ligand-mediated TCR down-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina; Menné, Charlotte; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2002-01-01

    . The other pathway is dependent on protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated activation of the CD3 gamma di-leucine-based receptor-sorting motif. Previous studies have failed to demonstrate a connection between ligand- and PKC-induced TCR down-regulation. Thus, although an apparent paradox, the dogma has been...... that ligand- and PKC-induced TCR down-regulations are not interrelated. By analyses of a newly developed CD3 gamma-negative T cell variant, freshly isolated and PHA-activated PBMC, and a mouse T cell line, we challenged this dogma and demonstrate in this work that PKC activation and the CD3 gamma di...

  9. GLUT4 expression in human muscle fibres is not correlated with intracellular triglyceride (TG) content. Is TG a maker or a marker of insulin resistance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Ottosen, P D; Vach, W

    2003-01-01

    diabetic subjects, and young lean controls. TG density was significantly higher in slow compared to fast fibres in all studied subjects (pslow twitch fibres of obese diabetic subjects compared to obese (p...We have recently reported a progressive decline in the expression of glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) from control subjects through obese non-diabetics to obese type 2 diabetic subjects, indicating that the reduced GLUT4 in slow twitch fibres could be secondary to obesity. In this study we...... densities in slow and fast fibres did not correlate with the corresponding GLUT4 density in the same fibres in our study groups (p>0.05). Plasma TG and FFA did not correlate with GLUT4 expression in slow or fast fibres (p>0.05). In conclusion, TG content was increased in diabetic slow fibres with a reduced...

  10. Compound list: allyl alcohol [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available allyl alcohol AA 00010 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/allyl_alcohol....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/allyl_alcohol...dbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/allyl_alcohol.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:/.../ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/allyl_alcohol.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney....Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Repeat/allyl_alcohol.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Repeat.zip ...

  11. Compound list: valproic acid [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available valproic acid VPA 00005 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/valpr...oic_acid.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/valpr...oic_acid.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/valpr...edbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/valproic_acid.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp:...//ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/valproic_acid.Rat.in_vivo.Kidne

  12. Compound list: naphthyl isothiocyanate [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available naphthyl isothiocyanate ANIT 00009 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/...LATEST/Human/in_vitro/naphthyl_isothiocyanate.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/op...en-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/naphthyl_isothiocyanate.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/arc...hive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/naphthyl_isothiocyanate.Rat.in_...vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/naphthyl_isothiocyanate.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  13. Association of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) and Thyroglobulin (TG) Genetic Variants with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hinal; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Begum, Rasheedunnisa; Shastri, Minal; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hypothyroidism is known to be caused by immune responses related to the thyroid gland and its immunological feature includes presence of autoimmune antibodies. Therefore the aim was to analyze presence of anti-TPO antibodies in hypothyroidism patients in Gujarat. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) is one of the susceptibility genes for various autoimmune diseases. Hence, exon1 +49A/G and 3’UTR CT60A/G single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CTLA4 and its mRNA expression levels were investigated in autoimmune hypothyroidism patients. Thyroglobulin (TG) is known to be associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders and thus exon 33 (E33) SNP in TG was investigated. We analyzed the presence of anti-TPO antibodies in the plasma samples of 84 hypothyroidism patients and 62 controls by ELISA. PCR-RFLP technique was used for genotyping of polymorphisms. sCTLA4 and flCTLA4 mRNA expression levels were assessed by real time PCR. 59.52% of hypothyroid patients had anti-TPO antibodies in their circulation. The genotype and allele frequencies differed significantly for +49A/G (p = 0.0004 for +49AG, p = 0.0019 for +49GG & p = 0.0004 for allele), CT60 (p = 0.0110 for CT60AG, p = 0.0005 for CT60GG & phypothyroidism when adjusted for age and gender. Our results suggest +49A/G and CT60 polymorphism of CTLA4 and E33 polymorphism of TG may be genetic risk factors for autoimmune hypothyroidism susceptibility and down regulation of both forms of CTLA4 advocates the crucial role of CTLA4 in pathogenesis of autoimmune hypothyroidism. PMID:26963610

  14. Compound list: vitamin A [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vitamin A VA 00059 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/vitam...in_A.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/vitam...in_A.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/vitam...pen-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/vitamin_A.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  15. Compound list: WY-14643 [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WY-14643 WY 00030 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_v...itro/WY-14643.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/W...Y-14643.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Sing...le/WY-14643.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-

  16. Comparing Effects of TCR and TSC on MHO Distance Protection Setting in 400 kV Algerian Transmission Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed ZELLAGUI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the performances of distance relays setting in 400 kV in Eastern Algerian transmission networks at Sonelgaz Group (Algerian company of Electrical and Gas compensated by shunt Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS. The facts are used for controlling transmission voltage, power flow, reactive power, and damping of power system oscillations in high power transfer levels. The effects of SVC devices i.e. Thyristor Controlled Reactor (TCR and the Thyristor Switched Capacitors (TSC insertion, on the total impedance of a transmission line protected by MHO distance relay are investigated. The modified setting zones protections for three forward zones (Z1, Z2 and Z3 have been calculated in order to improve the performances of distance relay protection and prevent circuit breaker nuisance tripping.

  17. Gamma delta T-cell differentiation and effector function programming, TCR signal strength, when and how much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarin, Payam; Chen, Edward L Y; In, Tracy S H; Anderson, Michele K; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2015-07-01

    γδ T-cells boast an impressive functional repertoire that can paint them as either champions or villains depending on the environmental and immunological cues. Understanding the function of the various effector γδ subsets necessitates tracing the developmental program of these subsets, including the point of lineage bifurcation from αβ T-cells. Here, we review the importance of signals from the T-cell receptor (TCR) in determining αβ versus γδ lineage fate, and further discuss how the molecular components of this pathway may influence the developmental programming of γδ T-cells functional subsets. Additionally, we discuss the role of temporal windows in restricting the development of IL-17 producing γδ T-cell subtypes, and explore whether fetal and adult hematopoietic progenitors maintain the same potential for giving rise to this important subset. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Download - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive ...

  19. Database Description - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ne expression data and predict the safety of candidate chemicals has been develop...ears of the project, more than 30 safety biomarkers were develped by using TG-GATEs. In addition, data acqui

  20. IL-15 augments TCR-induced CD4+ T cell expansion in vitro by inhibiting the suppressive function of CD25 High CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom L Van Belle

    Full Text Available Due to its critical role in NK cell differentiation and CD8(+ T cell homeostasis, the importance of IL-15 is more firmly established for cytolytic effectors of the immune system than for CD4(+ T cells. The increased levels of IL-15 found in several CD4(+ T cell-driven (auto- immune diseases prompted us to examine how IL-15 influences murine CD4(+ T cell responses to low dose TCR-stimulation in vitro. We show that IL-15 exerts growth factor activity on both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in a TCR-dependent and Cyclosporin A-sensitive manner. In CD4(+ T cells, IL-15 augmented initial IL-2-dependent expansion and once IL-15Rα was upregulated, IL-15 sustained the TCR-induced expression of IL-2/15Rβ, supporting proliferation independently of secreted IL-2. Moreover, IL-15 counteracts CD4(+ T cell suppression by a gradually expanding CD25(HighCD4(+ T cell subset that expresses Foxp3 and originates from CD4(+CD25(+ Tregs. These in vitro data suggest that IL-15 may dramatically strengthen the T cell response to suboptimal TCR-triggering by overcoming an activation threshold set by Treg that might create a risk for autoimmune pathology.

  1. miR-20a inhibits TCR-mediated signaling and cytokine production in human naïve CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarendra V Reddycherla

    Full Text Available Upon TCR stimulation by peptide-MHC complexes, CD4+ T cells undergo activation and proliferation. This process will ultimately culminate in T-cell differentiation and the acquisition of effector functions. The production of specific cytokines by differentiated CD4+ T cells is crucial for the generation of the appropriate immune response. Altered CD4+ T-cell activation and cytokine production result in chronic inflammatory conditions and autoimmune disorders. miRNAs have been shown to be important regulators of T-cell biology. In this study, we have focused our investigation on miR-20a, a member of the miR-17-92 cluster, whose expression is decreased in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. We have found that miR-20a is rapidly induced upon TCR-triggering in primary human naïve CD4+ T cells and that its transcription is regulated in a Erk-, NF-κB-, and Ca++-dependent manner. We have further shown that overexpression of miR-20a inhibits TCR-mediated signaling but not the proliferation of primary human naïve CD4+ T cells. However, miR-20a overexpression strongly suppresses IL-10 secretion and moderately decreases IL-2, IL-6 and IL8 production, which are crucial regulators of inflammatory responses. Our study suggests that miR-20a is a new player in the regulation of TCR signaling strength and cytokine production.

  2. Nuclear pore complex-mediated modulation of TCR signaling is required for naïve CD4+ T cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlido, Joana; Sakuma, Stephen; Raices, Marcela; Carrette, Florent; Tinoco, Roberto; Bradley, Linda M; D'Angelo, Maximiliano A

    2018-05-07

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are channels connecting the nucleus with the cytoplasm. We report that loss of the tissue-specific NPC component Nup210 causes a severe deficit of naïve CD4 + T cells. Nup210-deficient CD4 + T lymphocytes develop normally but fail to survive in the periphery. The decreased survival results from both an impaired ability to transmit tonic T cell receptor (TCR) signals and increased levels of Fas, which sensitize Nup210 -/- naïve CD4 + T cells to Fas-mediated cell death. Mechanistically, Nup210 regulates these processes by modulating the expression of Cav2 (encoding Caveolin-2) and Jun at the nuclear periphery. Whereas the TCR-dependent and CD4 + T cell-specific upregulation of Cav2 is critical for proximal TCR signaling, cJun expression is required for STAT3-dependent repression of Fas. Our results uncover an unexpected role for Nup210 as a cell-intrinsic regulator of TCR signaling and T cell homeostasis and expose NPCs as key players in the adaptive immune system.

  3. Notes on the implementation of the TG-43 formalism in high-rate brachytherapy; Notas sobre la implementacion del formalismo TG-43 en braquiterapia de lata tasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sendon del Rio, J. R.; Gonzalez Ruiz, C.; Garcia Marcos, R.; Jimenez Rojas, R.; Lopez Bote, M. A.

    2011-07-01

    The TG-43 formalism is based on dosimetric parameters depend on the specific font design extracted from dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo in water. Relatively easy to implement, yet provides a degree of uncertainty, making it necessary to verify the calculation algorithm in the planning system to assess its behavior.

  4. Imaging TCR-Dependent NFAT-Mediated T-Cell Activation with Positron Emission Tomography In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ponomarev

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A noninvasive method for molecular imaging of T-cell activity in vivo would be of considerable value. It would aid in understanding the role of specific genes and signal transduction pathways in the course of normal and pathologic immune responses, could elucidate temporal dynamics and immune regulation at different stages of disease and following therapy. We developed and assessed a novel method for monitoring the T-cell receptor (TCR -dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT -mediated activation of T cells by optical fluorescence imaging (OFI and positron emission tomography (PET. The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase/green fluorescent protein [HSV1-tk/GFP (TKGFP ] dual reporter gene was used to monitor NFAT-mediated transcriptional activation in human Jurkat cells. A recombinant retrovirus bearing the NFAT-TKGFP reporter system was constructed in which the TKGFP reporter gene was placed under control of an artificial cis-acting NFAT-specific enhancer. Transduced Jurkat cells were used to establish subcutaneous infiltrates in nude rats. We demonstrated that noninvasive OR and nuclear imaging of T-cell activation is feasible using the NFAT-TKGFP reporter system. PET imaging with [124]FIAU using the NFAT-TKGFP reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect T-cell activation in vivo. PET images were confirmed by independent measurements of T-cell activation (e.g., CD69 and induction of GFP fluorescence. PET imaging of TCR-induced NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity may be useful in the assessment of T cell responses, T-cell-based adoptive therapies, vaccination strategies and immunosuppressive drugs.

  5. Relationship TG/HDL-C and insulin resistance in adult women by nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Belén

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ratio assessment TG/HDL-C is an indicator of LDL size, facilitating the detection of individuals with increased atherogenic risk. Estimating the size of the LDL becomes important, especially in patients with TG values near the upper limit of normal values of reference and HDL-C. The objective of the study is to estimate the association between TG/HDL-C and insulin resistance (IR by nutritional status in adult women attending the Foundation for Endocrine Metabolic Diseases Research and Applied Clinical Research (FIEEM.Material and methods: Design Cross-sectional, non-pregnant adult women, apparently healthy, older than 30 years old, attending FIEEM in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires. Dependent variable: TG/HDL-C ≥ 3.0 considered high value. Independent variables: IR by homeostatic model index HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5 categorizing the sample into two groups: with and without IR, and controlled by nutritional status using body mass index (BMI and waist circumference (CC. SPSS Statistics 15.0, calculating X2 or Fisher exact test, OR with confidence intervals of 95% and establishing logistic regression p value < 0.05.Results: We evaluated a purposive sample of 104 women (31.4% and 26% IR with TG/HDL-C high. 84.6% were overweight or obese and 88.5% increased CC. Women with BMI had significantly increased 0.15-fold increased risk (95% CI = 0.01 to 1.26 for TG/HDL-C high (p = 0.04 than the control women. There was no significance with increased CC. The ratio TG/HDL-C high IR was significantly correlated (r = 0.30 p = 0.002.Conclusions: Body weight was significantly associated with IR and the ratio TG/HDL-C increased. This ratio correlated significantly with IR in apparently healthy women.

  6. TG/FT-IR characterization of additives typically employed in EPDM formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Beck Sanches

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG/FT-IR is a very popular technique for rubbers characterization. It involves analyses of the base polymer and additives. Ethylene–propylene–diene (EPDM rubbers are frequently investigated by TG/FT-IR; however, the focus has been the degradation temperature range of the polymer. In this study, unvulcanized and vulcanized EPDM rubber and its additives were investigated by TG/FT-IR, without solvent extraction, and in a wide temperature range. Initially, the additives were individually characterized. TG/FT-IR identified the characteristic groups of all the additives analyzed and distinguished them from each other. Afterwards, unvulcanized and vulcanized EPDM rubbers were investigated without prior extraction.TG/FT-IR detected absorptions due to the additives tetramethylthiuram monosulfide and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole. Both of these sulfur-containing additives were present in the EPDM formulation at concentrations of 0.7 phr (0.63 wt %. The TG/FT-IR technique had some limitations, because not all the additives in EPDM rubber were detected. Paraffin oil, stearic acid and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,2-dihydroquinoline functional groups were not observed in either the unvulcanized or vulcanized EPDM. Nevertheless, in addition to the ability of this method to detect sulfur-containing groups, the lack of a pre-extraction reduces the time and effort required for additive analysis in rubbers.

  7. Aged Tg2576 mice are impaired on social memory and open field habituation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, R M J; Koros, E; Bornemann, K D; Rawlins, J N P

    2009-02-11

    In a previous publication [Deacon RMJ, Cholerton LL, Talbot K, Nair-Roberts RG, Sanderson DJ, Romberg C, et al. Age-dependent and -independent behavioral deficits in Tg2576 mice. Behav Brain Res 2008;189:126-38] we found that very few cognitive tests were suitable for demonstrating deficits in Tg2576 mice, an amyloid over-expression model of Alzheimer's disease, even at 23 months of age. However, in a retrospective analysis of a separate project on these mice, tests of social memory and open field habituation revealed large cognitive impairments. Controls showed good open field habituation, but Tg2576 mice were hyperactive and failed to habituate. In the test of social memory for a juvenile mouse, controls showed considerably less social investigation on the second meeting, indicating memory of the juvenile, whereas Tg2576 mice did not show this decrement.As a control for olfactory sensitivity, on which social memory relies, the ability to find a food pellet hidden under wood chip bedding was assessed. Tg2576 mice found the pellet as quickly as controls. As this test requires digging ability, this was independently assessed in tests of burrowing and directly observed digging. In line with previous results and the hippocampal dysfunction characteristic of aged Tg2576 mice, they both burrowed and dug less than controls.

  8. Compound list: carbon tetrachloride [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available carbon tetrachloride CCL4 00003 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LAT...EST/Human/in_vitro/carbon_tetrachloride.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tgg...ates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/carbon_tetrachloride.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/carbon_tetrachloride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.S...ingle.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/carbon_tetrachloride.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ...

  9. The diabetogenic mouse MHC class II molecule I-A[subscript g7] is endowed with a switch that modulates TCR affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Corper, Adam L.; Herro, Rana; Jabri, Bana; Wilson, Ian A.; Teyton, Luc (Scripps); (UC)

    2011-11-16

    Genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity is frequently associated with specific MHC alleles. Diabetogenic MHC class II molecules, such as human HLA-DQ8 and mouse I-A{sub g7}, typically have a small, uncharged amino acid residue at position 57 of their {beta} chain ({beta}57); this results in the absence of a salt bridge between {beta}57 and Arg{alpha}76, which is adjacent to the P9 pocket of the peptide-binding groove. However, the influence of Arg{alpha}76 on the selection of the TCR repertoire remains unknown, particularly when the MHC molecule binds a peptide with a neutral amino acid residue at position P9. Here, we have shown that diabetogenic MHC class II molecules bound to a peptide with a neutral P9 residue primarily selected and expanded cells expressing TCRs bearing a negatively charged residue in the first segment of their complementarity determining region 3{beta}. The crystal structure of one such TCR in complex with I-A{sub g7} bound to a peptide containing a neutral P9 residue revealed that a network of favorable long-range (greater than 4 {angstrom}) electrostatic interactions existed among Arg{alpha}76, the neutral P9 residue, and TCR, which supported the substantially increased TCR/peptide-MHC affinity. This network could be modulated or switched to a lower affinity interaction by the introduction of a negative charge at position P9 of the peptide. Our results support the existence of a switch at residue {beta}57 of the I-Ag7 and HLA-DQ8 class II molecules and potentially link normal thymic TCR selection with abnormal peripheral behavior.

  10. Assessment of display performance for medical imaging systems: Executive summary of AAPM TG18 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Badano, Aldo; Chakraborty, Dev

    2005-01-01

    Digital imaging provides an effective means to electronically acquire, archive, distribute, and view medical images. Medical imaging display stations are an integral part of these operations. Therefore, it is vitally important to assure that electronic display devices do not compromise image quality and ultimately patient care. The AAPM Task Group 18 (TG18) recently published guidelines and acceptance criteria for acceptance testing and quality control of medical display devices. This paper is an executive summary of the TG18 report. TG18 guidelines include visual, quantitative, and advanced testing methodologies for primary and secondary class display devices. The characteristics, tested in conjunction with specially designed test patterns (i.e., TG18 patterns), include reflection, geometric distortion, luminance, the spatial and angular dependencies of luminance, resolution, noise, glare, chromaticity, and display artifacts. Geometric distortions are evaluated by linear measurements of the TG18-QC test pattern, which should render distortion coefficients less than 2%/5% for primary/secondary displays, respectively. Reflection measurements include specular and diffuse reflection coefficients from which the maximum allowable ambient lighting is determined such that contrast degradation due to display reflection remains below a 20% limit and the level of ambient luminance (L amb ) does not unduly compromise luminance ratio (LR) and contrast at low luminance levels. Luminance evaluation relies on visual assessment of low contrast features in the TG18-CT and TG18-MP test patterns, or quantitative measurements at 18 distinct luminance levels of the TG18-LN test patterns. The major acceptable criteria for primary/secondary displays are maximum luminance of greater than 170/100 cd/m 2 , LR of greater than 250/100, and contrast conformance to that of the grayscale standard display function (GSDF) of better than 10%/20%, respectively. The angular response is tested to

  11. Tissue transglutaminase (TG-2) modified amniotic membrane: a novel scaffold for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, David Y S; Brown, Sheridan V; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Mather, Melissa L; Hutter, Victoria; Tint, Naing L; Rose, Felicity R A J; Dua, Harminder S

    2012-01-01

    The amniotic membrane (AM) is considered as a natural cell culture substrate and has occasionally been exploited in regenerative medicine especially for ocular surface reconstruction and dermal wound healing applications. However, its use is limited by its relatively weak mechanical strength, difficulty during manual handling and susceptibility to proteolytic degradation in vivo. Therefore, in this study we aimed to enhance the mechanical and biological characteristics of the AM by enzymatically cross-linking it using tissue transglutaminase (TG)—a calcium-dependent enzyme capable of forming stable ε(γ-glutamyl)lysine cross-linkages. Using a biological catalyst such as TG does not only prevent denaturation during sample preparation but also minimizes the potential of residual chemical cross-linking agents compared to alternative methodologies. Human AM, sourced from elective caesarean sectioning, were treated with TG, bovine serum albumin and/or a no-treatment control. Samples were then compared in terms of their physical and (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transparency, mechanical strength, susceptibility to proteolytic degradation) biological characteristics (in vitro cell culture, activation of dendritic cells (DC)) and their in vivo biocompatibility/angiogenic capacity (chick chorioallantoic membrane assay). TG-treated AM exhibited enhanced mechanical strength and greater resistance to proteolytic/collagenase degradation compared to the control(s). SEM imaging of the TG-treated membrane summarized a significantly closer association and greater interconnectivity of individual collagen fibres yet it had no effect on the overall transparency of the AM. In vitro cell culture demonstrated no detrimental effect of TG-treatment on the AM in terms of cell attachment, spreading, proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, an ‘immune response’ was not elicited based on extended in vitro culture with human-monocyte-derived DC. Interestingly, the TG

  12. Ocular changes in TgF344-AD rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yuchun; Lu, Bin; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Girman, Sergey; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Sadun, Alfredo A; Svendsen, Clive N; Cohen, Robert M; Wang, Shaomei

    2014-01-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive decline in learning, memory, and executive functions. In addition to cognitive and behavioral deficits, vision disturbances have been reported in early stage of AD, well before the diagnosis is clearly established. To further investigate ocular abnormalities, a novel AD transgenic rat model was analyzed. Transgenic (Tg) rats (TgF344-AD) heterozygous for human mutant APPswe/PS1ΔE9 and age-matched wild type (WT) rats, as well as 20 human postmortem retinal samples from both AD and healthy donors were used. Visual function in the rodent was analyzed using the optokinetic response and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus. Immunohistochemistry on retinal and brain sections was used to detect various markers including amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques. As expected, Aβ plaques were detected in the hippocampus, cortex, and retina of Tg rats. Plaque-like structures were also found in two AD human whole-mount retinas. The choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in both Tg rat and in AD human eyes when compared with age-matched controls. Tg rat eyes also showed hypertrophic retinal pigment epithelial cells, inflammatory cells, and upregulation of complement factor C3. Although visual acuity was lower in Tg than in WT rats, there was no significant difference in the retinal ganglion cell number and retinal vasculature. In this study, we observed pathological changes in the choroid and in RPE cells in the TgF344-AD rat model; choroidal thinning was observed further in human AD retina. Along with Ab deposition, the inflammatory response was manifested by microglial recruitment and complement activation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the significance and mechanisms of these pathological changes [corrected].

  13. Spaceflight influences both mucosal and peripheral cytokine production in PTN-Tg and wild type mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin L McCarville

    Full Text Available Spaceflight is associated with several health issues including diminished immune efficiency. Effects of long-term spaceflight on selected immune parameters of wild type (Wt and transgenic mice over-expressing pleiotrophin under the human bone-specific osteocalcin promoter (PTN-Tg were examined using the novel Mouse Drawer System (MDS aboard the International Space Station (ISS over a 91 day period. Effects of this long duration flight on PTN-Tg and Wt mice were determined in comparison to ground controls and vivarium-housed PTN-Tg and Wt mice. Levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2 and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1 were measured in mucosal and systemic tissues of Wt and PTN-Tg mice. Colonic contents were also analyzed to assess potential effects on the gut microbiota, although no firm conclusions could be made due to constraints imposed by the MDS payload and the time of sampling. Spaceflight-associated differences were observed in colonic tissue and systemic lymph node levels of IL-2 and TGF-β1 relative to ground controls. Total colonic TGF-β1 levels were lower in Wt and PTN-Tg flight mice in comparison to ground controls. The Wt flight mouse had lower levels of IL-2 and TGF-β1 compared to the Wt ground control in both the inguinal and brachial lymph nodes, however this pattern was not consistently observed in PTN-Tg mice. Vivarium-housed Wt controls had higher levels of active TGF-β1 and IL-2 in inguinal lymph nodes relative to PTN-Tg mice. The results of this study suggest compartmentalized effects of spaceflight and on immune parameters in mice.

  14. Molybdenum(V, germanium(IV, aluminum(III and nickel(II adducts with ethyleneurea, ethylenethiourea and propyleneurea: some empirical correlations involving TG and IR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROBSON F. DE FARIAS

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The adducts MoCl5·2eu, MoCl5·2pu, GeCl4·2etu, AlCl3·2pu, AlCl3·3pu, NiCl2·2etu and NiCl2·4etu (eu = ethyleneurea, etu = ethylenethiourea and pu =propyleneurea were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis (C, H, N, infrared spectroscopy (IR and thermogravimetry (TG. IR Results show that eu and pu coordinate through oxygen, whereas etu coordinates through nitrogen. For all investigated adducts, a single mass loss step associated with the release of ligand molecules is observed. Empirical correlations involving TG and IR data are established.

  15. Local lymph node assay: how testing laboratories apply OECD TG 429 for REACH purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovida, Costanza

    2011-01-01

    The Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) is the official method for assessing the allergic contact dermatitis potential of chemicals for the purposes of REACH regulation. The LLNA went through a validation process that allowed the delineation of a robust protocol for performing new tests. The OECD accepted this method in 2002 and published OECD TG 429. The European Chemical Agency (ECHA) recently published data that were submitted in the registration dossiers of chemicals. This database was analysed to determine how testing laboratories apply OECD TG 429. This analysis comes after a detailed analysis of four full study reports that were also prepared for REACH purposes. Although the majority of the tests are fully compliant with OECD TG 429, some showed major deviations, and a number of others used more animals than necessary. This suggests that in vivo tests need to be planned more carefully and consciously to obtain meaningful results with the minimum animal number necessary.

  16. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is involved in the resistance of cancer cells to the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Carmine; Di Gennaro, Elena; Piro, Geny; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Caraglia, Michele; Budillon, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    Vorinostat demonstrated preclinical and clinical efficacy in human cancers and is the first histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) approved for cancer treatment. Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes a Ca 2+ dependent transamidating reaction resulting in covalent cross-links between proteins. TG2 acts also as G-protein in trans-membrane signaling and as a cell surface adhesion mediator. TG2 up-regulation has been demonstrated in several cancers and its expression levels correlate with resistance to chemotherapy and metastatic potential. We demonstrated that the anti-proliferative effect of the HDACi vorinostat is paralleled by the induction of TG2 mRNA and protein expression in cancer cells but not in ex vivo treated peripheral blood lymphocytes. This effect was also shared by other pan-HDACi and resulted in increased TG2 transamidating activity. Notably, high TG2 basal levels in a panel of cancer cell lines correlated with lower vorinostat antiproliferative activity. Notably, in TG2-knockdown cancer cells vorinostat anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects were enhanced, whereas in TG2-full-length transfected cells were impaired, suggesting that TG2 could represent a mechanism of intrinsic or acquired resistance to vorinostat. In fact, co-treatment of tumor cells with inhibitors of TG2 transamidating activity potentiated the antitumor effect of vorinostat. Moreover, vorinostat-resistant MCF7 cells selected by stepwise increasing concentrations of the drug, significantly overexpressed TG2 protein compared to parental cells, and co-treatment of these cells with TG2 inhibitors reversed vorinostat-resistance. Taken together, our data demonstrated that TG2 is involved in the resistance of cancer cells to vorinostat, as well as to other HDACi.

  17. High-Tg TOPAS mPOF strain sensing at 110 degrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a mPOF made of high-Tg TOPAS grade 5013 with Tg = 135°C. We inscribe FBGs into the fiber and demonstrate strain sensing of 2.5% strain at 98°C, further we also demonstrate strain sensing at a record high temperature of 110°C. The Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are around 860 nm, whe...... the propagation loss is 5.1dB/m, close to the fiber loss minimum of 3.67dB/m at 787nm....

  18. FPGA Implementation of Burst-Mode Synchronization for SOQSPK-TG

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    is normalized to π. The proposed burst-mode architecture is written in VHDL and verified using Modelsim. The VHDL design is implemented on a Xilinx...Document Number: SET 2014-0043 412TW-PA-14298 FPGA Implementation of Burst-Mode Synchronization for SOQSPK-TG June 2014 Final Report Test...To) 9/11 -- 8/14 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FPGA Implementation of Burst-Mode Synchronization for SOQSPK-TG 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER: W900KK-11-C-0032 5b

  19. Database Description - Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database Database Description General information of database Database... name Open TG-GATEs Pathological Image Database Alternative name - DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00954-0...iomedical Innovation 7-6-8, Saito-asagi, Ibaraki-city, Osaka 567-0085, Japan TEL:81-72-641-9826 Email: Database... classification Toxicogenomics Database Organism Taxonomy Name: Rattus norvegi... Article title: Author name(s): Journal: External Links: Original website information Database

  20. A Novel Function for the Streptococcus pneumoniae Aminopeptidase N: Inhibition of T Cell Effector Function through Regulation of TCR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance K. Blevins

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn causes a variety of disease states including fatal bacterial pneumonia. Our previous finding that introduction of Spn into an animal with ongoing influenza virus infection resulted in a CD8+ T cell population with reduced effector function gave rise to the possibility of direct regulation by pneumococcal components. Here, we show that treatment of effector T cells with lysate derived from Spn resulted in inhibition of IFNγ and tumor necrosis factor α production as well as of cytolytic granule release. Spn aminopeptidase N (PepN was identified as the inhibitory bacterial component and surprisingly, this property was independent of the peptidase activity found in this family of proteins. Inhibitory activity was associated with reduced activation of ZAP-70, ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38, demonstrating the ability of PepN to negatively regulate TCR signaling at multiple points in the cascade. These results reveal a novel immune regulatory function for a bacterial aminopeptidase.

  1. Clinical translation and regulatory aspects of CAR/TCR-based adoptive cell therapies-the German Cancer Consortium approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krackhardt, Angela M; Anliker, Brigitte; Hildebrandt, Martin; Bachmann, Michael; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Nettelbeck, Dirk M; Renner, Matthias; Uharek, Lutz; Willimsky, Gerald; Schmitt, Michael; Wels, Winfried S; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina

    2018-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified by TCRs or CARs represents a highly attractive novel therapeutic strategy to treat malignant diseases. Various approaches for the development of such gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs) have been initiated by scientists in recent years. To date, however, the number of clinical trials commenced in Germany and Europe is still low. Several hurdles may contribute to the delay in clinical translation of these therapeutic innovations including the significant complexity of manufacture and non-clinical testing of these novel medicinal products, the limited knowledge about the intricate regulatory requirements of the academic developers as well as limitations of funds for clinical testing. A suitable good manufacturing practice (GMP) environment is a key prerequisite and platform for the development, validation, and manufacture of such cell-based therapies, but may also represent a bottleneck for clinical translation. The German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) and the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) have initiated joint efforts of researchers and regulators to facilitate and advance early phase, academia-driven clinical trials. Starting with a workshop held in 2016, stakeholders from academia and regulatory authorities in Germany have entered into continuing discussions on a diversity of scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory aspects, as well as the benefits and risks of clinical application of CAR/TCR-based cell therapies. This review summarizes the current state of discussions of this cooperative approach providing a basis for further policy-making and suitable modification of processes.

  2. Evaluating the genotoxic effects of workers exposed to lead using micronucleus assay, comet assay and TCR gene mutation test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhijian; Lou Jianlin; Chen Shijie; Zheng Wei; Wu Wei; Jin Lifen; Deng Hongping; He Jiliang

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic effects of lead (Pb) exposure, 25 workers in a workplace producing storage battery were monitored for three genetic end-points using micronucleus (MN) assay, comet assay and TCR gene mutation test. Twenty-five controls were matched with workers according to age, gender and smoking. The air Pb concentration in the workplace was 1.26 mg/m 3 . All subjects were measured for Pb concentration of blood by atom absorption spectrophotometry. The mean Pb concentration of blood in workers (0.32 mg/l) was significantly higher than that in controls (0.02 mg/l). The results of MN test showed that the mean micronuclei rate (MNR) and mean micronucleated cells rate (MCR) in workers were 9.04 ± 1.51 per mille and 7.76 ± 1.23 per mille , respectively, which were significantly higher than those (2.36 ± 0.42 per mille and 1.92 ± 0.31 per mille ) in controls (P -4 and 1.74 ± 0.17 x 10 -4 , respectively, there was no significant difference between workers and controls (P > 0.05). The results of our study indicated that the genetic damage was detectable in 25 workers occupationally exposed to lead

  3. T-cell receptor (TCR) phenotype of nodal Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma (CTL): a clinicopathologic study of 39 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Seiichi; Asano, Naoko; Miyata-Takata, Tomoko; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Elsayed, Ahmed Ali; Satou, Akira; Takahashi, Emiko; Kinoshita, Tomohiro; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2015-04-01

    Among Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive cytotoxic T/NK-cell lymphoma, there are only a few reports on the clinicopathologic features of patients with primary nodal presentation (nodal EBV cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma [CTL]). Here, we compared the clinicopathologic profiles of 39 patients with nodal EBV CTL with those of 27 cases of "extranasal" NK/T-cell lymphoma of nasal type (ENKTL), especially addressing their T-cell receptor (TCR) phenotype. Histologically, 22 of 39 nodal EBV CTL cases (56%) were unique in having centroblastoid appearance, which was contrasted with the lower incidence of this feature in ENKTL (15%, P=0.001). In contrast, pleomorphic appearance was more frequently seen in ENKTL than in nodal EBV CTL (67% vs. 23%, P=0.001). Thirty-three of 39 nodal EBV CTL cases (85%) were of T-cell lineage on the basis of TCR expression and/or TCRγ gene rearrangement; in detail, 18 cases (46%) were TCRβ positive (αβ T), 5 (13%) were TCRγ and/or δ positive (γδ T), and 10 (26%) were TCR-silent type with clonal TCRγ gene rearrangement but no expression of TCRβ, γ, or δ. These results were clearly contrasted by a lower incidence of T-cell lineage in ENKTL (7 cases, 26%, P<0.001). Notably, the survival time of the 5 nodal lymphoma patients with γδ T-cell phenotype was within 3 months, which was inferior to those of αβ T and TCR-silent types (P=0.003), and 3 of those with available clinical information were all found to be associated with autoimmune diseases. These data suggest that nodal EBV CTL is distinct from ENKTL.

  4. TIM-3 Suppresses Anti-CD3/CD28-Induced TCR Activation and IL-2 Expression through the NFAT Signaling Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Tomkowicz

    Full Text Available TIM-3 (T cell immunoglobulin and mucin-domain containing protein 3 is a member of the TIM family of proteins that is preferentially expressed on Th1 polarized CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Recent studies indicate that TIM-3 serves as a negative regulator of T cell function (i.e. T cell dependent immune responses, proliferation, tolerance, and exhaustion. Despite having no recognizable inhibitory signaling motifs, the intracellular tail of TIM-3 is apparently indispensable for function. Specifically, the conserved residues Y265/Y272 and surrounding amino acids appear to be critical for function. Mechanistically, several studies suggest that TIM-3 can associate with interleukin inducible T cell kinase (ITK, the Src kinases Fyn and Lck, and the p85 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K adaptor protein to positively or negatively regulate IL-2 production via NF-κB/NFAT signaling pathways. To begin to address this discrepancy, we examined the effect of TIM-3 in two model systems. First, we generated several Jurkat T cell lines stably expressing human TIM-3 or murine CD28-ECD/human TIM-3 intracellular tail chimeras and examined the effects that TIM-3 exerts on T cell Receptor (TCR-mediated activation, cytokine secretion, promoter activity, and protein kinase association. In this model, our results demonstrate that TIM-3 inhibits several TCR-mediated phenotypes: i NF-kB/NFAT activation, ii CD69 expression, and iii suppression of IL-2 secretion. To confirm our Jurkat cell observations we developed a primary human CD8+ cell system that expresses endogenous levels of TIM-3. Upon TCR ligation, we observed the loss of NFAT reporter activity and IL-2 secretion, and identified the association of Src kinase Lck, and PLC-γ with TIM-3. Taken together, our results support the conclusion that TIM-3 is a negative regulator of TCR-function by attenuating activation signals mediated by CD3/CD28 co-stimulation.

  5. [Correlation of SNP of IL-2-330T/G Gene with Genetic Susceptibility and Efficacy of Immunosuppressive Therapy in Patients with Aplastic Anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Chang, Hong

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the correlation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of Interleukin-2(IL-2)-330T/G with genetic susceptibility and the efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy in patients with aplastic anemia. The peripheral blood samples from 103 patients with aplastic anemia in our hospital were collected. Out of 103 patients 46 received immuosuppressive therapy and were observed for 4 months, and 100 healthy adults were selected as control. The electrophoresis and DNA sequence were performed. The polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was used to amplify the polymorphic gene segment of IL-2 -330T/G from 103 aplastic anemia patients and 100 healthy adults. The frequencis of IL-2-330 GG genotype and G allele were a little higher in patients with aplastic anemia than that in the healthy adults(12.6% vs 12.0%, P>0.05; 27.7% vs 33.5%, P>0.05), but not statistically significant(P>0.05); in the 103 patients with aplastic anemia, 46 received immunosuppressive therapy, whereas 29 patients showed response, no significant difference was found between the responders and non-responders in the IL-2-330 GG genotype and G allele (31.0% vs 48.3%, P>0.05; 64.8% vs 61.8%, P>0.05). IL-2 -330T/G gene polymorphism may not correlate with the susceptibility of aplastic anemia or the efficacy of immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. Sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation in an extremely unstable oxide glass and its implication for structural heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Hu, L.N.; Liu, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    We study the sub-Tg relaxation in an extremely unstable glass former, i.e., 65SiO2-35Al2O3, and its relation to structural heterogeneity (e.g., structurally ordered domains in glass matrix). This is done by hyperquenching (~106 K/s) the liquid, then annealing the hyperquenched glass below Tg...... and subsequently scanning the annealed hyperquenched glass in a differential scanning calorimeter. The results show that structural ordering can take place even below Tg. An endothermic pre-peak is observed when the hyperquenched sample is annealed at 0.75Tg for sufficiently long time, which is, however, much...... weaker compared to that of stable glass formers subjected to same annealing conditions. We also investigate the effect of the sub-Tg annealing on crystallization above Tg. The results imply that some structurally ordered domains exist already in the liquid state. The ordered domains lower the activation...

  7. BCR CDR3 length distributions differ between blood and spleen and between old and young patients, and TCR distributions can be used to detect myelodysplastic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickman, Yishai; Mehr, Ramit; Dunn-Walters, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) is the most hyper-variable region in B cell receptor (BCR) and T cell receptor (TCR) genes, and the most critical structure in antigen recognition and thereby in determining the fates of developing and responding lymphocytes. There are millions of different TCR Vβ chain or BCR heavy chain CDR3 sequences in human blood. Even now, when high-throughput sequencing becomes widely used, CDR3 length distributions (also called spectratypes) are still a much quicker and cheaper method of assessing repertoire diversity. However, distribution complexity and the large amount of information per sample (e.g. 32 distributions of the TCRα chain, and 24 of TCRβ) calls for the use of machine learning tools for full exploration. We have examined the ability of supervised machine learning, which uses computational models to find hidden patterns in predefined biological groups, to analyze CDR3 length distributions from various sources, and distinguish between experimental groups. We found that (a) splenic BCR CDR3 length distributions are characterized by low standard deviations and few local maxima, compared to peripheral blood distributions; (b) healthy elderly people's BCR CDR3 length distributions can be distinguished from those of the young; and (c) a machine learning model based on TCR CDR3 distribution features can detect myelodysplastic syndrome with approximately 93% accuracy. Overall, we demonstrate that using supervised machine learning methods can contribute to our understanding of lymphocyte repertoire diversity. (paper)

  8. CDR3 analysis of TCR Vβ repertoire of CD8⁺ T cells from chickens infected with Eimeria maxima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chao; Yin, Guangwen; Qin, Mei; Suo, Jingxia; Lv, Qiyao; Xie, Li; Wang, Yunzhou; Huang, Xiaoxi; Chen, Yuchen; Liu, Xianyong; Suo, Xun

    2014-08-01

    CD8(+) T cells play a major role in the immune protection of host against the reinfection of Eimeria maxima, the most immunogenic species of eimerian parasites in chickens. To explore the dominant complementarity-determining regions 3 (CDR3) of CD8(+) T cell populations induced by the infection of this parasite, sequence analysis was performed in this study for CDR3 of CD8(+) T cells from E. maxima infected chickens. After 5 days post the third or forth infection, intraepithelial lymphocytes were isolated from the jejunum of bird. CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells were sorted and subjected to total RNA isolation and cDNA preparation. PCR amplification and cloning of the loci between Vβ1 and Cβ was conducted for the subsequent sequencing of CDR3 of T cell receptor (TCR). After the forth infection, 2 birds exhibited two same frequent TCR CDR3 sequences, i.e., AKQDWGTGGYSNMI and AGRVLNIQY; while the third bird showed two different frequent TCR CDR3 sequences, AKQGARGHTPLN and AKQDIEVRGPNTPLN. No frequent CDR3 sequence was detected from uninfected birds, though AGRVLNIQY was also found in two uninfected birds. Our result preliminarily demonstrates that frequent CDR3 sequences may exist in E. maxima immunized chickens, encouraging the mining of the immunodominant CD8(+) T cells against E. maxima infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Generation of TCR-Expressing Innate Lymphoid-like Helper Cells that Induce Cytotoxic T Cell-Mediated Anti-leukemic Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Norihiro; Uemura, Yasushi; Zhang, Rong; Kitayama, Shuichi; Iriguchi, Shoichi; Kawai, Yohei; Yasui, Yutaka; Tatsumi, Minako; Ueda, Tatsuki; Liu, Tian-Yi; Mizoro, Yasutaka; Okada, Chihiro; Watanabe, Akira; Nakanishi, Mahito; Senju, Satoru; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki; Kaneko, Shin

    2018-06-05

    CD4 + T helper (Th) cell activation is essential for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against malignancy. We reprogrammed a Th clone specific for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)-derived b3a2 peptide to pluripotency and re-differentiated the cells into original TCR-expressing T-lineage cells (iPS-T cells) with gene expression patterns resembling those of group 1 innate lymphoid cells. CD4 gene transduction into iPS-T cells enhanced b3a2 peptide-specific responses via b3a2 peptide-specific TCR. iPS-T cells upregulated CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in response to interleukin-2 and interleukin-15. In the presence of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide, antigen-specific dendritic cells (DCs) conditioned by CD4-modified CD40L high iPS-T cells stimulated WT1-specific CTL priming, which eliminated WT1 peptide-expressing CML cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, CD4 modification of CD40L high iPS-T cells generates innate lymphoid helper-like cells inducing bcr-abl-specific TCR signaling that mediates effectiveanti-leukemic CTL responses via DC maturation, showing potential for adjuvant immunotherapy against leukemia. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Linker for activation of T cells is displaced from lipid rafts and decreases in lupus T cells after activation via the TCR/CD3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoel, Nursamaa; Brun, Susana; Bracho, Carmen; Rodríguez, Martín A; Blasini, Ana M

    2012-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by abnormal signal transduction mechanisms in T lymphocytes. Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) couples TCR/CD3 activation with downstream signaling pathways. We reported diminished ERK 1/2 kinase activity in TCR/CD3 stimulated lupus T cells. In this study we evaluated the expression, phosphorylation, lipid raft and immunological synapse (IS) localization and colocalization of LAT with key signalosome molecules. We observed a diminished expression and an abnormal localization of LAT in lipid rafts and at the IS in activated lupus T cells. LAT phosphorylation, capture by GST-Grb2 fusion protein, and coupling to Grb2 and PLCγ1, was similar in healthy control and lupus T cells. Our results suggest that an abnormal localization of LAT within lipid rafts and its accelerated degradation after TCR/CD3 activation may compromise the assembly of the LAT signalosome and downstream signaling pathways required for full MAPK activation in lupus T cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The quantum chemical causality of pMHC-TCR biological avidity: Peptide atomic coordination data and the electronic state of agonist N termini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S.E. Antipas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantum state of functional avidity of the synapse formed between a peptide-Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC and a T cell receptor (TCR is a subject not previously touched upon. Here we present atomic pair correlation meta-data based on crystalized tertiary structures of the Tax (HTLV-1 peptide along with three artificially altered variants, all of which were presented by the (Class I HLA-A201 protein in complexation with the human (CD8+ A6TCR. The meta-data reveal the existence of a direct relationship between pMHC-TCR functional avidity (agonist/antagonist and peptide pair distribution function (PDF. In this context, antagonist peptides are consistently under-coordinated in respect to Tax. Moreover, Density Functional Theory (DFT datasets in the BLYP/TZ2P level of theory resulting from relaxation of the H species on peptide tertiary structures reveal that the coordination requirement of agonist peptides is also expressed as a physical observable of the protonation state of their N termini: agonistic peptides are always found to retain a stable ammonium (NH3+ terminal group while antagonist peptides are not.

  12. BCR CDR3 length distributions differ between blood and spleen and between old and young patients, and TCR distributions can be used to detect myelodysplastic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickman, Yishai; Dunn-Walters, Deborah; Mehr, Ramit

    2013-10-01

    Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) is the most hyper-variable region in B cell receptor (BCR) and T cell receptor (TCR) genes, and the most critical structure in antigen recognition and thereby in determining the fates of developing and responding lymphocytes. There are millions of different TCR Vβ chain or BCR heavy chain CDR3 sequences in human blood. Even now, when high-throughput sequencing becomes widely used, CDR3 length distributions (also called spectratypes) are still a much quicker and cheaper method of assessing repertoire diversity. However, distribution complexity and the large amount of information per sample (e.g. 32 distributions of the TCRα chain, and 24 of TCRβ) calls for the use of machine learning tools for full exploration. We have examined the ability of supervised machine learning, which uses computational models to find hidden patterns in predefined biological groups, to analyze CDR3 length distributions from various sources, and distinguish between experimental groups. We found that (a) splenic BCR CDR3 length distributions are characterized by low standard deviations and few local maxima, compared to peripheral blood distributions; (b) healthy elderly people's BCR CDR3 length distributions can be distinguished from those of the young; and (c) a machine learning model based on TCR CDR3 distribution features can detect myelodysplastic syndrome with approximately 93% accuracy. Overall, we demonstrate that using supervised machine learning methods can contribute to our understanding of lymphocyte repertoire diversity.

  13. 3D analysis of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation in monkeys vaccinated with the first peptide inducing sterilizing immunity against human malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A Patarroyo

    Full Text Available T-cell receptor gene rearrangements were studied in Aotus monkeys developing high antibody titers and sterilizing immunity against the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite upon vaccination with the modified synthetic peptide 24112, which was identified in the Merozoite Surface Protein 2 (MSP-2 and is known to bind to HLA-DRbeta1*0403 molecules with high capacity. Spectratyping analysis showed a preferential usage of Vbeta12 and Vbeta6 TCR gene families in 67% of HLA-DRbeta1*0403-like genotyped monkeys. Docking of peptide 24112 into the HLA-DRbeta1*0401-HA peptide-HA1.7TCR complex containing the VDJ rearrangements identified in fully protected monkeys showed a different structural signature compared to nonprotected monkeys. These striking results show the exquisite specificity of the TCR/pMHCII complex formation needed for inducing sterilizing immunity and provide important hints for a logical and rational methodology to develop multiepitopic, minimal subunit-based synthetic vaccines against infectious diseases, among them malaria.

  14. Adiponectin gene polymorphism rs2241766 T/G is associated with response to pioglitazone treatment in type 2 diabetic patients from southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Insulin sensitizing drugs such as pioglitazone are not uniformly treatment effective among individual type 2 diabetic patients. Here, the relationship of pioglitazone efficacy to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP of the adiponectin gene, a critical gene directly regulated by the drug, was examined in a cohort of Chinese Han type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: Eighty type 2 diabetic patients were treated with pioglitazone (15 mg/day for 12 weeks without interruption of their current therapeutic regimen. Fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c% were collected both prior to and following pioglitazone treatment. Response to pioglitazone was defined as a decrease of at least 15% in HbA1c% levels. Three regions of the adiponectin gene containing SNPs (promoter, intron 2 and exon 2, and exon 3 were amplified and sequenced to determine genotype. RESULTS: Serum adiponectin levels were significantly increased (p<0.001 whereas fasting plasma glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and HbA1c% values were significantly decreased relative to baseline measurements (p<0.001. Response of patients with TG and TT genotypes at rs2241766 (exon2; 52.9% vs. 12.7%, respectively p = 0.001 was statistically significant relative to all other patients. Amongst rs2241766 TG and TT patients, the mean decrease in HbA1c% levels was greater where the genotype was TG (1.15±0.80 vs. 0.52±0.64, p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: The adiponectin gene polymorphism rs2241766 T/G is associated with pioglitazone efficacy in type 2 diabetic patients, and status of the polymorphism may be an important clinical factor to consider prior to pioglitazone treatment.

  15. Fragility of chalcogenide glass in relation to characteristic temperature T0/Tg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, A. M.; Shanker Rao, T.; Lilly Shanker Rao, T.; Venkataraman, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present study reports the mutual relationship between the fragility index m and the characteristic temperature T0/Tg. The fragility of the chalcogenide amorphous glass of Ge10Se50Te40 is calculated by utilizing glass transition temperature (Tg) measured by DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimetry) at different heating rates (β) in the range 5 to 20 K/min. Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann (VFT) equation is fitted to the data of Tg. In addition to the VFT method, three other methods are also used to evaluate m. The fragility index m of the Ge10Se50Te40 system showed the trend of decrease with increasing heating rate but remained stable around 22 for the heating rate 10 K/min. The value of m for the glass is near the lower limit (m ≈ 16) this indicates the alloy is a strong glass forming material in accordance of Angell’s interpretation of fragility. The calculated values of characteristic temperature T0/Tg is very close to 1 which also indicates that clearly the system is most fragile.

  16. TG13 current terminology, etiology, and epidemiology of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimura, Yasutoshi; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Pitt, Henry A.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Garden, O. James; Büchler, Markus W.; Windsor, John A.; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Miura, Fumihiko; Higuchi, Ryota; Gabata, Toshifumi; Hata, Jiro; Gomi, Harumi; Dervenis, Christos; Lau, Wan-Yee; Belli, Giulio; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Hilvano, Serafin C.; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    While referring to the evidence adopted in the Tokyo Guidelines 2007 (TG07) as well as subsequently obtained evidence, further discussion took place on terminology, etiology, and epidemiological data. In particular, new findings have accumulated on the occurrence of symptoms in patients with

  17. Comparison between TG-51 and TRS-398: electron contamination effect on photon beam-quality specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Antonio Lopez; Teijeiro, Antonio; Salvador, Francisco; Medal, Daniela; Vazquez, Julio; Salgado, Manuel; Carrion, MarIa C

    2004-01-01

    Two dosimetry protocols based on absorbed dose to water have recently been implemented: TG-51 and TRS-398. These protocols use different beam-quality indices. The effect of electron contamination in measurements of %dd(10) x has been proposed as a disadvantage of the TG-51. For actual measurements of %dd(10) x in five clinical beams ) a purging magnet was employed to remove the electron contamination. Also, %dd(10) x was measured in the different ways described in TG-51 for high-energy beams: with a lead foil at 50 cm from the phantom surface, at 30 cm, and for open beam. Moreover, TPR 20,10 was determined. Also, periodic quality-control measurements were used for comparing both quality indices and variation over time, but D 20,10 was used instead of TPR 20,10 and measurements in open beam for the %dd(10) x determination. Considering both protocols, S w,air and k Q were calculated in order to compare the results with the experimental data. Significant differences (0.3% for k Q ) were only found for the two high-energy beams, but when the electron contamination is underestimated by TG-51, the difference in k Q is lower. Differences in the other cases and variations over time were less than 0.1%

  18. Ocular Changes in TgF344-AD Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Yuchun; Lu, Bin; Ljubimov, Alexander V.; Girman, Sergey; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Svendsen, Clive N.; Cohen, Robert M.; Wang, Shaomei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we observed pathological changes in the choroid and in RPE cells in the TgF344-AD rat model; choroidal thinning was further observed in human AD retina. Along with Aβ deposition, the inflammatory response was manifested by microglial recruitment and complement activation.

  19. TG-FTIR Study of the Influence of potassium Chloride on Wheat Straw Pyrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wójtowicz, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    of products into char, tar and gas. In this work, a combination of thermogravimetry and evolved gas analysis by Fourier transform infrared analysis (TG-FTIR) has been applied to study the influence of potassium chloride (KCl) on wheat straw pyrolysis. Raw straw, washed straw and washed straw impregnated...

  20. Body weight - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...le URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/open_tggates_body_...atabase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Body weight - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive ...

  1. Thermal behavior of biflorin by beans TG and a DSC photovisual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. S. Aragão

    Full Text Available This work proposes thermal characterization, of the biflorine, orto-quinon of Capraria biflora L., through the TG and DSC photovisual data. The thermogravimetric results showed that the decomposition reaction biflorine occurs three steps under air atmosphere, The DSC of biflorin presented five peaks relating to phase transitions. The DSC photovisual system demonstrated changes in biflorin.

  2. Detecting spatial memory deficits beyond blindness in tg2576 Alzheimer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassine, Nour; Lazaris, Anelise; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Després, Olivier; Meyer, Laurence; Maitre, Michel; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Mathis, Chantal

    2013-03-01

    The retinal degeneration Pde6b(rd1) (rd) mutation can be a major pitfall in behavioral studies using tg2576 mice bred on a B6:SJL genetic background, 1 of the most widely used models of Alzheimer's disease. After a pilot study in wild type mice, performance of 8- and 16-month-old tg2576 mice were assessed in several behavioral tasks with the challenge of selecting 1 or more task(s) showing robust memory deficits on this genetic background. Water maze acquisition was impossible in rd homozygotes, whereas Y-maze alternation, object recognition, and olfactory discrimination were unaffected by both the transgene and the rd mutation. Spatial memory retention of 8- and 16-month-old tg2576 mice, however, was dramatically affected independently of the rd mutation when mice had to recognize a spatial configuration of objects or to perform the Barnes maze. Thus, the latter tasks appear extremely useful to evaluate spatial memory deficits and to test cognitive therapies in tg2576 mice and other mouse models bred on a background susceptible to visual impairment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. SU-F-T-22: Clinical Implications When Using TG-186 (ACE) Heterogeneity Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likhacheva, A; Grade, E; Sadeghi, A; Sokolowski, T [Arizona Cancer Specialists, Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric calculations using traditional TG-43 formalism and Oncentra Brachy Advanced Collapsed cone Engine (ACE) TG-186 calculation algorithm in clinical setting. Methods: We analyzed dosimetry of four patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using a multi-channel intracavitary device (SAVI). All patients were treated to 34 Gy in 10 fractions using a high-dose-rate (192) Ir source. The plans were designed and treated using the TG-43 model. ACE was used to assess the effect heterogeneity correction on various dosimetric parameters. Mass density was estimated using Hounsfield units. Results: Compared to TG-43 formalism, ACE estimated lower doses to targets and organs at risk. The mean difference was 19.8% (range 15.3–24.1%) for PTV-eval V200, 12.0% (range 9.7–17.7%) for PTV-eval V150, 4.3% (range 3.3–6.5%) for PTV-eval D95, 3.3% (range 1.4–5.4%) for PTV-eval D90, 5.4% (range 2.9–9.9%) for maximum rib dose, and 5.7% (2.4–7.4%) for maximum skin dose. There was no correlation between the magnitude of the difference and the PTV-eval volume, air volume, or tissue-applicator conformance. Conclusion: Based on our preliminary study, the TG-43 algorithm appears to overestimate the dose to targets and organs at risk when compared to the ACE TG-186 software. We hypothesize that air adjacent to the SAVI struts contributes to lack of scatter thereby contributing a significant difference in dose calculation when using ACE. We believe that ACE calculation provides a more realistic isodose distribution than TG-43. We plan to further investigate the impact of heterogeneity correction on brachytherapy planning for a wide variety of clinical scenarios, include skin, cervix/uterus, prostate, and lung.

  4. Local confidence limits for IMRT and VMAT techniques: a study based on TG119 test suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Chandroth, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a local confidence limit (CL) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques used at Waikato Regional Cancer Centre. This work was carried out based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group (TG) 119 report. The AAPM TG 119 report recommends CLs as a bench mark for IMRT commissioning and delivery based on its multiple institutions planning and dosimetry comparisons. In this study the locally obtained CLs were compared to TG119 benchmarks. Furthermore, the same bench mark was used to test the capabilities and quality of the VMAT technique in our clinic. The TG 119 test suite consists of two primary and four clinical tests for evaluating the accuracy of IMRT planning and dose delivery systems. Pre defined structure sets contoured on computed tomography images were downloaded from AAPM website and were transferred to a locally designed phantom. For each test case two plans were generated using IMRT and VMAT optimisation. Dose prescriptions and planning objectives recommended by TG119 report were followed to generate the test plans in Eclipse Treatment Planning System. For each plan the point dose measurements were done using an ion chamber at high dose and low dose regions. The planar dose distribution was analysed for percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3 %/3 mm, for both the composite plan and individual fields of each plan. The CLs were generated based on the results from the gamma analysis and point dose measurements. For IMRT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.49 % at high dose region and 2.95 % for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 2.12 % for individual fields and 5.9 % for the composite plan. For VMAT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.56 % at high dose region and 2.6 % for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 1.46 % for individual fields and 0

  5. Análises de protocolos de braquiterapia, por alta taxa de dose, do controle de qualidade de alguns serviços locais, baseados no TG40, TG56 e ARCAL XXX Analysis of the high dose rate brachytherapy protocols of quality assurance programs of some local services, based on TG40, TG56 and ARCAL XXX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen S. Guzmán Calcina

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A braquiterapia por alta taxa de dose está recebendo atenção considerável na maioria dos países. Por isso, nos serviços que utilizam este equipamento exige-se que o desenvolvimento de um programa de controle de qualidade seja cada vez mais rigoroso, para garantir não apenas a segurança aos pacientes, mas também aos operadores e demais envolvidos. Este trabalho tem por objetivos fazer um levantamento dos tipos de testes para um equipamento de braquiterapia por alta taxa de dose, propostos pelos protocolos oficiais publicados (TG40, TG56 e ARCAL XXX e avaliar os tipos de testes que atualmente são realizados por alguns serviços de radioterapia, comparando-os com aqueles apresentados nos protocolos citados. Das análises feitas, observou-se que: a quanto aos protocolos oficiais, o TG56 é mais completo que o TG40 e o ARCAL XXX; b quanto às instituições analisadas, estas em geral se basearam no TG56 para elaborar seus próprios protocolos, os quais demonstraram ter também concordância com os outros já citados. Nestes protocolos, a inexistência dos testes anuais foi notada, o que pode ser explicado por sua aparição nas freqüências trimestral e semestral. Do produto deste estudo são apresentadas tabelas dos tipos de testes com suas respectivas freqüências de utilização, das quais um protocolo pode ser inferido para auxiliar na implementação, pelo menos, dos tipos de testes de controle de qualidade básicos e indispensáveis para o equipamento, garantindo, assim, um tratamento adequado aos pacientes e uma melhor segurança ao pessoal envolvido e, conseqüentemente, assegurando a garantia de qualidade na braquiterapia por alta taxa de dose.High dose rate brachytherapy has been increasingly recognized in most countries, and radiotherapy services using this equipment are encouraged to have a very efficient quality assurance program to ensure protection for patients, workers and other personnel involved. The objective of this

  6. Thymic commitment of regulatory T cells is a pathway of TCR-dependent selection that isolates repertoires undergoing positive or negative selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, A; Caramalho, I; Seixas, E; Demengeot, J

    2005-01-01

    The seminal work of Le Douarin and colleagues (Ohki et al. 1987; Ohki et al. 1988; Salaun et al. 1990; Coutinho et al. 1993) first demonstrated that peripheral tissue-specific tolerance is centrally established in the thymus, by epithelial stromal cells (TEC). Subsequent experiments have shown that TEC-tolerance is dominant and mediated by CD4 regulatory T cells (Treg) that are generated intrathymically by recognition of antigens expressed on TECs (Modigliani et al. 1995; Modigliani et al. 1996a). From these and other observations, in 1996 Modigliani and colleagues derived a general model for the establishment and maintenance of natural tolerance (MM96) (Modigliani et al. 1996b), with two central propositions: (1) T cell receptor (TCR)-dependent sorting of emergent repertoires generates TEC-specific Treg displaying the highest TCR self-affinities below deletion thresholds, thus isolating repertoires undergoing positive and negative selection; (2) Treg are intrathymically committed (and activated) for a unique differentiative pathway with regulatory effector functions. The model explained the embryonic/perinatal time window of natural tolerance acquisition, by developmental programs determining (1) TCR multireactivity, (2) the cellular composition in the thymic stroma (relative abundance of epithelial vs hemopoietic cells), and (3) the dynamics of peripheral lymphocyte pools, built by accumulation of recent thymic emigrants (RTE) that remain recruitable to regulatory functions. We discuss here the MM96 in the light of recent results demonstrating the promiscuous expression of tissue-specific antigens by medullary TECs (Derbinski et al. 2001; Anderson et al. 2002; Gotter et al. 2004) and indicating that Treg represent a unique differentiative pathway (Fontenot et al. 2003; Hori et al. 2003; Khattri et al. 2003), which is adopted by CD4 T cells with high avidity for TEC-antigens (Bensinger et al. 2001; Jordan et al. 2001; Apostolou et al. 2002). In the likelihood that

  7. Modified T-cells (using TCR and CTAs, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR and other molecular tools in recent gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Odiba

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy by the transfer of cloned TCRs that are isolated from tumor penetrating T-cells becomes a possibility through NY-ESOc259; a human-derived affinity-enhanced TCR that provides a level of sufficiency in long-term safety and efficacy. NY-ESOc259 recognizes a peptide common to CTAs (LAGE-1 and NY-ESO-1 in melanoma. Risks associated with insertion related transformation in gene therapy have been alleviated through strategies that include the engineering of transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALEN, RNA-guided nucleases (CRISPR/Cas9, Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN. Cancer immunotherapy based on the genetic modification of autologous T-cells (dependent on the engineered autologous CD8+ T-cells, designed to distinguish and destroy cells bearing tumor-specific antigens via a CAR is able to exterminate B-cell leukemias and lymphomas that are resilient to conventional therapies. A tool with a very large reservoir of potentials in molecular therapy strategy is the Pluripotent Stem Cells (PSC, with pluripotency factors that include Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc, Oct4, differentiating into disease-associated cell phenotypes of three germ layers, comprising of mesoderm (e.g. cardiac cells, blood and muscle, endoderm (liver, pancreas and ectoderm (epidermis, neurons. It finds good application in disease modelling as well as therapeutic options in the restoration of CGD by using AAVS1 as the vector where the therapeutic cassette is integrated into the locus to restore superoxide production in the granulocytes. Fascinatingly, Clinical trial involving iPSC are already underway where scientists have plans to use iPSC-derived cells to treat macular degeneration (a devastating age-related eye disease. Application of these findings has redefined incurable diseases disorders as curable. Keywords: Clinical trials, Disorders, Gene therapy, Molecular biology, Pharmacotherapy, Vector

  8. WE-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, N; Murray, B

    2014-01-01

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Using DoseLab to Perform TG-142 Imaging QA The goals of this session will be to present a clinical overview of acquiring images for TG-142 Imaging QA, as well as analyzing and evaluating results using DoseLab software. DoseLab supports planar imaging QA analysis using almost any QA phantom provided by numerous vendors. General advantages and disadvantages of selecting each of these phantoms will be briefly summarized. Best practices for selecting image acquisition parameters will be presented. A demonstration of using DoseLab software to perform a series of TG-142 tests will be performed. We will disuss why DoseLab uses its own set of imaging QA formulas, and why imaging QA measurement values of the same nominal properties will vary between TG- 142 software packages. Because TG-142 does not specify baseline and tolerance values for imaging QA, the presentation will recommend performing the manufacturer's acceptance test procedure to validate the equipment is functioning correctly. Afterwards, results can be obtained using the clinic's selected set of phantoms, image acquisition parameters, and TG-142 software to set proper baseline values. This presentation will highlight the reasons why comparing imaging QA results can be trickier than comparing linear accelerator treatment results and what physicists should keep in mind when comparing imaging QA results for different machines. Physicists are often unsure of the next step when there is an issue discovered during Imaging QA. Therefore, a few common examples

  9. WE-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childress, N [Mobius Medical Management, LLC,, Houston, TX (United States); Murray, B [ZapIT Medical, Dublin, OH (Ireland)

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Using DoseLab to Perform TG-142 Imaging QA The goals of this session will be to present a clinical overview of acquiring images for TG-142 Imaging QA, as well as analyzing and evaluating results using DoseLab software. DoseLab supports planar imaging QA analysis using almost any QA phantom provided by numerous vendors. General advantages and disadvantages of selecting each of these phantoms will be briefly summarized. Best practices for selecting image acquisition parameters will be presented. A demonstration of using DoseLab software to perform a series of TG-142 tests will be performed. We will disuss why DoseLab uses its own set of imaging QA formulas, and why imaging QA measurement values of the same nominal properties will vary between TG- 142 software packages. Because TG-142 does not specify baseline and tolerance values for imaging QA, the presentation will recommend performing the manufacturer's acceptance test procedure to validate the equipment is functioning correctly. Afterwards, results can be obtained using the clinic's selected set of phantoms, image acquisition parameters, and TG-142 software to set proper baseline values. This presentation will highlight the reasons why comparing imaging QA results can be trickier than comparing linear accelerator treatment results and what physicists should keep in mind when comparing imaging QA results for different machines. Physicists are often unsure of the next step when there is an issue discovered during Imaging QA. Therefore, a few common examples

  10. Characterisation of model compounds and a synthetic coal by TG/MS/FTIR to represent the pyrolysis behaviour of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenillas, A.; Pevida, C.; Rubiera, F.; Garcia, R.; Pis, J.J. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, CSIC, Apartado 73, 33080 Oviedo (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    Coal pyrolysis is the initial, accompanying reaction of a number of coal conversion processes such as hydrogenation, combustion and gasification. However, because of the inherent complexity of coal composition, it is difficult to describe coal pyrolysis clearly. Single model compounds have been used before in order to provide additional insight into the complex processes that occur in the pyrolysis of coal. Yet the picture obtained is a simplified one and certain important aspects such as coal structure, interactions between different surface groups and cross-links are omitted. The approach used in this work involves the preparation of a synthetic coal, SC, with a known structure by curing a mixture of single, well-defined model compounds. By means of chemical characterisation, the SC was shown to contain the macroscopic features of a high volatile coal (proximate and ultimate analyses). FTIR characterisation revealed the presence of functional groups similar to those of coal in the structure of the SC. Temperature-programmed pyrolysis tests were performed in a thermobalance linked to a mass spectrometer and a Fourier transform infrared analyser (TG/MS/FTIR). The thermal behaviour of the synthetic coal (i.e., rate of mass loss and the evolution profiles of gaseous compounds during pyrolysis tests) is very similar to that of the high volatile bituminous coal which was used as a reference material. The great advantage of using SC lies in the fact that its composition and structure can be accurately determined and employed in subsequent applications in basic and mechanistic studies.

  11. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, Shahid B.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-01-01

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for 103 Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r,θ), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r 103 Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r,θ) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil trade mark sign 103 Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r,θ) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the linear interpolation technique. The results of these investigations indicate that the TG-43U1 formalism can be extended for elongated brachytherapy sources, if the two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy function is tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0 cm, L/2, and L/2±0.2 cm. Moreover, with the addition of recommended radial distances for 2D anisotropy functions, the linear interpolation technique more closely replicates

  12. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clements, M [RAD Image, Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Wiesmeyer, M [Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Automated Imaging QA for TG-142 with RIT Presentation Time: 2:45 – 3:15 PM This presentation will discuss software tools for automated imaging QA and phantom analysis for TG-142. All modalities used in radiation oncology will be discussed, including CBCT, planar kV imaging, planar MV imaging, and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. Vendor supplied phantoms as well as a variety of third-party phantoms will be shown, along with appropriate analyses, proper phantom setup procedures and scanning settings, and a discussion of image quality metrics. Tools for process automation will be discussed which include: RIT Cognition (machine learning for phantom image identification), RIT Cerberus (automated file system monitoring and searching), and RunQueueC (batch processing of multiple images). In addition to phantom analysis, tools for statistical tracking, trending, and reporting will be discussed. This discussion will include an introduction to statistical process control, a valuable tool in analyzing data and determining appropriate tolerances. An Introduction to TG-142 Imaging QA Using Standard Imaging Products Presentation Time: 3:15 – 3:45 PM Medical Physicists want to understand the logic behind TG-142 Imaging QA. What is often missing is a firm understanding of the connections between the EPID and OBI phantom imaging, the software “algorithms” that calculate the QA metrics, the establishment of baselines, and the analysis and interpretation of the results. The goal of our brief presentation will be to

  13. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Tools for TG-142 Linac Imaging QA I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clements, M; Wiesmeyer, M

    2014-01-01

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The therapy topic this year is solutions for TG-142 recommendations for linear accelerator imaging QA. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Automated Imaging QA for TG-142 with RIT Presentation Time: 2:45 – 3:15 PM This presentation will discuss software tools for automated imaging QA and phantom analysis for TG-142. All modalities used in radiation oncology will be discussed, including CBCT, planar kV imaging, planar MV imaging, and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. Vendor supplied phantoms as well as a variety of third-party phantoms will be shown, along with appropriate analyses, proper phantom setup procedures and scanning settings, and a discussion of image quality metrics. Tools for process automation will be discussed which include: RIT Cognition (machine learning for phantom image identification), RIT Cerberus (automated file system monitoring and searching), and RunQueueC (batch processing of multiple images). In addition to phantom analysis, tools for statistical tracking, trending, and reporting will be discussed. This discussion will include an introduction to statistical process control, a valuable tool in analyzing data and determining appropriate tolerances. An Introduction to TG-142 Imaging QA Using Standard Imaging Products Presentation Time: 3:15 – 3:45 PM Medical Physicists want to understand the logic behind TG-142 Imaging QA. What is often missing is a firm understanding of the connections between the EPID and OBI phantom imaging, the software “algorithms” that calculate the QA metrics, the establishment of baselines, and the analysis and interpretation of the results. The goal of our brief presentation will be to

  14. Impaired hippocampal acetylcholine release parallels spatial memory deficits in Tg2576 mice subjected to basal forebrain cholinergic degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels

    2013-01-01

    (BFCD) in 3 months old male Tg2576 mice to co-express cholinergic degeneration with Aβ overexpression as these characteristics constitutes key hallmarks of AD. At 9 months, SAP lesioned Tg2576 mice were cognitively impaired in two spatial paradigms addressing working memory and mid to long-term memory...

  15. Observation of changes of serum leptin and lipid (TG and TC) levels in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhaobao; Cheng Guanghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum leptin (with RIA) and lipid (TG and TC) (with biochemistry) levels in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum Leptin, TG and TC levels were determined in 29 patients with Graves' disease both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, serum Leptin, TG and TC levels in the patients were significantly lower than those in the controls. After treatment, serum Leptin, TG and TC levels increased and were significantly higher than those before treatment and were not much different from those in controls. Conclusion: The changes of serum Leptin, TG and TC levels may be of value for outcome prediction in patients with Graves' disease. (authors)

  16. Sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation in an unstable oxide glass former: insights into the structural heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Zhang, Yanfei

    Structural heterogeneity plays a crucial role in determining functionality of glasses. In this work we have found that the sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation pattern in a hyperquenched glass is highly sensitive to structural heterogeneity. As a consequence, the former can be used as an effective approach...... to detect and quantify the structural heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. However, the chemical nature of structural heterogeneity should be revealed by other means such as high resolution microscopic and spectroscopic methods. To study the impact of the structural heterogeneity on the sub-Tg relaxation...... chemical features and degrees of structural heterogeneity in glass-forming liquids. This finding contributes to the microscopic origin of both the primary and secondary relaxation in terms of structural heterogeneity. Finally the results provide insights into the relation between structural heterogeneity...

  17. Compositional characterization of carbon electrode material: A study using simultaneous TG-DTA-FTIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raje, Naina; Aacherekar, Darshana A.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2009-01-01

    Present work describes the application of thermal methods, especially the evolved gas analysis (EGA) for the compositional characterization of carbon electrode material with respect to its organic, amorphous and graphitic carbon content. Trace levels of organic carbon present in the amorphous carbon samples were determined qualitatively by using FTIR absorption spectroscopy. Amorphous and graphitic carbon content in synthetic mixture samples were determined quantitatively using simultaneous TG-DTA-FTIR measurements. FTIR system was calibrated using the measured absorption signal of the evolved carbon dioxide due to the decomposition of cadmium carbonate. Inter-comparison studies using TG-FTIR measurements show that simultaneous FTIR spectroscopy is an effective complementary quantitative measurement technique for thermogravimetric analysis involving the complex decomposition reaction processes.

  18. Characteristic Study of Some Different Kinds of Coal Particles Combustion with Online TG-MS-FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Guanfu

    2018-01-01

    Four kinds of pulverized coal samples from China and Indonesia were studied by thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectrometry and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-MS-FTIR). The thermal behaviors and gaseous emissions of these coals were analyzed in this work. The results indicate that the relative lower values of H/C ratios, which normally represent the degree of aromatization and ring condensation in coal samples, could lead to the relative more intense thermal reaction. The time-evolved profiles of some typical gas products (i.e., CO, SO2, CH4, NO, NO2, NH3 and etc.) were provided by TG-MS-FTIR, and their variations are different. For all the samples, the releases of SO2 and COS can be found at lower temperature than those of NO and CO. As the temperature increases, the possible conversion of NO2 and NH3 to NO is deduced in this work.

  19. TH-A-BRC-01: AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieterich, S.

    2016-01-01

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  20. Abnormal three-steplike sub-Tg enthalpy relaxation pattern in hyperquenched metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Lina; Yue, Yuanzheng

    Our recent work observed a quite different relaxation pattern, i.e., the abnormal three-steplike sub-Tg relaxation in CuZrAl GRs[1]. However, the generality and the origin of this remarkable thermodynamic anomaly remain enigmatic. By hyperquenching strategy, the present work investigated the depe......Our recent work observed a quite different relaxation pattern, i.e., the abnormal three-steplike sub-Tg relaxation in CuZrAl GRs[1]. However, the generality and the origin of this remarkable thermodynamic anomaly remain enigmatic. By hyperquenching strategy, the present work investigated...... in La55Al25Ni20 GRs. However, the correlation between Tf and the activation energy for initiating the energy releasing during thermal scanning is three-steplike for La55Al25Ni20, revealing the similar phenomenon with the abnormal ERP of Cu46Zr46Al8. These unexpected phenomena have been well explained...

  1. TH-A-BRC-01: AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieterich, S. [UC Davis Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  2. TH-A-BRC-02: AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, S. [San Diego Medical Physics (United States)

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  3. TH-A-BRC-02: AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S.

    2016-01-01

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  4. Role of humidity and other correction factors in the AAPM TG-21 dosimetry protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, D.W.; Ross, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed derivation is presented of the formulas required to determine Ngas and Dmed in the AAPM TG-21 dosimetry protocol. This protocol specifies how to determine the absorbed dose in an electron or photon beam when using exposure or absorbed dose calibrated ion chambers. It is shown that the expression given in TG-21's recent letter of clarification is incorrect. Accounting for humidity correctly increases, by 0.4%, all absorbed dose determinations using an exposure calibrated ion chamber. Taking into account other correction factors in the equation for exposure could also have varying, but significant effects (possibly over 1%). These are the stem scatter correction, the axial nonuniformity correction and the electrode correction for electrodes made of different materials from the wall. Attention is drawn to differences in the definitions of the exposure and absorbed dose calibration factors, Nx and ND, respectively, as supplied by the NBS and the NRCC

  5. A Monte Carlo derived TG-51 equivalent calibration for helical tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.D.; Mackenzie, M.; Rogers, D.W.O.; Fallone, B.G.

    2005-01-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) requires a method of accurately determining the absorbed dose under reference conditions. In the AAPM's TG-51 external beam dosimetry protocol, the quality conversion factor, k Q , is presented as a function of the photon component of the percentage depth-dose at 10 cm depth, %dd(10) x , measured under the reference conditions of a 10x10 cm 2 field size and a source-to-surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm. The value of %dd(10) x from HT cannot be used for the determination of k Q because the design of the HT does not meet the following TG-51 reference conditions: (i) the field size and the practical SSD required by TG-51 are not obtainable and (ii) the absence of the flattening filter changes the beam quality thus affecting some components of k Q . The stopping power ratio is not affected because of its direct relationship to %dd(10) x . We derive a relationship for the Exradin A1SL ion chamber converting the %dd(10) x measured under HT 'reference conditions' of SSD=85 cm and a 5x10 cm 2 field-size [%dd(10) x[HTRef] ], to the dosimetric equivalent value under for TG-51 reference conditions [%dd(10) x[HTTG-51] ] for HT. This allows the determination of k Q under the HT reference conditions. The conversion results in changes of 0.1% in the value of k Q for our particular unit. The conversion relationship should also apply to other ion chambers with possible errors on the order of 0.1%

  6. Helhetsorienterad utvärdering av kollektivtrafikåtgärder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiselius, Lena Winslott; Barfod, Michael Bruhn; Leleur, Steen

    Under hösten 2008 och våren 2009 har forskare vid Avd. Trafik och väg vid Lunds Tekniska Högskola, DTU Transport vid Danmarks Tekniska Universitet samt National-ekonomiska institutionen vid Lunds Universitet genomfört ett forskningsprojekt med syfte att studera tillämpningen av en sammansatt...... (helhetsorienterad) analys av kollektiv-trafikåtgärder....

  7. TgICMAP1 is a novel microtubule binding protein in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife T Heaslip

    Full Text Available The microtubule cytoskeleton provides essential structural support for all eukaryotic cells and can be assembled into various higher order structures that perform drastically different functions. Understanding how microtubule-containing assemblies are built in a spatially and temporally controlled manner is therefore fundamental to understanding cell physiology. Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite, contains at least five distinct tubulin-containing structures, the spindle pole, centrioles, cortical microtubules, the conoid, and the intra-conoid microtubules. How these five structurally and functionally distinct sets of tubulin containing structures are constructed and maintained in the same cell is an intriguing problem. Previously, we performed a proteomic analysis of the T. gondii apical complex, a cytoskeletal complex located at the apical end of the parasite that is composed of the conoid, three ring-like structures, and the two short intra-conoid microtubules. Here we report the characterization of one of the proteins identified in that analysis, TgICMAP1. We show that TgICMAP1 is a novel microtubule binding protein that can directly bind to microtubules in vitro and stabilizes microtubules when ectopically expressed in mammalian cells. Interestingly, in T. gondii, TgICMAP1 preferentially binds to the intra-conoid microtubules, providing us the first molecular tool to investigate the intra-conoid microtubule assembly process during daughter construction.

  8. Cotinine improves visual recognition memory and decreases cortical Tau phosphorylation in the Tg6799 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizzell, J Alex; Patel, Sagar; Barreto, George E; Echeverria, Valentina

    2017-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with the progressive aggregation of hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule associated protein Tau in the central nervous system. Cotinine, the main metabolite of nicotine, reduced working memory deficits, synaptic loss, and amyloid β peptide aggregation into oligomers and plaques as well as inhibited the cerebral Tau kinase, glycogen synthase 3β (GSK3β) in the transgenic (Tg)6799 (5XFAD) mice. In this study, the effect of cotinine on visual recognition memory and cortical Tau phosphorylation at the GSK3β sites Serine (Ser)-396/Ser-404 and phospho-CREB were investigated in the Tg6799 and non-transgenic (NT) littermate mice. Tg mice showed short-term visual recognition memory impairment in the novel object recognition test, and higher levels of Tau phosphorylation when compared to NT mice. Cotinine significantly improved visual recognition memory performance increased CREB phosphorylation and reduced cortical Tau phosphorylation. Potential mechanisms underlying theses beneficial effects are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Textural properties of low-fat set-type yoghurt depending on mTG addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Darnay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to determine how 0.5-2 U/g non-inactivated mTG affects the pH development and apparent viscosity during fermentation. Furthermore we wished to examine how the enzyme addition could change protein structure, gel strength and sensory characteristics by healthy low-fat set-type yoghurt product. Therefore commercial mTG enzyme preparation was added in different concentrations (0.5-2.0 U/g, in 0.5 U/g steps to 1.5 % bovine milk simultaneously with DVS starter culture. Our study revealed that enzyme dosage (0.5-2 U/g protein had no impact on pH development and apparent viscosity during fermentation when manufacturing low-fat (1.5 % set-type yoghurt. The addition of mTG contributed to 38 % more whey retention with incorporation of β-casein, and caused 44 % higher gel strength up to a level of 1 U/g protein.

  10. Down regulation of the TCR complex CD3 ζ-chain on CD3+ T cells: a potential mechanism for helminth mediated immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jane Appleby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The CD3ζ forms part of the T cell receptor (TCR where it plays an important role in coupling antigen recognition to several intracellular signal-transduction pathways leading to T cell effector functions. Down regulation of CD3ζ leads to impairment of immune responses including reduced cell proliferation and cytokine production. In experimental models helminth parasites have been shown to modulate immune responses directed against them and unrelated antigens, so called bystander antigens, but there is a lack of studies validating these observations in humans. This study focused on investigated the relationship between expression levels of the TCR CD3ζ chain with lymphocyte cell proliferation during human infection with the helminth parasite, Schistosoma haematobium which causes uro-genital schistosomiasis. Using flow cytometry, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from individuals naturally exposed to S. haematobium in rural Zimbabwe were phenotyped, and expression levels of CD3ζ on T cells were related to intensity of infection. In this population, parasite infection intensity was inversely related to CD3ζ expression levels (p<0.05, consistent with down-regulation of CD3ζ expression during helminth infection. Furthermore, PBMC proliferation was positively related to expression levels of CD3ζ (p<0.05 after allowing for confounding variables (host age, sex, infection level. CD3ζ expression levels had a differing relationship between immune correlates of susceptibility and immunity, measured by antibody responses, indicating a complex relationship between immune activation status and immunity. The relationships between the CD3ζ chain of the TCR and schistosome infection, PBMC proliferation and schistosome-specific antibody responses have not previously been reported, and these results may indicate a mechanism for the impaired T cell proliferative responses observed during human schistosome infection.

  11. TCR moves to MCR

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Sollander, AB/OP/TI

    2005-01-01

    The monitoring of CERN's technical infrastructure has moved from the Technical Control Room in building 212 to the Meyrin Control Room (MCR) in building 354 (see map) and from the TS/CSE group to AB/OP. The operation's team as well as the services provided remain the same as before and you can still reach the operator on shift by calling 72201. Peter Sollander, AB/OP/TI

  12. Recombinant TgHSP70 Immunization Protects against Toxoplasma gondii Brain Cyst Formation by Enhancing Inducible Nitric Oxide Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neide M. Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause congenital infection in humans and animals and severe disease in immunocompromised individuals; consequently development of vaccines against the parasite is highly necessary. Under stress conditions, T. gondii expresses the highly immunogenic heat shock protein 70 (TgHSP70. Here, we assessed the protective efficacy of rTgHSP70 immunization combined with Alum in oral ME-49 T. gondii infection and the mechanisms involved on it. It was observed that immunized mice with rTgHSP70 or rTgHSP70 adsorbed in Alum presented a significantly reduced number of cysts in the brain that was associated with increased iNOS+ cell numbers in the organ, irrespective the use of the adjuvant. Indeed, ex vivo experiments showed that peritoneal macrophages pre-stimulated with rTgHSP70 presented increased NO production and enhanced parasite killing, and the protein was able to directly stimulate B cells toward antibody producing profile. In addition, rTgHSP70 immunization leads to high specific antibody titters systemically and a mixed IgG1/IgG2a response, with predominance of IgG1 production. Nonetheless, it was observed that the pretreatment of the parasite with rTgHSP70 immune sera was not able to control T. gondii internalization and replication by NIH fibroblast neither peritoneal murine macrophages, nor anti-rTgHSP70 antibodies were able to kill T. gondii by complement-mediated lysis, suggesting that these mechanisms are not crucial to resistance. Interestingly, when in combination with Alum, rTgHSP70 immunization was able to reduce inflammation in the brain of infected mice and in parallel anti-rTgHSP70 immune complexes in the serum. In conclusion, immunization with rTgHSP70 induces massive amounts of iNOS expression and reduced brain parasitism, suggesting that iNOS expression and consequently NO production in the brain is a protective mechanism induced by TgHSP70 immunization, therefore rTgHSP70 can be a good candidate for

  13. Clinical reevaluation of radioimmunological thyroglobulin (hTg) determination in follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettger, I.; Kanitz, W.; Pabst, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    A reevaluation of the clinical value of radioimmunological thyroglobulin (hTg) determination during follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, in general, confirms our previous results already published in 1980 and 1981. A total of 163 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, 53 with papillary and 110 with follicular carcinoma, was studied up to January 1984. 586 sera are included in this study. The differentiation of suspicious from nonsuspicious findings was found to be based upon a cut-off concentration of 10 μg/l. Pathological findings were associated with hTg concentrations above 20 μg/l. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated to be between 95 and 97%, sensitivity of the method in comparison to be radioiodine whole-body scan was 98 versus 83%, respectively, and specificity 94%. At first 5 false negative and 6 false positive hTg findings have been obtained. 7.6% of the patients demonstrated endogeneous hTg antibodies by Boyden test. 7.7% of Boyden test negative sera showed an unacceptable hTg recovery of worse than +- 50%, which was possibly due to endogeneous antibodies. Again, endogenous TSH was able to stimulate hTg secretion in the form of elevated levels, yet did not affect the clinical diagnosis. Examples of the behaviour of hTg levels during follow-up are demonstrated. Specifically, the cases with false hTg findings are discussed. Basically, the conclusions are the same as in 1980 and 1981: hTg determination is able to replace the routinely performed radioiodine whole-body scan during follow-up, if once residual thyroid tissue and metastases have been excluded by means of radioiodine and an optimal follow-up program is used. (orig.) [de

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light chain as a biomarker of neurodegeneration in the Tg4510 and MitoPark mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clement, Amalie; Mitchelmore, Cathy; Andersson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    examined whether changes in NF-L levels in brain, plasma, and CSF reflect the changing disease status of preclinical models of neurodegeneration. Using Western Blot and ELISA we characterized NF-L and disease-related proteins in brain, CSF and plasma samples from Tg4510 mice (tauopathy/AD), MitoPark mice...... (PD), and their age-matched control littermates. We found that CSF NF-L clearly discriminates Tg4510 from control littermates, which was not observed for the MitoPark model. However, both Tg4510 and MitoPark showed altered expression and solubilization of NFs compared to control littermates. We found...

  15. FXIIIA and TGF-beta over-expression produces normal musculo-skeletal phenotype in TG2-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, U; Oliva, F; Taurisano, G; Orlandi, A; Pietroni, V; Candi, E; Melino, G; Maffulli, N

    2009-04-01

    Transglutaminase (TGs) enzymes and proteins crosslinking have for long time been implicated in the formation of hard tissue development, matrix maturation and mineralization. Among the TGs family members, in the context of connective tissue formation, TG2 and Factor XIII are expressed in cartilage by hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we analyse the morphological consequences of TG2 deficiency, during the development of skeletal elements. When TG2 is absent, there are not gross abnormalities in the development of the skeletal system, probably from compensatory mechanisms resulting in increased expression of FXIIIA and TGF-beta 1. In vivo other TGs may be involved in promoting chondrocytes and osteoblast differentiation and matrix mineralisation.

  16. Rapid detection of SNP (c.309T>G in the MDM2 gene by the Duplex SmartAmp method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Enokida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic polymorphisms in the human MDM2 gene are suggested to be a tumor susceptibility marker and a prognostic factor for cancer. It has been reported that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP c.309T>G in the MDM2 gene attenuates the tumor suppressor activity of p53 and accelerates tumor formation in humans. METHODOLOGY: In this study, to detect the SNP c.309T>G in the MDM2 gene, we have developed a new SNP detection method, named "Duplex SmartAmp," which enabled us to simultaneously detect both 309T and 309G alleles in one tube. To develop this new method, we introduced new primers i.e., nBP and oBPs, as well as two different fluorescent dyes that separately detect those genetic polymorphisms. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: By the Duplex SmartAmp method, the genetic polymorphisms of the MDM2 gene were detected directly from a small amount of genomic DNA or blood samples. We used 96 genomic DNA and 24 blood samples to validate the Duplex SmartAmp by comparison with results of the conventional PCR-RFLP method; consequently, the Duplex SmartAmp results agreed totally with those of the PCR-RFLP method. Thus, the new SNP detection method is considered useful for detecting the SNP c.309T>G in the MDM2 gene so as to judge cancer susceptibility against some cellular stress in the clinical setting, and also to handle a large number of samples and enable rapid clinical diagnosis.

  17. TCR stimulation strength is inversely associated with establishment of functional brain-resident memory CD8 T cells during persistent viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, Saumya; Jin, Ge; Schell, Todd D; Lukacher, Aron E

    2017-04-01

    Establishing functional tissue-resident memory (TRM) cells at sites of infection is a newfound objective of T cell vaccine design. To directly assess the impact of antigen stimulation strength on memory CD8 T cell formation and function during a persistent viral infection, we created a library of mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV) variants with substitutions in a subdominant CD8 T cell epitope that exhibit a broad range of efficiency in stimulating TCR transgenic CD8 T cells. By altering a subdominant epitope in a nonstructural viral protein and monitoring memory differentiation of donor monoclonal CD8 T cells in immunocompetent mice, we circumvented potentially confounding changes in viral infection levels, virus-associated inflammation, size of the immunodominant virus-specific CD8 T cell response, and shifts in TCR affinity that may accompany temporal recruitment of endogenous polyclonal cells. Using this strategy, we found that antigen stimulation strength was inversely associated with the function of memory CD8 T cells during a persistent viral infection. We further show that CD8 TRM cells recruited to the brain following systemic infection with viruses expressing epitopes with suboptimal stimulation strength respond more efficiently to challenge CNS infection with virus expressing cognate antigen. These data demonstrate that the strength of antigenic stimulation during recruitment of CD8 T cells influences the functional integrity of TRM cells in a persistent viral infection.

  18. TCR stimulation strength is inversely associated with establishment of functional brain-resident memory CD8 T cells during persistent viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Maru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Establishing functional tissue-resident memory (TRM cells at sites of infection is a newfound objective of T cell vaccine design. To directly assess the impact of antigen stimulation strength on memory CD8 T cell formation and function during a persistent viral infection, we created a library of mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV variants with substitutions in a subdominant CD8 T cell epitope that exhibit a broad range of efficiency in stimulating TCR transgenic CD8 T cells. By altering a subdominant epitope in a nonstructural viral protein and monitoring memory differentiation of donor monoclonal CD8 T cells in immunocompetent mice, we circumvented potentially confounding changes in viral infection levels, virus-associated inflammation, size of the immunodominant virus-specific CD8 T cell response, and shifts in TCR affinity that may accompany temporal recruitment of endogenous polyclonal cells. Using this strategy, we found that antigen stimulation strength was inversely associated with the function of memory CD8 T cells during a persistent viral infection. We further show that CD8 TRM cells recruited to the brain following systemic infection with viruses expressing epitopes with suboptimal stimulation strength respond more efficiently to challenge CNS infection with virus expressing cognate antigen. These data demonstrate that the strength of antigenic stimulation during recruitment of CD8 T cells influences the functional integrity of TRM cells in a persistent viral infection.

  19. IL-12-mediated STAT4 signaling and TCR signal strength cooperate in the induction of CD40L in human and mouse CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Regina; Hartung, Anett; Zehn, Dietmar; Frentsch, Marco; Thiel, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    CD40L is one of the key molecules bridging the activation of specific T cells and the maturation of professional and nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells including B cells. CD4(+) T cells have been regarded as the major T-cell subset that expresses CD40L upon cognate activation; however, we demonstrate here that a putative CD8(+) helper T-cell subset expressing CD40L is induced in human and murine CD8(+) T cells in vitro and in mice immunized with antigen-pulsed dendritic cells. IL-12 and STAT4-mediated signaling was the major instructive cytokine signal boosting the ability of CD8(+) T cells to express CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, TCR signaling strength modulated CD40L expression in CD8(+) T cells after primary differentiation in vitro as well as in vivo. The induction of CD40L in CD8(+) T cells regulated by IL-12 and TCR signaling may enable CD8(+) T cells to respond autonomously of CD4(+) T cells. Thus, we propose that under proinflammatory conditions, a self-sustaining positive feedback loop could facilitate the efficient priming of T cells stimulated by high affinity peptide displaying APCs. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Activation of human naïve Th cells increases surface expression of GD3 and induces neoexpression of GD2 that colocalize with TCR clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva-Cabello, Tania M; Mollicone, Rosella; Cruz-Muñoz, Mario E; López-Guerrero, Delia V; Martínez-Duncker, Iván

    2015-12-01

    CD4+ T helper lymphocytes (Th) orchestrate the immune response after their activation by antigen-presenting cells. Activation of naïve Th cells is reported to generate the reduction in surface epitopes of sialic acid (Sia) in α2,3 and α2,6 linkages. In this work, we report that in spite of this glycophenotype, anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated purified human naïve Th cells show a significant increase in surface Sia, as assessed by metabolic labeling, compared with resting naïve Th cells, suggesting an increased flux of Sia toward Siaα2,8 glycoconjugates. To understand this increase as a result of ganglioside up-regulation, we observed that very early after activation, human naïve Th cells show an increased expression in surface GD3 and neoexpression of surface GD2 gangliosides, the latter clustering with the T cell receptor (TCR). Also, we report that in contrast to GM2/GD2 synthase null mice, lentiviral vector-mediated silencing of the GM2/GD2 synthase in activated human naïve Th cells reduced efficient TCR clustering and downstream signaling, as assessed by proliferation assays and IL-2 and IL-2R expression, pointing to an important role of this enzyme in activation of human naive Th cells. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Double negative (CD3+ 4- 8- TCR alphabeta splenic cells from young NOD mice provide long-lasting protection against type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly Duncan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Double negative CD3(+4(-8(- TCR alphabeta splenic cells (DNCD3 can suppress the immune responses to allo and xenografts, infectious agents, tumors, and some autoimmune disorders. However, little is known about their role in autoimmune diabetes, a disease characterized by the reduction of insulin production subsequent to destruction of pancreatic beta-cells by a polyclonal population of self-reactive T-cells. Herein, we analyzed the function and phenotype of DNCD3 splenic cells in young NOD mice predisposed to several autoimmune disorders among which, the human-like autoimmune diabetes.DNCD3 splenic cells from young NOD mice (1 provided long-lasting protection against diabetes transfer in NOD/Scid immunodeficient mice, (2 proliferated and differentiated in the spleen and pancreas of NOD/Scid mice and pre-diabetic NOD mice into IL-10-secreting T(R-1 like cells in a Th2-like environment, and (3 their anti-diabetogenic phenotype is CD3(+(CD4(-CD8(-CD28(+CD69(+CD25(low Foxp3(- iCTLA-4(-TCR alphabeta(+ with a predominant Vbeta13 gene usage.These findings delineate a new T regulatory component in autoimmune diabetes apart from that of NKT and CD4(+CD25(high Foxp3(+T-regulatory cells. DNCD3 splenic cells could be potentially manipulated towards the development of autologous cell therapies in autoimmune diabetes.

  2. Tg.rasH2 Mice and not CByB6F1 Mice Should Be Used for 28-Day Dose Range Finding Studies Prior to 26-Week Tg.rasH2 Carcinogenicity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Belich, Jessica; Vidmar, Tom J; Elbekai, Reem H; McKeon, Marie; Brown, Caren

    Our recent retrospective analysis of data, collected from 29 Tg.rasH2 mouse carcinogenicity studies, determined how successful the strategy of choosing the high dose for the 26-week studies was based on the estimated maximum tolerated dose (EMTD) derived from earlier 28-day dose range finding (DRF) studies conducted in CByB6F1 mice. Our analysis demonstrated that the high doses applied at EMTD in the 26-week Tg.rasH2 studies failed to detect carcinogenic effects. To investigate why the dose selection process failed in the 26-week carcinogenicity studies, the initial body weights, terminal body weights, body weight gains, food consumption, and mortality from the first 4 weeks of 26-week studies with Tg.rasH2 mice were compared with 28-day DRF studies conducted with CByB6F1 mice. Both the 26-week and the earlier respective 28-day studies were conducted with the exact same vehicle, test article, and similar dose levels. The analysis of our results further emphasizes that the EMTD and subsequent lower doses, determined on the basis of the 28-day studies in CByB6F1 mice, may not be an accurate strategy for selecting appropriate dose levels for the 26-week carcinogenicity studies in Tg.rasH2 mice. Based on the analysis presented in this article, we propose that the Tg.rasH2 mice and not the CByB6F1 mice should be used in future DRF studies. The Tg.rasH2 mice demonstrate more toxicity than the CByB6F1 mice, possibly because of their smaller size compared to CByB6F1 mice. Also, the Tg.rasH2 males appear to be more sensitive than the female Tg.rasH2 mice.

  3. Influence of processing parameters on microstructure and tensile properties of TG6 titanium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tao; Guo Hongzhen; Wang Yanwei; Yao Zekun

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → This paper highlights the relationships among processing parameters, microstructure and tensile properties of TG6 high temperature titanium alloy. → The microstructural evolutions under different processing parameters were studied by the quantitative metallography, and the effects of microstructure on room and high temperature tensile properties of TG6 alloy were analysed by SEM and TEM. → Linear relationships of elongation vs. volume fraction of primary α phase and ultimate tensile strength vs. thickness of lamellar α phase were determined. - Abstract: Near-isothermal forging of the TG6 titanium alloy was conducted on microprocessor-controlled 630 ton hydraulic press at the deformation temperatures ranging from 850 deg. C to 1045 deg. C, the strain rates of 0.0008 s -1 , 0.003 s -1 and 0.008 s -1 and the deformation degree from 10% to 70%, and then different double heat treatments were applied to the forged specimens. The microstructural evolutions were researched by optical microscope and the microstructural features, i.e. volume fraction of primary α phase and thickness of lamellar α phase, were measured by means of the image analysis software. The room and high temperature tensile properties were obtained for all the specimens. Effects of microstructure on the properties were analysed by scanning electronic microscope. It was found that tenslie properties depended on microstructural features strongly. The plots of ultimate tensile strength vs. thickness of α lamellae and elongation vs. volume fraction of primary α phase produced straight lines. The liner equations were determined by fitting the experimental date, respectively. Compared to other parameters, heat treatment had more influence on the tensile strength and the tensile plasticity was more sensitive to the forging temperature.

  4. License - Open TG-GATEs | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us Open TG-GATEs License License to Use This Database Last updated : 2012/05/24 You may use this database...scribed below. The Standard License specifies the license terms regarding the use of this database and the r...equirements you must follow in using this database. The Additional License specif...icense. Standard License The Standard License for this database is the license specified in the Creative Com...mons Attribution-Share Alike 2.1 Japan . If you use data from this database, plea

  5. Total skin high-dose-rate electron therapy dosimetry using TG-51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossman, Michael S.; Sharma, Subhash C.

    2004-01-01

    An approach to dosimetry for total skin electron therapy (TSET) is discussed using the currently accepted TG-51 high-energy calibration protocol. The methodology incorporates water phantom data for absolute calibration and plastic phantom data for efficient reference dosimetry. The scheme is simplified to include the high-dose-rate mode conversion and provides support for its use, as it becomes more available on newer linear accelerators. Using a 6-field, modified Stanford technique, one may follow the process for accurate determination of absorbed dose

  6. Increased hippocampal excitability in the 3xTgAD mouse model for Alzheimer's disease in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Davis

    Full Text Available Mouse Alzheimer's disease (AD models develop age- and region-specific pathology throughout the hippocampal formation. One recently established pathological correlate is an increase in hippocampal excitability in vivo. Hippocampal pathology also produces episodic memory decline in human AD and we have shown a similar episodic deficit in 3xTg AD model mice aged 3-6 months. Here, we tested whether hippocampal synaptic dysfunction accompanies this cognitive deficit by probing dorsal CA1 and DG synaptic responses in anaesthetized, 4-6 month-old 3xTgAD mice. As our previous reports highlighted a decline in episodic performance in aged control mice, we included aged cohorts for comparison. CA1 and DG responses to low-frequency perforant path stimulation were comparable between 3xTgAD and controls at both age ranges. As expected, DG recordings in controls showed paired-pulse depression; however, paired-pulse facilitation was observed in DG and CA1 of young and old 3xTgAD mice. During stimulus trains both short-latency (presumably monosynaptic: 'direct' and long-latency (presumably polysynaptic: 're-entrant' responses were observed. Facilitation of direct responses was modest in 3xTgAD animals. However, re-entrant responses in DG and CA1 of young 3xTgAD mice developed earlier in the stimulus train and with larger amplitude when compared to controls. Old mice showed less DG paired-pulse depression and no evidence for re-entrance. In summary, DG and CA1 responses to low-frequency stimulation in all groups were comparable, suggesting no loss of synaptic connectivity in 3xTgAD mice. However, higher-frequency activation revealed complex change in synaptic excitability in DG and CA1 of 3xTgAD mice. In particular, short-term plasticity in DG and CA1 was facilitated in 3xTgAD mice, most evidently in younger animals. In addition, re-entrance was facilitated in young 3xTgAD mice. Overall, these data suggest that the episodic-like memory deficit in 3xTgAD mice

  7. Follow-up of patients with thyroglobulin-antibodies : Rising Tg-Ab trend is a risk factor for recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meer, Siegrid G A; Vorselaars, Wessel M C M; Kist, Jakob W; Stokkel, Marcel P M; de Keizer, Bart; Valk, Gerlof D; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Vriens, Menno R

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differentiated thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recurrences (5-20%) are the main reason for follow-up. Thyroglobulin (Tg) has proven to be an excellent disease marker, but thyroglobulin-antibodies (Tg-Ab) may interfere with Tg measurement, leading to over or

  8. TG2 regulates the heat-shock response by the post-translational modification of HSF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Federica; Villella, Valeria Rachela; D'Eletto, Manuela; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Esposito, Speranza; Ferrari, Eleonora; Monzani, Romina; Occhigrossi, Luca; Pagliarini, Vittoria; Sette, Claudio; Cozza, Giorgio; Barlev, Nikolai A; Falasca, Laura; Fimia, Gian Maria; Kroemer, Guido; Raia, Valeria; Maiuri, Luigi; Piacentini, Mauro

    2018-05-11

    Heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) is the master transcription factor that regulates the response to proteotoxic stress by controlling the transcription of many stress-responsive genes including the heat-shock proteins. Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism controlling the activation of HSF1. We demonstrate that transglutaminase type 2 (TG2), dependent on its protein disulphide isomerase activity, triggers the trimerization and activation of HSF1 regulating adaptation to stress and proteostasis impairment. In particular, we find that TG2 loss of function correlates with a defect in the nuclear translocation of HSF1 and in its DNA-binding ability to the HSP70 promoter. We show that the inhibition of TG2 restores the unbalance in HSF1-HSP70 pathway in cystic fibrosis (CF), a human disorder characterized by deregulation of proteostasis. The absence of TG2 leads to an increase of about 40% in CFTR function in a new experimental CF mouse model lacking TG2. Altogether, these results indicate that TG2 plays a key role in the regulation of cellular proteostasis under stressful cellular conditions through the modulation of the heat-shock response. © 2018 The Authors.

  9. A generic high-dose rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo, E-mail: Facundo.Ballester@uv.es [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa [Department of Medical and Health Sciences (IMH), Radiation Physics, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping SE-581 85, Sweden and Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm SE-171 76 (Sweden); Granero, Domingo [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Valencia E-46014 (Spain); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 (Australia); Mourtada, Firas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, Delaware 19713 (United States); Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares – IPEN-CNEN/SP, São Paulo 05508-000, Brazil and Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands); Zourari, Kyveli; Papagiannis, Panagiotis [Medical Physics Laboratory, Medical School, University of Athens, 75 MikrasAsias, Athens 115 27 (Greece); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Siebert, Frank-André [Clinic of Radiotherapy, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Kiel 24105 (Germany); Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) {sup 192}Ir source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic {sup 192}Ir source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra{sup ®} Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision ACUROS{sup TM}]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and PENELOPE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201){sup 3} voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR {sup 192}Ir source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by

  10. Long-term phenylbutyrate administration prevents memory deficits in Tg2576 mice by decreasing Abeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricobaraza, Ana; Cuadrado-Tejedor, Mar; Garcia-Osta, Ana

    2011-06-01

    Aberrations in protein folding, processing, and/or degradation are common features of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) is a well-known histone deacetylase inhibitor, which increases gene transcription of a number of genes, and also exerts neuroprotective effects. PBA acts as a chemical chaperone reducing the load of mutant or unfolded proteins during cellular stress. Previously, we reported that 5-week administration of PBA reinstated memory loss and dendritic spine densities in the Tg2576 mouse model of AD. In this study we reported that chronic administration of PBA, starting before the onset of disease symptoms (6 month-old) prevents age-related memory deficits in Tg2576 mice. The amelioration of the memory impairment is associated to a decrease in amyloid beta pathology and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that inflammation was reduced in PBA-treated animals. Together, the beneficial effects of PBA make it a promising agent for the prevention of AD.

  11. Investigation on caloric requirement of biomass pyrolysis using TG-DSC analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Fang [Institute of Utilization of Biomass, Shandong University of Technology, No. 12, Zhangzhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China)]. E-mail: hf@sdut.edu.cn; Yi Weiming [Institute of Utilization of Biomass, Shandong University of Technology, No. 12, Zhangzhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China); Bai Xueyuan [Institute of Utilization of Biomass, Shandong University of Technology, No. 12, Zhangzhou Road, Zibo, Shandong 255049 (China)

    2006-09-15

    The caloric requirement of biomass pyrolysis has an important influence on the course of the thermal conversion. However, precise data are difficult to achieve by the current calculation method because of the complexity of the process. A new method for achieving the caloric requirement of the process by integrating the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves was proposed after the simultaneous thermal analyzer (TG-DSC) and DSC curves were investigated. Experiments were conducted for wheat straw, cotton stalk, pine and peanut shell on a Netsch STA 449C analyzer. Powder samples were put into a platinum crucible with a lid on a high accuracy DSC-cp sample holder in the furnace and then heated from ambient temperature up to the maximum temperature of 973 K at the heating rate of 10 K/min in the analyzer. The product gases were swept away by 25 ml/min nitrogen. Mass changes (TG) and calorimetric effects (DSC) were recorded and analyzed. The process was investigated in detail through comparison of the DTG (differential thermogravimetric) and DSC curves of wheat straw. After the water influence in the DSC was eliminated, the relationship of the caloric requirement with the temperature of the aforementioned dry biomass was obtained by integrating the DSC curve. The results showed that 523 kJ, 459 kJ, 646 kJ and 385 kJ were required, respectively, to increase the temperature of 1 kg of dried wheat straw, cotton stalk, pine and peanut from 303 K to 673 K.

  12. Cheese whey protein recovery by ultrafiltration through transglutaminase (TG) catalysis whey protein cross-linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Qiong, Wang; Lan-Wei, Zhang; Xue, Han; Yi, Lu

    2017-01-15

    In whey ultrafiltration (UF) production, two main problems are whey protein recovery and membrane fouling. In this study, membrane coupling protein transglutaminase (TG) catalysis protein cross-linking was investigated under different conditions to find out the best treatment. We found that the optimal conditions for protein recovery involved catalyzing whey protein cross-linking with TG (40U/g whey proteins) at 40°C for 60min at pH 5.0. Under these conditions, the recovery rate was increased 15-20%, lactose rejection rate was decreased by 10%, and relative permeate flux was increase 30-40% compared to the sample without enzyme treatment (control). It was noticeable that the total resistance and cake resistance were decreased after enzyme catalysis. This was mainly due to the increased particle size and decreased zeta potential. Therefore, membrane coupling enzyme catalysis protein cross-linking is a potential means for further use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. SU-F-P-15: Report On AAPM TG 178 Gamma Knife Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, S [San Diego Medical Physics, Solana Beach, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers Conclusion: The full TG 178 report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics. Consultant to Elekta, Inc.

  14. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  15. TU-E-BRB-03: Overview of Proposed TG-132 Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, K. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is developing rapidly and is poised to substantially improve dose fusion accuracy for adaptive and retreatment planning and motion management and PET fusion to enhance contour delineation for treatment planning. However, DIR dose warping accuracy is difficult to quantify, in general, and particularly difficult to do so on a patient-specific basis. As clinical DIR options become more widely available, there is an increased need to understand the implications of incorporating DIR into clinical workflow. Several groups have assessed DIR accuracy in clinically relevant scenarios, but no comprehensive review material is yet available. This session will also discuss aspects of the AAPM Task Group 132 on the Use of Image Registration and Data Fusion Algorithms and Techniques in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning official report, which provides recommendations for DIR clinical use. We will summarize and compare various commercial DIR software options, outline successful clinical techniques, show specific examples with discussion of appropriate and inappropriate applications of DIR, discuss the clinical implications of DIR, provide an overview of current DIR error analysis research, review QA options and research phantom development and present TG-132 recommendations. Learning Objectives: Compare/contrast commercial DIR software and QA options Overview clinical DIR workflow for retreatment To understand uncertainties introduced by DIR Review TG-132 proposed recommendations.

  16. WE-A-18A-01: TG246 On Patient Dose From Diagnostic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supanich, M [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Dong, F [The Cleveland Clinic, Solon, OH (United States); Andersson, J [Umea University, Umea (Sweden); Pavlicek, W [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Bolch, W [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Fetterly, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Radiation dose from diagnostic and interventional radiations continues to be a focus of the regulatory, accreditation and standards organizations in the US and Europe. A Joint AAPM/EFOMP effort has been underway in the past year — having the goal to assist the clinical medical physicist with communicating optional and varied approaches in estimating (and validating) patient dose. In particular, the tools provided by DICOM Radiation Dose Structured Reports, either by themselves or as part of a networked data repository of dose related information are a rich source of actionable information. The tools of the medical physicist have evolved to include using DICOM data in meaningful ways to look at patient dose with respect to imaging practices. In addition to how accurate or reproducible a dose value is (totally necessary and our traditional workspace) it is now being asked how reproducible (patient to patient, device to device) are the delivered doses (new tasking)? Clinical medical physicists are best equipped to assist our radiology and technologist colleagues with this effort. The purpose of this session is to review the efforts of TG246 - bringing forward a summary content of the TG246 Report including specific dose descriptors for CT and Fluoroscopy — particularly in a focus of leveraging the RDSR as a means for monitoring good practices ALARA. Additionally, rapidly evolving technologies for more refined dose estimates are now in use. These will be presented as they look to having highly patient specific dose estimates in automated use.

  17. High Tg and fast curing epoxy-based anisotropic conductive paste for electronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeratitham, Waralee; Somwangthanaroj, Anongnat

    2016-03-01

    Herein, our main objective is to prepare the fast curing epoxy system with high glass transition temperature (Tg) by incorporating the multifunctional epoxy resin into the mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a major epoxy component and aromatic diamine as a hardener. Furthermore, the curing behavior as well as thermal and thermomechanical properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA). It was found that Tg obtained from tan δ of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system increased from 100 °C to 205 °C with the presence of 30 percentage by weight of multifunctional epoxy resin. Additionally, the isothermal DSC results showed that the multifunctional epoxy resin can accelerate the curing reaction of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system. Namely, a high degree of curing (˜90%) was achieved after a few minutes of curing at low temperature of 130 °C, owing to a large number of epoxy ring of multifunctional epoxy resin towards the active hydrogen atoms of aromatic diamine.

  18. Gender-Specific Neuroimmunoendocrine Response to Treadmill Exercise in 3xTg-AD Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Giménez-Llort

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3xTg-AD mouse develops a progressive Alzheimer's disease- (AD- like brain pathology that causes cognitive- and neuropsychiatric-like symptoms of dementia. Since its neuroimmunoendocrine axis is likewise impaired, this mouse is also useful for modelling complex age-related neurodegeneration. This study analyzed behavioral, physiological, neurochemical, pathological and immunoendocrine alterations in male and female 3xTg-AD mice and assayed the effects of a short therapy of forced physical exercise at the moderate pathology stage of 6 months of age. Gender effects were observed in most AD-related pathology and dysfunctions. Five weeks of treadmill training produced beneficial effects, such as the reduction of brain oxidative stress and GABA-A receptor dysfunction in males and improvement of sensorimotor function in females. In both sexes, exercise decreased the brain amyloid 42/40 ratio levels. The results highlight the importance of analyzing experimental therapies in both mouse model genders in order to improve our understanding of the disease and develop more appropriate therapies.

  19. SU-F-P-15: Report On AAPM TG 178 Gamma Knife Dosimetry and Quality Assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers Conclusion: The full TG 178 report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline of possible dosimetry protocols. The report will be reviewed by the AAPM Working Group on Recommendations for Radiotherapy External Beam Quality Assurance and then by the AAPM Science Council before publication in Medical Physics. Consultant to Elekta, Inc

  20. Cystatin C, CRP, log TG/HDLc and metabolic syndrome are associated with microalbuminuria in hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Rafaela do Socorro Souza e Silva [Pós-Graduação em Ciências Médicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Daniel França [Área de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Freitas, Eduardo [Departamento de Estatística, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil); Moura, Flavio José Dutra de; Rosa, Tânia Torres; Veiga, Joel Paulo Russomano, E-mail: joelprv@unb.br [Área de Clínica Médica, Nefrologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Brasília, Brasília, DF (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    In patients with systemic hypertension, microalbuminuria is a marker of endothelial damage and is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. To determine the factors that may lead to the occurrence of microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients with serum creatinine lower than 1.5 mg/dL. This cross-sectional study included 133 Brazilians with essential hypertension followed up at a hypertension outpatient clinic. Those with serum creatinine higher than 1.5 mg/dL, as well as those with diabetes mellitus, were excluded. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and GFR estimated by using the CKD-EPI formula were calculated. The serum levels of the following were assessed: CysC, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fasting glucose. Microalbuminuria was determined in 24-hour urine. Hypertensive patients were classified according to the presence of one or more criteria for metabolic syndrome. In a multiple regression analysis, the serum levels of CysC and CRP, the atherogenic index log TG/HDLc and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome were positively correlated with microalbuminuria (r{sup 2}: 0.277, p < 0.05). CysC, CRP, log TG/HDLc, and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome, regardless of serum creatinine, were associated with microalbuminuria, an early marker of kidney damage and cardiovascular risk in patients with essential hypertension.

  1. Cystatin C, CRP, log TG/HDLc and metabolic syndrome are associated with microalbuminuria in hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Rafaela do Socorro Souza e Silva; Vasconcelos, Daniel França; Freitas, Eduardo; Moura, Flavio José Dutra de; Rosa, Tânia Torres; Veiga, Joel Paulo Russomano

    2014-01-01

    In patients with systemic hypertension, microalbuminuria is a marker of endothelial damage and is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. To determine the factors that may lead to the occurrence of microalbuminuria in hypertensive patients with serum creatinine lower than 1.5 mg/dL. This cross-sectional study included 133 Brazilians with essential hypertension followed up at a hypertension outpatient clinic. Those with serum creatinine higher than 1.5 mg/dL, as well as those with diabetes mellitus, were excluded. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured, and body mass index (BMI) and GFR estimated by using the CKD-EPI formula were calculated. The serum levels of the following were assessed: CysC, creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein (CRP) and fasting glucose. Microalbuminuria was determined in 24-hour urine. Hypertensive patients were classified according to the presence of one or more criteria for metabolic syndrome. In a multiple regression analysis, the serum levels of CysC and CRP, the atherogenic index log TG/HDLc and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome were positively correlated with microalbuminuria (r 2 : 0.277, p < 0.05). CysC, CRP, log TG/HDLc, and the presence of three or more criteria for metabolic syndrome, regardless of serum creatinine, were associated with microalbuminuria, an early marker of kidney damage and cardiovascular risk in patients with essential hypertension

  2. Thermal Phenomena in the Friction Process of the TG15 - Hard Anodic Coating Couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Służałek G.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a one-dimensional model of heat conduction in a couple consisting of a cylinder made of a sliding plastic material, TG15, and a cuboid made of alloy AW 6061 coated with a hard anodic coating, where the couple is heated with the heat generated during friction. TG15 is a composite material based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE with a 15% graphite filler, used for piston rings in oil-free air-compressors. Measurement of temperature in the friction zone is extremely important for the understanding and analysis of the phenomena occurring therein. It is practically impossible to introduce a temperature sensor in such a place. Therefore, the interaction taking place in such a couple was modelled using numerical methods. In order to simplify and accelerate the calculations, a one-dimensional model and constant thermophysical parameters of the materials participating in friction were adopted. To solve the proposed model, the finite difference method was used (FDM. The resultant system of equations was solved by means of an explicit scheme.

  3. U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's results of the TG-53 experiment and field test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sachi V.; Morcos, Amir

    2009-05-01

    Herein is described the U.S. Army RDECOM-ARDEC's purpose and series of activities conducted at the 2008 NATO SET-093 TG-53 experiment and field test. The overall purpose of the field test as stated by SET-093 panel was to provide a baseline test capable of providing relevant scenarios and data regarding a variety of impulsive generated acoustic events. As organized, the field experiment also allowed the room o study sensor interoperability across multiple platforms and multi-national users via the spider communication framework/reporting structure. This multinational network maintained by the host ETBS with a standardized messaging format with specific goals for each participating organization. ARDEC's role and purpose for the test was to provide situational awareness via the Spider and associated messaging format to the ETBS command center while continuing to gather unique acoustic data from various vantage points. ARDEC had several deliverables for the TG-53 field experiment derived from the mission and spirit of the field test. The most relevant deliverable was to demonstrate sensor interoperability via the Spider network and provide situational awareness by describing the said mortar/artillery events. The second purpose revolved around a relevant environment algorithm validation of the muzzle blast discrimination for future UGS transition in particular the UTAMS II. The algorithm validation information remained internal to the specific data acquisition system and not broadcasted out on the Spider network. The TG-53 field experiments provided the added opportunity to further test and refine the algorithm based on the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and multiresolution analysis. These techniques are used to classify and reliably discriminates between launch and impact artillery and/or mortar events via acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics are found within the acoustic signatures since impact events emphasize concussive and

  4. Mushroom acidic glycosphingolipid induction of cytokine secretion from murine T cells and proliferation of NK1.1 α/β TCR-double positive cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hirofumi; Itonori, Saki; Sugita, Mutsumi; Nakamura, Kimihide; Ohba, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Akemi; Kushi, Yasunori

    2008-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-4 regulate many types of immune responses. Here we report that acidic glycosphingolipids (AGLs) of Hypsizigus marmoreus and Pleurotus eryngii induced secretion of IFN- γ and IL-4 from T cells in a CD11c-positive cell-dependent manner similar to that of α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and isoglobotriaosylceramide (iGb3), although activated T cells by AGLs showed less secretion of cytokine than those activated by α-GalCer. In addition, stimulation of these mushroom AGLs induced proliferation of NK1.1 α/β TCR-double positive cells in splenocytes. Administration of a mixture of α-GalCer and AGLs affected the stimulation of α-GalCer and generally induced a subtle Th1 bias for splenocytes but induced an extreme Th2 bias for thymocytes. These results suggested that edible mushroom AGLs contribute to immunomodulation

  5. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1997-05-23

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-109. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241 C-109 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices.

  6. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-101: best-basis inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a preliminary Tank Characterization Report (TCR). It only contains the current best-basis inventory (Appendix D) for single-shell tank 241-TX-101. No TCRs have been previously issued for this tank, and current core sample analyses are not available. The best-basis inventory, therefore, is based on an engineering assessment of waste type, process flowsheet data, early sample data, and/or other available information. The Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes describes standard methodology used to derive the tank-by-tank best-basis inventories. This preliminary TCR will be updated using this same methodology when additional data on tank contents become available

  7. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TY-102: best-basis inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Place, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a preliminary Tank Characterization Report (TCR). It only contains the current best-basis inventory (Appendix D) for single-shell tank 241-TY-102. No TCRs have been previously issued for this tank, and current core sample analyses are not available. The best-basis inventory, therefore, is based on an engineering assessment of waste type, process flowsheet data, early sample data, and/or other available information. The Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes describes standard methodology used to derive the tank-by-tank best-basis inventories. This preliminary TCR will be updated using this same methodology when additional data on tank contents become available

  8. Preliminary tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-113: best-basis inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Place, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    This document is a preliminary Tank Characterization Report (TCR). It only contains the current best-basis inventory (Appendix D) for single-shell tank 241-TX-113. No TCRs have been previously issued for this tank, and current core sample analyses are not available. The best-basis inventory, therefore, is based on an engineering assessment of waste type, process flowsheet data, early sample data, and/or other available information. The Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes describes standard methodology used to derive the tank-by-tank best-basis inventories. This preliminary TCR will be updated using this same methodology when additional data on tank contents become available

  9. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-109

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1997-01-01

    One of the major functions of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize wastes in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis, along with other available information about a tank, are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-C-109. The objectives of this report are: (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241 C-109 waste; and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. The response to technical issues is summarized in Section 2.0, and the best-basis inventory estimate is presented in Section 3.0. Recommendations regarding safety status and additional sampling needs are provided in Section 4.0. Supporting data and information are contained in the appendices

  10. Defective TCR stimulation in anergized type 2 T helper cells correlates with abrogated p56(lck) and ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, A; Akdis, C A; Akdis, M; Simon, H U; Blaser, K

    1997-07-01

    Development of IgE-mediated allergic conditions is dependent on the secretion of a Th2 cytokine pattern, including IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13. The induction of anergy would be one mechanism to abrogate cytokine secretion by Th2 cells, which may be pivotal to the allergic response. We demonstrate here that incubation of cloned human CD4+ phospholipase A2 (PLA)-specific Th2 cells with antigenic peptide, in the absence of professional APC, results in a state of nonresponsiveness. The anergic T cells failed to proliferate or secrete IL-4 in response to optimal stimulation with PLA and autologous, professional APC. Secretion of IL-5 and IL-13, however, was only partially inhibited. The anergic state of the Th2 cells was not associated with CD3 or CD28 down-regulation. However, anergy did appear to be closely related to alterations in signaling pathways, mediated through the TCR, of the cells. In contrast to untreated Th2 cells, anergized Th2 cells failed to respond to anti-CD3 mAb with either increased tyrosine kinase activity or increased levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of p56(lck) or ZAP70. A strong and sustained intracellular calcium flux, observed in untreated Th2 cells in response to anti-CD3 mAb, was absent in anergic Th2 cells. Furthermore, the induction of anergy seems to represent an active process, associated with increased levels of basal tyrosine kinase activity, cytokine production, and CD25 up-regulation in anergic Th2 cells. Together, our results indicate that anergy in Th2 cells is associated with defective transmembrane signaling through the TCR.

  11. The binding activity of Mel-18 at the Il17a promoter is regulated by the integrated signals of the TCR and polarizing cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod-Dvorai, Reut; Jacob, Eyal; Boyko, Yulia; Avni, Orly

    2011-08-01

    We have previously shown that in differentiated T-helper (Th)1 and Th2 cells, polycomb group (PcG) proteins are associated differentially with the promoters of the signature cytokine genes. The correlation of the binding activity of PcG proteins with gene expression is unusual, since they are well known as epigenetic regulators that maintain transcriptional silencing. Here we show that in Th17 cells, the more phenotypically flexible Th lineage, the PcG proteins Mel-18 and less strikingly Ezh2 are associated differentially with the Il17a promoter. Using the RNAi approach, we found that Mel-18 and Ezh2 positively regulate the expression of Il17a and Il17f. The inducible binding of Mel-18 and Ezh2 at the Il17a promoter was dependent on signaling pathways downstream of the TCR. However, a continuous presence of TGF-β, the cytokine that is necessary to maintain Il17a expression, was required to preserve the binding activity of Mel-18, but not of Ezh2, following restimulation. The binding of Mel-18 at the Il17a promoter was correlated with the recruitment of the lineage-specifying transcription factor RORγt. Altogether, our results suggest that in Th17 cells the TCR and polarizing cytokines synergize to modulate the binding activity of Mel-18 at the Il17a promoter, and consequently to facilitate Il17a expression. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Structure investigations on zirconium phosphate preparates by means of DTA, ETA, and TG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbell, J.D.; Specht, S.; Born, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    The simultanous DTA, ETA and TG inorganic ion exchanger based on zirconium phosphate enables the clear interpretation of the effects occuring. In particular it can be seen that the fast transition in amorphous preparates at high temperature of a badly defined form of pyrophosphate into the cubic crystalline substances, however a measurable energy release by means of DTA is not observed due to the slight mobility of the atoms in the crystal lattice. This effect on the other hand may be seen using ETA. In addition, an exothermal reaction occuring in some preparates, especially in cation charged ones, was traced back to the forming of part-crystalline structures which could be especially fast and sensitively characterized using DTA. (orig.) [de

  13. Solid-phase microextraction for bioconcentration studies according to OECD TG 305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duering, Rolf-Alexander; Boehm, Leonard [Land Use and Nutrition (IFZ) Justus Liebig University Giessen, Institute of Soil Science and Soil Conservation, Research Centre for BioSystems, Giessen (Germany); Schlechtriem, Christian [Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), Schmallenberg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    An important aim of the European Community Regulation on chemicals and their safe use is the identification of (very) persistent, (very) bioaccumulative, and toxic substances. In other regulatory chemical safety assessments (pharmaceuticals, biocides, pesticides), the identification of such (very) persistent, (very) bioaccumulative, and toxic substances is of increasing importance. Solid-phase microextraction is especially capable of extracting total water concentrations as well as the freely dissolved fraction of analytes in the water phase, which is available for bioconcentration in fish. However, although already well established in environmental analyses to determine and quantify analytes mainly in aqueous matrices, solid-phase microextraction is still a rather unusual method in regulatory ecotoxicological research. Here, the potential benefits and drawbacks of solid-phase microextraction are discussed as an analytical routine approach for aquatic bioconcentration studies according to OECD TG 305, with a special focus on the testing of hydrophobic organic compounds characterized by log K{sub OW}> 5. (orig.)

  14. Synthesis, characterization and TG-DSC study of cadmium halides adducts with caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Robson F. de; Silva, Ademir O. da; Silva, Umberto G. da

    2003-11-28

    The synthesis, characterization and TG-DSC study of the compounds CdX{sub 2}{center_dot}ncaff, for which X: Cl, Br and I; n=1 and 2 and caff: caffeine is reported. It is verified that caffeine is coordinated through more than one coordination site, despite the fact that the nitrogen of the imidazole ring is the main coordination site. The following thermal stability trend is observed: Cl>Br>I and monoadducts are more stable than bisadducts. The thermal degradation (td) enthalpies have the values (kJ mol{sup -1}): 58.2 and 71.5; 74.9 and 91.4; 31.1 and 47.5 for Cl, Br and I mono and bisadducts, respectively.

  15. Investigation of hydropyrolysis behaviour of Shenmu macerals by TG-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q.; Li, W.; Chen, H.; Li, B. [Analysis and Test Center, Shandong Academy of Sciences, Jinan (China)

    2004-12-01

    The hydropyrolysis characteristics of Shenmu coal and its macerals were investigated using TG-151 thermo balance, and the evolved gases were on-line analyzed by mass spectroscopy. The results show that vitrinite has higher volatile yield, maximum weight loss rate and lower peak temperature. Vitrinite produces more C{sub 1} - C{sub 4} lighter hydrocarbons and C{sub 5} - C{sub 8} aromatic hydrocarbons than inertinite. Vitrinite has a higher water yield, which is consistent with that the vitrinite has higher phenolic-OH content. The difference in the evolved gases and water between pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis shows the effect of hydrogenation and hydrocracking during hydropyolysis. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Dynamic traffic grooming with Spectrum Engineering (TG-SE) in flexible grid optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaosong; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jiawei; Wang, Jianping; Zhang, Guoying; Chen, Xue; Zhang, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Flexible grid has emerged as an evolutionary technology to satisfy the ever increasing demand for higher spectrum efficiency and operational flexibility. To optimize the spectrum resource utilization, this paper introduces the concept of Spectrum Engineering in flex-grid optical networks. The sliceable optical transponder has been proposed to offload IP traffic to the optical layer and reduce the number of IP router ports and transponders. We discuss the impact of sliceable transponder in traffic grooming and propose several traffic-grooming schemes with Spectrum Engineering (TG-SE). Our results show that there is a tradeoff among different traffic grooming policies, which should be adopted based on the network operator's objectives. The proposed traffic grooming with Spectrum Engineering schemes can reduce OPEX as well as increase spectrum efficiency by efficiently utilizing the bandwidth variability and capability of sliceable optical transponders.

  17. Association between MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism and the risk of bladder cancer: new data in a Chinese population and an updated meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie LG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Linguo Xie,1,2,* Yan Sun,2,* Tao Chen,1,2,* Dawei Tian,1,2 Yujuan Li,3 Yu Zhang,1,2 Na Ding,2 Zhonghua Shen,1,2 Hao Xu,1,2 Xuewu Nian,4 Nan Sha,1,2 Ruifa Han,1,2 Hailong Hu,1,2 Changli Wu1,2 Objective: Human murine double minute 2 protein (MDM2 is mainly a negative regulator of p53 tumor suppressor pathway. We aimed to investigate the association between MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism and bladder cancer risk. Methods: A total of 535 bladder cancer patients and 649 health controls were recruited for our study. MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction method. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between the genotype and susceptibility of bladder cancer. Kaplan–Meier estimates and log-rank test were obtained to analyze the association between the genotype and risk of recrudesce in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer patients. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was fitted to identify independent prognostic factors. To further investigate the association, we conducted a meta-analysis including six studies. Results: The frequency of the MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism showed no significant difference between cases and controls (all P>0.05. In the stratification analysis, the results showed that G allele carriers were prone to have a significant decrease in risk of low-grade bladder cancer (adjusted odds ratio: 0.613, 95% confidence interval: 0.427–0.881, and G variant was associated with a significantly reduced risk of recurrence in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer patients with or without chemotherapy (P<0.05. The results of the meta-analysis showed that G allele and GG genotype of MDM2 SNP309 polymorphism were significantly associated with increased risk of bladder cancer in Caucasians (both P<0.05, and no association was observed in total populations and Asians (P>0.05. Conclusion: MDM2 SNP309 T>G polymorphism has no influence on bladder cancer risk in Asians, but

  18. Technical Report: TG-142 compliant and comprehensive quality assurance tests for respiratory gating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, Kyle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Rong, Yi, E-mail: yrong@ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To develop and establish a comprehensive gating commissioning and quality assurance procedure in compliance with TG-142. Methods: Eight Varian TrueBeam Linacs were used for this study. Gating commissioning included an end-to-end test and baseline establishment. The end-to-end test was performed using a CIRS dynamic thoracic phantom with a moving cylinder inside the lung, which was used for carrying both optically simulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 films while the target is moving, for a point dose check and 2D profile check. In addition, baselines were established for beam-on temporal delay and calibration of the surrogate, for both megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) beams. A motion simulation device (MotionSim) was used to provide periodic motion on a platform, in synchronizing with a surrogate motion. The overall accuracy and uncertainties were analyzed and compared. Results: The OSLD readings were within 5% compared to the planned dose (within measurement uncertainty) for both phase and amplitude gated deliveries. Film results showed less than 3% agreement to the predicted dose with a standard sinusoid motion. The gate-on temporal accuracy was averaged at 139 ± 10 ms for MV beams and 92 ± 11 ms for kV beams. The temporal delay of the surrogate motion depends on the motion speed and was averaged at 54.6 ± 3.1 ms for slow, 24.9 ± 2.9 ms for intermediate, and 23.0 ± 20.1 ms for fast speed. Conclusions: A comprehensive gating commissioning procedure was introduced for verifying the output accuracy and establishing the temporal accuracy baselines with respiratory gating. The baselines are needed for routine quality assurance tests, as suggested by TG-142.

  19. AbetaPP induces cdk5-dependent tau hyperphosphorylation in transgenic mice Tg2576.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otth, Carola; Concha, Ilona I; Arendt, Thomas; Stieler, Jens; Schliebs, Reinhard; González-Billault, Christian; Maccioni, Ricardo B

    2002-10-01

    Previous studies of Abeta-induced neuronal damage of hippocampal cells in culture have provided strong evidence that deregulation of the Cdk5/p35 kinase system is involved in the neurodegeneration pathway. Cdk5 inhibitors and antisense probes neuroprotected hippocampal cells against the neurotoxic action of Abeta. To further investigate the mechanisms underlying the participation of Cdk5 in neuronal degeneration, the transgenic mouse containing the Swedish mutations, Tg2576, was used as an animal model. Immunocytochemical studies using anti-Abeta(1-17) antibody evidenced the presence of labeled small-clustered core plaques in the hippocampus and cortex of 18-month-old transgenic mice brains. The loss of granular cells without a compressed appearance was detected in the vicinity of the cores in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Immunostaining of Tg2576 brain sections with antibodies AT8, PHF1 and GFAP labeled punctuate dystrophic neurites in and around the amyloid core. Reactive astrogliosis around the plaques in the hippocampus was also observed. Studies at the molecular level showed differences in the expression of the truncated Cdk5 activator p25 in the transgenic animal, as compared with wild type controls. However no differences in Cdk5 levels were detected, thus corroborating previous cellular findings. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylated tau epitopes were substantially increased as assessed with the AT8 and PHF1 antibodies, in agreement with the observation of a p25 increase in the transgenic animal. These observations strongly suggest that the increased exposure of Alzheimer's type tau phosphoepitopes in the transgenic mice correlated with deregulation of Cdk5 leading to an increase in p25 levels. These studies also provide further evidence on the links between extraneuronal amyloid deposition and tau pathology.

  20. The polyphenol oleuropein aglycone protects TgCRND8 mice against Aß plaque pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Grossi

    Full Text Available The claimed beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet include prevention of several age-related dysfunctions including neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer-like pathology. These effects have been related to the protection against cognitive decline associated with aging and disease by a number of polyphenols found in red wine and extra virgin olive oil. The double transgenic TgCRND8 mice (overexpressing the Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein, aged 1.5 and 4, and age-matched wild type control mice were used to examine in vivo the effects of 8 weeks dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone (50 mg/kg of diet, the main polyphenol found in extra virgin olive oil. We report here that dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone strongly improves the cognitive performance of young/middle-aged TgCRND8 mice, a model of amyloid-ß deposition, respect to age-matched littermates with un-supplemented diet. Immunofluorescence analysis of cerebral tissue in oleuropein aglycone-fed transgenic mice showed remarkably reduced ß-amyloid levels and plaque deposits, which appeared less compact and "fluffy"; moreover, microglia migration to the plaques for phagocytosis and a remarkable reduction of the astrocyte reaction were evident. Finally, oleuropein aglycone-fed mice brain displayed an astonishingly intense autophagic reaction, as shown by the increase of autophagic markers expression and of lysosomal activity. Data obtained with cultured cells confirmed the latter evidence, suggesting mTOR regulation by oleuropein aglycone. Our results support, and provide mechanistic insights into, the beneficial effects against Alzheimer-associated neurodegeneration of a polyphenol enriched in the extra virgin olive oil, a major component of the Mediterranean diet.

  1. TH-B-204-03: TG-199: Implanted Markers for Radiation Treatment Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Implanted markers as target surrogates have been widely used for treatment verification, as they provide safe and reliable monitoring of the inter- and intra-fractional target motion. The rapid advancement of technology requires a critical review and recommendation for the usage of implanted surrogates in current field. The symposium, also reporting an update of AAPM TG 199 - Implanted Target Surrogates for Radiation Treatment Verification, will be focusing on all clinical aspects of using the implanted target surrogates for treatment verification and related issues. A wide variety of markers available in the market will be first reviewed, including radiopaque markers, MRI compatible makers, non-migrating coils, surgical clips and electromagnetic transponders etc. The pros and cons of each kind will be discussed. The clinical applications of implanted surrogates will be presented based on different anatomical sites. For the lung, we will discuss gated treatments and 2D or 3D real-time fiducial tracking techniques. For the prostate, we will be focusing on 2D-3D, 3D-3D matching and electromagnetic transponder based localization techniques. For the liver, we will review techniques when patients are under gating, shallow or free breathing condition. We will review techniques when treating challenging breast cancer as deformation may occur. Finally, we will summarize potential issues related to the usage of implanted target surrogates with TG 199 recommendations. A review of fiducial migration and fiducial derived target rotation in different disease sites will be provided. The issue of target deformation, especially near the diaphragm, and related suggestions will be also presented and discussed. Learning Objectives: Knowledge of a wide variety of markers Knowledge of their application for different disease sites Understand of issues related to these applications Z. Wang: Research funding support from Brainlab AG Q. Xu: Consultant for Accuray; Q. Xu, I am a consultant

  2. TH-B-204-00: Implanted Markers for Radiation Therapy and TG 199 Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Implanted markers as target surrogates have been widely used for treatment verification, as they provide safe and reliable monitoring of the inter- and intra-fractional target motion. The rapid advancement of technology requires a critical review and recommendation for the usage of implanted surrogates in current field. The symposium, also reporting an update of AAPM TG 199 - Implanted Target Surrogates for Radiation Treatment Verification, will be focusing on all clinical aspects of using the implanted target surrogates for treatment verification and related issues. A wide variety of markers available in the market will be first reviewed, including radiopaque markers, MRI compatible makers, non-migrating coils, surgical clips and electromagnetic transponders etc. The pros and cons of each kind will be discussed. The clinical applications of implanted surrogates will be presented based on different anatomical sites. For the lung, we will discuss gated treatments and 2D or 3D real-time fiducial tracking techniques. For the prostate, we will be focusing on 2D-3D, 3D-3D matching and electromagnetic transponder based localization techniques. For the liver, we will review techniques when patients are under gating, shallow or free breathing condition. We will review techniques when treating challenging breast cancer as deformation may occur. Finally, we will summarize potential issues related to the usage of implanted target surrogates with TG 199 recommendations. A review of fiducial migration and fiducial derived target rotation in different disease sites will be provided. The issue of target deformation, especially near the diaphragm, and related suggestions will be also presented and discussed. Learning Objectives: Knowledge of a wide variety of markers Knowledge of their application for different disease sites Understand of issues related to these applications Z. Wang: Research funding support from Brainlab AG Q. Xu: Consultant for Accuray; Q. Xu, I am a consultant

  3. Furoquinoline Alkaloids and Methoxyflavones from the Stem Bark of Melicope madagascariensis (Baker T.G. Hartley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent E. Rasamison

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Melicope madagascariensis (Rutaceae is an endemic plant species of Madagascar that was first classified as a member of the genus Euodia J. R. & G. Forst (Rutaceae under the scientific name Euodia madagascariensis Baker. Based on morphological characteristics, Thomas Gordon Hartley taxonomically revised E. madagascariensis Baker to be M. madagascariensis (Baker T.G. Hartley. Chemotaxonomical studies have long been used to help the identification and confirmation of taxonomical classification of plant species and botanicals. Aiming to find more evidences to support the taxonomical revision performed on E. madagascariensis, we carried out phytochemical investigation of two samples of the plant. Fractionation of the ethanol extracts prepared from two stem bark samples of M. madagascariensis (Baker T.G. Hartley led to the isolation of seven known furoquinoline alkaloids 1–7 and two known methoxyflavones 8 and 9. The presence of furoquinoline alkaloids and methoxyflavones in the title species is in agreement with its taxonomic transfer from Euodia to Melicope. Antiprotozoal evaluation of the isolated compounds showed that 6-methoxy-7-hydroxydictamnine (heliparvifoline, 3 showed weak antimalarial activity (IC50 = 35 µM against the chloroquine-resistant strain Dd2 of Plasmodium falciparum. Skimmianine (4 displayed moderate cytotoxicity with IC50 value of 1.5 µM against HT-29 colon cancer cell line whereas 3,5-dihydroxy-3′,4′,7-trimethoxyflavone (9 was weakly active in the same assay (IC50 = 13.9 µM. Graphical Abstract

  4. Technical Report: TG-142 compliant and comprehensive quality assurance tests for respiratory gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Kyle; Rong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and establish a comprehensive gating commissioning and quality assurance procedure in compliance with TG-142. Methods: Eight Varian TrueBeam Linacs were used for this study. Gating commissioning included an end-to-end test and baseline establishment. The end-to-end test was performed using a CIRS dynamic thoracic phantom with a moving cylinder inside the lung, which was used for carrying both optically simulated luminescence detectors (OSLDs) and Gafchromic EBT2 films while the target is moving, for a point dose check and 2D profile check. In addition, baselines were established for beam-on temporal delay and calibration of the surrogate, for both megavoltage (MV) and kilovoltage (kV) beams. A motion simulation device (MotionSim) was used to provide periodic motion on a platform, in synchronizing with a surrogate motion. The overall accuracy and uncertainties were analyzed and compared. Results: The OSLD readings were within 5% compared to the planned dose (within measurement uncertainty) for both phase and amplitude gated deliveries. Film results showed less than 3% agreement to the predicted dose with a standard sinusoid motion. The gate-on temporal accuracy was averaged at 139 ± 10 ms for MV beams and 92 ± 11 ms for kV beams. The temporal delay of the surrogate motion depends on the motion speed and was averaged at 54.6 ± 3.1 ms for slow, 24.9 ± 2.9 ms for intermediate, and 23.0 ± 20.1 ms for fast speed. Conclusions: A comprehensive gating commissioning procedure was introduced for verifying the output accuracy and establishing the temporal accuracy baselines with respiratory gating. The baselines are needed for routine quality assurance tests, as suggested by TG-142

  5. TH-B-204-03: TG-199: Implanted Markers for Radiation Treatment Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Implanted markers as target surrogates have been widely used for treatment verification, as they provide safe and reliable monitoring of the inter- and intra-fractional target motion. The rapid advancement of technology requires a critical review and recommendation for the usage of implanted surrogates in current field. The symposium, also reporting an update of AAPM TG 199 - Implanted Target Surrogates for Radiation Treatment Verification, will be focusing on all clinical aspects of using the implanted target surrogates for treatment verification and related issues. A wide variety of markers available in the market will be first reviewed, including radiopaque markers, MRI compatible makers, non-migrating coils, surgical clips and electromagnetic transponders etc. The pros and cons of each kind will be discussed. The clinical applications of implanted surrogates will be presented based on different anatomical sites. For the lung, we will discuss gated treatments and 2D or 3D real-time fiducial tracking techniques. For the prostate, we will be focusing on 2D-3D, 3D-3D matching and electromagnetic transponder based localization techniques. For the liver, we will review techniques when patients are under gating, shallow or free breathing condition. We will review techniques when treating challenging breast cancer as deformation may occur. Finally, we will summarize potential issues related to the usage of implanted target surrogates with TG 199 recommendations. A review of fiducial migration and fiducial derived target rotation in different disease sites will be provided. The issue of target deformation, especially near the diaphragm, and related suggestions will be also presented and discussed. Learning Objectives: Knowledge of a wide variety of markers Knowledge of their application for different disease sites Understand of issues related to these applications Z. Wang: Research funding support from Brainlab AG Q. Xu: Consultant for Accuray; Q. Xu, I am a consultant

  6. TH-B-204-00: Implanted Markers for Radiation Therapy and TG 199 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Implanted markers as target surrogates have been widely used for treatment verification, as they provide safe and reliable monitoring of the inter- and intra-fractional target motion. The rapid advancement of technology requires a critical review and recommendation for the usage of implanted surrogates in current field. The symposium, also reporting an update of AAPM TG 199 - Implanted Target Surrogates for Radiation Treatment Verification, will be focusing on all clinical aspects of using the implanted target surrogates for treatment verification and related issues. A wide variety of markers available in the market will be first reviewed, including radiopaque markers, MRI compatible makers, non-migrating coils, surgical clips and electromagnetic transponders etc. The pros and cons of each kind will be discussed. The clinical applications of implanted surrogates will be presented based on different anatomical sites. For the lung, we will discuss gated treatments and 2D or 3D real-time fiducial tracking techniques. For the prostate, we will be focusing on 2D-3D, 3D-3D matching and electromagnetic transponder based localization techniques. For the liver, we will review techniques when patients are under gating, shallow or free breathing condition. We will review techniques when treating challenging breast cancer as deformation may occur. Finally, we will summarize potential issues related to the usage of implanted target surrogates with TG 199 recommendations. A review of fiducial migration and fiducial derived target rotation in different disease sites will be provided. The issue of target deformation, especially near the diaphragm, and related suggestions will be also presented and discussed. Learning Objectives: Knowledge of a wide variety of markers Knowledge of their application for different disease sites Understand of issues related to these applications Z. Wang: Research funding support from Brainlab AG Q. Xu: Consultant for Accuray; Q. Xu, I am a consultant

  7. ETS transcription factor ELF5 induces lumen formation in a 3D model of mammary morphogenesis and its expression is inhibited by Jak2 inhibitor TG101348.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chean, Jennifer; Chen, Charng-Jui; Shively, John E

    2017-10-01

    The loss of expression of a single gene can revert normal tissue to a malignant phenotype. For example, while normal breast has high lumenal expression of CEACAM1, the majority of breast cancers exhibit the early loss of this gene with the concurrent loss of their lumenal phenotype. MCF7 cells that lack CEACAM1 expression and fail to form lumena in 3D culture, regain the normal phenotype when transfected with CEACAM1. In order to probe the mechanism of this gain of function, we treated these cells with the clinically relevant Jak2 inhibitor TG101348 (TG), expecting that disruption of the prolactin receptor signaling pathway would interfere with the positive effects of transfection of MCF7 cells with CEACAM1. Indeed, lumen formation was inhibited, resulting in the down regulation of a set of genes, likely involved in the complex process of lumen formation. As expected, inhibition of the expression of many of these genes also inhibited lumen formation, confirming their involvement in a single pathway. Among the genes identified by the inhibition assay, ETS transcription factor ELF5 stood out, since it has been identified as a master regulator of mammary morphogenesis, and is associated with prolactin receptor signaling. When ELF5 was transfected into the parental MCF7 cells that lack CEACAM1, lumen formation was restored, indicating that ELF5 can replace CEACAM1 in this model system of lumenogenesis. We conclude that the event(s) that led to the loss of expression of CEACAM1 is epistatic in that multiple genes associated with a critical pathway were affected, but that restoration of the normal phenotype can be achieved with reactivation of certain genes at various nodal points in tissue morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-cell analysis reveals a link between CD3- and CD59-mediated signaling pathways in Jurkat T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipp, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is a key signal during T cell activation and is commonly used as a read-out parameter for stimulation of T cell signaling. Upon T cell stimulation a variety of calcium signals is produced by individual cells of the T cell population and the type of calcium signal strongly influences cell fate decisions. The heterogeneous nature of T cells is masked in ensemble measurements, which highlights the need for single-cell measurements. In this study we used single-cell calcium measurements in Jurkat cells to investigate signaling pathways, which are triggered by different proteins, namely CD3 and CD59. By application of an automated cluster algorithm the presented assay provides unbiased analysis of a large data set of individual calcium time traces generated by the whole cell population. By using this method we could demonstrate that the Jurkat population generates heterogeneous calcium signals in a stimulus-dependent manner. Furthermore, our data revealed the existence of a link between CD3- and CD59-mediated signaling pathways. Single-cell calcium measurements in Jurkat cells expressing different levels of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex indicated that CD59-mediated calcium signaling is critically dependent on TCR surface expression levels. In addition, triggering CD59-mediated calcium signaling resulted in down-regulation of TCR surface expression levels, which is known to happen upon direct TCR triggering too. Moreover, by using siRNA-mediated protein knock-downs and protein knock-out Jurkat mutants we could show that CD3- and CD59-mediated calcium signaling require identical key proteins. We therefore explored by which mechanism CD59-mediated signaling couples into TCR-mediated signaling. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments and live-cell protein-protein interaction assays provided no evidence of a direct physical interaction between CD3- and CD59-mediated signaling pathways

  9. T-cell receptor repertoire of human peripheral CD161hiTRAV1-2+ MAIT cells revealed by next generation sequencing and single cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Kathrin; Beltrán, Eduardo; Moser, Markus; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Dornmair, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are a T-cell subset that expresses a conserved TRAV1-2 (Vα7.2) T-cell receptor (TCR) chain and the surface marker CD161. They are involved in the defence against microbes as they recognise small organic molecules of microbial origin that are presented by the non-classical MHC molecule 1 (MR1). MAIT cells express a semi-restricted TCR α chain with TRAV1-2 preferentially linked to TRAJ33, TRAJ12, or TRAJ20 which pairs with a limited set of β chains. To investigate the TCR repertoire of human CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) T cells in depth we analysed the α and β chains of this T-cell subset by next generation sequencing. Concomitantly we analysed 132 paired α and β chains from single cells to assess the αβ pairing preferences. We found that the CD161(hi)TRAV1-2(+) TCR repertoire in addition to the typical MAIT TCRs further contains polyclonal elements reminiscent of classical αβ T cells. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cistatina C, PCR, Log TG/HDLc e Sindrome Metabolica estao Relacionados a Microalbuminuria na Hipertensao

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela do Socorro Souza e Silva Moura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: Em pacientes com hipertensão arterial sistêmica, a microalbuminúria é um marcador de lesão endotelial e está associada a um risco aumentado de doença cardiovascular. Objetivo: O objetivo do presente estudo foi determinar os fatores que influenciam a ocorrência de microalbumiúria em pacientes hipertensos com creatinina sérica menor que 1,5 mg/dL. Métodos: Foram incluídos no estudo 133 pacientes brasileiros atendidos em um ambulatório multidisciplinar para hipertensos. Pacientes com creatinina sérica maior do que 1,5 mg/dL e aqueles com diabete mellitus foram excluídos do estudo. A pressão arterial sistólica e diastólica foi aferida. O índice de massa corporal (IMC e a taxa de filtração glomerular estimada pela fórmula CKD-EPI foram calculados. Em um estudo transversal, creatinina, cistatina C, colesterol total, HDL colesterol, LDL colesterol, triglicerídeos, proteína C-reativa (PCR e glicose foram mensurados em amostra de sangue. A microalbuminúria foi determinada na urina colhida em 24 horas. Os hipertensos foram classificados pela presença de um ou mais critérios para síndrome metabólica. Resultados: Em análise de regressão múltipla, os níveis séricos de cistatina C, PCR, o índice aterogênico log TG/HDLc e a presença de três ou mais critérios para síndrome metabólica foram positivamente correlacionados com a microalbuminuria (r2: 0,277; p < 0,05. Conclusão: Cistatina C, PCR, log TG/HDLc e presença de três ou mais critérios para síndrome metabólica, independentemente da creatinina sérica, foram associados com a microalbuminúria, um marcador precoce de lesão renal e de risco cardiovascular em pacientes com hipertensão arterial essencial.

  11. The relationship between the Tg depression and the speeding up of physical aging in polystyrene/gold nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Virginie M.; Cangialosi, Daniele; Alegria, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2011-03-01

    The effect of gold nanoparticles on the segmental dynamics, glass transition (Tg) and physical aging of polystyrene (PS) was studied in PS/Gold nanocomposites samples containing 5 and 15 wt.% of 60 nm spherical gold nanoparticles, surface-treated with thiolated-PS. While the segmental dynamics of PS, as assessed by broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), was found to be unchanged in presence of gold nanoparticles, the calorimetric Tg of PS was shown to decrease with increasing the amount of nanoparticles in the samples. Furthermore, the physical aging of PS, monitored by measuring the enthalpy relaxation below Tg by means of DSC, was shown to speed up with increasing the nanoparticles weight fraction, i.e. the amount of PS/Gold interface in the hybrid material. Thus, the main conclusion of our work is that PS molecular mobility and out-of-equilibrium dynamics are decoupled in these nanocomposites. The significant effect of the amount of PS/Gold interface on both the physical aging rate of PS and the calorimetric Tg depression are quantitatively accounted for by a model based on the diffusion of free volume holes towards polymer interfaces, with a diffusion coefficient depending only on the molecular mobility.

  12. No Effect of Resveratrol on VLDL-TG Kinetics and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Men with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marianne K; Nellemann, Birgitte; Bibby, Bo Martin

    2018-01-01

    The present study assess long-term effects of high-dose Resveratrol (RSV) on basal and insulin-mediated very low-desity lipoprotein triglyceride (VLDL-TG), palmitate and glucose kinetics, and liver fat content in men with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Participants (n=16) were non...

  13. Anxiety-like behavior as an early endophenotype in the TgF344-AD rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Berkowitz, Laura E; Thompson, Shannon M; Drake, Emma N; Olguin, Carlos R; Clark, Benjamin J

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline and the presence of aggregates of amyloid beta (plaques) and hyperphosphorylated tau (tangles). Early diagnosis through neuropsychological testing is difficult due to comorbidity of symptoms between AD and other types of dementia. As a result, there is a need to identify the range of behavioral phenotypes expressed in AD. In the present study, we utilized a transgenic rat (TgF344-AD) model that bears the mutated amyloid precursor protein as well as presenilin-1 genes, resulting in progressive plaque and tangle pathogenesis throughout the cortex. We tested young adult male and female TgF344-AD rats in a spatial memory task in the Morris water maze and for anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze. Results indicated that regardless of sex, TgF344-AD rats exhibited increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze, which occurred without significant deficits in the spatial memory. Together, these results indicate that enhanced anxiety-like behavior represents an early-stage behavioral marker in the TgF344-AD rat model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular structure of virgin and Tg cycled (Ag2Se)x (AsSe)1-x bulk glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtman, Jacob; Chen, Ping; Boochand, P.

    2009-03-01

    AsSe, the base glass (x = 0) in the titled ternary, is an interesting example of a chalcogenide that is partially de-mixed into As4Se4 molecules segregated from a connected AsSe network, with the latter determining glass network properties. Raman scattering reveals sharp modes of the Realgar molecules that are superimposed on broad modes coming from of the backbone. Upon Tg cycling virgin samples (as quenched melts), the concentration of de-mixed As4Se4 molecules decreases, suggesting that thermally induced polymerization occurs; molecules break up to form part of the connective tissue. Modulated DSC experiments reveal a broad exotherm near 140 ^oC in virgin samples, which becomes nearly extinct in Tg cycled samples. The exotherm may represent Realgar molecules nano-crystallizing as the temperature approaches Tg. Compositional trends in thermal parameters such as Tg(x), δCp(x), and the δHnr(x) as a function of Ag2Se content `x' of the glasses will be reported.

  15. TG-FTIR measurement of CO2-H2O co-adsorption for CO2 air capture sorbent screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smal, I.M.; Yu, Qian; Veneman, Rens; Fränzel-Luiten, B.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Capturing atmospheric CO2 using solid sorbents is gaining interest. As ambient air normally contains much more (up to 100 times) water than CO2, a selective sorbent is desirable as co-adsorption will most likely occur. In this study, a convenient method based on an TG-FTIR analysis system is

  16. Citalopram Ameliorates Impairments in Spatial Memory and Synaptic Plasticity in Female 3xTgAD Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the primary cause of dementia. There is no effective treatment. Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ plays an important role in the pathogenesis and thus strategies suppressing Aβ production and accumulation seem promising. Citalopram is an antidepressant drug and can decrease Aβ production and amyloid plaques in transgenic mice of AD and humans. Whether citalopram can ameliorate memory deficit was not known yet. We tested the effects of citalopram on behavioral performance and synaptic plasticity in female 3xTgAD mice, a well-characterized model of AD. Mice were treated with citalopram or water from 5 months of age for 3 months. Citalopram treatment at approximately 10 mg/kg/day significantly improved spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM test, while not affecting anxiety-like and depression-like behavior in 3xTgAD mice. Further, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP impairment in 3xTgAD mice was reversed by citalopram treatment. Citalopram treatment also significantly decreased the levels of insoluble Aβ40 in hippocampal and cortical tissues in 3xTgAD mice, accompanied with a reduced amyloid precursor protein (APP. Together, citalopram treatment may be a promising strategy for AD and further clinical trials should be conducted to verify the effect of citalopram on cognition in patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment.

  17. Characteristic Study of Shenmu Bituminous Coal Combustion with Online TG-MS-FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Guanfu

    2018-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of Shenmu bituminous pulverized coal (SBC) were comprehensively investigated with a combined TG-MS-FTIR system by considering the effect of particle size, heating rate and total flowrate. The combustion products were accurately quantified by normalization and numerical analysis of MS results. The results indicate that the decrease of the particle size, heating rate and total flowrate result in lower ignition and burnout temperatures. The activation energy tends to be lower with smaller particle size, lower heating rate and total flowrate. The MS and FTIR results demonstrate that lower concentrations of different products, such as NO, NO2, HCN, CH4 and SO2 were produced with smaller particle size, slower heating rate and lower total flowrate. The decrease of particle size would lead to more contact area with oxygen and slower heating rate could provide more sufficient time for the diffusion. High total flowrate would reduce the oxygen adsorbability on the coal particle surface and shorten the residence time of oxygen, which makes the ignition difficult to occur. This work will guide to understand the combustion kinetics of pulverized coals and be beneficial to control the formation of pollutants.

  18. STUDY ON THE CONTENT OF SEDIMENT PARTICLES IN THE AIR AROUND TG. JIU TOWN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Violeta Cazalbașu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems of the modern era is the air pollution. This phenomenon, highly complex, has become the focus of several international organizations since the consequences of air pollution are felt outside the country borders. By and large wecan speak of a regional pollution, which consists of atmospheric contamination by waste or by products liquids, solids gas, threatening the health of people, plants and animals or which can attack materials, reduce visibility and cause unpleasant odors. On a planetary scale, the elimination or accumulation in the atmosphere of certain products, leads to irreparable consequences on the planet's natural balance: ozone depletion and global warming of the atmosphere. This paper presents the study on the sedimentparticles in the air in Tg-Jiu. Determination of particulate matter from the air was done according to Standard no. 10195 / 75.Air purity.Determination of settled particles. In 2014 no exceeding of the maximum allowable concentration of sediment particles has been found in the four sampling points and in2015, out of a total of 60 measurements in four sampling points only one was above the maximum permissible concentration

  19. High-Tg Polynorbornene-Based Block and Random Copolymers for Butanol Pervaporation Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, Richard A.; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Takigawa, Tamami; Kashino, Tomomasa; Burtovyy, Oleksandr; Bell, Andrew

    Vinyl addition polymers of substituted norbornene (NB) monomers possess desirably high glass transition temperatures (Tg); however, until very recently, the lack of an applicable living polymerization chemistry has precluded the synthesis of such polymers with controlled architecture, or copolymers with controlled sequence distribution. We have recently synthesized block and random copolymers of NB monomers bearing hydroxyhexafluoroisopropyl and n-butyl substituents (HFANB and BuNB) via living vinyl addition polymerization with Pd-based catalysts. Both series of polymers were cast into the selective skin layers of thin film composite (TFC) membranes, and these organophilic membranes investigated for the isolation of n-butanol from dilute aqueous solution (model fermentation broth) via pervaporation. The block copolymers show well-defined microphase-separated morphologies, both in bulk and as the selective skin layers on TFC membranes, while the random copolymers are homogeneous. Both block and random vinyl addition copolymers are effective as n-butanol pervaporation membranes, with the block copolymers showing a better flux-selectivity balance. While polyHFANB has much higher permeability and n-butanol selectivity than polyBuNB, incorporating BuNB units into the polymer (in either a block or random sequence) limits the swelling of the polyHFANB and thereby improves the n-butanol pervaporation selectivity.

  20. A comparative Tg-Ms study of the carbonization behaviour of different pitches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, R.; Arenillas, A.; Crespo, J.L.; Pis, J.J.; Moinelo, S.R. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the formation of mesophase spherules from a low-temperature coal tar pitch under carbonization conditions. For comparison, the carbonization of a high-temperature coal tar pitch and a petroleum pitch were also considered. Different degrees of mesophase formation and development for each pitch. The results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis, and the thermogravimetric analyzer mass spectrometer (TG-MS) tests were compared with the different extents of mesophase formation, checked by optical microscopy. According to the results, several stages can be distinguished as temperature increases in the carbonization process of the pitches. In the low-temperature coal tar pitch, the devolatilization of light components, especially phenols, accounts for the most significant weight loss. Moreover, cross-linking contributes greatly to the formation and development of mesophase, resulting in the predominance of bulk mesophase in a relatively short time in the case of the low-temperature coal tar pitch. 19 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. MO-A-BRB-00: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3) To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar with special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.

  2. MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, S. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3) To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar with special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.

  3. Influence of the Zeolite ZSM-5 on Catalytic Pyrolysis of Biomass via TG-FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bio-oil from the pyrolysis of biomass is an important renewable source for liquid fuel. However, the application of bio-oil has been severely restricted due to its high viscosity, acidity, and low heating value. Thus, it has been necessary to upgrade bio-oil for automobile fuel via catalytic deoxygenation reactions. Herein, the effects of the zeolite ZSM-5 on the pyrolysis of four biomass materials (corn cob, corn straw, pine powder, and cellulose were investigated via TG-FTIR (thermogravimetric analyzer coupled with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to better understand the working mechanism of ZSM-5. The contents of the products of H2O, CO, CO2, and the C-O, C=O, and OH groups evolved with increasing pyrolytic temperature were monitored by FTIR. It was found that the relative contents of the C-O and C=O groups were decreased under the catalysis of ZSM-5, while the formations of CO, H2O, and the OH containing compounds were promoted. To explain the regulations, reaction routes were speculated and the catalytic conversion mechanisms were deduced.

  4. Studies concerning recycling by composting organic waste in Tg-Mureş

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Morar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Recycling organic waste has become a matter of utmost importance for overall healthiness of the Earth, its volume largely interacting with the economic development. The problem tends to become a vital matter of survival for an entire society. In this context, recovery, recycling, physical-chemical treatment, composting or incineration are methods of waste processing, commonly used in most countries of the world. These measures are intended to both environmental protection and rational use and economically efficient. Based on the data regarding the municipal waste generated in Mures County, in previous years, and in Tg-Mures city, in 2007 were calculated the quantities expected to generate by the year 2038. Also, concerning the cleaning recovery it is proposed the pile composting method, being, from our point of view, more Beneficial in the area. In conclusion, at county level but at city level too, there is still working to do, primarily in terms of awareness, not only the population but also the relevant, local bodies, of what means the cleaning recovery of the municipal waste.

  5. MO-A-BRB-01: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kry, S.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3) To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar with special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.

  6. MO-A-BRB-00: TG191: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will highlight the upcoming TG-191 report: Clinical Use of Luminescent Dosimeters. Luminescent dosimetry based on TLD and OSLD is a practical, accurate, and precise technique for point dosimetry in medical physics applications. The charges of Task Group 191 were to detail the methodologies for practical and optimal luminescent dosimetry in a clinical setting. This includes (1) To review the variety of TLD/OSL materials available, including features and limitations of each. (2) To outline the optimal steps to achieve accurate and precise dosimetry with luminescent detectors and to evaluate the uncertainty induced when less rigorous procedures are used. (3) To develop consensus guidelines on the optimal use of luminescent dosimeters for clinical practice. (4) To develop guidelines for special medically relevant uses of TLDs/OSLs (e.g., mixed field i.e. photon/neutron dosimetry, particle beam dosimetry, skin dosimetry). While this report provides general guidelines for arbitrary TLD and OSLD processes, the report, and therefore this presentation, provide specific guidance for TLD-100 (LiF:Ti,Mg) and nanoDot (Al2O3:C) dosimeters because of their prevalence in clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Understand the available dosimetry systems, and basic theory of their operation Understand the range of dose determination methodologies and the uncertainties associated with them Become familiar with special considerations for TLD/OSLD relevant for special clinical situations Learn recommended commissioning and QA procedures for these dosimetry systems.

  7. TG-FTIR, DSC and quantum chemical studies of the thermal decomposition of quaternary methylammonium halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, Marlena; Storoniak, Piotr; Skurski, Piotr; Blazejowski, Jerzy; Rak, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of quaternary methylammonium halides was studied using thermogravimetry coupled to FTIR (TG-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as well as the DFT, MP2 and G2 quantum chemical methods. There is almost perfect agreement between the experimental IR spectra and those predicted at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level: this has demonstrated for the first time that an equimolar mixture of trimethylamine and a methyl halide is produced as a result of decomposition. The experimental enthalpies of dissociation are 153.4, 171.2, and 186.7 kJ/mol for chloride, bromide and iodide, respectively, values that correlate well with the calculated enthalpies of dissociation based on crystal lattice energies and quantum chemical thermodynamic barriers. The experimental activation barriers estimated from the least-squares fit of the F1 kinetic model (first-order process) to thermogravimetric traces - 283, 244 and 204 kJ/mol for chloride, bromide and iodide, respectively - agree very well with theoretically calculated values. The theoretical approach assumed in this work has been shown capable of predicting the relevant characteristics of the thermal decomposition of solids with experimental accuracy

  8. Characterization of a Single Chain Fv Antibody that Reacts with Free Morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukizono, Miho; Kamegawa, Mariko; Tanaka, Koichi; Kohra, Shinya; Arizono, Koji; Hamazoe, Yuta; Sugimura, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    An immune phage library derived from mice, hyperimmunized with morphine-conjugated BSA, was used to isolate a single-chain Fv (scFv) clone, M86, with binding activity to morphine-conjugated thyroglobulin (morphine-C-Tg) but not to codeine-, cocaine-, or ketamine-conjugated Tg. Surface plasmon resonance analysis using a morphine-C-Tg-coupled CM5 sensor chip showed that the Kd value was 1.26 × 10−8 M. To analyze its binding activity to free morphine and related compounds, we performed a competi...

  9. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N [OH State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs.

  10. SU-E-T-468: Implementation of the TG-142 QA Process for Seven Linacs with Enhanced Beam Conformance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woollard, J; Ayan, A; DiCostanzo, D; Grzetic, S; Hessler, J; Gupta, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a TG-142 compliant QA process for 7 Varian TrueBeam linear accelerators (linacs) with enhanced beam conformance and dosimetrically matched beam models. To ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs, the QA process should include a common set of baseline values for use in routine QA on all linacs. Methods: The TG 142 report provides recommended tests, tolerances and frequencies for quality assurance of medical accelerators. Based on the guidance provided in the report, measurement tests were developed to evaluate each of the applicable parameters listed for daily, monthly and annual QA. These tests were then performed on each of our 7 new linacs as they came on line at our institution. Results: The tolerance values specified in TG-142 for each QA test are either absolute tolerances (i.e. ±2mm) or require a comparison to a baseline value. The results of our QA tests were first used to ensure that all 7 linacs were operating within the suggested tolerance values provided in TG −142 for those tests with absolute tolerances and that the performance of the linacs was adequately matched. The QA test results were then used to develop a set of common baseline values for those QA tests that require comparison to a baseline value at routine monthly and annual QA. The procedures and baseline values were incorporated into a spreadsheets for use in monthly and annual QA. Conclusion: We have developed a set of procedures for daily, monthly and annual QA of our linacs that are consistent with the TG-142 report. A common set of baseline values was developed for routine QA tests. The use of this common set of baseline values for comparison at monthly and annual QA will ensure consistent performance of all 7 linacs

  11. SU-E-J-52: Decreasing Frequency of Performing TG-142 Imaging QA – 5 Year Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose This study is an update to check if the frequency of imaging QA suggested by AAPM Task Group Report 142 (TG142) is necessary with our 5 year experience. TG142 presents recommendations for QA criteria of IGRT treatment. ACR has adopted it to be the requirements for any radiatiotherapy practices; however, we propose to reduce the frequency on image quality QA according to this 5 year study.Method and Materials: This study uses VarianIX2100 and Siemens Artiste Linacs to perform QAs on KV, MV, CBCT modalities. The QA was designed following under the recommendations of TG142. This study reports the daily imaging positioning/repositioning and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. QA results on kV, MV and CBCT from 4/7/2010∼3/11/15 are analyzed. KV, MV, CBCT images are taken with the Varian isocube localized at the isocenter. Digital graticule is used in the software to verify the isocenter position. CBCT images are taken with the cube placed at 1cm superior, lateral and anterior of the isocenter. In-line fusion software is used to verify the contrived shift. Digital ruler provided at the on-board-imaging software or adaptive-targeting software was used to measure the position differences. The position differences were recorded at AP,LR,SI directions. Results 5 year records on kV, MV, CBCT show the shifts in all three directions are within the tolerance of 1mm suggested in TG142 for stereotactic radiation treatment(SRS/SRT). There is no occasion where shifts are outside 1mm tolerance. Conclusions The daily imaging QA suggested in TG142 is useful in ensuring the accuracy needed for SRS/SRT in IGRT. 5 year measurements presented suggest that decreasing the frequency of imaging QA may be acceptable, in particular for institutions reporting no violation of tolerance over periods of few years.

  12. SU-E-J-52: Decreasing Frequency of Performing TG-142 Imaging QA – 5 Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T; Ma, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study is an update to check if the frequency of imaging QA suggested by AAPM Task Group Report 142 (TG142) is necessary with our 5 year experience. TG142 presents recommendations for QA criteria of IGRT treatment. ACR has adopted it to be the requirements for any radiatiotherapy practices; however, we propose to reduce the frequency on image quality QA according to this 5 year study.Method and Materials: This study uses VarianIX2100 and Siemens Artiste Linacs to perform QAs on KV, MV, CBCT modalities. The QA was designed following under the recommendations of TG142. This study reports the daily imaging positioning/repositioning and imaging and treatment coordinate coincidence. QA results on kV, MV and CBCT from 4/7/2010∼3/11/15 are analyzed. KV, MV, CBCT images are taken with the Varian isocube localized at the isocenter. Digital graticule is used in the software to verify the isocenter position. CBCT images are taken with the cube placed at 1cm superior, lateral and anterior of the isocenter. In-line fusion software is used to verify the contrived shift. Digital ruler provided at the on-board-imaging software or adaptive-targeting software was used to measure the position differences. The position differences were recorded at AP,LR,SI directions. Results 5 year records on kV, MV, CBCT show the shifts in all three directions are within the tolerance of 1mm suggested in TG142 for stereotactic radiation treatment(SRS/SRT). There is no occasion where shifts are outside 1mm tolerance. Conclusions The daily imaging QA suggested in TG142 is useful in ensuring the accuracy needed for SRS/SRT in IGRT. 5 year measurements presented suggest that decreasing the frequency of imaging QA may be acceptable, in particular for institutions reporting no violation of tolerance over periods of few years

  13. Dosimetric and radiobiological comparison of TG-43 and Monte Carlo calculations in 192Ir breast brachytherapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppa, V; Pappas, E P; Karaiskos, P; Major, T; Polgár, C; Papagiannis, P

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of introducing model based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) as an alternative to TG-43 in 192 Ir interstitial breast brachytherapy. A 57 patient cohort was used in a retrospective comparison between TG-43 based dosimetry data exported from a treatment planning system and Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry performed using MCNP v. 6.1 with plan and anatomy information in DICOM-RT format. Comparison was performed for the target, ipsilateral lung, heart, skin, breast and ribs, using dose distributions, dose-volume histograms (DVH) and plan quality indices clinically used for plan evaluation, as well as radiobiological parameters. TG-43 overestimation of target DVH parameters is statistically significant but small (less than 2% for the target coverage indices and 4% for homogeneity indices, on average). Significant dose differences (>5%) were observed close to the skin and at relatively large distances from the implant leading to a TG-43 dose overestimation for the organs at risk. These differences correspond to low dose regions (<50% of the prescribed dose), being less than 2% of the prescribed dose. Detected dosimetric differences did not induce clinically significant differences in calculated tumor control probabilities (mean absolute difference <0.2%) and normal tissue complication probabilities. While TG-43 shows a statistically significant overestimation of most indices used for plan evaluation, differences are small and therefore not clinically significant. Improved MBDCA dosimetry could be important for re-irradiation, technique inter-comparison and/or the assessment of secondary cancer induction risk, where accurate dosimetry in the whole patient anatomy is of the essence. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Correlations of serum levels of TG with leptin and other related factors (L-1, NPY adiponectin) in patients with hyperlipidaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Donghong; Yu Ping; Wei Jingjun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes and correlations of serum levels of triglyeride (TG), leptin, L -1, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and adiponectin in patients with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Methods: Serum levels of TG, leptin, L-1, NPY and adiponectin in 54 patients with HTG and 55 controls were measured with radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results: The serum levels of TG, Leptin, L -1 and NPY in patients with HTG [ (3.46 ± 1.14) mmol/L, (10.56 ±3.79) μg/L, (0.40 ± 0.18) μg/L, (115.89 ± 24.56) μg/L, respectively] were significantly higher than those in controls [ (1.26 ± 0.30) mmol/L, (5.66 ± 2.01) μg/L, (0.22 ± 0.09) μg/L, (95.21 ± 16.85) μg/L, respectively] P < 0.01 in all. But serum levels of adiponectin in patients with HTG (8.98 ± 3.51μg/L) was significantly lower than those in controls [(13.21 ± 9.46) μg/L, P < 0.01]. There were significantly positive correlations between serum TG levels and serum levels of leptin (r = 0.576, P < 0.05). There were also significantly positive correlations between serum leptin levels and serum levels of L-1 and NPY (r = 0.582; r = 0.479, respectively, P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was close relationship between increase in serum TG level and changes of serum levels of leptin, L-1, NPY, adiponectin. Neural-endocrine-immune system participated in fatty metabolism and could result in HTG. (authors)

  15. Hyper-Expression of PD-1 Is Associated with the Levels of Exhausted and Dysfunctional Phenotypes of Circulating CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ Mucosal-Associated Invariant T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yean K. Yong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells, defined as CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ T cells, play an important role in the innate defense against bacterial infections, and their functionality is impaired in chronic viral infections. Here, we investigated the frequency and functional role of MAIT cells in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The peripheral CD3+CD161++TCR iVα7.2+ MAIT cells in chronic HBV-infected patients and healthy controls were phenotypically characterized based on CD57, PD-1, TIM-3, and CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 expression. The frequency of MAIT cells was significantly decreased among chronic HBV-infected individuals as compared to controls. Expression of CD57, PD-1, CTLA-4, as well as HLA-DR and CD38 on MAIT cells was significantly elevated in chronic HBV-infected individuals relative to controls. The percentage of T cell receptor (TCR iVα7.2+ CD161+ MAIT cells did not correlate with HBV viral load but inversely with HLA-DR on CD4+ T cells and MAIT cells and with CD57 on CD8+ T cells suggesting that decrease of MAIT cells may not be attributed to direct infection by HBV but driven by HBV-induced chronic immune activation. The percentage and expression levels of PD-1 as well as CTLA-4 on MAIT cells inversely correlated with plasma HBV-DNA levels, which may suggest either a role for MAIT cells in the control of HBV infection or the effect of HBV replication in the liver on MAIT cell phenotype. We report that decrease of TCR iVα7.2+ MAIT cells in the peripheral blood and their functions were seemingly impaired in chronic HBV-infected patients likely because of the increased expression of PD-1.

  16. Influence of metal additives on pyrolysis behavior of bituminous coal by TG-FTIR analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Wenjuan; Fang, Mengxiang; Cen, Jianmeng; Li, Chao; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). State Key Lab. of Clean Energy Utilization

    2013-07-01

    To study the catalytic effects of alkali, alkaline earth and transition metal additives on coal pyrolysis behavior, bituminous coal loaded NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2} was respectively investigated using Thermogravimetry and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (TG-FTIR). Results indicated that the maximum mass loss rate decreased under the metal additives in the primary pyrolysis stage. The total mass loss of pyrolysis was reduced in metals catalyzed pyrolysis except for Na loaded sample. Kinetic analysis was taken for all samples adopting the method of Coats-Redfern. Activation energy of raw coal in the primary pyrolysis stage was 92.15vkJ.mol{sup -1}, which was lowered to 44.59-73.42 kJ.mol{sup -1} under metal additives. The orders of catalytic effect for this bituminous coal were Mg > Fe > Ca > Ni > K > Na according to their activation energies. Several investigated volatiles including CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, CO, toluene, phenol and formic acid were identified from FTIR spectra. The yields of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, toluene, phenol and formic acid were decreased, but the evolution of CO was increased. The presence of metals in the coal samples have been involved in a repeated bond-forming and bond-breaking process, which greatly hindered the release of tars during pyrolysis as the tar precursors were connected to coal/char matrix and were thermally cracked, becoming a part of char.

  17. SU-E-T-87: A TG-100 Approach for Quality Improvement of Associated Dosimetry Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, R; Pawlicki, T; Kim, G [UCSD Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetry protocols devote so much time to the discussion of ionization chamber choice, use and performance that is easy to forget about the importance of the associated dosimetry equipment (ADE) in radiation dosimetry - barometer, thermometer, electrometer, phantoms, triaxial cables, etc. Improper use and inaccuracy of these devices may significantly affect the accuracy of radiation dosimetry. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk factors in the monthly output dosimetry procedure and recommend corrective actions using a TG-100 approach. Methods: A failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) of the monthly linac output check procedure was performed to determine which steps and failure modes carried the greatest risk. In addition, a fault tree analysis (FTA) was performed to expand the initial list of failure modes making sure that none were overlooked. After determining the failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs), 11 physicists were asked to score corrective actions based on their ease of implementation and potential impact. The results were aggregated into an impact map to determine the implementable corrective actions. Results: Three of the top five failure modes were related to the thermometer and barometer. The two highest RPN-ranked failure modes were related to barometric pressure inaccuracy due to their high lack-of-detectability scores. Six corrective actions were proposed to address barometric pressure inaccuracy, and the survey results found the following two corrective actions to be implementable: 1) send the barometer for recalibration at a calibration laboratory and 2) check the barometer accuracy against the local airport and correct for elevation. Conclusion: An FMEA on monthly output measurements displayed the importance of ADE for accurate radiation dosimetry. When brainstorming for corrective actions, an impact map is helpful for visualizing the overall impact versus the ease of implementation.

  18. Compound list: N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available N-methyl-N-nitrosourea MNU 00164 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LA...TEST/Human/in_vitro/N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-...tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/N-methyl-N-nitrosourea.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ...

  19. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules on human T cells induces signal-transduction events, including activation of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1, and elevation of the intracellular free calcium concentration. In this study, we demonstrate...... that the ZAP70 tyrosine kinase is tyrosine phosphorylated in Jurkat T cells and in purified peripheral T cells after MHC-I ligation. The tyrosine-phosphorylated ZAP70 kinase exhibits a particular phenotype with low affinities for proteins at 21, 40, 60, and 120 kDa, proteins normally co-precipitated with ZAP70...... after TCR/CD3 stimulation. The phosphorylation of ZAP70 after MHC-I ligation was dependent on TCR/CD3 surface expression. One of the natural substrates for ZAP70 is the zeta-chain dimer of the TCR/CD3 complex. MHC-I cross-linking induces a phosphorylated zeta-protein that migrates as a dimer at 42 k...

  20. Differential effect on TCR:CD3 stimulation of a 90-kD glycoprotein (gp90/Mac-2BP), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain protein family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silvestri, B; Calderazzo, F; Coppola, V

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of a 90-kD glycoprotein (gp90/Mac-2BP) belonging to the scavenger receptor family, present in normal serum and at increased levels in inflammatory disease and cancer patients, on some T cell function parameters. Whereas the lymphocyte proliferative response to non-specific ......We studied the effects of a 90-kD glycoprotein (gp90/Mac-2BP) belonging to the scavenger receptor family, present in normal serum and at increased levels in inflammatory disease and cancer patients, on some T cell function parameters. Whereas the lymphocyte proliferative response to non......-specific mitogens such as phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), but not pokeweed mitogen (PWM), was strongly reduced, probably due to the lectin-binding properties of gp90/Mac-2BP, the response to T cell receptor (TCR) agonists such as superantigens and allogeneic cells was potentiated. When...... lymphocytes were stimulated with different anti-TCR:CD3 MoAbs, both in soluble and solid-phase form, gp90/Mac-2BP was able to down-regulate the proliferative response to anti-CD3 MoAb, whereas the response to anti-TCR alphabeta MoAb was enhanced. A similar differential effect was observed when a MoAb against...

  1. In vivo determination of triglyceride (TG) secretion in rats fed different dietary saturated fats using [2-3H]-glycerol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.C.; Yang, H.; Lasekan, J.; Clayton, M.; Ney, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (154±1 g) were fed diets containing 2% corn oil (CO) + 14% butterfat (BF), beef tallow (BT), olive oil (OO) or coconut oil (CN) vs a 16% CO control diet for 5 weeks. Changes in plasma TG specific activity (dpm/mg TG) were determined in individual unanesthetized rats after injection of 100 μCi [2- 3 H]-glycerol via a carotid cannula. Fractional rate constants were obtained using a 2-compartment model and nonlinear regression analysis. Results demonstrated no difference in the fractional rate constants among dietary groups; but, differences in the rates of hepatic TG secretion were noted. Rats fed BT showed a higher rate of hepatic TG secretion than rats fed CO. Rats fed BF, OO or CN showed somewhat higher rates of hepatic TG secretion than CO. VLDL TG, phospholipid, and apolipoprotein B and E levels were higher with saturated fats vs CO. The data suggest that the higher plasma TG levels noted in response to feeding saturated fats vs corn oil can be explained, in part, by an increased flux of hepatic TG secretion

  2. Simulation of the shielding effects of an applicator on the AAPM TG-43 parameters of CS-137 Selectron LDR brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sina, S.; Faghihi, R.; Meigooni, A. S.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Zehtabian, M.; Mosleh-Shirazi, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    The dose rate distribution delivered by a low dose rate 137 Cs pellet source, a spherical source used within the source trains Selectron gynecological brachytherapy system, was investigated using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code. Materials and Methods: The calculations were performed in both water and Plexiglas and the absolute dose rate distribution for a single pellet source and the AAPM TG-43 parameters were computed. A spherical phantom with dimensions large enough (60 cm) was used to provide full scattering conditions. In order to score dose at different distances from the source centre, this sphere was divided into a set of 600 concentric spherical shells of 0.05 cm thickness. The calculations were performed up to a distance of 10 cm from the source centre. To calculate the effect of the applicator and dummy pellets on dose rate constant and radial dose function, a single pellet source was simulated inside the vaginal applicator, and spherical tally cells with radius of 0.05 cm were used in the simulations. The F6 tally was used to score the absolute dose rate at a given point in the phantom. Results: The dose rate constant for a single active pellet was found to be 1.102±0.007 cGyh -1 U -1 , and the dose rate constant for an active pellet inside the applicator was 1.095±0.009 cGyh -1 U -l . The tabulated data and 5th order polynomial fit coefficients for the radial dose function along with the dose rate constant are provided for both cases. The effect of applicator and dummy pellets on anisotropy function of the source was also investigated. Conclusion: The error resulting from ignoring the applicator was reduced using the data of a single pellet. The results indicate that F(r, θ) decreases towards the applicator.

  3. Comparison between AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 for plane parallel ionization chambers irradiated by clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    We compared the results of absorbed dose determined at reference conditions according to AAPM T G-51 and IAEA TRS-398 using plane parallel ionization chambers. The study showed agreement between the two protocols for Holt ,Exradin P11, NACP, Attix RMI 449 and Roos ionization chambers. For Markus ionization chambers the absorbed dose calculated using AAPM TG-51 is higher than that calculated using IAEA TRS-398 by 1.8 % for R 5 0 =2 cm and decrease with increased R 5 0 to reach 1.2 % for R 5 0 =20 cm. For Capintec PS-033 ionization chambers the absorbed dose calculated using AAPM TG-51 is constantly higher than that calculated by IAEA TRS-398 by 1.5 %. A theoretical explanation was introduced for these results

  4. TH-A-BRC-03: AAPM TG218: Measurement Methods and Tolerance Levels for Patient-Specific IMRT Verification QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miften, M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  5. TH-A-BRC-03: AAPM TG218: Measurement Methods and Tolerance Levels for Patient-Specific IMRT Verification QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miften, M.

    2016-01-01

    AAPM TG-135U1 QA for Robotic Radiosurgery - Sonja Dieterich Since the publication of AAPM TG-135 in 2011, the technology of robotic radiosurgery has rapidly developed. AAPM TG-135U1 will provide recommendations on the clinical practice for using the IRIS collimator, fiducial-less real-time motion tracking, and Monte Carlo based treatment planning. In addition, it will summarize currently available literature about uncertainties. Learning Objectives: Understand the progression of technology since the first TG publication Learn which new QA procedures should be implemented for new technologies Be familiar with updates to clinical practice guidelines AAPM TG-178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance - Steven Goetsch Purpose: AAPM Task Group 178 Gamma Stereotactic Radiosurgery Dosimetry and Quality Assurance was formed in August, 2008. The Task Group has 12 medical physicists, two physicians and two consultants. Methods: A round robin dosimetry intercomparison of proposed ionization chambers, electrometer and dosimetry phantoms was conducted over a 15 month period in 2011 and 2012 (Med Phys 42, 11, Nov, 2015). The data obtained at 9 institutions (with ten different Elekta Gamma Knife units) was analyzed by the lead author using several protocols. Results: The most consistent results were obtained using the Elekta ABS 16cm diameter phantom, with the TG-51 protocol modified as recommended by Alfonso et al (Med Phys 35, 11, Nov 2008). A key white paper (Med Phys, in press) sponsored by Elekta Corporation, was used to obtain correction factors for the ionization chambers and phantoms used in this intercomparison. Consistent results were obtained for both Elekta Gamma Knife Model 4C and Gamma Knife Perfexion units as measured with each of two miniature ionization chambers. Conclusion: The full report gives clinical history and background of gamma stereotactic radiosurgery, clinical examples and history, quality assurance recommendations and outline

  6. Study on the Spatial Resolution of Single and Multiple Coincidences Compton Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyev, Andriy; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Celler, Anna

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we study the image resolution that can be obtained from the Multiple Coincidences Compton Camera (MCCC). The principle of MCCC is based on a simultaneous acquisition of several gamma-rays emitted in cascade from a single nucleus. Contrary to a standard Compton camera, MCCC can theoretically provide the exact location of a radioactive source (based only on the identification of the intersection point of three cones created by a single decay), without complicated tomographic reconstruction. However, practical implementation of the MCCC approach encounters several problems, such as low detection sensitivities result in very low probability of coincident triple gamma-ray detection, which is necessary for the source localization. It is also important to evaluate how the detection uncertainties (finite energy and spatial resolution) influence identification of the intersection of three cones, thus the resulting image quality. In this study we investigate how the spatial resolution of the reconstructed images using the triple-cone reconstruction (TCR) approach compares to images reconstructed from the same data using standard iterative method based on single-cone. Results show, that FWHM for the point source reconstructed with TCR was 20-30% higher than the one obtained from the standard iterative reconstruction based on expectation maximization (EM) algorithm and conventional single-cone Compton imaging. Finite energy and spatial resolutions of the MCCC detectors lead to errors in conical surfaces definitions (“thick” conical surfaces) which only amplify in image reconstruction when intersection of three cones is being sought. Our investigations show that, in spite of being conceptually appealing, the identification of triple cone intersection constitutes yet another restriction of the multiple coincidence approach which limits the image resolution that can be obtained with MCCC and TCR algorithm.

  7. Progressive impairment of directional and spatially precise trajectories by TgF344-AD Rats in the Morris Water Task

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Shannon; Harvey, Ryan; Clark, Benjamin; Drake, Emma; Berkowitz, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Spatial navigation is impaired in early stages of Alzheimers disease (AD), and may be a defining behavioral marker of preclinical AD. Nevertheless, limitations of diagnostic criteria for AD and within animal models of AD make characterization of preclinical AD difficult. A new rat model (TgF344-AD) of AD overcomes many of these limitations, though spatial navigation has not been comprehensively assessed. Using the hidden and cued platform variants of the Morris water task, a longitudinal asse...

  8. Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG): toward integrated treatment of symptoms related to traumatic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Geert E; Kleber, Rolf J; de la Rie, Simone M; Bos, Jannetta B A; Gersons, Berthold P R; Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic events such as disasters, accidents, war, or criminal violence are often accompanied by the loss of loved ones, and may then give rise to traumatic grief. Traumatic grief refers to a clinical diagnosis of persistent complex bereavement disorder (PCBD) with comorbid (symptoms of) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD) following confrontation with a traumatic loss. Trauma survivors, who are frequently from different cultural backgrounds, have often experienced multiple losses and ambiguous loss (missing family members or friends). Current evidence-based treatments for PTSD do not focus on traumatic grief. To develop a treatment for traumatic grief combining treatment interventions for PTSD and PCBD that may accommodate cultural aspects of grief. To provide a rationale for treatment, we propose a cognitive stress model of traumatic grief. Based on this model and on existing evidence-based treatments for PTSD and complicated grief, we developed Brief Eclectic Psychotherapy for Traumatic Grief (BEP-TG) for the treatment of patients with traumatic grief. The treatment is presented along with a case vignette. Processes contributing to traumatic grief include inadequately integrating the memory of the traumatic loss, negative appraisal of the traumatic loss, sensitivity to matching triggers and new stressors, and attempting to avoid distress. BEP-TG targets these processes. The BEP-TG protocol consists of five parts with proven effectiveness in the treatment of PCBD, PTSD, and MDD: information and motivation, grief-focused exposure, memorabilia and writing assignments, finding meaning and activation, and a farewell ritual. Tailored to fit the needs of trauma survivors, BEP-TG can be used to address traumatic grief symptoms related to multiple losses and ambiguous loss, as well as cultural aspects of bereavement through its different components.

  9. Developing a Treatment Planning Software Based on TG-43U1 Formalism for Cs-137 LDR Brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Sedigheh; Faghihi, Reza; Soleimani Meigooni, Ali; Siavashpour, Zahra; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin

    2013-08-01

    The old Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) used for intracavitary brachytherapy with Cs-137 Selectron source utilize traditional dose calculation methods, considering each source as a point source. Using such methods introduces significant errors in dose estimation. As of 1995, TG-43 is used as the main dose calculation formalism in treatment TPSs. The purpose of this study is to design and establish a treatment planning software for Cs-137 Solectron brachytherapy source, based on TG-43U1 formalism by applying the effects of the applicator and dummy spacers. Two softwares used for treatment planning of Cs-137 sources in Iran (STPS and PLATO), are based on old formalisms. The purpose of this work is to establish and develop a TPS for Selectron source based on TG-43 formalism. In this planning system, the dosimetry parameters of each pellet in different places inside applicators were obtained by MCNP4c code. Then the dose distribution around every combination of active and inactive pellets was obtained by summing the doses. The accuracy of this algorithm was checked by comparing its results for special combination of active and inactive pellets with MC simulations. Finally, the uncertainty of old dose calculation formalism was investigated by comparing the results of STPS and PLATO softwares with those obtained by the new algorithm. For a typical arrangement of 10 active pellets in the applicator, the percentage difference between doses obtained by the new algorithm at 1cm distance from the tip of the applicator and those obtained by old formalisms is about 30%, while the difference between the results of MCNP and the new algorithm is less than 5%. According to the results, the old dosimetry formalisms, overestimate the dose especially towards the applicator's tip. While the TG-43U1 based software perform the calculations more accurately.

  10. Role of Tulipa gesneriana TEOSINTE BRANCHED1 (TgTB1) in the control of axillary bud outgrowth in bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pachon, Natalia M; Mutimawurugo, Marie-Chantal; Heynen, Eveline; Sergeeva, Lidiya; Benders, Anne; Blilou, Ikram; Hilhorst, Henk W M; Immink, Richard G H

    2018-06-01

    Tulip vegetative reproduction. Tulips reproduce asexually by the outgrowth of their axillary meristems located in the axil of each bulb scale. The number of axillary meristems in one bulb is low, and not all of them grow out during the yearly growth cycle of the bulb. Since the degree of axillary bud outgrowth in tulip determines the success of their vegetative propagation, this study aimed at understanding the mechanism controlling the differential axillary bud activity. We used a combined physiological and "bottom-up" molecular approach to shed light on this process and found that first two inner located buds do not seem to experience dormancy during the growth cycle, while mid-located buds enter dormancy by the end of the growing season. Dormancy was assessed by weight increase and TgTB1 expression levels, a conserved TCP transcription factor and well-known master integrator of environmental and endogenous signals influencing axillary meristem outgrowth in plants. We showed that TgTB1 expression in tulip bulbs can be modulated by sucrose, cytokinin and strigolactone, just as it has been reported for other species. However, the limited growth of mid-located buds, even when their TgTB1 expression is downregulated, points at other factors, probably physical, inhibiting their growth. We conclude that the time of axillary bud initiation determines the degree of dormancy and the sink strength of the bud. Thus, development, apical dominance, sink strength, hormonal cross-talk, expression of TgTB1 and other possibly physical but unidentified players, all converge to determine the growth capacity of tulip axillary buds.

  11. MO-E-9A-01: Risk Based Quality Management: TG100 In Action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Palta, J [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Dunscombe, P [Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Thomadsen, B [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    One of the goals of quality management in radiation therapy is to gain high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. To accomplish these goals professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has published many quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), and quality management (QM) guidance documents. In general, the recommendations provided in these documents have emphasized on performing device-specific QA at the expense of process flow and protection of the patient against catastrophic errors. Analyses of radiation therapy incidents find that they are most often caused by flaws in the overall therapy process, from initial consult through final treatment, than by isolated hardware or computer failures detectable by traditional physics QA. This challenge is shared by many intrinsically hazardous industries. Risk assessment tools and analysis techniques have been developed to define, identify, and eliminate known and/or potential failures, problems, or errors, from a system, process and/or service before they reach the customer. These include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA), and establishment of a quality management program that best avoids the faults and risks that have been identified in the overall process. These tools can be easily adapted to radiation therapy practices because of their simplicity and effectiveness to provide efficient ways to enhance the safety and quality of treatment processes. Task group 100 (TG100) of AAPM has developed a risk-based quality management program that uses these tools. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based QM program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process. Learn how to perform a FMEA analysis for a given process. Learn what

  12. MO-AB-206-02: Testing Gamma Cameras Based On TG177 WG Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halama, J. [Loyola Univ. Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  13. SU-E-T-159: Evaluation of a Patient Specific QA Tool Based On TG119

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmeg, S; Zhang, Y; O'Daniel, J; Yin, F; Ren, L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a 3D patient specific QA tool by analysis of the results produced from associated software in homogenous phantom and heterogonous patient CT. Methods: IMRT and VMAT plans of five test suites introduced by TG119 were created in ECLIPSE on a solid water phantom. The ten plans -of increasing complexity- were delivered to Delta4 to give a 3D measurement. The Delta4's “Anatomy” software uses the measured dose to back-calculate the energy fluence of the delivered beams, which is used for dose calculation in a patient CT using a pencilbeam algorithm. The effect of the modulated beams' complexity on the accuracy of the “Anatomy” calculation was evaluated. Both measured and Anatomy doses were compared to ECLIPSE calculation using 3% - 3mm gamma criteria.We also tested the effect of heterogeneity by analyzing the results of “Anatomy” calculation on a Brain VMAT and a 3D conformal lung cases. Results: In homogenous phantom, the gamma passing rates were found to be as low as 74.75% for a complex plan with high modulation. The mean passing rates were 91.47% ± 6.35% for “Anatomy” calculation and 99.46% ± 0.62% for Delta4 measurements.As for the heterogeneous cases, the rates were 96.54%±3.67% and 83.87%±9.42% for Brain VMAT and 3D lung respectively. This increased error in the lung case could be due to the use of the pencil beam algorithm as opposed to the AAA used by ECLIPSE.Also, gamma analysis showed high discrepancy along the beam edge in the “Anatomy” calculated results. This suggests a poor beam modeling in the penumbra region. Conclusion: The results show various sources of errors in “Anatomy” calculations. These include beam modeling in the penumbra region, complexity of a modulated beam (shown in homogenous phantom and brain cases) and dose calculation algorithms (3D conformal lung case)

  14. TG/DTG, FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry, and NMR Spectroscopy Study of Heavy Fuel Oil

    KAUST Repository

    Elbaz, Ayman M.

    2015-11-12

    There is an increasing interest in the comprehensive study of heavy fuel oil (HFO) due to its growing use in furnaces, boilers, marines, and recently in gas turbines. In this work, the thermal combustion characteristics and chemical composition of HFO were investigated using a range of techniques. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was conducted to study the nonisothermal HFO combustion behavior. Chemical characterization of HFO was accomplished using various standard methods in addition to direct infusion atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (APCI-FTICR MS), high resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13C NMR, and two-dimensional heteronuclear multiple bond correlation (HMBC) spectroscopy. By analyzing thermogravimetry and differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) results, three different reaction regions were identified in the combustion of HFO with air, specifically, low temperature oxidation region (LTO), fuel deposition (FD), and high temperature oxidation (HTO) region. At the high end of the LTO region, a mass transfer resistance (skin effect) was evident. Kinetic analysis in LTO and HTO regions was conducted using two different kinetic models to calculate the apparent activation energy. In both models, HTO activation energies are higher than those for LTO. The FT-ICR MS technique resolved thousands of aromatic and sulfur containing compounds in the HFO sample and provided compositional details for individual molecules of three major class species. The major classes of compounds included species with one sulfur atom (S1), with two sulfur atoms (S2), and purely hydrocarbons (HC). The DBE (double bond equivalent) abundance plots established for S1 and HC provided additional information on their distributions in the HFO sample. The 1H NMR and 13C NMR results revealed that nearly 59% of the 1H nuclei were distributed as paraffinic CH2 and 5% were in aromatic groups. Nearly 21% of 13C nuclei were

  15. MO-AB-206-02: Testing Gamma Cameras Based On TG177 WG Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halama, J.

    2016-01-01

    This education session will cover the physics and operation principles of gamma cameras and PET scanners. The first talk will focus on PET imaging. An overview of the principles of PET imaging will be provided, including positron decay physics, and the transition from 2D to 3D imaging. More recent advances in hardware and software will be discussed, such as time-of-flight imaging, and improvements in reconstruction algorithms that provide for options such as depth-of-interaction corrections. Quantitative applications of PET will be discussed, as well as the requirements for doing accurate quantitation. Relevant performance tests will also be described. Learning Objectives: Be able to describe basic physics principles of PET and operation of PET scanners. Learn about recent advances in PET scanner hardware technology. Be able to describe advances in reconstruction techniques and improvements Be able to list relevant performance tests. The second talk will focus on gamma cameras. The Nuclear Medicine subcommittee has charged a task group (TG177) to develop a report on the current state of physics testing of gamma cameras, SPECT, and SPECT/CT systems. The report makes recommendations for performance tests to be done for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests, and identifies those needed satisfy the ACR accreditation program and The Joint Commission imaging standards. The report is also intended to be used as a manual with detailed instructions on how to perform tests under widely varying conditions. Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation members of the audience will: Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of gamma cameras for planar imaging. Be familiar with the tests recommended for routine quality assurance, annual physics testing, and acceptance tests of SPECT systems. Be familiar with the tests of a SPECT/CT system that include the CT images

  16. MO-E-9A-01: Risk Based Quality Management: TG100 In Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huq, M; Palta, J; Dunscombe, P; Thomadsen, B

    2014-01-01

    One of the goals of quality management in radiation therapy is to gain high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. To accomplish these goals professional societies such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) has published many quality assurance (QA), quality control (QC), and quality management (QM) guidance documents. In general, the recommendations provided in these documents have emphasized on performing device-specific QA at the expense of process flow and protection of the patient against catastrophic errors. Analyses of radiation therapy incidents find that they are most often caused by flaws in the overall therapy process, from initial consult through final treatment, than by isolated hardware or computer failures detectable by traditional physics QA. This challenge is shared by many intrinsically hazardous industries. Risk assessment tools and analysis techniques have been developed to define, identify, and eliminate known and/or potential failures, problems, or errors, from a system, process and/or service before they reach the customer. These include, but are not limited to, process mapping, failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis (FTA), and establishment of a quality management program that best avoids the faults and risks that have been identified in the overall process. These tools can be easily adapted to radiation therapy practices because of their simplicity and effectiveness to provide efficient ways to enhance the safety and quality of treatment processes. Task group 100 (TG100) of AAPM has developed a risk-based quality management program that uses these tools. This session will be devoted to a discussion of these tools and how these tools can be used in a given radiotherapy clinic to develop a risk based QM program. Learning Objectives: Learn how to design a process map for a radiotherapy process. Learn how to perform a FMEA analysis for a given process. Learn what

  17. A poliomyelitis model through mucosal infection in transgenic mice bearing human poliovirus receptor, TgPVR21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Noriyo; Iwasaki, Takuya; Ami, Yasushi; Sato, Yuko; Hatano, Ikuyoshi; Harashima, Ayako; Suzaki, Yuriko; Yoshii, Takao; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Sata, Tetsutaro; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Koike, Satoshi; Kurata, Takeshi; Nomoto, Akio

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic mice bearing the human poliovirus receptor (TgPVR) are less susceptible to oral inoculation, although they are susceptible to parenteral inoculation. We investigated the susceptibility of TgPVR 21 line [Arch. Virol. 130 (1994) 351] to poliovirus through various mucosal routes. Intranasal inoculation of a neurovirulent Mahoney strain (OM1) caused flaccid paralysis with viral replication in the central nervous system at a dose of 10 6 cell culture infectious dose (CCID 50 ), in contrast, no paralysis following oral or intragastric inoculation of the same dose. Intranasal inoculation of a vaccine strain, Sabin 1, at 10 6 CCID 50 , resulted in no paralysis. Initial replication of poliovirus in the nasal cavity was confirmed by virus isolation and detection of negative-stranded replicative intermediates by RT-PCR and viral antigens using a high-sensitive immunohistochemistry and genome/transcripts by in situ hybridization. Poliovirus-specific IgG antibodies were elevated in the sera of surviving TgPVR21. This model can be used as a mucosal infection model and for differentiation of neurovirulent and attenuated poliovirus strains

  18. Role of protein glycosylation on the expression of muscarinic receptors of N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A.; Chiang, P.K.

    1986-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are glycoproteins. Experiments were conducted to determine whether active glycosylation of proteins in N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells could affect the expression of muscarinic receptors on the cell surface. The binding of radioactive N-methylscopolamine, a membrane impermeable ligand, to intact cells was used as a measure of mAChR. In the presence of the inhibitors of glycosylation, such as tunicamycin, monensin and amphomycin, N-linked glycosylation of proteins in the N4TG1 cells was inhibited, as measured by the incorporation of radioactive glucosamine or mannose in proteins. At the concentrations of tunicamycin and monensin used, the glycosylation of proteins after 3 hours were drastically reduced, but the number of mAChR in the cells was not altered. The apparent lack of effect within a short incubation period could be attributed to the presence of preformed oligosaccharide dolichol readily available for N-glycosylation. However, after 24 hours, tunicamycin (0.05 μg/ml) caused a decrease in the number of mAChR by 17% without having any effect on protein synthesis. Therefore, de novo glycosylation of proteins may be required for the expression of mAChR receptors in the N4TG1 neuroblastoma cell surface

  19. Cytokine-producing microglia have an altered beta-amyloid load in aged APP/PS1 Tg mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Ilkjær, Laura; Clausen, Bettina H

    2015-01-01

    of CD11b, TNF, and IL-1Ra. Cytokine production and Aβ load were assessed in neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia by flow cytometry. Whereas most microglia in aged mice produced IL-1Ra, relatively low proportions of microglia produced TNF, IL-1α, and IL-1β. However, microglial production......, however the inter-relationship between these processes is poorly understood. Here we show that % Aβ plaque load followed a sigmoidal trajectory with age in the neocortex of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 Tg mice, and correlated positively with soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42. Aβ measures were moderately correlated with mRNA levels...... of these latter cytokines was generally increased in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Microglia that phagocytosed endogenously-produced Aβ were only observed in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Differences in phagocytic index and total Aβ load were observed in microglia with specific cytokine profiles. Both phagocytic index and total Aβ load...

  20. Yeast three-hybrid screen identifies TgBRADIN/GRA24 as a negative regulator of Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahi V Odell

    Full Text Available Differentiation of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii into its latent bradyzoite stage is a key event in the parasite's life cycle. Compound 2 is an imidazopyridine that was previously shown to inhibit the parasite lytic cycle, in part through inhibition of parasite cGMP-dependent protein kinase. We show here that Compound 2 can also enhance parasite differentiation, and we use yeast three-hybrid analysis to identify TgBRADIN/GRA24 as a parasite protein that interacts directly or indirectly with the compound. Disruption of the TgBRADIN/GRA24 gene leads to enhanced differentiation of the parasite, and the TgBRADIN/GRA24 knockout parasites show decreased susceptibility to the differentiation-enhancing effects of Compound 2. This study represents the first use of yeast three-hybrid analysis to study small-molecule mechanism of action in any pathogenic microorganism, and it identifies a previously unrecognized inhibitor of differentiation in T. gondii. A better understanding of the proteins and mechanisms regulating T. gondii differentiation will enable new approaches to preventing the establishment of chronic infection in this important human pathogen.

  1. Trend analysis of body weight parameters, mortality, and incidence of spontaneous tumors in Tg.rasH2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Madhav G; Denton, Melissa D; Vidmar, Tom; Elbekai, Reem H

    2014-01-01

    Carcinogenicity studies have been performed in conventional 2-year rodent studies for at least 3 decades, whereas the short-term carcinogenicity studies in transgenic mice, such as Tg.rasH2, have only been performed over the last decade. In the 2-year conventional rodent studies, interlinked problems, such as increasing trends in the initial body weights, increased body weight gains, high incidence of spontaneous tumors, and low survival, that complicate the interpretation of findings have been well established. However, these end points have not been evaluated in the short-term carcinogenicity studies involving the Tg.rasH2 mice. In this article, we present retrospective analysis of data obtained from control groups in 26-week carcinogenicity studies conducted in Tg.rasH2 mice since 2004. Our analysis showed statistically significant decreasing trends in initial body weights of both sexes. Although the terminal body weights did not show any significant trends, there was a statistically significant increasing trend toward body weight gains, more so in males than in females, which correlated with increasing trends in the food consumption. There were no statistically significant alterations in mortality trends. In addition, the incidence of all common spontaneous tumors remained fairly constant with no statistically significant differences in trends. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Measurements of Gasification Characteristics of Coal and Char in CO2-Rich Gas Flow by TG-DTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis, combustion, and gasification properties of pulverized coal and char in CO2-rich gas flow were investigated by using gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA with changing O2%, heating temperature gradient, and flow rate of CO2-rich gases provided. Together with TG-DTA, flue gas generated from the heated coal, such as CO, CO2, and hydrocarbons (HCs, was analyzed simultaneously on the heating process. The optimum O2% in CO2-rich gas for combustion and gasification of coal or char was discussed by analyzing flue gas with changing O2 from 0 to 5%. The experimental results indicate that O2% has an especially large effect on carbon oxidation at temperature less than 1100°C, and lower O2 concentration promotes gasification reaction by producing CO gas over 1100°C in temperature. The TG-DTA results with gas analyses have presented basic reference data that show the effects of O2 concentration and heating rate on coal physical and chemical behaviors for the expected technologies on coal gasification in CO2-rich gas and oxygen combustion and underground coal gasification.

  3. Primary motor cortex alterations in Alzheimer disease: A study in the 3xTg-AD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orta-Salazar, E; Feria-Velasco, A I; Díaz-Cintra, S

    2017-04-19

    In humans and animal models, Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterised by accumulation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau protein, neuronal degeneration, and astrocytic gliosis, especially in vulnerable brain regions (hippocampus and cortex). These alterations are associated with cognitive impairment (loss of memory) and non-cognitive impairment (motor impairment). The purpose of this study was to identify cell changes (neurons and glial cells) and aggregation of Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein in the primary motor cortex (M1) in 3xTg-AD mouse models at an intermediate stage of AD. We used female 3xTg-AD mice aged 11 months and compared them to non-transgenic mice of the same age. In both groups, we assessed motor performance (open field test) and neuronal damage in M1 using specific markers: BAM10 (extracellular Aβ aggregates), tau 499 (hyperphosphorylated tau protein), GFAP (astrocytes), and Klüver-Barrera staining (neurons). Female 3xTg-AD mice in intermediate stages of the disease displayed motor and cellular alterations associated with Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposition in M1. Patients with AD display signs and symptoms of functional impairment from early stages. According to our results, M1 cell damage in intermediate-stage AD affects motor function, which is linked to progression of the disease. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. TCR-independent functions of Th17 cells mediated by the synergistic actions of cytokines of the IL-12 and IL-1 families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Kyung Lee

    Full Text Available The development of Th17 cells is accompanied by the acquisition of responsiveness to both IL-12 and IL-23, cytokines with established roles in the development and/or function of Th1 and Th17 cells, respectively. IL-12 signaling promotes antigen-dependent Th1 differentiation but, in combination with IL-18, allows the antigen-independent perpetuation of Th1 responses. On the other hand, while IL-23 is dispensable for initial commitment to the Th17 lineage, it promotes the pathogenic function of the Th17 cells. In this study, we have examined the overlap between Th1 and Th17 cells in their responsiveness to common pro-inflammatory cytokines and how this affects the antigen-independent cytokine responses of Th17 cells. We found that in addition to the IL-1 receptor, developing Th17 cells also up-regulate the IL-18 receptor. Consequently, in the presence of IL-1β or IL-18, and in the absence of TCR activation, Th17 cells produce Th17 lineage cytokines in a STAT3-dependent manner when stimulated with IL-23, and IFN© via a STAT4-dependent mechanism when stimulated with IL-12. Thus, building on previous findings of antigen-induced plasticity of Th17 cells, our results indicate that this potential of Th17 cells extends to their cytokine-dependent antigen-independent responses. Collectively, our data suggest a model whereby signaling via either IL-1β or IL-18 allows for bystander responses of Th17 cells to pathogens or pathogen products that differentially activate innate cell production of IL-12 or IL-23.

  5. A novel Toxoplasma gondii nuclear factor TgNF3 is a dynamic chromatin-associated component, modulator of nucleolar architecture and parasite virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Olguin-Lamas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In Toxoplasma gondii, cis-acting elements present in promoter sequences of genes that are stage-specifically regulated have been described. However, the nuclear factors that bind to these cis-acting elements and regulate promoter activities have not been identified. In the present study, we performed affinity purification, followed by proteomic analysis, to identify nuclear factors that bind to a stage-specific promoter in T. gondii. This led to the identification of several nuclear factors in T. gondii including a novel factor, designated herein as TgNF3. The N-terminal domain of TgNF3 shares similarities with the N-terminus of yeast nuclear FK506-binding protein (FKBP, known as a histone chaperone regulating gene silencing. Using anti-TgNF3 antibodies, HA-FLAG and YFP-tagged TgNF3, we show that TgNF3 is predominantly a parasite nucleolar, chromatin-associated protein that binds specifically to T. gondii gene promoters in vivo. Genome-wide analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identified promoter occupancies by TgNF3. In addition, TgNF3 has a direct role in transcriptional control of genes involved in parasite metabolism, transcription and translation. The ectopic expression of TgNF3 in the tachyzoites revealed dynamic changes in the size of the nucleolus, leading to a severe attenuation of virulence in vivo. We demonstrate that TgNF3 physically interacts with H3, H4 and H2A/H2B assembled into bona fide core and nucleosome-associated histones. Furthermore, TgNF3 interacts specifically to histones in the context of stage-specific gene silencing of a promoter that lacks active epigenetic acetylated histone marks. In contrast to virulent tachyzoites, which express the majority of TgNF3 in the nucleolus, the protein is exclusively located in the cytoplasm of the avirulent bradyzoites. We propose a model where TgNF3 acts essentially to coordinate nucleolus and nuclear functions by modulating

  6. ANÁLISES DE PROTOCOLOS TELETERÁPICOS DE CONTROLE DE QUALIDADE DE ALGUNS SERVIÇOS LOCAIS, BASEADOS NO TG40 E ARCAL XXX Routine teletherapy quality control protocols based on TG40 and ARCAL XXX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen S. Guzmán Calcina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerando a importância da garantia da qualidade nos serviços de radioterapia, este trabalho tem como primeiro objetivo fazer uma avaliação dos testes propostos pelos protocolos oficiais internacionais TG40 e ARCAL XXX para os equipamentos de cobalto, acelerador linear e simulador. O segundo objetivo consistiu em se fazer uma avaliação dos testes que atualmente são realizados por alguns serviços de radioterapia nacionais e da América Latina, comparando-os com os apresentados nos protocolos citados. Dos resultados obtidos, observou-se que embora o TG40 apresente os testes básicos necessários para um controle de qualidade adequado, o ARCAL ainda sugere testes complementares. Dos resultados e discussões, concluiu-se que é necessário que os serviços de radioterapia implementem os testes de controle de qualidade básicos e indispensáveis aos seus equipamentos, e que os demais testes sejam implementados de acordo com as suas necessidades e disponibilidades. Como produto deste estudo, sugestões de protocolos são apresentadas para o trabalho de rotina, provenientes da fusão dos protocolos analisados.In view of the great importance of quality control in radiotherapy services, this paper aimed primarily to evaluate the tests recommended by international protocols TG40 and ARCAL XXX for teletherapic equipments (cobalt, linear accelerator and simulator. A second objective was to evaluate the tests currently used in some radiotherapy services in Brazil and Latin America and to compare these tests with the ones recommended by the international protocols. Our results suggest that ARCAL is more complete than TG40, although the latter includes all the essential basic tests. We concluded that radiotherapy services should implement all basic quality control tests and that all other complementary tests should be implemented according to the need of each service. Finally, suggestions of protocols are presented, elaborated from the official and

  7. Linear pharmacokinetic parameters for monoclonal antibodies are similar within a species and across different pharmacological targets: A comparison between human, cynomolgus monkey and hFcRn Tg32 transgenic mouse using a population-modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Alison; Keunecke, Anne; van Steeg, Tamara J; van der Graaf, Piet H; Avery, Lindsay B; Jones, Hannah; Berkhout, Jan

    2018-04-10

    The linear pharmacokinetics (PK) of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be considered a class property with values that are similar to endogenous IgG. Knowledge of these parameters across species could be used to avoid unnecessary in vivo PK studies and to enable early PK predictions and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulations. In this work, population-pharmacokinetic (popPK) modeling was used to determine a single set of 'typical' popPK parameters describing the linear PK of mAbs in human, cynomolgus monkey and transgenic mice expressing the human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn Tg32), using a rich dataset of 27 mAbs. Non-linear PK was excluded from the datasets and a 2-compartment model was applied to describe mAb disposition. Typical human popPK estimates compared well with data from comparator mAbs with linear PK in the clinic. Outliers with higher than typical clearance were found to have non-specific interactions in an affinity-capture self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy assay, offering a potential tool to screen out these mAbs at an early stage. Translational strategies were investigated for prediction of human linear PK of mAbs, including use of typical human popPK parameters and allometric exponents from cynomolgus monkey and Tg32 mouse. Each method gave good prediction of human PK with parameters predicted within 2-fold. These strategies offer alternative options to the use of cynomolgus monkeys for human PK predictions of linear mAbs, based on in silico methods (typical human popPK parameters) or using a rodent species (Tg32 mouse), and call into question the value of completing extensive in vivo preclinical PK to inform linear mAb PK.

  8. Insulin receptor in mouse neuroblastoma cell line N18TG2: binding properties and visualization with colloidal gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, C; Stefanini, S; Bernardo, A; Augusti-Tocco, G

    1992-08-01

    Insulin function in the nervous system is still poorly understood. Possible roles as a neuromodulator and as a growth factor have been proposed (Baskin et al., 1987, Ann. Rev. Physiol. 49, 335-347). Stable cell lines may provide an appropriate experimental system for the analysis of insulin action on the various cellular components of the central nervous system. We report here a study to investigate the presence and the properties of insulin specific binding sites in the murine neuroblastoma line, N18TG2, together with insulin action on cell growth and metabolism. Also, receptor internalization has been studied. Binding experiments, carried out in standard conditions at 20 degrees C, enabled us to demonstrate that these cells bind insulin in a specific manner, thus confirming previous findings on other cell lines. Saturation curves showed the presence of two binding sites with Kd 0.3 and 9.7 nM. Competition experiments with porcine and bovine insulin showed an IC50 of 1 and 10 nM, respectively. Competition did not occur in the presence of the unrelated hormones ACTH and FSH. Dissociation experiments indicated the existence of an internalization process of the ligand-receptor complex; this was confirmed by an ultrastructural study using gold conjugated insulin. As far as the insulin action in N18TG2 cells is concerned, physiological concentrations stimulate cell proliferation, whereas no stimulation of glucose uptake was observed, indicating that insulin action in these cells is not mediated by general metabolic effects. On the basis of these data, N18TG2 line appears to be a very suitable model for further studies of the neuronal type insulin receptors, and possibly insulin specific action on the nervous system.

  9. SU-E-T-127: Application of TG-119 for Evaluation of Proton Spot Scanning Based Planning and Treatment Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, J; Cao, N; Wong, T [SCCA Proton Therapy, A Procure Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Bowen, S; Bloch, C [University of Washington, School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The clinical test cases presented in AAPM TG-119 are used to evaluate the accuracy of treatment planning and delivery through spot scanning proton beams. Methods: An IBA spot scanning delivery system has been commissioned to be used with the RayStation treatment planning system. Various test cases provided in TG-119 were used for planning and delivery verification. The CT dataset and structures as provided by TG-119 were imported into a mock patient. The plans were optimized using the multi field optimization (MFO) to achieve the desired goals. The planner was given the flexibility to achieve the given dose-volume goals by creating appropriate objectives and constraints. Beams were delivered to a phantom and measurements were performed at multiple depths using the MatrixxPT detector array. The analyses were performed on beam by beam basis and quantified using the gamma index. A tolerance of 3%/3 mm in 2D was used for gamma index analysis along with dose threshold of 10%. Results: The clinical goals for targets and critical structures were met or improved for all cases except the C-Shape target with difficult constraints. The minimum gamma index using the 3%/3mm as a criterion is 93.3% for one of the planes measured for C-Shape target. Using 2%/2mm as a criterion, the minimum gamma index drops to 70%. Only Prostate target has all the planes above >90% pass using the 2%/2mm criterion. Conclusion: The overall accuracy of the treatment planning and delivery is deemed clinically acceptable. The test cases with highly modulated beams can have steep gradients in the dose profiles that can reduce the gamma index pass rate. Gamma analysis based on 3D data may be needed for routine use of 2%/2mm criterion. In addition, improvements in modelling of spot profiles in dose engine may be required for further improving the gamma index pass rate.

  10. Tail-flick test response in 3×Tg-AD mice at early and advanced stages of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeta-Corral, Raquel; Defrin, Ruti; Pick, Chagi G; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-07-23

    Despite the impact of pain in cognitive dysfunctions and affective disorders has been largely studied, the research that examines pain dimensions in cognitive impairment or dementia is still scarce. In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias, management of pain is challenging. While the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain is preserved, the cognitive-evaluative and the affective-motivational pain dimensions are affected. Due to the complexity of the disease and the poor self-reports, pain is underdiagnosed and undertreated. In confluence with an impaired thermoregulatory behavior, the patients' ability to confront environmental stressors such as cold temperature can put them at risk of fatal accidental hypothermia. Here, 3xTg-AD mice demonstrate that the sensorial-discriminative threshold to a noxious cold stimulus, as measured by the latency of tail-flicking, was preserved at early and advances stages of disease (7 and 11 month-old, respectively) as compared to age-matched (adulthood and middle aged, respectively) non-transgenic mice (NTg). In both genotypes, the sensory deterioration and poor thermoregulatory behavior associated to age was observed as an increase of tail-flick response and poor sensorimotor performance. At both stages studied, 3xTg-AD mice exhibited BPSD (Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia)-like alterations in the corner, open-field, dark-light box and the T-maze tests. In the adult NTg mice, this nociceptive withdrawal response was correlated with copying with stress-related behaviors. This integrative behavioral profile was lost in both groups of 3xTg-AD mice and middle aged controls, suggesting derangements in their subjacent networks and the complex interplay between the pain dimensions in the elderly with dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. SU-F-T-248: FMEA Risk Analysis Implementation (AAPM TG-100) in Total Skin Electron Irradiation Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez-Rosello, B; Bautista-Ballesteros, J; Bonaque, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, J [Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Clinica Benidorm, Benidorm, Alicante (Spain); Gonzalez-Sanchis, A; Lopez-Torrecilla, J; Brualla-Gonzalez, L; Garcia-Hernandez, T; Vicedo-Gonzalez, A; Granero, D; Serrano, A; Borderia, B; Solera, C [Hospital General ERESA, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Rosello, J [Hospital General ERESA, Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Universidad de Valencia, Valencia, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Total Skin Electron Irradiation (TSEI) is a radiotherapy treatment which involves irradiating the entire body surface as homogeneously as possible. It is composed of an extensive multi-step technique in which quality management requires high consumption of resources and a fluid communication between the involved staff, necessary to improve the safety of treatment. The TG-100 proposes a new perspective of quality management in radiotherapy, presenting a systematic method of risk analysis throughout the global flow of the stages through the patient. The purpose of this work has been to apply TG-100 approach to the TSEI procedure in our institution. Methods: A multidisciplinary team specifically targeting TSEI procedure was formed, that met regularly and jointly developed the process map (PM), following TG-100 guidelines of the AAPM. This PM is a visual representation of the temporal flow of steps through the patient since start until the end of his stay in the radiotherapy service. Results: This is the first stage of the full risk analysis, which is being carried out in the center. The PM provides an overview of the process and facilitates the understanding of the team members who will participate in the subsequent analysis. Currently, the team is implementing the analysis of failure modes and effects (FMEA). The failure modes of each of the steps have been identified and assessors are assigning a value of severity (S), frequency of occurrence (O) and lack of detection (D) individually. To our knowledge, this is the first PM made for the TSEI. The developed PM can be useful for those centers that intend to implement the TSEI technique. Conclusion: The PM of TSEI technique has been established, as the first stage of full risk analysis, performed in a reference center in this treatment.

  12. Investigation of thermodynamic properties of magnesium chloride amines by HPDSC and TG. For application in a high-lift high-temperature chemical heat pump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bevers, E.R.T.; Oonk, H.A.J.; Haije, W.G.; Ekeren, P.J. van

    2007-01-01

    The formation as well as the decomposition of magnesium chloride ammonia complexes was studied by high-pressure differential scanning calorimetry (HPDSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TG). HPDSC runs were performed under constant ammonia pressure conditions to determine the transition temperatures

  13. T cell Ig domain and mucin domain 1 engagement on invariant NKT cells in the presence of TCR stimulation enhances IL-4 production but inhibits IFN-gamma production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Sung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Chang Woo; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2010-04-15

    The T cell Ig domain and mucin domain (TIM)1 protein expressed on the surface of Th2 cells regulates the immune response by modulating cytokine production. However, the functional roles of TIM1 have not been examined in NKT cells. Therefore, we investigated the immunologic effects of TIM1 on NKT cells. We found that mouse NK1.1(+)TCR-beta(+), alpha-galactosyl ceramide/CD1d dimer(+) NKT, and NKT hybridoma (DN32.D3) cells constitutively express TIM1 and TIM4 on their surface. Engagement of TIM1 on NKT cells by any of several anti-TIM1 mAbs suppressed the production of IFN-gamma in the presence of TCR stimulation in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effects of such engagement on Th2 cytokine production by the NKT cells varied with the particular anti-TIM1 Ab clone. Moreover, in DN32.D3 TIM4-knockdown NKT hybridoma cells, TIM1 engagement by rTIM1 or TIM4 enhanced IL-4 production while inhibiting IFN-gamma production in the presence of alpha-galactosyl ceramide stimulation. TIM1 engagement increased GATA-3 expression but reduced T-bet expression in NKT cells in the presence of TCR engagement. The adoptive transfer of NKT cells preincubated with anti-TIM1 mAbs into Jalpha18(-/-) mice aggravated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by suppressing IFN-gamma production. Taken together, these results suggest that TIM1 costimulation on NKT cells enhances the cellular production of IL-4 while inhibiting the production of IFN-gamma. Thus, as a differential regulator of the immune response, TIM1 on NKT cells may be a useful therapeutic target for immune diseases.

  14. Tracking the conversion of nitrogen during pyrolysis of antibiotic mycelial fermentation residues using XPS and TG-FTIR-MS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Yang, Shijun; Wang, Liang; Liu, Yuchen; Qian, Feng; Yao, Wenqing; Zhang, Shicheng; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic mycelial fermentation residues (AMFRs), which are emerging solid pollutants, have been recognized as hazardous waste in China since 2008. Nitrogen (N), which is an environmental sensitivity element, is largely retained in AMFR samples derived from fermentation substrates. Pyrolysis is a promising technology for the treatment of solid waste. However, the outcomes of N element during the pyrolysis of AMFRs are still unknown. In this study, the conversion of N element during the pyrolysis of AMFRs was tracked using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and online TG-FTIR-MS (Thermogravimetry-Fourier transform infrared-Mass spectrometry) technology. In the AMFR sample, organic amine-N, pyrrolic-N, protein-N, pyridinic-N, was the main N-containing species. XPS results indicated that pyrrolic-N and pyridinic-N were retained in the AMFR-derived pyrolysis char. More stable species, such as N-oxide and quaternary-N, were also produced in the char. TG-FTIR-MS results indicated that NH_3 and HCN were the main gaseous species, and their contents were closely related to the contents of amine-N and protein-N, and pyrrolic-N and pyridinic-N of AMFRs, respectively. Increases in heating rate enhanced the amounts of NH_3 and HCN, but had less of an effect on the degradation degree of AMFRs. N-containing organic compounds, including amine-N, nitrile-N and heterocyclic-N, were discerned from the AMFR pyrolysis process. Their release range was extended with increasing of heating rate and carbon content of AMFR sample. This work will help to take appropriate measure to reduce secondary pollution from the treatment of AMFRs. - Highlights: • Hazardous AMFR material was treated by slow pyrolysis reaction. • TG-FTIR-MS were used to study the N conversion for pyrolysis gas and bio-oil. • NH_3 and HCN were observed as the main N-containing gas species. • XPS were used to study the N conversion for pyrolysis char. • Stable species, such as N-oxide and quaternary-N, were

  15. Characterization of Two Different Clay Materials by Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dilatometry (DIL) and Mass Spectrometry (MS) - 12215

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Ekkehard [NETZSCH Geraetebau GmbH, Wittelsbacherstrasse 42, 95100 Selb (Germany); Henderson, Jack B. [NETZSCH Instruments North America, LLC, 129 Middlesex Turnpike, Burlington, MA 01803 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    An illitic clay containing higher amounts of organic materials was investigated by dilatometry, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetric. The evolved gases were studied during simultaneous TG-DSC (STA) and dilatometer measurements with simultaneous mass spectrometry in inert gas and oxidizing atmosphere. The dilatometer results were compared with the STA-MS results which confirmed and explained the reactions found during heating of the clay, like dehydration, dehydroxylation, shrinkage, sintering, quartz phase transition, combustion or pyrolysis of organics and the solid state reactions forming meta-kaolinite and mullite. The high amount of organic material effects in inert gas atmosphere most probably a reduction of the oxides which leads to a higher mass loss than in oxidizing atmosphere. Due to this reduction an additional CO{sub 2} emission at around 1000 deg. C was detected which did not occur in oxidizing atmosphere. Furthermore TG-MS results of a clay containing alkali nitrates show that during heating, in addition to water and CO{sub 2}, NO and NO{sub 2} are also evolved, leading to additional mass loss steps. These types of clays showed water loss starting around 100 deg. C or even earlier. This relative small mass loss affects only less shrinkage during the expansion of the sample. The dehydroxylation and the high crystalline quartz content result in considerable shrinkage and expansion of the clay. During the usual solid state reaction where the clay structure collapses, the remaining material finally shrinks down to a so-called clinker. With the help of MS the TG steps can be better interpreted as the evolved gases are identified. With the help of the MS it is possible to distinguish between CO{sub 2} and water (carbonate decomposition, oxidation of organics or dehydration/dehydroxylation). The MS also clearly shows that mass number 44 is found during the TG step of the illitic clay at about 900 deg. C in inert gas, which was interpreted

  16. SU-E-T-393: Using TG119 to Assess RapidArc at Hamad Medical Corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobah, A; El-Kaissi, T; Hammoud, R; Al-Hammadi, N

    2012-06-01

    To provide a confidence level within our clinic relating to the implementation and administration of RapidArc, the AAPM TG1 19 has been implemented. This task group provides a sound and relatively simple methodology for determining the accuracy of the overall IMRT process administered in the day-to-day clinicMethods: Six different test plans, of varying complexity, were created on mock structure sets, downloaded from AAPM, and delivered. The treatment planning system results were then compared with the delivered results. Plans were created and delivered on a solid water phantom, using 25×25cm water equivalent slabs of varying thicknesses. Delivered point and planar dose measurements were obtained using an ionization chamber and film, respectively. The confidence limit (CL), averaged for all test plans, was calculated for the high dose point in the PTV and for the low dose point in the avoidance structure. This was used as an indicator of the uncertainty of the average difference between measured and planned dose. Where the precision of the delivery is based on how small the CL value is.For both the high and low dose points, the local CL's were determined to be 0.036 and 0.011, respectively. The range of results for the CL presented in TG1 19 varies from 0.015 to 0.098 for the high dose point, and from 0.014 to 0.086 for the low dose point. Our results indicate the accurate implementation of RapidArc within our clinic, especially when compared to the results of other institutions, published in TG1 19. Furthermore, the CL value for the low dose measurements is lower than any of the results published in TG119. We recommend that any clinic conducting IMRT should implement this task group. This will not only provide a greater understanding of the delivery and its limitations, but will also give the overall accuracy and consistency of the technique as it applies to the various treatment sites. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer’s disease (3xTgAD mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elysse M. Knight

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD and non-transgenic (Non-Tg control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4–10 months, 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD.

  18. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer’s disease (3xTgAD) mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Elysse M.; Brown, Timothy M.; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Smith, Jennifer C. M.; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Allan, Stuart M.; Lawrence, Catherine B.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD) and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4–10 months), 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD. PMID:22864021

  19. Age-related changes in core body temperature and activity in triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTgAD) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Elysse M; Brown, Timothy M; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Smith, Jennifer C M; Waters, Elizabeth J; Allan, Stuart M; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised, not only by cognitive deficits and neuropathological changes, but also by several non-cognitive behavioural symptoms that can lead to a poorer quality of life. Circadian disturbances in core body temperature and physical activity are reported in AD patients, although the cause and consequences of these changes are unknown. We therefore characterised circadian patterns of body temperature and activity in male triple transgenic AD mice (3xTgAD) and non-transgenic (Non-Tg) control mice by remote radiotelemetry. At 4 months of age, daily temperature rhythms were phase advanced and by 6 months of age an increase in mean core body temperature and amplitude of temperature rhythms were observed in 3xTgAD mice. No differences in daily activity rhythms were seen in 4- to 9-month-old 3xTgAD mice, but by 10 months of age an increase in mean daily activity and the amplitude of activity profiles for 3xTgAD mice were detected. At all ages (4-10 months), 3xTgAD mice exhibited greater food intake compared with Non-Tg mice. The changes in temperature did not appear to be solely due to increased food intake and were not cyclooxygenase dependent because the temperature rise was not abolished by chronic ibuprofen treatment. No β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques or neurofibrillary tangles were noted in the hypothalamus of 3xTgAD mice, a key area involved in temperature regulation, although these pathological features were observed in the hippocampus and amygdala of 3xTgAD mice from 10 months of age. These data demonstrate age-dependent changes in core body temperature and activity in 3xTgAD mice that are present before significant AD-related neuropathology and are analogous to those observed in AD patients. The 3xTgAD mouse might therefore be an appropriate model for studying the underlying mechanisms involved in non-cognitive behavioural changes in AD.

  20. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeets Ruben L

    2012-03-01

    activation. PMA/CD3 stimulation enhances a Th1-like response in an Lck and PKCθ dependent fashion, whereas PMA/CD28 stimulation results in a Th2-like phenotype independent of the proximal TCR-tyrosine kinase Lck. This approach offers a robust and fast translational in vitro system for skewed T helper cell responses in Jurkat T cells, primary human CD4+ Tcells and in a more complex matrix such as human whole blood.