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Sample records for task lists clinical

  1. Cosmetology Series. Duty Task List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the occupational duty/task lists for three occupations in the cosmetology series. Each occupation is divided into a number of duties. A separate page for each duty in the occupation lists the tasks in that duty along with its code number and columns to indicate whether that particular duty has been taught and to provide…

  2. Industrial Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    The duties and tasks found in these task lists form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult occupational training programs for industrial occupations. The industrial occupations are divided into eight clusters. The clusters and occupations are: construction cluster (bricklayer, carpenter, building maintenance…

  3. Task Lists for Health Occupations. Radiologic Aide. Activity Aide. Optometric Assistant. Physical Therapy Aide. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Janice

    These task lists contain employability skills and tasks for the following health occupations: radiologic aide, activity aide, physical therapy aide, and optometric assistant. The duties and tasks found in these lists form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult occupational training programs. Employability skills…

  4. Validated Competency Task Lists for Apparel and Accessories Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selke-Kern, Barbara E.

    Developed by a project that validated task lists by a variety of teachers and apparel marketing business persons, this guide contains task lists for occupations in the field of apparel and accessories marketing. The guide is organized in three sections. Section 1 includes the following: (1) notes on using the information in the guide; (2) a…

  5. Parts Counterperson. Auto, Agriculture & Truck. Task List Competency Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Instructional Materials Center, White Bear Lake.

    Developed by industry representatives and educators for use by vocational instructors, this guide focuses on the tasks and competencies necessary for a student to develop in order to secure employment as a counterperson in automobile, agriculture, and truck parts. The task list is an outline of various skills and proficiencies and covers sales,…

  6. Task group to develop list of environmental standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new task group designed to develop a list of existing and potential standards that are applicable to environmental contamination problems in soil, rock, and groundwater has been established by the American Society for Testing a n d Materials (ASTM) Subcommittee on Geotechnics of Waste Management. The list currently includes over 60 existing and draft ASTM standards from ASTM committees in the areas of site characterization, construction evaluation, and geosynthetics.

  7. A New Semantic List Learning Task to Probe Functioning of the Papez Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Kassel, Michelle T.; Weisenbach, Sara L.; Walker, Sara J.; Guidotti-Breting, Leslie M.; Rao, Julia A.; Hazlett, Kathleen E.; Considine, Ciaran M.; Sethi, Gurpriya; Vats, Naalti; Pecina, Marta; Welsh, Robert C.; Starkman, Monica N.; Giordani, Bruno; Langenecker, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction List learning tasks are powerful clinical tools for studying memory, yet have been relatively underutilized within the functional imaging literature. This limits understanding of regions such as the Papez circuit which support memory performance in healthy, non-demented adults. Method The current study characterized list learning performance in 40 adults who completed a Semantic List Learning Task (SLLT) with a Brown-Peterson manipulation during functional MRI (fMRI). Cued recall with semantic cues, and recognition memory were assessed after imaging. Internal reliability and convergent and discriminant validity were evaluated. Results Subjects averaged 38% accuracy in recall (62% for recognition), with primacy but no recency effects observed. Validity and reliability were demonstrated by showing that the SLLT was correlated with the California Verbal Learning test (CVLT), but not with executive functioning tests, and high intraclass correlation coefficient across lists for recall (.91). fMRI measurements during Encoding (vs. Silent Rehearsal) revealed significant activation in bilateral hippocampus, parahippocampus, and bilateral anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Post-hoc analyses showed increased activation in anterior and middle hippocampus, subgenual cingulate, and mammillary bodies specific to Encoding. In addition, increasing age was positively associated with increased activation in a diffuse network, particularly frontal cortex and specific Papez regions for correctly recalled words. Gender differences were specific to left inferior and superior frontal cortex. Conclusions This is a clinically relevant list learning task that can be used in studies of groups for which the Papez circuit is damaged or disrupted, in mixed or crossover studies at imaging and clinical sites. PMID:26313512

  8. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkan, D.; Derksen, R.; Levy, R.; Machin, S.; Ortel, T.; Pierangeli, S.; Roubey, R.; Lockshin, M.

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing

  9. Task Listings Resulting from the Vocational Competency Measures Project. Memorandum Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    This memorandum report consists of 14 task listings resulting from the Vocational Competency Measures Project. (The Vocational Competency Measures Project was a test development project that involved the writing and verification of task listings for 14 vocational occupational areas through over 225 interviews conducted in 27 states.) Provided in…

  10. Automotive Mechanic: Task List and Competency Record. Developed for Vocational-Technical Curriculum Articulation in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Intended for the vocational instructor, the booklet presents a task list and competency record for the occupational program of automotive mechanic. The list was developed by a working committee of auto mechanics instructors and industry representatives throughout the state of Minnesota for use in program articulation between secondary and…

  11. Lubrication Specialist: Task List and Competency Record. Developed for Vocational-Technical Curriculum Articulation in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    Intended for the vocational instructor, the booklet presents a task list and competency record for the occupational program of lubrication specialist. The list was developed by a working committee of auto mechanics instructors and industry representatives throughout the state of Minnesota for use in program articulation between secondary and…

  12. TASK SHIFTING IN HIV CLINICS, WESTERN KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    officers who are doctor-substitute cadres. In Tanzania, training is the disciplines of general medicine and surgery, ophthalmology, radiology, dermatology, anaesthesiology and dentistry and in Kenya training. East African Medical Journal Vol. 87 No. 7 July 2010. TASK SHIFTING IN HIV CLINICS, WESTERN KENYA.

  13. Herbal Hepatotoxicity: Clinical Characteristics and Listing Compilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Frenzel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Herb induced liver injury (HILI and drug induced liver injury (DILI share the common characteristic of chemical compounds as their causative agents, which were either produced by the plant or synthetic processes. Both, natural and synthetic chemicals are foreign products to the body and need metabolic degradation to be eliminated. During this process, hepatotoxic metabolites may be generated causing liver injury in susceptible patients. There is uncertainty, whether risk factors such as high lipophilicity or high daily and cumulative doses play a pathogenetic role for HILI, as these are under discussion for DILI. It is also often unclear, whether a HILI case has an idiosyncratic or an intrinsic background. Treatment with herbs of Western medicine or traditional Chinese medicine (TCM rarely causes elevated liver tests (LT. However, HILI can develop to acute liver failure requiring liver transplantation in single cases. HILI is a diagnosis of exclusion, because clinical features of HILI are not specific as they are also found in many other liver diseases unrelated to herbal use. In strikingly increased liver tests signifying severe liver injury, herbal use has to be stopped. To establish HILI as the cause of liver damage, RUCAM (Roussel Uclaf Causality Assessment Method is a useful tool. Diagnostic problems may emerge when alternative causes were not carefully excluded and the correct therapy is withheld. Future strategies should focus on RUCAM based causality assessment in suspected HILI cases and more regulatory efforts to provide all herbal medicines and herbal dietary supplements used as medicine with strict regulatory surveillance, considering them as herbal drugs and ascertaining an appropriate risk benefit balance.

  14. Revealing List-Level Control in the Stroop Task by Uncovering Its Benefits and a Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Julie M.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Scullin, Michael K.; Braver, Todd S.

    2011-01-01

    Interference is reduced in mostly incongruent relative to mostly congruent lists. Classic accounts of this list-wide proportion congruence effect assume that list-level control processes strategically modulate word reading. Contemporary accounts posit that reliance on the word is modulated poststimulus onset by item-specific information (e.g.,…

  15. The effects of awareness and secondary task demands on Stroop performance in the pre-cued lists paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Julie M; Diede, Nathaniel T

    2017-01-04

    Prior research has demonstrated that explicit pre-cues informing participants of the proportion congruence of an upcoming list of Stroop trials affect performance in mostly congruent lists but not mostly incongruent lists. This pattern suggests a limited role for expectations in influencing Stroop performance. An alternative explanation, however, is that the effects of pre-cues may be masked by a bleed-over of awareness (of the proportion congruence manipulation) from cued to uncued lists given use of a within-subjects manipulation of cueing in prior research. One aim of the current study was to test this explanation by examining patterns of cueing effects when cueing is manipulated between subjects. A second aim was to examine the effects of a secondary, stimulus detection task on expectation and experience-driven effects in the pre-cued lists paradigm. Countering the bleed-over of awareness account, the prior finding of a selective effect of expectations in mostly congruent lists was again observed in the current experiments, and post-experimental assessments of awareness in the uncued condition were unrelated to Stroop performance. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the secondary task did not disrupt experience-driven control but did disrupt the expectation-driven use of pre-cues especially when participants did not know that secondary task stimuli would appear in advance of a list. These findings advance our understanding of the role of awareness in patterns of Stroop performance, and raise interesting questions about the types of advance knowledge that can be integrated in an expectation-driven fashion to optimize Stroop performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ground Truth Creation for Complex Clinical NLP Tasks - an Iterative Vetting Approach and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jennifer J; Tsou, Ching-Huei; Devarakonda, Murthy V

    2017-01-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) holds the promise of effectively analyzing patient record data to reduce cognitive load on physicians and clinicians in patient care, clinical research, and hospital operations management. A critical need in developing such methods is the "ground truth" dataset needed for training and testing the algorithms. Beyond localizable, relatively simple tasks, ground truth creation is a significant challenge because medical experts, just as physicians in patient care, have to assimilate vast amounts of data in EHR systems. To mitigate potential inaccuracies of the cognitive challenges, we present an iterative vetting approach for creating the ground truth for complex NLP tasks. In this paper, we present the methodology, and report on its use for an automated problem list generation task, its effect on the ground truth quality and system accuracy, and lessons learned from the effort.

  17. Learning from experience: development of a cognitive task-list to assess the second stage of labour for operative delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Ryan; Simpson, Andrea; Gurau, David; Secter, Michael; Mocarski, Eva; Pittini, Richard; Snelgrove, John; Windrim, Rory; Higgins, Mary

    2015-04-01

    Ensuring the availability of operative vaginal delivery is one strategy for reducing the rising Caesarean section rate. However, current training programs appear inadequate. We sought to systematically identify the core steps in assessing women in the second stage of labour for safe operative delivery, and to produce an expert task-list to assist residents and obstetricians in deciding on the safest mode of delivery for their patients. Labour and delivery nursing staff of three large university-associated hospitals identified clinicians they considered to be skilled in operative vaginal deliveries. Obstetricians who were identified consistently were invited to participate in the study. Participants were filmed performing their normal assessment of the second stage of labour on a model. Two clinicians reviewed all videos and documented all verbal and non-verbal components of the assessment; these components were grouped into overarching themes and combined into an integrated expert task-list. The task-list was then circulated to all participants for additional comments, checked against SOGC guidelines, and redrafted, allowing production of a final expert task-list. Thirty clinicians were identified by this process and 20 agreed to participate. Themes identified were assessment of suitability, focused history, physical examination including importance of an abdominal examination, strategies to accurately assess fetal position, station, and the likelihood of success, cautionary signs to prompt reassessment in the operating room, and warning signs to abandon operative delivery for Caesarean section. Communication strategies were emphasized. Having expert clinicians teach assessment in the second stage of labour is an important step in the education of residents and junior obstetricians to improve confidence in managing the second stage of labour.

  18. Exploring dental operators' perceptions of their clinical tasks.

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    Thomson, W M; Brook, J A; Brook, R J

    1994-03-01

    Clinical variation is a result of the complex interaction of operator, operating environment and client variables. This study explores intra-operator characteristics by applying a technique from psychology known as Repertory Grid to New Zealand dental therapists, in order to elicit the ways in which they view their work. Individual interviews were conducted with 13 dental therapists to elicit the full range of tasks that they perform and the various ways that they describe them. Each therapist then rated her own work activities or tasks on her personal set of bipolar descriptions (personal constructs). Principal components analyses of each individual's set of ratings produced graphs which portrayed the pattern of meanings which therapists attributed to their work activities. Common features among the 13 therapists' work perceptions were then identified and categorised according to five types of variables (therapist, client, procedural, time and interpersonal). Common features included operator perceptions of painfulness of procedures, complexity of decision-making, interaction with people, stress for the therapist, preventive care for the client, routineness of task and challenge for the therapist. This detailed information gives a better understanding of the complex ways in which therapists view their tasks and therefore make decisions in the clinical setting. It could be conveniently used to develop a questionnaire to assess the empirical relationships between intra-operator factors and clinical outputs.

  19. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 4. Clinic QPCB Task Sort for Clinical Physician Assistants--Dermatology, ENT, Opththalmology, Orthopedics, and Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 4 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties for clinical physician assistants. (BT)

  20. Impact of Prefrontal Theta Burst Stimulation on Clinical Neuropsychological Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Viejo-Sobera

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Theta burst stimulation (TBS protocols hold high promise in neuropsychological rehabilitation. Nevertheless, their ability to either decrease (continuous, cTBS or increase (intermittent, iTBS cortical excitability in areas other than the primary motor cortex, and their consistency modulating human behaviors with clinically relevant tasks remain to be fully established. The behavioral effects of TBS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC are particularly interesting given its involvement in working memory (WM and executive functions (EF, often impaired following frontal brain damage. We aimed to explore the ability of cTBS and iTBS to modulate WM and EF in healthy individuals, assessed with clinical neuropsychological tests (Digits Backward, 3-back task, Stroop Test, and Tower of Hanoi. To this end, 36 participants were assessed using the four tests 1 week prior to stimulation and immediately following a single session of either cTBS, iTBS, or sham TBS, delivered to the left dlPFC. No significant differences were found across stimulation conditions in any of the clinical tasks. Nonetheless, in some of them, active stimulation induced significant pre/post performance modulations, which were not found for the sham condition. More specifically, sham stimulation yielded improvements in the 3-back task and the Color, Color-Word, and Interference Score of the Stroop Test, an effect likely caused by task practice. Both, iTBS and cTBS, produced improvements in Digits Backward and impairments in 3-back task accuracy. Moreover, iTBS increased Interference Score in the Stroop Test in spite of the improved word reading and impaired color naming, whereas cTBS decreased the time required to complete the Tower of Hanoi. Differing from TBS outcomes reported for cortico-spinal measures on the primary motor cortex, our analyses did not reveal any of the expected performance differences across stimulation protocols. However, if one considers independently

  1. Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcomes: Clinical Measures of Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Shana; Gilchrist, Laura; Sander, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most commonly reported impairments after breast cancer treatment affecting anywhere from 16-73% of breast cancer survivors Despite the high reported incidence of pain from cancer and its treatments, the ability to evaluate cancer pain continues to be difficult due to the complexity of the disease and the subjective experience of pain. The Oncology Section Breast Cancer EDGE Task Force was created to evaluate the evidence behind clinical outcome measures of pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. Methods The authors systematically reviewed the literature for pain outcome measures published in the research involving women diagnosed with breast cancer. The goal was to examine the reported psychometric properties that are reported in the literature in order to determine clinical utility. Results Visual Analog Scale, Numeric Rating Scale, Pressure Pain Threshold, McGill Pain Questionnaire, McGill Pain Questionnaire – Short Form, Brief Pain Inventory and Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form were highly recommended by the Task Force. The Task Force was unable to recommend two measures for use in the breast cancer population at the present time. Conclusions A variety of outcome measures were used to measure pain in women diagnosed with breast cancer. When assessing pain in women with breast cancer, researchers and clinicians need to determine whether a unidimensional or multidimensional tool is most appropriate as well as whether the tool has strong psychometric properties. PMID:25346950

  2. Effects of Delay and Number of Related List Items on Implicit Activation for DRM Critical Items in a Speeded Naming Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Michelle L.; Hutchison, Keith A.; Rand, Kristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined decay and additivity of semantic priming produced by DRM false memory lists on a naming task. Subjects were presented with study lists containing 14 DRM items that were either all 14 related, the first 7 related, the second 7 related, or all 14 unrelated to the non-presented critical item. Priming was measured on a naming…

  3. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren García-Cortés

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplements (DS are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™ while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang. Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs.

  4. Hepatotoxicity by Dietary Supplements: A Tabular Listing and Clinical Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cortés, Miren; Robles-Díaz, Mercedes; Ortega-Alonso, Aida; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Andrade, Raul J.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements (DS) are extensively consumed worldwide despite unproven efficacy. The true incidence of DS-induced liver injury (DSILI) is unknown but is probably under-diagnosed due to the general belief of safety of these products. Reported cases of herbals and DS-induced liver injury are increasing worldwide. The aim of this manuscript is to report a tabular listing with a description of DS associated with hepatotoxicity as well as review the phenotype and severity of DSILI. Natural remedies related to hepatotoxicity can be divided into herbal product-induced liver injury and DS-induced liver injury. In this article, we describe different DS associated with liver injury, some of them manufactured DS containing several ingredients (Herbalife™ products, Hydroxycut™, LipoKinetix™, UCP-1 and OxyELITE™) while others have a single ingredient (green tea extract, linoleic acid, usnic acid, 1,3-Dimethylamylamine, vitamin A, Garcinia cambogia and ma huang). Additional DS containing some of the aforementioned ingredients implicated in liver injury are also covered. We have also included illicit androgenic anabolic steroids for bodybuilding in this work, as they are frequently sold under the denomination of DS despite being conventional drugs. PMID:27070596

  5. The relation of salivary cortisol to patterns of performance on a word list learning task in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhr, Julie; Demireva, Petya; Heffner, Kathi

    2008-10-01

    A pattern of performance on a word list learning task known as a reduced primacy effect has been shown to be characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and can distinguish AD from depression. Deficits in memory and hippocampal atrophy seen in AD have been associated with hypercortisolism. The present study evaluated whether the reduced primacy effect is associated with elevated salivary cortisol in a sample of 40 healthy older community-dwelling adults participating in a study of memory and stress. We found that primacy, but not recency, was associated with higher salivary cortisol levels. In addition, participants who showed a reduced primacy had higher salivary cortisol levels than those with a normal serial position curve. Results suggest that there may be value to examining both serial position curves and changes to cortisol patterns over time as potential predictors of cognitive decline in healthy older adults.

  6. Just-in-time coding of the problem list in a clinical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J. J.; Collins, J.; Sorrentino, C.; Campbell, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Clinically useful problem lists are essential to the CPR. Providing a terminology that is standardized and understood by all clinicians is a major challenge. UNMC has developed a lexicon to support their problem list. Using a just-in-time coding strategy, the lexicon is maintained and extended prospectively in a dynamic clinical environment. The terms in the lexicon are mapped to ICD-9-CM, NANDA, and SNOMED International classification schemes. Currently, the lexicon contains 12,000 terms. This process of development and maintenance of the lexicon is described. PMID:9929226

  7. Maltreated and non-maltreated children's true and false memories of neutral and emotional word lists in the Deese/Roediger-McDermott task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugerud, Gunn Astrid; Howe, Mark L; Magnussen, Svein; Melinder, Annika

    2016-03-01

    Maltreated (n=26) and non-maltreated (n=31) 7- to 12-year-old children were tested on the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory task using emotional and neutral word lists. True recall was significantly better for non-maltreated than maltreated children regardless of list valence. The proportion of false recall for neutral lists was comparable regardless of maltreatment status. However, maltreated children showed a significantly higher false recall rate for the emotional lists than non-maltreated children. Together, these results provide new evidence that maltreated children could be more prone to false memory illusions for negatively valenced information than their non-maltreated counterparts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Task-based learning programme for clinical years of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Hasan; Degirmenci, Berna; Musal, Berna; Itil, Oya; Akalin, Elif; Kilinc, Oguz; Ozkan, Sebnem; Alici, Emin

    2006-03-01

    Task-based learning (TBL) is an educational strategy recommended for the later years of the medical education programme. The TBL programme was adopted for clinical years in the 2000-2001 academic year in Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine (DEUSM). The aim of this paper is to describe the TBL programme of DEUSM. DEUSM outlined 50 clinical tasks for fourth-year students and 37 for fifth-year students. The tasks were grouped into four and five blocks. Interdisciplinary practicals, lectures and patient visits were organised in each task's schedule. The tasks were the focus of learning and each discipline contributed its own learning opportunities to the attached tasks. Formative and summative methods were used to evaluate the programme. Based on the experience and feedback provided by the students and trainers, the authors considered TBL an applicable and advisable approach for the clinical years of medical education.

  9. Carla Task Force on Sarcopenia: propositions for clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abellan van Kan, G.; Andre, E.; Bischoff Ferrari, H.A.; Boirie, Y.; Onder, G.; Pahor, M.; Ritz, P; Rolland, Y.; Sampaio, C.; Studenski, S.; Visser, M.; Vellas, B.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of an aging population, public health priorities need to evolve. As the populations gets older, the already existing pathologies have become commonplace with specific geriatric clinical syndromes like frailty, mobility disability, or cognitive impairment, among others. Sarcopenia is

  10. The Workforce Task Force report: clinical implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, William D; Vatz, Kenneth A; Griggs, Robert C; Pedley, Timothy

    2013-07-30

    The American Academy of Neurology Workforce Task Force (WFTF) report predicts a future shortfall of neurologists in the United States. The WFTF data also suggest that for most states, the current demand for neurologist services already exceeds the supply, and by 2025 the demand for neurologists will be even higher. This future demand is fueled by the aging of the US population, the higher health care utilization rates of neurologic services, and by a greater number of patients gaining access to the health care system due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Uncertainties in health care delivery and patient access exist due to looming concerns about further Medicare reimbursement cuts. This uncertainty is set against a backdrop of Congressional volatility on a variety of issues, including the repeal of the sustainable growth rate for physician reimbursement. The impact of these US health care changes on the neurology workforce, future increasing demands, reimbursement, and alternative health care delivery models including accountable care organizations, nonphysician providers such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, and teleneurology for both stroke and general neurology are discussed. The data lead to the conclusion that neurologists will need to play an even larger role in caring for the aging US population by 2025. We propose solutions to increase the availability of neurologic services in the future and provide other ways of meeting the anticipated increased demand for neurologic care.

  11. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of a Dual-Tasking Paradigm in a Memory Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Malene Schjnning; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Siersma, Volkert; Hasselbalch, Steen Gregers; Hoegh, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Daily living requires the ability to perform dual-tasking. As cognitive skills decrease in dementia, performing a cognitive and motor task simultaneously become increasingly challenging and subtle gait abnormalities may even be present in pre-dementia stages. Therefore, a dual-tasking paradigm, such as the Timed Up and Go-Dual Task (TUG-DT), may be useful in the diagnostic assessment of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic ability of a dual-tasking paradigm in patients with MCI or mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to evaluate the association between the dual-tasking paradigm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarkers. The study is a prospective cohort study conducted in a clinical setting in two memory clinics. Eighty-six patients were included (28 MCI, 17 AD, 41 healthy controls (HC)). The ability to perform dual-tasking was evaluated by the TUG-DT. Patients underwent a standardized diagnostic assessment and were evaluated to determine progression yearly. ROC curve analysis illustrated a high discriminative ability of the dual-tasking paradigm in separating MCI patients from HC (AUC: 0.78, AUC: 0.82) and a moderate discriminative ability in separating MCI from AD (AUC: 0.73, AUC: 0.55). Performance discriminated clearly between all groups (p paradigm for progression and rate of cognitive decline. A moderately strong correlation between the dual-tasking paradigm and CSF AD biomarkers was observed. In our study, we found that patients with MCI and mild AD have increasing difficulties in dual-tasking compared to healthy elderly. Hence, the dual-tasking paradigm may be a potential complement in the diagnostic assessment in a typical clinical setting.

  12. Clinical Complexity in Medicine: A Measurement Model of Task and Patient Complexity.

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    Islam, R; Weir, C; Del Fiol, G

    2016-01-01

    Complexity in medicine needs to be reduced to simple components in a way that is comprehensible to researchers and clinicians. Few studies in the current literature propose a measurement model that addresses both task and patient complexity in medicine. The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated approach to understand and measure clinical complexity by incorporating both task and patient complexity components focusing on the infectious disease domain. The measurement model was adapted and modified for the healthcare domain. Three clinical infectious disease teams were observed, audio-recorded and transcribed. Each team included an infectious diseases expert, one infectious diseases fellow, one physician assistant and one pharmacy resident fellow. The transcripts were parsed and the authors independently coded complexity attributes. This baseline measurement model of clinical complexity was modified in an initial set of coding processes and further validated in a consensus-based iterative process that included several meetings and email discussions by three clinical experts from diverse backgrounds from the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa. The proposed clinical complexity model consists of two separate components. The first is a clinical task complexity model with 13 clinical complexity-contributing factors and 7 dimensions. The second is the patient complexity model with 11 complexity-contributing factors and 5 dimensions. The measurement model for complexity encompassing both task and patient complexity will be a valuable resource for future researchers and industry to measure and understand complexity in healthcare.

  13. How age affects memory task performance in clinically normal hearing persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercammen, Charlotte; Goossens, Tine; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate memory task performance in different age groups, irrespective of hearing status. Data are collected on a short-term memory task (WAIS-III Digit Span forward) and two working memory tasks (WAIS-III Digit Span backward and the Reading Span Test). The tasks are administered to young (20-30 years, n = 56), middle-aged (50-60 years, n = 47), and older participants (70-80 years, n = 16) with normal hearing thresholds. All participants have passed a cognitive screening task (Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA)). Young participants perform significantly better than middle-aged participants, while middle-aged and older participants perform similarly on the three memory tasks. Our data show that older clinically normal hearing persons perform equally well on the memory tasks as middle-aged persons. However, even under optimal conditions of preserved sensory processing, changes in memory performance occur. Based on our data, these changes set in before middle age.

  14. "How To" Videos Improve Residents Performance of Essential Perioperative Electronic Medical Records and Clinical Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Veronica; Caskey, Robert C; Dumon, Kristoffel R; Soegaard Ballester, Jacqueline M; Brooks, Ari D; Morris, Jon B; Dempsey, Daniel T

    The ability to use electronic medical records (EMR) is an essential skill for surgical residents. However, frustration and anxiety surrounding EMR tasks may detract from clinical performance. We created a series of brief, 1-3 minutes "how to" videos demonstrating 7 key perioperative EMR tasks: booking OR cases, placing preprocedure orders, ordering negative-pressure wound dressing supplies, updating day-of-surgery history and physical notes, writing brief operative notes, discharging patients from the postanesthesia care unit, and checking vital signs. Additionally, we used "Cutting Insights"-a locally developed responsive mobile application for surgical trainee education-as a platform for providing interns with easy access to these videos. We hypothesized that exposure to these videos would lead to increased resident efficiency and confidence in performing essential perioperative tasks, ultimately leading to improved clinical performance. Eleven surgery interns participated in this initiative. Before watching the "how to" videos, each intern was timed performing the aforementioned 7 key perioperative EMR tasks. They also underwent a simulated perioperative emergency requiring the performance of 3 of these EMR tasks in conjunction with 5 other required interventions (including notifying the chief resident, the anesthesia team, and the OR coordinator; and ordering fluid boluses, appropriate laboratories, and blood products). These simulations were scored on a scale from 0 to 8. The interns were then directed to watch the videos. Two days later, their times for performing the 7 tasks and their scores for a similar perioperative emergency simulation were once again recorded. Before and after watching the videos, participants were surveyed to assess their confidence in performing each EMR task using a 5-point Likert scale. We also elicited their opinions of the videos and web-based mobile application using a 5-point scale. Statistical analyses to assess for

  15. Learning to be a midwife in the clinical environment; tasks, clinical practicum hours or midwifery relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Lyn; Tierney, Olivia; Jones, Donovan

    2016-01-01

    Discussions continue within the midwifery profession around the number of and type of clinical experiences required to ensure competent midwifery graduates. Introduction of the three year Bachelor of Midwifery in Australia, almost two decades ago, was intended to reduce the pressure students were under to complete their academic requirements whilst ensuring students developed midwifery practice that encapsulates the philosophical values of midwifery. Currently, midwifery students are mandated to achieve a minimum number of clinical skills and Continuity of Care Experience (CCE) relationships in order to register upon completion of their degree. To achieve these experiences, universities require students to complete a number of clinical practicum hours. Furthermore students are required to demonstrate competent clinical performance of a number of clinical skills. However, there is no evidence to date that a set number of experiences or hours ensures professional competence in the clinical environment. The aim of this paper is to promote discussion regarding the mandated requirements for allocated clinical practicum hours, specified numbers of clinical-based skills and CCE relationships in the context of learning to be a midwife in Australia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Task-specific writing tremor: clinical phenotypes, progression, treatment outcomes, and proposed nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondo, William G; Satija, Pankaj

    2012-02-01

    Task-specific tremor diagnoses remain controversial. We evaluated 56 subjects seen with writing tremor. The diagnosis was made if there was a clear history of exclusive tremor while writing for at least 3 years before noticing tremor in any other scenario and the continued presence of writing tremor as the most prominent aspect of their tremor disorder on examination. The age of tremor onset was 47.2 ± 18.0 years (73.2% male). Ethnic backgrounds were Caucasian (68.4%), African (23.2%), Hispanic (5.2%), and Asian/Indian (3.3%), and 44% reported any tremor in a first degree relative. Writing tremor often progressed to other task-specific tremors or rest tremor but not to immediate postural tremor, as usually seen in essential tremor. The other tremor provoking scenarios were eating/drinking (14), brushing teeth/shaving/make-up (5), typing (2), suture removal (1), and drafting (1) and occurred a mean of 7.5 years after the onset of writing tremor. Fourteen developed a "rest" (true rest or crescendo) tremor but only 2 of these met clinical criteria for Parkinson's disease. Pharmacologic treatments of writing tremor, including with ethanol, were generally poor, whereas deep brain stimulation of the ventral intermediate (VIM) thalamus was successful. Compared with patients with "classic" essential tremor in our clinic, writing tremor patients were more likely African, more likely male, had an older age of onset, a lower likelihood of familial tremor, and were more refractory to tremor medications and ethanol. This supports segregation between task-specific tremor and essential tremor but does not support the specific diagnosis of "writing tremor" because many patients progress to tremor with other tasks.

  17. Attentional bias modification based on visual probe task: methodological issues, results and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Machado Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Attentional bias, the tendency that a person has to drive or maintain attention to a specific class of stimuli, may play an important role in the etiology and persistence of mental disorders. Attentional bias modification has been studied as a form of additional treatment related to automatic processing. Objectives: This systematic literature review compared and discussed methods, evidence of success and potential clinical applications of studies about attentional bias modification (ABM using a visual probe task. Methods: The Web of Knowledge, PubMed and PsycInfo were searched using the keywords attentional bias modification, attentional bias manipulation and attentional bias training. We selected empirical studies about ABM training using a visual probe task written in English and published between 2002 and 2014. Results: Fifty-seven studies met inclusion criteria. Most (78% succeeded in training attention in the predicted direction, and in 71% results were generalized to other measures correlated with the symptoms. Conclusions: ABM has potential clinical utility, but to standardize methods and maximize applicability, future studies should include clinical samples and be based on findings of studies about its effectiveness.

  18. Multiple Electrophysiological Markers of Visual-Attentional Processing in a Novel Task Directed toward Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bolduc-Teasdale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals who have sustained a mild brain injury (e.g., mild traumatic brain injury or mild cerebrovascular stroke are at risk to show persistent cognitive symptoms (attention and memory after the acute postinjury phase. Although studies have shown that those patients perform normally on neuropsychological tests, cognitive symptoms remain present, and there is a need for more precise diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to develop precise and sensitive markers for the diagnosis of post brain injury deficits in visual and attentional functions which could be easily translated in a clinical setting. Using electrophysiology, we have developed a task that allows the tracking of the processes involved in the deployment of visual spatial attention from early stages of visual treatment (N1, P1, N2, and P2 to higher levels of cognitive processing (no-go N2, P3a, P3b, N2pc, SPCN. This study presents a description of this protocol and its validation in 19 normal participants. Results indicated the statistically significant presence of all ERPs aimed to be elicited by this novel task. This task could allow clinicians to track the recovery of the mechanisms involved in the deployment of visual-attentional processing, contributing to better diagnosis and treatment management for persons who suffer a brain injury.

  19. Rational drug therapy education in clinical phase carried out by task-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, S Sırrı; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Özlem, Mıdık

    2017-01-01

    Irrational drug use results in drug interactions, treatment noncompliance, and drug resistance. Rational pharmacotherapy education is being implemented in many faculties of medicine. Our aim is to introduce rational pharmacotherapy education by clinicians and to evaluate task-based rational drug therapy education in the clinical context. The Kirkpatrick's evaluation model was used for the evaluation of the program. The participants evaluated the program in terms of constituents of the program, utilization, and contribution to learning. Voluntary participants responded to the evaluation forms after the educational program. Data are evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative tools. SPSS (version 21) used for quantitative data for determining mean and standard deviation values. Descriptive qualitative analysis approach is used for the analysis of open-ended questions. It was revealed that the program and its components have been favorable. A total 95.9% of the students consider the education to be beneficial. Simulated patients practice and personal drug choice/problem-based learning sessions were appreciated by the students in particular. 93.9% of the students stated that all students of medicine should undergo this educational program. Among the five presentations contained in the program, "The Principles of Prescribing" received the highest points (9 ± 1.00) from participating students in general evaluation of the educational program. This study was carried out to improve task-based rational drug therapy education. According to feedback from the students concerning content, method, resource, assessment, and program design; some important changes, especially in number of facilitators and indications, are made in rational pharmacotherapy education in clinical task-based learning program.

  20. Rational drug therapy education in clinical phase carried out by task-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilge, S. Sırrı; Akyüz, Bahar; Ağrı, Arzu Erdal; Özlem, Mıdık

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Irrational drug use results in drug interactions, treatment noncompliance, and drug resistance. Rational pharmacotherapy education is being implemented in many faculties of medicine. Our aim is to introduce rational pharmacotherapy education by clinicians and to evaluate task-based rational drug therapy education in the clinical context. Methods: The Kirkpatrick's evaluation model was used for the evaluation of the program. The participants evaluated the program in terms of constituents of the program, utilization, and contribution to learning. Voluntary participants responded to the evaluation forms after the educational program. Data are evaluated using both quantitative and qualitative tools. SPSS (version 21) used for quantitative data for determining mean and standard deviation values. Descriptive qualitative analysis approach is used for the analysis of open-ended questions. Results: It was revealed that the program and its components have been favorable. A total 95.9% of the students consider the education to be beneficial. Simulated patients practice and personal drug choice/problem-based learning sessions were appreciated by the students in particular. 93.9% of the students stated that all students of medicine should undergo this educational program. Among the five presentations contained in the program, “The Principles of Prescribing” received the highest points (9 ± 1.00) from participating students in general evaluation of the educational program. Conclusion: This study was carried out to improve task-based rational drug therapy education. According to feedback from the students concerning content, method, resource, assessment, and program design; some important changes, especially in number of facilitators and indications, are made in rational pharmacotherapy education in clinical task-based learning program. PMID:28458432

  1. Machine-learning model observer for detection and localization tasks in clinical SPECT-MPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parages, Felipe M.; O'Connor, J. Michael; Pretorius, P. Hendrik; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we propose a machine-learning MO based on Naive-Bayes classification (NB-MO) for the diagnostic tasks of detection, localization and assessment of perfusion defects in clinical SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI), with the goal of evaluating several image reconstruction methods used in clinical practice. NB-MO uses image features extracted from polar-maps in order to predict lesion detection, localization and severity scores given by human readers in a series of 3D SPECT-MPI. The population used to tune (i.e. train) the NB-MO consisted of simulated SPECT-MPI cases - divided into normals or with lesions in variable sizes and locations - reconstructed using filtered backprojection (FBP) method. An ensemble of five human specialists (physicians) read a subset of simulated reconstructed images, and assigned a perfusion score for each region of the left-ventricle (LV). Polar-maps generated from the simulated volumes along with their corresponding human scores were used to train five NB-MOs (one per human reader), which are subsequently applied (i.e. tested) on three sets of clinical SPECT-MPI polar maps, in order to predict human detection and localization scores. The clinical "testing" population comprises healthy individuals and patients suffering from coronary artery disease (CAD) in three possible regions, namely: LAD, LcX and RCA. Each clinical case was reconstructed using three reconstruction strategies, namely: FBP with no SC (i.e. scatter compensation), OSEM with Triple Energy Window (TEW) SC method, and OSEM with Effective Source Scatter Estimation (ESSE) SC. Alternative Free-Response (AFROC) analysis of perfusion scores shows that NB-MO predicts a higher human performance for scatter-compensated reconstructions, in agreement with what has been reported in published literature. These results suggest that NB-MO has good potential to generalize well to reconstruction methods not used during training, even for reasonably dissimilar datasets (i

  2. Task-based learning: the answer to integration and problem-based learning in the clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, R; Crosby, J; Davis, M H; Howie, P W; Struthers, A D

    2000-05-01

    Integrated teaching and problem-based learning (PBL) are powerful educational strategies. Difficulties arise, however, in their application in the later years of the undergraduate medical curriculum, particularly in clinical attachments. Two solutions have been proposed - the use of integrated clinical teaching teams and time allocated during the week for PBL separate from the clinical work. Both approaches have significant disadvantages. Task-based learning (TBL) is a preferred strategy. In TBL, a range of tasks undertaken by a doctor are identified, e.g. management of a patient with abdominal pain, and these are used as the focus for learning. Students have responsibility for integrating their learning round the tasks as they move through a range of clinical attachments in different disciplines. They are assisted in this process by study guides. The implementation of TBL is described in one medical school. One hundred and thirteen tasks, arranged in 16 groups, serve to integrate the student learning as they rotate through 10 clinical attachments. This trans-disciplinary approach to integration, which incorporates the principles of PBL offers advantages to both teachers and students. It recognizes that clinical attachments in individual disciplines can offer rich learning opportunities and that such attachments can play a role in an integrated, as well as in a traditional, curriculum. In TBL, the contributions of the clinical attachments to the curriculum learning outcomes must be clearly defined and tasks selected which will serve as a focus for the integration of the students' learning over the range of attachments.

  3. Implementation of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology: integration of clinical tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Dinesen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To explore how the implementation of the concept ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology influences the integration of clinical tasks across healthcare sectors. Theory: Inter-organisational theory. Methods: The case study approach was applied. Triangulations of data collection techniques were used: documentary materials, participant observation, qualitative and focus group interviews. Results: The clinical decision-making and task solving became multidisciplinary and integrated with the implementation of telehomecare and, therefore, complex in terms of the prescription and adjustment of patient medicine. Workflows between healthcare professionals across sectors changed from sequential to collective client flows. Pre-existing procedures for patient care, treatment, and responsibility were challenged. In addition, the number of tasks for the district nurses increased. Integration in the clinical task-solving area increases fragmentation in the knowledge technologies in a network perspective. Conclusions: Implementing the concept of ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology will result in a more integrated clinical task-solving process that involves healthcare professionals from various sectors. Overall, the integration of clinical tasks between hospital and district nursing will result in a direct benefit for the heart patients.

  4. Implementation of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology: integration of clinical tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesen, Birthe; Gustafsson, Jeppe; Nøhr, Christian; Andersen, Stig Kjær; Sejersen, Holger; Toft, Egon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To explore how the implementation of the concept ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology influences the integration of clinical tasks across healthcare sectors. Theory Inter-organisational theory. Methods The case study approach was applied. Triangulations of data collection techniques were used: documentary materials, participant observation, qualitative and focus group interviews. Results The clinical decision-making and task solving became multidisciplinary and integrated with the implementation of telehomecare and, therefore, complex in terms of the prescription and adjustment of patient medicine. Workflows between healthcare professionals across sectors changed from sequential to collective client flows. Pre-existing procedures for patient care, treatment, and responsibility were challenged. In addition, the number of tasks for the district nurses increased. Integration in the clinical task-solving area increases fragmentation in the knowledge technologies in a network perspective. Conclusions Implementing the concept of ‘Home hospitalisation of heart patients’ by means of telehomecare technology will result in a more integrated clinical task-solving process that involves healthcare professionals from various sectors. Overall, the integration of clinical tasks between hospital and district nursing will result in a direct benefit for the heart patients. PMID:17627299

  5. The intersubject and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation during three encoding tasks: implications for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Greg S. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Radiology, Richmond, VA (United States); Tomaszewski Farias, Sarah [University of California at Davis, Department of Neurology, Sacramento (United States); Buonocore, Michael H. [University of California at Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento (United States); Yonelinas, Andrew P. [University of California at Davis, Department of Psychology, Davis (United States)

    2006-07-15

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the inter- and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation for three memory encoding tasks previously used in the context of presurgical functional mapping. The primary region of interest (ROI) was the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Comparative ROIs included the inferior frontal and fusiform gyri which are less affected by susceptibility-induced signal losses than the MTL regions. Eighteen subjects were scanned using three memory encoding paradigms: word-pair, pattern, and scene encoding. Nine subjects underwent repeat scanning. Intersubject reproducibility of FMRI activation was evaluated by examining the percent of subjects who showed activation within a given ROI and the range to which individual laterality indices (LIs) varied from the mean. Intrasubject test-retest reproducibility was evaluated by examining the LI test-retest correlation, the average difference between LIs from two separate imaging sessions, and concordance ratios of activation volumes (R{sub volume} and R{sub overlap}). For scene encoding the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL were as good as or better than the reproducibility within the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. For pattern encoding and word-pair encoding, the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL tended to be worse compared to the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. The differences in FMRI reproducibility appeared more dependent on the task than the susceptibility effects. The results of this study suggest that FMRI-based assessment of the neural substrates of memory using a scene encoding task may be a useful clinical tool. (orig.)

  6. The intersubject and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation during three encoding tasks: implications for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Greg S.; Tomaszewski Farias, Sarah; Buonocore, Michael H.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the inter- and intrasubject reproducibility of FMRI activation for three memory encoding tasks previously used in the context of presurgical functional mapping. The primary region of interest (ROI) was the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Comparative ROIs included the inferior frontal and fusiform gyri which are less affected by susceptibility-induced signal losses than the MTL regions. Eighteen subjects were scanned using three memory encoding paradigms: word-pair, pattern, and scene encoding. Nine subjects underwent repeat scanning. Intersubject reproducibility of FMRI activation was evaluated by examining the percent of subjects who showed activation within a given ROI and the range to which individual laterality indices (LIs) varied from the mean. Intrasubject test-retest reproducibility was evaluated by examining the LI test-retest correlation, the average difference between LIs from two separate imaging sessions, and concordance ratios of activation volumes (R volume and R overlap ). For scene encoding the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL were as good as or better than the reproducibility within the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. For pattern encoding and word-pair encoding, the reproducibility of activation volume and LIs within the MTL tended to be worse compared to the fusiform and inferior frontal ROIs. The differences in FMRI reproducibility appeared more dependent on the task than the susceptibility effects. The results of this study suggest that FMRI-based assessment of the neural substrates of memory using a scene encoding task may be a useful clinical tool. (orig.)

  7. Adapting Cognitive Task Analysis to Investigate Clinical Decision Making and Medication Safety Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Militello, Laura G; Glassman, Peter A; Arthur, Karen J; Zillich, Alan J; Weiner, Michael

    2017-05-03

    Cognitive task analysis (CTA) can yield valuable insights into healthcare professionals' cognition and inform system design to promote safe, quality care. Our objective was to adapt CTA-the critical decision method, specifically-to investigate patient safety incidents, overcome barriers to implementing this method, and facilitate more widespread use of cognitive task analysis in healthcare. We adapted CTA to facilitate recruitment of healthcare professionals and developed a data collection tool to capture incidents as they occurred. We also leveraged the electronic health record (EHR) to expand data capture and used EHR-stimulated recall to aid reconstruction of safety incidents. We investigated 3 categories of medication-related incidents: adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug-disease interactions. Healthcare professionals submitted incidents, and a subset of incidents was selected for CTA. We analyzed several outcomes to characterize incident capture and completed CTA interviews. We captured 101 incidents. Eighty incidents (79%) met eligibility criteria. We completed 60 CTA interviews, 20 for each incident category. Capturing incidents before interviews allowed us to shorten the interview duration and reduced reliance on healthcare professionals' recall. Incorporating the EHR into CTA enriched data collection. The adapted CTA technique was successful in capturing specific categories of safety incidents. Our approach may be especially useful for investigating safety incidents that healthcare professionals "fix and forget." Our innovations to CTA are expected to expand the application of this method in healthcare and inform a wide range of studies on clinical decision making and patient safety.

  8. Consolidated List of Lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    List of chemicals subject to reporting requirements under the Emergency Planning and Community Right- To-Know Act (EPCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Section 112(r) of the Clean Air Act.

  9. Assessment of dual tasking has no clinical value for fall prediction in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, K.; Esselink, R.A.J.; Weiss, A; Kessels, R.P.C.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the value of dual-task performance for the prediction of falls inpatients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Two hundred sixty three patients with PD (H&Y 1-3, 65.2 +/- 7.9 years)walked two times along a 10-m trajectory, both under single-task and dual-task

  10. SU-E-T-181: Clinical Implementation of Task Group 176

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgdorf, B [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Yeager, C; Zhou, F; Hand, C [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The implementation of TG-176 with regards to immobilization devices and couch tops as they effect dosimetric treatment planning. Methods: The external devices used clinically were scanned to measure their HU values. Plans were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) using these devices, one that accounted for the correct HU value of the each device and another that did not include the device as a structure. A dose subtraction was performed between the two plans to evaluate the dosimetric differences. The metrics used for evaluation included attenuation and surface dose. Plan parameters were varied to evaluate the impact of the devices in different clinical scenarios. Results: While the exact HU values of our results are clinic-dependent, the protocol being implemented is widely applicable. We recommend a four step process for implementing this task group. First, physics should scan each treatment device to determine accurate HU values. Second, CT therapists should include in the setup note which table top was used during patient CT simulation and are asked to make immobilization devices as uniform in thickness as possible. Therapists should also index the devices whenever possible so beam will traverse the same area of the device. Third, the dosimetrist should manually correct the HU value for any external device, including the couch. For H&N cases, the rails must be removed from the couch structure. When rails are used during treatments, it is important to make note of their exact position in the setup notes. Finally, physicians should be made aware that there could be changes in surface doses depending on whether or not immobilization devices or couch tops are in the beam path. Conclusion: The protocol outlined above was implemented to reduce the errors that arise from ignoring effects of external devices, thus ensuring safer, more accurate patient treatments.

  11. Assessment of dual tasking has no clinical value for fall prediction in Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smulders, Katrijn; Esselink, Rianne A. J.; Weiss, Aner; Kessels, Roy P. C.; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Bloem, Bastiaan R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the value of dual-task performance for the prediction of falls in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Two hundred sixty-three patients with PD (H&Y 1–3, 65.2 ± 7.9 years) walked two times along a 10-m trajectory, both under single-task and dual-task (DT) conditions (combined with an auditory Stroop task). To control for a cueing effect, Stroop stimuli were presented at variable or fixed 1- or 2-s intervals. The auditory Stroop task was also pe...

  12. Reliability of clinical competency evaluation list for novice physical and occupational therapists requiring assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Yoshikiyo; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Yoshito; Hirano, Yudai; Koyama, Soichiro; Tanabe, Shigeo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the reliability of a clinical ability evaluation table developed in a previous study with the aim of clarifying the abilities necessary for therapists to independently implement their duties. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-eight physical therapists with less than 2 years of clinical experience were targeted for evaluation, 48 main supervisors, and 48 sub-supervisors, 144 in total, were studied. [Results] The total score was lower when the evaluation was conducted by the target therapists themselves than when it was conducted by the main or sub-supervisors. Regarding the reliability of the total scores for the entire scale and each category, values representing the intra-rater reliability were higher when the evaluation was conducted by the target therapists or main supervisors, while there were marked differences between high and low values for each item. Regarding the inter-rater reliability, both the total scores for the entire scale and each category, as well as values for each item, were low. [Conclusion] Values representing the intra-rater reliability of the study table were low, indicating the necessity of further improvement.

  13. Assessment of dual tasking has no clinical value for fall prediction in Parkinson’s disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katrijn Smulders; Bastiaan Bloem; Roy Kessels; Alexander Geurts; Aner Weiss; Rianne Esselink

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the value of dual-task performance for the prediction of falls inpatients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Two hundred sixty three patients with PD (H&Y 1–3, 65.2 ± 7.9 years)walked two times along a 10-m trajectory, both under single-task and dual-task

  14. International variation in performance by clinical discipline and task on the United States medical licensing examination step 2 clinical knowledge component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Kathleen Z; Swanson, David B; Ouyang, Wenli; Dillon, Gerard F; Boulet, John R

    2014-11-01

    To investigate country-to-country variation in performance across clinical science disciplines and tasks for examinees taking the Step 2 Clinical Knowledge (CK) component of the United States Medical Licensing Examination. In 2012 the authors analyzed demographic characteristics, total scores, and percent-correct clinical science discipline and task scores for more than 88,500 examinees taking Step 2 CK for the first time during the 2008-2010 academic years. For each examinee and score, differences between the score and the mean performance of examinees at U.S. MD-granting medical schools were calculated, and mean differences by country of medical school were tabulated for analysis of country-to-country variation in performance by clinical discipline and task. Controlling for overall performance relative to U.S. examinees, results showed that international medical graduates (IMGs) performed best in Surgery and worst in Psychiatry for clinical discipline scores; for clinical tasks, IMGs performed best in Understanding Mechanisms of Disease and worst in Promoting Preventive Medicine and Health Maintenance. The pattern of results was strongest for IMGs attending schools in the Middle East and Australasia, present to a lesser degree for IMGs attending schools in Europe, and absent for IMGs attending Caribbean medical schools. Country-to-country differences in relative performance were present for both clinical discipline and task scores. Possible explanations include differences in learning outcomes, curriculum emphasis and clinical experience, standards of care, and culture, as well as the effects of English as a second language and relative emphasis on preparing students to take the Step 2 CK exam.

  15. Multi-morbidities of allergic rhinitis in adults: European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cingi, C.; Gevaert, P.; Mösges, R.; Rondon, C.; Hox, V.; Rudenko, M.; Muluk, N. B.; Scadding, G.; Manole, F.; Hupin, C.; Fokkens, W. J.; Akdis, C.; Bachert, C.; Demoly, P.; Mullol, J.; Muraro, A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Pawankar, R.; Rombaux, P.; Toskala, E.; Kalogjera, L.; Prokopakis, E.; Hellings, P. W.; Bousquet, J.

    2017-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force on Allergic Rhinitis (AR) comorbidities. The aim of this multidisciplinary European consensus document is to highlight the role of multimorbidities in the definition, classification, mechanisms,

  16. Critical care providers refer to information tools less during communication tasks after a critical care clinical information system introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballermann, Mark; Shaw, Nicola T; Mayes, Damon C; Gibney, R T Noel

    2011-01-01

    Electronic documentation methods may assist critical care providers with information management tasks in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). We conducted a quasi-experimental observational study to investigate patterns of information tool use by ICU physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists during verbal communication tasks. Critical care providers used tools less at 3 months after the CCIS introduction. At 12 months, care providers referred to paper and permanent records, especially during shift changes. The results suggest potential areas of improvement for clinical information systems in assisting critical care providers in ensuring informational continuity around their patients.

  17. Psychometric Properties of the Chinese Version of the Brief Borderline Symptom List in Undergraduate Students and Clinical Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Yang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The brief version of the Borderline Symptom List (BSL-23 is a self-rated scale developed from the initial 95-item version of Borderline Symptom List (BSL-95. The current study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the BSL-23. A total of 570 undergraduate students and 323 clinical patients completed the BSL-23, the borderline subscale of the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ-4+, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th version (BIS-11, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ and the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA was conducted to test the one-factor structure of the BSL-23. Cronbach’s alpha, Omega coefficient, Split-Half coefficient, Mean Inter-Item Correlation (MIC and test-retest reliability were also measured. The correlations between the BSL-23 and other psychological variables were used to assess criterion-related validity and convergent validity. Participants who scored ≥ 5 on the borderline subscale of the PDQ-4+ were placed into the borderline personality disorder (BPD screening-positive group, while the others were placed into the screening-negative group. Independent sample t-tests were performed to examine the differences in BSL-23 scores between the BPD screening-positive group and the BPD screening-negative group. The CFA results supported the one-factor structure of the BSL-23 in both samples. The internal consistency was high both in the undergraduate sample (Cronbach’s α = 0.93, Omega = 0.95, Split-Half coefficient = 0.89, MIC = 0.38 and the clinical sample (Cronbach’s α = 0.97, Omega = 0.97, Split-Half coefficient = 0.96, MIC = 0.56. The test-retest reliability within 2 weeks was 0.62. The BSL-23 displayed moderate to high correlations with the PDQ-4+-Borderline subscale, the CES-D, the BIS-11, the CTQ and the ASQ (r = 0.35 – 0.70. In addition, the BSL-23 discriminated between

  18. Clinical predictors of the optimal spectacle correction for comfort performing desktop tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Davenport, Byrd; Rentz, Jodi; Miller, Amy; Benson, William

    2008-11-01

    The best strategy for spectacle correction of presbyopia for near tasks has not been determined. Thirty volunteers over the age of 40 years were tested for subjective accommodative amplitude, pupillary size, fusional vergence, interpupillary distance, arm length, preferred working distance, near and far visual acuity and preferred reading correction in the phoropter and trial frames. Subjects performed near tasks (reading, writing and counting change) using various spectacle correction strengths. Predictors of the correction maximising near task comfort were determined by multivariable linear regression. The mean age was 54.9 years (range 43 to 71) and 40 per cent had diabetes. Significant predictors of the most comfortable addition in univariate analyses were age (pphoropter (p=0.002) or trial frames (p0.15). The preferred addition wearing trial frames holding a reading target at a distance selected by the patient was the only independent predictor. Excluding this variable, distance visual acuity was predictive independent of age or near vision wearing distance correction. The distance selected for task performance was predicted by vision wearing distance correction at near and at distance. Multivariable linear regression can be used to generate tables based on distance visual acuity and age or near vision wearing distance correction to determine tentative near spectacle addition. Final spectacle correction for desktop tasks can be estimated by subjective refraction with trial frames.

  19. A contribution of cognitive decision models to clinical assessment: decomposing performance on the Bechara gambling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Jerome R; Stout, Julie C

    2002-09-01

    The Bechara simulated gambling task is a popular method of examining decision-making deficits exhibited by people with brain damage, psychopathology, antisocial personality, or drug abuse problems. However, performance on this task is confounded by complex interdependencies between cognitive, motivational, and response processes, making it difficult to sort out and identify the specific processes responsible for the observed behavioral deficits. The authors compare 3 competing cognitive decision models of the Bechara task in terms of their ability to explain the performance deficits observed in Huntington's disease patients as compared with healthy populations and people with Parkinson's disease. The parameters of the best fitting model are used to decompose the observed performance deficit of the Huntington patients into cognitive, motivational, and response sources.

  20. Oncology Section EDGE Task Force on Urogenital Cancer: A Systematic Review of Clinical Measures for Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Alicia; Harrington, Shana E; Hill, Alexandra; Roscow, Amanda; Alappattu, Meryl

    2017-07-01

    Compared to the general population, women and men with urogenital and colorectal cancer experience higher rates of urinary and fecal incontinence. Although a variety of measures exist to assess these areas, currently, there are no guidelines recommending which outcomes rehabilitation professionals should administer to examine these impairments in those with cancer. To identify outcome measures for assessing urinary and fecal incontinence and evaluate their psychometric data and applicability to the cancer population. Multiple electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo) were reviewed using specific search terms to locate articles that identify outcome measures assessing urinary and fecal incontinence. As part of a larger effort to identify outcome measures for both incontinence and sexual dysfunction, 1118 articles were initially identified, 228 articles were reviewed, and 37 outcome measures were selected for analysis, 13 of which were related to urinary and fecal incontinence. Each incontinence outcome measure was independently reviewed and rated by two reviewers using the Cancer EDGE Task Force Outcome Measure Rating Form. Any discrepancies between reviewers were discussed and an overall recommendation for each outcome measure was made using the 4-point Cancer EDGE Task Force Rating Scale. The Task Force was able to highly recommend 1 measure addressing urinary incontinence (American Urological Association Symptom Index) and 2 measures assessing both urinary and fecal incontinence (Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory - Short Form, Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire - Short Form). The Task Force also recommended two measures of urinary incontinence that demonstrated strong psychometric properties, but had not yet been evaluated in the cancer population (Incontinence Quality of Life Questionnaire, International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form). The Task Force was unable to recommend any measures that solely addressed fecal incontinence. Five

  1. Relationship of neuroimaging to typical sleep times during a clinical reasoning task: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durning, S.J.; Kelly, W.; Costanzo, M.E.; Artino, A.R.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Beckman, T.J.; Roy, M.J.H.M. van; Holmboe, E.S.; Wittich, C.M.; Schuwirth, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep deprivation and fatigue have been associated with medical errors, clinical performance decrements, and reduced quality of life for both practicing physicians and medical students. Greater understanding of the impact of sleep quantity on clinical reasoning could improve patient

  2. The Chief Clinical Informatics Officer (CCIO): AMIA Task Force Report on CCIO Knowledge, Education, and Skillset Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannry, Joseph; Sengstack, Patricia; Thyvalikakath, Thankam Paul; Poikonen, John; Middleton, Blackford; Payne, Thomas; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    The emerging operational role of the "Chief Clinical Informatics Officer" (CCIO) remains heterogeneous with individuals deriving from a variety of clinical settings and backgrounds. The CCIO is defined in title, responsibility, and scope of practice by local organizations. The term encompasses the more commonly used Chief Medical Informatics Officer (CMIO) and Chief Nursing Informatics Officer (CNIO) as well as the rarely used Chief Pharmacy Informatics Officer (CPIO) and Chief Dental Informatics Officer (CDIO). The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) identified a need to better delineate the knowledge, education, skillsets, and operational scope of the CCIO in an attempt to address the challenges surrounding the professional development and the hiring processes of CCIOs. An AMIA task force developed knowledge, education, and operational skillset recommendations for CCIOs focusing on the common core aspect and describing individual differences based on Clinical Informatics focus. The task force concluded that while the role of the CCIO currently is diverse, a growing body of Clinical Informatics and increasing certification efforts are resulting in increased homogeneity. The task force advised that 1.) To achieve a predictable and desirable skillset, the CCIO must complete clearly defined and specified Clinical Informatics education and training. 2.) Future education and training must reflect the changing body of knowledge and must be guided by changing day-to-day informatics challenges. A better defined and specified education and skillset for all CCIO positions will motivate the CCIO workforce and empower them to perform the job of a 21st century CCIO. Formally educated and trained CCIOs will provide a competitive advantage to their respective enterprise by fully utilizing the power of Informatics science.

  3. Organization of the clinical activity of geriatric oncology: report of a SIOG (International Society of Geriatric Oncology) task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Silvio; Aapro, M S; Bennett, J M; Mori, M; Regenstreif, D; Rodin, M; Stein, B; Zulian, G B; Droz, J P

    2007-04-01

    Management for elderly cancer patients world wide is far from being optimal and few older patients are entering clinical trials. A SIOG Task Force was therefore activated to analyze how the clinical activity of Geriatric Oncology is organized. A structured questionnaire was circulated among the SIOG Members. Fifty eight answers were received. All respondents identified Geriatric Oncology, as an area of specialization, however the organization of the clinical activity was variable. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) was performed in 60% of cases. A Geriatric Oncology Program (GOP) was identified in 21 centers, 85% located in Oncology and 15% in Geriatric Departments. In the majority of GOP scheduled case discussion conferences dedicated to elderly cancer patients took regular place, the composition of the multidisciplinary team involved in the GOP activity included Medical Oncologists, Geriatricians, Nurses, Pharmacists, Social Workers. Fellowships in Geriatric Oncology were present in almost half of GOPs. Over 60% of respondents were willing to recruit patients over 70 years in clinical trials, while the proportion of cases included was only 20%. Enrolment in clinical trials was perceived as more difficult by 52% and much more difficult in 12% of the respondents. In conclusion, a better organization of the clinical activity in Geriatric Oncology allows a better clinical practice and an optimal clinical research. The GOP which can be set up in the oncological as well as in the geriatric environment thought a multidisciplinary coordinator effort. Future plans should also concentrate on divisions, units or departments of Geriatric Oncology.

  4. Symptom severity prediction from neuropsychiatric clinical records: Overview of 2016 CEGS N-GRID shared tasks Track 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Michele; Stubbs, Amber; Uzuner, Özlem

    2017-11-01

    The second track of the CEGS N-GRID 2016 natural language processing shared tasks focused on predicting symptom severity from neuropsychiatric clinical records. For the first time, initial psychiatric evaluation records have been collected, de-identified, annotated and shared with the scientific community. One-hundred-ten researchers organized in twenty-four teams participated in this track and submitted sixty-five system runs for evaluation. The top ten teams each achieved an inverse normalized macro-averaged mean absolute error score over 0.80. The top performing system employed an ensemble of six different machine learning-based classifiers to achieve a score 0.86. The task resulted to be generally easy with the exception of two specific classes of records: records with very few but crucial positive valence signals, and records describing patients predominantly affected by negative rather than positive valence. Those cases proved to be very challenging for most of the systems. Further research is required to consider the task solved. Overall, the results of this track demonstrate the effectiveness of data-driven approaches to the task of symptom severity classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of task constraints in relating laboratory and clinical measures of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Riley, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that age-related postural control deficits are more clearly detected from force plate recordings when using postural control tasks with an explicitly defined goal as opposed to the frequently used quiet stance task. Eighteen older adults (over 65) and seventeen younger adults (under 30) stood on a force plate with visual feedback (VFB) of the center of pressure (COP) and without such visual feedback with eyes open (NVFB). In the VFB condition, online visual feedback about the COP was provided and participants maintained that feedback on a stationary visual target for 80s. We hypothesized that age-related difference in COP variability (standard deviation of COP position and average absolute maximum COP velocity; AAMV) would be more pronounced in the VFB than in the NVFB condition. In addition, we hypothesized that Berg balance scale (BBS) scores for older adults would correlate more strongly with the COP measures in the VFB condition than in the NVFB condition. Results showed that VFB enhanced age-related differences only for AAMV in anterior-posterior direction. Both age groups decreased postural sway when using VFB. Older adults increased AAMV with VFB while young adults did not, indicating that the task modified their postural control strategy stronger than in younger adults. BBS scores were correlated with the AAMV in both feedback conditions, while COP position variability was more clearly correlated with BBS in the VFB condition. These results suggest that the quiet stance task is sufficient to index balance function if velocity-based COP variables are utilized in the analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside clinical trials II-An ISPOR Good Research Practices Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Scott D; Willke, Richard J; Glick, Henry; Reed, Shelby D; Augustovski, Federico; Jonsson, Bengt; Briggs, Andrew; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-03-01

    Clinical trials evaluating medicines, medical devices, and procedures now commonly assess the economic value of these interventions. The growing number of prospective clinical/economic trials reflects both widespread interest in economic information for new technologies and the regulatory and reimbursement requirements of many countries that now consider evidence of economic value along with clinical efficacy. As decision makers increasingly demand evidence of economic value for health care interventions, conducting high-quality economic analyses alongside clinical studies is desirable because they broaden the scope of information available on a particular intervention, and can efficiently provide timely information with high internal and, when designed and analyzed properly, reasonable external validity. In 2005, ISPOR published the Good Research Practices for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Alongside Clinical Trials: The ISPOR RCT-CEA Task Force report. ISPOR initiated an update of the report in 2014 to include the methodological developments over the last 9 years. This report provides updated recommendations reflecting advances in several areas related to trial design, selecting data elements, database design and management, analysis, and reporting of results. Task force members note that trials should be designed to evaluate effectiveness (rather than efficacy) when possible, should include clinical outcome measures, and should obtain health resource use and health state utilities directly from study subjects. Collection of economic data should be fully integrated into the study. An incremental analysis should be conducted with an intention-to-treat approach, complemented by relevant subgroup analyses. Uncertainty should be characterized. Articles should adhere to established standards for reporting results of cost-effectiveness analyses. Economic studies alongside trials are complementary to other evaluations (e.g., modeling studies) as information for decision

  7. Planning performance in schizophrenia patients: a meta-analysis of the influence of task difficulty and clinical and sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, F; Viechtbauer, W; Leonhart, R; Nitschke, K; Kaller, C P

    2017-08-01

    Despite a large body of research on planning performance in adult schizophrenia patients, results of individual studies are equivocal, suggesting either no, moderate or severe planning deficits. This meta-analysis therefore aimed to quantify planning deficits in schizophrenia and to examine potential sources of the heterogeneity seen in the literature. The meta-analysis comprised outcomes of planning accuracy of 1377 schizophrenia patients and 1477 healthy controls from 31 different studies which assessed planning performance using tower tasks such as the Tower of London, the Tower of Hanoi and the Stockings of Cambridge. A meta-regression analysis was applied to assess the influence of potential moderator variables (i.e. sociodemographic and clinical variables as well as task difficulty). The findings indeed demonstrated a planning deficit in schizophrenia patients (mean effect size: ; 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.78) that was moderated by task difficulty in terms of the minimum number of moves required for a solution. The results did not reveal any significant relationship between the extent of planning deficits and sociodemographic or clinical variables. The current results provide first meta-analytic evidence for the commonly assumed impairments of planning performance in schizophrenia. Deficits are more likely to become manifest in problem items with higher demands on planning ahead, which may at least partly explain the heterogeneity of previous findings. As only a small fraction of studies reported coherent information on sample characteristics, future meta-analyses would benefit from more systematic reports on those variables.

  8. Cognitive Impairments and Depressive Symptoms Did Not Impede Upper Extremity Recovery in a Clinical Repetitive Task Practice Program after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Becker, James T.; Whyte, Ellen M.; Huber, Lynne M.; Waterstram, Laura F.; Ward, Amalie Andrew; Grattan, Emily S.; Holm, Margo B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We examined whether cognitive impairments or depressive symptoms impeded improvement in upper extremity function in a clinical repetitive task practice program. Design Participants had mild to moderate upper extremity impairment after stroke (n=20). We characterized baseline cognitive function and depressive symptoms with the Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Status and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. We measured upper extremity function at baseline, week 4 and week 24 with the Action Research Arm Test. Results Participants with and without cognitive impairments improved significantly over time (F1,17=84.48, pstroke (t17=.07, p=.95). Participants with and without depressive symptoms improved significantly over time (F1,18=86.29, pstroke (t17=.06, p=.95). Conclusions Preliminary findings suggest that cognitive impairments and depressive symptoms may not impede benefit from repetitive task practice after stroke. PMID:22311057

  9. The secure base script and the task of caring for elderly parents: implications for attachment theory and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cory K; Waters, Harriet Salatas; Hartman, Marilyn; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Miklowitz, David J; Waters, Everett

    2013-01-01

    This study explores links between adults' attachment representations and the task of caring for elderly parents with dementia. Participants were 87 adults serving as primary caregivers of a parent or parent-in-law with dementia. Waters and Waters' ( 2006 ) Attachment Script Assessment was adapted to assess script-like attachment representation in the context of caring for their elderly parent. The quality of adult-elderly parent interactions was assessed using the Level of Expressed Emotions Scale (Cole & Kazarian, 1988 ) and self-report measures of caregivers' perception of caregiving as difficult. Caregivers' secure base script knowledge predicted lower levels of negative expressed emotion. This effect was moderated by the extent to which participants experienced caring for elderly parents as difficult. Attachment representations played a greater role in caregiving when caregiving tasks were perceived as more difficult. These results support the hypothesis that attachment representations influence the quality of care that adults provide their elderly parents. Clinical implications are discussed.

  10. Clinical Skills Verification in General Psychiatry: Recommendations of the ABPN Task Force on Rater Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, Michael D.; Broquet, Karen E.; Anzia, Joan Meyer; Beresin, Eugene V.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Kaye, David; Rao, Nyapati Raghu; Rostain, Anthony Leon; Sexson, Sandra B.; Summers, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) announced in 2007 that general psychiatry training programs must conduct Clinical Skills Verification (CSV), consisting of observed clinical interviews and case presentations during residency, as one requirement to establish graduates' eligibility to sit for the written certification…

  11. Pharmacy students' preference for using mobile devices in a clinical setting for practice-related tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Craig A H; Hastings, Justine F; Bryant, Jennifer E

    2015-03-25

    To examine pharmacy students' ownership of, use of, and preference for using a mobile device in a practice setting. Eighty-one pharmacy students were recruited and completed a pretest that collected information about their demographics and mobile devices and also had them rank the iPhone, iPad mini, and iPad for preferred use in a pharmacy practice setting. Students used the 3 devices to perform pharmacy practice-related tasks and then completed a posttest to again rank the devices for preferred use in a pharmacy practice setting. The iPhone was the most commonly owned mobile device (59.3% of students), and the iPad mini was the least commonly owned (18.5%). About 70% of the students used their mobile devices at least once a week in a pharmacy practice setting. The iPhone was the most commonly used device in a practice setting (46.9% of students), and the iPod Touch was the least commonly used device (1.2%). The iPad mini was the most preferred device for use in a pharmacy practice setting prior to performing pharmacy practice-related tasks (49.4% of students), and was preferred by significantly more students after performing the tasks (70.4%). Pharmacy students commonly use their mobile devices in pharmacy practice settings and most selected the iPad mini as the preferred device for use in a practice setting even though it was the device owned by the fewest students.

  12. Pharmacy Students’ Preference for Using Mobile Devices in a Clinical Setting for Practice-Related Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Justine F.; Bryant, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine pharmacy students’ ownership of, use of, and preference for using a mobile device in a practice setting. Methods. Eighty-one pharmacy students were recruited and completed a pretest that collected information about their demographics and mobile devices and also had them rank the iPhone, iPad mini, and iPad for preferred use in a pharmacy practice setting. Students used the 3 devices to perform pharmacy practice-related tasks and then completed a posttest to again rank the devices for preferred use in a pharmacy practice setting. Results. The iPhone was the most commonly owned mobile device (59.3% of students), and the iPad mini was the least commonly owned (18.5%). About 70% of the students used their mobile devices at least once a week in a pharmacy practice setting. The iPhone was the most commonly used device in a practice setting (46.9% of students), and the iPod Touch was the least commonly used device (1.2%). The iPad mini was the most preferred device for use in a pharmacy practice setting prior to performing pharmacy practice-related tasks (49.4% of students), and was preferred by significantly more students after performing the tasks (70.4%). Conclusion. Pharmacy students commonly use their mobile devices in pharmacy practice settings and most selected the iPad mini as the preferred device for use in a practice setting even though it was the device owned by the fewest students. PMID:25861103

  13. The effect of clinical experience, judgment task difficulty and time pressure on nurses’ confidence calibration in a high fidelity clinical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Huiqin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Misplaced or poorly calibrated confidence in healthcare professionals’ judgments compromises the quality of health care. Using higher fidelity clinical simulations to elicit clinicians’ confidence 'calibration' (i.e. overconfidence or underconfidence in more realistic settings is a promising but underutilized tactic. In this study we examine nurses’ calibration of confidence with judgment accuracy for critical event risk assessment judgments in a high fidelity simulated clinical environment. The study also explores the effects of clinical experience, task difficulty and time pressure on the relationship between confidence and accuracy. Methods 63 student and 34 experienced nurses made dichotomous risk assessments on 25 scenarios simulated in a high fidelity clinical environment. Each nurse also assigned a score (0–100 reflecting the level of confidence in their judgments. Scenarios were derived from real patient cases and classified as easy or difficult judgment tasks. Nurses made half of their judgments under time pressure. Confidence calibration statistics were calculated and calibration curves generated. Results Nurse students were underconfident (mean over/underconfidence score −1.05 and experienced nurses overconfident (mean over/underconfidence score 6.56, P = 0.01. No significant differences in calibration and resolution were found between the two groups (P = 0.80 and P = 0.51, respectively. There was a significant interaction between time pressure and task difficulty on confidence (P = 0.008; time pressure increased confidence in easy cases but reduced confidence in difficult cases. Time pressure had no effect on confidence or accuracy. Judgment task difficulty impacted significantly on nurses’ judgmental accuracy and confidence. A 'hard-easy' effect was observed: nurses were overconfident in difficult judgments and underconfident in easy judgments. Conclusion Nurses were poorly calibrated

  14. Implications of ICD-10 for Sarcopenia Clinical Practice and Clinical Trials: Report by the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, B; Fielding, R A; Bens, C; Bernabei, R; Cawthon, P M; Cederholm, T; Cruz-Jentoft, A J; Del Signore, S; Donahue, S; Morley, J; Pahor, M; Reginster, J-Y; Rodriguez Mañas, L; Rolland, Y; Roubenoff, R; Sinclair, A; Cesari, M

    2018-01-01

    Establishment of an ICD-10-CM code for sarcopenia in 2016 was an important step towards reaching international consensus on the need for a nosological framework of age-related skeletal muscle decline. The International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research Task Force met in April 2017 to discuss the meaning, significance, and barriers to the implementation of the new code as well as strategies to accelerate development of new therapies. Analyses by the Sarcopenia Definitions and Outcomes Consortium are underway to develop quantitative definitions of sarcopenia. A consensus conference is planned to evaluate this analysis. The Task Force also discussed lessons learned from sarcopenia trials that could be applied to future trials, as well as lessons from the osteoporosis field, a clinical condition with many constructs similar to sarcopenia and for which ad hoc treatments have been developed and approved by regulatory agencies.

  15. Iowa Gambling Task with non-clinical participants: Effects of using real + virtual cards and additional trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Overman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT in clinical populations can be interpreted only in relation to established base line performance in normal populations. As in all comparisons of assessment tools, the normal base line must reflect performance under conditions in which subjects can function at their best levels. In this review, we show that a number of variables enhance IGT performance in non-clinical participants. First, optimal performance is produced by having participants turn over real cards while viewing virtual cards on a computer screen. The use of only virtual cards results in significantly lower performance than the combination of real + virtual cards. Secondly, administration of more than 100 trials also enhances performance. When using the real/virtual card procedure, performance is shown to significantly increase from early adolescence through young adulthood. Under these conditions young (mean age 19 years and older (mean age 59 years adults perform equally. Females, as a group, score lower than males because females tend to choose cards from high-frequency-of-gain Deck B. Groups of females with high or low gonadal hormones perform equally. Concurrent tasks, e.g., presentation of aromas, decrease performance in males. Age and gender effects are discussed in terms of a dynamic between testosterone and orbital prefrontal cortex.

  16. Influence of functional task-oriented mental practice on the gait of transtibial amputees: a randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Rodrigo Gontijo; Da-Silva, Paulo José Guimarães; Dos Santos Couto Paz, Clarissa Cardoso; da Silva Ferreira, Ana Carolina; Tierra-Criollo, Carlos Julio

    2017-04-11

    allowed transtibial amputees to reestablish independent locomotion. Since the effects of MP were preserved after 1 month, the improvement is considered related to the specificity of the MP tasks. Therefore, MP may improve the clinical aspect of gait rehabilitation when included in a training program.

  17. FRAX® International Task Force of the 2010 Joint International Society for Clinical Densitometry & International Osteoporosis Foundation Position Development Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauley, Jane A; El-Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada; Luckey, Marjorie M

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a serious worldwide epidemic. FRAX® is a web-based tool developed by the Sheffield WHO Collaborating Center team, that integrates clinical risk factors and femoral neck BMD and calculates the 10 year fracture probability in order to help health care professionals identify patients who need treatment. However, only 31 countries have a FRAX® calculator. In the absence of a FRAX® model for a particular country, it has been suggested to use a surrogate country for which the epidemiology of osteoporosis most closely approximates the index country. More specific recommendations for clinicians in these countries are not available. In North America, concerns have also been raised regarding the assumptions used to construct the US ethnic specific FRAX® calculators with respect to the correction factors applied to derive fracture probabilities in Blacks, Asians and Hispanics in comparison to Whites. In addition, questions were raised about calculating fracture risk in other ethnic groups e.g., Native Americans and First Canadians. The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) in conjunction with the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) assembled an international panel of experts that ultimately developed joint Official Positions of the ISCD and IOF advising clinicians regarding FRAX® usage. As part of the process, the charge of the FRAX® International Task Force was to review and synthesize data regarding geographic and race/ethnic variability in hip fractures, non-hip osteoporotic fractures, and make recommendations about the use of FRAX® in ethnic groups and countries without a FRAX® calculator. This synthesis was presented to the expert panel and constitutes the data on which the subsequent Official Positions are predicated. A summary of the International Task Force composition and charge is presented here. Copyright © 2011 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrating nurse researchers in clinical practice – a challenging, but necessary task for nurse leaders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kjerholt, Mette; Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    2016-01-01

    Aim To create awareness among nurse leaders, of what they may need to consider, when integrating nurse researchers as advanced nurse practitioners (ANP) at PhD-level among their staff. Background In a time of transition nurse leaders may be challenged by the change towards evidence-based clinical...... nursing, including integrating nurse researchers in ANP positions. Methods A collective case study including three ANPs took place at a large regional hospital in Denmark. The cases were first analysed by focusing on the generic features, functions and skills of ANPs, and second by focusing...... on the approaches to evidence-based practice seen in the cases. Results Regardless of same position, formal level of research expertise and overall responsibility, different approaches related to each ANPs professional profile, interest, academic ambitions and personality were seen. Conclusion Nurse leaders must...

  19. Person-centered approaches in medicine: clinical tasks, psychological paradigms, and postnonclassic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezzich J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to demonstrate advances in methodological means suggested by Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept in association with a theoretical model of a Person-centered diagnosis and practical use of the construct for clinical psychology and medicine. This, to a greater extent, arises from the fact that the cultural-historical concept (due to its humanistic nature and epistemological content is closely related to the person-centered integrative approach. But for all that the concept corresponds to the ideals of postnonclassical model of scientific rationality with a number of ‘key’ features. Above all it manifests its “methodological maturity” to cope with open self-developing systems, which is most essential at the modern stage of scientific knowledge.The work gives consideration to ‘defining pillars’ of Person-centered approach in modern medicine, to humanistic traditions of the Russian clinical school, and high prospects in diagnostics of such mental constructs as “subjective pattern of disease” and “social situation of personal development in disease” - within the context of person-centered integrative diagnosis.This article discusses the need for implementation a cross-cultural study of subjective pattern of disease and its correlation with a particular “social situation of personality development under disease conditions”. It aims at development and substantiation of the model of person-centered integrative approach, enhancement of its diagnostic scope and, consequently, improvement of the model of person-centered care in modern psychiatry and medicine.

  20. Revisiting the multiple sclerosis functional composite: proceedings from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) Task Force on Clinical Disability Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontaneda, D; LaRocca, N; Coetzee, T; Rudick, Ra

    2012-08-01

    This article describes proceedings from a meeting of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) Task Force on Clinical Disability Measures (the TF). The TF was appointed by the NMSS Research Programs Advisory Committee with the goal of pooling and analyzing existing datasets to explore the utility of novel disability outcome measures based on the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) approach. The TF seeks to determine the suitability of the MSFC approach as a primary clinical outcome measure for registration trials in MS. The TF met in Washington, DC, Dec. 14 and 15, 2011, and provided unanimous support for a collaborative approach involving representatives from academic medicine, the pharmaceutical industry, regulatory agencies, the NMSS and the Critical Path Institute. There was also unanimous agreement that analysis of existing datasets would be useful in making progress toward the objective. The TF placed high value on determining the clinical meaning of individual component measures for the MSFC, and in establishing optimal analysis methods for MSFC so that scores would be more interpretable than the originally recommended z-score method. The background for a collaborative project aimed at developing an improved disability outcome measure is described in this paper.

  1. Repetition-priming effect: a cognitive task for the definition of a clinical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pagani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study how semantic priming words can influence behavioral measures (RTs, accuracy, to develop an experimental paradigm to differentiate visual neglect and hemianopia. 69 experimental subjects were involved in four experiments. In each experiment target words were preceded by word primes semantically related, neutral or unrelated to the target. The four experiments differed in terms of: number of prime, prime duration and distance between PC monitor and subject. In general, related primes should improve facilitatory effect in target recognition more than unrelated primes, reducing RTs and increasing response accuracy. After repeated ANOVA analysis applied to each experiment and paired comparisons, it is possible to point out that single related primes, shown for 150 ms, greatly improve response behavior in terms of RTs reduction. For future applications to the clinical field, we assume that neglect patients should be facilitated in these specific experimental conditions, due to implicit contralesional prime processing. On the contrary, hemianopics should nowise be facilitated, due to visual field deficit.

  2. Ethical and social implications of microdosing clinical trial (2). The draft guidance and the future tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Chieko

    2008-01-01

    Draft of the guidance (GD) for conducting the trial in the title (MCT) was officially announced by Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW) in Dec., 2007, but where the trial part alone was described without the research purposes involved in the starting idea of MCT. The authority invited opinions on the draft until Feb., 2008. This paper describes the detailed content of GD draft and discusses problems in future. GD draft contains: basic concept, range of non-clinical studies necessary for beginning MCT, methods to decide the maximal dose, concept for internal exposure of volunteers when radio-labeled compound is to be administered (for methods by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and positron emission tomography (PET)), quality assurance of the test compound, other notices, and references. The last item contains outlines of concerned laws and regulations (e.g., The Law Concerning Prevention from Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotopes, Etc. and Medical Law); nuclides for AMS (mainly, 14 C) (manufacturing and transporting the test compound containing 14 C, its distribution from MCT client to hospitals, handling in the hospital, and transporting of samples from hospital to AMS facility); and nuclides for PET. Public opinions collected by MHLW will decide the directions hereafter of GD, i.e. the omitted research purposes are additionally incorporated in the present GD draft or are independently described in another newer GD. (R.T.)

  3. Reexamining the validity and reliability of the clinical version of the Iowa gambling task: Evidence from a normal subject group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hung eLin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Over past decade, the Iowa gambling task (IGT has been utilized to test various decision deficits induced by neurological damage or psychiatric disorders. The IGT has recently been standardized for identifying 13 different neuropsychological disorders. Neuropsychological patients choose bad decks frequently, and normal subjects prefer good EV decks. However, the IGT has several validity and reliability problems. Some research groups have pointed out that the validity of IGT is influenced by the personality and emotional state of subjects. Additionally, several other studies have proposed that the prominent deck B phenomenon (PDB phenomenon – that is, normal subjects preferring bad deck B – may be the most serious problem confronting IGT validity. Specifically, deck B offers a high frequency of gains but negative EV. In the standard IGT administration, choice behavior can be understood with reference to gain-loss frequency (GLF rather than inferred future consequences (EV, the basic assumption of IGT. Furthermore, using two different criteria (basic assumption vs. professional norm results in significantly different classification results. Therefore, we recruited 72 normal subjects to test the validity and reliability of IGT. Each subject performed three runs of the computer-based clinical IGT version. The PDB phenomenon has been observed to a significant degree in the first and second stages of the clinical IGT version. Obviously, validity, reliability and the practice effect were unstable between two given stages. The present form of the clinical IGT version has only one stage, so its use should be reconsidered for examining normal decision makers; results from patient groups must also be interpreted with great care. GLF could be the main factor to be considered in establishing the constructional validity and reliability of the clinical IGT version.

  4. Multi-Tasking and Choice of Training Data Influencing Parietal ERP Expression and Single-Trial Detection—Relevance for Neuroscience and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Elsa A.; Kim, Su Kyoung

    2018-01-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) are often used in brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) for communication or system control for enhancing or regaining control for motor-disabled persons. Especially results from single-trial EEG classification approaches for BCIs support correlations between single-trial ERP detection performance and ERP expression. Hence, BCIs can be considered as a paradigm shift contributing to new methods with strong influence on both neuroscience and clinical applications. Here, we investigate the relevance of the choice of training data and classifier transfer for the interpretability of results from single-trial ERP detection. In our experiments, subjects performed a visual-motor oddball task with motor-task relevant infrequent (targets), motor-task irrelevant infrequent (deviants), and motor-task irrelevant frequent (standards) stimuli. Under dual-task condition, a secondary senso-motor task was performed, compared to the simple-task condition. For evaluation, average ERP analysis and single-trial detection analysis with different numbers of electrodes were performed. Further, classifier transfer was investigated between simple and dual task. Parietal positive ERPs evoked by target stimuli (but not by deviants) were expressed stronger under dual-task condition, which is discussed as an increase of task emphasis and brain processes involved in task coordination and change of task set. Highest classification performance was found for targets irrespective whether all 62, 6 or 2 parietal electrodes were used. Further, higher detection performance of targets compared to standards was achieved under dual-task compared to simple-task condition in case of training on data from 2 parietal electrodes corresponding to results of ERP average analysis. Classifier transfer between tasks improves classification performance in case that training took place on more varying examples (from dual task). In summary, we showed that P300 and overlaying parietal positive

  5. Verification of monitor unit calculations for non-IMRT clinical radiotherapy: Report of AAPM Task Group 114

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Robin L.; Heaton, Robert; Fraser, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    The requirement of an independent verification of the monitor units (MU) or time calculated to deliver the prescribed dose to a patient has been a mainstay of radiation oncology quality assurance. The need for and value of such a verification was obvious when calculations were performed by hand using look-up tables, and the verification was achieved by a second person independently repeating the calculation. However, in a modern clinic using CT/MR/PET simulation, computerized 3D treatment planning, heterogeneity corrections, and complex calculation algorithms such as convolution/superposition and Monte Carlo, the purpose of and methodology for the MU verification have come into question. In addition, since the verification is often performed using a simpler geometrical model and calculation algorithm than the primary calculation, exact or almost exact agreement between the two can no longer be expected. Guidelines are needed to help the physicist set clinically reasonable action levels for agreement. This report addresses the following charges of the task group: (1) To re-evaluate the purpose and methods of the ''independent second check'' for monitor unit calculations for non-IMRT radiation treatment in light of the complexities of modern-day treatment planning. (2) To present recommendations on how to perform verification of monitor unit calculations in a modern clinic. (3) To provide recommendations on establishing action levels for agreement between primary calculations and verification, and to provide guidance in addressing discrepancies outside the action levels. These recommendations are to be used as guidelines only and shall not be interpreted as requirements.

  6. Level of evidence, sponsorship, conflict of interest policy and commercial impact of PubMed-listed clinical urolithiasis-related trials in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenthaler, Martin; Miernik, Arkadiusz; Wilhelm, Konrad; Schlager, Daniel; Schoeb, Dominik Stefan; Adams, Fabian; Dahm, Philipp; Hein, Simon

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate published trials on urolithiasis regarding level of evidence, type of sponsorship and declared conflicts of interest (COIs), and to elucidate a potential commercial impact. We performed a systematic PubMed(®) literature search using a predefined Boolean search term to identify PubMed-listed clinical research studies on urolithiasis in 2014 (fourth quarter). All authors screened the results for eligibility criteria and two independent reviewers evaluated and performed data extraction of predefined endpoints, including level of evidence, declaration of COI and sponsorship/funding (as indicated in the published print version), and commercial impact. A total of 110 clinical trials in urolithiasis listed in PubMed met the inclusion criteria. Levels of evidence 1, 2, 3 and 4 were found in 15%, 14%, 21% and 51% of trials, respectively. A COI was indicated in a total of 90% of publications, 93% of which declared no existing conflict of interest. Sponsorship was indicated in 36% of publications, 55% of which stated public funding, 33% institutional funding, 10% industrial funding and 2% both public and industrial funding. A total of 11% of the published trials were rated as having a high commercial impact. The present study provides evidence of increasing levels of evidence for published clinical trials on urolithiasis in 2014 (as compared with earlier data). Ninety percent of publications indicated conflicts of interest, whereas sponsoring of studies was declared only by one-third. A considerable number of trials involved issues of high commercial impact. Recently established legal programmes and voluntary acts on self-reporting of financial relationships will enhance transparency in the future; however, increased public funding will be needed to further promote the quality of trials on urolithiasis. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Guidelines: Update of U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Policies and Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Moyer, Virginia; Grossman, David; Ebell, Mark; Woo, Meghan; Miller, Therese; Brummer, Tana; Chowdhury, Joya; Kato, Elisabeth; Siu, Albert; Phillips, William; Davidson, Karina; Phipps, Maureen; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) provides independent, objective, and scientifically rigorous recommendations for clinical preventive services. A primary concern is to avoid even the appearance of members having special interests that might influence their ability to judge evidence and formulate unbiased recommendations. The conflicts of interest policy for the USPSTF is described, as is the formal process by which best practices were incorporated to update the policy. The USPSTF performed a literature review, conducted key informant interviews, and reviewed conflicts of interest policies of ten similar organizations. Important findings included transparency and public accessibility; full disclosure of financial relationships; disclosure of non-financial relationships (that create the potential for bias and compromise a member's objective judgment); disclosure of family members' conflicts of interests; and establishment of appropriate reporting periods. Controversies in best practices include the threshold of financial disclosures, ease of access to conflicts of interest policies and declarations, vague definition of non-financial biases, and request for family members' conflicts of interests (particularly those that are non-financial in nature). The USPSTF conflicts of interest policy includes disclosures for immediate family members, a clear non-financial conflicts of interest definition, long look-back period and application of the policy to prospective members. Conflicts of interest is solicited from all members every 4 months, formally reviewed, adjudicated, and made publicly available. The USPSTF conflicts of interest policy is publicly available as part of the USPSTF Procedure Manual. A continuous improvement process can be applied to conflicts of interest policies to enhance public trust in members of panels, such as the USPSTF, that produce clinical guidelines and recommendations. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine

  8. Correspondence between clinical diagnoses of depressive and anxiety disorders and diagnostic screening via the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 in the Lundby Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattisson, Cecilia; Bogren, Mats; Horstmann, Vibeke

    2013-06-01

    To compare clinical assessments of mental disorders with the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 (HSCL-25) in a population-based sample consisting of middle-aged and elderly subjects. The Lundby Study is a prospective cohort study that evaluated mental disorders and personality traits in an unselected Swedish population. The study commenced in 1947, with follow-ups in 1957, 1972 and 1997 (n = 3563). Psychiatrists evaluated participants for mental disorders at several field investigations. In 1997, participants were also asked to complete the HSCL-25. Subjects with diagnoses of schizophrenia, dementia and certain other conditions were excluded leaving 1189 subjects aged 40-96 years. Diagnostic assessments by psychiatrists were compared with the results of the HSCL-25. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at two cut-off levels of the HSCL-25 (1.55 and 1.75), and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted. The performance of the HSCL-25 was analysed with regard to anxiety and depression subscales. The concordance of HSCL-25 with clinical best-estimate diagnoses was low. The anxiety subscale discriminated better than the depressive subscale. The correspondence between the clinical diagnoses made by psychiatrists and the HSCL-25 was not acceptable at a cut-off level 1.55. The HSCL-25 is limited in its ability to identify clinical syndromes. The HSCL-25 should be applied only as a preliminary screen for emotional distress and anxiety syndromes.

  9. Clinical Outcome Assessments: Conceptual Foundation-Report of the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Marc K; Powers, John H; Hobart, Jeremy; Patrick, Donald; Marquis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Isaac, Maria; Molsen, Elizabeth; Cano, Stefan; Burke, Laurie B

    2015-09-01

    An outcome assessment, the patient assessment used in an endpoint, is the measuring instrument that provides a rating or score (categorical or continuous) that is intended to represent some aspect of the patient's health status. Outcome assessments are used to define efficacy endpoints when developing a therapy for a disease or condition. Most efficacy endpoints are based on specified clinical assessments of patients. When clinical assessments are used as clinical trial outcomes, they are called clinical outcome assessments (COAs). COAs include any assessment that may be influenced by human choices, judgment, or motivation. COAs must be well-defined and possess adequate measurement properties to demonstrate (directly or indirectly) the benefits of a treatment. In contrast, a biomarker assessment is one that is subject to little, if any, patient motivational or rater judgmental influence. This is the first of two reports by the ISPOR Clinical Outcomes Assessment - Emerging Good Practices for Outcomes Research Task Force. This report provides foundational definitions important for an understanding of COA measurement principles. The foundation provided in this report includes what it means to demonstrate a beneficial effect, how assessments of patients relate to the objective of showing a treatment's benefit, and how these assessments are used in clinical trial endpoints. In addition, this report describes intrinsic attributes of patient assessments and clinical trial factors that can affect the properties of the measurements. These factors should be considered when developing or refining assessments. These considerations will aid investigators designing trials in their choice of using an existing assessment or developing a new outcome assessment. Although the focus of this report is on the development of a new COA to define endpoints in a clinical trial, these principles may be applied more generally. A critical element in appraising or developing a COA is to

  10. EULAR recommendations for the management of systemic lupus erythematosus. Report of a task force of the EULAR standing committee for international clinical studies including therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertsias, G.; Ioannidis, J. P. A.; Boletis, J.; Bombardieri, S.; Cervera, R.; Dostal, C.; Font, J.; Gilboe, I. M.; Houssiau, F.; Huizinga, T.; Isenberg, D.; Kallenberg, C. G. M.; Khamashta, M.; Piette, J. C.; Schneider, M.; Smolen, J.; Sturfelt, G.; Tincani, A.; van Vollenhoven, R.; Gordon, C.; Boumpas, D. T.

    Objective: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex disease with variable presentations, course and prognosis. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations addressing the major issues in the management of SLE. Methods: The EULAR Task Force on SLE comprised 19 specialists and a clinical

  11. Cross listing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherrer, Cristina

    The paper investigates the dynamics of price discovery for cross-listed firms and the impact of exchange rate shocks on firm value. A simple price discovery model is proposed in which prices in the home and foreign markets react to shocks on two latent prices, namely, the efficient firm value...... and the efficient exchange rate. I disentangle the effects on firm value from the exchange rate from the other determinants of a firm's cash flow. I use high-frequency data and find that a depreciation/appreciation of the home currency decreases/increases firm value. This finding is consistent with currency...... fluctuation affecting discount rates....

  12. Reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying and non-clinical controls measured by self-report and performance-based tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voth, Eva M; Claes, Laurence; Georgiadou, Ekaterini; Selle, Janine; Trotzke, Patrick; Brand, Matthias; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2014-10-01

    To examine reactive and regulative temperament in patients with compulsive buying (CB) by means of self-report measures and performance-based tasks and to explore the relationship between both measurement approaches. The study included 31 treatment-seeking patients with CB (25 women, 6 men) and an age and gender matched non-clinical control group without CB (CG). All participants answered the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). Reactive temperament was assessed using the Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System Scales (BIS/BAS) and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). Regulative temperament was measured using the Effortful Control subscale of the Adult Temperament Questionnaire (ATQ-EC) and a computerized version of the Stroop Task. To control the results for depression, the Patient Health Questionnaire-Depression Scale (PHQ-9) was administered. Crude group comparisons revealed higher BIS and BAS scores, poorer IGT performance and lower ATQ-EC scores in the CB-group compared to the CG. The groups did not differ in their performance on the Stroop task. After controlling for depressive symptoms that were significantly higher in the CB-group, only the group differences in BAS reactivity remained significant. No significant associations were found between questionnaires and performance-based tasks. Overall, the findings indicate that CB in the present clinical sample of treatment-seeking patients was mainly associated with higher approach tendencies and more depressive symptoms. The lacking correlation between self-reports and performance-based tasks is in line with prior research and suggests that both methodologies tap into different aspects of temperament. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cosmetology: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the cosmetology program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the secondary…

  14. Automated systems for the de-identification of longitudinal clinical narratives: Overview of 2014 i2b2/UTHealth shared task Track 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Amber; Kotfila, Christopher; Uzuner, Özlem

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Natural Language Processing (NLP) shared task featured four tracks. The first of these was the de-identification track focused on identifying protected health information (PHI) in longitudinal clinical narratives. The longitudinal nature of clinical narratives calls particular attention to details of information that, while benign on their own in separate records, can lead to identification of patients in combination in longitudinal records. Accordingly, the 2014 de-identification track addressed a broader set of entities and PHI than covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act - the focus of the de-identification shared task that was organized in 2006. Ten teams tackled the 2014 de-identification task and submitted 22 system outputs for evaluation. Each team was evaluated on their best performing system output. Three of the 10 systems achieved F1 scores over .90, and seven of the top 10 scored over .75. The most successful systems combined conditional random fields and hand-written rules. Our findings indicate that automated systems can be very effective for this task, but that de-identification is not yet a solved problem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Multi-way Multi-task Learning Approach for Multinomial Logistic Regression*. An Application in Joint Prediction of Appointment Miss-opportunities across Multiple Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeddini, Adel; Hong, Seung Hee

    2017-08-11

    Whether they have been engineered for it or not, most healthcare systems experience a variety of unexpected events such as appointment miss-opportunities that can have significant impact on their revenue, cost and resource utilization. In this paper, a multi-way multi-task learning model based on multinomial logistic regression is proposed to jointly predict the occurrence of different types of miss-opportunities at multiple clinics. An extension of L 1  / L 2 regularization is proposed to enable transfer of information among various types of miss-opportunities as well as different clinics. A proximal algorithm is developed to transform the convex but non-smooth likelihood function of the multi-way multi-task learning model into a convex and smooth optimization problem solvable using gradient descent algorithm. A dataset of real attendance records of patients at four different clinics of a VA medical center is used to verify the performance of the proposed multi-task learning approach. Additionally, a simulation study, investigating more general data situations is provided to highlight the specific aspects of the proposed approach. Various individual and integrated multinomial logistic regression models with/without LASSO penalty along with a number of other common classification algorithms are fitted and compared against the proposed multi-way multi-task learning approach. Fivefold cross validation is used to estimate comparing models parameters and their predictive accuracy. The multi-way multi-task learning framework enables the proposed approach to achieve a considerable rate of parameter shrinkage and superior prediction accuracy across various types of miss-opportunities and clinics. The proposed approach provides an integrated structure to effectively transfer knowledge among different miss-opportunities and clinics to reduce model size, increase estimation efficacy, and more importantly improve predictions results. The proposed framework can be

  16. A national analysis of dental waiting lists and point-in-time geographic access to subsidised dental care: can geographic access be improved by offering public dental care through private dental clinics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudko, Yevgeni; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Australia is one of the least densely populated countries in the world, with a population concentrated on or around coastal areas. Up to 33% of the Australian population are likely to have untreated dental decay, while people with inadequate dentition (fewer than 21 teeth) account for up to 34% of Australian adults. Historically, inadequate access to public dental care has resulted in long waiting lists, received much media coverage and been the subject of a new federal and state initiative. The objective of this research was to gauge the potential for reducing the national dental waiting list through geographical advantage, which could arise from subcontracting the delivery of subsidised dental care to the existing network of private dental clinics across Australia. Eligible population data were collected from the Australian Bureau of Statistics website. Waiting list data from across Australia were collected from publicly available sources and confirmed through direct communication with each individual state or territory dental health body. Quantum geographic information system software was used to map distribution of the eligible population across Australia by statistical area, and to plot locations of government and private dental clinics. Catchment areas of 5 km for metropolitan clinics and 5 km and 50 km for rural clinics were defined. The number of people on the waiting list and those eligible for subsidised dental care covered by each of the catchment areas was calculated. Percentage of the eligible population and those on the waiting list that could benefit from the potential improvement in geographic access was ascertained for metropolitan and rural residents. Fifty three percent of people on the waiting list resided within metropolitan areas. Rural and remote residents made up 47% of the population waiting to receive care. The utilisation of both government and private dental clinics for the delivery of subsidised dental care to the eligible population

  17. Influence of comorbidities in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus — research and clinical care. A report of the ISHCSF task force on comorbidities in INPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is a syndrome of ventriculomegaly, gait impairment, cognitive decline and incontinence that occurs in an elderly population prone to many types of comorbidities. Identification of the comorbidities is thus an important part of the clinical management of INPH patients. In 2011, a task force was appointed by the International Society for Hydrocephalus and Cerebrospinal Fluid Disorders (ISHCSF) with the objective to compile an evidence-based expert analysis of what we know and what we need to know regarding comorbidities in INPH. This article is the final report of the task force. The expert panel conducted a comprehensive review of the literature. After weighing the evidence, the various proposals were discussed and the final document was approved by all the task force members and represents a consensus of expert opinions. Recommendations regarding the following topics are given: I. Musculoskeletal conditions; II. Urinary problems; III. Vascular disease including risk factors, Binswanger disease, and white matter hyperintensities; IV. Mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease including biopsies; V. Other dementias (frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body, Parkinson); VI. Psychiatric and behavioral disorders; VII. Brain imaging; VIII. How to investigate and quantify. The task force concluded that comorbidity can be an important predictor of prognosis and post-operative outcome in INPH. Reported differences in outcomes among various INPH cohorts may be partly explained by variation in the rate and types of comorbidities at different hydrocephalus centers. Identification of comorbidities should thus be a central part of the clinical management of INPH where a detailed history, physical examination, and targeted investigations are the basis for diagnosis and grading. Future INPH research should focus on the contribution of comorbidity to overall morbidity, mortality and long-term outcomes. PMID:23758953

  18. Prolonged exposure vs eye movement desensitization and reprocessing vs waiting list for posttraumatic stress disorder in patients with a psychotic disorder: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, David P G; de Bont, Paul A J M; van der Vleugel, Berber M; de Roos, Carlijn; de Jongh, Ad; Van Minnen, Agnes; van der Gaag, Mark

    2015-03-01

    The efficacy of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatments in psychosis has not been examined in a randomized clinical trial to our knowledge. Psychosis is an exclusion criterion in most PTSD trials. To examine the efficacy and safety of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy in patients with psychotic disorders and comorbid PTSD. A single-blind randomized clinical trial with 3 arms (N = 155), including PE therapy, EMDR therapy, and waiting list (WL) of 13 outpatient mental health services among patients with a lifetime psychotic disorder and current chronic PTSD. Baseline, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up assessments were made. Participants were randomized to receive 8 weekly 90-minute sessions of PE (n = 53), EMDR (n = 55), or WL (n = 47). Standard protocols were used, and treatment was not preceded by stabilizing psychotherapeutic interventions. Clinician-rated severity of PTSD symptoms, PTSD diagnosis, and full remission (on the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale) were primary outcomes. Self-reported PTSD symptoms and posttraumatic cognitions were secondary outcomes. Data were analyzed as intent to treat with linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations. Participants in the PE and EMDR conditions showed a greater reduction of PTSD symptoms than those in the WL condition. Between-group effect sizes were 0.78 (P EMDR. Participants in the PE condition (56.6%; odds ratio [OR], 3.41; P = .006) or the EMDR condition (60.0%; OR, 3.92; P EMDR condition (16.4%; OR, 2.87; P = .10), were more likely to gain full remission than those in the WL condition (6.4%). Treatment effects were maintained at the 6-month follow-up in PE and EMDR. Similar results were obtained regarding secondary outcomes. There were no differences in severe adverse events between conditions (2 in PE, 1 in EMDR, and 4 in WL). The PE therapy and EMDR therapy showed no difference in any of the

  19. DisLexList

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    DisLexList is a simple analysis script for the generation of lists of lexemes in discourses, and may be used as a tool in discourse analysis (critical and otherwise). DisLexList is, in its current state, able to generate simple word lists and lexeme list based on output from VISL's flat structure...

  20. Neural substrates of the emotion-word and emotional counting Stroop tasks in healthy and clinical populations: A meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunliang; Becker, Benjamin; Huang, Wenhao; Wu, Xia; Eickhoff, Simon B; Chen, Taolin

    2018-02-26

    The emotional Stroop task (EST) is among the most influential paradigms used to probe attention-related or cognitive control-related emotional processing in healthy subjects and clinical populations. The neuropsychological mechanism underlying the emotional Stroop effect has attracted extensive and long-lasting attention in both cognitive and clinical psychology and neuroscience; however, a precise characterization of the neural substrates underlying the EST in healthy and clinical populations remains elusive. Here, we implemented a coordinate-based meta-analysis covering functional imaging studies that employed the emotion-word or emotional counting Stroop paradigms to determine the underlying neural networks in healthy subjects and the trans-diagnostic alterations across clinical populations. Forty-six publications were identified that reported relevant contrasts (negative > neutral; positive > neutral) for healthy or clinical populations as well as for hyper- or hypo-activation of patients compared to controls. We demonstrate consistent involvement of the vlPFC and dmPFC in healthy subjects and consistent involvement of the vlPFC in patients. We further identify a trans-diagnostic pattern of hyper-activation in the prefrontal and parietal regions. These findings underscore the critical roles of cognitive control processes in the EST and implicate trans-diagnostic cognitive control deficits. Unlike the current models that emphasize the roles of the amygdala and rACC, our findings implicate novel mechanisms underlying the EST for both healthy and clinical populations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rationalisation in public dental care – impact on clinical work tasks and mechanical exposure for dentists – a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonker, D.; Rolander, B.; Balogh, I.

    2013-01-01

    . In the present prospective study we assessed mechanical exposures among Swedish dentists in relation to specific rationalisations of clinical dental work during a six-year period. Body postures and movements of 12 dentists were assessed by inclinometry synchronised to video recordings of their work...

  2. Generic task problem descriptions: Category B, C, and D tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    This document contains information relating to Category B, C, and D generic technical activities. The specific information provided for each task includes the reactor type to which the generic issue applies, the NRC division with lead responsibility and a description of the problem to be addressed by the task. Also provided in this document is a listing of Category A generic technical activities and definitions of Priority Categories A, B, C, and D

  3. Task shifting of triage to peer expert informal care providers at a tertiary referral HIV clinic in Malawi: a cross-sectional operational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landes, Megan; Thompson, Courtney; Mwinjiwa, Edson; Thaulo, Edith; Gondwe, Chrissie; Akello, Harriet; Chan, Adrienne K

    2017-05-09

    HIV treatment models in Africa are labour intensive and require a high number of skilled staff. In this context, task-shifting is considered a feasible alternative for ART service delivery. In 2006, a lay health cadre of expert patients (EPs) at a tertiary referral HIV clinic in Zomba, Malawi was capacitated. There are few evaluations of EP program efficacy in this setting. Triage is the process of prioritizing patients in terms of the severity of their condition and ensures that no harmful delays occur to treatment and care. This study evaluates the safety of task-shifting triage, in an ambulatory low resource setting, to EPs. As a quality improvement exercise in April 2010, formal triage training was conducted by adapting the World Health Organization Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment Triage Module Guidelines. A cross sectional observation study was conducted 2 years after the intervention. Triage assessments performed by EPs were repeated by a clinical officer (gold standard) to assess sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative predictive values for EP triage scores. Proportions were calculated for categories of disposition by stratifying by EP and clinician triage scores. A total of 467 patients were triaged by 7 EPs and re-triaged by clinical officers. With combined triage scores for emergency and priority patients we report a sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 74% for the EP scoring, with a low positive predictive value (41%) and a high negative predictive value (96%). We calculate a serious miss rate of EP scoring (i.e. missed priority or emergency patients) as 2.2%. Admission rates to hospital were highest among those patients triaged as emergency cases either by the EP's (21%) or the clinicians (83%). Fewer patients triaged as priority by either EPs (5%) or clinicians (15%) were admitted to hospital, however these patients had the highest prevalence of same day lab testing and/or specialty referral. Our study provides reassurance that

  4. Exploring personality dimensions that influence practice and performance of a simulated laparoscopic task in the objective structured clinical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neha; Poolton, Jamie M; Wilson, Mark R; Leung, Gilberto; Zhu, Frank; Fan, Joe K M; Masters, Rich S W

    2015-01-01

    Surgical educators have encouraged the investigation of individual differences in aptitude and personality in surgical performance. An individual personality difference that has been shown to influence laparoscopic performance under time pressure is movement specific reinvestment. Movement specific reinvestment has 2 dimensions, movement self-consciousness (MS-C) (i.e., the propensity to consciously monitor movements) and conscious motor processing (CMP) (i.e., the propensity to consciously control movements), which have been shown to differentially influence laparoscopic performance in practice but have yet to be investigated in the context of psychological stress (e.g., the objective structured clinical examination [OSCE]). This study investigated the role of individual differences in propensity for MS-C and CMP in practice of a fundamental laparoscopic skill and in laparoscopic performance during the OSCE. Furthermore, this study examined whether individual differences during practice of a fundamental laparoscopic skill were predictive of laparoscopic performance during the OSCE. Overall, 77 final-year undergraduate medical students completed the movement specific reinvestment scale, an assessment tool that quantifies the propensity for MS-C and CMP. Participants were trained to proficiency on a fundamental laparoscopic skill. The number of trials to reach proficiency was measured, and completion times were recorded during early practice, later practice, and the OSCE. There was a trend for CMP to be negatively associated with the number of trials to reach proficiency (p = 0.064). A higher propensity for CMP was associated with fewer trials to reach proficiency (β = -0.70, p = 0.023). CMP and MS-C did not significantly predict completion times in the OSCE (p > 0.05). Completion times in early practice (β = 0.05, p = 0.016) and later practice (β = 0.47, p personality differences and individual differences in ability during practice could help inform the

  5. Task Analysis data Processing and Enhanced Representations (TAPER), Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Task Analysis (TA) is a fundamental part of NASA system design and validation. TAs are used to produce Master Task Lists that support engineering teams and...

  6. A task-specific interactive game-based virtual reality rehabilitation system for patients with stroke: a usability test and two clinical experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joon-Ho; Ryu, Hokyoung; Jang, Seong Ho

    2014-03-06

    Virtual reality (VR) is not commonly used in clinical rehabilitation, and commercial VR gaming systems may have mixed effects in patients with stroke. Therefore, we developed RehabMaster™, a task-specific interactive game-based VR system for post-stroke rehabilitation of the upper extremities, and assessed its usability and clinical efficacy. A participatory design and usability tests were carried out for development of RehabMaster with representative user groups. Two clinical trials were then performed. The first was an observational study in which seven patients with chronic stroke received 30 minutes of RehabMaster intervention per day for two weeks. The second was a randomised controlled trial of 16 patients with acute or subacute stroke who received 10 sessions of conventional occupational therapy only (OT-only group) or conventional occupational therapy plus 20 minutes of RehabMaster intervention (RehabMaster + OT group). The Fugl-Meyer Assessment score (FMA), modified Barthel Index (MBI), adverse effects, and drop-out rate were recorded. The requirements of a VR system for stroke rehabilitation were established and incorporated into RehabMaster. The reported advantages from the usability tests were improved attention, the immersive flow experience, and individualised intervention. The first clinical trial showed that the RehabMaster intervention improved the FMA (P = .03) and MBI (P = .04) across evaluation times. The second trial revealed that the addition of RehabMaster intervention tended to enhance the improvement in the FMA (P = .07) but did not affect the improvement in the MBI. One patient with chronic stroke left the trial, and no adverse effects were reported. The RehabMaster is a feasible and safe VR system for enhancing upper extremity function in patients with stroke.

  7. Acronym master list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This document is a master list of acronyms and other abbreviations that are used by or could be useful to, the personnel at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Many specialized and well-known abbreviations are not included in this list.

  8. National List of Beaches

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — EPA has published a list of coastal recreation waters adjacent to beaches (or similar points of access) used by the public in the U.S. The list, required by the...

  9. Assessing negative priming by attended distractors in a paper-and-pencil task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.M. Rosin

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper-and-pencil digit-comparison task for assessing negative priming (NP was introduced, using a referent-size-selection procedure that was demonstrated to enhance the effect. NP is indicated by slower responses to recently ignored items, and proposed within the clinical-experimental framework as a major cognitive index of active suppression of distracting information, critical to executive functioning. The digit-comparison task requires circling digits of a list with digit-asterisk pairs (a baseline measure for digit-selection, and the larger of two digits in each pair of the unrelated (with different digits in successive digit-pairs and related lists (in which the smaller digit subsequently became a target. A total of 56 students (18-38 years participated in two experiments that explored practice effects across lists and demonstrated reliable NP, i.e., slowing to complete the related list relative to the unrelated list, (F(2, 44 = 52.42, P < 0.0001. A 3rd experiment examined age-related effects. In the paper-and-pencil digit-comparison task, NP was reliable for the younger (N = 8, 18-24 years and middle-aged adults (N = 8, 31-54 years, but absent for the older group (N = 8, 68-77 years. NP was also reduced with aging in a computer-implemented digit-comparison task, and preserved in a task typically used to test location-specific NP, accounting for the dissociation between identity- and spatial-based suppression of distractors (Rao R(3, 12 = 16.02, P < 0.0002. Since the paper-and-pencil digit-comparison task can be administered easily, it can be useful for neuropsychologists seeking practical measures of NP that do not require cumbersome technical equipment.

  10. Competition for Listings

    OpenAIRE

    Foucault, Thierry; Parlour, Christine A

    1999-01-01

    We develop a model in which two profit maximizing exchanges compete for IPO listings. They choose the listing fees paid by firms wishing to go public and control the trading costs incurred by investors. All firms prefer lower costs, however firms differ in how they value a decrease in trading costs. Hence, in equilibrium, competing exchanges obtain positive expected profits by charging different trading fees and different listing fees. As a result, firms that list on different exchanges have ...

  11. Title III List of Lists -- Data Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This list was prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of the Emergency Planning and...

  12. Changes in clinical pain in fibromyalgia patients correlate with changes in brain activation in the cingulate cortex in a response inhibition task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Kairys, Anson; Ichesco, Eric; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Luisa; Barjola, Paloma; Heitzeg, Mary; Harris, Richard E; Clauw, Daniel J; Glass, Jennifer; Williams, David A

    2014-08-01

    The primary symptom of fibromyalgia is chronic, widespread pain; however, patients report additional symptoms including decreased concentration and memory. Performance-based deficits are seen mainly in tests of working memory and executive functioning. It has been hypothesized that pain interferes with cognitive performance; however, the neural correlates of this interference are still a matter of debate. In a previous, cross-sectional study, we reported that fibromyalgia patients (as compared with healthy controls) showed a decreased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response related to response inhibition (in a simple Go/No-Go task) in the anterior/mid cingulate cortex, supplementary motor area, and right premotor cortex. Here in this longitudinal study, neural activation elicited by response inhibition was assessed again in the same cohort of fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls using the same Go/No-Go paradigm. A decrease in percentage of body pain distribution was associated with an increase in BOLD signal in the anterior/mid cingulate cortex and the supplementary motor area, regions that have previously been shown to be "hyporeactive" in this cohort. Our results suggest that the clinical distribution of pain is associated with the BOLD response elicited by a cognitive task. The cingulate cortex and the supplementary motor area are critically involved in both the pain system as well as the response inhibition network. We hypothesize that increases in the spatial distribution of pain might engage greater neural resources, thereby reducing their availability for other networks. Our data also point to the potential for, at least partial, reversibility of these changes. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 77 FR 27737 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Attendant service tasks as post cleaning of eating utensils, compartmented trays, beverage containers...; provide equipment cleaning service, perform facility maintenance and sanitation; provide trash and garbage... additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement...

  14. Primacy and recency effects found using affective word lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Heath A; Shenal, Brian V; Everhart, D Erik; Robinson, Jennifer L

    2004-06-01

    This experiment tested hypotheses linking the right cerebral regulation of hostility and affective verbal learning. First, patterns of recall for positive, negative, and neutral affective list learning among high- and low-hostile individuals were examined. It was expected that low-hostiles would recall more items from the positive list and that high-hostiles would recall more words from the negative affective list. Also, independent of groups, it was expected that there would be a primacy effect for negative words and a recency effect for positive words. Exploratory analyses examined the relation between hostility and primacy and recency effects on the positive and negative word lists. High- and low-hostile participants (n = 65) completed the positive list learning task, the negative list learning task, or the neutral list learning task. Data analyses revealed no significant difference between the high- and low-hostile groups on the different affective lists. However, results of the present investigation reliably demonstrated the predicted primacy and recency effects. There was a primacy effect for the negative affective list and a recency effect for the positive affective list. These findings are consistent with previous research investigating the acquisition pattern of affective verbal learning.

  15. Measurement properties and feasibility of clinical tests to assess sit-to-stand/stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with neurological disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula F. S. Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subjects with neurological disease (ND usually show impaired performance during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks, with a consequent reduction in their mobility levels. OBJECTIVE: To determine the measurement properties and feasibility previously investigated for clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit in subjects with ND. METHOD: A systematic literature review following the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses protocol was performed. Systematic literature searches of databases (MEDLINE/SCIELO/LILACS/PEDro were performed to identify relevant studies. In all studies, the following inclusion criteria were assessed: investigation of any measurement property or the feasibility of clinical tests that evaluate sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit tasks in subjects with ND published in any language through December 2012. The COSMIN checklist was used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included studies. RESULTS: Eleven studies were included. The measurement properties/feasibility were most commonly investigated for the five-repetition sit-to-stand test, which showed good test-retest reliability (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient:ICC=0.94-0.99 for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and dementia. The ICC values were higher for this test than for the number of repetitions in the 30-s test. The five-repetition sit-to-stand test also showed good inter/intra-rater reliabilities (ICC=0.97-0.99 for stroke and inter-rater reliability (ICC=0.99 for subjects with Parkinson disease and incomplete spinal cord injury. For this test, the criterion-related validity for subjects with stroke, cerebral palsy and incomplete spinal cord injury was, in general, moderate (correlation=0.40-0.77, and the feasibility and safety were good for subjects with Alzheimer's disease. CONCLUSIONS: The five-repetition sit-to-stand test was used more often in subjects with ND, and most of the measurement

  16. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

  17. Technical Innovation: The Automated Residency Match Rank List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Colin; Rubinstein, David

    2016-01-01

    The creation of the final rank list for the National Residency Matching Program every year is a laborious task requiring the time and input of numerous faculty members and residents. This article describes the creation of an automated visual rank list to efficiently organize and guide discussion at the yearly rank meeting so that the task may be efficiently and fairly completed. The rank list was created using a PowerPoint (Microsoft) macro that can pull information directly from a spreadsheet to generate a visual rank list that can be modified on-the-fly during the final rank list meeting. An automatically created visual rank list helps facilitate an efficient meeting and creates an open and transparent process leading to the final ranking. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Biomechanics During Robotic and Mechanical Simulations of Physiologic and Clinical Motion Tasks: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A.; Myer, Gregory D.; Shearn, Jason T.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Investigators use in vitro joint simulations to invasively study the biomechanical behaviors of the anterior cruciate ligament. The aims of these simulations are to replicate physiologic conditions, but multiple mechanisms can be used to drive in vitro motions, which may influence biomechanical outcomes. The objective of this review was to examine, summarize, and compare biomechanical evidence related to anterior cruciate ligament function from in vitro simulations of knee motion. A systematic review was conducted (2004 to 2013) in Scopus, PubMed/Medline, and SPORTDiscus to identify peer-reviewed studies that reported kinematic and kinetic outcomes from in vitro simulations of physiologic or clinical tasks at the knee. Inclusion criteria for relevant studies were articles published in English that reported on whole-ligament anterior cruciate ligament mechanics during the in vitro simulation of physiologic or clinical motions on cadaveric knees that were unaltered outside of the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact, -deficient, and -reconstructed conditions. A meta-analysis was performed to synthesize biomechanical differences between the anterior-cruciate-ligament-intact and reconstructed conditions. 77 studies met our inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed. Combined joint rotations have the greatest impact on anterior cruciate ligament loads, but the magnitude by which individual kinematic degrees of freedom contribute to ligament loading during in vitro simulations is technique-dependent. Biomechanical data collected in prospective, longitudinal studies corresponds better with robotic-manipulator simulations than mechanical-impact simulations. Robotic simulation indicated that the ability to restore intact anterior cruciate ligament mechanics with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions was dependent on loading condition and degree of freedom examined. PMID:25547070

  19. Relationships between brain-derived neurotrophic factor, clinical symptoms and decision-making in chronic schizophrenia: data from the Iowa Gambling Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru eHori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF are significantly decreased in patients with schizophrenia and correlate with impairments in cognitive function. However, no study has investigated the relationship between the serum BDNF levels and decision-making. We compared patients with schizophrenia to healthy controls with respect to their decision-making ability and serum BDNF levels. Eighty-six chronic schizophrenia patients and 51 healthy controls participated in this study. We controlled for gender, age, and estimated intelligence quotient (IQ, and we investigated the differences in decision-making performance on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT between the schizophrenia patient and control groups. We also compared the IGT scores, the serum BDNF levels, and the clinical symptoms between the groups. The IGT scores of the schizophrenia patients were lower than those of the controls. A negative correlation was detected between the mean net scores on the trials in the final two blocks and the serum BDNF levels(p<0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that depressive symptoms and the serum BDNF levels were significantly associated with the mean net scores on the trials in the final two blocks. Based on these results, impaired sensitivity to both reward and punishment is associated with depressive symptoms and reduced serum BDNF levels in chronic schizophrenia patients and may be related to their poor performance on the IGT.

  20. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient...... paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more...... for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based...

  1. Novice supervisors' tasks and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Mathiesen, Birgit Bork

    2012-01-01

    The debut as a clinical supervisor is still rather unknown. The aim of this study is to explore what kind of tasks novice supervisors undertake and how they are prepared for these. During 2009–2010, 350 Danish clinical psychologists have responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Cor...... parallel to, the first supervisor tasks, preparing the novice supervisors for the often complicated tasks they are meeting.......The debut as a clinical supervisor is still rather unknown. The aim of this study is to explore what kind of tasks novice supervisors undertake and how they are prepared for these. During 2009–2010, 350 Danish clinical psychologists have responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core...... Questionnaire covering a wide range of items on professional development, experience, and practice. In this paper we focus on background data (experience, training and practice), specifically the tasks and training of the respondents as novice supervisors. The results show, that a majority of novice supervisors...

  2. CRNL library serials list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alburger, T.P.

    1982-04-01

    A list of 1900 serial publications (periodicals, society transactions and proceedings, annuals and directories, indexes, newspapers, etc.) is presented with volumes and years held by the Main Library. This library is the largest in AECL as well as one of the largest scientific and technical libraries in North America, and functions as a Canadian resource for nuclear information. A main alphabetical list is followed by broad subject field lists representing research interests, and lists of abstract and index serials, general bibliographic serials, conference indexes, press releases, English translations, and original language journals

  3. Retail Shopping Lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses consumers' shopping lists. The current study is based on a survey of 871 lists collected at retail grocery stores. Most items on shopping lists appear on the product category level rather than the brand level. The importance of the brand level varies considerably across product...... categories. An association between the frequency of a brand's appearance on lists and the amount of money spent on advertising the brand could not be found. A strong link between brands, prices and store names is revealed. Price in the majority of cases refers to brands rather than to product categories...

  4. Task-oriented rehabilitation robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, Nicolas; Choi, Younggeun; Winstein, Carolee; Gordon, James

    2012-11-01

    Task-oriented training is emerging as the dominant and most effective approach to motor rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke. Here, the authors propose that the task-oriented training framework provides an evidence-based blueprint for the design of task-oriented robots for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function in the form of three design principles: skill acquisition of functional tasks, active participation training, and individualized adaptive training. The previous robotic systems that incorporate elements of task-oriented trainings are then reviewed. Finally, the authors critically analyze their own attempt to design and test the feasibility of a TOR robot, ADAPT (Adaptive and Automatic Presentation of Tasks), which incorporates the three design principles. Because of its task-oriented training-based design, ADAPT departs from most other current rehabilitation robotic systems: it presents realistic functional tasks in which the task goal is constantly adapted, so that the individual actively performs doable but challenging tasks without physical assistance. To maximize efficacy for a large clinical population, the authors propose that future task-oriented robots need to incorporate yet-to-be developed adaptive task presentation algorithms that emphasize acquisition of fine motor coordination skills while minimizing compensatory movements.

  5. Monkeys Rely on Recency of Stimulus Repetition When Solving Short-Term Memory Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, John H., Jr.; Richmond, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Seven monkeys performed variants of two short-term memory tasks that others have used to differentiate between selective and nonselective memory mechanisms. The first task was to view a list of sequentially presented images and identify whether a test matched any image from the list, but not a distractor from a preceding list. Performance was best…

  6. Combined Use of the Rationalization of Home Medication by an Adjusted STOPP in Older Patients (RASP) List and a Pharmacist-Led Medication Review in Very Old Inpatients: Impact on Quality of Prescribing and Clinical Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Linden, Lorenz; Decoutere, Liesbeth; Walgraeve, Karolien; Milisen, Koen; Flamaing, Johan; Spriet, Isabel; Tournoy, Jos

    2017-02-01

    Polypharmacy and potentially inappropriate drugs have been associated with negative outcomes in older adults which might be reduced by pharmacist interventions. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of a pharmacist intervention, consisting of the application of the Rationalization of home medication by an Adjusted STOPP in older Patients (RASP) list and a pharmacist-led medication review on polypharmacy, the quality of prescribing, and clinical outcome in geriatric inpatients. A monocentric, prospective controlled trial was undertaken at the geriatric wards of a large university hospital. Pharmacists applied the RASP list to the drugs reconciled on admission and additionally performed an expert-based medication review, upon which recommendations were provided to the treating physicians. The primary outcome was the composite endpoint of drug discontinuation and dose reduction of drugs taken on admission. Secondary outcomes included RASP-identified potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs), the number of Emergency Department (ED) visits and quality of life (QOL) registered up to 3 months after discharge. On average, patients (n = 172) took 10 drugs on admission and were 84.5 years (standard deviation 4.8) of age. More drugs were discontinued or reduced in dose in the intervention group {control vs.intervention:median (interquartile range [IQR]) 3 (2-5) vs. 5 (3-7); p < 0.001}. More PIMs were discontinued in the intervention group, leading to less PIM at discharge [control vs.intervention:median (IQR) 2 (1-3) vs. 0.5 (0-1); p < 0.001]. No signal of harm was seen, and a significant improvement of QOL and less ED visits without hospitalization were observed. The combined intervention safely reduced drug use in very old inpatients and outperformed usual geriatric care. An increased QOL was seen, as well as a trend towards less ED visits. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01513265.

  7. Rare disease diagnosis as an information retrieval task

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly more clinicians use web Information Retrieval (IR) systems to assist them in diagnosing difficult medical cases, for instance rare diseases that they may not be familiar with. However, web IR systems are not necessarily optimised for this task. For instance, clinicians’ queries tend...... to be long lists of symptoms, often containing phrases, whereas web IR systems typically expect very short keyword-based queries. Motivated by such differences, this work uses a preliminary study of 30 clinical cases to reflect on rare disease retrieval as an IR task. Initial experiments using both Google...... web search and offline retrieval from a rare disease collection indicate that the retrieval of rare diseases is an open problem with room for improvement....

  8. B-1 Systems Approach to Training. Task Analysis Listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    RPQtllgpn COMMAND AIRSPEED MARKER = TBD MACH COMMAND SLEW SWITCH COMMAND MACH MARKER ■ TBD 01.1.5.048.00* SET AVVI BARQ CONTROLS...IUHP #11» COMMUNICATE A-V COPILOT UHF COMM PANEL COPILOT UHF COMM PANEL * TBD* COMM ESTABLISHED* 14.1.2.021.00* SET BARQ -ALTIMETERS

  9. Guide to listing references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of listing references. It introduces the reference of printed sources, CD-ROMs, websites, unpublished papers and program manuals, tapes, or other documentation for models. Meanwhile, it describes some examples to use Chicago Manual o...

  10. Contaminant Candidate List 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CCL 1 is a list of contaminants that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, that are known or...

  11. Contaminant Candidate List 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CCL 2 is a list of contaminants that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, that are known or...

  12. Contaminant Candidate List 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CCL 3 is a list of contaminants that are currently not subject to any proposed or promulgated national primary drinking water regulations, that are known or...

  13. Blazar Monitoring List

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is a compilation of sources in major blazar monitoring programs. This list contains all blazars known to be regularly monitored, plus all the MOJAVE- &...

  14. Green Power Partner List

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Green Power Partnership is a voluntary program designed to reduce the environmental impact of electricity generation by promoting renewable energy. There are thousands of Green Power Partners, all listed on this page.

  15. Goat production check list

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Mette Benedicte Olaf; Madsen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    This check list, financed by DanChurchAid, highlights all issues should be carefully investigated before investing in distribution of goats and in interventions to assist poor rural communities to improve their livelihood through goat production....

  16. Retrofitting Listed Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a case study where the energy demand for a listed building constructed in 1900 is reduced. Many older buildings are listed and have restrictions that include the entire building or that include only its exterior. For the building presented, only its exterior facade is listed....... The paper demonstrates measures for the improvement of the thermal insulation of the building with solid brick walls. Durable customised measures are shown. The customised measures are required not to change the overall exterior architecture as the building is considered to contribute to the uniqueness...... of the local urban environment and therefore listed. The reduced energy demand, related to individual measures, is estimated and building physics requirements are addressed together with the economic options for evaluating the profitability....

  17. Reference List About Implicit and Unconscious Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munar, Ana Maria; Villeseche, Florence; Weidemann, Cecilie Dam

    to publications accessible through the CBS library website and/or specifications of where and how to access each publication. In addition, as part of this effort and in line with the task list of the Council for Diversity and Inclusion, the report “Gender and Leadership Practices at Copenhagen Business School......The compilation of this reference list is one of the initiatives of the action plan developed by the Council for Diversity and Inclusion at Copenhagen Business School (CBS). This reference list is the first in a series of efforts initiated by this Council to develop an academic resource pool...... and knowledge base on diversity- and inclusion-related topics. An implicit and/or unconscious bias is a bias that we are unaware of and is therefore expressed unwillingly and unknowingly. As recent studies on implicit bias indicate “we now know that the operation of prejudice and stereotyping in social judgment...

  18. Molecular Biology Database List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, C

    1999-01-01

    Molecular Biology Database List (MBDL) includes brief descriptions and pointers to Web sites for the various databases described in this issue as well as other Web sites presenting data sets relevant to molecular biology. This information is compiled into a list (http://www.oup.co.uk/nar/Volume_27/Issue_01/summary/ gkc105_gml.html) which includes links both to source Web sites and to on-line versions of articles describing the databases. PMID:9847130

  19. Cross-domain interference costs during concurrent verbal and spatial serial memory tasks are asymmetric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Candice C; Mall, Jonathan T

    2012-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that memory for serial order is domain-general. Evidence also points to asymmetries in interference between verbal and visual-spatial tasks. We confirm that concurrently remembering verbal and spatial serial lists provokes substantial interference compared with remembering a single list, but we further investigate the impact of this interference throughout the serial position curve, where asymmetries are indeed apparent. A concurrent verbal order memory task affects spatial memory performance throughout the serial positions of the list, but performing a spatial order task affects memory for the verbal serial list only for early list items; in the verbal task only, the final items are unaffected by a concurrent task. Adding suffixes eliminates this asymmetry, resulting in impairment throughout the list for both tasks. These results suggest that domain-general working memory resources may be supplemented with resources specific to the verbal domain, but perhaps not with equivalent spatial resources.

  20. Low-intensity cognitive-behaviour therapy interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder compared to waiting list for therapist-led cognitive-behaviour therapy: 3-arm randomised controlled trial of clinical effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lovell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is prevalent and without adequate treatment usually follows a chronic course. "High-intensity" cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT from a specialist therapist is current "best practice." However, access is difficult because of limited numbers of therapists and because of the disabling effects of OCD symptoms. There is a potential role for "low-intensity" interventions as part of a stepped care model. Low-intensity interventions (written or web-based materials with limited therapist support can be provided remotely, which has the potential to increase access. However, current evidence concerning low-intensity interventions is insufficient. We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness of 2 forms of low-intensity CBT prior to high-intensity CBT, in adults meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV criteria for OCD.This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North West-Lancaster (reference number 11/NW/0276. All participants provided informed consent to take part in the trial. We conducted a 3-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial in primary- and secondary-care United Kingdom mental health services. All patients were on a waiting list for therapist-led CBT (treatment as usual. Four hundred and seventy-three eligible patients were recruited and randomised. Patients had a median age of 33 years, and 60% were female. The majority were experiencing severe OCD. Patients received 1 of 2 low-intensity interventions: computerised CBT (cCBT; web-based CBT materials and limited telephone support through "OCFighter" or guided self-help (written CBT materials with limited telephone or face-to-face support. Primary comparisons concerned OCD symptoms, measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Observer-Rated (Y-BOCS-OR at 3, 6, and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety, and

  1. EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis: report of a task force of the European Standing Committee for International Clinical Studies Including Therapeutics (ESCISIT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Combe, B.; Landewe, R.; Lukas, C.; Bolosiu, H. D.; Breedveld, F.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Ferraccioli, G.; Hazes, J. M. W.; Klareskog, L.; Machold, K.; Martin-Mola, E.; Nielsen, H.; Silman, A.; Smolen, J.; Yazici, H.

    2007-01-01

    To formulate EULAR recommendations for the management of early arthritis. In accordance with EULAR's "standardised operating procedures", the task force pursued an evidence based approach and an approach based on expert opinion. A steering group comprised of 14 rheumatologists representing 10

  2. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  3. Cognitive Factors Affecting Free Recall, Cued Recall, and Recognition Tasks in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamagishi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Our aim was to identify cognitive factors affecting free recall, cued recall, and recognition tasks in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Subjects: We recruited 349 consecutive AD patients who attended a memory clinic. Methods: Each patient was assessed using the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS and the extended 3-word recall test. In this task, each patient was asked to freely recall 3 previously presented words. If patients could not recall 1 or more of the target words, the examiner cued their recall by providing the category of the target word and then provided a forced-choice recognition of the target word with 2 distracters. The patients were divided into groups according to the results of the free recall, cued recall, and recognition tasks. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for repeated measures was carried out to evaluate the net effects of cognitive factors on the free recall, cued recall, and recognition tasks after controlling for the effects of age and recent memory deficit. Results: Performance on the ADAS Orientation task was found to be related to performance on the free and cued recall tasks, performance on the ADAS Following Commands task was found to be related to performance on the cued recall task, and performance on the ADAS Ideational Praxis task was found to be related to performance on the free recall, cued recall, and recognition tasks. Conclusion: The extended 3-word recall test reflects deficits in a wider range of memory and other cognitive processes, including memory retention after interference, divided attention, and executive functions, compared with word-list recall tasks. The characteristics of the extended 3-word recall test may be advantageous for evaluating patients’ memory impairments in daily living.

  4. Telephone word-list recall tested in the rural aging and memory study: two parallel versions for the TICS-M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogervorst, Eva; Bandelow, Stephan; Hart, John; Henderson, Victor W

    2004-09-01

    Parallel versions of memory tasks are useful in clinical and research settings to reduce practice effects engendered by multiple administrations. We aimed to investigate the usefulness of three parallel versions of ten-item word list recall tasks administered by telephone. A population based telephone survey of middle-aged and elderly residents of Bradley County, Arkansas was carried out as part of the Rural Aging and Memory Study (RAMS). Participants in the study were 1845 persons aged 40 to 95 years. Word lists included that used in the telephone interview of cognitive status (TICS) as a criterion standard and two newly developed lists. The mean age of participants was 61.05 (SD 12.44) years; 39.5% were over age 65. 78% of the participants had completed high school, 66% were women and 21% were African-American. There was no difference in demographic characteristics between groups receiving different word list versions, and performances on the three versions were equivalent for both immediate (mean 4.22, SD 1.53) and delayed (mean 2.35 SD 1.75) recall trials. The total memory score (immediate+delayed recall) was negatively associated with older age (beta = -0.41, 95%CI=-0.11 to -0.04), lower education (beta = 0.24, 95%CI = 0.36 to 0.51), male gender (beta = -0.18, 95%CI = -1.39 to -0.90) and African-American race (beta = -0.15, 95%CI = -1.41 to -0.82). The two RAMS word recall lists and the TICS word recall list can be used interchangeably in telephone assessment of memory of middle-aged and elderly persons. This finding is important for future studies where parallel versions of a word-list memory task are needed. (250 words).

  5. Booster parameter list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsa, Z.

    1986-10-01

    The AGS Booster is designed to be an intermediate synchrotron injector for the AGS, capable of accelerating protons from 200 MeV to 1.5 GeV. The parameters listed include beam and operational parameters and lattice parameters, as well as parameters pertaining to the accelerator's magnets, vacuum system, radio frequency acceleration system, and the tunnel. 60 refs., 41 figs

  6. List of Participants 183

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Sen D, BARC, Mumbai, India. Sequeira A, Mumbai, India. Shaikh A M, BARC, Mumbai, India. Sharma Daksha, AMU, Aligarh, India. Sharma K S, MS University of Baroda,. Vadodara, India. Sharma S M, BARC, Mumbai, India. Shinde A B, BARC, Mumbai, India. Shukla A, Martin-Luther University,. Germany.

  7. Making Lists, Enlisting Scientists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2011-01-01

    was the indicator conceptualised? How were notions of scientific knowledge and collaboration inscribed and challenged in the process? The analysis shows a two-sided process in which scientists become engaged in making lists but which is simultaneously a way for research policy to enlist scientists. In conclusion...

  8. List of Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of Participants. Participants from Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. Agarwalla S K, BARC, Mumbai. Bapna R C, BARC, Mumbai. Batra Jigyasa, BARC, Mumbai. Baruah S, BARC, Mumbai. Behera Rita, BARC, Mumbai. Bhandari S, BARC, Mumbai. Bhatnagar K S, BARC, Mumbai. Bhowmick G K, BARC ...

  9. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Abbas Sohrab, BARC, Mumbai, India. Achary S N, BARC, Mumbai, India. Acharya Prashant G, JMS College, Ahmedabad, India. Aggarwal S K, BARC, Mumbai, India. Agrawal Ashish, BARC, Mumbai, India. Alam Md Sayem, AMU, Aligarh, India. Alamelu D, BARC, Mumbai, India. Aldona Rajewska, IAE ...

  10. List of participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of participants. Behera Nirbhay Kumar, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bom- bay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076, India. Behera Shiba Prasad, Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre,. Mumbai 400 085, India. Bhagwat Ameeya Ashok, Department of Phyiscs, Indian Institute of ...

  11. The Christmas list

    CERN Multimedia

    James Gillies

    2010-01-01

    List making seems to be among mankind’s favourite activities, particularly as the old year draws to a close and the new one begins. It seems that we all want to know what the top 100 annoying pop songs are, who are the world’s most embarrassing people and what everyone’s been watching on TV. The transition from 2009 to 2010 was no different, but some of the latest batch of lists have a few surprising entries. According to the Global Language Monitor, ‘twitter’ was the top word of 2009. No surprises there, but ‘hadron’ came in at number 8 on the list. ‘King of pop’ was top phrase, according to the same source, but ‘god particle’ came in at number 10. And while ‘Barack Obama’ was the name of the year, ‘Large Hadron Collider’ came in at number four. The Global Language Monitor was not the only organization whose lists included particle physics references. &ls...

  12. Iterative List Decoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Høholdt, Tom; Hjaltason, Johan

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the relation between iterative decoding and the extended parity check matrix. By considering a modified version of bit flipping, which produces a list of decoded words, we derive several relations between decodable error patterns and the parameters of the code. By developing a tree...

  13. List of publications 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    AECL Research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1990

  14. Getting on the List

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... brochures What Every Patient Needs to Know Living Donation Multiple Listing Visit UNOS Store Learn more How organs are matched How to become a living donor ...

  15. List of Participants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    List of Participants. Margo Aller. Denis Bastieri. Xiongwei Bi. Weihao Bian. Vera Bychkova. Bo Chai. Jianling Chen. Xuhui Chen. Ye Chen. Zhifu Chen. Yongjun Chen. Liang Chen. Zhaoyu Chen. Kwongsang Cheng. Lang Cui. Benzhong Dai. Zhen Ding. Dimitrios Emmanoulopoulos. Xiaohong Fan. Junhui Fan. Longxing Fan.

  16. IEA Wind Task 36 Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Gregor; Cline, Joel; Frank, Helmut; Shaw, Will; Pinson, Pierre; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Kariniotakis, Georges; Sempreviva, Anna Maria; Draxl, Caroline

    2017-04-01

    Wind power forecasts have been used operatively for over 20 years. Despite this fact, there are still several possibilities to improve the forecasts, both from the weather prediction side and from the usage of the forecasts. The new International Energy Agency (IEA) Task on Wind Power Forecasting tries to organise international collaboration, among national weather centres with an interest and/or large projects on wind forecast improvements (NOAA, DWD, UK MetOffice, …) and operational forecaster and forecast users. The Task is divided in three work packages: Firstly, a collaboration on the improvement of the scientific basis for the wind predictions themselves. This includes numerical weather prediction model physics, but also widely distributed information on accessible datasets for verification. Secondly, we will be aiming at an international pre-standard (an IEA Recommended Practice) on benchmarking and comparing wind power forecasts, including probabilistic forecasts aiming at industry and forecasters alike. This WP will also organise benchmarks, in cooperation with the IEA Task WakeBench. Thirdly, we will be engaging end users aiming at dissemination of the best practice in the usage of wind power predictions, especially probabilistic ones. The Operating Agent is Gregor Giebel of DTU, Co-Operating Agent is Joel Cline of the US Department of Energy. Collaboration in the task is solicited from everyone interested in the forecasting business. We will collaborate with IEA Task 31 Wakebench, which developed the Windbench benchmarking platform, which this task will use for forecasting benchmarks. The task runs for three years, 2016-2018. Main deliverables are an up-to-date list of current projects and main project results, including datasets which can be used by researchers around the world to improve their own models, an IEA Recommended Practice on performance evaluation of probabilistic forecasts, a position paper regarding the use of probabilistic forecasts

  17. A study on task-analysis of clinical pathologists as medical consultants in Nihon University Hospital--a Japanese perspective by comparison with current status in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, K; Yanai, M; Hosokawa, N; Iwasaki, Y; Hoshino, T; Arashima, Y; Hayashi, K; Murakami, J; Tsuchiya, T; Kawano, K

    2000-07-01

    To identify our role and the customers' satisfaction, the on-call consultation service records of the Department of Clinical Pathology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Itabashi Hospital (NUIH), were analyzed. Between 1995 and 1998, 1,789 consultation services were recorded, and approximately 40% were from physicians, and 50% were from medical technologists. During office hours, many physicians made contact with us at the office of clinical pathology, the clinical laboratory and other places in the hospital by various means. They asked us to interpret multidisciplinary laboratory data, and to provide the specific information that might affect clinical management. Medical technologists asked for clinical information of patients with extreme measured values and requested that we contact with physicians. In contrast, on weekends/holidays or after routine working hours, physicians sometimes requested non-automated laboratory tests such as peripheral blood smears/bone marrow smears or Gram stains. The major contents of our responses to medical technologists were concerned with blood banking and handling of instruments not to be operated in routine work. These results reconfirm that we are still required to have clinical competence for common laboratory procedures and to have the capability of interpretation of multidisciplinary laboratory data in the university hospital. Traditionally, most Japanese clinical pathologists have been focused their attention on bench work in research laboratories. However, the present study shows that the clinical pathologists need to bridge the real gap between laboratory technology and patient care. Our on-call service system can enhance the education of clinical pathologists, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but also patient care. In addition, in response to a need for customer access to this service with a shortage of clinical pathologists, a more effective method would be to set up a proactive systemic approach in

  18. A matrix for the qualitative evaluation of nursing tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durosaiye, Isaiah O; Hadjri, Karim; Liyanage, Champika L; Bennett, Kina

    2017-11-22

    To formulate a model for patient-nurse interaction; to compile a comprehensive list of nursing tasks on hospital wards; and to construct a nursing tasks demand matrix. The physical demands associated with nursing profession are of growing interest among researchers. Yet, it is the complexity of nursing tasks that defines the demands of ward nurses' role. This study explores nursing tasks, based on patient-nurse interaction on hospital wards. Extant literature was reviewed to formulate a patient-nurse interaction model. Twenty ward nurses were interviewed to compile a list of nursing tasks. These nursing tasks were mapped against the patient-nurse interaction model. A patient-nurse interaction model was created, consisting of: (1) patient care, (2) patient surveillance and (3) patient support. Twenty-three nursing tasks were identified. The nursing tasks demand matrix was constructed. Ward managers may use a nursing tasks demand matrix to determine the demands of nursing tasks on ward nurses. While many studies have explored either the physical or the psychosocial aspects of nursing tasks separately, this study suggests that the physicality of nursing tasks must be evaluated in tandem with their complexity. Ward managers may take a holistic approach to nursing tasks evaluation by using a nursing tasks demand matrix. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Duty Module Methodology for Officer Career Management System Development: Task Data Bank, Task List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    THE BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES A Field Operating Agency under the Jurisdiction of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel FRANKLIN A. HART JOSEPH...teams and verity closures. O-BB-4 C?57 Perform field traverse, triangulation and re- section, using aiming circle, level, transit, theodolite, and

  20. Oral and head and neck cancer. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Human cancer etiology and epidemiology; Experimental carcinogenesis and pathology; Preclinical diagnosis and therapy; Clinical diagnosis and prognosis; Clinical therapy; Rehabilitation and psychological aspects of treatment; Training programs for dental professionals; Broad clinical programs

  1. QTL list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Policy | Contact Us QTL list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  2. Marker list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Database Site Policy | Contact Us Marker list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  3. The multi-feature hypothesis: Connectionist guidelines for L2 task design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, M.L.I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834297; de Graaff, H.C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/16516297X; Westhoff, G.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071250557; Brekelmans, J.M.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074625411

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of task type on the retention and ease of activation of second language (L2) vocabulary, based on the multi-feature hypothesis (Moonen, De Graaff, & Westhoff, 2006). Two tasks were compared: a writing task and a list-learning task. It was hypothesized that

  4. Neuroradiology critical findings lists: survey of neuroradiology training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiarz, L S; Trotter, S; Viertel, V G; Nagy, P; Lewin, J S; Yousem, D M

    2013-04-01

    The Joint Commission has identified timely reporting of critical results as one of the National Patient Safety Goals. We surveyed directors of neuroradiology fellowships to assess and compare critical findings lists across programs. A 3-question survey was e-mailed to directors of neuroradiology fellowships with the following questions: 1) Do you currently have a "critical findings" list that you abide by in your neuroradiology division? 2) How is that list distributed to your residents and fellows for implementation, if at all? and 3) Was this list vetted by neurology, neurosurgery, and otolaryngology departments? Programs with CF lists were asked for a copy of the list. Summary and comparative statistics were calculated. Fifty-one of 89 (57.3%) programs responded. Twenty-one of 51 (41.2%) programs had CF lists. Lists were distributed during orientation, sent via Web sites and e-mails, and posted in work areas. Eleven of 21 lists were developed internally, and 5 of 21, with the input from other departments. The origin of 5 of 21 lists was unknown. Forty CF entities were seen in 20 submitted lists (mean, 9.1; range, 2-23). The most frequent entities were the following: cerebral hemorrhage (18 of 20 lists), acute stroke (15 of 20), spinal cord compression (15 of 20), brain herniation (12 of 20), and spinal fracture/instability (12 of 20). Programs with no CF lists called clinicians on the basis of "common sense" and "clinical judgment." Less than a half (41.2%) of directors of neuroradiology fellowships that responded have implemented CF lists. CF lists have variable length and content and are predominantly developed by radiology departments without external input.

  5. Choosing wisely in headache medicine: the American Headache Society's list of five things physicians and patients should question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Elizabeth; Weizenbaum, Emma; Frishberg, Benjamin; Silberstein, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to draw attention to tests and procedures associated with low-value care in headache medicine, the American Headache Society (AHS) joined the Choosing Wisely initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation. The AHS president appointed an ad hoc "Choosing Wisely" task force of the AHS. The committee surveyed AHS members to develop a candidate list of items for the AHS "Top 5" list of low-value care in headache medicine. Through a process of literature review and consensus, the final list of five items was chosen. Draft recommendations went through several rounds of revision and a process of outside review. The AHS Board of Directors approved the final list of "Five Things." The five recommendations approved by the AHS Board of Directors are: (1) don't perform neuroimaging studies in patients with stable headaches that meet criteria for migraine; (2) don't perform computed tomography imaging for headache when magnetic resonance imaging is available, except in emergency settings; (3) don't recommend surgical deactivation of migraine trigger points outside of a clinical trial; (4) don't prescribe opioid- or butalbital-containing medications as a first-line treatment for recurrent headache disorders; and (5) don't recommend prolonged or frequent use of over-the-counter pain medications for headache. We recommend that headache medicine specialists and other physicians who evaluate and treat headache disorders should use this list when discussing care with patients. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  6. The spelling for writing list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S; Harris, K R; Loynachan, C

    1994-04-01

    Four different vocabulary lists based on the study of children's writing were used to generate a basic spelling list for students with learning disabilities and other poor spellers. For each vocabulary list, the smallest number of different words that accounted for 80% of the words children used in their writing were identified. Words that were common to only one or two of the lists or not normally used by children until fourth grade or later were eliminated. Each word was assigned a grade placement based on difficulty, pattern of occurrence in children's writing, and placement on current vocabulary lists and spelling materials. The resulting spelling list of 335 words is provided.

  7. Registered plant list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods Regis...tered plant list Data detail Data name Registered plant list DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01194-01-001 Descri...base Site Policy | Contact Us Registered plant list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data

  8. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... team also may ask you to do other tasks. For example, you may have to keep a ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  9. The Effects of a Combined Task Clarification, Goal Setting, Feedback, and Performance Contingent Consequence Intervention Package on Telephone Customer Service in a Medical Clinic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowiak, Julie M.; Madden, Gregory J.; Mathews, Ramona

    2006-01-01

    Appointment coordinators at a mid-western medical clinic were to provide exceptional telephone customer service. This included using a standard greeting, speaking in an appropriate tone of voice during the conversation, and using a standard closing to end the call. An analysis suggested performance deficiencies resulted from weak antecedents, poor…

  10. Student Assessment System. Student Performance Record. Task Detailing. Cosmetology. Georgia Vocational Education Program Articulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This booklet lists tasks and functions the cosmetology student should be able to do upon entering an employment situation or a postsecondary school. (Listings are also available for the areas of allied health occupations/practical nursing and transportation/automotive mechanics.) Tasks are coded to correspond to those on the Student Performance…

  11. Listed waste determination report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    On September 23, 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a notice clarifying interim status requirements for the management of radioactive mixed waste thereby subjecting the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and other applicable Department of Energy (DOE) sites to regulation under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Therefore, the DOE was required to submit a Part A Permit application for each treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) unit within the INEL, defining the waste codes and processes to be regulated under RCRA. The September 1990 revised Part A Permit application, that was approved by the State of Idaho identified 101 potential acute and toxic hazardous waste codes (F-, P-, and U- listed wastes according to 40 CFR 261.31 and 40 CFR 261.33) for some TSD units at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Most of these waste were assumed to have been introduced into the High-level Liquid Waste TSD units via laboratory drains connected to the Process Equipment Waste (PEW) evaporator (PEW system). At that time, a detailed and systematic evaluation of hazardous chemical use and disposal practices had not been conducted to determine if F-, P-, or Unlisted waste had been disposed to the PEW system. The purpose of this investigation was to perform a systematic and detailed evaluation of the use and disposal of the 101 F-, P-, and Unlisted chemicals found in the approved September 1990 Part A Permit application. This investigation was aimed at determining which listed wastes, as defined in 40 CFR 261.31 (F-listed) and 261.33 (P ampersand Unlisted) were discharged to the PEW system. Results of this investigation will be used to support revisions to the RCRA Part A Permit application

  12. Recommendations from the Investigational New Drug/Investigational Device Exemption Task Force of the clInical and Translational Science Award Consortium: developing and implementing a sponsor-investigators training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, M E Blair; Berglund, Jelena Petrovic; O'Reilly, Erin K; Hartman, Karen; Speicher, Lisa A; Adamo, Joan E; O'Riordan, Gerri; Brown, Jennifer Swanton; Schuff, Kathryn G

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to provide recommendations for provision of training for sponsor and investigators at Academic Health Centers. A subgroup of the Investigational New Drug/Investigational Device Exemption (IND/IDE) Task Force of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program Regulatory Knowledge Key Function Committee was assembled to specifically address how clinical investigators who hold an IND/IDE and thus assume the role of sponsor-investigators are adequately trained to meet the additional regulatory requirements of this role. The participants who developed the recommendations were representatives of institutions with IND/IDE support programs. Through an informal survey, the task force determined that a variety and mix of models are used to provide support for IND/IDE holders within CTSA institutions. In addition, a CTSA consortium-wide resources survey was used. The participants worked from the models and survey results to develop consensus recommendations to address institutional support, training content, and implementation. The CTSA IND/IDE Task Force recommendations are as follows: (1) Institutions should assess the scope of Food and Drug Administration-regulated research, perform a needs analysis, and provide resources to implement a suitable training program; (2) The model of training program should be tailored to each institution; (3) The training should specifically address the unique role of sponsor-investigators, and the effectiveness of training should be evaluated regularly by methods that fit the model adopted by the institution; and (4) Institutional leadership should mandate sponsor-investigator training and effectively communicate the necessity and availability of training.

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... list of NHLBI-sponsored clinical trials. NIH Clinical Research Studies Search for studies conducted within other Institutes at the NIH, including trials performed on our campus or trials NIH has sponsored at universities, medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a ...

  14. Generating Genome-Scale Candidate Gene Lists for Pharmacogenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niclas Tue; Brunak, Søren; Altman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    A critical task in pharmacogenomics is identifying genes that may be important modulators of drug response. High-throughput experimental methods are often plagued by false positives and do not take advantage of existing knowledge. Candidate gene lists can usefully summarize existing knowledge...

  15. Performance of Male and Female C57BL/6J Mice on Motor and Cognitive Tasks Commonly Used in Pre-Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura B; Fu, Amanda H; McCabe, Joseph T

    2016-05-01

    To date, clinical trials have failed to find an effective therapy for victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI) who live with motor, cognitive, and psychiatric complaints. Pre-clinical investigators are now encouraged to include male and female subjects in all translational research, which is of particular interest in the field of neurotrauma given that circulating female hormones (progesterone and estrogen) have been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects. To determine whether behavior of male and female C57BL6/J mice is differentially impaired by TBI, male and cycling female mice were injured by controlled cortical impact and tested for several weeks with functional assessments commonly employed in pre-clinical research. We found that cognitive and motor impairments post-TBI, as measured by the Morris water maze (MWM) and rotarod, respectively, were largely equivalent in male and female animals. However, spatial working memory, assessed by the y-maze, was poorer in female mice. Female mice were generally more active, as evidenced by greater distance traveled in the first exposure to the open field, greater distance in the y-maze, and faster swimming speeds in the MWM. Statistical analysis showed that variability in all behavioral data was no greater in cycling female mice than it was in male mice. These data all suggest that with careful selection of tests, procedures, and measurements, both sexes can be included in translational TBI research without concern for effect of hormones on functional impairments or behavioral variability.

  16. Impact of MRI on a knee arthroscopy waiting list.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, R. L.; Williams, L. A.; Watura, R.; Fairclough, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a waiting list initiative, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were arranged for 69 patients waiting for knee arthroscopy. All patients had a clinical diagnosis of a meniscal tear. With 11 non-attenders, 58 scans were performed. Of the patients scanned, 35 had demonstrable meniscal tears, and five patients had other pathology on their scans. All patients were reviewed clinically after their scans, and 24 patients were removed from the waiting list. After a further 9 months, only...

  17. Learning from Academic Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Ronald W.; Walsh, John

    1988-01-01

    Offers a descriptive theory of the nature of classroom tasks. Describes the interplay among (1) the conditions under which tasks are set; (2) the cognitive plans students use to accomplish tasks; and (3) the products students create as a result of their task-related efforts. (SKC)

  18. Wild Poliovirus List

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Affordable IPV Vaccine-derived Polioviruses: Managing the risks Antivirals Clinical Trials and Seroprevalence Surveys Research Publications Polio Research Committee Grants and Collaborations Polio ...

  19. Report of the AAPM Task Group No. 105: Issues associated with clinical implementation of Monte Carlo-based photon and electron external beam treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetty, Indrin J.; Curran, Bruce; Cygler, Joanna E.; DeMarco, John J.; Ezzell, Gary; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Kawrakow, Iwan; Keall, Paul J.; Liu, Helen; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; Rogers, D. W. O.; Seuntjens, Jan; Sheikh-Bagheri, Daryoush; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2007-01-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has been shown through many research studies to calculate accurate dose distributions for clinical radiotherapy, particularly in heterogeneous patient tissues where the effects of electron transport cannot be accurately handled with conventional, deterministic dose algorithms. Despite its proven accuracy and the potential for improved dose distributions to influence treatment outcomes, the long calculation times previously associated with MC simulation rendered this method impractical for routine clinical treatment planning. However, the development of faster codes optimized for radiotherapy calculations and improvements in computer processor technology have substantially reduced calculation times to, in some instances, within minutes on a single processor. These advances have motivated several major treatment planning system vendors to embark upon the path of MC techniques. Several commercial vendors have already released or are currently in the process of releasing MC algorithms for photon and/or electron beam treatment planning. Consequently, the accessibility and use of MC treatment planning algorithms may well become widespread in the radiotherapy community. With MC simulation, dose is computed stochastically using first principles; this method is therefore quite different from conventional dose algorithms. Issues such as statistical uncertainties, the use of variance reduction techniques, the ability to account for geometric details in the accelerator treatment head simulation, and other features, are all unique components of a MC treatment planning algorithm. Successful implementation by the clinical physicist of such a system will require an understanding of the basic principles of MC techniques. The purpose of this report, while providing education and review on the use of MC simulation in radiotherapy planning, is to set out, for both users and developers, the salient issues associated with clinical implementation and

  20. Clinical significance of serum tumor markers for gastric cancer: a systematic review of literature by the Task Force of the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hideaki; Noie, Tamaki; Ohashi, Manabu; Oba, Koji; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the clinical significance of serum tumor markers, particularly CEA, CA19-9, and CA72-4, in patients with gastric cancer. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "gastric cancer" and "tumor marker," to select 4,925 relevant reports published before the end of November 2012. A total of 187 publications contained data for CEA and CA19-9, and 19 publications contained data related to all three tumor markers. The positive rates were 21.1 % for CEA, 27.8 % for CA19-9, and 30.0 % for CA72-4. These three markers were significantly associated with tumor stage and patient survival. Serum markers are not useful for early cancer, but they are useful for detecting recurrence and distant metastasis, predicting patient survival, and monitoring after surgery. Tumor marker monitoring may be useful for patients after surgery because the positive conversion of tumor markers usually occurs 2-3 months before imaging abnormalities. Among other tumor markers, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is useful for detecting and predicting liver metastases. Moreover, CA125 and sialyl Tn antigens (STN) are useful for detecting peritoneal metastases. Although no prospective trial has yet been completed to evaluate the clinical significance of these serum markers, this literature survey suggests that combinations of CEA, CA19-9, and CA72-4 are the most effective ways for staging before surgery or chemotherapy. In particular, monitoring tumor markers that were elevated before surgery or chemotherapy could be useful for detection of recurrence or evaluation of the response.

  1. Radiation protection technician job task analysis manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This manual was developed to assist all DOE contractors in the design and conduct of job task analysis (JTA) for the radiation protection technician. Experience throughout the nuclear industry and the DOE system has indicated that the quality and efficiency in conducting a JTA at most sites is greatly enhanced by using a generic task list for the position, and clearly written guidelines on the JTA process. This manual is designed to provide this information for personnel to use in developing and conducting site-specific JTAs. (VC)

  2. Expansion of Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection by Task Shifting to Community-Based Nonspecialist Providers: A Nonrandomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattakuzhy, Sarah; Gross, Chloe; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Jenkins, Veronica; Silk, Rachel; Akoth, Elizabeth; Thomas, Aurielle; Ahmed, Charisse; Espinosa, Michelle; Price, Angie; Rosenthal, Elana; Tang, Lydia; Wilson, Eleanor; Bentzen, Soren; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam

    2017-09-05

    Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has resulted in high rates of disease cure; however, not enough specialists currently are available to provide care. To determine the efficacy of HCV treatment independently provided by nurse practitioners (NPs), primary care physicians (PCPs), or specialist physicians using DAA therapy. Nonrandomized, open-label clinical trial initiated in 2015. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02339038). 13 urban, federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) in the District of Columbia. A referred sample of 600 patients, of whom 96% were black, 69% were male, 82% were treatment naive, and 20% had cirrhosis. Seventy-two percent of the patients had HCV genotype 1a infection. The baseline characteristics of patients seen by each provider type were similar. Patients were assigned in a nonrandomized but specified manner to receive treatment from 1 of 5 NPs, 5 PCPs, or 6 specialists. All providers underwent an identical 3-hour training session based on guidelines. Patients received treatment with ledipasvir-sofosbuvir, which was provided on site, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration labeling requirements. Sustained virologic response (SVR). 516 patients achieved SVR, a response rate of 86% (95% CI, 83.0% to 88.7%), with no major safety signals. Response rates were consistent across the 3 provider types: NPs, 89.3% (CI, 83.3% to 93.8%); PCPs, 86.9% (CI, 80.6% to 91.7%); and specialists, 83.8% (CI, 79.0% to 87.8%). Patient loss to follow-up was the major cause of non-SVR. Nonrandomized patient distribution; possible referral bias. In a real-world cohort of patients at urban FQHCs, HCV treatment administered by nonspecialist providers was as safe and effective as that provided by specialists. Nurse practitioners and PCPs with compact didactic training could substantially expand the availability of community-based providers to escalate HCV therapy, bridging existing gaps in the continuum of care for patients with

  3. Project Tasks in Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben; Hansen, Poul Erik

    1998-01-01

    Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics......Description of the compulsary project tasks to be carried out as a part of DTU course 72238 Robotics...

  4. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching

  5. Microforms in Series Union List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsock, Ralph, Comp.

    This union list contains over 100 microform music collections from eight libraries which are members of the Mountain-Plains Chapter of the Music Library Association. The 22-page list includes major sets, series, and complete works of composers. Excluded are periodicals, single work/dissertation titles, and general collections that are currently…

  6. The STAPL pList

    KAUST Repository

    Tanase, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    We present the design and implementation of the stapl pList, a parallel container that has the properties of a sequential list, but allows for scalable concurrent access when used in a parallel program. The Standard Template Adaptive Parallel Library (stapl) is a parallel programming library that extends C++ with support for parallelism. stapl provides a collection of distributed data structures (pContainers) and parallel algorithms (pAlgorithms) and a generic methodology for extending them to provide customized functionality. stapl pContainers are thread-safe, concurrent objects, providing appropriate interfaces (e.g., views) that can be used by generic pAlgorithms. The pList provides stl equivalent methods, such as insert, erase, and splice, additional methods such as split, and efficient asynchronous (non-blocking) variants of some methods for improved parallel performance. We evaluate the performance of the stapl pList on an IBM Power 5 cluster and on a CRAY XT4 massively parallel processing system. Although lists are generally not considered good data structures for parallel processing, we show that pList methods and pAlgorithms (p-generate and p-partial-sum) operating on pLists provide good scalability on more than 103 processors and that pList compares favorably with other dynamic data structures such as the pVector. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  7. The functional neuroanatomy of multitasking: combining dual tasking with a short term memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Sabine; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Peeters, Ron; Emsell, Louise; Amant, Frederic; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Insight into the neural architecture of multitasking is crucial when investigating the pathophysiology of multitasking deficits in clinical populations. Presently, little is known about how the brain combines dual-tasking with a concurrent short-term memory task, despite the relevance of this mental operation in daily life and the frequency of complaints related to this process, in disease. In this study we aimed to examine how the brain responds when a memory task is added to dual-tasking. Thirty-three right-handed healthy volunteers (20 females, mean age 39.9 ± 5.8) were examined with functional brain imaging (fMRI). The paradigm consisted of two cross-modal single tasks (a visual and auditory temporal same-different task with short delay), a dual-task combining both single tasks simultaneously and a multi-task condition, combining the dual-task with an additional short-term memory task (temporal same-different visual task with long delay). Dual-tasking compared to both individual visual and auditory single tasks activated a predominantly right-sided fronto-parietal network and the cerebellum. When adding the additional short-term memory task, a larger and more bilateral frontoparietal network was recruited. We found enhanced activity during multitasking in components of the network that were already involved in dual-tasking, suggesting increased working memory demands, as well as recruitment of multitask-specific components including areas that are likely to be involved in online holding of visual stimuli in short-term memory such as occipito-temporal cortex. These results confirm concurrent neural processing of a visual short-term memory task during dual-tasking and provide evidence for an effective fMRI multitasking paradigm. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of bedtime writing on difficulty falling asleep: A polysomnographic study comparing to-do lists and completed activity lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scullin, Michael K; Krueger, Madison L; Ballard, Hannah K; Pruett, Natalya; Bliwise, Donald L

    2018-01-01

    Bedtime worry, including worrying about incomplete future tasks, is a significant contributor to difficulty falling asleep. Previous research showed that writing about one's worries can help individuals fall asleep. We investigated whether the temporal focus of bedtime writing-writing a to-do list versus journaling about completed activities-affected sleep onset latency. Fifty-seven healthy young adults (18-30) completed a writing assignment for 5 min prior to overnight polysomnography recording in a controlled sleep laboratory. They were randomly assigned to write about tasks that they needed to remember to complete the next few days (to-do list) or about tasks they had completed the previous few days (completed list). Participants in the to-do list condition fell asleep significantly faster than those in the completed-list condition. The more specifically participants wrote their to-do list, the faster they subsequently fell asleep, whereas the opposite trend was observed when participants wrote about completed activities. Therefore, to facilitate falling asleep, individuals may derive benefit from writing a very specific to-do list for 5 min at bedtime rather than journaling about completed activities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. ACC/AHA Special Report: Clinical Practice Guideline Implementation Strategies: A Summary of Systematic Reviews by the NHLBI Implementation Science Work Group: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wiley V; Pearson, Thomas A; Bennett, Glen C; Cushman, William C; Gaziano, Thomas A; Gorman, Paul N; Handler, Joel; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kushner, Robert F; MacKenzie, Thomas D; Sacco, Ralph L; Smith, Sidney C; Stevens, Victor J; Wells, Barbara L; Castillo, Graciela; Heil, Susan K R; Stephens, Jennifer; Vann, Julie C Jacobson

    2017-02-28

    In 2008, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened an Implementation Science Work Group to assess evidence-based strategies for effectively implementing clinical practice guidelines. This was part of a larger effort to update existing clinical practice guidelines on cholesterol, blood pressure, and overweight/obesity. Review evidence from the published implementation science literature and identify effective or promising strategies to enhance the adoption and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. This systematic review was conducted on 4 critical questions, each focusing on the adoption and effectiveness of 4 intervention strategies: (1) reminders, (2) educational outreach visits, (3) audit and feedback, and (4) provider incentives. A scoping review of the Rx for Change database of systematic reviews was used to identify promising guideline implementation interventions aimed at providers. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed a priori for each question, and the published literature was initially searched up to 2012, and then updated with a supplemental search to 2015. Two independent reviewers screened the returned citations to identify relevant reviews and rated the quality of each included review. Audit and feedback and educational outreach visits were generally effective in improving both process of care (15 of 21 reviews and 12 of 13 reviews, respectively) and clinical outcomes (7 of 12 reviews and 3 of 5 reviews, respectively). Provider incentives showed mixed effectiveness for improving both process of care (3 of 4 reviews) and clinical outcomes (3 reviews equally distributed between generally effective, mixed, and generally ineffective). Reminders showed mixed effectiveness for improving process of care outcomes (27 reviews with 11 mixed and 3 generally ineffective results) and were generally ineffective for clinical outcomes (18 reviews with 6 mixed and 9 generally ineffective results). Educational outreach visits (2 of 2

  10. [Accessible price lists at the anaesthesiologist's workplace enhance cost consciousness as a part of process and cost optimization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder-Ramos, S A; Bauer, M; Martin, E; Motsch, J; Böttiger, B W

    2003-02-01

    The imminent introduction of the DRG (diagnosis-related-group) system is putting hospitals in Germany under considerable pressure. This requires that personnel are efficiently allocated by optimizing organizational procedures and that the limited resources be distributed in a cost-effective manner. One prerequisite for this is a marked cost-consciousness on the part of those who "incur costs" in providing a service. To increase the awareness of costs in clinical physicians, the cost structures must be transparent. In order to achieve this goal, a project was initiated at the Department of Anaesthesiology at the University Hospital of Heidelberg, which aimed to enhance the cost-consciousness of the staff by making price lists available to anaesthesiologists at the workplace. In addition to the price lists, the 25 most expensive medications and medical products were added as an ABC analysis. The departmental staff was interviewed by questionnaire as to whether this project was reasonable. After 1 year the interview was repeated. The results of the questionnaire showed that in the opinion of the staff, price lists are an effective tool, as cost-consciousness on the part of clinical physicians can be enhanced by making price structures transparent. This is a major prerequisite for individual motivation in the cost-effective management. Although the ABC analyses demonstrate no long-term effect of the price-transparency on the cost structures, the staff showed increased cost-consciousness and individual motivation for economic tasks.

  11. MHAC--an assessment tool for analysing manual material handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batish, Ajay; Singh, Tejinder P

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an assessment tool for analysing material handling tasks and its application for material handling tasks prevalent in engine bearing industry. After a close observation of material handling tasks spread over many days, a list of tasks and parameters/variables affecting those tasks was made. Ergonomic conditions present in these tasks and their deficiencies were then identified and on the basis of the relationships between the tasks and their affinities, categories were developed. Using the data of those categories and various conditions and parameters, an assessment tool called MHAC (material handling assessment chart) was developed.

  12. Title III List of Lists -- Raw Data Set

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This list was prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine whether they need to submit reports under sections 302, 304, or 313 of the Emergency Planning and...

  13. On a List of Priests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isager, Signe

    2014-01-01

    The article concerns the fate of an often cited list of priests for Poseidon, which at some point was established and cut into a stele in ancient Halikarnassos. The list could be considered the genealogical table of Halikarnassos: The cult of Poseidon was founded by colonists from Troizen...... and the first priest on the list was a son of the god Poseidon himself. This could be read from the inscription on a new stele to which it was decided to transfer all the names on the first stele in the Late Hellenistic Period. The article presents two new documents for future discussions on when, why...

  14. Safeguards summary event list (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.J.; MacMurdy, P.H.

    1980-12-01

    The List contains nine categories of events involving NRC licensed material or licensees. It is deliberately broad in scope for two main reasons. First, the list is designed to serve as a reference document. It is as complete and accurate as possible. Second, the list is intended to provide as broad a perspective of the nature of licensee-related events as possible. The nine categories of events are as follows: bomb-related events; intrusion events; missing and/or allegedly stolen events; transportation-related events; vandalism events; arson events; firearms-related events; sabotage events; and miscellaneous events

  15. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ... taking part in a clinical trial. Your treatment team also may ask you to do other tasks. ...

  16. The Task Manager for the LHCb On-Line Farm

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Carbone, A; Galli, D; Gregori, D; Marconi, U; Peco, G; Vagnoni, V

    2004-01-01

    The Task Manager is a utility to start, stop and list processes on the on-line farm. Each process started by the Task Manager has a string environment variable set, named UTGID (User defined unique Thread Group Identifier) which allows to identify the process. The Task Manager uses the UTGID to list the running processes and to identify the processes to be stopped. It has also the ability to start a process using a particular user name and to set the scheduler type and the priority for the process itself. The Task Manager package includes a Linux DIM server (tmSrv), four Linux command line DIM clients (tmStart, tmLs, tmKill and tmStop) and a JCOP (Joint Control Project) PVSS client.

  17. #DDOD: Establishment Registration & Device Listing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — SUMMARY DDOD use case to request means on consolidating multiple data sources (MDR, PMA, 510(k), R&L) in order to build a list of all marketed medical devices....

  18. Efficient Algorithms for Subgraph Listing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niklas Zechner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Subgraph isomorphism is a fundamental problem in graph theory. In this paper we focus on listing subgraphs isomorphic to a given pattern graph. First, we look at the algorithm due to Chiba and Nishizeki for listing complete subgraphs of fixed size, and show that it cannot be extended to general subgraphs of fixed size. Then, we consider the algorithm due to Ga̧sieniec et al. for finding multiple witnesses of a Boolean matrix product, and use it to design a new output-sensitive algorithm for listing all triangles in a graph. As a corollary, we obtain an output-sensitive algorithm for listing subgraphs and induced subgraphs isomorphic to an arbitrary fixed pattern graph.

  19. The case for testing memory with both stories and word lists prior to dbs surgery for Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Bowers, Dawn; Price, Catherine C; Bauer, Russell M; Nisenzon, Anne; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S

    2011-04-01

    Patients seeking deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) typically undergo neuropsychological assessment to determine candidacy for surgery, with poor memory performance interpreted as a contraindication. Patients with PD may exhibit worse memory for word lists than for stories due to the lack of inherent organization in a list of unrelated words. Unfortunately, word list and story tasks are typically developed from different normative datasets, and the existence of a memory performance discrepancy in PD has been challenged. We compared recall of stories and word lists in 35 non-demented PD candidates for DBS. We administered commonly used neuropsychological measures of word list and story memory (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test, Logical Memory), along with a second word list task that was co-normed with the story task. Age-corrected scores were higher for the story task than for both word list tasks. Compared to story recall, word list recall correlated more consistently with motor severity and composite measures of processing speed, working memory, and executive functioning. These results support the classic view of fronto-subcortical contributions to memory in PD and suggest that executive deficits may influence word list recall more than story recall. We recommend a multi-componential memory battery in the neuropsychological assessment of DBS candidates to characterize both mesial temporal and frontal-executive memory processes. One should not rely solely on a word list task because patients exhibiting poor memory for word lists may perform better with stories and therefore deserve an interdisciplinary discussion for DBS surgery.

  20. Essential medicines for reproductive health: developing evidence based interagency list

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logez, Sophie; Jayasekar, Shalini; Moller, Helene; Ahmed, Kabir; Patel, Margaret Usher

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Although poor reproductive health constitutes a significant proportion of the disease burden in developing countries, essential medicines for reproductive health are often not available to the population. The objective was to analyze the guiding principles for developing national Essential Medicines Lists (EML). The second objective was to compare the reproductive health medicines included on these EMLs to the 2002 WHO/UNFPA list of essential drugs and commodities for reproductive health. Another objective was to compare the medicines included in existing international lists of medicines for reproductive health. Methods: The authors calculated the average number of medicines per clinical groups included in 112 national EMLs and compared these average numbers with the number of medicines per clinical group included on the WHO/UNFPA List. Additionally, they compared the content of the lists of medicines for reproductive health developed by various international agencies. Results: In 2003, the review of the 112 EMLs highlighted that medicines for reproductive health were not consistently included. The review of the international lists identified inconsistencies in their recommendations. The reviews’ outcomes became the catalyst for collaboration among international agencies in the development of the first harmonized Interagency List of Essential Medicines for Reproductive Health. Additionally, WHO, UNFPA and PATH published guidelines to support the inclusion of essential medicines for reproductive health in national medicine policies and EMLs. The Interagency List became a key advocacy tool for countries to review their EMLs. In 2009, a UNFPA/WHO assessment on access to reproductive health medicines in six countries demonstrated that the major challenge was that the Interagency List had not been updated recently and was inconsistently used. Conclusion: The addition of cost-effective medicines for reproductive health to EMLs can result in enhanced equity

  1. Transport Task Force Leadership, Task 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    The Transport Task Force (TTF) was initiated as a broad-based US magnetic fusion community activity during the fall of 1988 to focus attention on and encourage development of an increased understanding of anomalous transport in tokamaks. The overall TTF goal is to make progress on Characterizing, Understanding and Identifying how to Reduce plasma transport in tokamaks -- to CUIR transport

  2. Automation of a problem list using natural language processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haug Peter J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical problem list is an important part of the electronic medical record in development in our institution. To serve the functions it is designed for, the problem list has to be as accurate and timely as possible. However, the current problem list is usually incomplete and inaccurate, and is often totally unused. To alleviate this issue, we are building an environment where the problem list can be easily and effectively maintained. Methods For this project, 80 medical problems were selected for their frequency of use in our future clinical field of evaluation (cardiovascular. We have developed an Automated Problem List system composed of two main components: a background and a foreground application. The background application uses Natural Language Processing (NLP to harvest potential problem list entries from the list of 80 targeted problems detected in the multiple free-text electronic documents available in our electronic medical record. These proposed medical problems drive the foreground application designed for management of the problem list. Within this application, the extracted problems are proposed to the physicians for addition to the official problem list. Results The set of 80 targeted medical problems selected for this project covered about 5% of all possible diagnoses coded in ICD-9-CM in our study population (cardiovascular adult inpatients, but about 64% of all instances of these coded diagnoses. The system contains algorithms to detect first document sections, then sentences within these sections, and finally potential problems within the sentences. The initial evaluation of the section and sentence detection algorithms demonstrated a sensitivity and positive predictive value of 100% when detecting sections, and a sensitivity of 89% and a positive predictive value of 94% when detecting sentences. Conclusion The global aim of our project is to automate the process of creating and maintaining a problem

  3. List of Posters

    Science.gov (United States)

    List of Posters: Dark matter annihilation in the Galactic galo, by Dokuchaev Vyacheslav, et al. NEMO developments towards km3 telescope in the Mediterranean Sea. The NEMO project. Neutrino Mediterranean Observatory By Antonio Capone, NEMO Collaboration. Alignment as a result from QCD jet production or new still unknown physics at LHC? By Alexander Snigirev. Small-scale fluctuations of extensive air showers: systematics in energy and muon density estimation By Grigory Rubtsov. SHINIE: Simulation of High-Energy Neutrino Interacting with the Earth By Lin Guey-Lin, et al.. Thermodynamics of rotating solutions in n+1 dimensional Einstein - Maxwell -dilation gravity By Ahmad Sheykhi, et al.. Supernova neutrino physics with future large Cherenkov detectors By Daniele Montanino. Crossing of the Cosmological Constant Barrier in the string Inspired Dark Energy Model By S. Yu. Vernov. Calculations of radio signals produced by ultra-high and extremely high energy neutrino induced cascades in Antarctic ice By D. Besson, et al.. Inflation, Cosmic Acceleration and string Gravity By Ischwaree Neupane. Neutrino Physics: Charm and J/Psi production in the atmosphere By Liudmila Volkova. Three generation flavor transitions and decays of supernova relic neutrinos By Daniele Montanino. Lattice calculations & computational quantum field theory: Sonification of Quark and Baryon Spectra By Markum Harald, et al.. Generalized Kramers-Wannier Duality for spin systems with non-commutative symmetry By V. M. Buchstaber, et al.. Heavy ion collisions & quark matter: Nuclear matter jets and multifragmentation By Danut Argintaru, et al.. QCD hard interactions: The qT-spectrum of the Higgs and Slepton-pairs at the LHC By Guiseppe Bozzi. QCD soft interactions: Nonperturbative effects in Single-Spin Asymmetries: Instantons and TMD-parton distributions By Igor Cherednikov, et al.. Gluon dominance model and high multiplicity By Elena Kokoulina. Resonances in eta pi- pi- pi+ system By Dmitry Ryabchikov

  4. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (NIHTB-CB): list sorting test to measure working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Carlozzi, Noelle; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Kisala, Pamela A; Mungas, Dan; Conway, Kevin; Gershon, Richard

    2014-07-01

    The List Sorting Working Memory Test was designed to assess working memory (WM) as part of the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery. List Sorting is a sequencing task requiring children and adults to sort and sequence stimuli that are presented visually and auditorily. Validation data are presented for 268 participants ages 20 to 85 years. A subset of participants (N=89) was retested 7 to 21 days later. As expected, the List Sorting Test had moderately high correlations with other measures of working memory and executive functioning (convergent validity) but a low correlation with a test of receptive vocabulary (discriminant validity). Furthermore, List Sorting demonstrates expected changes over the age span and has excellent test-retest reliability. Collectively, these results provide initial support for the construct validity of the List Sorting Working Memory Measure as a measure of working memory. However, the relationship between the List Sorting Test and general executive function has yet to be determined.

  5. Task leaders reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loriaux, E.F.; Jehee, J.N.T.

    1995-01-01

    Report on CRP-OSS Task 4.1.1. ''Survey of existing documentation relevant to this programme's goals'' and report on CRP-OSS Task 4.1.2. ''Survey of existing Operator Support Systems and the experience with them'' are presented. 2 tabs

  6. India's Unfinished Telecom Tasks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India's Unfinished Telecom Tasks · India's Telecom Story is now well known · Indian Operators become an enviable force · At the same time · India Amongst the Leaders · Unfinished Tasks as Operators · LightGSM ON: Innovation for Rural Area from Midas · Broadband Access Options for India · Broadband driven by DSL: ...

  7. Requirements for clinical information modelling tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Jódar-Sánchez, Francisco; Kalra, Dipak

    2015-07-01

    This study proposes consensus requirements for clinical information modelling tools that can support modelling tasks in medium/large scale institutions. Rather than identify which functionalities are currently available in existing tools, the study has focused on functionalities that should be covered in order to provide guidance about how to evolve the existing tools. After identifying a set of 56 requirements for clinical information modelling tools based on a literature review and interviews with experts, a classical Delphi study methodology was applied to conduct a two round survey in order to classify them as essential or recommended. Essential requirements are those that must be met by any tool that claims to be suitable for clinical information modelling, and if we one day have a certified tools list, any tool that does not meet essential criteria would be excluded. Recommended requirements are those more advanced requirements that may be met by tools offering a superior product or only needed in certain modelling situations. According to the answers provided by 57 experts from 14 different countries, we found a high level of agreement to enable the study to identify 20 essential and 21 recommended requirements for these tools. It is expected that this list of identified requirements will guide developers on the inclusion of new basic and advanced functionalities that have strong support by end users. This list could also guide regulators in order to identify requirements that could be demanded of tools adopted within their institutions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Programming list processes. SLIP: symmetric list processor - applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broudin, Y.

    1966-06-01

    Modern aspects of programming languages are essentially turned towards list processing. The ordinary methods of sequential treatment become inadequate and we must substitute list processes for them, where the cells of a group have no neighbourhood connection, but where the address of one cell is contained in the preceding one. These methods are required in 'time sharing' solving problems. They also allow us to treat new problems and to solve others in the shortest time. Many examples are presented after an abstract of the most usual list languages and a detailed study of one of them : SLIP. Among these examples one should note: locating of words in a dictionary or in a card index, treatment of non numerical symbols, formal derivation. The problems are treated in Fortran II on an IBM 7094 machine. The subroutines which make up the language are presented in an appendix. (author) [fr

  9. System analysis task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    At this meeting, the main tasks of the study group were to discuss their task report with other task groups and to formulate the five-year research program, including next year's plans. A summary of the discussion with other task groups is presented. The general objective of the five-year program is to gather all elements necessary for a decision on the technical feasibility of the subseabed option. In addition, site selection criteria consistent with both radiological assessment and engineering capability will be produced. The task group report discussed radiological assessments, normal or base-case assessments, operational failures, low-probability postdisposal events, engineering studies, radiological criteria, legal aspects, social aspects, institutional aspects, generic comparison with other disposal options, and research priorities. The text of the report is presented along with supporting documents

  10. Task Description Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Reid; Apfelbaum, David

    2005-01-01

    Task Description Language (TDL) is an extension of the C++ programming language that enables programmers to quickly and easily write complex, concurrent computer programs for controlling real-time autonomous systems, including robots and spacecraft. TDL is based on earlier work (circa 1984 through 1989) on the Task Control Architecture (TCA). TDL provides syntactic support for hierarchical task-level control functions, including task decomposition, synchronization, execution monitoring, and exception handling. A Java-language-based compiler transforms TDL programs into pure C++ code that includes calls to a platform-independent task-control-management (TCM) library. TDL has been used to control and coordinate multiple heterogeneous robots in projects sponsored by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It has also been used in Brazil to control an autonomous airship and in Canada to control a robotic manipulator.

  11. Energy Efficient Task Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadottir, Asta; Ardkapan, Siamak Rahimi; Johnsen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    made lenses, capable of providing the desired light distribution. The user test shows that when working with general lighti ng of 100 lx in the room the developed task lig ht with its wide light distribution provides flexibility in choosing a reading task area on the desk and provides more visibility......The objectives of this work is to develop a task light for office lighting that fulfils the minimum requirements of the European standard EN12464 - 1 : Light and lighting – Lighting of work places, Part 1: Indoor workplaces and the Danish standard DS 700 : Lys og belysning I arbejdsrum , or more...... specifically the requirements that apply to the work area and the immediate surrounding area. By providing a task light that fulfils the requirements for task lighting and the immediate surrounding area, the general lighting only needs to provide the illuminance levels required for background lighting...

  12. Program Transformation to Identify List-Based Parallel Skeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Kannan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Algorithmic skeletons are used as building-blocks to ease the task of parallel programming by abstracting the details of parallel implementation from the developer. Most existing libraries provide implementations of skeletons that are defined over flat data types such as lists or arrays. However, skeleton-based parallel programming is still very challenging as it requires intricate analysis of the underlying algorithm and often uses inefficient intermediate data structures. Further, the algorithmic structure of a given program may not match those of list-based skeletons. In this paper, we present a method to automatically transform any given program to one that is defined over a list and is more likely to contain instances of list-based skeletons. This facilitates the parallel execution of a transformed program using existing implementations of list-based parallel skeletons. Further, by using an existing transformation called distillation in conjunction with our method, we produce transformed programs that contain fewer inefficient intermediate data structures.

  13. Independent task Fourier filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2001-11-01

    Since the early 1960s, a major part of optical computing systems has been Fourier pattern recognition, which takes advantage of high speed filter changes to enable powerful nonlinear discrimination in `real time.' Because filter has a task quite independent of the tasks of the other filters, they can be applied and evaluated in parallel or, in a simple approach I describe, in sequence very rapidly. Thus I use the name ITFF (independent task Fourier filter). These filters can also break very complex discrimination tasks into easily handled parts, so the wonderful space invariance properties of Fourier filtering need not be sacrificed to achieve high discrimination and good generalizability even for ultracomplex discrimination problems. The training procedure proceeds sequentially, as the task for a given filter is defined a posteriori by declaring it to be the discrimination of particular members of set A from all members of set B with sufficient margin. That is, we set the threshold to achieve the desired margin and note the A members discriminated by that threshold. Discriminating those A members from all members of B becomes the task of that filter. Those A members are then removed from the set A, so no other filter will be asked to perform that already accomplished task.

  14. Property Testing on Linked Lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Matulef, Kevin; Wilkinson, Bryan Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We define a new property testing model for algorithms that do not have arbitrary query access to the input, but must instead traverse it in a manner that respects the underlying data structure in which it is stored. In particular, we consider the case when the underlying data structure is a linked...... list, and the testing algorithm is allowed to either sample randomly from the list, or walk to nodes that are adjacent to those already visited. We study the well-known monotonicity testing problem in this model, and show that (n13) queries are both necessary and sufficient to distinguish whether...... a list is sorted (monotone increasing) versus a constant distance from sorted. Our bound is strictly greater than the (logn) queries required in the standard testing model, that allows element access indexed by rank, and strictly less than the (n12) queries required by a weak model that only allows...

  15. Task-baseret kommunikativ sprogundervisning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Svendsen

    2015-01-01

    Definition af task-baseret sprogundervisning, kriterier for task. Forskning i Second Language Acquisition med brug af task, tilrettelæggelse af task-baseret kommunikativ undervisning. Begrænsninger i og perspektiver for videreudvikling af task-baseret sprogundervising-......Definition af task-baseret sprogundervisning, kriterier for task. Forskning i Second Language Acquisition med brug af task, tilrettelæggelse af task-baseret kommunikativ undervisning. Begrænsninger i og perspektiver for videreudvikling af task-baseret sprogundervising-...

  16. Sustainability of return to work in sick-listed employees with low-back pain. Two-year follow-up in a randomized clinical trial comparing multidisciplinary and brief intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Chris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sick-listed employees with low back pain had similar return to work (RTW rates at one-year follow-up in a randomized trial comparing two interventions, but the effects were modified by specific workplace related factors. The present study addressed the sustainability of the intervention effects by performing a two-year follow-up and by using different outcome measures. Methods A total of 351 employees sick-listed for 3–16 weeks due to LBP were recruited from their general practitioners and were randomly allocated to a hospital-based brief or multidisciplinary intervention. Outcome measures were based on sick leave registered in a national database of social and health-related benefits. RTW rates, RTW status, sick leave weeks and sick leave relapse were studied. Results During the two-year follow-up 80.0% and 77.3% had RTW for at least four weeks continuously, and the percentages with RTW at the 104th week were 61.1% and 58.0% in the brief and multidisciplinary intervention groups, respectively. At the 104th week 16.6% and 18.8% were on sick leave in the two groups, respectively, and about 12% were employed in modified jobs or participated in job training. The number of weeks on sick leave in the first year was significantly lower in the brief intervention group (median 14 weeks than in the multidisciplinary intervention group (median 20 weeks, but during the second year the number of weeks on sick leave were not significantly different between intervention groups. Subgroups characterised by specific work related factors modified the effect of the intervention groups on RTW rates (p = 0.017. No difference in sick leave relapse was found between the intervention groups. Conclusion The effects of the brief and multidisciplinary interventions at the two-year follow-up were in general similar to the effects at one-year follow-up. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN18609003

  17. Considerations for the development of task-based search engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petcu, Paula; Dragusin, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous experience from working on a task-based search engine, we present a list of suggestions and ideas for an Information Retrieval (IR) framework that could inform the development of next generation professional search systems. The specific task that we start from is the clinicians......' information need in finding rare disease diagnostic hypotheses at the time and place where medical decisions are made. Our experience from the development of a search engine focused on supporting clinicians in completing this task has provided us valuable insights in what aspects should be considered...... by the developers of vertical search engines....

  18. Board Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minichilli, Alessandro; Zattoni, Alessandro; Nielsen, Sabina

    2012-01-01

    influence board tasks, and how the context moderates the relationship between processes and tasks. Our hypotheses are tested on a survey-based dataset of 535 medium-sized and large industrial firms in Italy and Norway, which are considered to substantially differ along legal and cultural dimensions...... identify three board processes as micro-level determinants of board effectiveness. Specifically, we focus on effort norms, cognitive conflicts and the use of knowledge and skills as determinants of board control and advisory task performance. Further, we consider how two different institutional settings...

  19. 48 CFR 8.703 - Procurement list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procurement list. 8.703... Blind or Severely Disabled 8.703 Procurement list. The Committee maintains a Procurement List of all... Procurement List may be accessed at: http://www.abilityone.gov/index.html Questions concerning whether a...

  20. Task-Driven Computing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhenyu

    2000-01-01

    .... They will want to use the resources to perform computing tasks. Today's computing infrastructure does not support this model of computing very well because computers interact with users in terms of low level abstractions...

  1. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    Civil servants conduct the work which makes welfare states functions on an everyday bases: Police men police, school teachers teach, and tax inspectors inspect. Focus in this paper is on the core tasks of tax inspectors. The paper argues that their core task of securing the collection of revenue...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...... has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...

  2. Comparing the effects of balance training with and without cognitive tasks on the quality of life and balance performance in community-dwelling older adults: a single-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Sinaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aging process can deteriorate the ability to maintain balance, specifically under dual-task conditions. Thus far, different methods of exercises therapy have been applied to improve balance performance of older adults. The present study was designed to compare the effects of two protocols of balance training on the quality of life (QoL and balance performance in older adults with mild balance impairments. Methods: Twenty-four older adults over 60 years old were allocated randomly into single-task (n=12 and dual-task (n=12 exercise groups. Single-task group received routine balance exercises, over a four-week period and dual-task group was treated by the same exercise program plus a cognitive task. QoL and balance status were assessed by the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 and Fullerton Advanced Balance scale (FAB questionnaires, before and after the interventions. Results: After four weeks of training, balance performance and some factors of QoL improved significantly in both groups (P<0.05. However, there were no significant differences in any of the variables between the two groups. Conclusion: Balance exercises, under both single- and dual-task conditions can improve the balance level and some aspects of QoL in older adults with mild balance impairments, with no priority of one group over another.

  3. IAHR List of Sea Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Helm-Petersen, J; Klopman, G.

    1997-01-01

    A Working Group on multidirectional waves formed by the International Association for Hydraulic Research has proposed an update of the IAHR List of Sea State Parameters from 1986 in the part concerning directional. Especially wave structure interaction with reflection of the waves have been treated....

  4. Panel draws up shopping list

    CERN Multimedia

    Clery, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    "European researchers have compiled a wish list of 35 large-scale projects that they would love to see built over the next 2 decades. The projects, which must be internationally important and open to all European researchers, include a database on the impacts of population aging, a polar research ship, and an underwater neutrino observatory." (1 page)

  5. Well, there's the list reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that if we treat the English there-construction as a type of copula construction, we can provide a unified analysis of the existential and the list reading. Research on copula structures has distinguished at least three types: predicational, specificational and

  6. Holidays. Instructional Media Advisory List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Media Evaluation Service.

    This annotated bibliography is directed at teachers of students in grades preK-6 and covers books about holidays. The holidays for which materials are listed are: Christmas, Easter, Halloween, Hanukkah, Passover, Purim, Rosh Hashanah, Sukkot, Thanksgiving, and Valentine's Day. A directory of publishers from whom these items are available is…

  7. List of publications, 1976 - 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. - reports, reprints of journal articles, and presentations to conferences - issued from April 1976 to March 1981 are listed under ten subject categories, and author and report number indexes are provided

  8. The program RADLST [Radiation Listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    The program RADLST (Radiation Listing) is designed to calculate the nuclear and atomic radiations associated with the radioactive decay of nuclei. It uses as its primary input nuclear decay data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) format. The code is written in FORTRAN 77 and, with a few exceptions, is consistent with the ANSI standard. 65 refs

  9. All varieties of encoding variability are not created equal: Separating variable processing from variable tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Mark J.; Bodner, Glen E.

    2014-01-01

    Whether encoding variability facilitates memory is shown to depend on whether item-specific and relational processing are both performed across study blocks, and whether study items are weakly versus strongly related. Variable-processing groups studied a word list once using an item-specific task and once using a relational task. Variable-task groups’ two different study tasks recruited the same type of processing each block. Repeated-task groups performed the same study task each block. Recall and recognition were greatest in the variable-processing group, but only with weakly related lists. A variable-processing benefit was also found when task-based processing and list-type processing were complementary (e.g., item-specific processing of a related list) rather than redundant (e.g., relational processing of a related list). That performing both item-specific and relational processing across trials, or within a trial, yields encoding-variability benefits may help reconcile decades of contradictory findings in this area. PMID:25018583

  10. Task Action Plans for generic activities: Category A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-10-01

    The document contains listings of generic technical activities as identified and placed in priority categories by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation (NRR). In addition, it contains definitions of Priority Categories A, B, C, and D and copies of forty approved Task Action Plans for Category A activites. Problem Descriptions for the Category B, C and D tasks are contained in NUREG--0471. This material was developed within the context of NRR's Program for the Resolution of Generic Issues Related to Nuclear Power Plants. As part of this program, the assignment of identified issues to priority categories and the approval of Task Action Plans were made by NRR's Technical Activities Steering Committee, chaired by the Deputy Director, NRR. The original document was published in November 1977. In December 1977 it was updated to add the Task Action Plan for Task No. A-17, Systems Interactions in Nuclear Power Plants. This update adds Task Action Plans for Tasks A-13, A-18, A-21, A-22, A-32, A-37, A-38 and A-40. Task A-41 has been included in Task A-40. In addition, as part of this update, the following changes were made to each Task Action Plan (with the exception of the Task Action Plan for Task A-9): (1) a title page was added that includes information such as Lead NRR Organization, Lead Supervisor, Task Manager, Applicability, and Projected Completion Date; (2) detailed schedule information was deleted; and (3) a new Section 3 entitled Basis for Continued Plant Operation and Licensing Pending Completion of Task was added. These changes represent general reformatting and the addition or deletion of certain general types of information. Some substantive revisions were made to several of the plans, however, a general revision of all of the plans was not undertaken at this time

  11. Training community resource center and clinic personnel to prompt patients in listing questions for doctors: follow-up interviews about barriers and facilitators to the implementation of consultation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkora, Jeffrey; Edlow, Brian; Aviv, Caryn; Sepucha, Karen; Esserman, Laura

    2008-01-31

    Visit preparation interventions help patients prepare to meet with a medical provider. Systematic reviews have found some positive effects, but there are no reports describing implementation experiences. Consultation Planning (CP) is a visit preparation technique in which a trained coach or facilitator elicits and documents patient questions for an upcoming medical appointment. We integrated CP into a university breast cancer clinic beginning in 1998. Representatives of other organizations expressed interest in CP, so we invited them to training workshops in 2000, 2001, and 2002. In order to learn from experience and generate hypotheses, we asked: 1) How many trainees implemented CP? 2) What facilitated implementation? 3) How have trainees, patients, physicians, and administrative leaders of implementing organizations reacted to CP? 4) What were the barriers to implementation? We attempted to contact 32 trainees and scheduled follow-up, semi-structured, audio-recorded telephone interviews with 18. We analyzed quantitative data by tabulating frequencies and qualitative data by coding transcripts and identifying themes. Trainees came from two different types of organizations, clinics (which provide medical care) versus resource centers (which provide patient support services but not medical care). We found that: 1) Fourteen of 21 respondents, from five of eight resource centers, implemented CP. Four of the five implementing resource centers were rural. 2) Implementers identified the championing of CP by an internal staff member as a critical success factor. 3) Implementers reported that modified CP has been productive. 4) Four respondents, from two resource centers and two clinics, did not implement CP, reporting resource limitations or conflicting priorities as the critical barriers. CP training workshops have been associated with subsequent CP implementations at resource centers but not clinics. We hypothesize that CP workshops combined with an internal champion

  12. Training community resource center and clinic personnel to prompt patients in listing questions for doctors: Follow-up interviews about barriers and facilitators to the implementation of consultation planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepucha Karen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Visit preparation interventions help patients prepare to meet with a medical provider. Systematic reviews have found some positive effects, but there are no reports describing implementation experiences. Consultation Planning (CP is a visit preparation technique in which a trained coach or facilitator elicits and documents patient questions for an upcoming medical appointment. We integrated CP into a university breast cancer clinic beginning in 1998. Representatives of other organizations expressed interest in CP, so we invited them to training workshops in 2000, 2001, and 2002. Objectives In order to learn from experience and generate hypotheses, we asked: 1 How many trainees implemented CP? 2 What facilitated implementation? 3 How have trainees, patients, physicians, and administrative leaders of implementing organizations reacted to CP? 4 What were the barriers to implementation? Methods We attempted to contact 32 trainees and scheduled follow-up, semi-structured, audio-recorded telephone interviews with 18. We analyzed quantitative data by tabulating frequencies and qualitative data by coding transcripts and identifying themes. Results Trainees came from two different types of organizations, clinics (which provide medical care versus resource centers (which provide patient support services but not medical care. We found that: 1 Fourteen of 21 respondents, from five of eight resource centers, implemented CP. Four of the five implementing resource centers were rural. 2 Implementers identified the championing of CP by an internal staff member as a critical success factor. 3 Implementers reported that modified CP has been productive. 4 Four respondents, from two resource centers and two clinics, did not implement CP, reporting resource limitations or conflicting priorities as the critical barriers. Conclusion CP training workshops have been associated with subsequent CP implementations at resource centers but not clinics. We

  13. Automated problem list generation and physicians perspective from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarakonda, Murthy V; Mehta, Neil; Tsou, Ching-Huei; Liang, Jennifer J; Nowacki, Amy S; Jelovsek, John Eric

    2017-09-01

    An accurate, comprehensive and up-to-date problem list can help clinicians provide patient-centered care. Unfortunately, problem lists created and maintained in electronic health records by providers tend to be inaccurate, duplicative and out of date. With advances in machine learning and natural language processing, it is possible to automatically generate a problem list from the data in the EHR and keep it current. In this paper, we describe an automated problem list generation method and report on insights from a pilot study of physicians' assessment of the generated problem lists compared to existing providers-curated problem lists in an institution's EHR system. The natural language processing and machine learning-based Watson 1 method models clinical thinking in identifying a patient's problem list using clinical notes and structured data. This pilot study assessed the Watson method and included 15 randomly selected, de-identified patient records from a large healthcare system that were each planned to be reviewed by at least two internal medicine physicians. The physicians created their own problem lists, and then evaluated the overall usefulness of their own problem lists (P), Watson generated problem lists (W), and the existing EHR problem lists (E) on a 10-point scale. The primary outcome was pairwise comparisons of P, W, and E. Six out of the 10 invited physicians completed 27 assessments of P, W, and E, and in process evaluated 732 Watson generated problems and 444 problems in the EHR system. As expected, physicians rated their own lists, P, highest. However, W was rated higher than E. Among 89% of assessments, Watson identified at least one important problem that physicians missed. Cognitive computing systems like this Watson system hold the potential for accurate, problem-list-centered summarization of patient records, potentially leading to increased efficiency, better clinical decision support, and improved quality of patient care. Copyright © 2017

  14. Is the WMS-IV verbal paired associates as effective as other memory tasks in discriminating amnestic mild cognitive impairment from normal aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Kerryn E; Kinsella, Glynda J; Ong, Ben; Mullaly, Elizabeth; Rand, Elizabeth; Storey, Elsdon; Ames, David; Saling, Michael; Clare, Linda; Parsons, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Paired associate learning tasks are reportedly particularly sensitive to preclinical Alzheimer's disease. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of the recently updated Wechsler Memory Scale verbal paired associates (VPA) in distinguishing the earliest stages of memory impairment (amnestic mild cognitive impairment, aMCI), and the clinical application at the case level, compared with other episodic memory tasks. Participants were 77 people with aMCI and 77 matched healthy older adults (HOA). VPA performance distinguished aMCI from HOA at the group level with large effect sizes, of similar size to the other tasks at immediate recall, but smaller than the CVLT-II list-learning task at delayed recall. Similarly, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis demonstrated good discrimination, similar to other tasks, but again with CVLT-II more accurate at delayed recall. Although group differences remained for normative data, on a case basis using existing normative data the VPA failed to identify 70% of aMCI as impaired. The findings suggest further examination of the normative data is required before the VPA is useful in clinical practice, and highlight the importance of comprehensive neuropsychological assessment in detecting mild memory changes in older adults.

  15. Comparison of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy, cognitive behavioral writing therapy, and wait-list in pediatric posttraumatic stress disorder following single-incident trauma: a multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Carlijn; van der Oord, Saskia; Zijlstra, Bonne; Lucassen, Sacha; Perrin, Sean; Emmelkamp, Paul; de Jongh, Ad

    2017-11-01

    Practice guidelines for childhood posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recommend trauma-focused psychotherapies, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is a brief trauma-focused, evidence-based treatment for PTSD in adults, but with few well-designed trials involving children and adolescents. We conducted a single-blind, randomized trial with three arms (n = 103): EMDR (n = 43), Cognitive Behavior Writing Therapy (CBWT; n = 42), and wait-list (WL; n = 18). WL participants were randomly reallocated to CBWT or EMDR after 6 weeks; follow-ups were conducted at 3 and 12 months posttreatment. Participants were treatment-seeking youth (aged 8-18 years) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of PTSD (or subthreshold PTSD) tied to a single trauma, who received up to six sessions of EMDR or CBWT lasting maximally 45 min each. Both treatments were well-tolerated and relative to WL yielded large, intent-to-treat effect sizes for the primary outcomes at posttreatment: PTSD symptoms (EMDR: d = 1.27; CBWT: d = 1.24). At posttreatment 92.5% of EMDR, and 90.2% of CBWT no longer met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. All gains were maintained at follow-up. Compared to WL, small to large (range d = 0.39-1.03) intent-to-treat effect sizes were obtained at posttreatment for negative trauma-related appraisals, anxiety, depression, and behavior problems with these gains being maintained at follow-up. Gains were attained with significantly less therapist contact time for EMDR than CBWT (mean = 4.1 sessions/140 min vs. 5.4 sessions/227 min). EMDR and CBWT are brief, trauma-focused treatments that yielded equally large remission rates for PTSD and reductions in the severity of PTSD and comorbid difficulties in children and adolescents seeking treatment for PTSD tied to a single event. Further trials of both treatments with PTSD tied to multiple traumas are warranted. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental

  16. Plant DB link - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e Site Policy | Contact Us Plant DB link - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  17. Robot task space analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.R.; Osborn, J.

    1997-01-01

    Many nuclear projects such as environmental restoration and waste management challenges involve radiation or other hazards that will necessitate the use of remote operations that protect human workers from dangerous exposures. Remote work is far more costly to execute than what workers could accomplish directly with conventional tools and practices because task operations are slow and tedious due to difficulties of remote manipulation and viewing. Decades of experience within the nuclear remote operations community show that remote tasks may take hundreds of times longer than hands-on work; even with state-of-the-art force- reflecting manipulators and television viewing, remote task performance execution is five to ten times slower than equivalent direct contact work. Thus the requirement to work remotely is a major cost driver in many projects. Modest improvements in the work efficiency of remote systems can have high payoffs by reducing the completion time of projects. Additional benefits will accrue from improved work quality and enhanced safety

  18. Report of a European Society of Cardiology-European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions task force on the evaluation of coronary stents in Europe: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Robert A; Serruys, Patrick W; Baumbach, Andreas; Escaned, Javier; Fajadet, Jean; James, Stefan; Joner, Michael; Oktay, Semih; Jüni, Peter; Kastrati, Adnan; Sianos, George; Stefanini, Giulio G; Wijns, William; Windecker, Stephan

    2015-10-07

    The evaluation for European Union market approval of coronary stents falls under the Medical Device Directive that was adopted in 1993. Specific requirements for the assessment of coronary stents are laid out in supplementary advisory documents. In response to a call by the European Commission to make recommendations for a revision of the advisory document on the evaluation of coronary stents (Appendix 1 of MEDDEV 2.7.1), the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) established a Task Force to develop an expert advisory report. As basis for its report, the ESC-EAPCI Task Force reviewed existing processes, established a comprehensive list of all coronary drug-eluting stents that have received a CE mark to date, and undertook a systematic review of the literature of all published randomized clinical trials evaluating clinical and angiographic outcomes of coronary artery stents between 2002 and 2013. Based on these data, the TF provided recommendations to inform a new regulatory process for coronary stents. The main recommendations of the task force include implementation of a standardized non-clinical assessment of stents and a novel clinical evaluation pathway for market approval. The two-stage clinical evaluation plan includes recommendation for an initial pre-market trial with objective performance criteria (OPC) benchmarking using invasive imaging follow-up leading to conditional CE-mark approval and a subsequent mandatory, large-scale randomized trial with clinical endpoint evaluation leading to unconditional CE-mark. The data analysis from the systematic review of the Task Force may provide a basis for determination of OPC for use in future studies. This paper represents an executive summary of the Task Force's report. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Task Specific Tremors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joseph H

    2015-07-01

    A patient reported bilateral hand tremors when writing but not with other tasks. These "task specific" tremors are considered subcategories of essential tremor. Primary writing tremor, in which the tremor occurs only with writing, is probably the most common. The important teaching point is that the "standard" tremor assessment, watching the patient holding a sustained posture and touching his finger to the examiner's and then back to the nose is not adequate. Patients should be tested doing the activity that causes them the most difficulty.

  20. TWRS engineering bibliography software listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husa, E.I.

    1995-01-01

    This document contains the computer software listing for Engineering Bibliography software, developed by E. Ivar Husa. This software is in the working prototype stage of development. The code has not been tested to requirements. TWRS Engineering created this software for engineers to share bibliographic references across the Hanford site network (HLAN). This software is intended to store several hundred to several thousand references (a compendium with limited range). Coded changes are needed to support the larger number of references

  1. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  2. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  3. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  4. Alcohol use disorders and the Division 12 Task Force of the American Psychological Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrady, B S

    2000-09-01

    The Division 12 Task Force on Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures promulgated guidelines to identify treatments with empirical support for effectiveness. No treatment for alcohol abuse or dependence was rated as efficacious; 4 treatments for other drug use disorders were rated "probably efficacious." The alcohol treatment research community has questioned why alcohol treatments with strong empirical support are not in the task force's list. This article presents results of the application of task force standards to 13 major psychosocial alcohol treatments viewed as having strong empirical support. Brief intervention and relapse prevention met task force criteria for "efficacious" treatments. However, in 1996, when the task force last published a list of empirically supported treatments (D. L. Chambless et al., 1996), there were insufficient published studies meeting task force criteria for these 2 treatments. Motivational enhancement met criteria to be rated "probably efficacious."

  5. Task-Based Learning: The Interaction between Tasks and Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between tasks and learners in task-based learning. Findings suggest that manipulation of task characteristics and conditions may not achieve the intended pedagogic outcomes, and that new ways are needed to focus learners' attention of form without sacrificing the meaning-driven principles of task-based learning.…

  6. Visual Adjacency Lists for Dynamic Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlawatsch, Marcel; Burch, Michael; Weiskopf, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We present a visual representation for dynamic, weighted graphs based on the concept of adjacency lists. Two orthogonal axes are used: one for all nodes of the displayed graph, the other for the corresponding links. Colors and labels are employed to identify the nodes. The usage of color allows us to scale the visualization to single pixel level for large graphs. In contrast to other techniques, we employ an asymmetric mapping that results in an aligned and compact representation of links. Our approach is independent of the specific properties of the graph to be visualized, but certain graphs and tasks benefit from the asymmetry. As we show in our results, the strength of our technique is the visualization of dynamic graphs. In particular, sparse graphs benefit from the compact representation. Furthermore, our approach uses visual encoding by size to represent weights and therefore allows easy quantification and comparison. We evaluate our approach in a quantitative user study that confirms the suitability for dynamic and weighted graphs. Finally, we demonstrate our approach for two examples of dynamic graphs.

  7. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  8. Supporting complex search tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gäde, Maria; Hall, Mark; Huurdeman, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    introductory to specialized, and from authoritative to speculative or opinionated, when to show what sources of information? How does the information seeking process evolve and what are relevant differences between different stages? With complex task and search process management, blending searching, browsing...

  9. Biomedical applications engineering tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenger, C. J., Sr.

    1976-01-01

    The engineering tasks performed in response to needs articulated by clinicians are described. Initial contacts were made with these clinician-technology requestors by the Southwest Research Institute NASA Biomedical Applications Team. The basic purpose of the program was to effectively transfer aerospace technology into functional hardware to solve real biomedical problems.

  10. Task analysis in neurosciences programme design - neurological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Defining educational objectives is the key to achieving the goal of professional competence in students. The technique of task analysis was selected to determine components of competence in clinical neurology appropriate to the needs of primary care. A survey of neurological problems in general practice revealed that ...

  11. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: task force report summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, R; Rodríguez-Pintó, I

    2014-10-01

    The Task Force on Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome (CAPS) aimed to assess the current knowledge on pathogenesis, clinical and laboratory features, diagnosis and classification, precipitating factors and treatment of CAPS. This article summarizes the main aspects of its final report. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  12. Longitudinal effects of bilingualism on dual-tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörman, Daniel Eriksson; Josefsson, Maria; Marsh, John E; Hansson, Patrik; Ljungberg, Jessica K

    2017-01-01

    An ongoing debate surrounds whether bilinguals outperform monolinguals in tests of executive processing. The aim of this study was to investigate if there are long-term (10 year) bilingual advantages in executive processing, as indexed by dual-task performance, in a sample that were 40-65 years at baseline. The bilingual (n = 24) and monolingual (n = 24) participants were matched on age, sex, education, fluid intelligence, and study sample. Participants performed free-recall for a 12-item list in three dual-task settings wherein they sorted cards either during encoding, retrieval, or during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list. Free recall without card sorting was used as a reference to compute dual-task costs. The results showed that bilinguals significantly outperformed monolinguals when they performed card-sorting during both encoding and retrieval of the word-list, the condition that presumably placed the highest demands on executive functioning. However, dual-task costs increased over time for bilinguals relative to monolinguals, a finding that is possibly influenced by retirement age and limited use of second language in the bilingual group.

  13. NCO Leadership: Tasks, Skills and Functions. Volume 1. Appendixes A and D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    leader requirements. In determining the parameters of a leadership position, changes in requirements based on the: situation, the leader, and...asked to review the tentative lists and make any additional changes . The two groups consisted of sixteen instructors from the NCO academies located...Maintenance (7 tasks). Job dimensions which contained relatively few important tasks included Group Manangement (1 task). General Unit Administration (no

  14. Expense for Clinical Documentation of Inpatients: Extent and Hierarchal Differences for the Example of a Gynaecological Department in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanner, M; Drack, G; Hornung, R

    2015-12-01

    Introduction: The majority of physicians consider administrative tasks to be a burden. The present questionnaire is intended to clarify the expense of time for documentation tasks in the treatment of inpatients in a gynaecological department of a Swiss hospital and to what extent differences occur between senior physicians and junior physicians. Materials and Methods: For three weeks physicians in the gynaecological department of a central Swiss hospital documented minute for minute predefined tasks during their duty periods. A questionnaire in tabular form served as survey instrument for this working time analysis. The minute for minute details for the individual participants were summed for each clinical task listed in the questionnaire in order to subsequently calculate the amounts of time spent for the respective task categories and to subject them to a subgroup analysis. Results: The participation rate of the physicians amounted to 87 %. 287 questionnaires were included in the evaluation. According to the responses, 25 % of the clinical working time for inpatients was used for documentation of clinical tasks. The subgroup analysis revealed a higher proportion for assistant physicians (30 %) than for senior physicians (18 %). Discussion: The present working time analysis reveals an unfavourable ratio between surgical and administrative tasks between junior and senior physicians. In addition there is a danger that the true burden for junior physicians is underestimated by their superiors due to hierarchal differences.

  15. Electronic Animal Drug Product Listing Directory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Electronic Animal Drug Product Listing Directory is a directory of all animal drug products that have been listed electronically since June 1, 2009, to comply...

  16. 19 CFR 122.47 - Stores list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Contents—(1) Required listing. The stores list shall include all of the following: (i) Alcoholic beverages..., Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing Within, and...

  17. Functional MRI of Handwriting Tasks: A Study of Healthy Young Adults Interacting with a Novel Touch-Sensitive Tablet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta Karimpoor

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Handwriting is a complex human activity that engages a blend of cognitive and visual motor skills. Current understanding of the neural correlates of handwriting has largely come from lesion studies of patients with impaired handwriting. Task-based fMRI studies would be useful to supplement this work. To address concerns over ecological validity, previously we developed a fMRI-compatible, computerized tablet system for writing and drawing including visual feedback of hand position and an augmented reality display. The purpose of the present work is to use the tablet system in proof-of-concept to characterize brain activity associated with clinically relevant handwriting tasks, originally developed to characterize handwriting impairments in Alzheimer’s disease patients. As a prelude to undertaking fMRI studies of patients, imaging was performed of twelve young healthy subjects who copied sentences, phone numbers, and grocery lists using the fMRI-compatible tablet. Activation maps for all handwriting tasks consisted of a distributed network of regions in reasonable agreement with previous studies of handwriting performance. In addition, differences in brain activity were observed between the test subcomponents consistent with different demands of neural processing for successful task performance, as identified by investigating three quantitative behavioral metrics (writing speed, stylus contact force and stylus in air time. This study provides baseline behavioral and brain activity results for fMRI studies that adopt this handwriting test to characterize patients with brain impairments.

  18. Strategy quantification using body worn inertial sensors in a reactive agility task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eke, Chika U; Cain, Stephen M; Stirling, Leia A

    2017-11-07

    Agility performance is often evaluated using time-based metrics, which provide little information about which factors aid or limit success. The objective of this study was to better understand agility strategy by identifying biomechanical metrics that were sensitive to performance speed, which were calculated with data from an array of body-worn inertial sensors. Five metrics were defined (normalized number of foot contacts, stride length variance, arm swing variance, mean normalized stride frequency, and number of body rotations) that corresponded to agility terms defined by experts working in athletic, clinical, and military environments. Eighteen participants donned 13 sensors to complete a reactive agility task, which involved navigating a set of cones in response to a vocal cue. Participants were grouped into fast, medium, and slow performance based on their completion time. Participants in the fast group had the smallest number of foot contacts (normalizing by height), highest stride length variance (normalizing by height), highest forearm angular velocity variance, and highest stride frequency (normalizing by height). The number of body rotations was not sensitive to speed and may have been determined by hand and foot dominance while completing the agility task. The results of this study have the potential to inform the development of a composite agility score constructed from the list of significant metrics. By quantifying the agility terms previously defined by expert evaluators through an agility score, this study can assist in strategy development for training and rehabilitation across athletic, clinical, and military domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Microprocessor multi-task monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludemann, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-task monitor program for microprocessors. Although written for the Intel 8085, it incorporates features that would be beneficial for implementation in other microprocessors used in controlling and monitoring experiments and accelerators. The monitor places permanent programs (tasks) arbitrarily located throughout ROM in a priority ordered queue. The programmer is provided with the flexibility to add new tasks or modified versions of existing tasks, without having to comply with previously defined task boundaries or having to reprogram all of ROM. Scheduling of tasks is triggered by timers, outside stimuli (interrupts), or inter-task communications. Context switching time is of the order of tenths of a milllisecond

  20. 77 FR 55195 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds services to the Procurement List that will be provided by nonprofit agencies employing...

  1. 75 FR 21246 - Procurement List; Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds to the Procurement List products to be furnished by a nonprofit agency employing persons who are...

  2. 75 FR 2510 - Procurement List: Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List: Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add to the Procurement List services to be provided by nonprofit...

  3. 77 FR 34025 - Procurement List; Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by the nonprofit agency employing persons...

  4. 78 FR 7412 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement List that will be furnished by the...

  5. 78 FR 34351 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People Who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds services to the Procurement List that will be provided by nonprofit agencies employing...

  6. 78 FR 9386 - Procurement List; Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds a service to the Procurement List that will be provided by a nonprofit agency employing persons...

  7. 78 FR 5423 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products to the Procurement List that will be furnished by the nonprofit agency employing...

  8. 75 FR 6869 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-12

    ...; ] COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds to the Procurement List products and a service to be furnished by...

  9. 78 FR 5423 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee... Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add products to the Procurement List that will be... have other severe disabilities. The following products are proposed for addition to the Procurement...

  10. 77 FR 2048 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement List that will be provided by the...

  11. 77 FR 62220 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies employing persons who are blind or have other...

  12. 78 FR 59658 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies...

  13. 77 FR 77037 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be furnished by nonprofit agencies...

  14. 75 FR 2510 - Procurement List; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Corrections AGENCY: Committee for Purchase... published by the Committee in proposing to add to and delete from the Procurement List a product and... adding services to and deleting from the Procurement List products and services on January 11, 2010 (75...

  15. 77 FR 53180 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase from People who are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds services to the Procurement List that will be provided by nonprofit agencies employing...

  16. 78 FR 56679 - Procurement List; Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action deletes products from the Procurement List previously furnished by nonprofit agencies employing...

  17. Airborne Lidar Surface Topography (LIST) Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Krainak, Michael A.; Harding, David J.; Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Cavanaugh, John; Valett, Susan; Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Winkert, Tom; Plants, Michael; hide

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss our development effort of an airborne instrument as a pathfinder for the Lidar Surface Technology (LIST) mission. This paper will discuss the system approach, enabling technologies, instrument concept and performance of the Airborne LIST Simulator (A-LISTS).

  18. 77 FR 4998 - List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... Addressed: Least Restrictive Environment [cir] Letter dated September 30, 2011, to Conference of Educational... IDEA. This list and the letters or other Departmental documents described in this list, with personally... and the letters or other Departmental documents described in this list in an accessible format (e.g...

  19. The eCALM Trial-eTherapy for cancer appLying mindfulness: online mindfulness-based cancer recovery program for underserved individuals living with cancer in Alberta: protocol development for a randomized wait-list controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zernicke Kristin A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated stress can exacerbate cancer symptom severity, and after completion of primary cancer treatments, many individuals continue to have significant distress. Mindfulness-Based Cancer Recovery (MBCR is an 8-week group psychosocial intervention consisting of training in mindfulness meditation and yoga designed to mitigate stress, pain, and chronic illness. Efficacy research shows face-to-face (F2F MBCR programs have positive benefits for cancer patients; however barriers exist that impede participation in F2F groups. While online MBCR groups are available to the public, none have been evaluated. Primary objective: determine whether underserved patients are willing to participate in and complete an online MBCR program. Secondary objectives: determine whether online MBCR will mirror previous efficacy findings from F2F MBCR groups on patient-reported outcomes. Method/design The study includes cancer patients in Alberta, exhibiting moderate distress, who do not have access to F2F MBCR. Participants will be randomized to either online MBCR, or waiting for the next available group. An anticipated sample size of 64 participants will complete measures online pre and post treatment or waiting period. Feasibility will be tracked through monitoring numbers eligible and participating through each stage of the protocol. Discussion 47 have completed/completing the intervention. Data suggest it is possible to conduct a randomized waitlist controlled trial of online MBCR to reach underserved cancer survivors. Trial registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01476891

  20. Task analysis: a detailed example of stepping up from JSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.; Paramore, B.A.; Buys, J.R.

    1984-10-01

    This paper discusses a pilot task analysis of operations in a proposed facility for the cutting and packaging of radioactively contaminated gloveboxes, for long-term storage or burial. The objective was to demonstrate how task analysis may be used as a tool for planning and risk management. Two specific products were generated - preliminary operating procedures and training requirements. The task data base, procedures list and training requirements developed were intended as first order categorizations. The analysis was limited to tasks that will be performed within the boundaries of the operational facility and the associated load-out area. The analysis documents tasks to be performed by D and D (Decontamination and Decommissioning) Workers. However, the analysis included all tasks identified as an integral part of glovebox processing within the facility. Thus tasks involving Radiation Protection Technicians (RPTs) are included. Based on hazard assessments, it is planned that at least two RPTs will be assigned full-time to the facility, so they may be considered part of its crew. Similarly, supervisory/administrative tasks are included where they were determined to be directly part of process sequences, such as obtaining appropriate certification. 11 tables

  1. Učni potni list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krajnc

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Decembra 1994 je bila v Rimu velika mednarodna konferenca o permanentnem ali vse življenje trajajočem izobraževanju. Široki strokovni javnosti sta bila takrat prvič predstavljena tudi dva nova pojma: osebni učni načrt in učni potni list. Pri priči sta se prijela v teoriji in praksi - očitno sta bila oba predloga odsev potreb.

  2. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadden, M.; Yardumian, J.

    1993-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List provides brief summaries of hundreds of safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Events are described under the categories: Bomb-related, Intrusion, Missing/Allegedly Stolen, Transportation-related, Tampering/Vandalism, Arson, Firearms-related, Radiological Sabotage, Non-radiological Sabotage, and Miscellaneous. Because of the public interest, the Miscellaneous category also includes events reported involving source material, byproduct material, and natural uranium, which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Information in the event descriptions was obtained from official NRC sources

  3. Safeguards summary event list (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of public interest, also included are events reported involving byproduct material which is exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage, nonradiological sabotage, alcohol and drugs, and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  4. Position list word aligned hybrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deliege, Francois; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2010-01-01

    of storage space. This paper presents the Position List Word Aligned Hybrid (PLWAH) compression scheme that improves significantly over WAH compression by better utilizing the available bits and new CPU instructions. For typical bit distributions, PLWAH compressed bitmaps are often half the size of WAH......Compressed bitmap indexes are increasingly used for efficiently querying very large and complex databases. The Word Aligned Hybrid (WAH) bitmap compression scheme is commonly recognized as the most efficient compression scheme in terms of CPU efficiency. However, WAH compressed bitmaps use a lot...

  5. If this then that: an introduction to automated task services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    This article explores automated task services, a type of website that allows users to create rules that are triggered by activity on one website and perform a task on another site. The most well-known automated task service is If This Then That (IFTTT), but recently a large number of these services have sprung up. These services can be used to connect websites, apps, business services, and even devices such as phones and home automation equipment. This allows for millions of possible combinations of rules, triggers, and actions. Librarians can put these services to use in many ways, from automating social media postings to remembering to bring their umbrella when rain is in the forecast. A list of popular automated task services is included, as well as a number of ideas for using these services in libraries.

  6. An FMRI-compatible Symbol Search task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Spencer W; Clark, Uraina S; Xu, Xiaomeng; Riskin-Jones, Hannah H; Hawkshead, Brittany E; Schwarz, Nicolette F; Labbe, Donald; Jerskey, Beth A; Sweet, Lawrence H

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to determine whether a Symbol Search paradigm developed for functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) is a reliable and valid measure of cognitive processing speed (CPS) in healthy older adults. As all older adults are expected to experience cognitive declines due to aging, and CPS is one of the domains most affected by age, establishing a reliable and valid measure of CPS that can be administered inside an MR scanner may prove invaluable in future clinical and research settings. We evaluated the reliability and construct validity of a newly developed FMRI Symbol Search task by comparing participants' performance in and outside of the scanner and to the widely used and standardized Symbol Search subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS). A brief battery of neuropsychological measures was also administered to assess the convergent and discriminant validity of the FMRI Symbol Search task. The FMRI Symbol Search task demonstrated high test-retest reliability when compared to performance on the same task administered out of the scanner (r=.791; pSymbol Search (r=.717; pSymbol Search task were also observed. The FMRI Symbol Search task is a reliable and valid measure of CPS in healthy older adults and exhibits expected sensitivity to the effects of age on CPS performance.

  7. Performing Task Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjaer, Bente; Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    In the paper, we deal with how to organize work for cross-professional knowledge sharing. We do so inspired by relational coordination theory, which is affiliated with positive organizational scholarship. Relational coordination theory is constituted by a combination of relationships marked...... by shared goals and knowledge as well as mutual respect and frequent, timely, accurate and problem-solving ways of communication with the purpose of dealing with the tasks at hand in an integrated way. We introduce and discuss relational coordination theory through a case-study within public healthcare....... Here cross-professional coordination of work was done by scheduled communication twice a day. When we proposed a way for further integration of tasks through an all-inclusive team organization, we were met with resistance. We use the study to discuss whether relational coordination theory is able to do...

  8. Download - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available arch and download 1 README README_e.html - 2 Registered plant list pgdbj_dna_marker_linkage_map_plant_specie... of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  9. Behavioral Task Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    methods included task analysis as a critical phase in developing instruction and training. Mon- temerlo and Tennyson (1976) noted that from 1951 to 1976...designed. The trend in the U.S . Department of Defense toward extensive procedural documentation noted by Montemerlo and Tennyson (1976) has not...M. Gagne’ (Ed.), Psychological principles in system development (pp. 187-228). New York: Holt. Montemerlo, M. D., & Tennyson , M. E. (1975

  10. The task force process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applegate, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    This paper focuses on the unique aspects of the Fernald Citizens Task Force process that have contributed to a largely successful public participation effort at Fernald. The Fernald Citizens Task Force passed quickly by many procedural issues. Instead, the Task Force concentrated on (a) educating itself about the site, its problems, and possible solutions, and (b) choosing a directed way to approach its mandate: To make recommendations on several open-quotes big pictureclose quotes issues, including future use of the site, cleanup levels, waste disposition, and cleanup priorities. This paper presents the approach used at Fernald for establishing and running a focused site-specific advisory board, the key issues that have been faced, and how these issues were resolved. The success of Fernald in establishing a strong and functioning site-specific advisory board serves as a useful model for other DOE facilities, although the Fernald model is just one of many approaches that can be taken. However, the approach presented here has worked extremely well for Fernald

  11. Gap Task Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Lissuaer, D

    One of the more congested areas in the ATLAS detector is the GAP region (the area between the Barrel Calorimeter and the End Cap calorimeter) where Inner Detector services, LAr Services and some Tile services all must co-habitat in a very limited area. It has been clear for some time that the space in the GAP region is not sufficient to accommodate all that is needed. In the last few month additional problems of routing all the services to Z=0 have been encountered due to the very limited space between the Tile Calorimeter and the first layer of Muon chambers. The Technical Management Board (TMB) and the Executive Board (EB) decided in the middle of March to establish a Task Force to look at this problem and come up with a solution within well-specified guidelines. The task force consisted of experts from the ID, Muon, Liquid Argon and Tile systems in addition to experts from the Technical Coordination team and the Physics coordinator. The task force held many meetings and in general there were some very l...

  12. Mobile Thread Task Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Bradley J.; Estlin, Tara A.; Bornstein, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    The Mobile Thread Task Manager (MTTM) is being applied to parallelizing existing flight software to understand the benefits and to develop new techniques and architectural concepts for adapting software to multicore architectures. It allocates and load-balances tasks for a group of threads that migrate across processors to improve cache performance. In order to balance-load across threads, the MTTM augments a basic map-reduce strategy to draw jobs from a global queue. In a multicore processor, memory may be "homed" to the cache of a specific processor and must be accessed from that processor. The MTTB architecture wraps access to data with thread management to move threads to the home processor for that data so that the computation follows the data in an attempt to avoid L2 cache misses. Cache homing is also handled by a memory manager that translates identifiers to processor IDs where the data will be homed (according to rules defined by the user). The user can also specify the number of threads and processors separately, which is important for tuning performance for different patterns of computation and memory access. MTTM efficiently processes tasks in parallel on a multiprocessor computer. It also provides an interface to make it easier to adapt existing software to a multiprocessor environment.

  13. Site maps and facilities listings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities

  14. Site maps and facilities listings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

  15. Lists of semi-dwarf cereal stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The lists are prepared in relation to the Co-ordinated Research Programme. At the first Research Co-ordination Meeting on evaluation of cereal semi-dwarf mutants for cross breeding, March 1981, programme participants were requested to list semi-dwarf mutants available at their institutes including also non-induced semi-dwarf stocks being used in cross-breeding programme for short stature. List-I is prepared from such lists provided by programme participants. Further it was requested to name breeders and institutes providing characteristics of the listed semi-dwarf stocks. List-II gives that information. In the List-I: Parents of semi-dwarf stocks derived from cross breeding, are shown in brackets. In column ''Culm length'', figures are in cm and those of parent cultivars are shown in brackets

  16. Development of a provisional essential medicines list for children in Canada: consensus process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Hannah; Oronsaye, Efosa; Bali, Anjli; Rajakulasingam, Yathavan; Lee, Taehoon; Umali, Norman; Cohen, Eyal; Finkelstein, Yaron; Offringa, Martin; Persaud, Nav

    2018-03-26

    Worldwide, many countries have developed a list of essential medicines for children to improve prescribing. We aimed to create an essential medicines list for children in Canada. We adapted the previously created preliminary list of essential medicines for adults in Canada and the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines for Children to create a provisional list of essential medicines for children in Canada. Canadian clinicians made suggestions for changes. Literature relevant to each suggestion was presented to clinician-scientists, who used a modified nominal group technique to make recommendations on the suggestions. Ontario Public Drug Programs prescription data were reviewed to identify commonly prescribed medications missing from the list. Literature relevant to these medications was shared with a clinician-scientist review panel to determine which should be added, and a revised list was developed. A total of 76 items were removed from the list of essential medicines for adults in Canada because they were not indicated for use in children or were not relevant in the Canadian health care context; 7 medications were added to the child list based on Ontario Public Drugs Programs prescribing data and clinician-scientist review. Suggestions to add, remove or substitute medications were made by peer-reviewers and resulted in removal of 1 medication and replacement of 1 medication. The process produced a provisional list of 67 essential medications for children. A provisional list of 67 essential medicines for children was created through a peer-reviewed, multistep process based on current clinical evidence, Canadian clinical practice guidelines and historical prescribing data. It is publicly posted at http://cleanmeds.ca/. The list should be further developed based on wider input and should be continuously revised based on emerging evidence of the safety and effectiveness of these medicines in all pediatric age groups. Copyright 2018, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  17. Reproducibility of standardized fine motor control tasks and age effects in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Esther J.; Tolonen, Antti J.; Cluitmans, Luc; van Gils, Mark; Zietsma, Rutger C.; Tijssen, Marina A.J.; Maurits, Natasha M.

    Graphical tasks can provide objective measures of important motor symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). These tasks could potentially be useful in clinical settings for (early) diagnosis and monitoring of such diseases. However, before such tasks can be used clinically,

  18. UMLS content views appropriate for NLP processing of the biomedical literature vs. clinical text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Mork, James G; Shooshan, Sonya E; Aronson, Alan R

    2010-08-01

    Identification of medical terms in free text is a first step in such Natural Language Processing (NLP) tasks as automatic indexing of biomedical literature and extraction of patients' problem lists from the text of clinical notes. Many tools developed to perform these tasks use biomedical knowledge encoded in the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) Metathesaurus. We continue our exploration of automatic approaches to creation of subsets (UMLS content views) which can support NLP processing of either the biomedical literature or clinical text. We found that suppression of highly ambiguous terms in the conservative AutoFilter content view can partially replace manual filtering for literature applications, and suppression of two character mappings in the same content view achieves 89.5% precision at 78.6% recall for clinical applications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Comparing the effects of balance training with and without cognitive tasks on the quality of life and balance performance in community-dwelling older adults: a single-blind randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Sinaei; Fahimeh Kamali; Ahmadreza Nematollahi; Zahra Etminan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aging process can deteriorate the ability to maintain balance, specifically under dual-task conditions. Thus far, different methods of exercises therapy have been applied to improve balance performance of older adults. The present study was designed to compare the effects of two protocols of balance training on the quality of life (QoL) and balance performance in older adults with mild balance impairments. Methods: Twenty-four older adults over 60 years old were ...

  20. Task Dominance Determines Backward Inhibition in Task Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Jost

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Switching between tasks is assumed to be accompanied by inhibiting currently irrelevant, but competing tasks. A dominant task that strongly interferes with performing a weaker task may receive especially strong inhibition. We tested this prediction by letting participants switch among three tasks that differ in dominance: a location discrimination task with strong stimulus–response bindings (responding with left-hand and right-hand button presses to stimuli presented left or right to the fixation cross was combined with a color/pattern and a shape discrimination task, for which stimulus–response mappings were arbitrary (e.g., left-hand button press mapped to a red stimulus. Across three experiments, the dominance of the location task was documented by faster and more accurate responses than in the other tasks. This even held for incompatible stimulus–response mappings (i.e., right-hand response to a left-presented stimulus and vice versa, indicating that set-level compatibility (i.e., “dimension overlap” was sufficient for making this location task dominant. As a behavioral marker for backward inhibition, we utilized n-2 repetition costs that are defined by higher reaction times for a switch back to a just abandoned and thus just inhibited task (ABA sequence than for a switch to a less recently inhibited task (CBA, n-2 non-repetition. Reliable n-2 task repetition costs were obtained for all three tasks. Importantly, these costs were largest for the location task, suggesting that inhibition indeed was stronger for the dominant task. This finding adds to other evidence that the amount of inhibition is adjusted in a context-sensitive way.

  1. Implementation of Task-based and problem-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes implementation of new task-based and problem-based pharmacotherapy course for 3rd year pre-clinical medical students at Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Omdurman Islamic University. Keywords: Pharmacotherapy, Task-based learning, P -drug. Sudan Journal of Medical Science Vol.

  2. Evaluating the contributions of task expectancy in the testing and guessing benefits on recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Mark J; Yates, Tyler J; Balota, David A

    2018-05-03

    Recently, we have shown that two types of initial testing (recall of a list or guessing of critical items repeated over 12 study/test cycles) improved final recognition of related and unrelated word lists relative to restudy. These benefits were eliminated, however, when test instructions were manipulated within subjects and presented after study of each list, procedures designed to minimise expectancy of a specific type of upcoming test [Huff, Balota, & Hutchison, 2016. The costs and benefits of testing and guessing on recognition memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 42, 1559-1572. doi: 10.1037/xlm0000269 ], suggesting that testing and guessing effects may be influenced by encoding strategies specific for the type of upcoming task. We follow-up these experiments by examining test-expectancy processes in guessing and testing. Testing and guessing benefits over restudy were not found when test instructions were presented either after (Experiment 1) or before (Experiment 2) a single study/task cycle was completed, nor were benefits found when instructions were presented before study/task cycles and the task was repeated three times (Experiment 3). Testing and guessing benefits emerged only when instructions were presented before a study/task cycle and the task was repeated six times (Experiments 4A and 4B). These experiments demonstrate that initial testing and guessing can produce memory benefits in recognition, but only following substantial task repetitions which likely promote task-expectancy processes.

  3. Update History of This Database - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L of The original website information 2014/10/10 PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant D...B link & Genome analysis methods English archive site is opened. 2012/08/08 PGDBj Regis...ate History of This Database - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  4. Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The Safeguards Summary Event List (SSEL) provides brief summaries of several hundred safeguards-related events involving nuclear material or facilities regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of public interest, the Miscellaneous category includes a few events which involve either source material, byproduct material, or natural uranium which are exempt from safeguards requirements. Events are described under the categories of bomb-related, intrusion, missing and/or allegedly stolen, transportation, tampering/vandalism, arson, firearms, radiological sabotage, nonradiological sabotage, pre-1990 alcohol and drugs (involving reactor operators, security force members, or management persons), and miscellaneous. The information contained in the event descriptions is derived primarily from official NRC reporting channels

  5. Fluctuations in work motivation: tasks do not matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jose; Curioso, Fernando; Gomes, Duarte; Arrieta, Carlos; Cortes, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that work motivation fluctuates considerably and in a nonlinear way over time. In the present research, we are interested in studying if the task at hand does or does not influence the presence of these fluctuations. We gathered daily registers from 69 workers during 21 consecutive working days (7036 registers) of task developed and levels of motivation, self-efficacy beliefs and instrumentalities perception. These registers were then categorized into a list of labor activities in main tasks and subtasks by means of three judges with a high level of agreement (97.47% for tasks, and 98.64% for subtasks). Taking the MSSD statistic (mean squared successive difference) of the average of motivation, self-efficacy and instrumentality, and using hierarchical regression analysis we have found that tasks (beta = .03; p = .188) and subtasks (beta = .10; p = .268) do not affect the presence of fluctuations in motivation. These results reveal instability in work motivation independently from the tasks and subtasks that the workers do. We proceed to find that fluctuations in work motivation show a fractal structure across the different tasks we do in a working day. Implications of these results to motivational theory will be discussed as well as possible explanations (e.g. the influence of affect in work motivation) and directions for future research are provided.

  6. Attentional biases in body dysmorphic disorder (BDD): Eye-tracking using the emotional Stroop task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Lin; Castle, David J; Rossell, Susan L

    2017-04-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterised by repetitive behaviours and/or mental acts occurring in response to preoccupations with perceived defects or flaws in physical appearance. This study aimed to examine attentional biases in BDD via the emotional Stroop task with two modifications: i) incorporating an eye-tracking paradigm, and ii) employing an obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) control group. Twenty-one BDD, 19 OCD and 21 HC participants, who were age-, sex-, and IQ-matched, were included. A card version of the emotional Stroop task was employed based on seven 10-word lists: (i) BDD-positive, (ii) BDD-negative, (iii) OCD-checking, (iv) OCD-washing, (v) general positive, (vi) general threat, and (vii) neutral (as baseline). Participants were asked to read aloud words and word colours consecutively, thereby yielding accuracy and latency scores. Eye-tracking parameters were also measured. Participants with BDD exhibited significant Stroop interference for BDD-negative words relative to HC participants, as shown by extended colour-naming latencies. In contrast, the OCD group did not exhibit Stroop interference for OCD-related nor general threat words. Only mild eye-tracking anomalies were uncovered in clinical groups. Inspection of individual scanning styles and fixation heat maps however revealed that viewing strategies adopted by clinical groups were generally disorganised, with avoidance of certain disorder-relevant words and considerable visual attention devoted to non-salient card regions. The operation of attentional biases to negative disorder-specific words was corroborated in BDD. Future replication studies using other paradigms are vital, given potential ambiguities inherent in emotional Stroop task interpretation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Progress report 1995 on fusion technology tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J.G. van der

    1996-07-01

    This annual progress report describes research activities which have been performed at ECN within the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme during the period 1 January to 31 December 1995. The work is organized in R and D contracts for the next step NET/ITER Technology, the Blanket Development Programme, the Long Term Programme and in NET contracts. The topics concern: Irradiation damage in austenitic and martensitic stainless steel, weldments, low-activation vanadium alloys, first wall coatings, simulation off-normal heat loads, nuclear data and neutronics for fusion, safety studies, development of ceramic breeding material and structural analysis on magnet coils. In addition the supporting and supplementary tasks and investigations in the category underlying technology are reported. A list of publications and staff members is also given. (orig.)

  8. License - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available f you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database as follows: ... PGDBj Registered plan... Policy | Contact Us License - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  9. Learning the preferences of physicians for the organization of result lists of medical evidence articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, D; Wilk, S; Michalowski, W; Slowinski, R; Thomas, R; Kadzinski, M; Farion, K

    2014-01-01

    Online medical knowledge repositories such as MEDLINE and The Cochrane Library are increasingly used by physicians to retrieve articles to aid with clinical decision making. The prevailing approach for organizing retrieved articles is in the form of a rank-ordered list, with the assumption that the higher an article is presented on a list, the more relevant it is. Despite this common list-based organization, it is seldom studied how physicians perceive the association between the relevance of articles and the order in which articles are presented. In this paper we describe a case study that captured physician preferences for 3-element lists of medical articles in order to learn how to organize medical knowledge for decision-making. Comprehensive relevance evaluations were developed to represent 3-element lists of hypothetical articles that may be retrieved from an online medical knowledge source such as MEDLINE or The Cochrane Library. Comprehensive relevance evaluations asses not only an article's relevance for a query, but also whether it has been placed on the correct list position. In other words an article may be relevant and correctly placed on a result list (e.g. the most relevant article appears first in the result list), an article may be relevant for a query but placed on an incorrect list position (e.g. the most relevant article appears second in a result list), or an article may be irrelevant for a query yet still appear in the result list. The relevance evaluations were presented to six senior physicians who were asked to express their preferences for an article's relevance and its position on a list by pairwise comparisons representing different combinations of 3-element lists. The elicited preferences were assessed using a novel GRIP (Generalized Regression with Intensities of Preference) method and represented as an additive value function. Value functions were derived for individual physicians as well as the group of physicians. The results show

  10. Flexible Clustered Multi-Task Learning by Learning Representative Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Multi-task learning (MTL) methods have shown promising performance by learning multiple relevant tasks simultaneously, which exploits to share useful information across relevant tasks. Among various MTL methods, clustered multi-task learning (CMTL) assumes that all tasks can be clustered into groups and attempts to learn the underlying cluster structure from the training data. In this paper, we present a new approach for CMTL, called flexible clustered multi-task (FCMTL), in which the cluster structure is learned by identifying representative tasks. The new approach allows an arbitrary task to be described by multiple representative tasks, effectively soft-assigning a task to multiple clusters with different weights. Unlike existing counterpart, the proposed approach is more flexible in that (a) it does not require clusters to be disjoint, (b) tasks within one particular cluster do not have to share information to the same extent, and (c) the number of clusters is automatically inferred from data. Computationally, the proposed approach is formulated as a row-sparsity pursuit problem. We validate the proposed FCMTL on both synthetic and real-world data sets, and empirical results demonstrate that it outperforms many existing MTL methods.

  11. TASK: Let's Have a Party!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, James

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a creative way to demystify contemporary art for students. TASK is artist Oliver Herring's creation, where participants actively interpret instructions found on little pieces of paper--what he calls "tasks." An art classroom has all the key ingredients for a TASK event: (1) people; (2) materials; (3) space;…

  12. Paradigmatic List Constructions. Patterns and Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Benigni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with listing as a useful conceptual tool for categorization and offers an overview of the different types of lists in Russian, highlighting both universal and language-specific characteristics of this kind of construction. The data-driven approach adopted in this study allows you to identify the main criteria according to which lists can be classified (exhaustiveness of the enumeration, conjunction, types of constituents, compositionality, and so on. Particular attention is paid to paradigmatic lists, i.e. lists whose items are in a paradigmatic relationship with each other as either synonyms, co-hyponyms or co-meronyms. The features of this family of lists are dealt with in the framework of Construction Grammar, which accounts for both similarities in structure and meaning and differences in pragmatic and communicative functions.

  13. Task Shifting in Dermatology: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Danielle N; Langan, Sinéad M; Freeman, Esther E

    2017-11-01

    Can task shifting be used to improve the delivery of dermatologic care in resource-poor settings worldwide? Task shifting is a means of redistributing available resources, whereby highly trained individuals train an available workforce to provide necessary care in low-resource settings. Limited evidence exists for task shifting in dermatology; however, studies from psychiatry demonstrate its efficacy. In the field of dermatology there is a need for high-quality evidence including randomized clinical trials to validate the implementation of task shifting in low-resource settings globally.

  14. Radiation carcinogenesis and related radiobiology. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) program of the National Cancer Institute. Each listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The descriptions are provided by cancer scientists in about 50 different countries. Research areas covered in this listing are: Human cancer and exposure to radiation; experimental radiation carcinogenesis and radiation biology

  15. The chromatic polynomial and list colorings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    We prove that, if a graph has a list of k available colors at every vertex, then the number of list-colorings is at least the chromatic polynomial evaluated at k when k is sufficiently large compared to the number of vertices of the graph.......We prove that, if a graph has a list of k available colors at every vertex, then the number of list-colorings is at least the chromatic polynomial evaluated at k when k is sufficiently large compared to the number of vertices of the graph....

  16. Room temperature line lists for deuterated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyuberis, Aleksandra A.; Zobov, Nikolay F.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Voronin, Boris A.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Lodi, Lorenzo; Liu, Anwen; Hu, Shui-Ming; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2017-12-01

    Line lists are presented for six deuterated isotopologues of water vapor namely HD16O, HD17O, HD18O, D216O, D217O and D218O. These line lists are prepared using empirically-determined energy levels, where available, to provide transition frequencies and high-quality ab initio dipole moment surfaces to provide transition intensities. The reliability of the predicted intensities is tested by computing multiple line lists and analyzing the stability of the results. The resulting intensities are expected to be accurate to a few percent for well-behaved, stable transitions. Complete T = 296 K line lists are provided for each species.

  17. SITE COMPREHENSIVE LISTING (CERCLIS) (Superfund) - NPL Sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Priorities List (NPL) Sites - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information System (CERCLIS) (Superfund) Public Access...

  18. Rostering and Task Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Anders Høeg

    to scheduling problems with temporal dependencies between tasks. However, these problems appear in various contexts and with different properties. A group of the problems considered are related to vehicle routing problems, where transportation and time windows are important factors that must be accounted for....... Mathematical and logic-based models are presented for the problems considered. Novel components are added to existing models and the modeling decisions are justified. In one case, the model is solved by a simple, but efficient greedy construction heuristic. In the remaining cases, column generation is applied....... Column generation is an iterative exact solution method based on the theory of linear programming and is capable of providing provably optimal solutions. In some of the applications, the approach is modified to provide feasible solutions of high-quality in less time. The exceptional solution quality...

  19. Selection of maintenance tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, B.; Rombos, P.

    1995-10-01

    Two methodologies for maintenance task selection, Reliability Centre Maintenance (RCM) and Degradation Mode Analysis (DMA), are compared with regard to application in the nuclear industry and potential for application at CANDU nuclear power plants. RCM is the favoured one of the two methodologies. It is more thorough than DMA, is well supported within the US nuclear industry, and - with experience in application - is gaining cost effectiveness. There is interest in the use of RCM in other nations, including France and Japan, and it is already being implemented at Bruce A NGS and Bruce B NGS in Canada. DMA lags behind RCM in development and currently there is little experience to support claims of major benefits at reduced cost. Significant advantages over RCM need to be demonstrated if DMA is to gain acceptance in the nuclear industry. (author). 41 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs

  20. Proceedings of the IRI Task Force Activity 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radicella, S.M.

    2002-08-01

    This ICTP Internal Report contains the list of papers presented, activity report and the write up of a number of presentations delivered during the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Task Force Activity 2001 which took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP during May 2001, particularly centred in the week from 21-25 May. The 2001 Task Force Activity is the eighth successful encounter of specialists organized by the URSI-Cospar IRI Working Group and the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics of Trieste, Italy. This project continues the IRI Task Force Activities at the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy. The primary focus of this activity was the development of a specification model for ionospheric variability. Such a model is high on the wish list of users of ionospheric models. Climatological models like IRI provide monthly mean values of ionospheric parameters. Understandably a satellite designer or operator needs to know not only the monthly average conditions but also the expected deviations from these mean values. The main discussions and presentations took place during the week 21-25 May. The format was similar to last year's activity with presentations and round-table discussions in the morning and follow-on work in small subgroups in front of computer terminals in the afternoon. This Proceedings contains also four papers of the previous IRI Task Force Activity which were omitted

  1. Medical student self-reported confidence in obstetrics and gynaecology: development of a core clinical competencies document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical competencies in obstetrics and gynaecology have not been clearly defined for Australian medical students, the growing numbers of which may impact clinical teaching. Our aim was to administer and validate a competencies list, for self-evaluation by medical students of their confidence to manage common clinical tasks in obstetrics and gynaecology; to evaluate students’ views on course changes that may result from increasing class sizes. Methods A draft list of competencies was peer-reviewed, and discussed at two student focus groups. The resultant list was administered as part of an 81 item online survey. Results Sixty-eight percent (N = 172) of those eligible completed the survey. Most respondents (75.8%) agreed or strongly agreed that they felt confident and well equipped to recognise and manage most common and important obstetric and gynaecological conditions. Confidence was greater for women, and for those who received a higher assessment grade. Free-text data highlight reasons for lack of clinical experience that may impact perceived confidence. Conclusions The document listing competencies for medical students and educators is useful for discussions around a national curriculum in obstetrics and gynaecology in medical schools, including the best methods of delivery, particularly in the context of increasing student numbers. PMID:23634953

  2. Analysis of the spelling patterns of 4th grade students based on a word dictation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria Thereza Mazorra dos; Befi-Lopes, Debora Maria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a profile of the spelling patterns studied in students from public and private schools and to describe a word spelling task for clinical and educational settings. Eighty-two fourth grade students belonging to the elementary school of public and private schools in São Paulo, ranging in age from nine to ten years, took part in this study. The spelling task consisted of a list of ten high frequency words (HFW), ten low frequency words (LFW), and ten pseudowords (PW), in which the typology and number of spelling errors were described. To compare the average number of mistakes on the HFWs, LFWs, and PWs, we used an analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparisons (pSpelling errors are a part of the process of learning to write, and students can show some variance in spelling performance. Furthermore, students need to be stimulated to analyze words and their aspects of phonology, morphology, and semantics. An analysis from the types of errors is not enough to plan intervention programs, but instead is necessary to understand the strategies that the child uses to write.

  3. Free recall of word lists under total sleep deprivation and after recovery sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Valverde Zanini, Gislaine; Tufik, Sérgio; Andersen, Monica Levy; da Silva, Raquel Cristina Martins; Bueno, Orlando Francisco Amodeo; Rodrigues, Camila Cruz; Pompéia, Sabine

    2012-02-01

    One task that has been used to assess memory effects of prior total sleep deprivation (TSD) is the immediate free recall of word lists; however, results have been mixed. A possible explanation for this is task impurity, since recall of words from different serial positions reflects use of distinct types of memory (last words: short-term memory; first and intermediate words: episodic memory). Here we studied the effects of 2 nights of TSD on immediate free recall of semantically unrelated word lists considering the serial position curve. Random allocation to a 2-night TSD protocol followed by one night of recovery sleep or to a control group. Study conducted under continuous behavioral monitoring. 24 young, healthy male volunteers. 2 nights of total sleep deprivation (TSD) and one night of recovery sleep. Participants were shown five 15 unrelated word-lists at baseline, after one and 2 nights of TSD, and after one night of recovery sleep. We also investigated the development of recall strategies (learning) and susceptibility to interference from previous lists. No free recall impairment occurred during TSD, irrespective of serial position. Interference was unchanged. Both groups developed recall strategies, but task learning occurred earlier in controls and was evident in the TSD group only after sleep recovery. Prior TSD spared episodic memory, short-term phonological memory, and interference, allowed the development of recall strategies, but may have decreased the advantage of using these strategies, which returned to normal after recovery sleep.

  4. Sentiment Analysis of Suicide Notes: A Shared Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestian, John P; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Linn-Gust, Michelle; South, Brett; Uzuner, Ozlem; Wiebe, Jan; Cohen, K Bretonnel; Hurdle, John; Brew, Christopher

    2012-01-30

    This paper reports on a shared task involving the assignment of emotions to suicide notes. Two features distinguished this task from previous shared tasks in the biomedical domain. One is that it resulted in the corpus of fully anonymized clinical text and annotated suicide notes. This resource is permanently available and will (we hope) facilitate future research. The other key feature of the task is that it required categorization with respect to a large set of labels. The number of participants was larger than in any previous biomedical challenge task. We describe the data production process and the evaluation measures, and give a preliminary analysis of the results. Many systems performed at levels approaching the inter-coder agreement, suggesting that human-like performance on this task is within the reach of currently available technologies.

  5. A multi-site single blind clinical study to compare the effects of prolonged exposure, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing and waiting list on patients with a current diagnosis of psychosis and co morbid post traumatic stress disorder: study protocol for the randomized controlled trial Treating Trauma in Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bont, Paul A J M; van den Berg, David P G; van der Vleugel, Berber M; de Roos, Carlijn; Mulder, Cornelis L; Becker, Eni S; de Jongh, Ad; van der Gaag, Mark; van Minnen, Agnes

    2013-05-23

    Trauma contributes to psychosis and in psychotic disorders post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often a comorbid disorder. A problem is that PTSD is underdiagnosed and undertreated in people with psychotic disorders. This study's primary goal is to examine the efficacy and safety of prolonged exposure and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) for PTSD in patients with both psychotic disorders and PTSD, as compared to a waiting list. Secondly, the effects of both treatments are determined on (a) symptoms of psychosis, in particular verbal hallucinations, (b) depression and social performance, and (c) economic costs. Thirdly, goals concern links between trauma exposure and psychotic symptomatology and the prevalence of exposure to traumatic events, and of PTSD. Fourthly predictors, moderators, and mediators for treatment success will be explored. These include cognitions and experiences concerning treatment harm, credibility and burden in both participants and therapists. A short PTSD-screener assesses the possible presence of PTSD in adult patients (21- to 65- years old) with psychotic disorders, while the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale interview will be used for the diagnosis of current PTSD. The M.I.N.I. Plus interview will be used for diagnosing lifetime psychotic disorders and mood disorders with psychotic features. The purpose is to include consenting participants (N = 240) in a multi-site single blind randomized clinical trial. Patients will be allocated to one of three treatment conditions (N = 80 each): prolonged exposure or EMDR (both consisting of eight weekly sessions of 90 minutes each) or a six-month waiting list. All participants are subjected to blind assessments at pre-treatment, two months post treatment, and six months post treatment. In addition, participants in the experimental conditions will have assessments at mid treatment and at 12 months follow-up. The results from the post treatment measurement can be considered

  6. EPCRA/CERCLA/CAA §112(r) Consolidated List of Lists – March 2015 Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    List of Lists was prepared to help firms handling chemicals determine, for a specific chemical, whether they may be subject to the following reporting requirements under Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know, CERCLA, and Clean Air Act.

  7. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Batra, Bipin; Sood, Ak; Ramakantan, Ravi; Bhargava, Satish K; Chidambaranathan, N; Indrajit, Ik

    2010-05-01

    There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed "key-list" that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as "manned" or "unmanned" stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations.

  8. Objective structured clinical examination in radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Anurag

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need for introducing objective structured clinical examination (OSCE as a part of radiology practical examinations in India. OSCE is an established, reliable, and effective multistation test for the assessment of practical professional skills in an objective and a transparent manner. In India, it has been successfully initiated and implemented in specialties like pediatrics, ophthalmology, and otolaryngology. Each OSCE station needs to have a pre-agreed "key-list" that contains a list of objective steps prepared for uniformly assessing the tasks given to students. Broadly, OSCE stations are classified as "manned" or "unmanned" stations. These stations may include procedure or pictorial or theory stations with clinical oriented contents. This article is one of a series of measures to initiate OSCE in radiology; it analyzes the attributes of OSCE stations and outlines the steps for implementing OSCE. Furthermore, important issues like the advantages of OSCE, its limitations, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis, and the timing of introduction of OSCE in radiology are also covered. The OSCE format in radiology and its stations needs to be validated, certified, and finalized before its use in examinations. This will need active participation and contribution from the academic radiology fraternity and inputs from faculty members of leading teaching institutions. Many workshops/meetings need to be conducted. Indeed, these collaborative measures will effectively sensitize universities, examiners, organizers, faculty, and students across India to OSCE and help successfully usher in this new format in radiology practical examinations.

  9. Task Demands in OSCEs Influence Learning Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafleur, Alexandre; Laflamme, Jonathan; Leppink, Jimmie; Côté, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Models on pre-assessment learning effects confirmed that task demands stand out among the factors assessors can modify in an assessment to influence learning. However, little is known about which tasks in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) improve students' cognitive and metacognitive processes. Research is needed to support OSCE designs that benefit students' metacognitive strategies when they are studying, reinforcing a hypothesis-driven approach. With that intent, hypothesis-driven physical examination (HDPE) assessments ask students to elicit and interpret findings of the physical exam to reach a diagnosis ("Examine this patient with a painful shoulder to reach a diagnosis"). When studying for HDPE, students will dedicate more time to hypothesis-driven discussions and practice than when studying for a part-task OSCE ("Perform the shoulder exam"). It is expected that the whole-task nature of HDPE will lead to a hypothesis-oriented use of the learning resources, a frequent use of adjustment strategies, and persistence with learning. In a mixed-methods study, 40 medical students were randomly paired and filmed while studying together for two hypothetical OSCE stations. Each 25-min study period began with video cues asking to study for either a part-task OSCE or an HDPE. In a crossover design, sequences were randomized for OSCEs and contents (shoulder or spine). Time-on-task for discussions or practice were categorized as "hypothesis-driven" or "sequence of signs and maneuvers." Content analysis of focus group interviews summarized students' perception of learning resources, adjustment strategies, and persistence with learning. When studying for HDPE, students allocate significantly more time for hypothesis-driven discussions and practice. Students use resources contrasting diagnoses and report persistence with learning. When studying for part-task OSCEs, time-on-task is reversed, spent on rehearsing a sequence of signs and maneuvers. OSCEs with

  10. Effect of training on the ability of dual-task coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosin F.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the working memory model proposed by A. Baddeley and G. Hitch, a dual-task paradigm has been suggested to evaluate the capacity to perform simultaneously two concurrent tasks. This capacity is assumed to reflect the functioning of the central executive component, which appears to be impaired in patients with dysexecutive syndrome. The present study extends the investigation of an index ("mu", which is supposed to indicate the capacity of coordination of concurrent auditory digit span and tracking tasks, by testing the influence of training on the performance in the dual task. The presentation of the same digit sequence lists or always-different lists did not differently affect the performance. The span length affected the mu values. The improved performance in the tasks under the dual condition closely resembled the improvement in the single-task performance. So, although training improved performance in the single and dual conditions, especially for the tracking component, the mu values remained stable throughout the sessions when the single tasks were performed first. Conversely, training improved the capacity of dual-task coordination throughout the sessions when dual task was performed first, addressing the issue of the contribution of the within-session practice to the mu index.

  11. Stress-Kinase Regulation of TASK-1 and TASK-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Rinné

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: TASK channels belong to the two-pore-domain potassium (K2P channel family. TASK-1 is discussed to contribute to chronic atrial fibrillation (AFib and has been together with uncoupling protein 1 found as a marker protein of brown adipose tissue (BAT fat. In addition, TASK-1 was linked in a genome-wide association study to an increased body mass index. A recent study showed that TASK-1 inhibition is causing obesity in mice by a BAT whitening and that these effects are linked to the mineralocorticoid receptor pathway, albeit the mechanism remained elusive. Therefore, we aimed to probe whether K2P channels are regulated by serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinases (SGKs which are known to modify many cellular functions by modulating ion channels. Methods: To this end we used functional co-expression studies and chemiluminescence-assays in Xenopus oocytes, together with fluorescence imaging and quantitative PCR experiments. Results: SGKs and proteinkinase B (PKB induced a strong, dose- and time-dependent current reduction of TASK-1 and TASK-3. SGK co-expression reduced the surface expression of TASK-1/3, leading to a predominant localization of the channels into late endosomes. The down regulation of TASK-3 channels was abrogated by the dynamin inhibitor dynasore, confirming a role of SGKs in TASK-1/3 channel endocytosis. Conclusion: Stress-mediated changes in SGK expression pattern or activation is likely to alter TASK-1/3 expression at the surface membrane. The observed TASK-1 regulation might contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic AFib and provide a mechanistic link between increased mineralocorticoid levels and TASK-1 reduction, both linked to BAT whitening.

  12. EXPERIENCED TASK-BASED MULTI ROBOT TASK ALLOCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Ezercan Kayır, H. Hilal

    2017-01-01

    In multi robot system applications, itis possible that the robots transform their past experiences into usefulinformation which will be used for next task allocation processes by usinglearning-based task allocation mechanisms. The major disadvantages of multi-robotQ-learning algorithm are huge learning space and computational cost due togeneralized state and joint action spaces of robots. In this study, experiencedtask-based multi robot task allocation approach is proposed. According to thisa...

  13. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa M. Reda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  14. 76 FR 81793 - The Commerce Control List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security 15 CFR Part 774 The Commerce Control List CFR Correction In Title 15 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Parts 300 to 799, revised as of Jan. 1... Commerce Control List), Category 9 Aerospace and Propulsion, Product Group E is amended by revising the...

  15. 14 CFR 1212.603 - Mailing lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mailing lists. 1212.603 Section 1212.603 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT-NASA REGULATIONS Instructions for NASA Employees § 1212.603 Mailing lists. NASA will not sell, rent, or otherwise disclose an...

  16. Textbooks in Greek and Latin: 1975 List

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Thomas G.

    1975-01-01

    List of textbooks in Greek and Latin for 1975. Subject, title, publisher and price are noted. Greek and Latin works are listed separately under the eight categories of texts, beginner's books, grammars, books about the language, readers and anthologies, composition, dictionaries, and New Testament Greek and Later Latin. (RM)

  17. 75 FR 47550 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ...--Macintosh Apple NSN: MR 473--Fresh Linen NPA: Industries for the Blind, Inc., West Allis, WI Contracting... Service, 5777 S. Aviation Blvd., N. Charleston, SC NPA: Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina, Inc... Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds products and services to the Procurement List that will be...

  18. 77 FR 42515 - Product List Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. MC2012-32 and CP2012-40; Order No. 1403] Product List Change AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a...--proposed changes to the Mail Classification Schedule competitive product list with the addition underlined...

  19. 78 FR 53734 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ...: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled, 1401 S Clark Street, Suite 10800..., Telephone: (703) 603-7740, Fax: (703) 603-0655, or email [email protected]One.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY... Procurement List for production by the nonprofit agency listed: Products: NSN: 6645-00-NIB-0141--Clock, Wall...

  20. 48 CFR 13.102 - Source list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Source list. 13.102... AND CONTRACT TYPES SIMPLIFIED ACQUISITION PROCEDURES Procedures 13.102 Source list. (a) Contracting... as their primary sources of vendor information. Offices maintaining additional vendor source files or...

  1. An Annotated Publications List on Homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutunjian, Beth Ann

    This annotated publications list on homelessness contains citations for 19 publications, most of which deal with problems of alcohol or drug abuse among homeless persons. Citations are listed alphabetically by author and cover the topics of homelessness and alcoholism, drug abuse, public policy, research methodologies, mental illness, alcohol- and…

  2. Radiation carcinogenesis and related radiobiology. Special listing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The special listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Human cancer and exposure to radiation; Experimental radiation carcinogenesis and radiation biology

  3. Extended Access List untuk Mengendalikan Trafik Jaringan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Antoni Musril

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Keamana jaringan komputer saat ini menjadi hal penting untuk diterapkan. Banyak organisasi yang telah menjadikan teknologi informasi sebagai bahagian penting dalam menunjang aktivitasnya. Akses pengguna yang tidak dibatasi menjadi ancaman bagi sebuah organisasi, karena banyak data dan informasi penting yang tersebar dalam perangkat jaringan komputer di organisasi tersebut dapat disusupi oleh pihak yang tidak berwenang. Salah satu usaha yang dapat dilakukan adalah dengan menerapkan extended access list yang merupakan salah satu bagian dari metode access control list. Extended access list dapat menyaring lalu lintas data suatu jaringan dengan mengontrol apakah paket-paket tersebut dilewatkan atau dihentikan. Extended access list juga dapat menjamin keamanan untuk setiap komputer sehingga jalur komunikasi serta hak akses setiap komputer dapat berjalan dengan baik. Extended access list memungkinkan penyaringan berdasarkan sumber atau alamat tujuan, protokol yang dipilih, port yang digunakan, dan apakah koneksi sudah ditetapkan. Tulisan ini membahas penerapan extended access list dalam jaringan supaya dapat melakukan filter terhadap paket data yang melewati jaringan. Penerapannya menggunakan software Packet Tracer 6.1.1 untuk membuat prototipe jaringan dan mensimulasikannya. Sehingga nanti dapat diterapkan pada jaringan yang sebenarnya. List yang dibangun pada penelitian ini diterapkan untuk protokol antara lain : TCP (WWW, FTP, Telnet, SMTP, POP3, UDP (DNS, dan ICMP (Ping. Hasilnya didapatkan extended access list yang dikonfigurasi pada router dalam topologi penelitian ini mampu melakukan filter terhadap paket yang melewati jaringan. Hasil konfigurasinya sangat spesifik, sehingga penerapan hak akses permit dan deny dapat dilakukan sesuai dengan aturan dan skenario yang dirancang.

  4. 76 FR 19751 - Procurement List; Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... who otherwise face significant barriers to employment. These employees will be paid service contract... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Addition to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action...

  5. 78 FR 45183 - Procurement List Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Requirement as aggregated by the General Services Administration. NSN: 7920-00-NIB-0564--Towel, Cleaning, Non... Procurement List. SUMMARY: This action adds a products and services to the Procurement List that will be... presented to it concerning capability of qualified nonprofit agencies to provide the products and services...

  6. 76 FR 26279 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ...-service area; clean and sanitize food service equipment, utensil cleaning, and dishwashing; clean pots... additions to the Procurement List. SUMMARY: The Committee is proposing to add services to the Procurement... in this notice will be required to procure the services listed below from nonprofit agencies...

  7. Clinical Application of Electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammell, H. L.; Orr, William

    The scalar electrocardiogram (ECG) is one of the most important and commonly used clinical tools in medicine. A detailed description of the recordings of cardiac electrical activity made by the ECG is presented, and the vast numbers of uses made with the data provided by this diagnostic tool are cited. Clinical applications of the ECG are listed.…

  8. Serial-Position Effects on a Free-Recall Task in Bilinguals

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Jeewon; Kaushanskaya, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined mechanisms that underlie free-recall performance in bilinguals? first language (L1) and second language (L2) through the prism of serial-position effects. On free-recall tasks, a typical pattern of performance follows a U-shaped serial-position curve, where items from the beginning of the list (the primacy effect) and items from the end of the list (the recency effect) are recalled with higher accuracy than items from the middle of the list. The present study contra...

  9. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  10. Database Description - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Database Description General information of database Database name PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list,...available URL of Web services - Need for user registration Not available About This Database Database Descri...ption Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Database Description - PGDBj Regis...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  11. Cognitive task load analysis : Allocating tasks and designing support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for Cognitive Task Analysis that guides the early stages of software development, aiming at an optimal cognitive load for operators of process control systems. The method is based on a practical theory of cognitive task load and support. In addition to the classical measure

  12. TAPS - An automated tool for identification of skills, knowledges, and abilities using natural language task description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.; Carter, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype, computer-based tool (TAPS) has been developed to aid training system developers in identifying skills, knowledges, and abilities (SKAs) during task analysis. TAPS uses concepts of flexible pattern matching to evaluate English descriptions of job behaviors and to recode them as SKA lists. This paper addresses the rationale for TAPS and describes its design including SKA definitions and task analysis logic. It also presents examples of TAPS's application

  13. TAPS: an automated tool for identification of skills, knowledges, and abilities using natural language task description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorgensen, C.C.; Carter, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    A prototype, computer-based tool (TAPS) has been developed to aid training system developers in identifying skills, knowledges, and abilities (SKAs) during task analysis. TAPS uses concepts of flexible pattern matching to evaluate English descriptions of job behaviors and to recode them as SKA lists. This paper addresses the rationale for TAPS and describes its design including SKA definitions and task analysis logic. It also presents examples of TAPS's application

  14. Correlates of academic procrastination: discomfort, task aversiveness, and task capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgram, N; Marshevsky, S; Sadeh, C

    1995-03-01

    The relationships among five aspects of academic procrastination--behavioral delay, personal upset about the delay, task aversiveness, task capability, and the desire to reduce behavioral delay--were investigated in 10th-grade Israeli students (N = 195). Upset about delay was weakly related to delay itself, and--unlike delay--was strongly related to perceived capability to perform academic tasks and to the desire to change delaying behavior. Students delayed more on academic tasks labeled unpleasant than pleasant, were neutral in between, and were correspondingly more upset about the former than the latter. They more frequently acknowledged reasons for academic procrastination that were less threatening to their self-image (e.g., problems in time management) than reasons that were more threatening (e.g., lack of ability). Interest in reducing delay is related more to self-perceived ability to handle tasks than to time spent procrastinating or reasons given for procrastinating.

  15. Detection of prospective memory deficits in mild cognitive impairment of suspected Alzheimer's disease etiology using a novel event-based prospective memory task.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Blanco-Campal, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relative discriminatory efficacy of an event-based prospective memory (PM) task, in which specificity of the instructions and perceptual salience of the PM cue were manipulated, compared with two widely used retrospective memory (RM) tests (Rivermead Paragraph Recall Test and CERAD-Word List Test), when detecting mild cognitive impairment of suspected Alzheimer\\'s disease etiology (MCI-AD) (N = 19) from normal controls (NC) (N = 21). Statistical analyses showed high discriminatory capacity of the PM task for detecting MCI-AD. The Non-Specific-Non-Salient condition proved particularly useful in detecting MCI-AD, possibly reflecting the difficulty of the task, requiring more strategic attentional resources to monitor for the PM cue. With a cutoff score of <4\\/10, the Non-Specific-Non-Salient condition achieved a sensitivity = 84%, and a specificity = 95%, superior to the most discriminative RM test used (CERAD-Total Learning: sensitivity = 83%; specificity = 76%). Results suggest that PM is an early sign of memory failure in MCI-AD and may be a more pronounced deficit than retrospective failure, probably reflecting the greater self-initiated retrieval demands involved in the PM task used. Limitations include the relatively small sample size, and the use of a convenience sample (i.e. memory clinic attenders and healthy active volunteers), reducing the generalizability of the results, which should be regarded as preliminary. (JINS, 2009, 15, 154-159.).

  16. List of publications 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This list includes all the scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - reports, reprints of journal articles, and translations - issued from 1986 April to 1987 December. Together with the earlier cumulative lists (AECL-5000, AECL-5001, AECL-5002, AECL--5003, AECL--5004, AECL--5005), it provides a complete catalogue of publications in the AECL-series. In the future, lists will be produced at twelve month intervals. The titles and other bibliographic information are arranged in several categories, each devoted to a broad subject area. In addition, each document is identified with an AECL number (for example, AECL-12345) which should be used in ordering reports and making enquiries

  17. World list of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Twice each year Nuclear News sends a questionnaire to each utility or agency on this list, asking for corrections or additions to the information listed. In cases where a response is not received, we try to follow up by phone or facsimile, though this is not always possible for plants outside the United States. The criterion for listing a unit is that either an order or a letter of intent has been signed for the reactor. In cases where the definition of open-quotes letter of intentclose quotes may be ambiguous, or where a special situation exists, the judgment of the utility is followed as to whether a plant should be included

  18. Validation of the computerized annunciation message list system (CAMLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, M.P.; Davey, E.C.; Lupton, L.R.

    1997-01-01

    The Computerized Annunciation Message List System is a computerized annunciation system for the control rooms of nuclear generating stations. CAMLS will alert operators to changes in plant conditions that may impact on safety and production and help staff to effectively respond. CAMLS is designed to: provide a clear and concise overview of the current problems or faults in the plant; provide an overview of the current state of the plant in terms of automatic process and equipment actions; provide support for specific operational tasks, through either pre-configured or operator-configured annunciation displays, including: rapid and efficient upset response, plant stabilization, problem diagnosis, recovery action planning and implementation, and rapid recovery from trip and return to power operation. To achieve this, several information processing, presentation,a nd interaction concepts were developed. 2 refs, 6 figs, 7 tabs

  19. Sequential rank agreement methods for comparison of ranked lists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn; Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Jensen, Andreas Kryger

    2015-01-01

    rank genes according to their difference in gene expression levels. This article constructs measures of the agreement of two or more ordered lists. We use the standard deviation of the ranks to define a measure of agreement that both provides an intuitive interpretation and can be applied to any number......The comparison of alternative rankings of a set of items is a general and prominent task in applied statistics. Predictor variables are ranked according to magnitude of association with an outcome, prediction models rank subjects according to the personalized risk of an event, and genetic studies...... are illustrated using gene rankings, and using data from two Danish ovarian cancer studies where we assess the within and between agreement of different statistical classification methods....

  20. Stability of age-related deficits in the mnemonic similarity task across task variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Shauna M; Stevenson, Rebecca; Wu, Claudia; Rutledge, Samantha; Stark, Craig E L

    2015-06-01

    Several studies in our lab and others have demonstrated age-related declines in mnemonic discrimination during a recognition memory paradigm using repeated items, similar lures, and novel foils. In particular, older adults exhibit a shift in lure discriminability, identifying similar lures as old items at a greater rate than young adults. This shift likely reflects deficits in pattern separation processing as a result of underlying changes in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Here, we explored whether alterations in the task design could rescue the age-related impairment or whether it was ubiquitous as one might expect if the neurobiological mechanisms were truly disturbed by typical aging. Despite overt instructions to study item details during encoding, we replicated the age-related deficit in mnemonic discrimination. We established reliable effects with short lists of stimuli and with repeated testing. Altering the task design from a study/test to a continuous recognition paradigm replicated the age-related shift in lure discrimination as well. Modifying the task to an old/new response (rather than old/similar/new) showed the same effect and a d' analysis showed that lure items were more akin to target items in older adults. Finally, we varied the test instructions in order to promote gist or veridical responses in the old/new task. Even these overt veridical test instructions did not ameliorate older adults' lure discrimination problems. Together, these findings demonstrate the robust nature of this age-related deficit and support the hypothesis that typical aging results in neurobiological changes that underlie this impairment. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Computer-Related Task Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longstreet, Phil; Xiao, Xiao; Sarker, Saonee

    2016-01-01

    's CSE is often a cumbersome process. Thus, we introduce the theoretical concept of self-prophecy (SP) and examine how this social influence strategy can be used to improve computer-related task performance. Two experiments are conducted to examine the influence of SP on task performance. Results show...

  2. Task Switching: A PDP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Shallice, Tim

    2002-01-01

    When subjects switch between a pair of stimulus-response tasks, reaction time is slower on trial N if a different task was performed on trial N--1. We present a parallel distributed processing (PDP) model that simulates this effect when subjects switch between word reading and color naming in response to Stroop stimuli. Reaction time on "switch…

  3. TASK: Anarchy in the Artroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Cynthia; Van Patten, Kelda

    2012-01-01

    Most teenagers do not really like to be told what to do. For that matter, most adults don't either. This article discusses contemporary artist Oliver Herring's TASK, which is an opportunity for participants to bend or define the rules on their own terms. It is about choice, and, for many, it is a dream come true. TASK is controlled chaos that can…

  4. Designing for dynamic task allocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongen, C.J.G. van; Maanen, P.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Future platforms are envisioned in which human-machine teams are able to share and trade tasks as demands in situations change. It seems that human-machine coordination has not received the attention it deserves by past and present approaches to task allocation. In this paper a simple way to make

  5. Preference for People and Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Mondin, Gregory W.; Ahn, Hyun-nie

    1999-01-01

    Investigates preference of Social (S) and Investigative (I) people for performing S and I tasks with S or I people or alone. Upper-division undergraduates in S majors (n=38) or I majors (n=15) were utilized in study. S participants preferred working with S people. I participants most preferred to perform I tasks with I people and least preferred…

  6. Task based design of a digital work environment (DWE for an academic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Meyyappan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Task based design is considered one of the effective ways of designing functional software. It is generally accepted that tasks play an important role in system and user interface design. Identifying the user's tasks enables the designer to construct user interfaces reflecting the tasks' properties, including efficient usage patterns, easy-to-use interaction sequences, and powerful assistance features. In this paper, we present a prototype of a Digital Work Environment (DWE to support a task-oriented design to information access in a typical community of academic users. The resources in DWE are organized according to specific tasks performed by the research students and staff in the Division of Information Studies of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. The tasks and resources were elicited based on the needs of faculty and students through interviews and focus groups. Examples of these tasks include preparation of a new course outline, setting of examination papers, preparation of reading lists and assignments, conducting literature reviews and writing dissertations. This paper discusses the problems of digital library users in an academic environment, highlights task oriented projects and focuses on the task of preparing and writing a Master dissertation. It highlights the importance of task based design in assisting and helping students and instructors from the time of selecting the research project to the time of submitting the final bound copies of the dissertation.

  7. Caffeine improves anticipatory processes in task switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Wijnen, Jasper G.; Lorist, Monicque M.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    We studied the effects of moderate amounts of caffeine on task switching and task maintenance using mixed-task (AABB) blocks, in which participants alternated predictably between two tasks, and single-task (AAAA, BBBB) blocks. Switch costs refer to longer reaction times (RT) on task switch trials

  8. EPA CIO Governance Board Membership List

    Science.gov (United States)

    In keeping with OMB guidance on implementing the Federal Information Technology Reform Act (FITARA), EPA is publishing its list of officials who perform the duties or responsibilities of a Bureau CIO.

  9. List of Nuclear Materials Licensing Actions Received

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — A catalog of all Materials Licensing Actions received for review. The catalog lists the name of the entity submitting the license application, their city and state,...

  10. HUD Subprime and Manufactured Home Lender List

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) periodically produce its HUD Subprime and Manufactured home Lender List for the lenders who specialize in...

  11. Title List of documents made publicly available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes: (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index. The docketed information contained in the Title List includes the information formerly issued throught the Department of Energy publication Power Reactor Docket Information, last published in January 1979. Microfiche of the docketed information listed in the Title List is available for sale on a subscription basis from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

  12. 76 FR 76952 - Procurement List Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... published notices of proposed additions to the Procurement List. After consideration of the material.... 1018--Scrubber, Non Scratch, Tub and Shower. NPA: Industries for the Blind, Inc., West Allis, WI...

  13. 78 FR 38953 - Procurement List Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... the material presented to it concerning capability of qualified nonprofit agencies to provide the...--Scrubber, Tub/Shower, Non-scratch, Light Blue. Coverage: B-List for the Broad Government requirement as...

  14. Title List of documents made publicly available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes: (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index. The docketed information contained in the Title List includes the information formerly issued through the Department of Energy publication Power Reactor Docket Information, last published in January 1979. Microfiche of the docketed information listed in the Title List is available for sale on a subscription basis from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

  15. A Check List for the Reading Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemake, Josephine S.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a check list created by teachers to be used as an evaluation instrument in observations of reading laboratories in the New York City area. Reflects their ideas about the essential components of a remedial reading program. (FL)

  16. Check List: Are You a Gifted Principal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Vicki L.

    1984-01-01

    An 18-item check list is provided for principals to evaluate themselves relative to encouraging gifts and talents of their most able students. Suggestions are given in the areas of educational needs, specialized materials, and counseling. (MC)

  17. List of Climatological Records - National Archives

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — State-by-state listing of weather records housed in the National Archives as of 1942. The original manuscript was published as one publication, but for ease of use...

  18. Novice supervisors' tasks and training - a descriptive study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus H.; Mathiesen, Birgit Bork

    , i.e. trained, prior to these tasks. These findings imply that more training is needed for novice supervisors. Preferably, this training should be introduced before, or at least parallel to, the first supervisor tasks, preparing the novice supervisors for the often complicated tasks they are meeting........ The aim of this study was to explore what kind of tasks novice supervisors undertake and how they are prepared for these. During 2009--2010, 350 Danish clinical psychologists have responded to the Development of Psychotherapists Common Core Questionnaire covering a wide range of items on professional...... development, experience, and practice. In this presentation we focus on the tasks and training of the respondents as novice supervisors. The results show, that a majority of novice supervisors were confronted with complicated jobs, e.g., group, internal and interdisciplinary supervision, but were not prepared...

  19. Single-task and dual-task tandem gait test performance after concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David R; Osternig, Louis R; Chou, Li-Shan

    2017-07-01

    To compare single-task and dual-task tandem gait test performance between athletes after concussion with controls on observer-timed, spatio-temporal, and center-of-mass (COM) balance control measurements. Ten participants (19.0±5.5years) were prospectively identified and completed a tandem gait test protocol within 72h of concussion and again 1 week, 2 weeks, 1 month, and 2 months post-injury. Seven uninjured controls (20.0±4.5years) completed the same protocol in similar time increments. Tandem gait test trials were performed with (dual-task) and without (single-task) concurrently performing a cognitive test as whole-body motion analysis was performed. Outcome variables included test completion time, average tandem gait velocity, cadence, and whole-body COM frontal plane displacement. Concussion participants took significantly longer to complete the dual-task tandem gait test than controls throughout the first 2 weeks post-injury (mean time=16.4 [95% CI: 13.4-19.4] vs. 10.1 [95% CI: 6.4-13.7] seconds; p=0.03). Single-task tandem gait times were significantly lower 72h post-injury (p=0.04). Dual-task cadence was significantly lower for concussion participants than controls (89.5 [95% CI: 68.6-110.4] vs. 127.0 [95% CI: 97.4-156.6] steps/minute; p=0.04). Moderately-high to high correlations between tandem gait test time and whole-body COM medial-lateral displacement were detected at each time point during dual-task gait (r s =0.70-0.93; p=0.03-0.001). Adding a cognitive task during the tandem gait test resulted in longer detectable deficits post-concussion compared to the traditional single-task tandem gait test. As a clinical tool to assess dynamic motor function, tandem gait may assist with return to sport decisions after concussion. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. List of publications covering BEBC experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harigel, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    This compilation lists all known publications in scientific periodicals concerning experiments with the Big European Bubble Chamber at CERN, from its initial operation in 1973 until the beginning of 1985. There is also a complete list of the experiments, with relevant data including the number of pictures taken. Other tabulations give the names of all experimenters and institutions associated with the chamber, and references to publications on various technical aspects. (orig.)

  1. Experiments with the hot list strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wos, L.

    1997-10-01

    Experimentation strongly suggests that, for attacking deep questions and hard problems with the assistance of an automated reasoning program, the more effective paradigms rely on the retention of deduced information. A significant obstacle ordinarily presented by such a paradigm is the deduction and retention of one or more needed conclusions whose complexity sharply delays their consideration. To mitigate the severity of the cited obstacle, the author formulates and features in this report the hot list strategy. The hot list strategy asks the researcher to choose, usually from among the input statements, one or more clauses that are conjectured to play a key role for assignment completion. The chosen clauses - conjectured to merit revisiting, again and again - are placed in an input list of clauses, called the hot list. When an automated reasoning program has decided to retain a new conclusion C - before any other clause is chosen to initiate conclusion drawing - the presence of a nonempty hot list (with an appropriate assignment of the input parameter known as heat) causes each inference rule in use to be applied to C together with the appropriate number of members of the hot list. Members of the hot list are used to complete applications of inference rules and not to initiate applications. The use of the hot list strategy thus enables an automated reasoning program to briefly consider a newly retained conclusion whose complexity would otherwise prevent its use for perhaps many CPU-hours. To give evidence of the value of the strategy, the author focuses on four contexts: (1) dramatically reducing the CPU time required to reach a desired goal; (2) finding a proof of a theorem that had previously resisted all but the more inventive automated attempts; (3) discovering a proof that is more elegant than previously known; and (4) answering a question that had steadfastly eluded researchers relying on an automated reasoning program.

  2. Who is responsible for what tasks within primary care: Perceived task allocation among primary care providers and interdisciplinary team members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Samuel T; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Meredith, Lisa S; Schmidt Hackbarth, Nicole; Stockdale, Susan E; Cordasco, Kristina M; Lanto, Andrew B; Roos, Philip J; Yano, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-01

    Unclear roles in interdisciplinary primary care teams can impede optimal team-based care. We assessed perceived task allocation among primary care providers (PCPs) and staff during implementation of a new patient-centered care model in Veterans Affairs (VA) primary care practices. We performed a cross-sectional survey of PCPs and primary care staff (registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical/vocational nurses (LPNs), and medical assistants/clerks (MAs)) in 23 primary care practices within one VA region. We asked subjects whether PCPs performed each of 14 common primary care tasks alone, or relied upon staff for help. Tasks included gathering preventive service history, disease screening, evaluating patients and making treatment decisions, intervening on lifestyle factors, educating patients about self-care activities and medications, refilling prescriptions, receiving and resolving patient messages, completing forms, tracking diagnostic data, referral tracking, and arranging home health care. We then performed multivariable regression to determine predictors of perceived PCP reliance on staff for each task. 162 PCPs and 257 staff members responded, a 60% response rate. For 12/14 tasks, fewer than 50% of PCPs reported relying on staff for help. For all 14 tasks, over 85% of RNs reported they were relied upon. For 12/14 tasks, over 50% of LPNs reported they were relied on, while for 5/14 tasks a majority of MAs reported being relied upon. Nurse practitioners and physician assistants (NP/PAs) reported relying on staff less than physicians. Early in the implementation of a team-based primary care model, most PCPs perceived they were solely responsible for most clinical tasks. RNs, and LPNs felt they were relied upon for most of the same tasks, while medical assistants/clerks reported being relied on for fewer tasks. Better understanding of optimal inter-professional team task allocation in primary care is needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Genome analysis methods - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tabase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Genome analysis methods - PGDBj Regis...switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data ...List Contact us PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods

  4. Cross-domain interference costs during concurrent verbal and spatial serial memory tasks are asymmetric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morey, Candice C.; Mall, Jonathan T.

    2012-01-01

    Some evidence suggests that memory for serial order is domain-general. Evidence also points to asymmetries in interference between verbal and visual-spatial tasks. We confirm that concurrently remembering verbal and spatial serial lists provokes substantial interference compared with remembering a

  5. Self-guided strategy-adaption training for older adults: Transfer effects to everyday tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiroli, Sara; Cavallini, Elena; Dunlosky, John; Vecchi, Tomaso; Hertzog, Christopher

    2017-09-01

    The goal of the present research was to examine the potential of a learner-oriented approach to improving older adults' performance in tasks that are similar to real-life situations that require strategic deployment of cognitive resources. A crucial element of this approach involves encouraging older adults to explicitly analyze tasks to consider how to adapt trained skills to a new task context. In an earlier study, a specialist-directed intervention produced training gains and transfer to some untrained memory tasks. In the present study, older adults received a manual instructing them about principles of task analysis, two memory strategies, and strategy adaptation. Self-guided strategy-adaption training involved practicing some memory tasks as well as instructions on how the trained skills could be applied to new tasks that were not practiced. The criterion tasks involved practice tasks, non-practiced tasks that were discussed in the manual, and transfer tasks that were never mentioned in the manual. Two of the tests were from the Everyday Cognition Battery (inductive reasoning and working memory). As compared to a waiting-list control group, older adults assigned to self-guided strategy-adaption training showed memory improvements on tasks that were practiced or discussed during training. Most important, the learner-oriented approach produced transfer to the everyday tasks. Our findings show the potential of instructing task appraisal processes as a basis for fostering transfer, including improving older adults' performance in simulated everyday tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Discharge of very preterm infants from neonatology: check list].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, F

    2004-02-01

    Key elements of the check list for neonatal discharge include: discharge discussion with parents, relation with maternal and child welfare assistants and family practitioner, scheduling of follow-up visits, request for insurance coverage, parental presence allowance, special education allowance, debriefing with nurses and nurses providers, clinical and biological appraisal, discharge prescription. For a former extremely premature baby, going home - often after a long hospitalization and a variety of pathologic problems - must be prepared and should not be decided in haste, not only for the baby and his/her parents, but also. for the neonatal staff!

  7. Filling the glass: Effects of a positive psychology intervention on executive task performance in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boselie, J J L M; Vancleef, L M G; Peters, M L

    2018-03-24

    Chronic pain is associated with emotional problems as well as difficulties in cognitive functioning. Prior experimental studies have shown that optimism, the tendency to expect that good things happen in the future, and positive emotions can counteract pain-induced task performance deficits in healthy participants. More specifically, induced optimism was found to buffer against the negative effects of experimental pain on executive functioning. This clinical experiment examined whether this beneficial effect can be extended to a chronic pain population. Patients (N = 122) were randomized to a positive psychology Internet-based intervention (PPI; n = 74) or a waiting list control condition (WLC; n = 48). The PPI consisted of positive psychology exercises that particularly target optimism, positive emotions and self-compassion. Results demonstrated that patients in the PPI condition scored higher on happiness, optimism, positive future expectancies, positive affect, self-compassion and ability to live a desired life despite pain, and scored lower on pain catastrophizing, depression and anxiety compared to patients in the WLC condition. However, executive task performance did not improve following completion of the PPI, compared to the WLC condition. Despite the lack of evidence that positive emotions and optimism can improve executive task performance in chronic pain patients, this study did convincingly demonstrate that it is possible to increase positive emotions and optimism in chronic pain patients with an online positive psychology intervention. It is imperative to further explore amendable psychological factors that may reduce the negative impact of pain on executive functioning. We demonstrated that an Internet-based positive psychology intervention strengthens optimism and positive emotions in chronic pain patients. These emotional improvements are not associated with improved executive task performance. As pain itself often cannot be relieved, it is

  8. Naval Postgraduate School Support Task

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this task was to provide lecturing and curriculum development support, as needed, to the Naval Postgraduate School's Physics Department/Weapons Curriculum in the area of High Energy Laser systems...

  9. When Task Conflict Becomes Personal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Hannes; van Emmerik, Hetty; Schreurs, Bert; Kuypers, Tom; van Iterson, Ad; Notelaers, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Although potentially beneficial, task conflict may threaten teams because it often leads to relationship conflict. Prior research has identified a set of interpersonal factors (e.g., team communication, team trust) that help attenuate this association. The purpose of this article is to provide an alternative perspective that focuses on the moderating role of performance-related factors (i.e., perceived team performance). Using social identity theory, we build a model that predicts how task conflict associates with growth in relationship conflict and how perceived team performance influences this association. We test a three-wave longitudinal model by means of random coefficient growth modeling, using data from 60 ongoing teams working in a health care organization. Results provide partial support for our hypotheses. Only when perceived team performance is low, do task conflicts relate with growth in relationship conflict. We conclude that perceived team performance seems to enable teams to uncouple task from relationship conflict. PMID:28190944

  10. Vocabulary Maintenance Task Group Report

    OpenAIRE

    Baskauf, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This was a presentation at the TDWG Annual Meeting in Costa Rica, 2016-12-08 in a Task Group report session.  Abstract: The Vocabulary Maintenance Task Group has completed drafts of a Standards Documentation Specification and a Vocabulary Management Specification (https://github.com/tdwg/vocab). This session will outline the important aspects of the specifications and answer questions about their content and implementation.

  11. Integrating Task and Data Parallelism

    OpenAIRE

    Massingill, Berna

    1993-01-01

    Many models of concurrency and concurrent programming have been proposed; most can be categorized as either task-parallel (based on functional decomposition) or data-parallel (based on data decomposition). Task-parallel models are most effective for expressing irregular computations; data-parallel models are most effective for expressing regular computations. Some computations, however, exhibit both regular and irregular aspects. For such computations, a better programming model is one that i...

  12. Touchscreen Sustained Attention Task (SAT) for Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangasser, Debra A; Wicks, Brittany; Waxler, David E; Eck, Samantha R

    2017-09-15

    Sustained attention is the ability to monitor intermittent and unpredictable events over a prolonged period of time. This attentional process subserves other aspects of cognition and is disrupted in certain neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it is clinically important to identify mechanisms that impair and improve sustained attention. Such mechanisms are often first discovered using rodent models. Therefore, several behavior procedures for testing aspects of sustained attention have been developed for rodents. One, first described by McGaughy and Sarter (1995), called the sustained attention task (SAT), trains rats to distinguish between signal (i.e., brief light presentation) and non-signal trials. The signals are short and thus require careful attention to be perceived. Attentional demands can be increased further by introducing a distractor (e.g., flashing houselight). We have modified this task for touchscreen operant chambers, which are configured with a touchscreen on one wall that can present stimuli and record responses. Here we detail our protocol for SAT in touchscreen chambers. Additionally, we present standard measures of performance in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Comparable performance on this task in both sexes highlights its use for attention studies, especially as more researchers are including female rodents in their experimental design. Moreover, the easy implementation of SAT for the increasingly popular touchscreen chambers increases its utility.

  13. Towards a sight word list in Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oweini, Ahmad; Hazoury, Katia

    2010-10-01

    While the English language boasts a century of research into its most frequently-used words, no such attempt has ever formally been made in the Arab world. This pioneering study presents a list of 500 commonly-used words in the Arabic language based on compilations of words gathered from a number of popular reading series in Lebanon, spanning grades K to 3. This list can serve as a powerful tool for language teachers—who face several challenges posed by the inherent nature of Arabic in terms of diglossia, orthography and morphology—and provide them with a handy list of words for their pupils. The study has its limitations in terms of scope, breadth and the nature of the technology used for counting words. Nonetheless, it makes a number of recommendations for the future, including the development of a readability formula based on this list, the expansion of the scope of this word list and improvement to increase its technical accuracy.

  14. Tackling obesity in areas of high social deprivation: clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a task-based weight management group programme - a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobbie, Hayden; Hajek, Peter; Peerbux, Sarrah; Kahan, Brennan C; Eldridge, Sandra; Trépel, Dominic; Parrott, Steve; Griffiths, Chris; Snuggs, Sarah; Myers Smith, Katie

    2016-10-01

    An increasing number of people require help to manage their weight. The NHS recommends weight loss advice by general practitioners and/or a referral to a practice nurse. Although this is helpful for some, more effective approaches that can be disseminated economically on a large scale are needed. To assess whether or not a task-based weight management programme [Weight Action Programme (WAP)] has better long-term effects than a 'best practice' intervention provided in primary care by practice nurses. Randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness analysis. General practices in east London, UK. Three hundred and thirty adults with a body mass index (BMI) of ≥ 30 kg/m 2 or a BMI of ≥ 28 kg/m 2 plus comorbidities were recruited from local general practices and via media publicity. Those who had a BMI of > 45 kg/m 2 , had lost > 5% of their body weight in the previous 6 months, were currently pregnant or taking psychiatric medications were excluded. Participants were randomised (2 : 1) to the WAP or nurse arms. The WAP intervention was delivered in eight weekly group sessions that combined dietary and physical activity, advice and self-monitoring in a group-oriented intervention. The initial course was followed by 10 monthly group maintenance sessions open to all participants in this study arm. The practice nurse intervention (best usual care) consisted of four one-to-one sessions delivered over 8 weeks, and included standard advice on diet and physical activity based on NHS 'Change4Life' materials and motivational support. The primary outcome measure was weight change at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures included change in BMI, waist circumference and blood pressure, and proportion of participants losing at least 5% and 10% of baseline body weight. Staff collecting measurements at the 6- and 12-month follow-ups were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome measure was analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle

  15. IEA Task 7. Activity leader and information dissemination. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, R.; Ruyssevelt, P.; Munro, D.

    2002-07-01

    This report summarised the findings of Task 7 of the International Energy Agency Photovoltaic (PV) Power Systems Programme concerning the economic viability of photovoltaic systems in buildings and the enhancement of solar architecture and the technical quality of PV power systems. Details are given of the participation of a UK contractor in the work, and the objectives of the UK involvement which cover the building of UK PV products, their competitiveness, and awareness and involvement of the building industry in PV buildings. The UK contribution to activities concerning commercial building integration concepts; guidelines, standardisation, certification and safety; and the organisation of a UK based international PV design competition are described. The major outputs from Task 7 are listed and include a book entitled 'Designing with Solar Power', a wide range of building integrated PV case studies, workshops, a database, and educational resources.

  16. Clinch River remedial investigation task 9 -- benthic macroinvertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, E.M. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes the results of Task 9 of the TVA/Department of Energy (DOE) Interagency Agreement supporting DOE`s Clinch River Remedial Investigation. Species lists and densities (numbers/m{sup 2}) of benthic macroinvertebrates sampled at 16 sites in the Clinch River and Poplar Creek embayments of upper Watts Bar Reservoir near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in March, 1994, are presented and briefly discussed. Data are also analyzed to assess and compare quality of benthic communities at each site, according to methods developed for TVA`s Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring Program. Results of this study will be incorporated with other program tasks in a comprehensive report prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1995, which will, in part, assess the effect of sediment contaminants on benthic macroinvertebrate communities in Watts Bar Reservoir.

  17. Data quality in electronic medical records in Manitoba: Do problem lists reflect chronic disease as defined by prescriptions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Alexander; Kroeker, Andrea L; Yakubovich, Sari; Duarte, Roberto; Dufault, Brenden; Katz, Alan

    2017-05-01

    To determine if the problem list (health conditions) in primary care electronic medical records (EMRs) accurately reflects the conditions for which chronic medications are prescribed in the EMR. A retrospective analysis of EMR data. Eighteen primary care clinics across rural and urban Manitoba using the Accuro EMR. Data from the EMRs of active patients seen in an 18-month period (December 18, 2011, to June 18, 2013, or December 3, 2012, to June 3, 2014) were used. The likelihood of documentation in the EMR problem list of those specific chronic diseases for which drug prescriptions were documented in the EMR. Regression modeling was performed to determine the effect of clinic patient load and remuneration type on the completeness of EMR problem lists. Overall problem-list completeness was low but was highest for diabetes and lowest for insomnia. Fee-for-service clinics generally had lower problem-list completeness than salaried clinics did for all prescription medications examined. Panel size did not affect problem-list completeness rates. The low EMR problem-list completeness suggests that this field is not reliable for use in quality improvement initiatives or research until higher reliability has been demonstrated. Further research is recommended to explore the reasons for the poor quality and to support improvement efforts. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  18. Clinical Strategies for Sampling Word Recognition Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlauch, Robert S; Carney, Edward

    2018-03-09

    Computer simulation was used to estimate the statistical properties of searches for maximum word recognition ability (PB max). These involve presenting multiple lists and discarding all scores but that of the 1 list that produced the highest score. The simulations, which model limitations inherent in the precision of word recognition scores, were done to inform clinical protocols. A secondary consideration was a derivation of 95% confidence intervals for significant changes in score from phonemic scoring of a 50-word list. The PB max simulations were conducted on a "client" with flat performance intensity functions. The client's performance was assumed to be 60% initially and 40% for a second assessment. Thousands of estimates were obtained to examine the precision of (a) single lists and (b) multiple lists using a PB max procedure. This method permitted summarizing the precision for assessing a 20% drop in performance. A single 25-word list could identify only 58.4% of the cases in which performance fell from 60% to 40%. A single 125-word list identified 99.8% of the declines correctly. Presenting 3 or 5 lists to find PB max produced an undesirable finding: an increase in the word recognition score. A 25-word list produces unacceptably low precision for making clinical decisions. This finding holds in both single and multiple 25-word lists, as in a search for PB max. A table is provided, giving estimates of 95% critical ranges for successive presentations of a 50-word list analyzed by the number of phonemes correctly identified.

  19. Supply Inventory Management: Evaluation of the Defense Supply Center Columbus Qualified Products List and Qualified Manufacturers List Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ... was transitioned from the Military Departments. The Defense Supply Center Columbus currently has management responsibility for over 300 Qualified Products Lists and 4 Qualified Manufacturers Lists...

  20. Written object naming, spelling to dictation, and immediate copying: Different tasks, different pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Patrick; Méot, Alain; Lagarrigue, Aurélie; Roux, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    We report an investigation of cross-task comparisons of handwritten latencies in written object naming, spelling to dictation, and immediate copying. In three separate sessions, adults had to write down a list of concrete nouns from their corresponding pictures (written naming), from their spoken (spelling to dictation) and from their visual presentation (immediate copying). Linear mixed models without random slopes were performed on the latencies in order to study and compare within-task fixed effects. By-participants random slopes were then included to investigate individual differences within and across tasks. Overall, the findings suggest that written naming, spelling to dictation, and copying all involve a lexical pathway, but that written naming relies on this pathway more than the other two tasks do. Only spelling to dictation strongly involves a nonlexical pathway. Finally, the analyses performed at the level of participants indicate that, depending on the type of task, the slower participants are more or less influenced by certain psycholinguistic variables.

  1. Testing complex animal cognition: Concept learning, proactive interference, and list memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Anthony A

    2018-01-01

    This article describes an approach for assessing and comparing complex cognition in rhesus monkeys and pigeons by training them in a sequence of synergistic tasks, each yielding a whole function for enhanced comparisons. These species were trained in similar same/different tasks with expanding training sets (8, 16, 32, 64, 128 … 1024 pictures) followed by novel-stimulus transfer eventually resulting in full abstract-concept learning. Concept-learning functions revealed better rhesus transfer throughout and full concept learning at the 128 set, versus pigeons at the 256 set. They were then tested in delayed same/different tasks for proactive interference by inserting occasional tests within trial-unique sessions where the test stimulus matched a previous sample stimulus (1, 2, 4, 8, 16 trials prior). Proactive-interference functions revealed time-based interference for pigeons (1, 10 s delays), but event-based interference for rhesus (no effect of 1, 10, 20 s delays). They were then tested in list-memory tasks by expanding the sample to four samples in trial-unique sessions (minimizing proactive interference). The four-item, list-memory functions revealed strong recency memory at short delays, gradually changing to strong primacy memory at long delays over 30 s for rhesus, and 10 s for pigeons. Other species comparisons and future directions are discussed. © 2018 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  2. The determinants of the financing decisions of listed and non-listed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the financing decisions of 19 listed companies in comparison with 16 non-listed companies in Ghana. The study tested hypotheses related to capital structure determinants and debt policy decisions. The study found support for the pecking order hypothesis across all firms. The free cash flow hypothesis ...

  3. Truebounded, Overbounded, or Underbounded? Scientists’ Personal Publication Lists versus Lists Generated through Bibliographic Information Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Dorsch

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A truebounded publication list of a scientific author consists of exactly all publications that meet two criteria: (1 they are formally published (e.g., journal article or proceeding paper; (2 they have scientific, scholarly, or academic content. A publication list is overbounded if it includes documents which do not meet the two criteria (such as novels; a publication list is underbounded if it is incomplete. Are authors’ personal publication lists, found on their personal sites on the Internet or in institutional repositories, truebounded, overbounded, or underbounded? And are the respective publication lists generated through bibliographic information services truebounded, overbounded, or underbounded? As case studies, publications of nine International Society of Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI Committee members (published between 2007 and 2016 were collected to create preferably complete personal publication lists according to the two criteria. We connect the “relative visibility of an author” with the concepts of truebounded, overbounded, and underbounded publication lists. The authors’ relative visibility values were determined for the information services Web of Science (WoS, Scopus, and Google Scholar and compared to the relative visibility of the authors’ personal publication lists. All results of the bibliographic information services are underbounded. Relative visibility is highest in Google Scholar, followed by Scopus and WoS.

  4. Ownership and financing structures of listed and large non-listed corporations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, S.; Tzioumis, K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we use a large firm-level dataset covering 19 European countries in order to compare the ownership and financing structures and performance of listed (LCs) and large non-listed companies (NLCs). For the overall sample, we find that the substantial majority of NLCs have either a large

  5. Focus on energy conservation: a project list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    The Urban Land Institute (ULI) has prepared the following list of outstanding energy conserving projects for the US Department of Energy. As requested by the Department, the list includes descriptions of land developments and individual buildings suggested by members of ULI and by other sources. The projects have been selected to exemplify the major energy saving techniques in use today, with emphasis on those strategies most significant for people engaged in the business of land development. To make the list a useful reference for developers and public officials, ULI has attempted to cover energy conservation in the broadest sense from overall site planning to the functioning of individual building components. Focusing too closely on the myriad types of hardware available has been avoided and examples of the basic considerations important to energy-conscious planning and design are provided. Details on some heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems are provided in order to acquaint readers with major innovations in the field.

  6. Tank waste remediation system risk management list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collard, L.B.

    1995-01-01

    The Tank Waste Remedation System (TWRS) Risk Management List and it's subset of critical risks, the Critical Risk Management List, provide a tool to senior RL and WHC management (Level-1 and -2) to manage programmatic risks that may significantly impact the TWRS program. The programmatic risks include cost, schedule, and performance risks. Performance risk includes technical risk, supportability risk (such as maintainability and availability), and external risk (i.e., beyond program control, for example, changes in regulations). The risk information includes a description, its impacts, as evaluation of the likelihood, consequences and risk value, possible mitigating actions, and responsible RL and WHC managers. The issues that typically form the basis for the risks are presented in a separate table and the affected functions are provided on the management lists

  7. Executive dysfunction can explain word-list learning disability in very mild Alzheimer's disease: the Tajiri project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ryusaku; Meguro, Kenichi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Ishizaki, Junichi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Meguro, Mitsue; Sekita, Yasuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    Elderly people with questionable dementia (i.e. a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) of 0.5) have been focused on as representing the borderline zone condition between healthy people and dementia patients. Many of them are known to have pathologic traits of very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although they present mild memory disorder, the underlying mechanism has not been fully investigated. Herein is reported the mechanism of learning disability in very mild AD. Eighty-six CDR 0.5 participants and 101 age- and education-matched healthy controls (CDR 0) were randomly selected from a community in the town of Tajiri, Miyagi Prefecture. The word-recall task of the Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-Japanese (i.e. learning and recall of 10 words) was administered. The numbers of words recalled in each trial and those never recalled throughout the trials were compared for the two CDR groups. The serial-position function was depicted for three parts (i.e. primary, middle, and recency). The CDR 0.5 group recalled significantly fewer words than the CDR 0 group. The number of never-recalled words was greater in the CDR 0.5 group. A remarkable difference was found in the middle part of the word list. The number of never-recalled words of the CDR 0.5 group was greater in the middle part. The large number of never-recalled words accounted for the poor learning performance of very mild AD participants. The results suggested that very mild AD participants have difficulty in learning and retaining words in the middle part of the word-list because of a functional decline of the central executive system.

  8. Preliminary list of plant invaders in Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stešević, D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that Invasive alien species (IAS are considered to be the second cause of global biodiversity loss after direct habitat destruction and have adverse environmental, economic and social impacts from the local level upwards, in last decades investigations of alien flora of Montenegro are intensified. In this paper we are presenting a preliminary list of IAS, with the aim to provide a basic data on IAS in Montenegro, to enable future monitoring and to draw attention on the problems which expansion of IAS is bringing with itself. The list consists of 50 plant taxa species and supspecies level.

  9. Bites of Lists - mapping and filtering sublists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    The idea of applying map and filter functions on consecutive sublists instead of on individual list elements is discussed and developed in this paper. A non-empty, consecutive sublist is called a bite. Both map and filter functions accept a function parameter - a bite function - which...... is responsible for returning a prefix bite of a list. We develop families of bite functions via a collection of higher-order bite generators. On top of the bite generators, a number of bite mapping and bite filtering functions are introduced. We illustrate the usefulness of bite mapping and filtering via...

  10. Title list of documents made publicly available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number Index. The docketed information contained in the Title List includes the information formerly issued though the Department of Energy publication Power Reactor Docket Information, last published in January 1979

  11. Approach to suspected food allergy in atopic dermatitis. Guideline of the Task Force on Food Allergy of the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI) and the Medical Association of German Allergologists (ADA) and the German Society of Pediatric Allergology (GPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Thomas; Erdmann, Stephan; Fuchs, Thomas; Henzgen, Margot; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Lepp, Ute; Niggemann, Bodo; Raithel, Martin; Reese, Imke; Saloga, Joachim; Vieths, Stefan; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    The following guideline of the "Arbeitsgruppe Nahrungsmittelallergie der DGAKI" (Task Force on Food Allergy of the German Society of Allergology and Clinical Immunology) and the ADA ("Arzteverband Deutscher Allergologen", Medical Association of German Allergologists) and the GPA (German Society of Pediatric Allergology) summarizes the approach to be taken when food allergy is suspected in patients with atopic dermatitis (neurodermatitis, atopic eczema). The problem is clinically relevant because many patients assume that allergic reactions against foods are responsible for triggering or worsening their eczema. It is important to identify those patients who will benefit from an elimination diet but also to avoid unnecessary diets. Elimination diets (especially in early childhood) are associated with the risk of malnutrition and additional emotional stress for the patients. The gold standard for the diagnosis of food-dependent reactions is to perform placebo-controlled, double-blind oral food challenges because specific IgE, prick tests and history often do not correlate with clinical reactivity. This is particularly true in the case of delayed eczematous skin reactions. Diagnostic elimination diets should be used before an oral provocation test. If multiple sensitizations against foods are discovered in a patient, an oligoallergenic diet and a subsequent stepwise supplementation of the nutrition should be performed. If a specific food is suspected of triggering food allergy, oral provocation should be performed after a diagnostic elimination diet. As eczema-tous skin reactions may develop slowly (i. e. within one or two day), the skin be inspected the day after the provocation test and that a repetitive test be performed if the patient has not reacted to a given food on the first day of oral provocation. The guideline discusses various clinical situations for patients with atopic dermatitis to facilitate differentiated diagnostic procedures.

  12. The Picture Complexity Effect: Another List Composition Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khuyen; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    "List composition effects" refer to the findings in which a given memory phenomenon shows discrepant patterns across different list designs (i.e., mixed or pure lists). These effects have typically been reported with verbal materials (e.g., word lists, paired associates, sentences); much less research has examined whether these effects…

  13. 31 CFR 596.310 - Terrorism List Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 596.310 Terrorism List Government. The term Terrorism List Government... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Terrorism List Government. 596.310...

  14. Listing of nuclear power plant larger than 100 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, B.

    1975-12-01

    This report contains a list of all nuclear power plants larger than 100 MWe, printed out from the Argus Data Bank at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. The plants are listed by country. The report contains also a plant ranking list, where the plants are listed by the load factor (12 months). (M.S.)

  15. Graphical programming of telerobotic tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, D.E.; McDonald, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    With a goal of producing faster, safer, and cheaper technologies for nuclear waste cleanup, Sandia is actively developing and extending intelligent systems technologies. Graphical Programming is a key technology for robotic waste cleanup that Sandia is developing for this goal. This paper describes Sancho, Sandia most advanced Graphical Programming supervisory software. Sancho, now operational on several robot systems, incorporates all of Sandia's recent advances in supervisory control. Sancho, developed to rapidly apply Graphical Programming on a diverse set of robot systems, uses a general set of tools to implement task and operational behavior. Sancho can be rapidly reconfigured for new tasks and operations without modifying the supervisory code. Other innovations include task-based interfaces, event-based sequencing, and sophisticated GUI design. These innovations have resulted in robot control programs and approaches that are easier and safer to use than teleoperation, off-line programming, or full automation

  16. Structural Design of HRA Database using generic task for Quantitative Analysis of Human Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yo Chan; Choi, Sun Yeong; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung Won Dea

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a design of generic task based HRA database for quantitative analysis of human performance in order to estimate the number of task conductions. The estimation method to get the total task conduction number using direct counting is not easy to realize and maintain its data collection framework. To resolve this problem, this paper suggests an indirect method and a database structure using generic task that enables to estimate the total number of conduction based on instructions of operating procedures of nuclear power plants. In order to reduce human errors, therefore, all information on the human errors taken by operators in the power plant should be systematically collected and examined in its management. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out a research to develop a data collection framework to establish a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) database that could be employed as technical bases to generate human error probabilities (HEPs) and performance shaping factors (PSFs)]. As a result of the study, the essential table schema was designed to the generic task database which stores generic tasks, procedure lists and task tree structures, and other supporting tables. The number of task conduction based on the operating procedures for HEP estimation was enabled through the generic task database and framework. To verify the framework applicability, case study for the simulated experiments was performed and analyzed using graphic user interfaces developed in this study.

  17. Structural Design of HRA Database using generic task for Quantitative Analysis of Human Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Yo Chan; Choi, Sun Yeong; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung Won Dea [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This paper describes a design of generic task based HRA database for quantitative analysis of human performance in order to estimate the number of task conductions. The estimation method to get the total task conduction number using direct counting is not easy to realize and maintain its data collection framework. To resolve this problem, this paper suggests an indirect method and a database structure using generic task that enables to estimate the total number of conduction based on instructions of operating procedures of nuclear power plants. In order to reduce human errors, therefore, all information on the human errors taken by operators in the power plant should be systematically collected and examined in its management. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is carrying out a research to develop a data collection framework to establish a Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) database that could be employed as technical bases to generate human error probabilities (HEPs) and performance shaping factors (PSFs)]. As a result of the study, the essential table schema was designed to the generic task database which stores generic tasks, procedure lists and task tree structures, and other supporting tables. The number of task conduction based on the operating procedures for HEP estimation was enabled through the generic task database and framework. To verify the framework applicability, case study for the simulated experiments was performed and analyzed using graphic user interfaces developed in this study.

  18. Cognitive impairments of aphasics in picture sorting and matching tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R; Glöckner-Rist, A; Lutz, M; Maier, T; Meier, E

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of earlier experiments showing a differential deficit of aphasics in picture sorting and matching tasks, two experiments were conducted to test the conjecture of a specific deficit of aphasics in the analytical appraisal of individual features. Broca's and Wernicke's aphasics--according to clinical diagnoses and the Aachener Aphasie Test--were compared with patients having right-hemisphere lesions or left-hemisphere lesions without aphasia. Both groups of aphasics differed from the control groups in the sorting task, irrespective of the sorting criterion, but the differences were small. The picture matching task did not discriminate between groups. Obviously, the basic assumption has to be modified with respect to specific conditions of task requirements. The experimental literature is reviewed.

  19. Musical Tasks and Energetic Arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hayoung A; Watson, Angela L

    2018-03-08

    Music is widely recognized as a motivating stimulus. Investigators have examined the use of music to improve a variety of motivation-related outcomes; however, these studies have focused primarily on passive music listening rather than active participation in musical activities. To examine the influence of participation in musical tasks and unique participant characteristics on energetic arousal. We used a one-way Welch's ANOVA to examine the influence of musical participation (i.e., a non-musical control and four different musical task conditions) upon energetic arousal. In addition, ancillary analyses of participant characteristics including personality, age, gender, sleep, musical training, caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol revealed their possible influence upon pretest and posttest energetic arousal scores. Musical participation yielded a significant relationship with energetic arousal, F(4, 55.62) = 44.38, p = .000, estimated ω2 = 0.60. Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed statistically significant differences between five conditions. Descriptive statistics revealed expected differences between introverts' and extraverts' energetic arousal scores at the pretest, F(1, 115) = 6.80, p = .010, partial η2= .06; however, mean differences failed to reach significance at the posttest following musical task participation. No other measured participant characteristics yielded meaningful results. Passive tasks (i.e., listening to a story or song) were related to decreased energetic arousal, while active musical tasks (i.e., singing, rhythm tapping, and keyboard playing) were related to increased energetic arousal. Musical task participation appeared to have a differential effect for individuals with certain personality traits (i.e., extroverts and introverts).

  20. Listed Firm's Level of Stakeholder Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes how Danish listed firms comply with the Danish Corporate Governance Code's recommendations regarding the categories: Role of shareholders, role of stakeholders and transparency. It is shown that the number of recommendations can be explained by six different underlying facto...

  1. 76 FR 74779 - List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ... free, at 1-(800) 877-8339. Individuals with disabilities can obtain a copy of this list and the letters... Parents President Kathleen Chamberlain, responding to an inquiry as to whether a child with a disability... published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and...

  2. List of publications, 1989 January - December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This list includes all the scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. This includes both technical reports and reprints of journal articles and conference proceedings issued from 1989 January to 1989 December. The titles and other bibliographic information are arranged in several categories, each devoted to a broad subject area. In addition, each document is identified with an AECL number

  3. List of M.Sc. Dissertation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaja Sayajirao Univ. of Baroda (India). Dept. of Child Development.

    Listed are titles, authors, and dates of research conducted under the auspices of the Department of Child Development, Faculty of Home Science, University of Baroda, India. Studies made between 1963 and 1979 are organized under three general headings: human development; marriage, family relationships, and welfare; and early childhood education. In…

  4. 77 FR 12816 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... entities to furnish the products to the Government. 3. There are no known regulatory alternatives which... Justice, Federal Prison System, Washington, DC. Coverage: C-List for 100% of the requirements of UNICOR--Sheridan, OR, as aggregated by Federal Prison Industries. Barry S. Lineback, Director, Business Operations...

  5. 76 FR 9555 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed deletions from the Procurement...'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 46- 48c) in connection with the products proposed for deletion from the Procurement...

  6. 77 FR 26795 - Product List Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... the United States Postal Service to Transfer Parcel Post to the Competitive Product List, April 26... had an estimated cost coverage of 89.2 percent. It recognizes that a price increase will be necessary... ground package market (1.1 percent), even though Parcel Post prices are lower than those charged by UPS...

  7. 76 FR 34064 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed..., Party, Birthday, Sports-Theme, 8pc. NPA: Winston-Salem Industries for the Blind, Inc., Winston-Salem, NC...

  8. 77 FR 29596 - Procurement List Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ...-0001--Hammer--2 lb, Engineer's, 16'' Fiberglass Handle. NSN: 5120-00-NIB-0002--Hammer--3 lb, Engineer's, 16'' Fiberglass Handle. NSN: 5120-00-NIB-0003--Hammer--4 lb, Engineer's, 16'' Fiberglass Handle. NSN...: General Services Administration, Kansas City, MO. Coverage: B-List for the Broad Government Requirement as...

  9. 77 FR 13198 - Product List Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... Agreements Domestic Outbound International Part C--Glossary of Terms and Conditions [Reserved] Part D... rule. SUMMARY: The Commission is updating the market dominant and competitive product lists. This..., CP2012-12 and CP2012-13); Global Plus 2C (MC2012-5, CP2012-10 and CP2012-11); and Inbound Market Dominant...

  10. 77 FR 28250 - Entity List Additions; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security 15 CFR Part 744 [Docket No. 111027661-2429-02] RIN 0694-AF43 Entity List Additions; Corrections AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security... Administration, Bureau of Industry and Security, Department of Commerce, Phone: (202) 482-5991, Fax: (202) 482...

  11. Textbooks in Greek and Latin: 1968 List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenheim, Ursula

    1968-01-01

    This bibliography lists separately, with price and publisher, Greek and Latin works published in the United States, Canada, and Great Britain. While bilingual and interlinear texts are omitted in favor of annotated editions of authors, the inclusion of a vocabulary or occasional translation is indicated. Entries appear in the following categories:…

  12. TEXTBOOKS IN GREEK AND LATIN, 1966 LIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHOENHEIM, URSULA

    THIS BIBLIOGRAPHY LISTS SEPARATELY, WITH PRICE AND PUBLISHER, GREEK AND LATIN WORKS PUBLISHED IN THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA. WHILE BILINGUAL AND INTERLINEAR TEXTS ARE OMITTED IN FAVOR OF ANNOTATED EDITIONS OF AUTHORS, THE INCLUSION OF A VOCABULARY OR OCCASIONAL TRANSLATION IS INDICATED. THE SECTIONS FOR EACH LANGUAGE ARE--(1) TEXTS OF CLASSICAL…

  13. 78 FR 36820 - List of Applications Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... applicant 2. Extensive public comment under review 3. Application is technically complex and is of... priority issues or volume of special permit applications Meaning of Application Number Suffixes N--New... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and...

  14. 78 FR 51819 - List of Applications Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... applicant 2. Extensive public comment under review 3. Application is technically complex and is of... priority issues or volume of special permit applications Meaning of Application Number Suffixes N--New... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and...

  15. 78 FR 43270 - List of Applications Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... from applicant 2. Extensive public comment under review 3. Application is technically complex and is of... priority issues or volume of special permit applications Meaning of Application Number Suffixes N--New... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration List of Applications Delayed AGENCY: Pipeline and...

  16. 77 FR 65365 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... 10800, 1421 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, Virginia 22202-3259. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...-8506) in connection with the products proposed for addition to the Procurement List. End of...: 6650-00-NIB-0053--Flat Top 8x35, Trifocal, Polycarbonate, Clear NSN: 6650-00-NIB-0054--Lenses...

  17. Check list of European Hymenomycetous Heterobasidiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, M.A.

    1966-01-01

    With this check list an attempt is made to account for the recorded European species of those Basidiomycetes that Patouillard called the “Hétérobasidies”, excluding, however, the Uredinales and Ustilaginales. Therefore, it covers the Septobasidiales, Tremellales (comprising the Auriculariineae and

  18. 76 FR 38641 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    .... Contracting Activity: Dept of Agric/Agricultural Marketing Service, Washington, DC. Coverage: C-List for 100..., Agricultural Marketing Service, Washington, DC. Services: Service Type/Locations: Custodial Service, USDA..., HI. Contracting Activity: Dept of the Navy, Navfac Engineering Command Hawaii, Pearl Harbor, HI...

  19. 76 FR 777 - National Wetland Plant List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... from List 96 that were assigned a new species name (these include misapplication of genus, spelling..., whichever is more recent. Wetlands are identified using the three-factor approach. Because the species being... requests for changes to wetland ratings will be evaluated using scientific approaches using limited but...

  20. List of publications 1981-1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This list includes all the scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - reports, reprints of journal articles, and translations - issued from 1981 April to 1986 March. The titles and other bibliographic information are arranged in several categories, each devoted to a broad subject area

  1. 78 FR 12295 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ...) Emergency Call Center & Military Police Station, 6940 Marchant Street, Building 216, Fort Benning, GA. NPA..., Fort Lee, VA Coverage: C-List for the requirements of military commissaries and exchanges as aggregated... for the requirements of military commissaries and exchanges as aggregated by the Defense Commissary...

  2. 76 FR 40341 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ...-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 46- 48c) in connection with the products and services proposed for addition...: Janitorial Services, Mustang Armed Force Reserve Center (AFRC), Mustang, OK. Norman Armed Force Reserve... COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions...

  3. 78 FR 68823 - Procurement List Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ...'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 8501-8506) in connection with the products and services deleted from the... Center, Chicago, IL. Service Type/Location: Janitorial/Custodial Service, Gamelin USARC, 10 Asylum Road... COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Deletions...

  4. 77 FR 75616 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... the objectives of the Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 8501-8506) in connection with the services... Center, Detroit, MI Service Type/Location: Contract Closeout Service, Architect of the Capitol... COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Additions...

  5. 78 FR 17641 - Procurement List Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ...-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 8501-8506) in connection with the products and service proposed for addition.../Location: Information Technology (IT) Service, Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC), Defense Human Resources... COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Additions...

  6. 78 FR 63967 - Procurement List; Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... objectives of the Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 8501-8506) in connection with the services proposed for... Procurement List: Services Service Type/Location: Base Supply Center Service, Georgia National Guard, Clay... Road, Commerce City, CO NPA: North Metro Community Services for Developmentally Disabled, Westminster...

  7. 78 FR 41916 - Procurement List Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    ... the objectives of the Javits-Wagner-O'Day Act (41 U.S.C. 8501-8506) in connection with the service..., El Paso Service Processing Center, 8915 Montana Avenue, El Paso, TX. NPA: Mavagi Enterprises, Inc... COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List Addition...

  8. 77 FR 42778 - Product List Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. MC2012-34 and CP2012-42; Order No. 1405] Product List Change AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a... product; Attachment B--a redacted copy of the contract; Attachment C--proposed changes to the Mail...

  9. 77 FR 39276 - Product List Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. MC2012-29 and CP2012-38; Order No. 1381] Product List Change AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a..., authorizing the new product; Attachment B--a redacted copy of the contract; Attachment C--proposed changes to...

  10. 77 FR 42779 - Product List Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-20

    ... POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. MC2012-33 and CP2012-41; Order No. 1404] Product List Change AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a... product; Attachment B--a redacted copy of the contract; Attachment C--proposed changes to the Mail...

  11. 77 FR 71400 - Procurement List, Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...-0051--Reflective Safety Belt, Vinyl, Adjustable 31'' to 55'', Fluorescent Green NSN: 4240-00-NIB-0052--Reflective Safety Belt, Vinyl, Adjustable 31'' to 55'', Dark Green NPA: Envision, Inc., Wichita, KS. Contracting Activity: DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY TROOP SUPPORT, PHILADELPHIA, PA. Coverage: C-List for 100% of...

  12. The Co-Teaching Book of Lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Filled with down-to-earth ideas, suggestions, strategies, and techniques, "The Co-Teaching Book of Lists" provides educators with a hands-on resource for making the co-teaching experience a success. Written by educator and popular teacher trainer Kathy Perez, this book gives educators a classroom-tested and user-friendly reference for the…

  13. List of publications 1991 January-December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    AECL Research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1991

  14. 76 FR 9338 - List of Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... Educational Placements Topic Addressed: Revocation of Consent [cir] Letter dated August 31, 2010 to Kansas... Educational Evaluations [cir] Letter dated August 13, 2010 to individuals (personally identifiable information... on the list are those letters that contain interpretations of the requirements of the IDEA and its...

  15. Science responses to IUCN Red Listing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jaric, Ivan; Roberts, D.L.; Gessner, J.; Solow, A.R.; Courchamp, F.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, NOV (2017), č. článku e4025. ISSN 2167-8359 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : data deficient * critically endangered * IUCN Red List * endangered species * extinction risk Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 2.177, year: 2016

  16. 76 FR 55882 - Procurement List; Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... sale and delivery. This will maximize employment for individuals with the most barriers to competitive.... Therefore, employment opportunities for people who are blind or severely disabled are maximized through the... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Addition AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From...

  17. List of publications 1993 January - December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    AECL research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1993. (author)

  18. 15 CFR 286.11 - Listings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., e.g., printed directories, electronic bulletin boards, or other means to ensure accessibility by all... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Listings. 286.11 Section 286.11 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF...

  19. 19 CFR 19.46 - Employee lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the port director, does not furnish a written list of names, addresses, social security numbers, and... director in writing of the names, addresses, social security numbers, and dates and places of birth of such... U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  20. List of Theses 1975 and 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Cristina Y., Comp.

    The fourth in a continuing series, this publication lists the masters' and doctoral theses on various aspects of mass communication concerning Asia submitted to colleges and universities in Asia and abroad in 1975-1976. The 93 entries are grouped into eight sections: general; advertising, management, and public relations; broadcast media; social…

  1. 29 CFR 6.46 - Ineligible list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS ENFORCING LABOR STANDARDS IN FEDERAL AND FEDERALLY ASSISTED CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS AND FEDERAL SERVICE CONTRACTS Substantial Interest Proceedings § 6.46 Ineligible list. Upon the final decision of the Administrative Law Judge, Administrative Review...

  2. [Evaluation of Web-based software applications for administrating and organising an ophthalmological clinical trial site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Reznicek, L; Leicht, S; Ulbig, M; Wolf, A

    2013-07-01

    The importance and complexity of clinical trials is continuously increasing, especially in innovative specialties like ophthalmology. Therefore an efficient clinical trial site organisational structure is essential. In modern internet times, this can be accomplished by web-based applications. In total, 3 software applications (Vibe on Prem, Sharepoint and open source software) were evaluated in a clinical trial site in ophthalmology. Assessment criteria were set; they were: reliability, easiness of administration, usability, scheduling, task list, knowledge management, operating costs and worldwide availability. Vibe on Prem customised by the local university met the assessment criteria best. Other applications were not as strong. By introducing a web-based application for administrating and organising an ophthalmological trial site, studies can be conducted in a more efficient and reliable manner. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Novice supervisors' tasks and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard; Mathiesen, Birgit Bork

    2012-01-01

    were confronted with complicated jobs, e.g., group, internal and interdisciplinary supervision, but were not prepared, i.e. trained, prior to these tasks. These findings imply that more training is needed for novice supervisors. Preferably, this training should be introduced before, or at least...... Questionnaire covering a wide range of items on professional development, experience, and practice. In this paper we focus on background data (experience, training and practice), specifically the tasks and training of the respondents as novice supervisors. The results show, that a majority of novice supervisors...

  4. Job Management and Task Bundling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Jansen, Gustav R.; McElvain, Kenneth; Walker-Loud, André

    2018-03-01

    High Performance Computing is often performed on scarce and shared computing resources. To ensure computers are used to their full capacity, administrators often incentivize large workloads that are not possible on smaller systems. Measurements in Lattice QCD frequently do not scale to machine-size workloads. By bundling tasks together we can create large jobs suitable for gigantic partitions. We discuss METAQ and mpi_jm, software developed to dynamically group computational tasks together, that can intelligently backfill to consume idle time without substantial changes to users' current workflows or executables.

  5. A Convex Formulation for Learning Task Relationships in Multi-Task Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Yeung, Dit-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Multi-task learning is a learning paradigm which seeks to improve the generalization performance of a learning task with the help of some other related tasks. In this paper, we propose a regularization formulation for learning the relationships between tasks in multi-task learning. This formulation can be viewed as a novel generalization of the regularization framework for single-task learning. Besides modeling positive task correlation, our method, called multi-task relationship learning (MT...

  6. Summary of the work of the NEANDC task force on U-238

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowerby, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    The work of the Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Data Committee (NEANDC) Task Force on U-238 is summarised. The Task Force was set up in 1982 to consider two discrepancies in U-238 data - the neutron widths of the resolved resonance above 1.4 keV and the capture cross-section in the resolved and unresolved resonance regions. The work is summarised historically and to put the activities of the Task Force into context the paper starts with a brief description of the methods and data used to determine U-238 resonance parameters. It follows with a description of the state of the data in 1982 and then describes the work of the Task Force in the period up to 1985, the period during which the Task Force found the reasons for the discrepancies. Consideration is then given to the period following 1985 during which resonance analysis on U-238 has been performed and a recommended set of parameters covering the energy range 0-10 keV produced. These are listed in an appendix to the paper and are now included in the U-238 evaluations contained in JEF-2 and ENDF/B-VI. Finally a review is given of the main conclusions of the Task Force followed by a list of work still requiring to be done. (author). 15 figs., 10 tabs., 49 refs., 3 appendix

  7. [Hemostasis task descriptive file meeting the standard NF EN ISO 15 189 requirements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachia, Anissa; Ladrat, Jean-Jacques; Duchassaing, Danielle; Tallon, Roselyne; Fougeray, Isabelle; Garandeau, Caroline; Texier, Jean-Claude; Trapateau, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    This work is a presentation of an hemostasis task descriptive file in regard with the requirements of the standard NF EN ISO 15189. The chosen method is based on the Deming wheel, that is to say: 1) Forward planning, done by the quality department of the work organization. 2) Drafting of a task descriptive file of the laboratory technician (working hours, equipments, done analysis, three levels of qualification, recurrent tasks, periodic hours, occasional hours, reference document). Creation of the hemostasis descriptive task file, by the position referents, according to the previous pattern, validation and enforcement in regard with the links to the associated documents. 3) Making-up based on the newly-trained technicians' comments, and on the listed dysfunctions. 4) Adjustment according to the listed anomalies. The main difficulties were, for some people, an opposition to modifications and a sensation of uselessness to formalize the daily tasks already done by a qualified and experienced staff. However, the pertinence of this process has been accepted by the majority. To conclude, the reorganization and the near finalization of the task descriptive file will not only enable the improvement of the work and the strategy processes, but also the identification and the formalization of the time devoted to quality.

  8. INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the nineteenth revision of the INIS: Authority List for Journal Titles (IAEA-INIS-11). It lists 10,797 journal titles which have contained articles within the scope of INIS. The purpose of this Authority List is to provide descriptive cataloguers with a standard abbreviation for journal titles and to assist users of INIS products with a tool for verifying the full title of a journal. A journal, or periodical, is generally published within a defined, fixed interval between issues, which usually has more than one issue a year, and which usually includes a mixture of articles, letters, summaries, etc. Within this definition, annuals such as Annual Review of Nuclear Science are included. Series titles as, for example the McGraw-Hill Series in Nuclear Engineering, are not included in this Authority. Entries: Each entry consists of: - the full journal title (highlighted); - the abbreviated title; - ISSN, if available; - CODEN, if available; - additional information related to the journal title. Arrangement: In Part I, the full journal titles are grouped by country or international organization name and ordered alphabetically, followed by the ISSN, the CODEN in square brackets if available, and then the abbreviated title. The abbreviated title is based on the rules of ISO 4: Documentation - International Code for the Abbreviation of Titles of Periodicals. The abbreviations of the words are taken from the ISDS List of Periodical Title Word Abbreviation. In Part II, the order of the citations is reversed: the abbreviated journal titles are arranged alphabetically, followed by country code. Then the full journal titles are followed by the country of publication, and if available, ISSN and CODEN. Additional Information: There is important information related to the journal titles which are fundamental for tracing the history of the title and the present status. They are listed below and are entered whenever applicable: - Ceased publication; - Superseded by

  9. Stable Encoding of Task Structure Coexists With Flexible Coding of Task Events in Sensorimotor Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yasuo; Liu, Jun; Hu, Dan; DeCoteau, William E.; Eden, Uri T.; Smith, Anne C.

    2009-01-01

    The sensorimotor striatum, as part of the brain's habit circuitry, has been suggested to store fixed action values as a result of stimulus-response learning and has been contrasted with a more flexible system that conditionally assigns values to behaviors. The stability of neural activity in the sensorimotor striatum is thought to underlie not only normal habits but also addiction and clinical syndromes characterized by behavioral fixity. By recording in the sensorimotor striatum of mice, we asked whether neuronal activity acquired during procedural learning would be stable even if the sensory stimuli triggering the habitual behavior were altered. Contrary to expectation, both fixed and flexible activity patterns appeared. One, representing the global structure of the acquired behavior, was stable across changes in task cuing. The second, a fine-grain representation of task events, adjusted rapidly. Such dual forms of representation may be critical to allow motor and cognitive flexibility despite habitual performance. PMID:19625536

  10. On the Origins of the Task Mixing Cost in the Cuing Task-Switching Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Orit; Meiran, Nachshon

    2005-01-01

    Poorer performance in conditions involving task repetition within blocks of mixed tasks relative to task repetition within blocks of single task is called mixing cost (MC). In 2 experiments exploring 2 hypotheses regarding the origins of MC, participants either switched between cued shape and color tasks, or they performed them as single tasks.…

  11. 77 FR 65002 - Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act (BPCA) Priority List of Needs in Pediatric Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... to patient populations for study, lack of knowledge related to the ethical conduct of clinical trials... pediatric therapeutics. The BPCA Priority List consists of key therapeutic needs in the medical treatment of... diseases, disorders, or conditions where more complex knowledge and testing of therapeutics, including...

  12. Patient care and administrative activities of nurses in clinical/surgical units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Moura Luvisotto

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the administrative and nursing care activities most performed by nurses in clinical/surgical units and to determine which are most and least pleasant to them. Methods: A descriptive-exploratory field study, with a quantitative approach and with a sample made up of 40 nurses working in clinical/surgical units who answered a three-part questionnaire composed of identification data and characterization of the professional; a list of nursing and administrative activities for the nurse to grade according to the numbers: “0 = I do not perform it”, “1 = I perform it occasionally”, “2 = I perform it often”, “3 = I perform it daily”; two open-ended questions, in which the nurse listed the activities he/she enjoyed the most and the least. Results: The administrative activities most performed by the nurses were: changing work shifts, preparing employee daily task charts and managing tests; the most performed nursing care activities were related to the stages of the Nursing Care Systematization and the interaction with the multi-professional team; the most enjoyable activities were direct patient care, patient evaluation and implementation of the systematization; the least enjoyable activities were administrative and bureaucratic routines, justification of complaints/problem-solving and preparation of employee task charts. Conclusion: Compared to administrative activities, nursing activities were performed most during the daily routine of the nurse, and the most enjoyable activities were those related to patient care, according to the opinions of the professionals.

  13. Procedural Error and Task Interruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    performance, and pilot data suggest that the task can distinguish between cognitive processes that are impaired by sleep deprivation and those that are...0247 Background Accomplishments Validation studies Modeling Other publications Table of Contents Pilot study: Effects of sleep deprivation ...Altmann, Hambrick, & Fenn) to assess individual differences in susceptibility to effects of sleep deprivation . Finally but importantly, we found

  14. Task descriptions versus use cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Søren; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    project: Acquire a new system to support a hotline. Among the 15 replies, eight used traditional use cases that specified a dialog between user and system. Seven used a related technique, task description, which specified the customer’s needs without specifying a dialog. It also allowed the analyst...

  15. A Population of Assessment Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daro, Phil; Burkhardt, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    We propose the development of a "population" of high-quality assessment tasks that cover the performance goals set out in the "Common Core State Standards for Mathematics." The population will be published. Tests are drawn from this population as a structured random sample guided by a "balancing algorithm."

  16. NASA's Big Data Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. P.; Kinter, J. L.; Beebe, R. F.; Feigelson, E.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Mentzel, C.; Smith, G.; Tino, C.; Walker, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    Two years ago NASA established the Ad Hoc Big Data Task Force (BDTF - https://science.nasa.gov/science-committee/subcommittees/big-data-task-force), an advisory working group with the NASA Advisory Council system. The scope of the Task Force included all NASA Big Data programs, projects, missions, and activities. The Task Force focused on such topics as exploring the existing and planned evolution of NASA's science data cyber-infrastructure that supports broad access to data repositories for NASA Science Mission Directorate missions; best practices within NASA, other Federal agencies, private industry and research institutions; and Federal initiatives related to big data and data access. The BDTF has completed its two-year term and produced several recommendations plus four white papers for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. This presentation will discuss the activities and results of the TF including summaries of key points from its focused study topics. The paper serves as an introduction to the papers following in this ESSI session.

  17. Survey of Task Analysis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-14

    Taylor, for example, referred to task analysis in his work on scientific management (65). In the same time frame, the Gilbreths developed the first...ciation, Washington, D. C., 1965. 21. Gilbreth , F. B. Bricklaying System, M. C. Clark, New York, 1909. -42- REFERENCES (Continued) 22. Gilbreth , F

  18. Aging and the Simon task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes; Verleger, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    A visual Simon task was used to study the influence of aging on visuospatial attention and inhibitory control processes. Responses were much slower for elderly than for young participants. The delay in trials in which stimulus and response side did not correspond as compared to when they did

  19. Use cases versus task descriptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Søren; Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    2011-01-01

    to specify require-ments for the same project: Acquire a new system to support a hotline. [Princi-pal ideas/results] Among the 15 replies, eight used traditional use cases that specified a dialog between users and system. Seven used a related technique, task description, which specified the customer's needs...

  20. Imaging gait analysis: An fMRI dual task study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürki, Céline N; Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Reinhardt, Julia; Stippich, Christoph; Kressig, Reto W; Blatow, Maria

    2017-08-01

    In geriatric clinical diagnostics, gait analysis with cognitive-motor dual tasking is used to predict fall risk and cognitive decline. To date, the neural correlates of cognitive-motor dual tasking processes are not fully understood. To investigate these underlying neural mechanisms, we designed an fMRI paradigm to reproduce the gait analysis. We tested the fMRI paradigm's feasibility in a substudy with fifteen young adults and assessed 31 healthy older adults in the main study. First, gait speed and variability were quantified using the GAITRite © electronic walkway. Then, participants lying in the MRI-scanner were stepping on pedals of an MRI-compatible stepping device used to imitate gait during functional imaging. In each session, participants performed cognitive and motor single tasks as well as cognitive-motor dual tasks. Behavioral results showed that the parameters of both gait analyses, GAITRite © and fMRI, were significantly positively correlated. FMRI results revealed significantly reduced brain activation during dual task compared to single task conditions. Functional ROI analysis showed that activation in the superior parietal lobe (SPL) decreased less from single to dual task condition than activation in primary motor cortex and in supplementary motor areas. Moreover, SPL activation was increased during dual tasks in subjects exhibiting lower stepping speed and lower executive control. We were able to simulate walking during functional imaging with valid results that reproduce those from the GAITRite © gait analysis. On the neural level, SPL seems to play a crucial role in cognitive-motor dual tasking and to be linked to divided attention processes, particularly when motor activity is involved.

  1. Maternal mortality can be reduced through task- shifting in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical doctors to be employed as trainers and supervisors of clinical officers in the same way as has happened in Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia and Ethiopia. There is no collision of interests in this approach, since medical doctors are prerequisites for any success of “task-shifting”. It is argued that any initiative ...

  2. Use of Job Task Analysis (JTA) in the development of craft training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonyeau, J.A.; Long, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Northern States Power Company is making a major effort to develop performance based training. It is finding the use of JTA data very helpful in the revision of its maintenance craft training programs. The technique being used involves a group of interns from the Training and Development Program of the University of Minnesota. These interns are largely graduate students, but with no nuclear and little mechanical/electrical experience. A Job Analysis for each discipline was used to: guide the following task analysis, determine program content, evaluate existing OJT check lists, and to define the four crafts used for mechanical maintenance. From the Job Analysis, a Training Task List was developed and correlated to training materials. The analysis of the tasks on the Training Task List is proceeding. Taxonomies of systems or subjects are compared to existing lesson plans. These taxonomies are useful when writing new lesson plans. The taxonomies are an excellent start for the development of enabling objectives. A Nine-Step Plan is being followed in the application of JTA data to the development and refinement of performance based training

  3. Mining expressed sequence tags identifies cancer markers of clinical interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrabanek Lucy

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression data are a rich source of information about the transcriptional dis-regulation of genes in cancer. Genes that display differential regulation in cancer are a subtype of cancer biomarkers. Results We present an approach to mine expressed sequence tags to discover cancer biomarkers. A false discovery rate analysis suggests that the approach generates less than 22% false discoveries when applied to combined human and mouse whole genome screens. With this approach, we identify the 200 genes most consistently differentially expressed in cancer (called HM200 and proceed to characterize these genes. When used for prediction in a variety of cancer classification tasks (in 24 independent cancer microarray datasets, 59 classifications total, we show that HM200 and the shorter gene list HM100 are very competitive cancer biomarker sets. Indeed, when compared to 13 published cancer marker gene lists, HM200 achieves the best or second best classification performance in 79% of the classifications considered. Conclusion These results indicate the existence of at least one general cancer marker set whose predictive value spans several tumor types and classification types. Our comparison with other marker gene lists shows that HM200 markers are mostly novel cancer markers. We also identify the previously published Pomeroy-400 list as another general cancer marker set. Strikingly, Pomeroy-400 has 27 genes in common with HM200. Our data suggest that a core set of genes are responsive to the deregulation of pathways involved in tumorigenesis in a variety of tumor types and that these genes could serve as transcriptional cancer markers in applications of clinical interest. Finally, our study suggests new strategies to select and evaluate cancer biomarkers in microarray studies.

  4. Who Multi-Tasks and Why? Multi-Tasking Ability, Perceived Multi-Tasking Ability, Impulsivity, and Sensation Seeking

    OpenAIRE

    Sanbonmatsu, David M.; Strayer, David L.; Medeiros-Ward, Nathan; Watson, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between personality and individual differences in multi-tasking ability. Participants enrolled at the University of Utah completed measures of multi-tasking activity, perceived multi-tasking ability, impulsivity, and sensation seeking. In addition, they performed the Operation Span in order to assess their executive control and actual multi-tasking ability. The findings indicate that the persons who are most capable of multi-tasking effectively are ...

  5. A check list of the helminths of guineafowls (Numididae) and a host list of these parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, K; Boomker, J

    2007-12-01

    Published and personal records have been compiled into a reference list of the helminth parasites of guineafowls. Where data on other avian hosts was available these have been included for completeness' sake and to give an indication of host range. The parasite list for the Helmeted guineafowls, Numida meleagris, includes five species of acanthocephalans, all belonging to a single genus, three trematodes belonging to three different genera, 34 cestodes representing 15 genera, and 35 nematodes belonging to 17 genera. The list for the Crested guineafowls, Guttera edouardi, contains a single acanthocephalan together with 10 cestode species belonging to seven genera, and three nematode species belonging to three different genera. Records for two cestode species from genera and two nematode species belonging to a single genus have been found for the guineafowl genus Acryllium. Of the 70 helminths listed for N. meleagris, 29 have been recorded from domestic chickens.

  6. Changes to EPCRA, CERCLA, CAA 112(r) Consolidated List of Lists – March 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changes include adding to the explanation for applying TPQs for EHS that are molten solids or solids in solution, reinstated TRI reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide, and updated radionuclides list.

  7. Atigeo at TREC 2014 Clinical Decision Support Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    their parent codes before in- dexing them. We conducted similar explorations on the MEDLINE corpus, in which each document is indexed with human...discussed in Section 7.4 that com- bines semantic information and pseudo-relevance feedback, but sadly, that approach also only works for the MEDLINE corpus...done with respect to the MEDLINE corpus, and alt- hough they provide interesting insight to the prob- lem, many of the methods may not be applicable to

  8. Colitis tuberculosa - Crohn's disease - a clinical, radiological and endoscopical task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deu, E.; Ortner, R.; Kratochvil, P.; Brandstaetter, G.; Ratschek, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report on a case of multifocal stenosing tuberculosis of the stomach, pointing out the difficulties in differential diagnosis especially against Crohn's disease. The importance of X-ray examination is discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health Topics ... specific trials you're interested in. For a list of questions to ask your doctor and the ...

  10. The disruptive effects of pain on multitasking in a virtual errands task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David J; Law, Anna S

    2017-07-01

    Pain is known to have a disruptive effect on cognitive performance, but prior studies have used highly constrained laboratory tasks that lack ecological validity. In everyday life people are required to complete more complex sets of tasks, prioritising task completion and recalling lists of tasks which need to be completed, and these tasks continue to be attempted during episodes or states of pain. The present study therefore examined the impact of thermal induced pain on a simulated errand task. Fifty-five healthy adults (36 female) performed the Edinburgh Virtual Errands Task (EVET) either during a painful thermal sensation or with no concurrent pain. Participants also completed the Experience of Cognitive Intrusion of Pain (ECIP) questionnaire to measure their self-reported cognitive impact of pain in general life. Participants who completed the EVET task in pain and who self-reported high intrusion of pain made significantly more errors than those who reported lower intrusion on the ECIP. Findings here support the growing literature that suggests that pain has a significant impact on cognitive performance. Furthermore, these findings support the developing literature suggesting that this relationship is complex when considering real world cognition, and that self-report on the ECIP relates well to performance on a task designed to reflect the complexities of everyday living. If extrapolated to chronic pain populations, these data suggest that pain during complex multitasking performance may have a significant impact on the number of errors made. For people highly vulnerable to cognitive intrusion by pain, this may result in errors such as selecting the wrong location or item to perform tasks, or forgetting to perform these tasks at the correct time. If these findings are shown to extend to chronic pain populations then occupational support to manage complex task performance, using for example diaries/electronic reminders, may help to improve everyday abilities

  11. Task Analyses for Difficult-to-Assess Collective Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    pronunciation and use of common phrases of the local dialect likely to be of utility during the KLE. Rehearse mission with KLE team. Coordinate...lesson. Evaluate the ability of HN students to perform tasks to standard. Identify deficiencies in HN student performance and correct errors during...to include work schedules, mail, and other required support for mission. Coordinate for the translation of all necessary documents from English to

  12. Who Multi-Tasks and Why? Multi-Tasking Ability, Perceived Multi-Tasking Ability, Impulsivity, and Sensation Seeking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanbonmatsu, David M.; Strayer, David L.; Medeiros-Ward, Nathan; Watson, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between personality and individual differences in multi-tasking ability. Participants enrolled at the University of Utah completed measures of multi-tasking activity, perceived multi-tasking ability, impulsivity, and sensation seeking. In addition, they performed the Operation Span in order to assess their executive control and actual multi-tasking ability. The findings indicate that the persons who are most capable of multi-tasking effectively are not the persons who are most likely to engage in multiple tasks simultaneously. To the contrary, multi-tasking activity as measured by the Media Multitasking Inventory and self-reported cell phone usage while driving were negatively correlated with actual multi-tasking ability. Multi-tasking was positively correlated with participants’ perceived ability to multi-task ability which was found to be significantly inflated. Participants with a strong approach orientation and a weak avoidance orientation – high levels of impulsivity and sensation seeking – reported greater multi-tasking behavior. Finally, the findings suggest that people often engage in multi-tasking because they are less able to block out distractions and focus on a singular task. Participants with less executive control - low scorers on the Operation Span task and persons high in impulsivity - tended to report higher levels of multi-tasking activity. PMID:23372720

  13. Task difficulty moderates the revelation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßfalg, André; Currie, Devon; Bernstein, Daniel M

    2017-05-01

    Tasks that precede a recognition probe induce a more liberal response criterion than do probes without tasks-the "revelation effect." For example, participants are more likely to claim that a stimulus is familiar directly after solving an anagram, relative to a condition without an anagram. Revelation effect hypotheses disagree whether hard preceding tasks should produce a larger revelation effect than easy preceding tasks. Although some studies have shown that hard tasks increase the revelation effect as compared to easy tasks, these studies suffered from a confound of task difficulty and task presence. Conversely, other studies have shown that the revelation effect is independent of task difficulty. In the present study, we used new task difficulty manipulations to test whether hard tasks produce larger revelation effects than easy tasks. Participants (N = 464) completed hard or easy preceding tasks, including anagrams (Exps. 1 and 2) and the typing of specific arrow key sequences (Exps. 3-6). With sample sizes typical of revelation effect experiments, the effect sizes of task difficulty on the revelation effect varied considerably across experiments. Despite this variability, a consistent data pattern emerged: Hard tasks produced larger revelation effects than easy tasks. Although the present study falsifies certain revelation effect hypotheses, the general vagueness of revelation effect hypotheses remains.

  14. 29 CFR 541.707 - Occasional tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occasional tasks. 541.707 Section 541.707 Labor Regulations... Definitions and Miscellaneous Provisions § 541.707 Occasional tasks. Occasional, infrequently recurring tasks... to a nonexempt employee; whether the exempt employee performs the task frequently or occasionally...

  15. Government Assigns New Supervisory Task. Safe Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekberg, Anna

    2003-01-01

    When the Government decided to shutdown one of the two Barsebaeck reactors in February of 1998, it presented SKI with a task that came much earlier than expected; the supervision of the decommissioning of a reactor. As a result of proposals presented in Parliament, SKI began the formulation of a long-term strategy in 1997 for the inspection of a nuclear plant during the decommissioning process. As a preliminary task, SKI started a research programme dealing with the potential risks associated with the transition from normal operations through shutdown to final deconstruction of the power plant. Emphasis was laid on safety culture issues and on questions of organization, as opposed to an earlier stress on the purely technical aspects of decommissioning. After a long period of uncertainty, following much discussion, in July 1998 a Government decision was finally reached to shutdown the first reactor at Barsebaeck. This was carried out in November 1999. It is still uncertain as to when the other reactor will be decommissioned; a decision is expected at the earliest in 2004. This uncertainty, resulting from the prolonged decision making process, could be detrimental to the safety culture on the site; motivation could diminish, and key personnel could be lost. Decommissioning is a new phase in the life cycle of a plant, giving rise to new inspection issues of supervision. During the period of uncertainty, while awaiting SKI has identified ten key areas, dealing with the safety culture of the organization, in connection with the decommissioning of Barsebaeck 1. 1. Obtaining and retaining staff competence during decommissioning; 2. Sustaining organizational memory; 3. Identifying key organizational functions and management skills that are critical during the transition from operations to decommissioning. 4. Sustaining organizational viability and accountability for decommissioning; 5. Sustaining motivation and trust in management of dismantlement; 6. Overseeing

  16. Development of advanced MCR task analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, J. C.; Park, J. H.; Lee, S. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, E. S.; Cho, S. B.; Kang, J. S.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes task analysis methodology for advanced HSI designs. Task analyses was performed by using procedure-based hierarchical task analysis and task decomposition methods. The results from the task analysis were recorded in a database. Using the TA results, we developed static prototype of advanced HSI and human factors engineering verification and validation methods for an evaluation of the prototype. In addition to the procedure-based task analysis methods, workload estimation based on the analysis of task performance time and analyses for the design of information structure and interaction structures will be necessary

  17. Improvements to the Red List Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart H M Butchart

    Full Text Available The Red List Index uses information from the IUCN Red List to track trends in the projected overall extinction risk of sets of species. It has been widely recognised as an important component of the suite of indicators needed to measure progress towards the international target of significantly reducing the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. However, further application of the RLI (to non-avian taxa in particular has revealed some shortcomings in the original formula and approach: It performs inappropriately when a value of zero is reached; RLI values are affected by the frequency of assessments; and newly evaluated species may introduce bias. Here we propose a revision to the formula, and recommend how it should be applied in order to overcome these shortcomings. Two additional advantages of the revisions are that assessment errors are not propagated through time, and the overall level extinction risk can be determined as well as trends in this over time.

  18. Bases for PUREX deactivation safety equipment list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walser, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the basis and justification for changes in classification of equipment listed in WHC-SD-SEL-001 Rev 1, open-quotes PUREX Plant Safety Equipment List.close quotes The reference document will be re-issued as Rev 2 based on the DEACTIVATION mode as evaluated in this document. Systems, components, and structures are evaluated based on consequences of failure on the health and safety of the general public for Safety Class 1, the health and safety of the on-site worker for Safety Class 2, and the health and safety of the facility worker for Safety Class 3. The consequences of a failure on the environment are also addressed in this ranking based on the level of insult. The criteria for the three levels of Safety class equipment are given in Appendix I for ease of reference

  19. Radioactive waste - a select list of material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    A chronological bibliography is presented of literature relating to radioactive waste management in the United Kingdom concentrating on material published since 1978. The main sections include Dept. of Environ. and Official publications, administrative and environmental concerns, technological and scientific considerations, including publications on geological aspects, deep-sea bed and ocean-dumping and salt domes, with general background material and further sources of information listed at the end. (U.K.)

  20. Epiphytes and the National Wetland Plant List

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    includes an ongoing effort to assess the entire flora of the United States and its territories to ensure that the list is comprehensive and complete...BONAP (Biota of North America Program). Kartesz (in press) tracks the flora of North America and maintains an extensive database of distribution and...anchored to the stems or trunks of trees or shrubs or occasionally on moss mats but never found growing on the ground. 2. Obligate epiphytes on rocks