WorldWideScience

Sample records for targeting socially excluded

  1. Listening to the socially excluded: the European national action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, David

    2007-12-01

    Over the past two years, Help the Aged has worked with colleagues across Europe, through the Age network of 160 aging organizations, to help excluded older people feed their views into the European National Action Plans on Social Exclusion; to better understand the barriers faced when consulting older people.

  2. Oxytocin biases men but not women to restore social connections with individuals who socially exclude them

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yao, Shuxia; Xu, Lei; Geng, Yayuan; Zhao, Weihua; Ma, Xiaole; Kou, Juan; Luo, Ruixue; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2017-01-01

    We normally react to individuals who exclude us socially by either avoiding them or increasing our attempts to interact with them. The neuropeptide oxytocin can promote social bonds and reduce social conflict and we therefore investigated whether it facilitates more positive social responses towards individuals who exclude or include us. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subject design 77 healthy Chinese male and female participants received intranasal oxytocin (40 IU) or placebo...

  3. The politics of corruption, inequality, and the socially excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Salas, Anna

    2013-07-01

    In this article, the production of knowledge in the context of socially excluded people exposed to inequality, oppression, and exploitation is problematized. The analysis follows Enrique Dussel's philosophical exegesis of the politics of power and corruption and his vision of a critical transformation of the social political order. The argument is also informed by the work of critical educator Paulo Freire, who elucidates the conditions of oppression and marginalization and highlights the importance of conscientization to develop a critical awareness of these conditions. Hannah Arendt's work on the politics of understanding totalitarianism also assists in the elucidation of the machinery that operates behind oppression to sustain power and inequality. The article emphasizes the need to recognize the inequality of conditions that exists between the producer of knowledge and those who live through inequality and oppression in their lived corporality. A critical transformation of the process of production of knowledge is needed to both acknowledge the conditions that sustain this endeavour in the first place and avoid the corruption of knowledge. A work of conscientization is also necessary among knowledge producers to undertake a critical analysis of inequality that exposes the corruption of power. This analysis needs to examine and unmask the hidden mechanisms that perpetuate inequality and oppression and serve only the interests of a few. The abysmal gaps between the wealthy and the poor within and among countries bespeak a degree of human indifference that reflects a most serious and complex phenomenon that perverts something profoundly human in our societies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Oxytocin biases men but not women to restore social connections with individuals who socially exclude them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolei; Yao, Shuxia; Xu, Lei; Geng, Yayuan; Zhao, Weihua; Ma, Xiaole; Kou, Juan; Luo, Ruixue; Kendrick, Keith M

    2017-01-12

    We normally react to individuals who exclude us socially by either avoiding them or increasing our attempts to interact with them. The neuropeptide oxytocin can promote social bonds and reduce social conflict and we therefore investigated whether it facilitates more positive social responses towards individuals who exclude or include us. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subject design 77 healthy Chinese male and female participants received intranasal oxytocin (40 IU) or placebo before playing a modified virtual ball-tossing game with three fictitious partners who either showed exclusion, inclusion or neutral behavioral interactions with them. Results showed that both male and female subjects threw the ball more often to individuals who excluded rather than included them, although oxytocin did not alter this or awareness/feelings of exclusion or inclusion. However, when subjects returned a week later males, but not females, in the oxytocin group exhibited an increased liking for, and preference for playing again with, players who had previously excluded them. This oxytocin effect was positively associated with independent traits. Our findings suggest that in a collectivist culture oxytocin may promote the desire of males, but not females, with a stronger independent orientation to rebuild social connections with individuals who have previously excluded them.

  5. 'To each according to his needs': public libraries and socially excluded people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicken, Mandy

    2004-09-01

    To deliver a comprehensive and efficient service to all the community, public libraries must first identify needs and allocate an appropriate level of resources. This article focuses on public libraries in England. It outlines: the Government's policy on social inclusion; the needs of the various socially excluded groups; partnerships and funding; staff training and motivation; and examples of good practice.

  6. Acting on social exclusion: neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of excluders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A; Güroğlu, Berna

    2015-02-01

    This functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural correlates of punishment and forgiveness of initiators of social exclusion (i.e. 'excluders'). Participants divided money in a modified Dictator Game between themselves and people who previously either included or excluded them during a virtual ball-tossing game (Cyberball). Participants selectively punished the excluders by decreasing their outcomes; even when this required participants to give up monetary rewards. Punishment of excluders was associated with increased activation in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and bilateral anterior insula. Costly punishment was accompanied by higher activity in the pre-SMA compared with punishment that resulted in gains or was non-costly. Refraining from punishment (i.e. forgiveness) was associated with self-reported perspective-taking and increased activation in the bilateral temporoparietal junction, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings show that social exclusion can result in punishment as well as forgiveness of excluders and that separable neural networks implicated in social cognition and cognitive control are recruited when people choose either to punish or to forgive those who excluded them. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Acting on Observed Social Exclusion: Developmental Perspectives on Punishment of Excluders and Compensation of Victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Geert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A.; van den Bos, Wouter; Güroglu, Berna

    2013-01-01

    This study examined punishment of excluders and compensation of victims after observing an instance of social exclusion at various phases of adolescent development. Participants (n = 183; age 9 to 22 years) were first included in a virtual ball-tossing game, Cyberball, and then "observed" the exclusion of a peer. Subsequently, they…

  8. The effect of excluding juveniles on apparent adult olive baboons (Papio anubis) social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedurek, Piotr; Lehmann, Julia

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been much interest in investigating the social structure of group living animals using social network analysis. Many studies so far have focused on the social networks of adults, often excluding younger, immature group members. This potentially may lead to a biased view of group social structure as multiple recent studies have shown that younger group members can significantly contribute to group structure. As proof of the concept, we address this issue by investigating social network structure with and without juveniles in wild olive baboons (Papio anubis) at Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria. Two social networks including all independently moving individuals (i.e., excluding dependent juveniles) were created based on aggressive and grooming behaviour. We used knockout simulations based on the random removal of individuals from the network in order to investigate to what extent the exclusion of juveniles affects the resulting network structure and our interpretation of age-sex specific social roles. We found that juvenile social patterns differed from those of adults and that the exclusion of juveniles from the network significantly altered the resulting overall network structure. Moreover, the removal of juveniles from the network affected individuals in specific age-sex classes differently: for example, including juveniles in the grooming network increased network centrality of adult females while decreasing centrality of adult males. These results suggest that excluding juveniles from the analysis may not only result in a distorted picture of the overall social structure but also may mask some of the social roles of individuals belonging to different age-sex classes. PMID:28323851

  9. Social exclusion and punishment of excluders: neural correlates and developmental trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Bregtje Gunther; Güroğlu, Berna; Op de Macks, Zdeňa A; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Van der Molen, Maurits W; Crone, Eveline A

    2012-01-02

    Social exclusion is a distressing experience and can result in a reduction of prosocial behavior. In this fMRI study we examined the neural networks involved in social exclusion and subsequent fairness considerations across adolescent development. Participants from 3 age groups (10-12, 14-16 and 19-21 year olds) participated in the study and performed two tasks; first, participants played Cyberball to induce feelings of social inclusion and exclusion, followed by a Dictator game in which participants were asked to divide coins between themselves and the players who previously included or excluded them. Results revealed a network of regions associated with social exclusion, which involve the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)/ventral anterior cingulate cortex (vACC), subgenual ACC and the lateral PFC, as well as the insula and the dorsal ACC. Although social exclusion generated strong distress for all age groups, 10-12 year olds showed increased activity in the subgenual ACC in the exclusion game, which has been associated in previous studies with negative affective processing. Results of the Dictator game revealed that all age groups selectively punished the excluders by making lower offers. These offers were associated with activation in the temporoparietal junction (TPJ), superior temporal sulcus (STS) and the lateral PFC. Age comparisons revealed that adults showed additional activity in the insula and dorsal ACC when making offers to the excluders. The results are discussed in the light of recent findings on neural networks involved in social exclusion and the development of social brain regions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Excluded and behaving unethically: social exclusion, physiological responses, and unethical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouchaki, Maryam; Wareham, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Across 2 studies, we investigated the ethical consequences of physiological responses to social exclusion. In Study 1, participants who were socially excluded were more likely to engage in unethical behavior to make money and the level of physiological arousal experienced during exclusion--measured using galvanic skin response--mediated the effects of exclusion on unethical behavior. Likewise, in Study 2, results from a sample of supervisor-subordinate dyads revealed a positive relationship between experience of workplace ostracism and unethical behaviors as rated by the immediate supervisors. This relationship was mediated by employees' reports of experienced physiological arousal. Together, the results of these studies demonstrate that physiological arousal accompanies social exclusion and provides an explanatory mechanism for the increased unethical behavior in both samples. Theoretical implications of these findings for research on ethical behavior and social exclusion in the workplace are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Tuberculosis peer educators: personal experiences of working with socially excluded communities in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, L A; Hayward, A C; Story, A

    2013-10-01

    Peer education is a relatively unexplored intervention for tuberculosis (TB) control, particularly among socially excluded communities. In London, peer educators are used to raise awareness of TB and promote uptake of radiological screening among people using homeless and/or drug and alcohol treatment services. To understand the motivation and personal impact of being a peer educator on people with experience of anti-tuberculosis treatment, homelessness and addiction. In-depth semi-structured interviews with peer educators were recorded and transcribed, and then analysed using a grounded theory approach to identify themes. Reflexivity and thick description were used to support transparency of findings. Becoming a peer educator supports individuals in making sense of past experiences and renewing their sense of self. The role places value on personal experience and the communication approach this supports. The project environment is an important motivator, providing the peer with structure, social support and respect. Being a peer educator with experience of homelessness and addiction can be beneficial and empowering and help long-term recovery. Peers are an underused resource for strengthening TB control among socially excluded populations. There is a need for further research into the contribution of peers to TB control, including analyses of economic effectiveness.

  12. Prejudice in practitioners who work with socially excluded people in Andalusia: A dual process approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Luis Álvarez-Castillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that the professional profile of those who work with socially excluded people is not compatible with the maintenance of prejudices against the group they help. The current study tested this hypothesis regarding the Dual Process Cognitive-Motivational Model of Duckitt (2001 and Duckitt and Sibley (2010. Data from 565 Andalusian professionals were collected in a cross-sectional survey, using measures of socio-demographics, personality, values, ideological attitudes, political position, and prejudice. The model fitted to data reproduced the basic relations in the hypothesized model, although its explanatory power was limited. Prejudice was significantly explained by both paths (authoritarianism and dominance, leading to the conclusion that the reduced level of prejudice held by professionals corresponds to the perception of socially excluded people as a dissident group. This suggests that professional identity as a broad construct may moderate the variance in prejudice. Finally, these findings also suggest that the professional development of social workers should be promoted.

  13. Excluded and avoided: racial microaggressions targeting Asian international students in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshmand, Sara; Spanierman, Lisa B; Tafarodi, Romin W

    2014-07-01

    This qualitative study explored East and South Asian international students' (N = 12) experiences with racial microaggressions at one Canadian university. Data were collected through unstructured, individual interviews. Using a modified version of the consensual qualitative research method (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997), we identified six racial microaggressions themes: (a) excluded and avoided, (b) ridiculed for accent, (c) rendered invisible, (d) disregarded international values and needs, (e) ascription of intelligence, and (f) environmental microaggressions (structural barriers on campus). In addition, we used the same approach to identify themes pertaining to the ways in which students coped with racial microaggressions: (a) engaging with own racial and cultural groups, (b) withdrawing from academic spheres, and (c) seeking comfort in the surrounding multicultural milieu. Microaggressions and coping themes differed based on country of origin and language proficiency. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  14. Targeted Advertising and Social Status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Vikander (Nick)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper shows how a firm can use non-targeted advertising to exploit consumers' desire for social status. A monopolist sells multiple varieties of a good to consumers who each care about what others believe about his wealth. Advertising allows consumers both to buy different varieties

  15. Voices and Preferred Solutions of Socially Excluded Students in Primary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Renske; de Boer, Anke; Minnaert, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Advocates of inclusive education argue that the social participation of students with special educational needs (SEN) increases by educating them together with typically developing peers. However, research indicates that this is not obvious for all students with SEN (Guralnick, Neville, Hammond, &

  16. How does the use of mobile phones by 16-24 year old socially excluded women affect their capabilities?

    OpenAIRE

    Faith, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    This research looks at the impact of mobile phone use on the lives and opportunities of 16-24 year-old socially excluded women, using a novel, cross-disciplinary framework of the capability approach and affordances. \\ud \\ud Fieldwork took the form of semi-structured interviews in 2013-14 with 30 women between the ages of 16-24, and four youth workers. The instrumental affordances of mobile phones are examined to understand whether they provide a means to address issues relating to work, healt...

  17. [Why pediatric consultations increase in the centers for the socially excluded?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, M; Troller, S; Gambert, C; Oriot, D

    1998-07-01

    Studies done by Médecins du Monde indicate that sanitary exclusion is a growing phenomenon in France, children included. Paediatricians must be concerned by this phenomenon, which is related to the social precarity of many families who do not use the standard health care structure. They must understand the reasoning behind the choices of these families, and be involved in the care of their children in places that they accept to visit. Paediatricians should also be present in institutions, conferences and debates where public health policy is discussed in order to defend the place of paediatrics in the sanitary organisation.

  18. Equitable access to health insurance for socially excluded children? The case of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gemma A; Parmar, Divya; Dkhimi, Fahdi; Asante, Felix; Arhinful, Daniel; Mladovsky, Philipa

    2017-08-01

    To help reduce child mortality and reach universal health coverage, Ghana extended free membership of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) to children (under-18s) in 2008. However, despite the introduction of premium waivers, a substantial proportion of children remain uninsured. Thus far, few studies have explored why enrolment of children in NHIS may remain low, despite the absence of significant financial barriers to membership. In this paper we therefore look beyond economic explanations of access to health insurance to explore additional wider determinants of enrolment in the NHIS. In particular, we investigate whether social exclusion, as measured through a sociocultural, political and economic lens, can explain poor enrolment rates of children. Data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 4050 representative households conducted in Ghana in 2012. Household indices were created to measure sociocultural, political and economic exclusion, and logistic regressions were conducted to study determinants of enrolment at the individual and household levels. Our results indicate that socioculturally, economically and politically excluded children are less likely to enrol in the NHIS. Furthermore, households excluded in all dimensions were more likely to be non-enrolled or partially-enrolled (i.e. not all children enrolled within the household) than fully-enrolled. These results suggest that equity in access for socially excluded children has not yet been achieved. Efforts should be taken to improve coverage by removing the remaining small, annually renewable registration fee, implementing and publicising the new clause that de-links premium waivers from parental membership, establishing additional scheme administrative offices in remote areas, holding regular registration sessions in schools and conducting outreach sessions and providing registration support to female guardians of children. Ensuring equitable access to NHIS will contribute substantially

  19. Targeted social mobilization in a global manhunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Alex; Cebrian, Manuel; Rahwan, Iyad; Dsouza, Sohan; McInerney, James; Naroditskiy, Victor; Venanzi, Matteo; Jennings, Nicholas R; deLara, J R; Wahlstedt, Eero; Miller, Steven U

    2013-01-01

    Social mobilization, the ability to mobilize large numbers of people via social networks to achieve highly distributed tasks, has received significant attention in recent times. This growing capability, facilitated by modern communication technology, is highly relevant to endeavors which require the search for individuals that possess rare information or skills, such as finding medical doctors during disasters, or searching for missing people. An open question remains, as to whether in time-critical situations, people are able to recruit in a targeted manner, or whether they resort to so-called blind search, recruiting as many acquaintances as possible via broadcast communication. To explore this question, we examine data from our recent success in the U.S. State Department's Tag Challenge, which required locating and photographing 5 target persons in 5 different cities in the United States and Europe - in under 12 hours - based only on a single mug-shot. We find that people are able to consistently route information in a targeted fashion even under increasing time pressure. We derive an analytical model for social-media fueled global mobilization and use it to quantify the extent to which people were targeting their peers during recruitment. Our model estimates that approximately 1 in 3 messages were of targeted fashion during the most time-sensitive period of the challenge. This is a novel observation at such short temporal scales, and calls for opportunities for devising viral incentive schemes that provide distance or time-sensitive rewards to approach the target geography more rapidly. This observation of '12 hours of separation' between individuals has applications in multiple areas from emergency preparedness, to political mobilization.

  20. Modern discrimination: How perperators and targets interactively perpetuate social disadvantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellemers, Naomi|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/086631276; Barreto, M

    Stereotypes and discriminatory behavior do not necessarily imply that people are explicitly devalued or actively excluded from attractive positions in society. Instead, these often implicitly communicate that any social disadvantages are due to individual shortcomings. Recent research has uncovered

  1. Intellectually Capable but Socially Excluded? A Review of the Literature and Research on Students with Autism in Further Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Nick; Beavan, Nick

    2012-01-01

    As autism is a social learning disability it is a disadvantage in any social setting such as a classroom. The 1990s saw a surge of young people diagnosed with autism who are now approaching college age; indeed there is evidence that students with autism are becoming a significant cohort in further education. However, anecdotal evidence suggests…

  2. “Not Designed for Us”: How Science Museums and Science Centers Socially Exclude Low-Income, Minority Ethnic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how people from low-income, minority ethnic groups perceive and experience exclusion from informal science education (ISE) institutions, such as museums and science centers. Drawing on qualitative data from four focus groups, 32 interviews, four accompanied visits to ISE institutions, and field notes, this paper presents an analysis of exclusion from science learning opportunities during visits alongside participants’ attitudes, expectations, and conclusions about participation in ISE. Participants came from four community groups in central London: a Sierra Leonean group (n = 21), a Latin American group (n = 18), a Somali group (n = 6), and an Asian group (n = 13). Using a theoretical framework based on the work of Bourdieu, the analysis suggests ISE practices were grounded in expectations about visitors’ scientific knowledge, language skills, and finances in ways that were problematic for participants and excluded them from science learning opportunities. It is argued that ISE practices reinforced participants preexisting sense that museums and science centers were “not for us.” The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings in relation to previous research on participation in ISE and the potential for developing more inclusive informal science learning opportunities. PMID:25574059

  3. "Not Designed for Us": How Science Museums and Science Centers Socially Exclude Low-Income, Minority Ethnic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Emily

    2014-11-01

    This paper explores how people from low-income, minority ethnic groups perceive and experience exclusion from informal science education (ISE) institutions, such as museums and science centers. Drawing on qualitative data from four focus groups, 32 interviews, four accompanied visits to ISE institutions, and field notes, this paper presents an analysis of exclusion from science learning opportunities during visits alongside participants' attitudes, expectations, and conclusions about participation in ISE. Participants came from four community groups in central London: a Sierra Leonean group ( n = 21), a Latin American group ( n = 18), a Somali group ( n = 6), and an Asian group ( n = 13). Using a theoretical framework based on the work of Bourdieu, the analysis suggests ISE practices were grounded in expectations about visitors' scientific knowledge, language skills, and finances in ways that were problematic for participants and excluded them from science learning opportunities. It is argued that ISE practices reinforced participants preexisting sense that museums and science centers were "not for us." The paper concludes with a discussion of the findings in relation to previous research on participation in ISE and the potential for developing more inclusive informal science learning opportunities.

  4. Target reference points of social policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Vasiliev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the problems of developing an integrated approach to the formation of interconnected factors of social policy. Identified the need to integrate economic and social factors. As a system of socio-economic, policy includes the phenomena of human and social capital. The analysis of the international rankings of economic and social development from the perspective of the key problems of social dynamics. Presents directions of social policy of Russia in the long term and short term. Named social risks of devaluation of the national currency.

  5. Privacy Respecting Targeted Advertising for Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kahl , Christian; Crane , Stephen; Tschersich , Markus; Rannenberg , Kai

    2011-01-01

    Part 10: Mobile Application Security and Privacy (Short Papers); International audience; Online Social Networks form an increasingly important part of people’s lives. As mobile technologies improve accessibility, concerns about privacy and trust are more apparent as advertising becomes a critical component of most social network’s economic model. In this paper we describe the PICOS project’s research into privacy preserving advertising options for social networks. We introduce an architecture...

  6. Developing conservation targets in social-ecological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip S. Levin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of targets is foundational in conservation. Although progress has been made in setting targets, the diverse linkages among ecological and social components make target setting for coupled social-ecological systems extremely challenging. Developing integrated social-ecological targets is difficult because it forces policy makers to consider how management actions propagate throughout social-ecological systems, and because ultimately it is society, not scientists, that defines targets. We developed an interdisciplinary approach for identifying management targets and illustrate this approach using an example motivated by Puget Sound, USA. Our approach blends ecological modeling with empirical social science to articulate trade-offs and reveal societal preferences for different social-ecological states. The framework aims to place information in the hands of decision makers and promote discussion in the appropriate forums. Our ultimate objective is to encourage the informed participation of citizens in the development of social-ecological targets that reflect their values while also protecting key ecosystem attributes.

  7. Challenges of the Targeting Approach to Social Protection: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... Keywords: Social Protection, Cash Transfers, Targeting Approach, Challenges, Livelihood ..... Methodology. A qualitative case study design was implemented within the Wa Municipality of the. Upper West Region (UWR), the youngest and ..... Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Method.

  8. Actualization of Social Cognitions into Aggressive Behavior toward Disliked Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, Katlin; Hodges, Ernest V. E.; Salmivalli, Christina

    2011-01-01

    The basic premise that social cognitions guide behavior (aggression) was evaluated within relationships marked by dislike. At Time 1, a disliked target was identified for each participant (195 fifth-grade children; 109 boys; 11-12 years old at Time 1) who then responded to questions about different aggression-supporting social cognitions with…

  9. The Effects of Target Audience on Social Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsarhan, Hesham

    2013-01-01

    Online social bookmarking systems allow users to assign tags (i.e., keywords) to represent the content of resources. Research on the effects of target audience on social tagging suggests that taggers select different tags for themselves, their community (e.g., family, friends, colleagues), and the general public (Panke & Gaiser, 2009; Pu &…

  10. Challenges of the Targeting Approach to Social Protection: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global debates on social protection have raised concerns about the appropriateness of the targeting approach for better inclusion. This study contributes to these debates by exploring the specific challenges associated with the targeting mechanism adopted by the Ghana Livelihood Empowerment against Poverty (LEAP) ...

  11. Social marketing targeting Indigenous peoples: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubacki, Krzysztof; Szablewska, Natalia

    2017-09-07

    Social marketing is a discipline focused on the application of marketing principles to induce socially desirable behaviour change. As social marketing remains one of the main behaviour change approaches pursued by governments and international organisations, it is important to consider its use in relation to vulnerable groups that are particularly exposed to discriminatory practices, marginalisation, exclusion and destitution. The aim of this systematic review is to identify the extent to which Andreasen's (2002) six social marketing benchmark criteria were reported in social marketing interventions targeting Indigenous peoples. A total of 20 articles covering 13 social marketing interventions were identified for review. Although none of the interventions gave evidence that they addressed all six of the benchmark criteria, they appear to have been effective in challenging some of the issues faced by Indigenous peoples. However, the criteria of segmentation, exchange and competition remain underused in the identified interventions. Social marketing interventions targeting Indigenous peoples tend to rely on television and radio advertising, showing potential for more use of product, place and price to influence, facilitate and maintain socially desirable behaviour change. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Social Engineering Attacks on Government Opponents: Target Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marczak William R.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available New methods of dissident surveillance employed by repressive nation-states increasingly involve socially engineering targets into unwitting cooperation (e.g., by convincing them to open a malicious attachment or link. While a fair amount is understood about the nature of these threat actors and the types of tools they use, there is comparatively little understood about targets’ perceptions of the risks associated with their online activity, and their security posture. We conducted in-depth interviews of 30 potential targets of Middle Eastern and Horn of Africa-based governments, also examining settings and software on their computers and phones. Our engagement illuminates the ways that likely targets are vulnerable to the types of social engineering employed by nation-states.

  13. Can Social Functioning in Schizophrenia Be Improved through Targeted Social Cognitive Intervention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Roberts

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to use cognitive remediation in psychosocial intervention for schizophrenia have increasingly incorporated social cognition as a treatment target. A distinction can be made in this work between “broad-based” interventions, which integrate social cognitive training within a multicomponent suite of intervention techniques and “targeted” interventions; which aim to enhance social cognition alone. Targeted interventions have the potential advantage of being more efficient than broad-based interventions; however, they also face difficult challenges. In particular, targeted interventions may be less likely to achieve maintenance and generalization of gains made in treatment. A novel potential solution to this problem is described which draws on the social psychological literature on social cognition.

  14. Do Corporate Social Performance Targets in Executive Compensation Contribute to Corporate Social Performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E.H. Maas (Karen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo deal with potential conflicts between the triple-bottom-line expectations of investors and the performance of executives, firms can use incentives by integrating corporate social performance (CSP) targets into executive compensation. No evidence yet exists that CSP targets in

  15. Nuclear safety targets and problems of social acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macgill, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The following are among the factors which make the problem of setting acceptable safety targets for societal protection from possible nuclear accidents one of such formidable proportion: The varied and often conflicting positions among and between the many constituencies with a claim to interest in the problem: local, national and international populations; lay, workplace and professional communities; private and public interests; active environmental lobbies and intentionally passive publics; powerful influences and politically unprivileged classes; press and mass media. To seek 'acceptability' of safety targets through common consensus is problematised by the difficulty in overcoming the immense social and historical forces that give rise to the prevailing contrariety among different people's positions. To seek resolution of differences by some appropriate weighting of the different views of different constituencies is problematised by the lack of unique identification of what the constituencies are, by the difficulty in faithfully representing their views, and by the absence of 'laws of social entitlement' vis-a-vis the weight that should be given to each. In sum, the problem of setting socially acceptable safety targets is itself bound up with inherently open ended questions of democracy and representation. (author)

  16. Inconsistent condom use among socially excluded heroin users Uso inconsistente del condón en los usuarios de heroina en situación de exclusión social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The study focused in sexual behaviour among socially excluded heroin users, identifying factors associated with inconsistent condom use. Data was collected in the cities of Granada and Seville between July and October 2000, through a structured questionnaire, to 391 participants. Twenty two and 15% of participants have made consistent use of condoms in vaginal sex in the last year with occasional and regular partners respectively. There is a greater likelihood of inconsistent condom use with occasional partners among users who had had oral sex, and who does not know if their partner(s inject or injected drugs. For regular partners those who have an injecting partner and do not speak with their sexual partners about AIDS have a higher probability to do not use always a condom. For both groups, when always the partner is who propose the use of condoms (when used and not themselves, the risk not to use it is near 4 times more than when thems elves propose to use it. Speaking about condoms and AIDS with mate, partners and family, and learning to negotiate the use of condoms seems to be the most important strategies to be approached for this sample, from the social and health care system in order to promote a protected sex.El objetivo del presente trabajo es analizar las conductas sexuales entre los usuarios de heroína, en situación de exclusión social, y conocer los factores asociados al uso inconsistente del condón en sus relaciones sexuales (coito vaginal con parejas ocasionales y estables. Los datos fueron recogidos en las ciudades de Granada y de Sevilla entre julio y octubre de 2000, a través de un cuestionario estructurado, a 391 participantes. El 22 y el 15% de los participantes han hecho un uso consistente del condón durante el último año con sus parejas ocasionales y estables, respectivamente. Se ha encontrado una mayor probabilidad de un uso inconsistente del condón con las parejas ocasionales entre usuarios que habían practicado

  17. 45 CFR 400.206 - Federal funding for social services and targeted assistance services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and Providing Assistance and Services § 400.206 Federal funding for social services and targeted assistance services. (a) Federal funding is available for refugee social services as set forth in Subpart I... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal funding for social services and targeted...

  18. University engagement with socially excluded communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benneworth, Paul Stephen; Benneworth, P.

    2012-01-01

    There appears to be an almost overwhelming consensus that an increasingly important element of the role of universities in contemporary society is to provide useful knowledge and contribute to emerging societal problems. However, the scale of the academic analysis to date has been surprising in its

  19. Producing the voice of socially excluded people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Esben

    2003-01-01

    An investigation of the practices of outreach workers, when they try to build bridges between drug addicts and homeless people living in the streets and welfare and health care institutions. The article uses tools from discourse analysis and governmentality analysis......An investigation of the practices of outreach workers, when they try to build bridges between drug addicts and homeless people living in the streets and welfare and health care institutions. The article uses tools from discourse analysis and governmentality analysis...

  20. Targeted social media advertising and consumer decision making in online buying behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, S. (Siiri)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this research is to understand how targeted social media advertising influences online buying behavior. More accurately, this research focuses on the five-stage consumer buying decision process model and how targeted social media advertisements affect each stage of the model. This research approaches the subject through phenomenography, where the objective is to concentrate on the attitudes and opinions ...

  1. Targeting Millennials: Social Media Strategies within Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Whitney L.

    2015-01-01

    Using a quantitative survey method with an online questionnaire as the data collection tool, the author surveyed 189 social media managers working at American Higher Education institutions to identify forms of social media in use, along with the most popular strategies that colleges and universities use with Facebook.

  2. Evaluation of a Social Marketing Campaign Targeting Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan L.; Bellows, Laura; Beckstrom, Leslie; Anderson, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of a pilot social marketing program to increase preschoolers' willingness to try new foods. Methods: Four Head Start centers participated (2 experimental, 2 control) in a study using a quasi-experimental design. Experimental sites received a 12-week intervention developed using social marketing…

  3. Social protection in Brazil: universalism and targeting in the FHC and Lula administrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nilson do Rosário

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the organization of Brazil's social protection system after the Federal Constitution of 1998 (CF 1988). It also demonstrates that 1988 Federal Constitution favored the institutionalization of universalist public policies. This institutionalization took place amidst conflict with the stabilization goals of the Real Plan. The paper argues that such an institutionalization protected public spending in the social area of the macroeconomic management's minimalist project. It also identifies the implementation of social programs targeting the poor during the 1980's decade. Targeting is an innovation directly associated with the adjustment agenda. It reveals that under the FHC and Lula administrations there was an identical adoption of targeted social programs. The targeting of social protection did not possess power of veto over the universalist proposals arising from the democratization in the 1980's. It demonstrates that the Bolsa Família Program (Family Grant Program - PBF), the main mark of the Lula administration, is a large scale adaptation of the targeted programs of direct transfer of income in the FHC administration. The combination of universalism and targeting expanded the scope of social policy. However, the significant growth in social public spending has not been producing broad social results, although the poor in Brazil have benefited from the PBF's targeting.

  4. Evaluating a Targeted Social Program When Placement Is Decentralized. Policy Research Working Papers No. 1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravallion, Martin; Wodon, Quentin

    Assessment of welfare gains from a targeted social program can be seriously biased unless the endogeneity of program participation is addressed. Bias comes from two sources of placement endogeneity: the purposive targeting of geographic areas, and the targeting of individual recipients within selected areas. Partial decentralization of program…

  5. Theory including future not excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagao, K.; Nielsen, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    with future explicitly present in the formalism and influencing in principle the past is not excluded phenomenologically, because the effects are argued to be very small in the present era. Furthermore, we explicitly derive the Hamiltonian for the future state via a path integral, and confirm that it is given...

  6. Negative symptoms and social cognition: identifying targets for psychological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Rief, Winfried

    2011-09-01

    How to improve treatment for negative symptoms is a continuing topic of debate. Suggestions have been made to advance psychological understanding of negative symptoms by focusing on the social cognitive processes involved in symptom formation and maintenance. Following the recommendations by the National Institute of Mental Health workshop on social cognition in schizophrenia, this study investigated associations between negative symptoms and various aspects of social cognition including Theory of Mind (ToM), attribution, empathy, self-esteem, and interpersonal self-concepts in 75 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 75 healthy controls. Negative symptoms were significantly associated with difficulties in ToM, less readiness to be empathic, lower self-esteem, less self-serving bias, negative self-concepts related to interpersonal abilities, and dysfunctional acceptance beliefs. Different aspects of social cognition were mildly to moderately correlated and interacted in their impact on negative symptoms: Difficulties in ToM were associated with negative symptoms in persons with low but not in persons with medium or high levels of self-esteem. Taken together, the social cognition variables and their hypothesized interaction explained 39% of the variance in negative symptoms after controlling for neurocognition and depression. The results highlight the relevance of self-concepts related to social abilities, dysfunctional beliefs, and global self-worth alone and in interaction with ToM deficits for negative symptoms and thereby provide a helpful basis for advancing psychosocial interventions.

  7. Bringing in the target audience in bystander social marketing materials for communities: suggestions for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2011-06-01

    The Know Your Power™ social marketing campaign images model active bystander behaviors that target audience members can use in situations where sexual and relationship violence and stalking are occurring, have occurred, or have the potential to occur. In this practitioner note, we describe strategies that we have used to engage target audience members in the development of the social marketing campaign that we hope can be used by practitioners. We give examples from the development and evaluation of the Know Your Power(TM) social marketing campaign that used focus group and other types of feedback from the target audience to inform the direction of the campaign.

  8. Knowledge Productivity for Sustainable Innovation: Social Capital as HRD Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlen, Corry; van der Klink, Marcel; Roentgen, Uta; Curfs, Emile; Boshuizen, Henny

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the feasibility of a conceptual model on relations between organisational innovation, knowledge productivity and social capital. It explores processes of knowledge productivity for sustainable innovation and associated HRD implications in knowledge intensive organisations, taking the perspective that…

  9. Knowledge productivity for sustainable innovation: social capital as HRD target

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehlen, Corry; Van der Klink, Marcel; Roentgen, Uta; Curfs, Emile; Boshuizen, Els

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to test the feasibility of a conceptual model on relations between organisational innovation, knowledge productivity and social capital. It explores processes of knowledge productivity for sustainable innovation and associated HRD implications in knowledge

  10. Targeted activation of the hippocampal CA2 area strongly enhances social memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A S; Williams Avram, S K; Cymerblit-Sabba, A; Song, J; Young, W S

    2016-08-01

    Social cognition enables individuals to understand others' intentions. Social memory is a necessary component of this process, for without it, subsequent encounters are devoid of any historical information. The CA2 area of the hippocampus, particularly the vasopressin 1b receptor (Avpr1b) expressed there, is necessary for memory formation. We used optogenetics to excite vasopressin terminals, originating from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, in the CA2 of mice. This markedly enhanced their social memory if the stimulation occurred during memory acquisition, but not retrieval. This effect was blocked by an Avpr1b antagonist. Finally, this enhanced memory is resistant to the social distraction of an introduced second mouse, important for socially navigating populations of individuals. Our results indicate the CA2 can increase the salience of social signals. Targeted pharmacotherapy with Avpr1b agonists or deep brain stimulation of the CA2 are potential avenues of treatment for those with declining social memory as in various dementias.

  11. ScottishPower learning's school-to-work education and training programs[Empowering socially excluded youth and building future managers' leadership, communication and social skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitagawa, K.; Watt, D.; Yachnin, R.

    2001-08-01

    Serving approximately 7 million homes and businesses across the United Kingdom and the northwest United States, ScottishPower and its subsidiaries are one of the 12 largest electricity groups in the world. Following deregulation in the electricity industry in the United Kingdom in 1990, ScottishPower found it had to change quickly to capture emerging opportunities. It recognized the need to support employee development and set up an Open Learning Centre to be used by staff for their own personal development. Investment was made in occupational health and wellness services. The following three-step training process was established for ScottishPower: (1) conduct employability assessments; (2) design and deliver a learning activity so that the individual will be successful in the workplace; and (3) engage learners. ScottishPower has implemented several training programs to empower employees, their families and their communities: education transition programs for 15-18 year olds; pre-vocational training for 16-25 year olds; and, vocational training for 16-25 year olds. The keys to success include people, processes, infrastructure, resources committed, challenges, and innovation. In cooperation with trade unions, government bodies, economic development agencies and education and training agencies, ScottishPower has developed a wide spectrum of training and development programs aimed at unemployed young people in socially deprived areas of the United Kingdom.

  12. Building Social Competence in Preschool: The Effects of a Social Skills Intervention Targeting Children Enrolled in Head Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.; Walker, Virginia; Jamison, Kristen R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the peer-to-peer interactions of at-risk children enrolled in Head Start who participated in a social pragmatic intervention targeting skills such as initiations, responses, name use, proximity, and turn-taking skills. Eight Head Start classroom teams received two workshops and two coaching sessions and were taught to…

  13. Social exclusion impairs distractor suppression but not target enhancement in selective attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengsi; Li, Zhiai; Diao, Liuting; Fan, Lingxia; Zhang, Lijie; Yuan, Shuge; Yang, Dong

    2017-11-01

    Social exclusion has been thought to weaken one's ability to exert inhibitory control. Existing studies have primarily focused on the relationship between exclusion and behavioral inhibition, and have reported that exclusion impairs behavioral inhibition. However, whether exclusion also affects selective attention, another important aspect of inhibitory control, remains unknown. Therefore, the current study aimed to explore whether social exclusion impairs selective attention, and to specifically examine its effect on two hypothesized mechanisms of selective attention: target enhancement and distractor suppression. The Cyberball game was used to manipulate social exclusion. Participants then performed a visual search task while event-related potentials were recorded. In the visual search task, target and salient distractor were either both presented laterally or one was presented on the vertical midline and the other laterally. Results showed that social exclusion differentially affected target and distractor processing. While exclusion impaired distractor suppression, reflected as smaller distractor-positivity (Pd) amplitudes for the exclusion group compared to the inclusion group, it did not affect target enhancement, reflected as similar target-negativity (Nt) amplitudes for both the exclusion and inclusion groups. Together, these results extend our understanding of the relationship between exclusion and inhibitory control, and suggest that social exclusion affects selective attention in a more complex manner than previously thought. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A SYSTEM APPROACH TO ORGANISING PROTECTION FROM TARGETED INFORMATION IN SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Tumbinskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives The aim of the study is to formalise a generalised algorithm for the distribution of targeted information in social networks, serving as the basis for a methodology for increasing personal information security. Method The research is based on the methodology of protection from unwanted information distributed across social network systems. Results The article presents the formalisation of an algorithm for the distribution of targeted information across social networks: input and output parameters are defined and the algorithm’s internal conditions are described, consisting of parameters for implementing attack scenarios, which variation would allow them to be detailed. A technique for protection from targeted information distributed across social networks is proposed, allowing the level of protection of personal data and information of social networks users to be enhanced, as well as the reliability of information increased. Conclusion The results of the research will help to prevent threats to information security, counteract attacks by intruders who often use methods of competitive intelligence and social engineering through the use of countermeasures. A model for protection against targeted information and implement special software for its integration into online social network social information systems is developed. The system approach will allow external monitoring of events in social networks to be carried out and vulnerabilities identified in the mechanisms of instant messaging, which provide opportunities for attacks by intruders. The results of the research make it possible to apply a network approach to the study of informal communities, which are actively developing today, at a new level. 

  15. Patient-targeted Googling and social media: a cross-sectional study of senior medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Chester, Aaron N.; Walthert, Susan E.; Gallagher, Stephen J.; Anderson, Lynley C.; Stitely, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Social media and Internet technologies present several emerging and ill-explored issues for a modern healthcare workforce. One issue is patient-targeted Googling (PTG), which involves a healthcare professional using a social networking site (SNS) or publicly available search engine to find patient information online. The study’s aim was to address a deficit in data and knowledge regarding PTG, and to investigate medical student use of SNSs due to a close association with PTG. Metho...

  16. Social media analytics and research testbed (SMART: Exploring spatiotemporal patterns of human dynamics with geo-targeted social media messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiue-An Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The multilevel model of meme diffusion conceptualizes how mediated messages diffuse over time and space. As a pilot application of implementing the meme diffusion, we developed the social media analytics and research testbed to monitor Twitter messages and track the diffusion of information in and across different cities and geographic regions. Social media analytics and research testbed is an online geo-targeted search and analytics tool, including an automatic data processing procedure at the backend and an interactive frontend user interface. Social media analytics and research testbed is initially designed to facilitate (1 searching and geo-locating tweet topics and terms in different cities and geographic regions; (2 filtering noise from raw data (such as removing redundant retweets and using machine learning methods to improve precision; (3 analyzing social media data from a spatiotemporal perspective; and (4 visualizing social media data in diagnostic ways (such as weekly and monthly trends, trend maps, top media, top retweets, top mentions, or top hashtags. Social media analytics and research testbed provides researchers and domain experts with a tool that can efficiently facilitate the refinement, formalization, and testing of research hypotheses or questions. Three case studies (flu outbreaks, Ebola epidemic, and marijuana legalization are introduced to illustrate how the predictions of meme diffusion can be examined and to demonstrate the potentials and key functions of social media analytics and research testbed.

  17. Targeted social protection in a pastoralist economy: case study from Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, S A; Jensen, N D; Mude, A G

    2016-11-01

    Social protection programmes are designed to help vulnerable populations - including pastoralists - maintain a basic level of well-being, manage risk, and cope with negative shocks. Theory suggests that differential targeting according to poverty status can increase the reach and effectiveness of budgeted social protection programmes. Chronically poor households benefit most from social protection designed to help them meet their basic needs and make vital investments necessary to graduate from poverty. Vulnerable non-destitute households benefit from protection against costly temporary shocks, but do not necessarily need regular assistance. Welfare gains occur when a comprehensive social protection programme considers the needs of both types of households. The authors use evidence-based understanding of poverty dynamics in the pastoralist-based economy of northern Kenya's arid and semi-arid lands as a case study to discuss and compare the observed impacts of two different social protection schemes on heterogeneous pastoralist households: a targeted, unconditional, cash-transfer programme designed to support the poorest, and an index-based livestock insurance programme, which acts as a productive 'safety net' to help stem a descent into poverty and increase resilience. Both types of social protection scheme have been shown to decrease poverty, improve food security and protect child health. However, the behavioural response for asset accumulation varies with the type of protection and the household's unique situation. Poor households that receive cash transfers retain and accumulate assets quickly. Insured households, who are typically vulnerable yet not destitute, protect existing herds and invest more in the livestock they already own. The authors argue that differential targeting increases programme efficiency, and discuss Kenya's current approach to implementing differentially targeted social protection.

  18. Exogenous Social Identity Cues Differentially Affect the Dynamic Tracking of Individual Target Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Roy; Gabbert, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    We report on an experiment to investigate the top-down effect of exogenous social identity cues on a multiple-identity tracking task, a paradigm well suited to investigate the processes of binding identity to spatial locations. Here we simulated an eyewitness event in which dynamic targets, all to be tracked with equal effort, were identified from…

  19. Outreach for Outreach: Targeting social media audiences to promote a NASA kids’ web site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, C. C.

    2009-12-01

    The Space Place is a successful NASA web site that benefits upper elementary school students and educators by providing games, activities, and resources to stimulate interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, as well as to inform the audience of NASA’s contributions. As online social networking grows to be a central component of modern communication, The Space Place has explored the benefits of integrating social networks with the web site to increase awareness of materials the web site offers. This study analyzes the capabilities of social networks, and specifically the demographics of Twitter and Facebook. It then compares these results with the content, audience, and perceived demographics of The Space Place web site. Based upon the demographic results, we identified a target constituency that would benefit from the integration of social networks into The Space Place web site. As a result of this study, a Twitter feed has been established that releases a daily tweet from The Space Place. In addition, a Facebook page has been created to showcase new content and prompt interaction among fans of The Space Place. Currently, plans are under way to populate the Space Place Facebook page. Each social network has been utilized in an effort to spark excitement about the content on The Space Place, as well as to attract followers to the main NASA Space Place web site. To pursue this idea further, a plan has been developed to promote NASA Space Place’s social media tools among the target audience.

  20. A Targeted Minimum Benefit Plan: A New Proposal to Reduce Poverty Among Older Social Security Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Herd

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the big news in Social Security reform has been the program’s fiscal concerns. In light of concerns about both program costs and benefit adequacy, we propose an effective and relatively inexpensive targeted program to provide a minimally adequate floor to old-­age income through the Social Security system. This minimum benefit plan would provide a cost-­effective method for reducing elder poverty to very low levels. A key element is that the benefit would not count toward income eligibility thresholds for other social programs. Other aspects include an income-­tested benefit that would bring beneficiaries to 100 percent of the poverty threshold; application by filing of a 1040 income tax return; and setting of benefit levels and distribution through the Social Security Administration.

  1. Social capital interventions targeting older people and their impact on health: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Planas, Laura; Nyqvist, Fredrica; Puig, Teresa; Urrútia, Gerard; Solà, Ivan; Monteserín, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    Observational studies show that social capital is a protective health factor. Therefore, we aim to assess the currently unclear health impact of social capital interventions targeting older adults. We conducted a systematic review based on a logic model. Studies published between January 1980 and July 2015 were retrieved from MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Web of Science. We included randomised controlled trials targeting participants over 60 years old and focused on social capital or its components (eg, social support and social participation). The comparison group should not promote social capital. We assessed risk of bias and impact on health outcomes and use of health-related resources applying a procedure from the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) based on vote-counting and standardised decision rules. The review protocol was registered in PROSPERO (reference number CRD42014015362). We examined 17 341 abstracts and included 73 papers reporting 36 trials. Trials were clinically and methodologically diverse and reported positive effects in different contexts, populations and interventions across multiple subjective and objective measures. According to sufficiently reported outcomes, social capital interventions showed mixed effects on quality of life, well-being and self-perceived health and were generally ineffective on loneliness, mood and mortality. Eight trials with high quality showed favourable impacts on overall, mental and physical health, mortality and use of health-related resources. Our review highlights the lack of evidence and the diversity among trials, while supporting the potential of social capital interventions to reach comprehensive health effects in older adults. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Improving environmental and social targeting through adaptive management in Mexico's payments for hydrological services program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Katharine R E; Alix-Garcia, Jennifer M; Shapiro-Garza, Elizabeth; Fine, Leah R; Radeloff, Volker C; Aronson, Glen; Castillo, Selene; Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos; Yañez-Pagans, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Natural resource managers are often expected to achieve both environmental protection and economic development even when there are fundamental trade-offs between these goals. Adaptive management provides a theoretical structure for program administrators to balance social priorities in the presence of trade-offs and to improve conservation targeting. We used the case of Mexico's federal Payments for Hydrological Services program (PSAH) to illustrate the importance of adaptive management for improving program targeting. We documented adaptive elements of PSAH and corresponding changes in program eligibility and selection criteria. To evaluate whether these changes resulted in enrollment of lands of high environmental and social priority, we compared the environmental and social characteristics of the areas enrolled in the program with the characteristics of all forested areas in Mexico, all areas eligible for the program, and all areas submitted for application to the program. The program successfully enrolled areas of both high ecological and social priority, and over time, adaptive changes in the program's criteria for eligibility and selection led to increased enrollment of land scoring high on both dimensions. Three factors facilitated adaptive management in Mexico and are likely to be generally important for conservation managers: a supportive political environment, including financial backing and encouragement to experiment from the federal government; availability of relatively good social and environmental data; and active participation in the review process by stakeholders and outside evaluators. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  3. Social media targeting of health messages. A promising approach for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betsch, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    In their contribution, Remschmidt and colleagues (1) put forward an innovative approach for recruiting female, German study participants from diverse social and ethnical backgrounds to assess their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding HPV vaccination. The approach involves placing advertisements on the social media platform Facebook that specify tags for not only the sought after socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender) but also self-relevant aspects of the target group. These tags determine which Facebook users will see the ad. By sequentially adjusting the tags, the researchers were able to recruit different sub-populations, resulting in a final sample similar to a representative German sample for a particular age group.

  4. Using geo-targeted social media data to detect outdoor air pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor air pollution has become a more and more serious issue over recent years (He, 2014. Urban air quality is measured at air monitoring stations. Building air monitoring stations requires land, incurs costs and entails skilled technicians to maintain a station. Many countries do not have any monitoring stations and even lack any means to monitor air quality. Recent years, the social media could be used to monitor air quality dynamically (Wang, 2015; Mei, 2014. However, no studies have investigated the inter-correlations between real-space and cyberspace by examining variation in micro-blogging behaviors relative to changes in daily air quality. Thus, existing methods of monitoring AQI using micro-blogging data shows a high degree of error between real AQI and air quality as inferred from social media messages. In this paper, we introduce a new geo-targeted social media analytic method to (1 investigate the dynamic relationship between air pollution-related posts on Sina Weibo and daily AQI values; (2 apply Gradient Tree Boosting, a machine learning method, to monitor the dynamics of AQI using filtered social media messages. Our results expose the spatiotemporal relationships between social media messages and real-world environmental changes as well suggesting new ways to monitor air pollution using social media.

  5. Using geo-targeted social media data to detect outdoor air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W.; Wang, Y.; Tsou, M. H.; Fu, X.

    2016-06-01

    Outdoor air pollution has become a more and more serious issue over recent years (He, 2014). Urban air quality is measured at air monitoring stations. Building air monitoring stations requires land, incurs costs and entails skilled technicians to maintain a station. Many countries do not have any monitoring stations and even lack any means to monitor air quality. Recent years, the social media could be used to monitor air quality dynamically (Wang, 2015; Mei, 2014). However, no studies have investigated the inter-correlations between real-space and cyberspace by examining variation in micro-blogging behaviors relative to changes in daily air quality. Thus, existing methods of monitoring AQI using micro-blogging data shows a high degree of error between real AQI and air quality as inferred from social media messages. In this paper, we introduce a new geo-targeted social media analytic method to (1) investigate the dynamic relationship between air pollution-related posts on Sina Weibo and daily AQI values; (2) apply Gradient Tree Boosting, a machine learning method, to monitor the dynamics of AQI using filtered social media messages. Our results expose the spatiotemporal relationships between social media messages and real-world environmental changes as well suggesting new ways to monitor air pollution using social media.

  6. „Careers of young delinquents”, i.e. the phenomenon of excluding pre-school children who are at risk of social maladjustment during the early stages of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research on the process of social exclusion from the first stage of the education of children at risk of social maladjustment. The author presents strategies and tactics used by teachers of preschool education to eliminate the exclusion of children who cause educational problems. The author analyzes the data in accordance with the methodology of grounded theory in the context of game theory.

  7. Social identity and support for counteracting tobacco company marketing that targets vulnerable populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Sabeeh A; Pepper, Jessica K; Morgan, Jennifer C; Brewer, Noel T

    2017-06-01

    Tobacco companies use advertising to target vulnerable populations, including youth, racial/ethnic minorities, and sexual minorities. We sought to examine how personal identity affects support for population-specific anti-smoking advertisements that could serve as countermeasures to industry marketing practices. In 2014-2015, we surveyed probability phone samples of adults and adolescents (n = 6,139) and an online convenience sample of adults (n = 4,137) in the United States. We experimentally varied the description of tobacco industry marketing practices (no description, general, or specific to a target group). The four prevention target groups were teens; African Americans; Latinos; and gays, lesbians, and bisexuals (GLBs). Participants were either members or non-members of their prevention target group. Support was highest for anti-smoking advertisements targeting teens, moderate for Latinos and African Americans, and lowest for GLBs. In-group members expressed higher support than out-group members when anti-smoking advertisements targeted African Americans, Latinos, and GLBs (all p marketing practices did not have an effect. Results were similar across the phone and online studies. Our findings suggest that the public strongly supports advertisements to prevent smoking among teens, but support for similar efforts among other vulnerable populations is comparatively low. Anti-smoking campaigns for vulnerable populations may benefit from a greater understanding of the role of social identity in shaping public support for such campaigns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Climate policy and the social cost of power generation: Impacts of the Swedish national emissions target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederholm, Patrik; Pettersson, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the design of climate policy in a small open economy may affect the internalization of carbon-related external costs and ultimately the social choice between different power generation technologies. Empirically we focus on the Swedish case and analyze three climate policy regimes, out of which two represent different national goal formulations and thus compliance strategies. The results show that the social choice between power generation technologies in Sweden will be significantly influenced by the choice of climate policy regime. Most notably, if Sweden would abandon its present national target for carbon dioxide emissions and instead make full use of the country's participation in international emissions trading, natural gas-fired power would replace onshore wind power as the power generation source with the lowest social cost

  9. What works in inclusion health: overview of effective interventions for marginalised and excluded populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchenski, Serena; Maguire, Nick; Aldridge, Robert W; Hayward, Andrew; Story, Alistair; Perri, Patrick; Withers, James; Clint, Sharon; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Hewett, Nigel

    2017-11-10

    Inclusion health is a service, research, and policy agenda that aims to prevent and redress health and social inequities among the most vulnerable and excluded populations. We did an evidence synthesis of health and social interventions for inclusion health target populations, including people with experiences of homelessness, drug use, imprisonment, and sex work. These populations often have multiple overlapping risk factors and extreme levels of morbidity and mortality. We identified numerous interventions to improve physical and mental health, and substance use; however, evidence is scarce for structural interventions, including housing, employment, and legal support that can prevent exclusion and promote recovery. Dedicated resources and better collaboration with the affected populations are needed to realise the benefits of existing interventions. Research must inform the benefits of early intervention and implementation of policies to address the upstream causes of exclusion, such as adverse childhood experiences and poverty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Narrative Review of Social Media and Game-Based Nutrition Interventions Targeted at Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Monica; Yeung, Sin Hang; Partridge, Stephanie; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    The increased popularity of social media and mobile gaming among young adults provides an opportunity for innovative nutrition programs. This review evaluated the efficacy of these strategies in interventions targeted at 18- to 35-year-olds. The protocol was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). Ten scientific databases, information technology conference proceedings, and gray literature were searched. Two reviewers conducted screening, data extraction, and quality assessments. Interventions were included if they used social media or electronic games. Comparisons were made pre- to post-intervention, or between intervention and control arms. Outcomes of interest included change in nutrition knowledge, attitudes, behavior, or weight and/or body composition. Eleven social media-based (randomized controlled trials [RCT] n=7) and six game-based [RCT n=1]) interventions were included. Overall quality of studies was low. Social media-based strategies included forum/blogs (n=5), Facebook (n=5), Twitter (n=1), YouTube (n=1), and chat rooms (n=1). Eight (RCT n=6) of 11 social media-based studies demonstrated improvements in outcomes. Findings suggested that social media may be more effective when combined with other strategies. Virtual reality games (n=3), web-based games (n=2), and a mobile application (n=1) were used in the gaming interventions. While a significant increase in knowledge was reported by three gaming studies (RCT=1), two used nonvalidated tools and longer-term measures of weight and behavioral outcomes were limited. The use of social media and gaming for nutrition promotion is in its infancy. Preliminary evidence suggests that these strategies have some utility for intervening with young adults. Further research using high-quality study designs is required, with measurement of outcomes over longer time periods. The systematic review protocol is registered with PROSPERO (registration number: CRD42015025427

  11. Of Caucasians, Asians, and Giraffes: The Influence of Categorization and Target Valence on Social Projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machunsky, Maya; Walther, Eva

    2015-09-01

    Past research has indicated that social projection is moderated by categorization, with more projection onto ingroups than onto outgroups. However, a few studies have reported elevated levels of projection even onto outgroups. In line with recent evidence, we hypothesized that positive target valence is the key feature of conditions that elicit projection onto outgroups. The present research extends previous findings by testing whether the effect of valence occurs independent of categorization, with increased levels of projection onto positive ingroup and non-ingroup targets alike. We designed two experiments in which target valence was manipulated by means of evaluative conditioning. Category membership was varied by using faces of Caucasians, Asians, and giraffes. The results supported our valence hypothesis. Counter-intuitively, we also found higher levels of projection onto giraffes than onto humans. These findings suggest that current cognition-based models of projection are not sufficient to account for the whole range of projection phenomena. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  12. AFSC/ABL: 2009 Chinook Excluder Samples

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project genetically analyzed 1,620 chinook salmon samples from the 2009 spring salmon excluder device test. These samples were collected over a short period of...

  13. Excluded Volume Effects in Gene Stretching

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Pui-Man

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the effects excluded volume on the stretching of a single DNA in solution. We find that for small force F, the extension h is not linear in F but proportion to F^{\\chi}, with \\chi=(1-\

  14. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... level of 750,000 per ml. (1,000,000 per ml. for goat milk) (§ 58.133 (b)(6)); or (d) The producer's milk... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...

  15. Multilingual Connotation Frames: A Case Study on Social Media for Targeted Sentiment Analysis and Forecast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashkin, Hannah J.; Bell, Eric B.; Choi, Yejin; Volkova, Svitlana

    2017-07-30

    People around the globe respond to major real world events through social media. To study targeted public sentiments across many languages and geographic locations, we introduce multilingual connotation frames: an extension from English connotation frames of Rashkin et al. (2016) with 10 additional European languages, focusing on the implied sentiments among event participants engaged in a frame. As a case study, we present large scale analysis on targeted public sentiments using 1.2 million multilingual connotation frames extracted from Twitter. We rely on connotation frames to build models to forecast country-specific connotation dynamics – perspective change over time towards salient entities and events. Our results demonstrate that connotation dynamics can be accurately predicted up to half a week in advance.

  16. An Analysis of How Building a Collaborative Community of Professional Social Studies Teachers through Targeted Ambient Professional Development Impacts Social Studies Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Brown, Karen; Shaffer, LaShorage; Werner, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a yearlong ambient professional development (PD) program-The Wayne Schools Global Geography Project (WSGG-project)-that focused on improving teacher quality through PD and classroom observations for in-service social studies teachers. The project targeted middle and high school social studies teachers and used…

  17. What is the Right to Exclude Immigrants?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    It is normally taken for granted that states have a right to control immigration into their territory. When immigration is raised as a normative issue two questions become salient, one about what the right to exclude is, and one about whether and how it might be justified. This paper considers...... the first question. The paper starts by noting that standard debates about immigration have not addressed what the right to exclude is. Standard debates about immigration furthermore tend to result either in fairly strong cases for open borders or in denials that considerations of justice apply...... to immigration at all, which results in state discretion positions. This state of debate is both theoretically unsatisfactory and normatively implausible. The paper therefore explores an alternative approach to the right to exclude immigrants from the perspective of recent debates about the territorial rights...

  18. YOUTH ASPIRATIONS, SOCIAL MOBILITY AND EDUCATIONAL TARGET ACHIEVEMENT IN SRI LANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J.M.N.G. Samarakoon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to identify how young students set educational targets in major competency levels of their education namely, GCE Ordinary Level (O/L, GCE Advanced Level (A/L, First Degree and Post-Graduate level, and how far they achieve those targets or deviate, which can be used as a yardstick to measure the impact and relevance of education in Sri Lanka. The study was conducted in the Sabaragamuwa University of Sri Lanka in 2011. A questionnaire was provided to 150 respondents who were selected based on formal systematic random sampling method. The study reveals that students select their future field of education during the period of GCE O/L based on their performance and set future targets accordingly. The ‘white collar job mentality’ is infused to most students during this period with considerable contribution from parents, family members, teachers and other social networks, which intensifies competition in the job market later on. The Chi-square test concluded that there is a relationship between the selection of subject stream at A/L and family income at 5% level of significance (P value=0.043, probability 95%, which later determines job prospects and their payoffs. Additionally, 67% of the undergraduates in the sample have decided to follow a postgraduate degree due to the challenges in the job market. The paper concludes that though youth aspirations and social mobility are based on education, they are also heavily conditioned by structural realities such as family wealth, status, and life opportunities, as well as unequal distributions of education facilities.

  19. Community based social marketing for implementation of energy saving targets at local level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Streimikiene

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy saving and greenhouse gas (GHG emission reduction policies at local level need to be investigated and new tools for climate change mitigation are necessary seeking to achieve GHG emission targets in Lithuania. Most Lithuanian municipalities have signed Covenant of Mayors and have prepared local energy action plans. However, all these plans include just energy saving measures on supply side and renovation of buildings. Nevertheless, the significant energy savings and GHG emission reductions can be achieved through behavioural changes. The aim of the paper is to apply community based social marketing approach in assessment of achievable energy saving and GHG emission reduction targets set by local energy action plans. The paper presents the results of case study implemented in Kaunas region municipality. The case study was conducted by creating focus groups and applying two scenarios: baseline or doing nothing and climate change mitigation scenario including intervention measures. The results of case study revealed that the total energy consumption reduction target set in Sustainable energy development strategy of Kaunas region county - 11% - can be achieved by combining results of energy consumption reduction in both focus groups. The survey conducted after study finalization revealed that respondents were provided with a lot of additional knowledge during the study and achieved real money savings. The major barriers of energy savings in households are related with the lack of information on energy savings and GHG emission reduction.

  20. Polyelectrolyte solutions: Excluded-volume considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoussi, Hedi; Karasz, Frank E.

    1993-12-01

    We provide experimental evidence for the electrostatically related excluded-volume effects on the colligative properties and the single chain behavior of polyelectrolyte solutions in the dilute regime. The data are compared to the theory developed by Fixman, Skolnick, Odijk, and Houwaart. Good agreement between these theoretical considerations and the experimental data is observed.

  1. The Paradox of the Excluded Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A paradox seems to exist where a child, of compulsory schooling age, is excluded from a school. The practice of exclusion has evolved over the almost two centuries of compulsory schooling. Abolition of corporal punishment in Western Australia and elsewhere has tended to focus attention on exclusion and the grounds justifying such action by school…

  2. Our grandmothers, excluded from history, preservers and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our grandmothers, excluded from history, preservers and transmitters of indegenous values: ecomaternalistic approach. ... Journal of Religion and Human Relations ... It further calls for the retrieval of the said hidden histories of women which would hopefully be a lesson for the contemporary and future women.

  3. Multifaceted Sexual Desire and Hormonal Associations: Accounting for Social Location, Relationship Status, and Desire Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Sara B; Burke, Shannon M; Goldey, Katherine L; van Anders, Sari M

    2017-11-01

    Sexual desire is typically measured as a unitary erotic phenomenon and is often assumed by biological and biomedical researchers, as well as the lay public, to be directly connected to physiological parameters like testosterone (T). In the present study, we empirically examined how conceptualizing sexual desire as multifaceted might clarify associations with T and contextual variables. To do so, we used the Sexual Desire Questionnaire (DESQ), which assesses multifaceted dyadic sexual desire, to explore how contextual variables such as social location, relationship status, and desire target (e.g., partner vs. stranger) might be meaningful for reports of sexual desire and associated hormonal correlations. We focused on women (N = 198), because sexual desire and testosterone are generally unlinked in healthy men. Participants imagined a partner or stranger while answering the 65 DESQ items and provided a saliva sample for hormone assay. Analyses showed that the DESQ factored differently for the current sample than in previous research, highlighting how sexual desire can be constructed differently across different populations. We also found that, for the Intimacy, Eroticism, and Partner Focus factors, mean scores were higher when the desire target was a partner relative to a stranger for participants in a relationship, but equally high between partner versus stranger target for single participants. DESQ items resolved into meaningful hormonal desire components, such that high endorsement of Fantasy Experience was linked to higher T, and higher cortisol was linked with lower endorsement of the Intimacy factor. We argue that conceptualizing desire as multifaceted and contextualized when assessing hormonal links-or questions in general about desire-can clarify some of its complexities and lead to new research avenues.

  4. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  5. Extended Excluded Volume: Its Origin and Consequences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Rouha, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2013), s. 201-210 ISSN 0033-4545. [International Conference on Solution Chemistry (ICSC-32) /32./. La Grande Motte, 28.08.2011-02.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720802 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : excluded volume * partial molar volume * primitive models Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2013

  6. Targeting brains, producing responsibilities: the use of neuroscience within British social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, Tineke; Pickersgill, Martyn

    2015-05-01

    Concepts and findings 'translated' from neuroscientific research are finding their way into UK health and social policy discourse. Critical scholars have begun to analyse how policies tend to 'misuse' the neurosciences and, further, how these discourses produce unwarranted and individualizing effects, rooted in middle-class values and inducing guilt and anxiety. In this article, we extend such work while simultaneously departing from the normative assumptions implied in the concept of 'misuse'. Through a documentary analysis of UK policy reports focused on the early years, adolescence and older adults, we examine how these employ neuroscientific concepts and consequently (re)define responsibility. In the documents analysed, responsibility was produced in three different but intersecting ways: through a focus on optimisation, self-governance, and vulnerability. Our work thereby adds to social scientific examinations of neuroscience in society that show how neurobiological terms and concepts can be used to construct and support a particular imaginary of citizenship and the role of the state. Neuroscience may be leveraged by policy makers in ways that (potentially) reduce the target of their intervention to the soma, but do so in order to expand the outcome of the intervention to include the enhancement of society writ large. By attending as well to more critical engagements with neuroscience in policy documents, our analysis demonstrates the importance of being mindful of the limits to the deployment of a neurobiological idiom within policy settings. Accordingly, we contribute to increased empirical specificity concerning the impacts and translation of neuroscientific knowledge in contemporary society whilst refusing to take for granted the idea that the neurosciences necessarily have a dominant role (to play). Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Patient-targeted Googling and social media: a cross-sectional study of senior medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Aaron N; Walthert, Susan E; Gallagher, Stephen J; Anderson, Lynley C; Stitely, Michael L

    2017-12-04

    Social media and Internet technologies present several emerging and ill-explored issues for a modern healthcare workforce. One issue is patient-targeted Googling (PTG), which involves a healthcare professional using a social networking site (SNS) or publicly available search engine to find patient information online. The study's aim was to address a deficit in data and knowledge regarding PTG, and to investigate medical student use of SNSs due to a close association with PTG. The authors surveyed final year medical students at the Otago Medical School, University of Otago in January 2016. A subset completed focus groups that were analysed using thematic analysis to identify key themes relating to students' attitudes towards PTG, and reasons why they might engage in PTG. Fifty-four students completed the survey (response rate = 65.1%), which showed that PTG was uncommon (n = 9, 16.7%). Attitudes were varied and context dependent. Most participants saw problems with PTG and favoured more explicit guidance on the issue (n = 29, 53.7%). SNS usage was high (n = 51, 94.4%); participants were concerned by the content of their SNS profiles and who they were connecting with online. Participants showing high SNS use were 1.83 times more likely to have conducted PTG than lower use groups. The diverse attitudes uncovered in this study indicated that teaching or guidelines could be useful to healthcare professionals considering PTG. Though ethically problematic, PTG may be important to patient care and safety. The decision to conduct PTG should be made with consideration of ethical principles and the intended use of the information.

  8. 77 FR 51033 - Notice of Change in Notification of Refugee Social Services and Targeted Assistance Formula Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of Refugee Resettlement [C.F.D.A. Numbers: 93.566 and 93.584] Notice of Change in Notification of Refugee Social Services and Targeted Assistance Formula Grant Allocations AGENCY: Office of Refugee Resettlement, ACF, HHS. ACTION: Notification of change...

  9. Social entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social entrepreneurship has experienced a renaissance in the world over the last decade. The business sector, pressed by the economic crisis and social responsibility imperatives, started to turn towards some of the more sustainable organisational models, which combine profit and responsible orientation. Social entrepreneurship, as a whole, is characterised by the support and assistance rendered to the community and the vulnerable social groups. Social entrepreneurs are a proof that financial success does not exclude responsible behaviour towards the social community and the environment, and that the socially beneficial target may also serve as a successful business driver. At the same time, social enterprises may be a very useful source of entrepreneurial ideas in the economies which are passing through transition, with the high unemployment rates. Filling in the gaps in offering certain social services, with simultaneous profit making and offering option for engagement of entire families, are only some of the features characteristic for the social enterprises, which could become one of the leading models of business conducted in the Serbian economy.

  10. Corporate social responsibility initiatives addressing social exclusion in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Wendy J

    2009-08-01

    The private sector is often seen as a driver of exclusionary processes rather than a partner in improving the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations. However, private-sector initiatives and partnerships- collectively labelled corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives-may be able to positively impact social status, earning potential, and access to services and resources for socially-excluded populations. This paper presents case studies of CSR projects in Bangladesh that are designed to reduce social exclusion among marginalized populations and explores whether CSR initiatives can increase economic and social capabilities to reduce exclusion. The examples provide snapshots of projects that (a) increase job-skills and employment opportunities for women, disabled women, and rehabilitated drug-users and (b) provide healthcare services to female workers and their communities. The CSR case studies cover a limited number of people but characteristics and practices replicable and scaleable across different industries, countries, and populations are identified. Common success factors from the case studies form the basis for recommendations to design and implement more CSR initiatives targeting socially-excluded groups. The analysis found that CSR has potential for positive and lasting impact on developing countries, especifically on socially-excluded populations. However, there is a need for additional monitoring and critical evaluation.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives Addressing Social Exclusion in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The private sector is often seen as a driver of exclusionary processes rather than a partner in improving the health and welfare of socially-excluded populations. However, private-sector initiatives and partnerships—collectively labelled corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives—may be able to positively impact social status, earning potential, and access to services and resources for socially-excluded populations. This paper presents case studies of CSR projects in Bangladesh that are designed to reduce social exclusion among marginalized populations and explores whether CSR initiatives can increase economic and social capabilities to reduce exclusion. The examples provide snapshots of projects that (a) increase job-skills and employment opportunities for women, disabled women, and rehabilitated drug-users and (b) provide healthcare services to female workers and their communities. The CSR case studies cover a limited number of people but characteristics and practices replicable and scaleable across different industries, countries, and populations are identified. Common success factors from the case studies form the basis for recommendations to design and implement more CSR initiatives targeting socially-excluded groups. The analysis found that CSR has potential for positive and lasting impact on developing countries, especifically on socially-excluded populations. However, there is a need for additional monitoring and critical evaluation. PMID:19761088

  12. Understanding Social Situations (USS): A proof-of-concept social-cognitive intervention targeting theory of mind and attributional bias in individuals with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiszdon, Joanna M; Roberts, David L; Penn, David L; Choi, Kee-Hong; Tek, Cenk; Choi, Jimmy; Bell, Morris D

    2017-03-01

    In this proof-of-concept trial, we examined the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of Understanding Social Situations (USS), a new social-cognitive intervention that targets higher level social-cognitive skills using methods common to neurocognitive remediation, including drill and practice and hierarchically structured training, which may compensate for the negative effects of cognitive impairment on learning. Thirty-eight individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders completed the same baseline assessment of cognitive and social-cognitive functioning twice over a 1-month period to minimize later practice effects, then received 7-10 sessions of USS training, and then completed the same assessment again at posttreatment. USS training was well tolerated and received high treatment satisfaction ratings. Large improvements on the USS Skills Test, which contained items similar to but not identical to training stimuli, suggest that we were effective in teaching specific training content. Content gains generalized to improvements on some of the social-cognitive tasks, including select measures of attributional bias and theory of mind. Importantly, baseline neurocognition did not impact the amount of learning during USS (as indexed by the USS Skills Test) or the amount of improvement on social-cognitive measures. USS shows promise as a treatment for higher level social-cognitive skills. Given the lack of relationship between baseline cognition and treatment effects, it may be particularly appropriate for individuals with lower range cognitive function. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Fighting Dark Networks: Using Social Network Analysis to Implement the Special Operations Targeting Process for Direct and Indirect Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    key player problem of network intervention targeting, are described in pieces by Ballester , Calvo-Armengol and Zenou.90 As a military practitioners go...Properties of Eigenvector Centrality,” Social Networks 29, no. 4 (2007), 555–564. 90 Coralio Ballester , Antoni Calvo-Armengol, and Yves Zenou...Sociological Review 58 (1993): 837–860. Ballester , Coralio, Antoni Calvo-Armengol, and Yves Zenou. “Who’s Who in Crime Networks. Wanted: The Key Player

  14. Applying Theory of Mind Concepts When Designing Interventions Targeting Social Cognition among Youth Offenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Kristine K.; Westby, Carol

    2014-01-01

    This study employed a multiple baseline, across-participants, single-subject design to investigate the feasibility of an individual, narrative-based, social problem-solving intervention on the social problem-solving, narrative, and theory of mind (ToM) abilities of 3 incarcerated adolescent youth offenders identified as having emotional…

  15. 'Get Your Life Back': process and impact evaluation of an asthma social marketing campaign targeting older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Uwana; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don; Caputi, Peter

    2013-08-15

    Asthma in older adults is underdiagnosed and poorly self-managed. This population has little knowledge about the key symptoms, the prevalence among older adults, and the serious consequences of untreated asthma. The purpose of this study was to undertake a multifaceted evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase asthma awareness among older adults in a regional Australian community. A cohort of older adults in an intervention region (n = 316) and a control region (n = 394) were surveyed immediately prior to and following the social marketing campaign. Campaign awareness, message recall, materials recognition, and actions taken as a result of the campaign were assessed in both regions. Asthma knowledge and perceptions, experience of asthma symptoms, and general health were also assessed in both regions at baseline and follow-up. Analyses were conducted to explore the effects of the campaign in the intervention region, and to examine outcomes among different audience segments. The survey data showed that those in the target segments (Wheezers and Strugglers) had better message recall, and were more likely to report having taken action to control their respiratory symptoms. The campaign significantly increased the number of calls to an asthma information line from the target audience in the intervention community. A theory-based social marketing campaign conducted over 3-months increased the asthma information seeking behaviours of older adults in the intervention community compared to the control community. Recommendations are outlined for future community health promotion campaigns targeting older adults.

  16. ‘Get Your Life Back’: process and impact evaluation of an asthma social marketing campaign targeting older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma in older adults is underdiagnosed and poorly self-managed. This population has little knowledge about the key symptoms, the prevalence among older adults, and the serious consequences of untreated asthma. The purpose of this study was to undertake a multifaceted evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase asthma awareness among older adults in a regional Australian community. Methods A cohort of older adults in an intervention region (n = 316) and a control region (n = 394) were surveyed immediately prior to and following the social marketing campaign. Campaign awareness, message recall, materials recognition, and actions taken as a result of the campaign were assessed in both regions. Asthma knowledge and perceptions, experience of asthma symptoms, and general health were also assessed in both regions at baseline and follow-up. Analyses were conducted to explore the effects of the campaign in the intervention region, and to examine outcomes among different audience segments. Results The survey data showed that those in the target segments (Wheezers and Strugglers) had better message recall, and were more likely to report having taken action to control their respiratory symptoms. The campaign significantly increased the number of calls to an asthma information line from the target audience in the intervention community. Conclusions A theory-based social marketing campaign conducted over 3-months increased the asthma information seeking behaviours of older adults in the intervention community compared to the control community. Recommendations are outlined for future community health promotion campaigns targeting older adults. PMID:23947479

  17. The mediating role of social workers in the implementation of regional policies targeting energy poverty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpellini, Sabina; Sanz Hernández, M. Alexia; Llera-Sastresa, Eva; Aranda, Juan A.; López Rodríguez, María Esther

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a socio-political reflection of the role played by social workers in regional policies and of the real needs of households affected by energy poverty. The paper also examines the impact of technical-specialised training on the ability of social workers to prevent and mitigate conditions of household energy poverty in Europe. The adoption of a research-action-participation methodological framework and a training research approach has permitted the opinions of social workers to be collected through surveys, and their central role in implementing regional policies to be highlighted. The conclusions obtained have made possible the construction of a self-diagnosis and data-collection tool which increases the ability of social workers to mediate and implement urgent mitigation measures for energy poverty. Finally, regional policies which aim to mitigate household energy poverty are examined from the professional perspective of social workers. - Highlights: • Social workers play a mediating role in the certification of household energy poverty. • Specific training for social workers contributes to the prevention of energy poverty. • National wide regulation would enable the implementation of equitable measures for energy poverty. • It is recommendable to define progressive subsidies depending on the level of energy vulnerability of the households.

  18. 31 CFR 19.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluded Parties List System 19.950 Section 19.950 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 19.950 Excluded Parties List System Excluded Parties...

  19. 29 CFR 778.225 - Talent fees excludable under regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Talent fees excludable under regulations. 778.225 Section... Payments That May Be Excluded From the âRegular Rateâ Talent Fees in the Radio and Television Industry § 778.225 Talent fees excludable under regulations. Section 7(e)(3) provides for the exclusion from the...

  20. 26 CFR 1.1563-2 - Excluded stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded stock. 1.1563-2 Section 1.1563-2...) INCOME TAXES Certain Controlled Corporations § 1.1563-2 Excluded stock. (a) Certain stock excluded. For purposes of sections 1561 through 1563 and the regulations thereunder, the term “stock” does not include...

  1. Tolerance-based interaction: a new model targeting opinion formation and diffusion in social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Topirceanu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main motivations behind social network analysis is the quest for understanding opinion formation and diffusion. Previous models have limitations, as they typically assume opinion interaction mechanisms based on thresholds which are either fixed or evolve according to a random process that is external to the social agent. Indeed, our empirical analysis on large real-world datasets such as Twitter, Meme Tracker, and Yelp, uncovers previously unaccounted for dynamic phenomena at population-level, namely the existence of distinct opinion formation phases and social balancing. We also reveal that a phase transition from an erratic behavior to social balancing can be triggered by network topology and by the ratio of opinion sources. Consequently, in order to build a model that properly accounts for these phenomena, we propose a new (individual-level opinion interaction model based on tolerance. As opposed to the existing opinion interaction models, the new tolerance model assumes that individual’s inner willingness to accept new opinions evolves over time according to basic human traits. Finally, by employing discrete event simulation on diverse social network topologies, we validate our opinion interaction model and show that, although the network size and opinion source ratio are important, the phase transition to social balancing is mainly fostered by the democratic structure of the small-world topology.

  2. O significado atribuído ao papel masculino e feminino por adolescentes de periferia El significado que los adolescentes de la periferia le atribuyen al rol masculino y femenino Meanings attributed to the masculine and feminine roles by socially-excluded adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Baggio

    2009-12-01

    , tiene repercusiones importantes en la forma en la que viven su sexualidad y en la construcción de una vida sana y en la formación de su ciudadanía.The objective of this research-action was to better comprehend the meanings attributed to the masculine and feminine roles by socially-excluded adolescents/youth that are integrated to a social-inclusion project. Twenty-seven subjects who are linked to the Gastronomy, Aesthetics, and New Discovery Groups. The data were derived from the "human body knowledge" workshop, developed separately in 3 groups through the construction of poster boards, collage activities, drawing, writing, the utilization of mannequins, and a dialectic approach to the theme. The data was analyzed according to thematic content analysis, producing two categories: "masculine strength and power", and "the contradictory role of the feminine gender." We conclude that the differences in masculine and feminine roles related to the social-political-cultural context of which these adolescents/youth are inserted, have important repercussions in the form in which they live their sexuality and more importantly their construction of healthy living and citizenship

  3. Shared sanitation: to include or to exclude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Duncan

    2016-05-01

    Just over 600 million people used shared sanitation in 2015, but this form of sanitation is not considered 'improved sanitation' or, in the current terminology, 'basic sanitation' by WHO/UNICEF, principally because they are typically unhygienic. Recent research has shown that neighbour-shared toilets perform much better than large communal toilets. The successful development of community-designed, built and managed sanitation-and-water blocks in very poor urban areas in India should be adapted and adopted throughout urban slums in developing countries, with a caretaker employed to keep the facilities clean. Such shared sanitation should be classified as 'basic', sometimes as 'safely-managed', sanitation, so contributing to the achievement of the sanitation target of the Sustainable Development Goals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. [How to reduce health inequities by targeting social determinants: the role of the health sector in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Valle, Adolfo; Terrazas, Paulina; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-04-01

    To study lines of action implemented in Mexico by the health sector from 2007 to 2012 in order to combat health inequities by targeting social determinants. To contribute to better understanding and knowledge of how health system inequalities in the Region of the Americas can be reduced. To formulate recommendations for designing a future public policy agenda to address the social determinants associated with health inequities in Mexico. The policies and programs established in the National Health Program (PRONASA) 2007 - 2012 were reviewed, and those that met four criteria were selected: i) they affected the social determinants of health (SDH); ii) they developed specific lines of action aimed at reducing health inequities; iii) they set concrete goals; and iv) they had been evaluated to determine whether those goals had been met. Three programs were selected: Seguro Popular, Programa de Desarrollo Humano Oportunidades (PDHO), and Caravanas de la Salud. Once each program's specific lines of action targeting SDH had been identified, the monitoring and evaluation indicators established in PRONASA 2007 - 2012, along with other available evaluations and empirical evidence, were used to measure the extent to which the goals were met. The findings showed that Seguro Popular had had a positive impact in terms of the financial protection of lower-income households. Moreover, the reduction in the gap between workers covered by the social security system and those who were not was more evident. By reducing poverty among its beneficiaries, the PDHO also managed to reduce health inequities. The indicators for Caravanas de la Salud, on the other hand, did not show statistically significant differences between the control localities and the localities covered by the program, except in the case of Pap tests. These findings have important public policy implications for designing an agenda that promotes continued targeting of SDH and heightening its impact in terms of reducing

  5. Targeting plug-in hybrid electric vehicle policies to increase social benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skerlos, Steven J.; Winebrake, James J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the U.S. federal government enacted tax credits aimed at encouraging consumers to purchase plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). These tax credits are available to all consumers equally and therefore do not account for the variability in social benefits associated with PHEV operation in different parts of the country. The tax credits also do not consider variability in consumer income. This paper discusses why the PHEV subsidy policy would have higher social benefits at equal or less cost if the tax credits were offered at different levels depending on consumer income and the location of purchase. Quantification of these higher social benefits and related policy proposals are left for future work.

  6. Systematic Review of Behavioral Interventions Targeting Social Communication Difficulties After Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Emma; Copley, Anna; Cornwell, Petrea; Kelly, Crystal

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether behavioral interventions are beneficial for adults with social communication difficulties after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Electronic databases were searched through October 2013 to find behavioral intervention trials. Keywords used in our search were intervention, therapy, treatment, and program combined with pragmatic disorder, pragmatic impairment, social communication disorder/impairment, conversation disorder/impairment, social disorder/impairment, cognitive-linguistic and cognitive-communication deficit; adult; and traumatic brain injury, head injury, and brain injury. Hand searches of the reference lists of relevant articles were also conducted. To be selected for detailed review, articles found in the initial search were assessed by 2 reviewers and had to meet the following criteria: (1) population (adults with TBI); (2) intervention (behavioral intervention); and (3) outcomes (changes in social communication). Articles needed to describe interventions that were delivered directly to adults with TBI with or without other people (such as significant others) involved. Of the 2181 articles initially identified, 15 were selected for detailed review. Data were independently extracted by members of the research team, then collated and reviewed by the team. Of the 15 publications that met the study criteria, 7 were single-case design studies, 3 were randomized controlled trials, 1 was a nonrandomized controlled trial, and 4 were cohort studies. The methodological qualities of eligible articles were examined using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database and Single-Case Experimental Design rating scales. The interventions described in the studies fell into 2 broad categories: those addressing a specific impairment in social communication, and context-specific interventions with a holistic focus on social communication skills. Studies using context-sensitive approaches had been published more recently and were generally group studies with higher

  7. Use of Social Media to Target Information-Driven Arms Control and Nonproliferation Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreyling, Sean J.; Williams, Laura S.; Gastelum, Zoe N.; Whattam, Kevin M.; Corley, Courtney D.; Cramer, Nicholas O.; Rose, Stuart J.; Bell, Eric B.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-07-19

    There has been considerable discussion within the national security community, including a recent workshop sponsored by the U.S. State Department, about the use of social media for extracting patterns of collective behavior and influencing public perception in areas relevant to arms control and nonproliferation. This paper seeks to explore if, and how, social media can be used to supplement nonproliferation and arms control inspection and monitoring activities on states and sites of greatest proliferation relevance. In this paper, we set the stage for how social media can be applied in this problem space and describe some of the foreseen challenges, including data validation, sources and attributes, verification, and security. Using information analytics and data visualization capabilities available at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we provide graphical examples of some social media "signatures" of potential relevance for nonproliferation and arms control purposes. We conclude by describing a proposed case study and offering recommendations both for further research and next steps by the policy community.

  8. Does life satisfaction change when watching your peers? An experimental exposure to social comparison targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Mimi Yung; Mikkelsen, Mai Bjørnskov

    This study examined whether social comparison affected life satisfaction in younger and older adults. In an experimental setting 204 younger and older adults were shown positive and negative documentaries with same-age characters. Life satisfaction increased after downward comparisons in both age...

  9. Intervention Integrity in the Low Countries: Interventions Targeting Social-Emotional Behaviors in the School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, Margot; Ekels, Elles; van der Valk, Cindel; van der Molen, Maurits

    2017-01-01

    The current study presents a review of intervention studies conducted in the Low Countries (i.e., The Netherlands and Flanders) focusing on social-emotional behaviors in the school. The primary purpose of this review was to assess whether studies included an operational definition of the intervention under study and reported data on the…

  10. Targeting Social Skills Deficits in an Adolescent with Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, Louis P.; Kuhn, David E.; Strother, Geri E.

    2009-01-01

    Social skills deficits are a defining feature of individuals diagnosed with autism and other pervasive developmental disorders (PDD), which can impair functioning and put the individual at higher risk for developing problem behavior (e.g., self-injury, aggression). In the current study, an adolescent with PDD displayed inappropriate social…

  11. Novel Therapeutic Targets to Treat Social Behavior Deficits in Autism and Related Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    other fields within biomedical neuroscience such as schizophrenia or depression wherein impaired social behavior is prominent. Technology Transfer...depression, which is often viewed as a manifestation of an inability to cope with stress. However, many individuals exposed to adversity maintain normal...other psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia , bipolar disorder and depression. Sociability 4 impairments have been modeled for translational

  12. A Trial of an iPad™ Intervention Targeting Social Communication Skills in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Watson, Sue; Petrou, Alexandra; Scott-Barrett, Juliet; Dicks, Pamela; Graham, Catherine; O'Hare, Anne; Pain, Helen; McConachie, Helen

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated a technology-based early intervention for social communication skills in pre-schoolers in a randomised controlled trial. Participants were 54 children aged under 6 years with a diagnosis of autism, assigned to either intervention or control conditions. The app engaged children, who played consistently, regardless of…

  13. Targeting cancer patients' quality of life through social comparison : A randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakel, Thecla M.; Dijkstra, Arie; Buunk, Abraham P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Former cancer patients' quality of life can be improved by offering social comparison information. Whether patients, however, benefit from the information may depend on how negative they perceive their present and their future. Design: We conducted a randomised experimental field study

  14. An ecological momentary assessment of comparison target as a moderator of the effects of appearance-focused social comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Tricia M; Crowther, Janis H

    2008-09-01

    This research examined whether comparison target moderates the effects of naturally occurring appearance-focused social comparisons on women's affect, appearance esteem, and dieting thoughts. During daily activities, body-satisfied (BS) women and body-dissatisfied (BD) women recorded their comparison targets and reactions to comparison information. For BS women, upward comparisons with peers were associated with more positive affect (PA) and appearance esteem and less guilt than upward comparisons with media images and downward comparisons with peers were associated with less PA than downward comparisons with media images. For BD women, upward comparisons with peers were associated with more appearance esteem and diet thoughts than upward comparisons with media images and downward comparisons with peers were associated with less PA, appearance esteem, and diet thoughts and more guilt than downward comparisons with media images.

  15. Why people living with HIV/AIDS exclude individuals from their chosen families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant JS

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Joan S Grant,1 David E Vance,1 Worawan White,2 Norman L Keltner,1 James L Raper3 1School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, 2Department of Nursing, Pensacola State College, Pensacola, Florida, 3School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, USA Abstract: Health professionals can gain a better understanding of key elements of social support by examining reasons why people living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (PLWH exclude individuals from their chosen families (ie, families of choice. Our study identified reasons why PLWH excluded specific individuals from their chosen families. This mixed-method design was drawn from a larger study of 150 PLWH, in which 94 self-reported why they excluded individuals from their chosen families. Physical and emotional distance (n = 64; 68.1%; nonsupport, nonacceptance, and harm (n = 25; 26.6%; conditional caring and trust (n = 22; 23.4%; and no blood/familial relationship (n = 13; 13.8% were the reasons PLWH excluded individuals from their chosen families. Demographic and personal characteristics were unrelated to these themes, supporting the conclusion that reasons for excluding family members are universal and not dependent on particular participant characteristics. For chosen family relationships to develop and exist, these findings emphasize the value of physical and emotional contact between individuals.Keywords: families, stigma, social networks, human immunodeficiency virus, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

  16. When are they old enough to drink? Outcomes of an Australian social marketing intervention targeting alcohol initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra C; Andrews, Kelly; Francis, Kate L; Akram, Muhammad

    2018-01-04

    This paper reports on the evaluation of an Australian whole-of-community social marketing intervention targeting social norms, which aimed to reduce inflated perceptions of the prevalence of underage drinking and increase the age at which alcohol initiation is considered acceptable. A community-wide intervention was delivered in a single community over a period of 2 years, targeting adolescents, parents and community members. Pre-and post-intervention computer-assisted telephone interview surveys were conducted in the intervention and a matched comparison (control) community. A total of 417 respondents completed both surveys (215 in the intervention community and 202 in the control community). The intervention community saw an increase of 6 months in the average age at which it is perceived to be acceptable for young people to have a sip/taste of alcohol and 5 months in the average age at which it is perceived to be acceptable to have weak/watered down alcohol. Furthermore, there was a reduction in the perception of the prevalence of alcohol consumption by young people to a level consistent with actual underage drinking rates. In comparison, the control community saw no change in any of these variables. This study provides preliminary evidence that a whole-of-community social marketing intervention can change perceptions of the prevalence, and acceptability, of underage drinking. Given the central role of social norms in decisions regarding alcohol consumption, these changes have the potential to reduce parental supply and thus underage drinking. © 2018 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  17. A Social Networking-based Advertising to Enhance Customer Reach Target

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Najmi Amer Haider Nuar; Hairulnizam Mahdin; Noryusliza Abdullah; Rozanawati Darman; Masitah Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    A traditional advertising is a method to deliver commercial messages to mass audiences through newspaper, outdoors billboards, radio and television. This method is quite expensive for small and medium company. The new concept of advertising such as social media, website and application provide an inexpensive way to promote businesses. The proposed idea is to create a new platform of advertising and promotional tools which is called Tagme. This system is developed based on web environment on W...

  18. Using geo-targeted social media data to detect outdoor air pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, W.; Wang, Y.; Tsou, M. H.; Fu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution has become a more and more serious issue over recent years (He, 2014). Urban air quality is measured at air monitoring stations. Building air monitoring stations requires land, incurs costs and entails skilled technicians to maintain a station. Many countries do not have any monitoring stations and even lack any means to monitor air quality. Recent years, the social media could be used to monitor air quality dynamically (Wang, 2015; Mei, 2014). However, no studies have i...

  19. Qualitative methods to ensure acceptability of behavioral and social interventions to the target population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Guadalupe X; Elder, John P

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces qualitative methods for assessing the acceptability of an intervention. Acceptability refers to determining how well an intervention will be received by the target population and the extent to which the new intervention or its might meet the needs of the target population an d organizational setting. In this paper, we focus on two common qualitative methods for conducting acceptability research and their advantages and disadvantages: focus groups and interviews. We provide examples from our own research and other studies to demonstrate the use of these methods for conducting acceptability research and how one might adapt this approach for oral health research. We present emerging methods for conducting acceptability research, including the use of community-based participatory research, as well as the utility of conducting acceptability research for assessing the appropriateness of measures in intervention research.

  20. COREnet: The Fusion of Social Network Analysis and Target Audience Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    be integrated into a HTML5 web-based Target Audience Analysis Worksheet TAAW? D. SCOPE AND METHODOLOGY This is a three-phase capstone project. The...Harrison & S. Huntington (Eds.), Culture matters: How values shape human progress (pp. 98–111). New York: Basic Books Gauchat, J. D., (2012). HTML5 for...networks to inform tactical engagement strategies that will influence the human domain. Small Wars Journal. MacDonald, M. (2012). HTML5 : The

  1. Determinants of prosocial behavior in included versus excluded contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther eCuadrado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosocial behavior is increasingly becoming necessary as more and more individuals experience exclusion. In this context it is important to understand the motivational determinants of prosocial behavior. Here we report two experiments which analyzed the influence of dispositional (prosocialness; rejection sensitivity and motivational variables (prosocial self-efficacy; prosocial collective efficacy; trust; anger; social affiliation motivation on prosocial behavior under neutral contexts (Study 1, and once under inclusion or exclusion conditions (Study 2. Both studies provided evidence for the predicted mediation of prosocial behavior. Results in both neutral and inclusion and exclusion conditions supported our predictive model of prosocial behavior. In the model dispositional variables predicted motivational variables, which in turn predicted prosocial behavior. We showed that the investigated variables predicted prosocial behavior; this suggests that to promote prosocial behavior one could (1 foster prosocialness, prosocial self and collective efficacy, trust in others and affiliation motivation and (2 try to reduce negative feelings and the tendency to dread rejection in an attempt to reduce the negative impact that these variables have on prosocial behavior. Moreover, the few differences that emerged in the model between the inclusion and exclusion contexts suggested that in interventions with excluded individuals special care emphasis should be placed on addressing rejection sensitivity and lack of trust.

  2. Vertical HIV transmission should be excluded from criminal prosecution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csete, Joanne; Pearshouse, Richard; Symington, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) is an important part of global and national responses to HIV and AIDS. In recent years, many countries have adopted laws to criminalise HIV transmission and exposure. Many of these laws are broadly written and have provisions that enable criminal prosecution of vertical transmission in some circumstances. Even if prosecutions have not yet materialised, the use of these laws against HIV-positive pregnant women could compound the stigma already faced by them and have a chilling effect on women's utilisation of prevention of mother-to-child transmission programmes. Although criminal laws targeting HIV transmission have often been proposed and adopted with the intent of protecting women, such laws may disadvantage women instead. Criminal laws on HIV transmission and exposure should be reviewed and revised to ensure that vertical transmission is explicitly excluded as an object of criminal prosecution. Scaling up PMTCT services and ensuring that they are affordable, accessible, welcoming and of good quality is the most effective strategy for reducing vertical transmission of HIV and should be the primary strategy in all countries.

  3. 20 CFR 404.1313 - World War II service excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service excluded. 404.1313... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1313 World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service of the United...

  4. 8 CFR 1241.20 - Aliens ordered excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aliens ordered excluded. 1241.20 Section 1241.20 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens...

  5. 24 CFR 3282.12 - Excluded structures-modular homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Capable of transferring all design loads imposed by or upon the structure into soil or bedrock without... Excluded structures—modular homes. (a) The purpose of this section is to provide the certification... structure that meets the definition of manufactured home at 24 CFR 3282.7(u) is excluded from the coverage...

  6. 48 CFR 733.103-73 - Protests excluded from consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Protests excluded from consideration. 733.103-73 Section 733.103-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... excluded from consideration. (a) Contract administration. Disputes between a contractor and USAID are...

  7. Proxy means test index for targeting social programs : two methodologies and empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkin Castaño

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Frecuentemente los beneficiarios de los programas sociales del Estado son identificados por medio de indicadores aproximados de los recursos (proxy means test, los cuales tratan de medir el bienestar de los inviduos del hogar. Uno de los más empleados es el predictor de una regresión del ingreso (o mejor del consumo sobre características relevantes. Éste tiene la desventaja de necesitar mediciones adecuadas del consumo o ingreso, las cuales son costosas de obtener. Otro enfoque consiste en usar análisis de componentes principales cualitativas. Este artículo muestra que hay una estrecha relación entre los dos indicadores, lo cual permite concluir que, en ausencia de información confiable del ingreso o consumo, el uso del análisis de componentes principales cualitativos es apropiado para construir el indicador de recursos.

  8. Included as Excluded and Excluded as Included: Minority Language Pupils in Norwegian Inclusion Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilt, Line Torbjørnsen

    2015-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of four Norwegian policy documents on inclusion of minority language pupils. The main concepts of this policy will be reconstructed and re-described, applying Niklas Luhmann's systems theory at different levels of the analysis. Luhmann's theory about society as a conglomerate of self-referential social systems…

  9. Social Media in Adult Education: Insights Gained from Grundtvig Learning Partnership Project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmina Vaičiūnienė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—the focus of this article is the role of social media in adult education and their impact on adult students in regards to their educational needs and specific personal situations within the frame of the learning partnership project. The Grundtvig learning partnership project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS is an international partnership that includes partners from 7 EU countries. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to define cases of the uptake of technologies and applications by MRU students; thus, the objectives of the research are 1 to review literature pertaining to the field of social media in adult education context and 2 to analyse the respondents’ insights as regards learning/teaching practices, resources, and facilities that affect their learning in relation to social networking and media use (taking into consideration both personal and educational perspectives. Design/methodology/approach—the research paper adopts qualitative research approach. Findings—students perceive SM mainly as online communication means (usually informal communication is implied. SM is firstly associated by learners with pastime venue, not educational resource. Thus, methods of teaching/learning in SM and with the help of SM have to be developed and improved. They have to be considered in line with the necessity to develop critical and reflexive thinking skills and media and information literacy skills. The respondents have pointed out both positive and negative aspects of social media use for learning/teaching. Creation of an inner institutional SM type involving qualified people with expertise in SM use for education has been suggested. Research limitations/implications—this article is focused only on the attitudes of MRU students though 105 interviews in total have been conducted within the framework of the project and not only students, but also teachers and

  10. Social Media in Adult Education: Insights Gained from Grundtvig Learning Partnership Project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmina Vaičiūnienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—the focus of this article is the role of social media in adult education and their impact on adult students in regards to their educational needs and specific personal situations within the frame of the learning partnership project. The Grundtvig learning partnership project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS is an international partnership that includes partners from 7 EU countries. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to define cases of the uptake of technologies and applications by MRU students; thus, the objectives of the research are 1 to review literature pertaining to the field of social media in adult education context and 2 to analyse the respondents’ insights as regards learning/teaching practices, resources, and facilities that affect their learning in relation to social networking and media use (taking into consideration both personal and educational perspectives.Design/methodology/approach—the research paper adopts qualitative research approach.Findings—students perceive SM mainly as online communication means (usually informal communication is implied. SM is firstly associated by learners with pastime venue, not educational resource. Thus, methods of teaching/learning in SM and with the help of SM have to be developed and improved. They have to be considered in line with the necessity to develop critical and reflexive thinking skills and media and information literacy skills. The respondents have pointed out both positive and negative aspects of social media use for learning/teaching. Creation of an inner institutional SM type involving qualified people with expertise in SM use for education has been suggested.Research limitations/implications—this article is focused only on the attitudes of MRU students though 105 interviews in total have been conducted within the framework of the project and not only students, but also teachers and

  11. Children's judgements and emotions about social exclusion based on weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Christine; Malti, Tina

    2014-09-01

    This study examined children's judgements and emotions associated with weight-based social exclusion using an ethnically diverse sample of one hundred and seventeen 9- and 13-year-old children. Children were interviewed about three scenarios depicting weight-based exclusion in athletic, academic, and social contexts. Children's judgements of exclusion, emotions attributed to the excluder and excluded targets, and justifications for judgements and emotions were examined. Overall, children judged weight-based exclusion to be wrong for moral reasons. However, they viewed weight-based exclusion in athletic contexts as less wrong compared with academic contexts, and they used more social-conventional reasoning to justify judgements and emotions attributed to excluders in athletic contexts compared with academic and social contexts. Children also expected excluded targets to feel negative emotions, whereas a range of positive and negative emotions was attributed to excluders. In addition, older children were more accepting of weight-based exclusion in athletic contexts than in academic and social contexts. We discuss the results in relation to the development of children's understanding of, and emotions associated with, exclusion based on weight. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Incomplete Excluder limb graft deployment: cause and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonaris, Chris; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Kouvelos, George; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    The Excluder stent graft (W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) is one of the most frequently used devices for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and offers the advantage of a simple and reliable deployment mechanism. We report an unexpected complication during deployment of an Excluder limb graft; the "rip cord" deployment system broke during pulling, most probably because of interference with a previously placed common iliac artery stent, thereby resulting in incomplete graft deployment. This report notes that problems may rarely arise when deploying an Excluder limb graft within already stented iliac arteries and provides technical considerations to manage such events successfully. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An evaluation of the effectiveness of targeted social marketing to promote adolescent and young adult reproductive health in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rossem, R; Meekers, D

    2000-10-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of the PSI/PMSC Horizon Jeunes youth-targeted social marketing program for improving adolescent reproductive health in urban Cameroon. The program targeted adolescents through peer education, youth clubs, mass media promotion, and behavior change communications. After about 13 months of intervention, knowledge of the program was nearly universal, and the majority of youths had direct contact with the program. Program effectiveness is examined using a quasi-experimental research design with a preintervention and postintervention survey in an intervention and comparison site. The intervention had a significant effect on several determinants of preventive behavior, including awareness of sexual risks, knowledge of birth control methods, and discussion of sexuality and contraceptives. The intervention increased the proportion of female youths who reported using oral contraceptives and condoms for birth control. However, condom use is not yet consistent. Although the proportion of young men who reported using condoms for birth control also increased, this change could not be attributed to the intervention. Although this short intervention successfully increased the reported use of various birth control methods, including condoms, there is no evidence that the intervention increased use of condoms for STD prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.

  14. Trust and cooperation in the public sphere: why Roma people should not be excluded?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş DRAGOMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent political developments in Romania and other Central and East European countries, marked by rising populism and political extremism, shed light on the essential issue of building a free, tolerant and inclusive public sphere, which is willing to let arguments to be decisive instead of power, status, race or wealth. The current tendencies of socially excluding Roma, indiscriminately taken by populists for unjustified social burden and intolerable racial difference, are a warning for more radical political action that could undermine on the long-run the effort to set up a democratic public space. Excluding from start an entire minority would only encourage future exclusions based on ideology, ethnicity or religion, according to the narrow definition populists use to give to the concept of ‘people’.

  15. Social and neural determinants of aggressive behavior: pharmacotherapeutic targets at serotonin, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miczek, Klaus A; Fish, Eric W; De Bold, Joseph F; De Almeida, Rosa M M

    2002-10-01

    Aggressive outbursts that result in harm and injury present a major problem for the public health and criminal justice systems, but there are no adequate treatment options. Obstacles at the level of social policy, institutional regulation, and scientific strategy in developing animal models continue to impede the development of specific anti-aggressive agents for emergency and long-term treatments. To be more relevant to the clinical situation, preclinical aggression research has begun to focus on the neurobiological determinants of escalated aggressive behavior that exceeds species-typical patterns. It is the goal of this review to examine novel pharmacological and molecular tools that target the neural mechanisms for different kinds of aggressive behavior more selectively than previously possible and to outline potential pharmacotherapeutic options. (1) The preclinical focus on the behavioral characteristics and determinants of intense aggression promises to be most relevant to the clinical distinction between the proposed impulsive-reactive-hostile-affective subtypes of human aggression and the controlled-proactive-instrumental-predatory subtypes of aggression. The neural circuits for many types of human and animal aggression critically involve serotonin, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and specific receptor subtypes. (2) The dynamic changes in frontal cortical serotonin that are triggered by engaging in aggressive behavior imply that serotonergic drug effects are largely determined by the functional state of the receptors at the time of drug treatment. Of the numerous 5-HT receptors currently identified, the 5-HT(1B) receptors offer a promising target for reducing impulsive aggressive behavior, particularly if the action can be limited to sites in the central nervous system. (3) Aggressive confrontations are salient stressors, both for the aggressor as well as the victim of aggression, that are accompanied by activation of the mesocorticolimbic but

  16. Office of Inspector General List of Excluded Individuals and Entities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The objective is to ensure that providers who bill Federal health care programs do not submit claims for services furnished, ordered or prescribed by an excluded...

  17. Dengue Vector Dynamics (Aedes aegypti) Influenced by Climate and Social Factors in Ecuador: Implications for Targeted Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart Ibarra, Anna M.; Ryan, Sadie J.; Beltrán, Efrain; Mejía, Raúl; Silva, Mercy; Muñoz, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti) population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. Methods/Principal findings We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011), conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. Conclusions These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in Spanish. PMID:24324542

  18. Dengue vector dynamics (Aedes aegypti influenced by climate and social factors in Ecuador: implications for targeted control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Stewart Ibarra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, is now the fastest spreading tropical disease globally. Previous studies indicate that climate and human behavior interact to influence dengue virus and vector (Aedes aegypti population dynamics; however, the relative effects of these variables depends on local ecology and social context. We investigated the roles of climate and socio-ecological factors on Ae. aegypti population dynamics in Machala, a city in southern coastal Ecuador where dengue is hyper-endemic. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied two proximate urban localities where we monitored weekly Ae. aegypti oviposition activity (Nov. 2010-June 2011, conducted seasonal pupal surveys, and surveyed household to identify dengue risk factors. The results of this study provide evidence that Ae. aegypti population dynamics are influenced by social risk factors that vary by season and lagged climate variables that vary by locality. Best-fit models to predict the presence of Ae. aegypti pupae included parameters for household water storage practices, access to piped water, the number of households per property, condition of the house and patio, and knowledge and perceptions of dengue. Rainfall and minimum temperature were significant predictors of oviposition activity, although the effect of rainfall varied by locality due to differences in types of water storage containers. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate the potential to reduce the burden of dengue in this region by conducting focused vector control interventions that target high-risk households and containers in each season and by developing predictive models using climate and non-climate information. These findings provide the region's public health sector with key information for conducting time and location-specific vector control campaigns, and highlight the importance of local socio-ecological studies to understand dengue dynamics. See Text S1 for an executive summary in

  19. Familial risk factors in social anxiety disorder: calling for a family-oriented approach for targeted prevention and early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, Susanne; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Within the last decade, social anxiety disorder (SAD) has been identified as a highly prevalent and burdensome disorder. Both the characterization of its symptomatology and effective treatment options are widely documented. Studies particularly indicate that SAD aggregates in families and has its onset in early adolescence. Given the family as an important context for children's cognitive, emotional and behavioural development, familial risk factors could be expected to significantly contribute to the reliable detection of populations at risk for SAD. Reviewing studies on familial risk factors for SAD argues for the importance of parental psychopathology and unfavourable family environment, but also denotes to several shortcomings such as cross-sectional designs, short follow-up periods, diverging methodologies and the focus on isolated factors. Using a prospective longitudinal study that covers the high-risk period for SAD, including a broader spectrum of putative risk factors may help to overcome many of the methodological limitations. This review sets out to develop a more family-oriented approach for predicting the onset and maintenance of SAD that may be fruitful to derive targeted prevention and early intervention in SAD.

  20. Excluded volume versus hydrogen bonding: complementary or incompatible concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezbeda, Ivo; Škvor, Jiří

    2012-12-01

    An attempt has been made to assess individual effects of the repulsive and attractive interactions on the structure of associating fluids using short-range models descending from parent realistic models. It is shown that neither the excluded volume (repulsive interactions) nor the hydrogen bonding (attractive interactions) considered separately are able to produce the correct structure. However, when both these types of interactions are considered together, they faithfully reproduce the structure of water and other associating fluids. Consequently, although some properties of aqueous systems can be explained qualitatively/intuitively by hydrogen bonding only, disregarding simultaneously the excluded volume effects may be misleading.

  1. Excluded-volume effects in the diffusion of hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Excluded-volume effects can play an important role in determining transport properties in diffusion of particles. Here, the diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in two or three dimensions is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle distribution function, with excluded-volume effects enhancing the overall collective diffusion rate. An expression for the effective (collective) diffusion coefficient is obtained. Stochastic simulations of the full particle system are shown to compare well with the solution of this equation for two examples. © 2012 American Physical Society

  2. Excluded-volume effects in the diffusion of hard spheres

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-03

    Excluded-volume effects can play an important role in determining transport properties in diffusion of particles. Here, the diffusion of finite-sized hard-core interacting particles in two or three dimensions is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The result is a nonlinear diffusion equation for the one-particle distribution function, with excluded-volume effects enhancing the overall collective diffusion rate. An expression for the effective (collective) diffusion coefficient is obtained. Stochastic simulations of the full particle system are shown to compare well with the solution of this equation for two examples. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  3. 8 CFR 1240.38 - Fingerprinting of excluded aliens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fingerprinting of excluded aliens. 1240.38 Section 1240.38 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEEDINGS TO DETERMINE REMOVABILITY OF ALIENS IN THE UNITED STATES Exclusion of...

  4. The public space and the right to exclude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Urzúa Bastida

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises that the notion of «public space», as is currently used, legitimize, at the same time is the base of what might be called the right to exclude. This is not happening by law, but culture. To argue this, there will develop three ideas: comfort, planning and civic order, presents in the above mentioned notion.

  5. 21 CFR 1404.950 - Excluded Parties List System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded Parties List System 1404.950 Section 1404.950 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION... other information about persons who are ineligible. The EPLS system includes the printed version...

  6. 48 CFR 52.247-7 - Freight Excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Freight Excluded. 52.247-7... AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 52.247-7 Freight... contracts for transportation or for transportation-related services when any commodities or types of...

  7. Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin-Independent Antidepressant Effects of (R)-Ketamine in a Social Defeat Stress Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Qu, Youge; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ma, Min; Dong, Chao; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    The role of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the antidepressant effects of ketamine is controversial. In addition to mTOR, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is a key signaling molecule in prominent pathways that regulate protein synthesis. (R)-Ketamine has a greater potency and longer-lasting antidepressant effects than (S)-ketamine. Here we investigated whether mTOR signaling and ERK signaling play a role in the antidepressant effects of two enantiomers. The effects of mTOR inhibitors (rapamycin and AZD8055) and an ERK inhibitor (SL327) on the antidepressant effects of ketamine enantiomers in the chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) model (n = 7 or 8) and on those of ketamine enantiomers in these signaling pathways in mouse brain regions were examined. The intracerebroventricular infusion of rapamycin or AZD8055 blocked the antidepressant effects of (S)-ketamine, but not (R)-ketamine, in the CSDS model. Furthermore, (S)-ketamine, but not (R)-ketamine, significantly attenuated the decreased phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream effector, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, in the prefrontal cortex of susceptible mice after CSDS. Pretreatment with SL327 blocked the antidepressant effects of (R)-ketamine but not (S)-ketamine. Moreover, (R)-ketamine, but not (S)-ketamine, significantly attenuated the decreased phosphorylation of ERK and its upstream effector, mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase, in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus of susceptible mice after CSDS. This study suggests that mTOR plays a role in the antidepressant effects of (S)-ketamine, but not (R)-ketamine, and that ERK plays a role in (R)-ketamine's antidepressant effects. Thus, it is unlikely that the activation of mTOR signaling is necessary for antidepressant actions of (R)-ketamine. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A proteção social no Brasil: universalismo e focalização nos governos FHC e Lula Social protection in Brazil: universalism and targeting in the FHC and Lula administrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilson do Rosário Costa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa a configuração do sistema de proteção social no Brasil após a Constituição Federal de 1988 (CF 1988. Demonstra que a CF 1988 favoreceu a institucionalização de políticas públicas universalistas. Esta institucionalização foi realizada em conflito com os pressupostos da estabilização do Plano Real. O trabalho argumenta que a institucionalização protegeu o gasto público na área social da proposta minimalista da gestão macroeconômica. Identifica também a implementação de programas sociais focalizados nos pobres ao longo da década de 1990. A focalização é uma inovação diretamente associada à agenda do ajuste. Revela que nos governo FHC e Lula ocorreu uma idêntica adesão aos programas sociais focalizados. A focalização da proteção social não teve o poder de vetar as propostas universalistas originadas da democratização dos anos 1980. Demonstra que o Programa Bolsa Família (PBF, principal marca do governo Lula, é uma adaptação, em larga escala, dos programas focalizados de transferência direta de renda do período FHC. A combinação de universalismo e focalização ampliou o escopo da política social. O expressivo crescimento do gasto público social não tem, entretanto, produzido resultados sociais abrangente, ainda que os pobres no Brasil tenham sido beneficiados pela focalização do PBF.This article analyzes the organization of Brazil's social protection system after the Federal Constitution of 1998 (CF 1988. It also demonstrates that 1988 Federal Constitution favored the institutionalization of universalist public policies. This institutionalization took place amidst conflict with the stabilization goals of the Real Plan. The paper argues that such an institutionalization protected public spending in the social area of the macroeconomic management's minimalist project. It also identifies the implementation of social programs targeting the poor during the 1980's decade. Targeting is

  9. Empowering the digitally excluded: learning initiatives for (invisible groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that some digitally excluded groups of learners are receiving more attention than others. Discussions regarding why some digitally excluded learners are more visible than others and therefore worthy of more committed digital inclusion interventions raises important questions about how we define and conceptualise digital inclusion and digital inclusion practice; particularly in relation to empowerment. In this article, we draw on a range of research, practice and policy literature to examine two important questions: what is empowerment and in whose hands does empowerment lie? We argue that empowerment involves making informed choices about technology use, but that learners often require support- human intervention- to make these choices. However, current digital inclusion research has failed to produce a detailed critique of what constitutes empowering support from educational institutions and their staff. A lack of open and reflexive accounts of practice means that we are no closer to identifying and understanding the kinds of empowering practices that are required to challenge the kinds of prejudices, stereotypes, risk-aversiveness and low aspirations associated with the most invisible of digitally excluded learners.

  10. Perceived social support as a moderator between negative life events and depression in adolescence: implications for prediction and targeted prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Miloseva, Lence; Vukosavljevic-Gvozden, Tatjana; Richter, Kneginja; Milosev, Vladimir; Niklewski, Günter

    2017-01-01

    Aim and Background: The role of the perceived social support in prevention of depression in adolescence still remains an insufficiently explored problem. By integrating the results of the previous studies of moderator role of perceived social support between negative life events and depression in adolescence we set up two goals. One is to determine whether perceived social support has moderator role in the sample consisted of clinical, subclinical and control respondents. Another goal is to i...

  11. Perceived social support as a moderator between negative life events and depression in adolescence: implications for prediction and targeted prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloseva, Lence; Vukosavljevic-Gvozden, Tatjana; Richter, Kneginja; Milosev, Vladimir; Niklewski, Günter

    2017-09-01

    The role of the perceived social support in prevention of depression in adolescence still remains an insufficiently explored problem. By integrating the results of the previous studies of moderator role of perceived social support between negative life events and depression in adolescence we set up two goals. One is to determine whether perceived social support has moderator role in the sample consisted of clinical, subclinical, and control respondents. Another goal is to identify in which group the interaction effect is significant, i.e. the perceived social support acts as moderator. The sample consisted of 412 adolescents (61.7% female and 38.3% male) aged 13-17 years (mean = 15.70, SD = 1.22). We applied: Data sheet for all respondents; Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support; Adolescent Life Events Questionnaire; Centre for Epidemiological Depression Scale. We have shown that the association between levels of depressive symptoms and negative life events changes as the value of the moderator variable perceived social support changes. The finding that the moderating interaction effect was significant only in the subclinical group is particularly interesting. Taking into account that perceived social support moderates the association between negative stress events and levels of depression, we can propose a model for the prevention of depression, which will include perceived social support. However, future research with longitudinal design is required to verify the results.

  12. Serratia liquefaciens Infection of a Previously Excluded Popliteal Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coelho

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs are rare in the general population, but they account for nearly 70% of peripheral arterial aneurysms. There are several possible surgical approaches including exclusion of the aneurysm and bypass grafting, or endoaneurysmorrhaphy and interposition of a prosthetic conduit. The outcomes following the first approach are favorable, but persistent blood flow in the aneurysm sac has been documented in up to one third of patients in the early post-operative setting. Complications from incompletely excluded aneurysms include aneurysm enlargement, local compression symptoms, and sac rupture. Notably infection of a previously excluded and bypassed PAA is rare. This is the third reported case of PAA infection after exclusion and bypass grafting and the first due to Serratia liquefaciens. Methods: Relevant medical data were collected from the hospital database. Results: This case report describes a 54 year old male patient, diagnosed with acute limb ischaemia due to a thrombosed PAA, submitted to emergency surgery with exclusion and venous bypass. A below the knee amputation was necessary 3 months later. Patient follow-up was lost until 7 years following surgical repair, when he was diagnosed with aneurysm sac infection with skin fistulisation. He had recently been diagnosed with alcoholic hepatic cirrhosis Child–Pugh Class B. The patient was successfully treated by aneurysm resection, soft tissue debridement and systemic antibiotics. Conclusion: PAA infection is a rare complication after exclusion and bypass procedures but should be considered in any patient with evidence of local or systemic infection. When a PAA infection is diagnosed, aneurysmectomy, local debridement, and intravenous antibiotic therapy are recommended. The “gold standard” method of PAA repair remains controversial. PAA excision or endoaneurysmorrhaphy avoids complications from incompletely excluded aneurysms, but is associated with

  13. Excluding black hole firewalls with extreme cosmic censorship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-183 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    The AMPS argument for black hole firewalls seems to arise not only from the assumption of local effective field theory outside the stretched horizon but also from an overcounting of internal black hole states that include states that are singular in the past. Here I propose to exclude such singular states by Extreme Cosmic Censorship (the conjectured principle that the universe is entirely nonsingular, except for transient singularities inside black and/or white holes). I argue that the remaining set of nonsingular realistic states do not have firewalls but yet preserve information in Hawking radiation from black holes that form from nonsingular initial states.

  14. Technique for determining cesium-137 in milk excluding ashing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonova, V.A.; Prokof'ev, O.N.

    1984-01-01

    For the purpose of simplification of the method of milk sample preparation for the radiochemical analysis for 137 Cs in laboratory sanitary and higienic investigations rapid analysis technique excluding sample ashing is developed. The technique comprises sample mixing with silica gel during an hour, 137 Cs desorption from silica gel into the 1N solution of hydrochloric acid, radiochemical analysis of hydrochloric solution for determining 137 Cs. The comparison of the results obtained by the above method and that with ashing provides perfect agreement. For taking into account the incompleteness of 137 Cs adsorption by silica gel a correction factor is applied in calculation formulae

  15. Verification of Carbon Sink Assessment. Can We Exclude Natural Sinks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, G.; Yamagata, Y

    2004-01-01

    Any human-induced terrestrial sink is susceptible to the effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, climate variability and other natural or indirect human-induced factors. It has been suggested in climate negotiations that the effects of these factors should be excluded from estimates of carbon sequestration used to meet the emission reduction commitments under the Kyoto Protocol. This paper focuses on the methodologies for factoring out the effects of atmospheric and climate variability/change. We estimate the relative magnitude of the non-human induced effects by using two biosphere models and discuss possibilities for narrowing estimate uncertainty

  16. Disability Reconsideration Average Processing Time (in Days) (Excludes technical denials)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — A presentation of the overall cumulative number of elapsed days (including processing time for transit, medical determinations, and SSA quality review) from the date...

  17. Excluding access to invasion hubs can contain the spread of an invasive vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florance, Daniel; Webb, Jonathan K; Dempster, Tim; Kearney, Michael R; Worthing, Alex; Letnic, Mike

    2011-10-07

    Many biological invasions do not occur as a gradual expansion along a continuous front, but result from the expansion of satellite populations that become established at 'invasion hubs'. Although theoretical studies indicate that targeting control efforts at invasion hubs can effectively contain the spread of invasions, few studies have demonstrated this in practice. In arid landscapes worldwide, humans have increased the availability of surface water by creating artificial water points (AWPs) such as troughs and dams for livestock. By experimentally excluding invasive cane toads (Bufo marinus) from AWP, we show that AWP provide a resource subsidy for non-arid-adapted toads and serve as dry season refuges and thus invasion hubs for cane toads in arid Australia. Using data on the distribution of permanent water in arid Australia and the dispersal potential of toads, we predict that systematically excluding toads from AWP would reduce the area of arid Australia across which toads are predicted to disperse and colonize under average climatic conditions by 38 per cent from 2,242,000 to 1,385,000 km(2). Our study shows how human modification of hydrological regimes can create a network of invasion hubs that facilitates a biological invasion, and confirms that targeted control at invasion hubs can reduce landscape connectivity to contain the spread of an invasive vertebrate.

  18. Diffusion of multiple species with excluded-volume effects

    KAUST Repository

    Bruna, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Stochastic models of diffusion with excluded-volume effects are used to model many biological and physical systems at a discrete level. The average properties of the population may be described by a continuum model based on partial differential equations. In this paper we consider multiple interacting subpopulations/species and study how the inter-species competition emerges at the population level. Each individual is described as a finite-size hard core interacting particle undergoing Brownian motion. The link between the discrete stochastic equations of motion and the continuum model is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The system for two species leads to a nonlinear cross-diffusion system for each subpopulation, which captures the enhancement of the effective diffusion rate due to excluded-volume interactions between particles of the same species, and the diminishment due to particles of the other species. This model can explain two alternative notions of the diffusion coefficient that are often confounded, namely collective diffusion and self-diffusion. Simulations of the discrete system show good agreement with the analytic results. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Diffusion of multiple species with excluded-volume effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Maria; Chapman, S Jonathan

    2012-11-28

    Stochastic models of diffusion with excluded-volume effects are used to model many biological and physical systems at a discrete level. The average properties of the population may be described by a continuum model based on partial differential equations. In this paper we consider multiple interacting subpopulations/species and study how the inter-species competition emerges at the population level. Each individual is described as a finite-size hard core interacting particle undergoing brownian motion. The link between the discrete stochastic equations of motion and the continuum model is considered systematically using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The system for two species leads to a nonlinear cross-diffusion system for each subpopulation, which captures the enhancement of the effective diffusion rate due to excluded-volume interactions between particles of the same species, and the diminishment due to particles of the other species. This model can explain two alternative notions of the diffusion coefficient that are often confounded, namely collective diffusion and self-diffusion. Simulations of the discrete system show good agreement with the analytic results.

  20. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  1. Using Social Media to Detect Outdoor Air Pollution and Monitor Air Quality Index (AQI: A Geo-Targeted Spatiotemporal Analysis Framework with Sina Weibo (Chinese Twitter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    Full Text Available Outdoor air pollution is a serious problem in many developing countries today. This study focuses on monitoring the dynamic changes of air quality effectively in large cities by analyzing the spatiotemporal trends in geo-targeted social media messages with comprehensive big data filtering procedures. We introduce a new social media analytic framework to (1 investigate the relationship between air pollution topics posted in Sina Weibo (Chinese Twitter and the daily Air Quality Index (AQI published by China's Ministry of Environmental Protection; and (2 monitor the dynamics of air quality index by using social media messages. Correlation analysis was used to compare the connections between discussion trends in social media messages and the temporal changes in the AQI during 2012. We categorized relevant messages into three types, retweets, mobile app messages, and original individual messages finding that original individual messages had the highest correlation to the Air Quality Index. Based on this correlation analysis, individual messages were used to monitor the AQI in 2013. Our study indicates that the filtered social media messages are strongly correlated to the AQI and can be used to monitor the air quality dynamics to some extent.

  2. Effects of Application of Social Marketing Theory and the Health Belief Model in Promoting Cervical Cancer Screening among Targeted Women in Sisaket Province, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichachai, Suparp; Songserm, Nopparat; Akakul, Theerawut; Kuasiri, Chanapong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major public health problem in Thailand, being ranked second only to breast cancer. Thai women have been reported to have a low rate of cervical cancer screening (27.7% of the 80% goal of WHO). We therefore aimed to apply the social marketing theory and health belief model in promoting cervical cancer screening in Kanthararom District, Sisaket Province. A total of 92 from 974 targeted women aged 3060 years were randomly divided into two groups. The experimental group underwent application of social marketing theory and a health belief model program promoting cervical cancer screening while the control group received normal services. Two research tools were used: (1) application of social marketing theory and health belief model program and (2) questionnaire used to evaluate perceptions of cervical cancer. Descriptive and inferential statistics including paired sample ttest and independent ttest were used to analyze the data. After the program had been used, the mean score of perception of cervical cancer of experimental group was at a higher level (x=4.09; S.D. =0.30), than in the control group (x=3.82; S.D. =0.20) with statistical significance (psocial marketing and the health belief model be used to promote cervical cancer screening in targeted women and it can be promoted as a guideline for other health services, especially in health promotion and disease prevention.

  3. ‘Women’: Privileged Targets for the Early 21th Century Social Programs – Reflections from a Critical Gender Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Anzorena

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the late ’90s, social programs to ameliorate the poverty conditions provoked by the neoliberal model have been applied in Argentina and in Latin America. These processes particularly affect women, as they are the privileged ‘target’ of those measures. This essay explores the ways in which the New Economics of the Family (NEF, in 90’s social programs, promotes the naturalization of women’s responsibility as homemakers, and defines them as functional to the objectives of palliative social policies. Such a vision profits from supposed natural ‘motherly virtues’, and far from promoting more egalitarian relations between women and men, reproduces gender and class discrimination by reinforcing the supposedly natural sexual division of labor.

  4. Only MR can safely exclude patients from arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincken, Patrice W.J.; Braak, Bert P.M. ter; Erkel, Arian R. van; Bloem, Johan L. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Bloem, Rolf M. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Leiden (Netherlands); Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Delft (Netherlands); Luijt, Peter A. van [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Traumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Coene, L.N.J.E.M. [HAGA Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands); Lange, Sam de [Medical Center Haaglanden, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The Hague (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was to determine in patients with subacute knee complaints and normal standardized physical examination the fraction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies showing arthroscopically treatable intra-articular pathology. There were 290 consecutive patients (between 16 and 45 years) with at least 4 weeks of knee complaints and low clinical suspicion of intra-articular pathology based on physical exam. Two hundred seventy-four patients were included. Sixteen patients with prior knee surgery, rheumatic arthritis, or severe osteoarthritis were excluded. MRI was used to assign patients to group 1 (treatable abnormalities) or group 2 (normal or no treatable findings), depending on whether MR demonstrated treatable pathology. Arthroscopy was performed in group 1 patients. If symptoms persisted for 3 months in group 2 patients, cross over to arthroscopy was allowed. MR showed treatable pathology in 73 patients (26.6%). Arthroscopy was performed in 64 patients of 73 patients (group 1). In 52 patients (81.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 71.4-91.1%), arthroscopy was therapeutic. Of the 13 arthroscopies (6.5%) in group 2, four were therapeutic (30.8%, 95% CI 1.7-59.8). The highest fraction of MR studies showing treatable pathology was found in males, aged over 30 years, with a history of effusion (54.5%, six of 11 patients). Authors believe that the negative predictive value of clinical assessment in patients with subacute knee complaints is too low to exclude these patients from MR. MR should at least be considered in male patients aged 30 years and over with a history of effusion. (orig.)

  5. Understanding Social Media’s Take on Climate Change through Large-Scale Analysis of Targeted Opinions and Emotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Neetu; Henry, Michael J.; Volkova, Svitlana

    2017-03-29

    Social media is a powerful data source for researchers interested in understanding population-level behavior, having been successfully leveraged in a number of different application areas including flu and illness prediction models, detecting civil unrest, and measuring public sentiment towards a given topic of interest within the public discourse. In this work, we present a study of a large collection of Twitter data centered on the social conversation around global cli- mate change during the UN Climate Change Conference, held in Paris, France during December 2015 (COP21). We first developed a mechanism for distinguishing between personal and non-personal accounts. We then analyzed demographics and emotion and opinion dynamics over time and location in order to understand how the different user types converse around meaningful topics on social media. This methodology offers an in-depth insight into the behavior and opinions around a topic where multiple distinct narratives are present, and lays the groundwork for future work in studying narratives in social media.

  6. Cognitive and Perceptual Selectivity and Target Regulation of Mental Activity in Personal Evaluation Situations of Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagalakova, Olga A.; Truevtsev, Dmitry V.; Sagalakov, Anatoly M.

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes modern theoretical and conceptual models of social anxiety disorder (SAD) (cognitive, metacognitive, psychopathological) with a view to determine specific features of psychological mechanisms of disorders studied in various approaches, to identify similarities and differences in conceptual SAD models, their heuristic…

  7. Hombres Sanos: exposure and response to a social marketing HIV prevention campaign targeting heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Donate, Ana P; Zellner, Jennifer A; Fernández-Cerdeño, Araceli; Sañudo, Fernando; Hovell, Melbourne F; Sipan, Carol L; Engelberg, Moshe; Ji, Ming

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the reach and impact of a social marketing intervention to reduce HIV risk among heterosexually identified (HI) Latino men who have sex with men and women (MSMW). Repeated cross-sectional intercept surveys were conducted in selected community venues during and after the campaign with 1,137 HI Latino men. Of them, 6% were classified as HI Latino MSMW. On average, 85.9% of the heterosexual respondents and 86.8% of the HI MSMW subsample reported exposure to the campaign. Responses to the campaign included having made an appointment for a male health exam that included HIV testing and using condoms. Campaign exposure was significantly associated with HIV testing behavior and intentions and with knowledge of where to get tested. The campaign reached its underserved target audience and stimulated preventive behaviors. Social marketing represents a promising approach for HIV prevention among HI Latinos, in general, and HI Latino MSMW, in particular.

  8. Targeting Health Care Through Preventive Work - A study of the impact of social distance on professionals’ judgments of children and families’ need of health improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Marie Østergaard

    2013-01-01

    care access. The political response has been to target health services to ‘those in need of special care’ through a more intense focus on prevention. The idea is to prevent illness instead of curing it. I study the impact of these new rules on the frontline level where home nurses, pedagogues...... and teachers interact with children and their families. A study shows that frontline workers think differently about whom to prevent from what, when and why. The degree of social distance as well as professional norms explain part of the variation in worries towards children and families, but the impact...

  9. Health care institutions should not exclude smokers from employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Thomas S; Kertesz, Stefan G; Nash, Ryan R

    2014-06-01

    Some health care institutions, including academic health centers, have adopted policies excluding smokers from employment. Claims advanced on behalf of these policies include financial savings from reduced health costs and absenteeism as well as advantages consonant with their message of healthy living. The authors suggest that the institutional savings from these policies are speculative and unproven. Also, in settings where large medical schools operate, it is likely to be the poor, including members of minority groups, who, under an employee smoker ban, will lose the opportunity to work for an employer that offers health insurance and other benefits. In response to the incentives created by such bans, some will quit smoking, but most will not. Thus, at the community level, employee smoker bans are more likely to be harmful than beneficial.Although private businesses may rightly choose not to hire smokers in the 19 states where such policies are legal, health care institutions, including academic health centers, should consider hiring choices in light of the values they profess. The traditional values of medicine include service to all persons in need, even when illness results from addiction or unsafe behavior. Secular academic communities require a shared dedication to discovery without requiring strict conformity of private behavior or belief. The authors conclude that for health care institutions, policies of hiring smokers and helping them to quit are both prudent and expressive of the norms of medical care, such as inclusion, compassion, and fellowship, that academic health professionals seek to honor.

  10. Connectivity and Excluded Volume Effects in Polymeric Complex Coacervates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Charles; Radhakrishna, Mithun

    Oppositely-charged polyelectrolytes in salt solutions can undergo phase separation to form complex coacervates. This charge-driven phase behavior is the basis for emerging motifs in self-assembly. Traditional uses for coacervates are in food and personal care products, while applications in technologies for drug delivery and sensory materials are being developed. One of the primary theories driving understanding of complex coacervates is the Voorn-Overbeek (V-O) theory, which is a precursor to more sophisticated field theories. We present both theory and simulation that provides an alternate picture of coacervates, specifically addressing the limitations of V-O. Our theoretical approach is based on PRISM, which is a liquid-state theory that specifically accounts for connectivity. This is compared with Monte Carlo-based simulations, which likewise provide a molecular picture of coacervation. We demonstrate that a combination of connectivity-based correlations and excluded volume has a profound effect on coacervation phase behavior, suggesting that favorable comparison of V-O to experiment benefits from a cancellation of errors. The influence of connectivity on coacervate phase behavior hints at new opportunities for molecular-based design in electrostatically-driven self-assembly.

  11. 48 CFR 9.404 - Excluded Parties List System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... action; (5) Termination date for each listing; (6) DUNS No.; (7) Social Security Number (SSN), Employer... telephone number of the agency point of contact for the action. (c) Each agency must— (1) Obtain password(s) from GSA to access the EPLS for data entry; (2) Notify GSA in the event a password needs to be...

  12. 42 CFR 412.27 - Excluded psychiatric units: Additional requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... diagnosis that is listed in the Fourth Edition, Text Revision of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, or in Chapter Five (“Mental Disorders”) of the International... personnel, psychological services, social work services, psychiatric nursing, and therapeutic activities. (c...

  13. 29 CFR 548.305 - Excluding certain additions to wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agreement or understanding with the employee, to omit from the computation of overtime certain incidental... business. It may also include such things as payment by the employer of the employee's social security tax... week to affect his overtime compensation by 50 cents. (e) There are many situations in which the...

  14. Segmenting and targeting American university students to promote responsible alcohol use: a case for applying social marketing principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sameer; Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn

    2011-10-01

    The current study contributes to the social marketing literature in the American university binge-drinking context in three innovative ways. First, it profiles drinking segments by "values" and "expectancies" sought from behaviors. Second, the study compares segment values and expectancies of two competing behaviors, that is, binge drinking and participation in alternative activities. Third, the study compares the influence of a variety of factors on both behaviors in each segment. Finally, based on these findings and feedback from eight university alcohol prevention experts, appropriate strategies to promote responsible alcohol use for each segment are proposed.

  15. Coworker incivility and incivility targets' work effort and counterproductive work behaviors: the moderating role of supervisor social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Kenji; Jex, Steve M

    2012-04-01

    This study addresses the relationships between coworker incivility and both work effort and counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs). It was expected that employees who experienced high levels of incivility from their coworkers would report reductions in work effort and higher levels of CWBs. Also, based on the emotion-centered model of work behaviors (Spector & Fox, 2002), it was expected that negative emotions would mediate the relationships between coworker incivility and both work effort and CWBs. Finally, we examined supervisor social support as a moderator of relationships between negative emotions and both work effort and CWBs. Two hundred nine full-time university employees completed a two-wave survey over a two-month time period. Results supported the hypothesized mediated relationships. It was also found that supervisor social support moderated the relationship between negative emotions and work effort but not the relationship between negative emotions and CWBs. Study implications and limitations are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Targeting screening and social marketing to increase detection of acute HIV infection in men who have sex with men in Vancouver, British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Mark; Cook, Darrel; Steinberg, Malcolm; Kwag, Michael; Robert, Wayne; Doupe, Glenn; Krajden, Mel; Rekart, Michael

    2013-10-23

    The contribution of acute HIV infection (AHI) to transmission is widely recognized, and increasing AHI diagnosis capacity can enhance HIV prevention through subsequent behavior change or intervention. We examined the impact of targeted pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and social marketing to increase AHI diagnosis among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vancouver. Observational study. We implemented pooled NAAT following negative third-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing for males above 18 years in six clinics accessed by MSM, accompanied by two social marketing campaigns developed by a community gay men's health organization. We compared test volume and diagnosis rates for pre-implementation (April 2006-March 2009) and post-implementation (April 2009-March 2012) periods. After implementation, we used linear regression to examine quarterly trends and calculated diagnostic yield. After implementation, the AHI diagnosis rate significantly increased from 1.03 to 1.84 per 1000 tests, as did quarterly HIV test volumes and acute to non-acute diagnosis ratio. Of the 217 new HIV diagnoses after implementation, 54 (24.9%) were AHIs (25 detected by pooled NAAT only) for an increased diagnostic yield of 11.5%. The average number of prior negative HIV tests (past 2 years) increased significantly for newly diagnosed MSM at the six study clinics compared to other newly diagnosed MSM in British Columbia, per quarter. Targeted implementation of pooled NAAT at clinics accessed by MSM is effective in increasing AHI diagnoses compared to third-generation EIA testing. Social marketing campaigns accompanying pooled NAAT implementation may contribute to increasing AHI diagnoses and frequency of HIV testing.

  17. Executive function needs to be targeted to improve social functioning with Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penadés, Rafael; Catalán, Rosa; Puig, Olga; Masana, Guillem; Pujol, Núria; Navarro, Víctor; Guarch, Joana; Gastó, Cristóbal

    2010-05-15

    While the role of impaired cognition in accounting for functional outcome in schizophrenia is generally established, the relationship between cognitive and functional change in the context of treatments is far from clear. The current paper tries to identify which cognitive changes lead to improvements in daily functioning among persons with chronic schizophrenia who had current negative symptoms and evidenced neuropsychological impairments. In a previous work, Cognitive Remediation Therapy (CRT) was compared with a control therapy, involving similar length of therapist contact but different targets. At the end of treatment, CRT conferred a benefit to people with schizophrenia in cognition and functioning [Schizophrenia Research, 87 (2006) 323-331]. Subsequently, analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were conducted with baseline and cognitive change scores as covariates to test whether cognitive change predicted change in functioning. Additionally, statistical tests to establish the mediation path with significant variables were performed. Although verbal memory, but not executive functioning, was associated with functioning at baseline, it was the improvement in executive functioning that predicted improved daily functioning. Verbal memory played a mediator role in the change process. Consequently, in order to improve daily functioning with CRT, executive function still needs to be targeted in despite of multiple cognitive impairments being present. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lot quality assurance sampling for monitoring coverage and quality of a targeted condom social marketing programme in traditional and non-traditional outlets in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piot, Bram; Navin, Deepa; Krishnan, Nattu; Bhardwaj, Ashish; Sharma, Vivek; Marjara, Pritpal

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study reports on the results of a large-scale targeted condom social marketing campaign in and around areas where female sex workers are present. The paper also describes the method that was used for the routine monitoring of condom availability in these sites. Methods The lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) method was used for the assessment of the geographical coverage and quality of coverage of condoms in target areas in four states and along selected national highways in India, as part of Avahan, the India AIDS initiative. Results A significant general increase in condom availability was observed in the intervention area between 2005 and 2008. High coverage rates were gradually achieved through an extensive network of pharmacies and particularly of non-traditional outlets, whereas traditional outlets were instrumental in providing large volumes of condoms. Conclusion LQAS is seen as a valuable tool for the routine monitoring of the geographical coverage and of the quality of delivery systems of condoms and of health products and services in general. With a relatively small sample size, easy data collection procedures and simple analytical methods, it was possible to inform decision-makers regularly on progress towards coverage targets. PMID:20167732

  19. 75 FR 49528 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (“NMG”) Excluding the Multimedia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ..., Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG'') Excluding the Multimedia Applications Division..., Inc., Networking and Multimedia Group (``NMG''), excluding the Multimedia Applications Division... services for chips used in networking and multimedia products. The company reports that workers leased from...

  20. 29 CFR 98.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 98.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most current information about persons... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System...

  1. 21 CFR 1308.26 - Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant... SCHEDULES OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Excluded Veterinary Anabolic Steroid Implant Products § 1308.26 Excluded veterinary anabolic steroid implant products. (a) Products containing an anabolic steroid, that are expressly...

  2. Using Social Media and Targeted Snowball Sampling to Survey a Hard-to-reach Population: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Dusek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Response rates to the academic surveys used in quantitative research are decreasing and have been for several decades among both individuals and organizations. Given this trend, providing doctoral students an opportunity to complete their dissertations in a timely and cost effective manner may necessitate identifying more innovative and relevant ways to collect data while maintaining appropriate research standards and rigor. The case of a research study is presented which describes the data collection process used to survey a hard-to-reach population. It details the use of social media, in this case LinkedIn, to facilitate the distribution of the web-based survey. A roadmap to illustrate how this data collection process unfolded is presented, as well as several “lessons learned” during this journey. An explanation of the considerations that impacted the sampling design is provided. The goal of this case study is to provide researchers, including doctoral students, with realistic expectations and an awareness of the benefits and risks associated with the use of this method of data collection.

  3. Clarifying the use of aggregated exposures in multilevel models: self-included vs. self-excluded measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuji Suzuki

    Full Text Available Multilevel analyses are ideally suited to assess the effects of ecological (higher level and individual (lower level exposure variables simultaneously. In applying such analyses to measures of ecologies in epidemiological studies, individual variables are usually aggregated into the higher level unit. Typically, the aggregated measure includes responses of every individual belonging to that group (i.e. it constitutes a self-included measure. More recently, researchers have developed an aggregate measure which excludes the response of the individual to whom the aggregate measure is linked (i.e. a self-excluded measure. In this study, we clarify the substantive and technical properties of these two measures when they are used as exposures in multilevel models.Although the differences between the two aggregated measures are mathematically subtle, distinguishing between them is important in terms of the specific scientific questions to be addressed. We then show how these measures can be used in two distinct types of multilevel models-self-included model and self-excluded model-and interpret the parameters in each model by imposing hypothetical interventions. The concept is tested on empirical data of workplace social capital and employees' systolic blood pressure.Researchers assume group-level interventions when using a self-included model, and individual-level interventions when using a self-excluded model. Analytical re-parameterizations of these two models highlight their differences in parameter interpretation. Cluster-mean centered self-included models enable researchers to decompose the collective effect into its within- and between-group components. The benefit of cluster-mean centering procedure is further discussed in terms of hypothetical interventions.When investigating the potential roles of aggregated variables, researchers should carefully explore which type of model-self-included or self-excluded-is suitable for a given situation

  4. Clarifying the use of aggregated exposures in multilevel models: self-included vs. self-excluded measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuji; Yamamoto, Eiji; Takao, Soshi; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S V

    2012-01-01

    Multilevel analyses are ideally suited to assess the effects of ecological (higher level) and individual (lower level) exposure variables simultaneously. In applying such analyses to measures of ecologies in epidemiological studies, individual variables are usually aggregated into the higher level unit. Typically, the aggregated measure includes responses of every individual belonging to that group (i.e. it constitutes a self-included measure). More recently, researchers have developed an aggregate measure which excludes the response of the individual to whom the aggregate measure is linked (i.e. a self-excluded measure). In this study, we clarify the substantive and technical properties of these two measures when they are used as exposures in multilevel models. Although the differences between the two aggregated measures are mathematically subtle, distinguishing between them is important in terms of the specific scientific questions to be addressed. We then show how these measures can be used in two distinct types of multilevel models-self-included model and self-excluded model-and interpret the parameters in each model by imposing hypothetical interventions. The concept is tested on empirical data of workplace social capital and employees' systolic blood pressure. Researchers assume group-level interventions when using a self-included model, and individual-level interventions when using a self-excluded model. Analytical re-parameterizations of these two models highlight their differences in parameter interpretation. Cluster-mean centered self-included models enable researchers to decompose the collective effect into its within- and between-group components. The benefit of cluster-mean centering procedure is further discussed in terms of hypothetical interventions. When investigating the potential roles of aggregated variables, researchers should carefully explore which type of model-self-included or self-excluded-is suitable for a given situation, particularly

  5. Vulnerable children, stigmatised smokers: The social construction of target audiences in media debates on policies regulating smoking in vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Josh; Weishaar, Heide; Semple, Sean; Duffy, Sheila; Hilton, Shona

    2017-11-01

    Following restrictions on smoking in vehicles carrying children in several countries, legislation to safeguard minors from second-hand smoke exposure in vehicles is under-consideration or has been implemented across the United Kingdom. This article presents the first investigation into social constructions of children, smokers and smoking parents in newsprint media and coverage of debates about protecting children from exposure to second-hand smoke in vehicles. Using Scotland as an example, articles on children's exposure to second-hand smoke published between 1 January 2004 and 16 February 2014 in three Scottish newspapers were identified using Nexis UK. In all, 131 articles were thematically coded and analysed. Children were portrayed as vulnerable and requiring protection, with few articles highlighting children's ability to voice concerns about the dangers of smoking. Smokers and smoking parents were mainly portrayed in a factual manner, but also frequently as irresponsible and, in some cases, intentionally imposing harm. Individual smokers were blamed for their recklessness, with only a small number of articles mentioning the need to assist smokers in quitting. Supporters of legislation focused on corresponding discourse, whereas critics directed debates towards established arguments against policy, including individual freedom, privacy and problems of enforcement. Focusing on children's vulnerability to second-hand smoke might have increased support for legislation but risked a side effect of smokers being stigmatised. The media and supporters of public health policy are encouraged to consider appropriate approaches to raise awareness of the health harms of second-hand smoke to children while avoiding unintended stigmatisation of those in which they want to encourage behaviour change.

  6. Genetic targeting of NRXN2 in mice unveils role in excitatory cortical synapse function and social behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesche eBorn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human genetics has identified rare copy number variations and deleterious mutations for all neurexin genes (NRXN1-3 in patients with neurodevelopmental diseases, and electrophysiological recordings in animal brains have shown that Nrxns are important for synaptic transmission. While several mouse models for Nrxn1α inactivation have previously been studied for behavioral changes, very little information is available for other variants. Here, we validate that mice lacking Nrxn2α exhibit behavioral abnormalities, characterized by social interaction deficits and increased anxiety-like behavior, which partially overlap, partially differ from Nrxn1α mutant behaviors. Using patch-clamp recordings in Nrxn2α knockout brains, we observe reduced spontaneous transmitter release at excitatory synapses in the neocortex. We also analyse at this cellular level a novel NRXN2 mouse model that carries a combined deletion of Nrxn2α and Nrxn2β. Electrophysiological analysis of this Nrxn2-mutant mouse shows surprisingly similar defects of excitatory release to Nrxn2α, indicating that the β-variant of Nrxn2 has no strong function in basic transmission at these synapses. Inhibitory transmission as well as synapse densities and ultrastructure remain unchanged in the neocortex of both models. Furthermore, at Nrxn2α and Nrxn2-mutant excitatory synapses we find an altered facilitation and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR function because NMDAR-dependent decay time and NMDAR-mediated responses are reduced. As Nrxn can indirectly be linked to NMDAR via neuroligin and PSD-95, the trans-synaptic nature of this complex may help to explain occurrence of presynaptic and postsynaptic effects. Since excitatory/inhibitory imbalances and impairment of NMDAR function are alledged to have a role in autism and schizophrenia, our results support the idea of a related pathomechanism in these disorders.

  7. Reducing aggressive responses to social exclusion using transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Paolo; Romero Lauro, Leonor J; DeWall, C Nathan; Chester, David S; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-03-01

    A vast body of research showed that social exclusion can trigger aggression. However, the neural mechanisms involved in regulating aggressive responses to social exclusion are still largely unknown. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the excitability of a target region. Building on studies suggesting that activity in the right ventrolateral pre-frontal cortex (rVLPFC) might aid the regulation or inhibition of social exclusion-related distress, we hypothesized that non-invasive brain polarization through tDCS over the rVLPFC would reduce behavioral aggression following social exclusion. Participants were socially excluded or included while they received tDCS or sham stimulation to the rVLPFC. Next, they received an opportunity to aggress. Excluded participants demonstrated cognitive awareness of their inclusionary status, yet tDCS (but not sham stimulation) reduced their behavioral aggression. Excluded participants who received tDCS stimulation were no more aggressive than included participants. tDCS stimulation did not influence socially included participants' aggression. Our findings provide the first causal test for the role of rVLPFC in modulating aggressive responses to social exclusion. Our findings suggest that modulating activity in a brain area (i.e. the rVLPFC) implicated in self-control and emotion regulation can break the link between social exclusion and aggression. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Vaccination coverage among adults, excluding influenza vaccination - United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kim, David K; Pilishvili, Tamara; Hales, Craig M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-02-06

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and vaccination indication). Influenza vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster vaccination. Increases in vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low

  9. Percutaneous endoscopy to diagnose malignancy in gastric outlet obstruction of excluded stomach after gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Rubin, Joshua; Kwong, Wilson

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer in the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a rare finding and most reported diagnoses are made via surgery. Endoscopic access to the excluded stomach is difficult, even with balloon-assisted enteroscopy. We present the case of a 74-year-old woman with malignant gastric outlet obstruction of the excluded stomach, 41 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Minimally invasive access to the excluded stomach was obtained by placement of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube, followed by insertion of a pediatric gastroscope through the gastrostomy tube tract. This novel approach provides minimally invasive access to the excluded stomach in patients with high suspicion of pathology in the excluded stomach, when balloon-assisted enteroscopy is not technically feasible or available.

  10. Two-year-olds exclude novel objects as potential referents of novel words based on pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassmann, Susanne; Stracke, Marén; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Many studies have established that children tend to exclude objects for which they already have a name as potential referents of novel words. In the current study we asked whether this exclusion can be triggered by social-pragmatic context alone without pre-existing words as blockers. Two-year-old children watched an adult looking at a novel object while saying a novel word with excitement. In one condition the adult had not seen the object beforehand, and so the children interpreted the adult's utterance as referring to the gazed-at object. In another condition the adult and child had previously played jointly with the gazed-at object. In this case, children less often assumed that the adult was referring to the object but rather they searched for an alternative referent--presumably because they inferred that the gazed-at object was old news in their common ground with the adult and so not worthy of excited labeling. Since this inference based on exclusion is highly similar to that underlying the Principle of Contrast/Mutual Exclusivity, we propose that this principle is not purely lexical but rather is based on children's understanding of how and why people direct one another's attention to things either with or without language.

  11. Excluding the poor from accessing biomedical literature: a rights violation that impedes global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamey, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    Most biomedical journals charge readers a hefty access toll to read the full text version of a published research article. These tolls bring enormous profits to the traditional corporate publishing industry, but they make it impossible for most people worldwide--particularly in low and middle income countries--to access the biomedical literature. Traditional publishers also insist on owning the copyright on these articles, making it illegal for readers to freely distribute and photocopy papers, translate them, or create derivative educational works. This article argues that excluding the poor from accessing and freely using the biomedical research literature is harming global public health. Health care workers, for example, are prevented from accessing the information they need to practice effective medicine, while policymakers are prevented from accessing the essential knowledge they require to build better health care systems. The author proposes that the biomedical literature should be considered a global public good, basing his arguments upon longstanding and recent international declarations that enshrine access to scientific and medical knowledge as a human right. He presents an emerging alternative publishing model, called open access, and argues that this model is a more socially responsive and equitable approach to knowledge dissemination.

  12. Who is excluded and how? An analysis of community spaces for maternal and child health in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Ayesha; Khan, Fazal Ali; Wood, Geof

    2015-11-25

    The maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) indicators of Pakistan depict the deplorable state of the poor and rural women and children. Many MNCH programmes stress the need to engage the poor in community spaces. However, caste and class based hierarchies and gendered social norms exclude the lower caste poor women from accessing healthcare. To find pathways for improving the lives of the excluded, this study considers the social system as a whole and describes the mechanisms of exclusion in the externally created formal community spaces and their interaction with the indigenous informal spaces. The study used a qualitative case study design to identify the formal and informal community spaces in three purposively selected villages of Thatta, Rajanpur, and Ghizer districts. Community perspectives were gathered by conducting 37 focus group discussions, based on participatory rural appraisal tools, with separate groups of women and men. Relevant documents of six MNCH programmes were reviewed and 25 key informant interviews were conducted with programme staff. We found that lower caste poor tenants and nomadic peasants were excluded from formal and informal spaces. The formal community spaces formed by MNCH programmes across Pakistan included fixed, small transitory, large transitory, and emerging institutional spaces. Programme guidelines mandated selection of community notables in groups/committees and used criteria that prevented registration of nomadic groups as eligible clients. The selection criteria and adverse attitude of healthcare workers, along with inadequacy of programmatic resources to sustain outreach activities also contributed to exclusion of the lower caste poor women from formal spaces. The informal community spaces were mostly gender segregated. Infrequently, MNCH information trickled down from the better-off to the lower caste poor women through transitory interactions in the informal domestic sphere. A revision of the purpose and

  13. 22 CFR 1006.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... System (EPLS)? 1006.500 Section 1006.500 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 1006.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most current information...

  14. 2 CFR 180.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 180.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most current information... List System (EPLS)? 180.500 Section 180.500 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET...

  15. 5 CFR 919.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Parties List System (EPLS)? 919.500 Section 919.500 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 919.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most current information about persons who are...

  16. 21 CFR 1404.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... System (EPLS)? 1404.500 Section 1404.500 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 1404.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most...

  17. 7 CFR 3017.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 3017.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most current information about... System (EPLS)? 3017.500 Section 3017.500 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  18. 22 CFR 208.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... List System (EPLS)? 208.500 Section 208.500 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 208.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most...

  19. 22 CFR 1508.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... System (EPLS)? 1508.500 Section 1508.500 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 1508.500 What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? The EPLS is a widely available source of the most current information...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1323 - Post-World War II service excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Post-World War II service excluded. 404.1323... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1323 Post-World War II service excluded. Your service was not in the active service...

  1. Psychiatric Disorder or Impairing Psychology in Children Who Have Been Excluded from School: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whear, Rebecca; Marlow, Ruth; Boddy, Kate; Ukoumunne, Obioha C.; Parker, Claire; Ford, Tamsin; Thompson-Coon, Jo; Stein, Ken

    2014-01-01

    When children with special educational needs are excluded from school, it should raise the concern that these children are not receiving adequate help and support. This systematic review aims to identify the prevalence of psychiatric disorder or impairing psychopathology among children who are excluded from school compared to children who are not…

  2. 21 CFR 1.362 - What records are excluded from this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What records are excluded from this subpart? 1.362 Section 1.362 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Requirements § 1.362 What records are excluded from this subpart? The establishment and maintenance of records...

  3. 31 CFR 19.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? 19.500 Section 19.500 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System...

  4. 34 CFR 85.500 - What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the purpose of the Excluded Parties List System (EPLS)? 85.500 Section 85.500 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Excluded Parties List System § 85.500 What is the purpose of the...

  5. Bias towards dementia: are hip fracture trials excluding too many patients? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hebert-Davies, Jonah; Laflamme, G.-Yves; Rouleau, Dominique; Bhandari, Mohit; Devereaux, Philip J.; Guyatt, Gordon; Heetveld, Martin J.; Jeray, Kyle; Liew, Susan; Richardson, Martin J.; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Swiontkowski, Marc; Tornetta, Paul; Walter, Stephen; Mohit, Bhandari; Sprague, Sheila; Viveiros, Helena; Simunovic, Nicole; Swinton, Marilyn; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Duraikannan, Aravin; Swiontkowski, Marc F.; Agel, Julie; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Goslings, J. Carel; Haverlag, Robert; Ponsen, M. J.; de Rijcke, P. A. R.; Koppert, C. L.; Buijk, Steven E.; Groenendijk, Richard P. R.; Dawson, I.; de Rycke, P. A. R.; Tetteroo, G. W. M.; Bruijninckx, M. M. M.; Doornebosch, P.; deGraaf, E. J. R.; Patka, Peter; Eversdijk, Martin; Peters, Rolf; van Waes, Oscar; den Hartog, Dennis; van Waes, O.; Oprel, P.; Gasthuis, Kennemer; Visser, Gijs A.; Stockmann, Heyn; Silvis, Rob; Snellen, J. P.; Rybroek, A.; Scheepers, J. J. G.; Vermeulen, Erik G. J.; Siroen, M. P. C.; Vuylsteke, Ronald; Brom, H. L. F.; Ryna, H.; van Laarhoven, H. A. J.; Haag, Den; Rhemrev, S.; Bosman, C. H. R.; van Otterloo, Alexander Mol; Hoogendoorn, Jochem; Idenburg, Floris; de Vries, A. C.; Meylaerts, S. A. G.; Roukema, Gert R.; Josaputra, H.; Keller, Paul; de Rooij, P. P.; Kuiken, H.; Boxma, H.; Cleffken, B. I.; Liem, Ronald; Poolman, Rudolf W.; Simons, Maarten P.; van der Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Willems, W. J.; de Meulemeester, Frank R. A. J.; van der Hart, Cor; Tarkan, K.; Festen, S.; de Nies, F.; Out, N. J. M.; Bosma, J.; de Graaf Gasthuis, Reinier; van der Elst, Maarten; van der Pol, Carmen C.; van't Reit, Martyne; Karsten, T. M.; de Vries, M. R.; Stassen, P. S.; Schep, N.; Schmidt, Ben; Hoffman, W. H.; Segers, J. M.; Zijl, Jacco; Verhoeven, Bart; Smits, Anke; Theunissen, Evert B. M.; Wille, J.; Govaert, Lonnek; Wittich, Phillippe; Brauw, Maurits; Wille, Jan; Ritchie, Ewan D.; Wittish, H.; Wessel, R. N.; Hammacher, E. R.; Ziekenhuis, Elisabeth; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; Meijer, Joast M. R.; van Egmond, Teun; van den Heijden, F. H. W. M.; Campo, Martin; Verhagen, Ronald; van Kampen, A.; Biert, J.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Edwards, Michael; Blokhuis, Taco; Frolke, Jan Paul M.; Geeraidts, L.; de Waal Malefyt, M. C.; Schreurs, B.; Simmermacher, Roger K. J.; van Mulken, Jeroen; van Gaalen, Steven M.; Bronovo, Ziekenhuis; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Guicherit, O. R.; Frihagen, Frede; Nordsletten, Lars; Kibsgaard, Thomas; Haug, Knut Jorgen; Lona, Tariei; Ugland, Stein; Nilsen, Kenneth; Brekke, Anne Christin; Vesterhus, Elise Berg; Tetsworth, Kevin; Weinrauch, Patrick; Pincus, Paul; Donald, Geoff; yang, Steven; Halliday, Brett; Gervais, Trevor; Holt, Michael; Flynn, Annette; Pirpiris, Marinis; Love, David; Bucknill, Andrew; Farrugia, Richard J.; Dowrick, Adam; Donohue, Craig; Bedi, Harvinder; Li, Doug; Edwards, Elton; Csonguray, Steven; Miller, Russell; Wang, Otis; Chia, Andrew; Jain, Arvind; Mammen, Mathan; Moaveni, Ash; Murdock, Zoe; Sage, Claire; Bahadur, Tegh; Jain, Anil Kumar; Pankaj, Amite; Pesantez, Rodrigo; Martinez, Adriana; Novoa, Catherine; Buckley, Richard E.; Duffy, Paul; Korley, Robert; Johnston, Kelly; Puloski, Shannon; Carcary, Kimberly; Avram, Victoria; Bicknell, Ryan; Yach, Jeff; Bardana, Davide; Wood, Gavin; Lambert, Sue; Sanders, David W.; Howard, Jamie; Macleod, Mark; Lawendy, Abdel; Bartley, Debra; Laney, Tim; Tieszer, Christina; Peterson, Devin; Zalzal, Paul; Naumetz, Victor; Brien, Heather; Weening, Brad; Wai, Eugene K.; Papp, Steven; Roffey, Darren; McCormack, Robert; Stone, Trevor; Perey, Bertrand; Viskontas, Darius; Boyer, Dory; Moola, Farhad; Zomar, Mauri; Moon, Karyn; McKee, Michael; Hall, Jeremy; Ahn, Henry; Vicente, Milena R.; Wild, Lisa M.; Kreder, Hans J.; Stephen, David J. G.; Nousianinen, Markku; Kunz, Monica; Syed, Khalid; Azad, Tania; Coles, Chad; Leighton, Ross; Johnstone, David; Glazebrook, Mark; Alexander, David; Coady, Cathy; Trask, Kelly; Dobbin, Gwendolyn; Oliver, Todd M.; Jones, Vicky; Ronan, James; Brown, Desmond T.; Carlilse, Hope; Shaughnessy, Lisa; Schwappach, John; Davis, Craig A.; Weingarten, Peter; Weinerman, Stewart; Newman, Heike; Baker, Janell; Browner, Kieran; Hurley, Meghan; Payton, Krystal; Zura, Robert; Manson, Maria J.; Goetz, David; Broderick, Scott J.; Porter, Scott; Pace, Thomas; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Snider, Becky; Schmidt, Andrew H.; Haas, Jonathan; Templeman, David; Westberg, Jerald R.; Mullis, Brian; Ertl, J. P.; Shively, Karl; Frizzel, Valda; Moore, Molly M.; Marcantonio, Andrew J.; Iorio, Richard; Lobo, Margaret; Kain, Michael; Specht, Lawrence; Tilzey, John; Garfi, John; Prayson, Michael J.; Laughlin, Richard; Rubino, Joe; Lawless, Mathew; DiPaola, Matt; Gayton, Chris; Dulaney-Cripe, Liz; Vallier, Heather A.; Wilber, John; Wilber, Roger G.; Sontich, John H.; Patterson, Brendan; Dolenc, Andrea; Robinson, Chalitha; DePaolo, Charles J.; Alosky, Rachel; Shell, E.; Keeve, Jonathan P.; Anderson, Chris; McDonald, Michael; Hoffman, Jodi; Baele, Joseph; Weber, Tim; Edison, Matt; Musapatika, Dana; Jones, Clifford; Ringler, James; Endres, Terrance; Gelbke, Martin; Jabara, Michael; Sietsema, Debra L.; Engerman, Susan M.; Switzer, Julie A.; Li, Mangnai; Marston, Scott; Cole, Peter; Vang, Sandy X.; Ly, Thuan; Anderson, Sarah; Foley, Amy; McBeth, Jessica; Comstock, Curt; Ziran, Navid; Shaer, James; Hileman, Barbara; Karges, David; Cannada, Lisa; Kuldjanov, Djoldas; Watson, John Tracy; Mills, James Jackman Emily; Hill, Leslie; Simon, Tiffanya; Abdelgawad, Amr; Shunia, Juan; Jenkins, Mark; Zumwalt, Mimi; Romero, Amanda West; Lowe, Jason; Goldstein, Jessica; Zamorano, David P.; Lawson, Deanna; Archdeacon, Michael; Wyrick, John; Hampton, Shelley; Lewis, Courtland G.; Ademi, Arben; Sullivan, Raymond; Caminiti, Stephanie; Graves, Matthew; Smith, Lori; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Crist, Brett D.; Murtha, Yvonne; Anderson, Linda K.; Kliewer, Toni K.; McPherson, Melinda K.; Sullivan, Kelly M.; Jarrett, Sharon L.; Sagebien, Carlos; Seuffert, Patricia; Mehta, Samir; Esterhai, John; Ahn, Jaimo; Tjoumakaris, Fotios; Horan, Annamarie D.; Kaminski, Christine; Tarkin, Ivan; Siska, Peter; Luther, Arlene; Irrgang, James; Farrell, Dana J.; Gorczyca, John T.; Gross, Jonathan M.; Kates, Stephen Lloyd; Colosi, Jen; Hibsch, Nancy; Noble, Krista; Neu, Sarah; Agarwal, Animesh; Wright, Rebecca; Hsu, Joseph R.; Randall, Gayle M.; Ficke, James R.; Charlton, Michael; Fan, Mary; Garcia, Socorro H.; Obremskey, William T.; Richards, Justin Edward; Robinson, Kenya; Carroll, Eben; Kulp, Brenda; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Devereaux, Philip James; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Koval, Ken J.; Tetsworth, Kevin D.; Culgin, Sarah; Desjardin, Heather; Beimers, Lijkele; de Vries, Jasper; Zurcher, Arthur W.; Albers, G. H. Rob; Rademakers, Maarten; Breugem, Stefan; van der Haven, Ibo; Damen, Peter Jan; Bulstra, Gythe H.; Somford, P.; Haverkamp, Daniël; Gasthuis, Onze Lieve Vrouwe; Molekamp, Willem Jan Kleyn; Kleipool, E. B.; Keizer, Stefan B.; Swen, Jan-Willem A.; Nelissen, Eelco M.; Hollander, Peter H. C. den; Metsaars, Weineke; Thomassen, J. W.; Fontijne, W. Peter J.; Wiersma, Saskia C.; Boetes, Bastiaan; JT, Edgar; Ziekenhuis, Spaarne; Nolte, Peter A.; de Jong, Tjitte; van Noort, Arthur; Vergroesen, Diederik A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Schutte, Bernard G.; Schuman, Lein; Hillen, Robert Jan; Cheung, John; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Nagels, Jochem; Krips, Rover; Mullers, J. Bernard; Schüller, Hans; Ziekenhuis, Amphia; van den Hout, Joost A. A. M.; Joosten, Adrianus J. P.; van der Broek, Chris M.; Bolder, Stefan B. T.; Eygendaal, Denise; Moonen, Adrianus F. C. M.; van Geenen, Rutger C. I.; Hoebink, Eric A.; Wagenmakers, Robert; van Helden, Wouter; Kooijman, Rob; Postema, Roelf R.; Lampe, Harald I. H.; Ziekenhuizen, Gelre; Bolhuis, Hugo W.; Bullens, Pieter H. J.; Hogervorst, Mike; de Kroon, Karin E.; Jansen, Rob H.; Raven, Eric E. J.; van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Reuver, Joost M.; Barnaart, Alexander F. W.; Roerdink, W. Herbert; van Erve, Ruud H. G. P.; Koorevaar, Rinco; Frima, Anthony Hans; Flikweert, Elvira R.; Falke, Mark L. M.; Kurek, Frans J.; Slingerland, Adrianus C. H.; Vallei, Gelderse; van Dijk, Jan P.; van Helden, Wouter H.; Mauer-Hansen, Espen; Boee, Berte; Clarke-Jensen, Jon; Brekke, Anne Christine; Vestergaard, Elise Berg; Carr, Ashley; Russ, Matthias; Li, Douglas; Doig, Stephen; Laflamme, Yves; Fernandes, Julio C.; Poirier, Marie-France; Bogoch, Earl; Kreder, Hans; Axelrod, Terry; Jenkinson, Richard; Wadey, Veronica; Nousiainen, Markku; Stephen, David; Macnevin, Melanie; Richardson, Glen C.; Biddulph, Michael; Gross, Michael; Dunbar, Michael; Dobbin, Gwen; Zarin, Jeffrey; Parvataneni, Hari; Baker, Janell K.; Roberson, James R.; Erens, Greg; Montelione, Anita; Woodard, Shawndra; Ertl, Janos; Cummings, Judd; Worman, Ripley; Webster, Mark; Parr, Andrew; Frizzell, Valda; Moore, Molly; Wilk, Richard; Torchia, Michael; Cross, William; Sems, Andrew; Taunton, Michael; Sanchez-Satelo, Joaquin; Sierrz, Rafsel; Timm, Kimberly; Foreman, Barbara; DePaolo, Charles; Hill, Rocky; Lewis, Coutland; Srivastava, Ajay; Bakeman, James; Sietsema, Deb; Strathy, Gregg; Johnson, Paul; Peter, Kathleen; Morton, Maeghan E.; Parvizi, Javad; Austin, Matthew; Morrison, Tiffany; Mont, Michael; Copeland, Carol; Delanois, Ronald; Khanuja, Harpal; Weddington, Shaquita; Bacon, Madeline; Mullen, Marylou; Kanlic, Enes; Abdelgawad, Amr Atef; Shunia, Juan Gerardo; Horan, Annamarie

    2012-01-01

    Patients with hip fractures are older and often present many co-morbidities, including dementia. These patients cannot answer quality of life questionnaires and are generally excluded from trials. We hypothesized that a significant number of patients are being excluded from these studies and this

  6. 8 CFR 241.21 - Stay of deportation of excluded alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stay of deportation of excluded alien. 241.21 Section 241.21 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS APPREHENSION AND DETENTION OF ALIENS ORDERED REMOVED Deportation of Excluded Aliens (for Hearings Commenced...

  7. 46 CFR 148.04-13 - Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding stainless steel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings... Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-13 Ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings (excluding... described as ferrous metal borings, shavings, turnings, or cuttings on board vessels (excluding stainless...

  8. Preventing Inclusion? Inclusive Early Childhood Education and the Option to Exclude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cologon, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    While there is increasing international commitment to inclusive education, as outlined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), many children remain excluded at school. One marginalised and frequently excluded group of people are people who experience disability. In the recently released first report on…

  9. 22 CFR 40.102 - Guardian required to accompany excluded alien.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. 40.102 Section 40.102 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH... Guardian required to accompany excluded alien. INA 212(a)(9)(B) is not applicable at the time of visa...

  10. Exploiting social influence to magnify population-level behaviour change in maternal and child health: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial of network targeting algorithms in rural Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Holly B; Stafford, Derek; Hughes, D Alex; Keegan, Thomas; Negron, Rennie; Broome, Jai; McKnight, Mark; Nicoll, Liza; Nelson, Jennifer; Iriarte, Emma; Ordonez, Maria; Airoldi, Edo; Fowler, James H; Christakis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Despite global progress on many measures of child health, rates of neonatal mortality remain high in the developing world. Evidence suggests that substantial improvements can be achieved with simple, low-cost interventions within family and community settings, particularly those designed to change knowledge and behaviour at the community level. Using social network analysis to identify structurally influential community members and then targeting them for intervention shows promise for the implementation of sustainable community-wide behaviour change. Methods and analysis We will use a detailed understanding of social network structure and function to identify novel ways of targeting influential individuals to foster cascades of behavioural change at a population level. Our work will involve experimental and observational analyses. We will map face-to-face social networks of 30 000 people in 176 villages in Western Honduras, and then conduct a randomised controlled trial of a friendship-based network-targeting algorithm with a set of well-established care interventions. We will also test whether the proportion of the population targeted affects the degree to which the intervention spreads throughout the network. We will test scalable methods of network targeting that would not, in the future, require the actual mapping of social networks but would still offer the prospect of rapidly identifying influential targets for public health interventions. Ethics and dissemination The Yale IRB and the Honduran Ministry of Health approved all data collection procedures (Protocol number 1506016012) and all participants will provide informed consent before enrolment. We will publish our findings in peer-reviewed journals as well as engage non-governmental organisations and other actors through venues for exchanging practical methods for behavioural health interventions, such as global health conferences. We will also develop a ‘toolkit’ for practitioners to

  11. Social scaling of extrapersonal space: target objects are judged as closer when the reference frame is a human agent with available movement potentialities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, C; Brass, M; Committeri, G

    2015-01-01

    effect was simply due to a line-of-sight mechanism (visual perspective taking) we compared the human agent free to move with the same agent tied to a pole with a rope, thus reducing movement potentialities while maintaining equal visual accessibility. The "Near space extension" disappeared when this manipulation was introduced, showing that movement potentialities are the relevant factor for such an effect. Our results demonstrate for the first time that during allocentric distance judgments within extrapersonal space, we implicitly process the movement potentialities of the RF. A target object is perceived as being closer when the allocentric RF is a human with available movement potentialities, suggesting a mechanism of social scaling of extrapersonal space processing. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Aspects concerning the lengths of the excluded shareholder’s liability towards third parties in the case of limited liability companies in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Stoican

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the current context of reinventing the trading company law, at the end of a lengthy and extremely difficult economic crisis, when every participant in the economic life tried to find their own way to adapt and make their activity survive the new social and commercial realities, not few were the cases when some of the Shareholders were excluded and their liability was drawn onto the legal person itself. Nevertheless, there is a type of legal liability of the former Shareholders, excluded from the Company, that still is quite deficiently regulated and, despite the sound argumentation and comprehensive regulation of Law no. 31/1990, it fails to provide a clear and detailed explanation of the consequences, namely, of the consequences the exclusion of a Shareholder has over the Third Parties of good-faith that the legal person (the Company had or continues to have legal relations with. This paper thus aims at analysing one of the main effects of excluding Shareholders from the company, namely the extent of their liability towards the Third Parties, and it is structured in five parts, as follows: 1 Introduction, 2 About the Shareholders’ exclusion, 3 The effects of excluding a Shareholder from the Limited Liability Company, 4 The excluded Shareholder’s liability towards the Third Parties and 5 Conclusions.

  13. 41 CFR 101-30.302 - Types of items excluded from cataloging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-FEDERAL CATALOG SYSTEM 30.3-Cataloging Items of Supply § 101-30.302 Types of items excluded from... Catalog System except when an agency determines that Federal item identification data will be of value in...

  14. Gore excluder device with the C3 delivery system for management of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morasch MD

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cheong J Lee, Mark L Keldahl, Mark D MoraschDivision of Vascular Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: The GORE Excluder stent-graft is one of the currently available devices approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in endovascular aortic repair. Recently, a new delivery system modification has been applied to the Excluder device which allows repositioning of the stent-graft to adjust for accurate proximal landing and facilitate gate cannulation. In this review, we examine the Excluder device with the new C3 delivery system and its potential benefit in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.Keywords: gore excluder, abdominal aortic aneurysm, repair, C3 delivery system

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable...

  16. Thermodynamics of the low-density excluded-volume hadron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Krzysztof; Zalewski, Kacper

    2016-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamics of excluded-volume particles at finite temperature and chemical potential in the low-density approximation. We assume Boltzmann statistics and study the influence of the excluded volume on an ideal gas thermodynamics at the same temperature, pressure, and number of particles. We show that considering the change of the free enthalpy due to the excluded volume, and using the Maxwell identities, one can derive relevant thermodynamic functions and parameters of multicomponent gases. The derivation is quite general, because particles may have different sizes and shapes which can also depend on their momenta. Besides its simplicity and generality, our approach has the advantage of eliminating the transcendental equations occurring in earlier studies. A representative example of the excluded-volume thermodynamics is the single-component gas of hard spheres. For this case, using a virial expansion, the validity limits of the low-density approximation are also discussed.

  17. Gore excluder device with the C3 delivery system for management of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    OpenAIRE

    Morasch, Mark; Cheong J. Lee,; Mark L. Keldahl,

    2012-01-01

    Cheong J Lee, Mark L Keldahl, Mark D MoraschDivision of Vascular Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: The GORE Excluder stent-graft is one of the currently available devices approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in endovascular aortic repair. Recently, a new delivery system modification has been applied to the Excluder device which allows repositioning of the stent-graft to adjust for accurate proximal landing and facilitate...

  18. Metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull: CNS involvement excluded by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taets ven Amerongen, A.H.M.; Kaiser, M.C.; Waal, F.C. de

    1987-01-01

    A case of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma to the skull is presented, demonstrating the superiority of magnetic resonance imaging over other imaging modalities to exclude CNS involvement. Precise delineation of different tumor components in extradural location contained in an intact dural rim together with compressed cortex showing no signs of tumorous involvement constituted an MRI appearance allowing us to exclude tumor outgrowth into the brain. (orig.)

  19. Excluded segmental duct bile leakage: the case for bilio-enteric anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrono, Damiano; Tandoi, Francesco; Romagnoli, Renato; Salizzoni, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Excluded segmental duct bile leak is the rarest type of post-hepatectomy bile leak and presents unique diagnostic and management features. Classical management strategies invariably entail a significant loss of functioning hepatic parenchyma. The aim of this study is to report a new liver-sparing technique to handle excluded segmental duct bile leakage. Two cases of excluded segmental duct bile leak occurring after major hepatic resection were managed by a Roux-en-Y hepatico-jejunostomy on the excluded segmental duct, avoiding the sacrifice of the liver parenchyma origin of the fistula. In both cases, classical management strategies would have led to the functional loss of roughly 50 % of the liver remnant. Diagnostic and management implications are thoroughly discussed. Both cases had an uneventful postoperative course. The timing of repair was associated with a different outcome: the patient who underwent surgical repair in the acute phase developed no long-term complications, whereas the patient who underwent delayed repair developed a late stenosis requiring percutaneous dilatation. Roux-en-Y hepatico-jejunostomy on the excluded bile duct is a valuable technique in selected cases of excluded segmental duct bile leakage.

  20. Social Skills Intervention Planning for Preschoolers: Using the SSiS-Rating Scales to Identify Target Behaviors Valued by Parents and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jennifer R.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Kaiser, Ann P.

    2014-01-01

    Teachers' and parents' importance ratings of social behaviors for 95 preschoolers were examined using the "Social Skills Improvement System-Rating Scales" (Gresham & Elliott, 2008). Multivariate analyses were used to examine parents' and teachers' importance ratings at the item and subscale levels. Overall,…

  1. The Interaction Effects of Program Training, Dosage, and Implementation Quality on Targeted Student Outcomes for The RULER Approach to Social and Emotional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Maria Regina; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Elbertson, Nicole A.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study examined how training, dosage, and implementation quality of a social and emotional learning program, The RULER Approach, were related to students' social and emotional competencies. There were no main effects for any of the variables on student outcomes, but students had more positive outcomes when their teachers (a) attended more…

  2. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  3. [Participation as Target of Social Medicine and Nursing Care: - Legal Definition of Long-Term Care Dependency - Strategies to Prevent Long-Term Care Dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüchtern, Elisabeth; Gansweid, Barbara; Gerber, Hans; von Mittelstaedt, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Objective: By the "Second Bill to Strengthen Long-Term Care", a new concept of long-term care dependency will be introduced, valid from 2017. Long-term care dependency according to Social Code XI will be defined covering more aspects than today. Therefore, the working group "Nursing Care" of the division "Social Medicine in Practice and Rehabilitation" in the German Society for Social Medicine and Prevention presents their results after working on the social medicine perspective of the definition and prevention of long-term care dependency. Methods: Both the definition and strategies to prevent long-term care dependency are systematically taken into consideration from the point of view of social medicine on the basis of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), as long-term care dependency means a defined condition of disability. Results: Both the current and the new concept of long-term care dependency focus activity limitations. The perspective of social medicine considers the interactions of health condition, its effects on daily activities and personal as well as environmental factors. From this point of view approaches for social benefits concerning prevention and rehabilitation can be identified systematically so as to work against the development and progression of long-term care dependency. The reference to the ICF can facilitate the communication between different professions. The new "graduation" of long-term care dependency would allow an international "translation" referring to the ICF. Conclusion: Experts from the field of social medicine as well as those of nursing care, care-givers and nursing researchers have in common the objective that persons in need of nursing care can participate in as many aspects of life of importance to them in an autonomous and self-determined way. The point of view of social medicine on long-term care dependency is fundamental for all occupational groups that are involved and for their

  4. Persons with Drug Addiction as Knowledge Providers: Their Contribution to Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Ron; Levit, Shabtay

    2012-01-01

    Social work students' stereotypical perceptions of excluded populations could be decisive in the way they treat those who are excluded. In an attempt to change such perceptions and enhance knowledge about how to work with an excluded population, a dialogue-in-class model was implemented between students of social work in Israel and persons with…

  5. Long-Term Outcome of the GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis for Treatment of Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poublon, Claire G; Holewijn, Suzanne; van Sterkenburg, Steven M M; Tielliu, Ignace F J; Zeebregts, Clark J; Reijnen, Michel M P J

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate long-term outcome of GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, Arizona) for elective treatment of infrarenal aortic aneurysms and to evaluate performance of different generations of the device. A retrospective analysis was performed of 248 patients undergoing elective endovascular aneurysm repair with the GORE EXCLUDER between January 2000 and December 2015 in 2 hospitals. Primary endpoint was reintervention-free survival. Secondary endpoints were technical success, overall survival, rupture-free survival, endoleaks, sac diameter change (> 5 mm), limb occlusion, and migration (> 5 mm). Median follow-up time was 26 months (range, 1-190 months). Assisted primary technical success was 96.8%. Reintervention-free survival for 5 and 10 years was 85.2% and 75.6%, respectively. Independent risk factors for reintervention were technical success (P GORE EXCLUDER compared with the low permeability GORE EXCLUDER (P = .001) and in the presence of type I, II, and V endoleaks (P GORE EXCLUDER is effective with acceptable reintervention rates in the long-term and few device-related adverse events or ruptures up to 10 years. Observed late adverse events and new-onset endoleaks emphasize the need for long-term surveillance. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Liquid socialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob

    (symbolic interactionism, post-structuralism, phenomenology, and actor-network theory). The findings suggest that alcohol has a variety of meanings for the teenagers. Drinking alcohol is a central symbolic marker of age and gender, and as such, it is a very serious matter to teenagers. In their symbolic...... struggle for social recognition, teenagers constitute a drinking pressure which somewhat excludes less- and non-drinking teenagers. However, at the same time drinking alcohol is also fun - and it is an important way of communication and reproducing friendships at parties. Moreover, teenagers experience...

  7. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Table of Excluded Nonnarcotic Products: Vicks® VapoInhaler®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-08

    This final rule adopts the interim final rule, with a correction to spelling of the manufacturer's name that was published in the Federal Register on October 27, 2015. The Drug Enforcement Administration is amending the table of Excluded Nonnarcotic Products to update the listing for Vicks® VapoInhaler®, containing 50 mg levmetamfetamine in a nasal decongestant inhaler, marketed by The Procter & Gamble Company. This over-the-counter, non-narcotic drug product is excluded from provisions of the Controlled Substances Act.

  8. 29 CFR 98.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true When do I check to see if a person is excluded or... When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a) Enter into a primary tier covered...

  9. 7 CFR 3017.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 3017.430 Section 3017.430 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or...

  10. 34 CFR 85.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When do I check to see if a person is excluded or... When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a) Enter into a primary tier covered...

  11. 29 CFR 1471.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or... Officials Regarding Transactions § 1471.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified in two ways: (a) You as an agency official...

  12. 29 CFR 1471.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When do I check to see if a person is excluded or... Officials Regarding Transactions § 1471.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a...

  13. The Development of Social Entrepreneurship – The Key to an Inclusive Society through Social Businesses

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian Sîrb

    2012-01-01

    The current international context, marked by the economic crisis and by the expansion of social problems, placed the concept of social economy and that of social entrepreneurship as being an effective tool in solving certain problems of socially excluded or under social risk persons, with real impact on their social inclusion and labour market integration. Regardless the goods or services produced or their price, the social economy organisations operate in a competitive environment...

  14. Diagnostic strategies for excluding pulmonary embolism in clinical outcome studies - A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruip, Marieke J. H. A.; Leclercq, Monique G. L.; van der Heul, Cees; Prins, Martin H.; Büller, Harry R.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary embolism is a common clinical disorder that is associated with high morbidity and mortality if untreated. It is important to confirm or rule out the diagnosis in patients with clinical suspicion of the disease. Purpose: To evaluate various diagnostic strategies for excluding

  15. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-14 - Treatment of certain intangible property excluded from section 197.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the contract or governmental grant is treated as the acquisition of a separate intangible asset. (4... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Treatment of certain intangible property... for Individuals and Corporations § 1.167(a)-14 Treatment of certain intangible property excluded from...

  16. Hybrid Endograft Solution for Complex Iliac Anatomy : Zenith Body and Excluder Limbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Wendy T.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Sondakh, Arthur O.; Vourliotakis, Georgios; Bracale, Umberto M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-center results with selective use of Gore Excluder limbs (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) in a Cook Zenith body (Cook Inc, Bloomington, IN) for elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. A prospectively held database for

  17. Hybrid endograft solution for complex iliac anatomy: Zenith body and Excluder limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Wendy T; Tielliu, Ignace F; Sondakh, Arthur O; Vourliotakis, Georgios; Bracale, Umberto M; Verhoeven, Eric L

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate single-center results with selective use of Gore Excluder limbs (W.L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) in a Cook Zenith body (Cook Inc, Bloomington, IN) for elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. A prospectively held database for patients with AAA, who were treated endovascularly between March 1999 and July 2008, was queried for patients treated with a Cook Zenith body and one or two Gore Excluder limbs. Indication, technical success, late limb occlusion, and disconnection were evaluated. From 276 patients who were treated with a Zenith body, 29 underwent repair with hybrid graft components with, in total, 41 Gore Excluder limbs. The indication was always complex iliac anatomy. The primary technical success rate in this group was 89% (26 of 29 patients), with a primary assisted technical success rate of 100%. Mortality at 30 days was 0%. The mean follow-up was 19.4 months (range 2-64 months). Late mortality was 13.8% (4 of 29), with no aneurysm-related death. No graft limb occlusion or disconnection occurred during follow-up. No reintervention was needed in the hybrid endograft group. The use of a Cook Zenith body with Gore Excluder limb(s) in case of adverse iliac anatomy is feasible and showed no adverse effects at the midterm follow-up.

  18. Long-Term Outcome of the GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis for Treatment of Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poublon, Claire G.; Holewijn, Suzanne; van Sterkenburg, Steven M. M.; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of GORE EXCLUDER AAA Endoprosthesis (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc, Flagstaff, Arizona) for elective treatment of infrarenal aortic aneurysms and to evaluate performance of different generations of the device. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was

  19. 20 CFR 668.650 - Can INA grantees exclude segments of the eligible population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... eligible population? 668.650 Section 668.650 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION... population? (a) No, INA grantees cannot exclude segments of the eligible population. INA grantees must document in their Two Year Plan that a system is in place to afford all members of the eligible population...

  20. Average crossing number of Gaussian and equilateral chains with and without excluded volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesinger, P. M.; Heermann, D. W.

    2008-03-01

    We study the influence of excluded volume interactions on the behaviour of the mean average crossing number (mACN) for random off-lattice walks. We investigated Gaussian and equilateral off-lattice random walks with and without ellipsoidal excluded volume up to chain lengths of N = 1500 and equilateral random walks on a cubic lattice up to N = 20000. We find that the excluded volume interactions have a strong influence on the behaviour of the local crossing number at very short distances but only a weak one at large distances. This behaviour is the basis of the proof in [ Y. Diao et al., Math. Gen. 36, 11561 (2003); Y. Diao and C. Ernst, Physical and Numerical Models in Knot Theory Including Applications to the Life Sciences] for the dependence of the mean average crossing number on the chain length N. We show that the data is compatible with an Nln(N)-bahaviour for the mACN, even in the case with excluded volume.

  1. 40 CFR 152.6 - Substances excluded from regulation by FIFRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substances excluded from regulation by FIFRA. 152.6 Section 152.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... purposes and no other pesticidal purposes. For purposes of this section, living organisms are not...

  2. 40 CFR 761.187 - Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reporting importers and by persons generating PCBs in excluded manufacturing processes. 761.187 Section 761.187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) MANUFACTURING, PROCESSING, DISTRIBUTION IN...

  3. Doryctinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of Konza Prairie excluding species of Heterospilus Haliday

    Science.gov (United States)

    The results of a survey of Doryctinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) at Konza Prairie, excluding species of Heterospilus Haliday, are reported. Eleven sites representing prairie and woodland/wetland areas, including gallery forest, were sampled in 2001 and 2005 using Malaise and canopy traps. Topographic...

  4. Cadmium tolerance and accumulation in Excluder Thlaspi arvense and various accessions of hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seregin, I.V.; Kozhevnikova, A.D.; Zhukovskaya, V.; Schat, H.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation and tolerance were analyzed in hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens F.K. Mey and excluder Thlaspi arvense L. Five accessions of N. caerulescens (La Calamine (LC, Belgium), Saint Félix de Palliéres (SF, France), Col du Mas de l’Aire (CMA, France), Ganges (GA, France) from

  5. Unanimous versus partial rejection: How the number of excluders influences the impact of ostracism in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandstrom, M.J.; Deutz, M.H.F.; Lansu, T.A.M.; Noorden, T.H.J. van; Karremans, J.C.T.M.; Cillessen, A.H.N.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that ostracism - the experience of being ignored and excluded - has negative effects on all of us, young and old. Using a Cyberball paradigm, the present research replicates the effects of ostracism on the moods (anger, anxiety, happiness, and anger) and fundamental needs

  6. Unanimous versus partial rejection : How the number of excluders influences the impact of ostracism in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandstrom, Marlene J.; Deutz, Marike H F; Lansu, Tessa A M; van Noorden, Tirza H J; Karremans, Johan C.; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    Previous research has shown that ostracism-the experience of being ignored and excluded-has negative effects on all of us, young and old. Using a Cyberball paradigm, the present research replicates the effects of ostracism on the moods (anger, anxiety, happiness, and anger) and fundamental needs

  7. 42 CFR 419.22 - Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective payment system. 419.22 Section 419.22 Public Health CENTERS... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services...

  8. 17 CFR 37.4 - Election to trade excluded and exempt commodities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Election to trade excluded and exempt commodities. 37.4 Section 37.4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING... commodities. A board of trade that is or elects to become a registered derivatives transaction execution...

  9. Addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from trial analysis: a guide for systematic reviewers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie A Akl

    Full Text Available Systematic reviewer authors intending to include all randomized participants in their meta-analyses need to make assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data.The objective of this paper is to provide systematic reviewer authors with a relatively simple guidance for addressing dichotomous data for participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials.This guide is based on a review of the Cochrane handbook and published methodological research. The guide deals with participants excluded from the analysis who were considered 'non-adherent to the protocol' but for whom data are available, and participants with missing data.Systematic reviewer authors should include data from 'non-adherent' participants excluded from the primary study authors' analysis but for whom data are available. For missing, unavailable participant data, authors may conduct a complete case analysis (excluding those with missing data as the primary analysis. Alternatively, they may conduct a primary analysis that makes plausible assumptions about the outcomes of participants with missing data. When the primary analysis suggests important benefit, sensitivity meta-analyses using relatively extreme assumptions that may vary in plausibility can inform the extent to which risk of bias impacts the confidence in the results of the primary analysis. The more plausible assumptions draw on the outcome event rates within the trial or in all trials included in the meta-analysis. The proposed guide does not take into account the uncertainty associated with assumed events.This guide proposes methods for handling participants excluded from analyses of randomized trials. These methods can help in establishing the extent to which risk of bias impacts meta-analysis results.

  10. Social Inequality and Gender

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Cyba

    2005-01-01

    In traditional sociological theories of inequality, the basis for an unequal distribution of social goods and life chances are classes or social strata, which have been formed by the employment position. Since not all women are integrated in the employment world, the problem arose that the disadvantages of women could only be explained by supplementary assumptions about their role in the family, or they would have to be excluded from the sociological analysis altogether. As a criticism to thi...

  11. A Web-Based Respondent Driven Sampling Pilot Targeting Young People at Risk for Chlamydia Trachomatis in Social and Sexual Networks with Testing: A Use Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Kevin; Hoebe, Christian; Kok, Gerjo; Crutzen, Rik; Kara-Zaïtri, Chakib; de Vries, Nanne; van Bergen, Jan; Hamilton, Robert; van der Sande, Marianne; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    With the aim of targeting high-risk hidden heterosexual young people for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) testing, an innovative web-based screening strategy using Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS) and home-based CT testing, was developed, piloted and evaluated. Two STI clinic nurses encouraged 37 CT

  12. Social engineering attack framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available link. A social engineering attack targets this weakness by; using various manipulation techniques in order to elicit sensitive; information. The field of social engineering is still in its infancy; stages with regards to formal definitions and attack...

  13. Social exclusion in finite populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Cong, Rui; Wu, Te; Wang, Long

    2015-04-01

    Social exclusion, keeping free riders from benefit sharing, plays an important role in sustaining cooperation in our world. Here we propose two different exclusion regimes, namely, peer exclusion and pool exclusion, to investigate the evolution of social exclusion in finite populations. In the peer exclusion regime, each excluder expels all the defectors independently, and thus bears the total cost on his own, while in the pool exclusion regime, excluders spontaneously form an institution to carry out rejection of the free riders, and each excluder shares the cost equally. In a public goods game containing only excluders and defectors, it is found that peer excluders outperform pool excluders if the exclusion costs are small, and the situation is converse once the exclusion costs exceed some critical points, which holds true for all the selection intensities and different update rules. Moreover, excluders can dominate the whole population under a suitable parameters range in the presence of second-order free riders (cooperators), showing that exclusion has prominent advantages over common costly punishment. More importantly, our finding indicates that the group exclusion mechanism helps the cooperative union to survive under unfavorable conditions. Our results may give some insights into better understanding the prevalence of such a strategy in the real world and its significance in sustaining cooperation.

  14. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  15. Ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume effects on spherical electric double layers: A density functional approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medasani, Bharat; Ovanesyan, Zaven; Thomas, Dennis G.; Sushko, Maria L.; Marucho, Marcelo

    2014-05-01

    In this article, we present a classical density functional theory for electrical double layers of spherical macroions that extends the capabilities of conventional approaches by accounting for electrostatic ion correlations, size asymmetry, and excluded volume effects. The approach is based on a recent approximation introduced by Hansen-Goos and Roth for the hard sphere excess free energy of inhomogeneous fluids [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 154506 (2006); Hansen-Goos and Roth, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 18, 8413 (2006)]. It accounts for the proper and efficient description of the effects of ionic asymmetry and solvent excluded volume, especially at high ion concentrations and size asymmetry ratios including those observed in experimental studies. Additionally, we utilize a leading functional Taylor expansion approximation of the ion density profiles. In addition, we use the mean spherical approximation for multi-component charged hard sphere fluids to account for the electrostatic ion correlation effects. These approximations are implemented in our theoretical formulation into a suitable decomposition of the excess free energy which plays a key role in capturing the complex interplay between charge correlations and excluded volume effects. We perform Monte Carlo simulations in various scenarios to validate the proposed approach, obtaining a good compromise between accuracy and computational cost. We use the proposed computational approach to study the effects of ion size, ion size asymmetry, and solvent excluded volume on the ion profiles, integrated charge, mean electrostatic potential, and ionic coordination number around spherical macroions in various electrolyte mixtures. Our results show that both solvent hard sphere diameter and density play a dominant role in the distribution of ions around spherical macroions, mainly for experimental water molarity and size values where the counterion distribution is characterized by a tight binding to the macroion, similar to that

  16. "Atmospheric Neutrino" and "Proton Decay" Data Exclude Some New Dark Matter Scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Itzhak; Nussinov, Shmuel

    2004-01-01

    Models in which the "dark" halo particles have mutual and potentially also appreciable nuclear interactions have been considered by various authors. In this note we briefly point out strategies for a most sensitive search for these particles. We show that a particular matter/anti-matter symmetric variant due to Farrar et al. is excluded by combining bounds on proton decay from various experiments and from super-Kamiokande and atmospheric neutrino measurements at super-Kamiokande.

  17. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of Fungal Cyclic Peptides, Excluding Cyclodipeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohan Wang; Minyi Lin; Dan Xu; Daowan Lai; Ligang Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic peptides are cyclic compounds formed mainly by the amide bonds between either proteinogenic or non-proteinogenic amino acids. This review highlights the occurrence, structures and biological activities of fungal cyclic peptides (excluding cyclodipeptides, and peptides containing ester bonds in the core ring) reported until August 2017. About 293 cyclic peptides belonging to the groups of cyclic tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-, octa-, nona-, deca-, undeca-, dodeca-, tetradeca-, and ...

  18. Coil–globule transition of a polymer involved in excluded-volume interactions with macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, Kenta; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Polymers adopt extended coil and compact globule states according to the balance between entropy and interaction energies. The transition of a polymer between an extended coil state and compact globule state can be induced by changing thermodynamic force such as temperature to alter the energy/entropy balance. Previously, this transition was theoretically studied by taking into account the excluded-volume interaction between monomers of a polymer chain using the partition function. For binary mixtures of a long polymer and short polymers, the coil-globule transition can be induced by changing the concentration of the shorter polymers. Here, we investigate the transition caused by short polymers by generalizing the partition function of the long polymer to include the excluded-volume effect of short polymers. The coil-globule transition is studied as a function of the concentration of mixed polymers by systematically varying Flory’s χ-parameters. We show that the transition is caused by the interplay between the excluded-volume interaction and the dispersion state of short polymers in the solvent. We also reveal that the same results can be obtained by combining the mixing entropy and elastic energy if the volume of a long polymer is properly defined

  19. The Gore Excluder US multi-center trial: analysis of adverse events at 2 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbe, Melina R; Matsumura, Jon S

    2003-06-01

    Although open surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms remains the standard of care, endovascular repair is becoming an attractive alternative as more long-term outcome data become available to show its safety and efficacy. The authors review data on the 2-year outcome of the pivotal US multicenter, prospective Gore Excluder Trial. Patients treated with the Excluder endograft (W.L. Gore, Flaggstaff, AZ) had less blood loss (310 +/- 19 v 1,590 +/- 124 mL; P <.0001), required fewer homologous transfusions (6% v 32%; P <.0001), and had faster inpatient recovery (2.0 +/- 0.1 v 9.8 +/- 1.4 days; P <.0001) compared with those treated with open repair. Early major adverse events were reduced significantly in the patients treated with the endograft (14% v 57% in control; P <.0001), and this persisted at 2 years. There was no difference in overall survival rate (P =.13). There were no deployment failures, early conversions, or aneurysm ruptures. At the 2-year time-point, trunk migration occurred in 1%, limb migration in 1%, limb narrowing in 1%, endoleak in 20%, and aneurysm growth in 14%. There was a 7% annual reintervention rate in the endograft group in the first 2 years. The Excluder endograft is a safe and effective treatment compared with open surgical repair for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms with appropriate anatomy.

  20. Excluded-Mean-Variance Neural Decision Analyzer for Qualitative Group Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Young Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many qualitative group decisions in professional fields such as law, engineering, economics, psychology, and medicine that appear to be crisp and certain are in reality shrouded in fuzziness as a result of uncertain environments and the nature of human cognition within which the group decisions are made. In this paper we introduce an innovative approach to group decision making in uncertain situations by using a mean-variance neural approach. The key idea of this proposed approach is to compute the excluded mean of individual evaluations and weight it by applying a variance influence function (VIF; this process of weighting the excluded mean by VIF provides an improved result in the group decision making. In this paper, a case study with the proposed excluded-mean-variance approach is also presented. The results of this case study indicate that this proposed approach can improve the effectiveness of qualitative decision making by providing the decision maker with a new cognitive tool to assist in the reasoning process.

  1. Use of resting myocardial scintigraphy during chest pain to exclude diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbirato, Gustavo Borges; Azevedo, Jader Cunha de; Felix, Renata Christian Martins; Correa, Patricia Lavatori; Volschan, Andre; Viegas, Monica; Pimenta, Lucia; Dohmann, Hans Fernando Rocha; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Mesquita, Claudio Tinoco

    2009-01-01

    Background: Images of myocardial perfusion taken during an episode of chest pain have been used for patients in the emergency department. Objective: To evaluate the operating characteristics of 99m Tc-Tetrofosmin scintigraphy during an episode of chest pain to exclude the diagnosis of cute myocardial infarction. Methods: One hundred and eight patients admitted with chest pain, or up to four hours after the end of symptoms and non diagnostic electrocardiogram, underwent resting scintigraphy and measurement of troponin I concentrations. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI) were not excluded (24 patients). Troponin I concentrations were determined at admission and 6 hours later. Nuclear physicians performed a blind analysis of the images, and myocardial infarction was confirmed whenever troponin I level increase was three times that of the control. Results: Resting perfusion image was abnormal in all 6 patients with MI. Only 1 patient had a normal image and increased troponin levels. Fifty-five patients had positive images without MI, and 46 patients had normal images and troponin levels. The prevalence of the disease was 6.5%. The sensitivity and specificity of the resting images during an episode of chest pain to diagnose MI was 85.7% and 45.5%, respectively. The negative predictive value was 97.7%. Conclusion: Patients undergoing chest pain protocol with SPECT showed an excellent negative predictive value to exclude diagnosis of myocardial infarction. These results suggest that resting perfusion image is an important tool at the chest pain unit. (author)

  2. Effect of excluded volume on the force-extension of wormlike chains in slit confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolan; Dorfman, Kevin

    We will present a quantitative phase diagram for the stretching of a wormlike chain confined in a slit with excluded volume interactions. Using pruned-enriched Rosenbluth method (PERM) simulations, we demonstrate the existence of a ``confined Pincus'' regime in slit confinement. This regime is similar to the Pincus regime in free solution, where excluded volume effects are sensible. The lower bound for the confined Pincus regime in the force-contour length plane and the dependence of the extension with force and slit size are in agreement with scaling theory. The upper bound of the confined Pincus regime depends on the confinement strength; it ends in strong confinement when the Pincus blobs do not have excluded volume, while it ends in weak confinement when the Pincus blobs do not fit in the slit. We also show the existence of a free-solution Pincus regime in weak confinement that exists before ideal chain behavior sets in under strong forces. We will discuss the implication of our results on the analysis of experiments on the ``tug-of-war'' stretching of DNA partially confined to a slit.

  3. Social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patin, Alexandra; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Social cognition is a major problem underlying deficiencies in interpersonal relationships in several psychiatric populations. And yet there is currently no gold standard for pharmacological treatment of psychiatric illness that directly targets these social cognitive areas. This chapter serves to illustrate some of the most innovative attempts at pharmacological modulation of social cognition in psychiatric illnesses including schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, autism spectrum disorders, antisocial personality disorder and psychopathy, social anxiety disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Pharmacological modulation includes studies administering oxytocin, ecstasy (MDMA), modafinil, methylphenidate, and D-cycloserine. Furthermore, some background on social cognition research in healthy individuals, which could be helpful in developing future treatments, is provided as well as the potential for each drug as a long-term treatment option.

  4. Social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallucci, M.; Ouwerkerk, J.W.; van Lange, P.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Social exclusion, and the threat of, represents a strong mechanism for both self-regulation and social regulation. Recent theorizing has proposed a link between social exclusion and the evolution of cooperation, posing that cognitive and emotional adaptations aimed at excluding particular

  5. 21 CFR 1404.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do I check to see if a person is excluded or... Officials Regarding Transactions § 1404.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a...

  6. 22 CFR 1508.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true When do I check to see if a person is excluded... § 1508.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a) Enter into a primary tier...

  7. 21 CFR 1404.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or... Officials Regarding Transactions § 1404.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified in two ways: (a) You as an agency official...

  8. 22 CFR 1006.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true When do I check to see if a person is excluded... Transactions § 1006.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a) Enter into a primary...

  9. 22 CFR 208.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When do I check to see if a person is excluded... Transactions § 208.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a) Enter into a primary...

  10. Local Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sapuppo, Antonio; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup

    2011-01-01

    Online social networks have become essential for many users in their daily communication. Through a combination of the online social networks with opportunistic networks, a new concept arises: Local Social Networks. The target of local social networks is to promote social networking benefits...... in physical environment in order to leverage personal affinities in the users' surroundings. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the concept of local social networks as a new social communication system. Particularly, the preliminary architecture and the prototype of local social networks...

  11. Personalization in social retargeting - A field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frick, T.W. (Thomas W.); T. Li (Ting)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study compares the effectiveness of product- and category-specific advertising personalization in Social Retargeting. Social Retargeting combines the features of social advertising, targeting consumers based on social connections, and retargeting, using consumers' browsing behavior

  12. Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.spick@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred; Reittner, Pia [Diagnostikum Graz-Südwest, Weblinger Guertel 25, 8054 Graz (Austria); Baltzer, Pascal A., E-mail: pascal.baltzer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases (NPV: 100%). • Malignancy rate in the BI-RADS 0 population is substantial with 13.5%. • Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast MRI if used as a problem-solving tool in BI-RADS 0 cases. Material and methods: In this IRB-approved, single-center study, 687 women underwent high-resolution-3D, dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2012 and December 2012. Of these, we analyzed 111 consecutive patients (mean age, 51 ± 12 years; range, 20–83 years) categorized as BI-RADS 0. Breast MRI findings were stratified by clinical presentations, conventional imaging findings, and breast density. MRI results were compared to the reference standard, defined as histopathology or an imaging follow-up of at least 1 year. Results: One hundred eleven patients with BI-RADS 0 conventional imaging findings revealed 30 (27%) mammographic masses, 57 (51.4%) mammographic architectural distortions, five (4.5%) mammographic microcalcifications, 17 (15.3%) ultrasound-only findings, and two palpable findings without imaging correlates. There were 15 true-positive, 85 true-negative, 11 false-positive, and zero false-negative breast MRI findings, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 100% (15/15), 88.5% (85/96), 57.7% (15/26), and 100% (85/85), respectively. Breast density and reasons for referral had no significant influence on the diagnostic performance of breast MRI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases resulting in a NPV of 100% (85/85) and a PPV of 57.7% (15/26)

  13. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  14. Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Tommy J [Knoxville, TN; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge, TN; Palumbo, Anthony V [Oak Ridge, TN; Riestenberg, David E [Knoxville, TN; McCallum, Scott D [Knoxville, TN

    2009-08-04

    A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

  15. Externality costs by emission. B. Sulfur dioxide (excluding acid rain effects)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This chapter reviews various direct costing studies of the damage caused by SO 2 and sulfate deposition to human health, materials, crops and visibility. Since so much has been written about SO 2 's contributions to acid rain, the costs of acid rain are discussed in Chapter 5D of this report. Acid rain effects have been excluded from the estimates presented here, whenever possible. The methodology, scope and results of each study are set forth, and where possible a cost per lb of SO 2 is extracted from the data. All dollar figures are stated in the year in which they were reported in the respective study, unless otherwise noted

  16. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARACHNIDS IN THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO (EXCLUDING ARANAE AND ACARI)

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo Delfin Gonzalez; Virginia Meléndez-Ramírez; Pablo C. Manrique-Saide; Abdiel Martin-Park; Carlos Arisqueta-Chablé

    2017-01-01

    The Chelicerata are the second group of arthropods with the highest diversity after insects and they can inhabit almost all types of environments. The most current classification recognizes 11 orders and estimates in the number of species vary from 52,000 to 100,000. We have made an extensive literature review on the diversity of arachnids in the Yucatan Peninsula (YP) (excluding spiders and ticks). In Mexico there are 834 known species which represent 6% of the worldwide diversity. In the YP...

  17. Chip-excluding in Lathe Cutting 1st. Report : Chip Form Geometry I

    OpenAIRE

    小尾, 誠; 岩里, 茂; 丹沢, 常正

    1981-01-01

    The cfficiency of chip-excluding in lathe cutting is very often determined by chip forms. So, the relation between the chip form and cutting conditions must be explained from the point of view of not only practical experiences but also theoretical studies. Here in the paper, the basic equation for chip forms has been derived analytically and the chip forms are simulated on the basis of an assumption that the chip is formed by certain herahedrons which are piled. By this study the following re...

  18. SPECKLE IMAGING EXCLUDES LOW-MASS COMPANIONS ORBITING THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR TRAPPIST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, Steve B.; Scott, Nicholas J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Everett, Mark E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Horch, Elliott P. [Department of Physics, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent Street, New Haven, CT, 06515 (United States); Winters, Jennifer G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States); Hirsch, Lea [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, 510 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Nusdeo, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5060, Atlanta, GA 30302 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We have obtained the highest-resolution images available of TRAPPIST-1 using the Gemini-South telescope and our speckle imaging camera. Observing at 692 and 883 nm, we reached the diffraction limit of the telescope providing a best resolution of 27 mas or, at the distance of TRAPPIST-1, a spatial resolution of 0.32 au. Our imaging of the star extends from 0.32 to 14.5 au. We show that to a high confidence level, we can exclude all possible stellar and brown dwarf companions, indicating that TRAPPIST-1 is a single star.

  19. Liquid socialities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob

    This dissertation has a two-fold aim. The first aim is to develop a set of sociological, methodological and theoretical approaches for investigating how alcohol becomes central in the lives of Danish teenagers. This set of approaches acknowledges some perspectives - i.e. gender, age, friendships......, fun, and partying - that are currently left out, or undertheorised, in adolescent alcohol studies. The second aim is to discuss why Danish teenagers focus so intensely on getting drunk. This question is investigated through an analysis of how alcohol functions in the leisure life of these teenagers...... struggle for social recognition, teenagers constitute a drinking pressure which somewhat excludes less- and non-drinking teenagers. However, at the same time drinking alcohol is also fun - and it is an important way of communication and reproducing friendships at parties. Moreover, teenagers experience...

  20. 22 CFR 1508.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 1508.430 Section 1508.430 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE....430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is...

  1. 34 CFR 85.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 85.430 Section 85.430 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE... How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is...

  2. 7 CFR 3017.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 3017.425 Section 3017.425 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see...

  3. 5 CFR 919.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When do I check to see if a person is...) Responsibilities of OPM Officials Regarding Transactions § 919.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified...

  4. 22 CFR 208.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 208.430 Section 208.430 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT... Transactions § 208.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a...

  5. 29 CFR 98.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 98.430 Section 98.430 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND... How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is...

  6. 2 CFR 1125.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When do I check to see if a person is... DoD Officials Regarding Transactions § 1125.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or... Component official must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you obligate additional...

  7. 31 CFR 19.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When do I check to see if a person is... Treasury Officials Regarding Transactions § 19.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you...

  8. 41 CFR 105-68.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When do I check to see...) Responsibilities of GSA Officials Regarding Transactions § 105-68.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As an agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or...

  9. 9 CFR 130.17 - User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites. 130.17 Section 130.17... FEES USER FEES § 130.17 User fees for other veterinary diagnostic laboratory tests performed at NVSL... Pathobiology Laboratory at NVSL (excluding FADDL) or at authorized sites are listed in the following table. The...

  10. Computer assisted strain-gauge plethysmography is a practical method of excluding deep venous thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, A.J.P.; Chakraverty, S.; Wright, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate a computed strain-gauge plethysmograph (CSGP) as a screening tool to exclude above knee deep venous thrombosis (DVT). METHODS: The first phase took place in the Radiology department. One hundred and forty-nine patients had both Doppler ultrasound and CSGP performed. Discordant results were resolved by venography where possible. The second phase took place in an acute medical admissions ward using a modified protocol. A further 173 patients had both studies performed. The results were collated and analysed. RESULTS: Phase 1. The predictive value of a negative CSGP study was 98%. There were two false-negative CSGP results (false-negative rate 5%), including one equivocal CSGP study which had deep venous thrombosis on ultrasound examination. Two patients thought to have thrombus on ultrasound proved not to have acute thrombus on venography. Phase 2. The negative predictive value of CSGP using a modified protocol was 97%. There were two definite and one possible false-negative studies (false-negative rate 4-7%). CONCLUSION: Computer strain-gauge plethysmograph can provide a simple, cheap and effective method of excluding lower limb DVT. However, its use should be rigorously assessed in each hospital in which it is used. Goddard, A.J.P., Chakraverty, S. and Wright, J. (2001)

  11. Stainless-steel wires exclude gulls from a wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel E.; Koenen, Kiana K. G.; MacKenzie, Kenneth G.; Pereira, Jillian W.; DeStefano, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing concern about the prevalence of pathogens and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the environment and the role wildlife plays in their transmission and dissemination. Gulls feeding at wastewater treatment plants may provide a route for transmission of pathogens and bacteria to public water supplies or other critical areas. The authors identified gulls routinely feeding at a wastewater treatment plant in Millbury, Mass., and tested the effectiveness of overhead stainless-steel wires in excluding gulls from the plant. The number of gulls in certainstructures was compared before and after wiring and during an experimental approach using simultaneous treatments and controls. Stainless-steel wires spaced at 0.9-3.3 m (3-10 ft) effectively prevented gulls from using treatment structures (p 24 months. Materials costs to wire all structures was about $5,700, and labor costs were $4,020. Overhead stainless-steel wires can provide a long-term, cost-efficient method of excluding ring-billed gulls from wastewater treatment plants.

  12. Unanimous versus partial rejection: How the number of excluders influences the impact of ostracism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Marlene J; Deutz, Marike H F; Lansu, Tessa A M; van Noorden, Tirza H J; Karremans, Johan C; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2017-04-01

    Previous research has shown that ostracism-the experience of being ignored and excluded-has negative effects on all of us, young and old. Using a Cyberball paradigm, the present research replicates the effects of ostracism on the moods (anger, anxiety, happiness, and anger) and fundamental needs (belongingness, control, meaningful existence, and self-esteem) of children (Study 1) and then extends the literature by examining the role of the number of ostracizers and inclusive members in this process by randomly assigning children to conditions varying in degree of ostracism (Study 2). Results of both studies showed that experiencing ostracism strongly and negatively affected all moods and fundamental needs-with the exception of anxiety. Study 2 in addition showed that the ratio of excluders to inclusive group members had different effects across outcomes. In all cases, complete ostracism produced the worst outcomes, suggesting that the presence of even a single ally reduces children's distress. For sadness, unanimous ostracism seemed particularly toxic. In some cases, facing two ostracizers produced significantly worse outcomes than only one, suggesting that consensual rejection might drive the negative effects on happiness, and sense of belonging, control, and meaningful existence. For self-esteem, only one ostracizer (in the presence of two inclusive members) was sufficient to induce a negative effect. Aggr. Behav. 43:190-203, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. "Do You Feel Excluded?" The Subjective Experience of Young State Benefit Recipients in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Sandra; Schels, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the connection between multiple deprivations and the subjective experience of social exclusion among young German state benefit recipients in 2005. Most studies equate deprivation with social exclusion. But current German concepts refer to an experienced constraint of inclusion and participation as well: multiply-deprived…

  14. Bringing in the Excluded? Aesthetic Labour, Skills and Training in the "New" Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickson, Dennis; Warhurst, Chris; Cullen, Anne Marie; Watt, Allan

    2003-01-01

    Documents the growth in aesthetic service occupations and issues regarding employability: interpersonal skills, training, and social exclusion of those deemed unsuitable for "style" labor. Examines a Scottish training program that raises concerns about social control but may improve the employability of long-term unemployed persons.…

  15. Health and Social Care Interventions Which Promote Social Participation for Adults with Learning Disabilities: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Sharon; Morris, David; Newlin, Meredith; Webber, Martin

    2016-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are among the most socially excluded in society. There is a significant gap in research evidence showing how health and social care workers can intervene to improve the social participation of adults with learning disabilities. A systematic review and modified narrative synthesis was used to appraise the quality…

  16. Theory in Social Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastings, Gerard; Brown, Abraham; Anker, Thomas Boysen

    2010-01-01

    The chapter looks at three important theories which help social marketers to think more systematically about the key questions they need to address:  (i) how does the target group or population feel about a particular behaviour (Stages of Change Theory); (ii) what social and contextual factors...... influence this positioning (Social Cognitive Theory and Social Norms) and; (iii) what offerings might encourage them to change their behaviour – or, those in a position to do so, to make the social context more conducive to change (Exchange Theory). Moreover, the chapter outlines how social marketers might...... benefit from a social epistemological approach....

  17. From chemical graphs in computer-aided drug design to general Markov-Galvez indices of drug-target, proteome, drug-parasitic disease, technological, and social-legal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera-Fernández, Pablo; Munteanu, Cristian R; Dorado, Julian; Martin-Romalde, Raquel; Duardo-Sanchez, Aliuska; González-Diaz, Humberto

    2011-12-01

    Complex Networks are useful in solving problems in drug research and industry, developing mathematical representations of different systems. These systems move in a wide range from relatively simple graph representations of drug molecular structures to large systems. We can cite for instance, drug-target protein interaction networks, drug policy legislation networks, or drug treatment in large geographical disease spreading networks. In any case, all these networks have essentially the same components: nodes (atoms, drugs, proteins, microorganisms and/or parasites, geographical areas, drug policy legislations, etc.) and edges (chemical bonds, drug-target interactions, drug-parasite treatment, drug use, etc.). Consequently, we can use the same type of numeric parameters called Topological Indices (TIs) to describe the connectivity patterns in all these kinds of Complex Networks despite the nature of the object they represent. The main reason for this success of TIs is the high flexibility of this theory to solve in a fast but rigorous way many apparently unrelated problems in all these disciplines. Another important reason for the success of TIs is that using these parameters as inputs we can find Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPR) models for different kind of problems in Computer-Aided Drug Design (CADD). Taking into account all the above-mentioned aspects, the present work is aimed at offering a common background to all the manuscripts presented in this special issue. In so doing, we make a review of the most common types of complex networks involving drugs or their targets. In addition, we review both classic TIs that have been used to describe the molecular structure of drugs and/or larger complex networks. Next, we use for the first time a Markov chain model to generalize Galvez TIs to higher order analogues coined here as the Markov-Galvez TIs of order k (MGk). Lastly, we illustrate the calculation of MGk values for different classes of

  18. Accuracy of transthoracic sonography in excluding post-interventional pneumothorax and hydropneumothorax Comparison to chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissig, Angelika; Kroegel, Claus

    2005-03-01

    Objective: Transthoracic sonography (TS) has evolved as an important imaging technique for diagnosing pleural and pulmonary conditions. However, the value of TS in either excluding or diagnosing pneumothorax is still under debate. This study was conducted to examine whether TS could replace chest radiography for the diagnosis of post-interventional pneumothorax and hydropneumothorax. Methods: 53 patients (21 females, 32 males; median age 64 years, range 37-94 years), 35 of whom underwent transbronchial biopsy (TBB) and 18 patients who had an ultrasound-guided chest tube placement (U-GCTP) were enrolled in the study. TS was performed three hours after either TBB or removal of a chest tube, followed by postero-anterior chest radiograph (CRX). If any discrepancy between TS, the clinical presentation and the CRX became apparent, either a lateral CRX or a computed tomography (CT) of the thorax was performed. TS was assessed according to the presence of the following criteria: (1) ''gliding sign'' of the pleural line, (2) comet tail artifacts, (3) reverberation artifacts, (4) air/fluid mirror, (5) hyperechoic reflectors within the pleural effusion and (6) ''lung point''. Results: In four out of the 53 patients (7.5%) a post-interventional pneumothorax or hydropneumothorax occurred. One out of the 35 patients (2.9%) developed a pneumothorax after TBB, requiring chest tube placement. Three patients (16.7%) developed a hydropneumothorax due to U-GCTP which was detected by sonography but was missed by postero-anterior CRX in one patient. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of TS were 100% in excluding post-interventional pneumothorax/hydropneumothorax. Conclusion: TS is a cost-effective and safe bed-side-method, allowing for an immediate exclusion or diagnosis of post-interventional pneumothorax/hydropneumothorax in patients who have undergone TBB or U-GCTP. Thus, these preliminary results suggest that CXR may only be required in

  19. Severity of the Issue of Excluded Young People in Macedonia from Education, Trainings and Employment: How to Cope With?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagica Novkovska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of young people aged 15–24 that are part of NEET (Not in Education, Employment or Training, is of particular interest for researchers and policy makers, since the social exclusion has strong negative impact on basic needs of persons. Determination of the extent of above social phenomenon is a base for analyses and policy making aiming at coping with it. This paper reports results of 10 years’ dataset analysis concerning the young people aged 15–24 in Macedonia that are part of NEET. Young people who are identified as a NEET are with very high risk of becoming vulnerable group for poverty and social exclusion. The status of these people is more and more important across Europe and their inclusion in the society is a crucial policy goal at European level. Data reported here urge the need for continuous, effective and well targeted support to youth with the aim of providing sustainable inclusion of them in education and labour market. This inclusion requires long term strategies for increasing of youth educational skills, competencies and employability. These strategies have to be focused on effective trainings for performing auxiliary tasks related to the use of emerging technologies that are expected to be dominant in the 21st century, by creating new type of professional education.

  20. Targeted Learning

    CERN Document Server

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the targe

  1. Preoperative CT staging of colon carcinoma (excluding the recto-sigmoid region)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acunas, B.; Rozanes, I.; Acunas, G.; Sayi, I.; Gokmen, E.; Celik, L.

    1990-01-01

    28 Patients with colon carcinoma (excluding the recto-sigmoid region) underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography (CT). The CT had a sensitivity of 60 and 67 per cent for detection of extramural invasion, 75 per cent sensitivity and specificity for lymph node metastases and a sensitivity of 87 per cent and specificity of 95 per cent for liver metastases. Compared with the modified Dukes classification, CT correctly staged 50 per cent of the patients with Dukes A lesions; 40 per cent with Dukes B, 75 per cent with Dukes C and 85 per cent with Dukes D lesions. The data presented in this study showed that CT has limitations in the sensitivity and accuracy of staging local colonic carcinoma. However, the authors recommend its use for patients who are clinically suspected of having extensive disease. (author). 10 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  2. Dyslexic adults can learn from repeated stimulus presentation but have difficulties in excluding external noise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L Beattie

    Full Text Available We examined whether the characteristic impairments of dyslexia are due to a deficit in excluding external noise or a deficit in taking advantage of repeated stimulus presentation. We compared non-impaired adults and adults with poor reading performance on a visual letter detection task that varied two aspects: the presence or absence of background visual noise, and a small or large stimulus set. There was no interaction between group and stimulus set size, indicating that the poor readers took advantage of repeated stimulus presentation as well as the non-impaired readers. The poor readers had higher thresholds than non-impaired readers in the presence of high external noise, but not in the absence of external noise. The results support the hypothesis that an external noise exclusion deficit, not a perceptual anchoring deficit, impairs reading for adults.

  3. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of Fungal Cyclic Peptides, Excluding Cyclodipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohan; Lin, Minyi; Xu, Dan; Lai, Daowan; Zhou, Ligang

    2017-11-27

    Cyclic peptides are cyclic compounds formed mainly by the amide bonds between either proteinogenic or non-proteinogenic amino acids. This review highlights the occurrence, structures and biological activities of fungal cyclic peptides (excluding cyclodipeptides, and peptides containing ester bonds in the core ring) reported until August 2017. About 293 cyclic peptides belonging to the groups of cyclic tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-, octa-, nona-, deca-, undeca-, dodeca-, tetradeca-, and octadecapeptides as well as cyclic peptides containing ether bonds in the core ring have been isolated from fungi. They were mainly isolated from the genera Aspergillus , Penicillium , Fusarium , Acremonium and Amanita . Some of them were screened to have antimicrobial, antiviral, cytotoxic, phytotoxic, insecticidal, nematicidal, immunosuppressive and enzyme-inhibitory activities to show their potential applications. Some fungal cyclic peptides such as the echinocandins, pneumocandins and cyclosporin A have been developed as pharmaceuticals.

  4. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of Fungal Cyclic Peptides, Excluding Cyclodipeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohan Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic peptides are cyclic compounds formed mainly by the amide bonds between either proteinogenic or non-proteinogenic amino acids. This review highlights the occurrence, structures and biological activities of fungal cyclic peptides (excluding cyclodipeptides, and peptides containing ester bonds in the core ring reported until August 2017. About 293 cyclic peptides belonging to the groups of cyclic tri-, tetra-, penta-, hexa-, hepta-, octa-, nona-, deca-, undeca-, dodeca-, tetradeca-, and octadecapeptides as well as cyclic peptides containing ether bonds in the core ring have been isolated from fungi. They were mainly isolated from the genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Acremonium and Amanita. Some of them were screened to have antimicrobial, antiviral, cytotoxic, phytotoxic, insecticidal, nematicidal, immunosuppressive and enzyme-inhibitory activities to show their potential applications. Some fungal cyclic peptides such as the echinocandins, pneumocandins and cyclosporin A have been developed as pharmaceuticals.

  5. Macromolecular Stabilization by Excluded Cosolutes: Mean Field Theory of Crowded Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapir, Liel; Harries, Daniel

    2015-07-14

    We propose a mean field theory to account for the experimentally determined temperature dependence of protein stabilization that emerges in solutions crowded by preferentially excluded cosolutes. Based on regular solution theory and employing the Flory-Huggins approximation, our model describes cosolutes in terms of their size, and two temperature-dependent microscopic parameters that correspond to macromolecule-cosolute and bulk solution interactions. The theory not only predicts a "depletion force" that can account for the experimentally observed stabilization of protein folding or association in the presence of excluded cosolutes but also predicts the full range of associated entropic and enthalpic components. Remarkably, depending on cosolute identity and in accordance with experiments, the theory describes entropically as well as enthalpically dominated depletion forces, even those disfavored by entropy. This emerging depletion attraction cannot be simply linked to molecular volumes. Instead, the relevant parameter is an effective volume that represents an interplay between solvent, cosolute, and macromolecular interactions. We demonstrate that the apparent depletion free energy is often accompanied by significant yet compensating entropy and enthalpy terms that, although having a net zero contribution to stabilization, can obscure the underlying molecular mechanism. This study underscores the importance of including often-neglected free energy terms that correspond to solvent-cosolute and cosolute-macromolecule interactions, which for most typical cosolutes are expected to be temperature dependent. We propose that experiments specifically aimed at resolving the temperature-dependence of cosolute exclusion from macromolecular surfaces should help reveal the full range of the underlying molecular mechanisms of the depletion force.

  6. Modeling fibrous biological tissues with a general invariant that excludes compressed fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewei; Ogden, Ray W.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.

    2018-01-01

    Dispersed collagen fibers in fibrous soft biological tissues have a significant effect on the overall mechanical behavior of the tissues. Constitutive modeling of the detailed structure obtained by using advanced imaging modalities has been investigated extensively in the last decade. In particular, our group has previously proposed a fiber dispersion model based on a generalized structure tensor. However, the fiber tension-compression switch described in that study is unable to exclude compressed fibers within a dispersion and the model requires modification so as to avoid some unphysical effects. In a recent paper we have proposed a method which avoids such problems, but in this present study we introduce an alternative approach by using a new general invariant that only depends on the fibers under tension so that compressed fibers within a dispersion do not contribute to the strain-energy function. We then provide expressions for the associated Cauchy stress and elasticity tensors in a decoupled form. We have also implemented the proposed model in a finite element analysis program and illustrated the implementation with three representative examples: simple tension and compression, simple shear, and unconfined compression on articular cartilage. We have obtained very good agreement with the analytical solutions that are available for the first two examples. The third example shows the efficacy of the fibrous tissue model in a larger scale simulation. For comparison we also provide results for the three examples with the compressed fibers included, and the results are completely different. If the distribution of collagen fibers is such that it is appropriate to exclude compressed fibers then such a model should be adopted.

  7. Accountability and the pressures to exclude: A cautionary tale from England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rustique-Forrester

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have produced conflicting findings about whether test-based rewards and sanctions create incentives that improve student performance, or hurdles that increase dropout and pushout rates from schools. This article reports the findings from a study that examined the impact of England's accountability reforms and investigated whether the confluent pressures associated with increased testing, school ranking systems, and other sanctions contributed to higher levels of student exclusion (expulsion and suspension. The study found that England's high-stakes approach to accountability, combined with the dynamics of school choice and other curriculum and testing pressures led to a narrowing of the curriculum, the marginalization of low-performing students, and a climate perceived by teachers to be less tolerant of students with academic and behavioral difficulties. A comparison of higher- and lower-excluding schools, however, found that these effects were more pronounced in the higher-excluding schools, which lacked strong systems and internal structures for supporting staff communication, teacher collaboration, and students' individual needs. The study offers an international perspective on recent trends toward greater accountability in education, pointing to a complex inter-relationship between the pressures of national policies and the unintended consequences on schools' organizational and teachers' instructional capacities. The study's findings raise particular implications for the United States and show that in the design of accountability systems, attention must be paid to how the pressures from accountability will affect the capacity of schools and teachers to respond to students who are low-performing and struggling academically.

  8. Prevalence of Fructose Malabsorption in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome After Excluding Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kee Wook; Seo, Myeognsook; Cho, Young Hwan; Park, Young-Ok; Yoon, So-Yoon; Lee, Jungbok; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, In Ja; Seo, So Young; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Park, Sang Hyoung; Kim, Kyung Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Byeon, Jeong-Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Jin-Ho; Myung, Seung-Jae

    2018-04-30

    Fructose malabsorption (FM) mimics symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and its prevalence has increased. Diagnosing FM in IBS is challenging because of its overlap with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). We assessed the prevalence of FM by comparing patients with IBS with asymptomatic control individuals after excluding SIBO using the glucose hydrogen breath test (HBT). Patients diagnosed with IBS and asymptomatic control individuals were enrolled prospectively. Dietary habits were assessed with the Food Frequency Questionnaire. After excluding SIBO, participants underwent HBTs with both 15 g and 25 g of fructose. Thirty-five patients with IBS and 35 age- and sex-matched asymptomatic control individuals were enrolled. The 15-g fructose HBT yielded positive results in 7 of the 35 (20.0%) patients with IBS and in 2 of 35 (5.7%) controls ( P = 0.070). The 25-g fructose HBT was positive in 16 of the 35 (45.7%) patients with IBS and in 8 of the 35 (22.9%) controls ( P = 0.040). Analysis of the Food Frequency Questionnaire responses showed no significant differences between the 2 groups in dietary intake, although patients with IBS showed a significantly higher mean fiber intake than controls (21.24 ± 11.35 g vs 15.87 ± 7.07 g, respectively, P = 0.040). The 25-g fructose HBT identified FM in a significantly higher percentage of SIBO-negative patients with IBS than in asymptomatic control individuals, suggesting that FM may correlate with IBS. Education regarding dietary control of foods containing fructose may be useful for the management of patients with IBS.

  9. North sea: a quarter of total's reserves (excluding the Middle East)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In 1994, for the fifth successive year, Total increased its proven reserves of hydrocarbons which reach 4.3 Gboe (+ 6% compared to 1993). Outside the Middle East, the reserves show a development of 9% and reach the threshold of 2 Gboe. In 1994, Total's production of hydrocarbons reached 633,000 boe/d (+ 4%), despite a fall of 3% in oil production in the Middle East. Excluding the Middle East, production was increased to 345,000 boe/d (+ 12%), including 212,000 boe/d for gas (+ 20%). Exploration/production investments were 5.8 GF in 1994 (excluding labour) and the development program for reserves and production for the coming years is based on yearly investments of some 6 GF. Total's production in Europe, essentially in the North Sea, was 154,000 boe/d in 1994 (+ 12%). This zone has potential for significant growth for the group which has undertaken exploration surveys in the Western Shetlands and in Haltenbanken. In the British zone, the Dunbar field and its neighbour Ellon were brought into production in December 1994. In the Norwegian zone, the Froy field, was brought into production last June. In the Lille-Frigg field, whose production started in May, initial reserves are estimated at 6,7 Bcm of gas. Total Norge AS also has interests in the producing fields of Ekofisk, Frigg, East-Frigg, Heimdal, Sleipner East, Veslefrikk, Oseberg, Brage, in those of Sleipner West and Huldra (start-up scheduled for 1997) and in Troll (phase 1) which should be producing in 1996. In the Dutch zone, the K4b and K5a blocks brought into production last November hold reserves estimated at 20 Bcm; their production could reach 2 Bcm/year as from 1995. (authors). 1 tab., 1 photo

  10. Increasing the efficiency of bacterial transcription simulations: When to exclude the genome without loss of accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillen David R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulating the major molecular events inside an Escherichia coli cell can lead to a very large number of reactions that compose its overall behaviour. Not only should the model be accurate, but it is imperative for the experimenter to create an efficient model to obtain the results in a timely fashion. Here, we show that for many parameter regimes, the effect of the host cell genome on the transcription of a gene from a plasmid-borne promoter is negligible, allowing one to simulate the system more efficiently by removing the computational load associated with representing the presence of the rest of the genome. The key parameter is the on-rate of RNAP binding to the promoter (k_on, and we compare the total number of transcripts produced from a plasmid vector generated as a function of this rate constant, for two versions of our gene expression model, one incorporating the host cell genome and one excluding it. By sweeping parameters, we identify the k_on range for which the difference between the genome and no-genome models drops below 5%, over a wide range of doubling times, mRNA degradation rates, plasmid copy numbers, and gene lengths. Results We assess the effect of the simulating the presence of the genome over a four-dimensional parameter space, considering: 24 min Conclusion Exclusion of the genome is shown to yield less than 5% difference in transcript numbers over wide ranges of values, and computational speed is improved by two to 24 times by excluding explicit representation of the genome.

  11. Prevention and health promotion for the excluded and the destitute in Europe

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chauvin, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    ... Abuse in Spain The Advisory Service on Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Bremen 65 71 73 77 82 84 90 95 98 104 107 Part 3. Health Promotion Public Health and Health Promotion Definition of Target...

  12. 'Mujeres': destinatarias privilegiadas de los planes sociales de inicios del siglo XXI - reflexiones desde una perspectiva crítica de género 'Women': privileged targets for the early 21th century social programs - reflections from a critical gender perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Anzorena

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde fines de los 1990 tanto en Argentina como en Latinoamérica, se han introducido planes sociales destinados a atenuar las condiciones de pobreza producto del modelo neoliberal. Estos procesos afectan de modo particular a las mujeres en cuanto las ubica como 'destinatarias' privilegiadas de estas medidas. En este ensayo buscamos explorar en que sentido en que algunos supuestos de la Nueva Economía de la Familia (NEF promueven la naturalización del rol reproductivo y doméstico para las mujeres, y las define como funcionales a los objetivos de las políticas sociales paliativas de los 1990. Esta visión, que promueve el aprovechamiento de las supuestas 'virtudes maternales' de las mujeres, reproduce la discriminación de género y clases, y refuerza la supuesta naturalidad de la división sexual del trabajoSince the late '90s, social programs to ameliorate the poverty conditions provoked by the neoliberal model have been applied in Argentina and in Latin America. These processes particularly affect women, as they are the privileged 'target' of those measures. This essay explores the ways in which the New Economics of the Family (NEF, in 90's social programs, promotes the naturalization of women's responsibility as homemakers, and defines them as functional to the objectives of palliative social policies. Such a vision profits from supposed natural 'motherly virtues', and far from promoting more egalitarian relations between women and men, reproduces gender and class discrimination by reinforcing the supposedly natural sexual division of labor

  13. Automatized target devices for radioisotope production at the RITs cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, P.V.; Ivanov, V.V.; Karasev, B.G.

    1981-01-01

    An automation target device intended for isotope production on the internal beam of the RITs cyclotron is decribed. The target device comprises the following main units: target head, vacuum lock, charging device, transport system for bringing the target for charging; mechanism of target discharge transport device, control interlocking and signalling control system of target radiation power. The automation target device permits radioisotope production on the cyclotron in commercial scales with automation substitution of irradiated targets. The time of substitution of one of six targets makes up only 5 min. The time of charging a new group of targets to the charge device - 60 min. Contact of the personnel with irradiated targets is practically excluded and the necessity of entering the cyclotron room for maintenance of the plant is reduced to the minimum [ru

  14. Some algebraic clues towards a syntactic view on the Principles of Non-Contradiction and Excluded-Middle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillas, E.; García-Honrado, I.; Termini, S.

    2014-02-01

    This short paper just considers the possibility of a new view for posing and proving Aristotle's Principles of Non-Contradiction and Excluded-Middle. It is done by means of their refutability, or deducibility, respectively, under Tarski's Consequence Operators.

  15. 22 CFR 1006.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 1006.430 Section 1006.430 Foreign Relations INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT... Transactions § 1006.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a...

  16. 41 CFR 105-68.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I check to see if...) Responsibilities of GSA Officials Regarding Transactions § 105-68.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified in two ways: (a) You as an...

  17. 2 CFR 180.425 - When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false When do I check to see if a person is... § 180.425 When do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? As a Federal agency official, you must check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified before you— (a) Enter into a primary...

  18. 5 CFR 919.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How do I check to see if a person is...) Responsibilities of OPM Officials Regarding Transactions § 919.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified in two ways: (a) You as an agency...

  19. 2 CFR 180.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? 180.430 Section 180.430 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET... § 180.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is...

  20. 31 CFR 19.430 - How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I check to see if a person is... Treasury Officials Regarding Transactions § 19.430 How do I check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified? You check to see if a person is excluded or disqualified in two ways: (a) You as an agency...

  1. Are Rural Development Programmes Socially Inclusive? Social Inclusion, Civic Engagement, Participation, and Social Capital: Exploring the Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Sally

    2008-01-01

    Considerable importance is attached to social exclusion/inclusion in recent EU rural development programmes. At the national/regional operation of these programmes groups of people who are not participating are often identified as "socially excluded groups". This article contends that rural development programmes are misinterpreting the…

  2. Outcomes of original and low-permeability Gore Excluder endoprosthesis for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanski, William; Fillinger, Mark

    2007-02-01

    Because of concern about the percentage of enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) after endovascular repair with the Excluder device (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Inc, Sunnyvale, Calif), the graft material was modified to reduce its permeability and released for commercial use in mid-2004. We studied all AAA repairs with Excluder endografts performed at our institution, including the original-permeability (OP) version (n = 99) and the low-permeability (LP) version (n = 48). All patients were followed up with serial computed tomography (CT) angiography and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Morphologic measurements, including AAA diameter and 3D volume, were prospectively entered into a database to evaluate changes in AAA size over time. Owing to the length of available follow-up for the LP version, the primary end point was AAA size change at 6 and 12 months, evaluated by Mann-Whitney U test for unpaired samples. Preoperative and postoperative anatomy was similar in the two groups, including AAA diameter (OP, 5.6 +/- 1 cm; LP, 5.8 +/- 2 cm; P = .3), aortic neck length (OP, 21 +/- 1 mm; LP, 22 +/- 2 mm; P = .9), postoperative aortic seal zone (OP, 18 +/- 1 mm; LP, 16 +/- 1 mm, P > .1) and iliac seal zone (OP, 33 +/- 1 mm, LP 31 +/- 1 mm, P = .2). The rate of sac shrinkage differed significantly. Orthogonal diameter measurements showed a significant difference in the rate of shrinkage by 12 months postoperatively (OP, -2.1 +/- 1 mm; LP, -5.1 +/- 1 mm; P = .01). By 3D volume, the rate of shrinkage was considerably different between the two groups at both 6 and 12 months (12 months: OP, -6% +/- 1%; LP, -20 +/- 4%; P = .0006). There was no enlargement by diameter in either group at 6 or 12 months postoperative. By standard volume criteria, however, 12 of 99 patients in the OP group and one of 48 patients in the LP group had significant AAA enlargement < or =12 months (P = .04). Of these, four of 12 patients in the OP group had enlargement without apparent endoleak, even

  3. Social learning and sociality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reader, S.M.; Lefebvre, L.

    2001-01-01

    Sociality may not be a defining feature of social learning. Complex social systems have been predicted to favour the evolution of social learning, but the evidence for this relationship is weak. In birds, only one study supports the hypothesis that social learning is an adaptive

  4. Template-based automatic breast segmentation on MRI by excluding the chest region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Muqing; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Wang, Xiaoyong; Su, Min-Ying; Chan, Siwa; Chen, Siping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Methods for quantification of breast density on MRI using semiautomatic approaches are commonly used. In this study, the authors report on a fully automatic chest template-based method. Methods: Nonfat-suppressed breast MR images from 31 healthy women were analyzed. Among them, one case was randomly selected and used as the template, and the remaining 30 cases were used for testing. Unlike most model-based breast segmentation methods that use the breast region as the template, the chest body region on a middle slice was used as the template. Within the chest template, three body landmarks (thoracic spine and bilateral boundary of the pectoral muscle) were identified for performing the initial V-shape cut to determine the posterior lateral boundary of the breast. The chest template was mapped to each subject's image space to obtain a subject-specific chest model for exclusion. On the remaining image, the chest wall muscle was identified and excluded to obtain clean breast segmentation. The chest and muscle boundaries determined on the middle slice were used as the reference for the segmentation of adjacent slices, and the process continued superiorly and inferiorly until all 3D slices were segmented. The segmentation results were evaluated by an experienced radiologist to mark voxels that were wrongly included or excluded for error analysis. Results: The breast volumes measured by the proposed algorithm were very close to the radiologist's corrected volumes, showing a % difference ranging from 0.01% to 3.04% in 30 tested subjects with a mean of 0.86% ± 0.72%. The total error was calculated by adding the inclusion and the exclusion errors (so they did not cancel each other out), which ranged from 0.05% to 6.75% with a mean of 3.05% ± 1.93%. The fibroglandular tissue segmented within the breast region determined by the algorithm and the radiologist were also very close, showing a % difference ranging from 0.02% to 2.52% with a mean of 1.03% ± 1.03%. The

  5. Should children with overweight or obesity be excluded from height references?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júlíusson, Pétur B; Brannsether, Bente; Kristiansen, Hege; Hoppenbrouwers, Karel; Bjerknes, Robert; Roelants, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Growth reference charts are usually based on measurements of children free from a medical condition that affects growth. However, samples collected during the past decades often contain a large proportion of overweight or obese children. Because obesity increases linear growth, the question arises to what extent the percentiles curves for length/height are affected by the presence of children with overweight or obesity. Data from two cross-sectional samples of 2-year-old to 18-year-old children were analysed: 12,252 Belgian children, measured in 2002-2004, and 6159 Norwegian children, measured in 2003-2006. The LMS method was used to estimate height-for-age curves with and without children considered overweight or obese according to the International Obesity Task Force thresholds. The prevalence of overweight (including obesity) and obesity was 13.0% and 2.8% in the Belgian and 13.8% and 2.3% in the Norwegian sample. Children were taller when overweight (+0.49 and 0.43 SD, in the Belgian and Norwegian sample, respectively) or obese (+0.73 and 0.72 SD in the Belgian and Norwegian sample, respectively). Effect sizes were smaller in younger and older children, which points to an advanced age of maturation as a possible cause. Excluding overweight and obese children had only a minor impact on the growth curves with largest difference in mean height SD scores -0.09 in the Belgian and -0.12 in the Norwegian sample with a corresponding increase of up to 0.5% and 1.2% in number of children >+2 SD. Current Belgian and Norwegian growth references for length/height were found to be largely unaffected by the current proportion of overweight and obese children. There is, therefore, no need for revised height charts that exclude overweight or obese children. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Social Inclusion and Critical Consciousness in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A.; Ortega, Lilyana

    2010-01-01

    Australia's Indigenous population is excluded from a range of opportunities, experiences and amenities that facilitate wellbeing, self-determination and social inclusion. This social exclusion constrains the career development and occupational attainment of Indigenous youth, which represent key routes to societal inclusion. Critical…

  7. Theory in Social Marketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastings, Gerard; Brown, Abraham; Anker, Thomas Boysen

    2010-01-01

    The chapter looks at three important theories which help social marketers to think more systematically about the key questions they need to address:  (i) how does the target group or population feel about a particular behaviour (Stages of Change Theory); (ii) what social and contextual factors...... influence this positioning (Social Cognitive Theory and Social Norms) and; (iii) what offerings might encourage them to change their behaviour – or, those in a position to do so, to make the social context more conducive to change (Exchange Theory). Moreover, the chapter outlines how social marketers might...

  8. Secure attachment partners attenuate neural responses to social exclusion: An fMRI investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karremans, J.C.; Heslenfeld, D.J.; van Dillen, L.F.; van Lange, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that social exclusion has devastating psychological, physiological, and behavioral consequences. However, little is known about possible ways to shield individuals from the detrimental effects of social exclusion. The present study, in which participants were excluded during a

  9. Strategies to exclude subjects who conceal and fabricate information when enrolling in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Devine

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials within the US face an increasing challenge with the recruitment of quality candidates. One readily available group of subjects that have high rates of participation in clinical research are subjects who enroll in multiple trials for the purpose of generating income through study payments. Aside from issues of safety and generalizability, evidence suggests that these subjects employ methods of deception to qualify for the strict entrance criteria of some studies, including concealing information and fabricating information. Including these subjects in research poses a significant risk to the integrity of data quality and study designs. Strategies to limit enrollment of subjects whose motivation is generating income have not been systematically addressed in the literature. The present paper is intended to provide investigators with a range of strategies for developing and implementing a study protocol with protections to minimize the enrollment of subjects whose primary motivation for enrolling is to generate income. This multifaceted approach includes recommendations for advertising strategies, payment strategies, telephone screening strategies, and baseline screening strategies. The approach also includes recommendations for attending to inconsistent study data and subject motivation. Implementing these strategies may be more or less important depending upon the vulnerability of the study design to subject deception. Although these strategies may help researchers exclude subjects with a higher rate of deceptive practices, widespread adoption of subject registries would go a long way to decrease the chances of subjects enrolling in multiple studies or more than once in the same study.

  10. My life as a pupil: The autobiographical memories of adolescents excluded from school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, Shaalan

    2017-02-01

    Narrative psychology is founded on the premise that substantial insight can be gained into individuals' self-understanding and behaviour by studying the content of their autobiographical memories. This article contributes to this field of inquiry by suggesting that our understanding of adolescents' exclusion from mainstream education can be enhanced by examining their recollections of school using a narrative dialogical approach. In a research project the autobiographical memories of fifteen female and twenty male students, aged 15-16 years, who had been excluded from secondary schools in London, England were collected and analysed. The aim was to examine how in their narrated depictions of the past, the adolescents explained and justified their position and behaviour at different times in their lives at school. The findings highlight how adolescents perceive themselves to have become positioned by the voices of significant others, schools as institutions and themselves at earlier or later stages in their lives. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Innovation Chinese rice wine brewing technology by bi-acidification to exclude rice soaking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao Lu; Liu, Shuang Ping; Yu, Jian Shen; Yu, Yong Jian; Zhu, Sheng Hu; Zhou, Zhi Lei; Hu, Jian; Mao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    As a traditional fermented alcoholic beverage of China, Chinese rice wine (CRW) had a long history of more than 5000 years. Rice soaking process was the most crucial step during CRW brewing process, because rice soaking quality directly determined the quality of CRW. However, rice soaking water would cause the eutrophication of water bodies and waste of water. The longer time of rice soaking, the higher the content of biogenic amine, and it would have a huge impact on human health. An innovation brewing technology was carried out to exclude the rice soaking process and the Lactobacillus was added to make up for the total acid. Compared to the traditional brewing technology, the new technology saved water resources and reduced environmental pollution. The concentration of biogenic amine was also decreased by 27.16%, which improving the security of the CRW. The esters increased led to more soft-tasted CRW and less aging time; the quality of CRW would be improved with less alcohol. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CONTRIBUTION TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF THE ARACHNIDS IN THE YUCATAN PENINSULA, MEXICO (EXCLUDING ARANAE AND ACARI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Delfin Gonzalez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Chelicerata are the second group of arthropods with the highest diversity after insects and they can inhabit almost all types of environments. The most current classification recognizes 11 orders and estimates in the number of species vary from 52,000 to 100,000. We have made an extensive literature review on the diversity of arachnids in the Yucatan Peninsula (YP (excluding spiders and ticks. In Mexico there are 834 known species which represent 6% of the worldwide diversity. In the YP 63 records were found (58 species and 5 genera of arachnids, which represent 6.8% of the Mexican species. According to our research, 28 of the 58 species (48% in the YP were also record in other parts of Mexico, the continent and the world. Undoubtedly, the state of Yucatan is the best represented of the YP. In order to have a better understanding of the diversity of arachnid species is important to promote biological compendiums and sampling programs, which will improve the representation of this group and probably increasing the number of local species.

  13. Tests of a system to exclude roots from buried radioactive waste in a warm, humid climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Corey, J.C.; Adriano, D.C.; Decker, O.D.; Griggs, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Vegetation is commonly used to stabilize the ground covering buried waste sites. However, constituents of buried waste can be brought to the surface if the waste is penetrated by plant roots. An ideal waste burial system would allow the use of vegetation to stabilize the soil above the buried waste but would exclude roots from the waste. One system that shows considerable promise is a slow release encapsulation of a root growth inhibitor (Trifluralin). Projected lifetimes of the capsule are in the order of 100 years. The capsule is bonded to a geotextile, which provides an easy means of distributing the capsule evenly over the area to be protected. Vegetation grown in the soil above the barrier has provided good ground cover, although some decrease in growth has been found in some species. Of the species tested the sensitivity to the biobarrier, as measured by the distance root growth stops near the barrier, is bamboo> bahia grass> bermuda grass> soybean. Potential uses for the biobarrier at the Savannah River Site (SRS) include the protection of clay caps over buried, low-level saltstone and protection of gravel drains and clay caps over decommissioned seepage basins. Trails of the biobarrier as part of waste site caps are scheduled to begin during the next 12 months

  14. Genome-wide association study of handedness excludes simple genetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J AL; Davison, A; McManus, I C

    2014-01-01

    Handedness is a human behavioural phenotype that appears to be congenital, and is often assumed to be inherited, but for which the developmental origin and underlying causation(s) have been elusive. Models of the genetic basis of variation in handedness have been proposed that fit different features of the observed resemblance between relatives, but none has been decisively tested or a corresponding causative locus identified. In this study, we applied data from well-characterised individuals studied at the London Twin Research Unit. Analysis of genome-wide SNP data from 3940 twins failed to identify any locus associated with handedness at a genome-wide level of significance. The most straightforward interpretation of our analyses is that they exclude the simplest formulations of the ‘right-shift' model of Annett and the ‘dextral/chance' model of McManus, although more complex modifications of those models are still compatible with our observations. For polygenic effects, our study is inadequately powered to reliably detect alleles with effect sizes corresponding to an odds ratio of 1.2, but should have good power to detect effects at an odds ratio of 2 or more. PMID:24065183

  15. External Events Excluding Earthquakes in the Design of Nuclear Power Plants. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This Safety Guide provides recommendations and guidance on design for the protection of nuclear power plants from the effects of external events (excluding earthquakes), i.e. events that originate either off the site or within the boundaries of the site but from sources that are not directly involved in the operational states of the nuclear power plant units. In addition, it provides recommendations on engineering related matters in order to comply with the safety objectives and requirements established in the IAEA Safety Requirements publication, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. It is also applicable to the design and safety assessment of items important to the safety of land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Application of safety criteria to the design; 3. Design basis for external events; 4. Aircraft crash; 5. External fire; 6. Explosions; 7. Asphyxiant and toxic gases; 8. Corrosive and radioactive gases and liquids; 9. Electromagnetic interference; 10. Floods; 11. Extreme winds; 12. Extreme meteorological conditions; 13. Biological phenomena; 14. Volcanism; 15. Collisions of floating bodies with water intakes and UHS components; Annex I: Aircraft crashes; Annex II: Detonation and deflagration; Annex III: Toxicity limits.

  16. Brief Report: Should Asperger Syndrome Be Excluded from the Forthcoming DSM-V?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaland, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Asperger syndrome (AS) is a "pervasive developmental disorder," characterized by social impairments and focused, circumscribed interests and activities in the absence of significant language impairment and cognitive delay. Since its inclusion in the DSM-IV, there has been a dramatic increase in its recognition both in children and adults. Some…

  17. Social exclusion weakens storage capacity and attentional filtering ability in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengsi; Qiao, Lei; Qi, Senqing; Li, Zhiai; Diao, Liuting; Fan, Lingxia; Zhang, Lijie; Yang, Dong

    2018-01-01

    Social exclusion has been found to impair visual working memory (WM), while the underlying neural processes are currently unclear. Using two experiments, we tested whether the poor WM performance caused by exclusion was due to reduced storage capacity, impaired attentional filtering ability or both. The Cyberball game was used to manipulate social exclusion. Seventy-four female participants performed WM tasks while event-related potentials were recorded. In Experiment 1, participants were made to remember the orientations of red rectangles while ignoring salient green rectangles. Results showed that exclusion impaired the ability to filter out irrelevant items from WM, as reflected by the similar contralateral delay activity (CDA) amplitudes for one-target-one-distractor condition and two-targets condition, as well as the similar CDA amplitudes for two-targets-two-distractors condition and four-targets condition in excluded individuals. In Experiment 2, participants were asked to remember 1-5 colored squares. Results showed that exclusion reduced storage capacity, as the CDA amplitudes reached asymptote at loads of two items for exclusion group and at loads of three items for inclusion group. Together, these two experiments provided complementary evidence that WM deficits caused by social exclusion were due to reduced storage capacity and impaired attentional filtering ability. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Determination of optimal LWR containment design, excluding accidents more severe than Class 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cave, L.; Min, T.K.

    1980-04-01

    Information is presented concerning the restrictive effect of existing NRC requirements; definition of possible targets for containment; possible containment systems for LWR; optimization of containment design for class 3 through class 8 accidents (PWR); estimated costs of some possible containment arrangements for PWR relative to the standard dry containment system; estimated costs of BWR containment

  19. Accelerator target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  20. Identification of cadmium-excluding Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) cultivars and their mechanisms of low cadmium accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuhui; Zhou, Qixing; Wei, Shuhe; Ren, Wenjie

    2012-06-01

    Screening out cadmium (Cd) excluding cultivars of a crop in agricultural production is an effective way to prohibit Cd entering into food chain. A judging criterion for Cd-excluding cultivars based on food safety was suggested and used in the identification of Cd-excluding welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) cultivars. A pot culture experiment was carried out to screen out Cd-excluding cultivars, of which the results were confirmed by plot experiments. The relevant factors of Cd accumulation in the pseudostem were analyzed and used in the correlation analysis aiming to study the low Cd accumulation mechanisms. The concentration of Cd in the pseudostem of welsh onions was 0.08-0.20, 0.18-0.41, and 0.26-0.61 mg/kg fresh weight (FW) under three treatments (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg), respectively. The significant (p onion cultivars, but Cd contamination in soil had little influence on biomass and the contents of soluble sugar, NO(3)(-)-N, and eight other elements in the tested welsh onion cultivars. Two cultivars were identified as Cd-excluding cultivars, mainly because the accumulation of Cd in their pseudostem was only 0.041 ± 0.003 and 0.046 ± 0.002 mg/kg FW, and 0.054 ± 0.001 and 0.066 ± 0.011 mg/kg FW, when growing in plots with Cd concentration of 0.49 and 0.99 mg/kg, respectively. Ribentiegancongwang and Wuyeqi could be identified as Cd-excluding cultivars. Low bioaccumulation factor of the roots was the main mechanism of Cd-excluding welsh onion cultivars.

  1. Template-based automatic breast segmentation on MRI by excluding the chest region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Muqing [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 and National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 518060 China (China); Chen, Jeon-Hor [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 and Department of Radiology, E-Da Hospital and I-Shou University, Kaohsiung 82445, Taiwan (China); Wang, Xiaoyong; Su, Min-Ying, E-mail: msu@uci.edu [Tu and Yuen Center for Functional Onco-Imaging, Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-5020 (United States); Chan, Siwa [Department of Radiology, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung 40407, Taiwan (China); Chen, Siping [National-Regional Key Technology Engineering Laboratory for Medical Ultrasound, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, 518060 China (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Methods for quantification of breast density on MRI using semiautomatic approaches are commonly used. In this study, the authors report on a fully automatic chest template-based method. Methods: Nonfat-suppressed breast MR images from 31 healthy women were analyzed. Among them, one case was randomly selected and used as the template, and the remaining 30 cases were used for testing. Unlike most model-based breast segmentation methods that use the breast region as the template, the chest body region on a middle slice was used as the template. Within the chest template, three body landmarks (thoracic spine and bilateral boundary of the pectoral muscle) were identified for performing the initial V-shape cut to determine the posterior lateral boundary of the breast. The chest template was mapped to each subject's image space to obtain a subject-specific chest model for exclusion. On the remaining image, the chest wall muscle was identified and excluded to obtain clean breast segmentation. The chest and muscle boundaries determined on the middle slice were used as the reference for the segmentation of adjacent slices, and the process continued superiorly and inferiorly until all 3D slices were segmented. The segmentation results were evaluated by an experienced radiologist to mark voxels that were wrongly included or excluded for error analysis. Results: The breast volumes measured by the proposed algorithm were very close to the radiologist's corrected volumes, showing a % difference ranging from 0.01% to 3.04% in 30 tested subjects with a mean of 0.86% ± 0.72%. The total error was calculated by adding the inclusion and the exclusion errors (so they did not cancel each other out), which ranged from 0.05% to 6.75% with a mean of 3.05% ± 1.93%. The fibroglandular tissue segmented within the breast region determined by the algorithm and the radiologist were also very close, showing a % difference ranging from 0.02% to 2.52% with a mean of 1.03% ± 1

  2. Oscillometric casual blood pressure normative standards for Swedish children using ABPM to exclude casual hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, Rafael T; Holtbäck, Ulla; Bergh, Anita; Svensson, Eva; Wühl, Elke

    2015-04-01

    Casual blood pressure (CBP) is considered a reliable proxy for cardiovascular health. Although the auscultatory technique is the reference standard method for measuring CBP, oscillometric devices are increasingly being used in children. We sought to establish oscillometric CBP normative standards for Swedish children. Cross-sectional oscillometric CBP readings were obtained by the Welch Allyn Spot Vital Signs 420 monitor and measured according to the International Guidelines' recommendations. Participants with elevated oscillometric CBP levels underwent verification by the auscultatory method. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was used to exclude casual hypertension. Data on 1,470 (772 males) apparently healthy Swedish schoolchildren aged 6-16 years were analyzed and sex-specific reference charts normalized to age or height were constructed. Systolic and diastolic CBP values were significantly higher with age, height, height standard deviation score (SDS), body mass index (BMI), and BMI SDS. Gender differences for systolic CBP were present starting from age of 15 years and revealed significantly higher values in boys than in girls, whereas for diastolic CBP, the differences were apparent at the age of 12 years, with higher values in girls. Increased BMI and BMI SDS were positively associated with CBP levels. Positive parental history of hypertension turned out to be a risk factor for higher systolic and diastolic CBP across all ages. Our normative standard for CBP can be used for blood pressure screening and control programs in Swedish children. The use of ABPM should be considered to confirm the diagnosis of casual hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Grasses and browsers reinforce landscape heterogeneity by excluding trees from ecosystem hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porensky, Lauren M; Veblen, Kari E

    2012-03-01

    Spatial heterogeneity in woody cover affects biodiversity and ecosystem function, and may be particularly influential in savanna ecosystems. Browsing and interactions with herbaceous plants can create and maintain heterogeneity in woody cover, but the relative importance of these drivers remains unclear, especially when considered across multiple edaphic contexts. In African savannas, abandoned temporary livestock corrals (bomas) develop into long-term, nutrient-rich ecosystem hotspots with unique vegetation. In central Kenya, abandoned corral sites persist for decades as treeless 'glades' in a wooded matrix. Though glades are treeless, areas between adjacent glades have higher tree densities than the background savanna or areas near isolated glades. The mechanisms maintaining these distinctive woody cover patterns remain unclear. We asked whether browsing or interactions with herbaceous plants help to maintain landscape heterogeneity by differentially impacting young trees in different locations. We planted the mono-dominant tree species (Acacia drepanolobium) in four locations: inside glades, far from glades, at edges of isolated glades and at edges between adjacent glades. Within each location, we assessed the separate and combined effects of herbivore exclusion (caging) and herbaceous plant removal (clearing) on tree survival and growth. Both caging and clearing improved tree survival and growth inside glades. When herbaceous plants were removed, trees inside glades grew more than trees in other locations, suggesting that glade soils were favorable for tree growth. Different types of glade edges (isolated vs. non-isolated) did not have significantly different impacts on tree performance. This represents one of the first field-based experiments testing the separate and interactive effects of browsing, grass competition and edaphic context on savanna tree performance. Our findings suggest that, by excluding trees from otherwise favorable sites, both herbaceous

  4. Patients with computed tomography-proven acute diverticulitis require follow-up to exclude colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafquat Zaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Traditionally, patients with acute diverticulitis undergo follow-up endoscopy to exclude colorectal cancer (CRC. However, its usefulness has been debated in this era of high-resolution computed tomography (CT diagnosis. We assessed the frequency and outcome of endoscopic follow-up for patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, according to the confidence in the CT diagnosis.Methods: Records of patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis between October 2007 and March 2014 at Sandwell & West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust were retrieved. The National Cancer Registry confirmed the cases of CRC. Endoscopy quality indicators were compared between these patients and other patients undergoing the same endoscopic examination over the same period.Results: We identified 235 patients with CT-proven acute diverticulitis, of which, 187 were managed conservatively. The CT report was confident of the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in 75% cases. Five of the 235 patients were subsequently diagnosed with CRC (2.1%. Three cases of CRC were detected in the 187 patients managed conservatively (1.6%. Forty-eight percent of the conservatively managed patients underwent follow-up endoscopy; one case of CRC was identified. Endoscopies were often incomplete and caused more discomfort for patients with diverticulitis compared with controls.Conclusions: CRC was diagnosed in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis at a higher rate than in screened asymptomatic populations, necessitating follow-up. CT reports contained statements regarding diagnostic uncertainty in 25% cases, associated with an increased risk of CRC. Follow-up endoscopy in patients with CT-proven diverticulitis is associated with increased discomfort and high rates of incompletion. The use of other follow-up modalities should be considered.

  5. Beyond the sticker price: including and excluding time in comparing food prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanliang; Davis, George C; Muth, Mary K

    2015-07-01

    An ongoing debate in the literature is how to measure the price of food. Most analyses have not considered the value of time in measuring the price of food. Whether or not the value of time is included in measuring the price of a food may have important implications for classifying foods based on their relative cost. The purpose of this article is to compare prices that exclude time (time-exclusive price) with prices that include time (time-inclusive price) for 2 types of home foods: home foods using basic ingredients (home recipes) vs. home foods using more processed ingredients (processed recipes). The time-inclusive and time-exclusive prices are compared to determine whether the time-exclusive prices in isolation may mislead in drawing inferences regarding the relative prices of foods. We calculated the time-exclusive price and time-inclusive price of 100 home recipes and 143 processed recipes and then categorized them into 5 standard food groups: grains, proteins, vegetables, fruit, and dairy. We then examined the relation between the time-exclusive prices and the time-inclusive prices and dietary recommendations. For any food group, the processed food time-inclusive price was always less than the home recipe time-inclusive price, even if the processed food's time-exclusive price was more expensive. Time-inclusive prices for home recipes were especially higher for the more time-intensive food groups, such as grains, vegetables, and fruit, which are generally underconsumed relative to the guidelines. Focusing only on the sticker price of a food and ignoring the time cost may lead to different conclusions about relative prices and policy recommendations than when the time cost is included. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Railway Porters of Mumbai : Social Capital in Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weitering, D.; Nooteboom, G.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores the scope and limitations of social capital and local forms of social security in the informal sector through a case study of railway coolies at Dadar station, Mumbai. The complex organisation of the coolies, virtually excluded from state or enterprise social security schemes,

  8. Targeted marketing and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Sonya A; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2010-01-01

    Targeted marketing techniques, which identify consumers who share common needs or characteristics and position products or services to appeal to and reach these consumers, are now the core of all marketing and facilitate its effectiveness. However, targeted marketing, particularly of products with proven or potential adverse effects (e.g., tobacco, alcohol, entertainment violence, or unhealthful foods) to consumer segments defined as vulnerable raises complex concerns for public health. It is critical that practitioners, academics, and policy makers in marketing, public health, and other fields recognize and understand targeted marketing as a specific contextual influence on the health of children and adolescents and, for different reasons, ethnic minority populations and other populations who may benefit from public health protections. For beneficial products, such understanding can foster more socially productive targeting. For potentially harmful products, understanding the nature and scope of targeted marketing influences will support identification and implementation of corrective policies.

  9. Identification of symptoms that indicate a pelvic examination is necessary to exclude PID in adolescent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D R; Fletcher, K; Joshi, N; Emans, S J

    2003-02-01

    evaluated for cervical and vaginal infections with urine and directly obtained vaginal swabs. Although some of these patients might have required a pelvic examination to exclude other causes of abnormal vaginal bleeding, at least 30% of the total sample could have been evaluated without a speculum and bimanual examination. If further studies support these findings, patients with symptoms suggestive of uncomplicated genitourinary infection (e.g., vaginal discharge, vaginal pruritus, or dysuria) who deny lower abdominal pain and dyspareunia can be evaluated with urine and vaginal samples in place of a speculum and bimanual examination.

  10. Reaching the Promised Land: Can Social Enterprise Reduce Social Exclusion and Empower Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Anna; Lyne, Isaac; Ryan, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, social enterprise is promoted as a mechanism to capture the supposed innovation and dynamism of the private sector to (amongst other things) wean "Third Sector" organisations off their dependence on grants and to offer opportunities to "empower" socially excluded communities. In this article, we place…

  11. How long must radioactive wastes from the nuclear fuel cycle be excluded from the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffen, G.

    1982-01-01

    Estimations of the social costs resulting from the generation and release of radionuclides in the nuclear fuel cycle on the basis of the ''potential hazard measure'' prove, without any additional hypotheses, costs too high as to be acceptable under social aspects. Other approaches to a comparison between advantages and disadvantages determine only part of the radioactivity or use equally unproven additional assumptions. The nuclear industry, but also representatives of supervisory authorities and research institutes argue on the basis of radiotoxicity calculations that even high-level radioactive wastes will cease to be an unbearable risk after several hundreds or thousands of years. In this connection no standardized measure of toxicity is used, nor is there any convincing reasoning agreed upon, so that the estimates of the moment when the high-level radioactive wastes can be considered harmless differ from 500 to 100000 years. An exact application of the various concepts of toxicity and a careful argumentation show, however that detailed safety considerations on an ultimate storage for radioactive wastes of the nuclear fuel cycle should also be made for long periods of times in the geological sense. (orig./RW) [de

  12. Aspects of the electric sector social benefits; Consideracoes sobre as tarifas sociais do setor eletrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelegrini, Marcelo Aparecido; Fugimoto, Sergio Kinya [Comissao de Servicos Publicos de Energia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mapelegrini@sp.gov.br; Pazzini, Luiz Henrique Alves [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica]. E-mail: pazzini@pea.usp.br

    2002-07-01

    In the present days there is a large differentiation in the framing of the low income residential sub category adopted by the electric power distribution concessionaires. The present criteria generates distortions in various Brazilian states whether excluding a large parcel of the population needing the benefit, or including parcels that are not the main target of the social policy, therefore indicating the necessity of a enclosing study for defining a comparison methodology for these questions in Brazil different regions. This work analyses the subject, describing the present situation and the proposals submitted for discussion. It is also presented the main aspects involved in the concepts of poverty and indigence lines used for definition of the public target of the benefit. Some alternatives proposals are discussed such as a geographic focusing with a limit value of consumption to be applied.

  13. Social Set Visualizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesch, Benjamin; Vatrapu, Ravi; Mukkamala, Raghava Rao

    2015-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art in big social data analytics is largely limited to graph theoretical approaches such as social network analysis (SNA) informed by the social philosophical approach of relational sociology. This paper proposes and illustrates an alternate holistic approach to big social data...... platforms. We present and discuss a theoretical and conceptual model of social data followed by a formal description of our technique based on set theory and event studies with a real-world social data example from Facebook. We then illustrate our new approach by reporting on the design, development...... in relation to the garment factory accidents in Bangladesh, and analyze the results. The enterprise application domain for the dashboard is corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the targeted end-users are CSR researchers and practitioners. The design of the dashboard was based on the social set analysis...

  14. 22 CFR 208.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction? 208.325 Section 208.325 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Regarding Transactions Doing Business with Other Persons § 208.325 What happens if I do business with an...

  15. 31 CFR 19.325 - What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens if I do business with an excluded person in a covered transaction? 19.325 Section 19.325 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the... Participants Regarding Transactions Doing Business with Other Persons § 19.325 What happens if I do business...

  16. Gomphocalyx and Phylohydrax (Rubiaceae): sister taxa excluded from Spermacoceae s.s., featuring a remarkable case of convergent evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dessein, S.; Andersson, L.; Geuten, K.; Smets, E.; Robbrecht, E.

    2005-01-01

    The genera Gomphocalyx and Phylohydrax (Rubiaceae) have been invariably placed in the tribe Spermacoceae s.s. based on the uni-ovulate ovary locules and pluri-aperturate pollen grains. Sequence data from the rps16 intron and the rbcL gene here presented exclude Gomphocalyx and Phylohydrax from

  17. 2 CFR 2700.137 - Who in the Small Business Administration may grant an exception to let an excluded person...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Who in the Small Business Administration may grant an exception to let an excluded person participate in a covered transaction? 2700.137 Section 2700.137 Grants and Agreements Federal Agency Regulations for Grants and Agreements SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NONPROCUREMENT DEBARMENT AND...

  18. 21 CFR 1.327 - Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... products to all other buyers. (4) A “retail food establishment” includes grocery stores, convenience stores... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is excluded from all or part of the regulations in this subpart? 1.327 Section 1.327 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  19. 29 CFR 1471.135 - May the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service exclude a person who is not currently...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service exclude....135 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General § 1471.135 May the Federal Mediation and...

  20. To defend or to affiliate: The effects of categorical similarity cues after social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jia-Sin; Sun, Chien-Ru

    2017-09-21

    This article proposed that after social exclusion, individuals may react in a hostile or amiable manner, which depends on the type of categorical similarity cues that new groups possess. For excluded individuals, groups that resemble their excluder would provoke a defensive attitude. They also exhibit hospitality to groups that resemble themselves to gain inclusion. In Experiment 1, social exclusion was manipulated by providing a scenario story regarding an individual who was excluded and subsequently wanted to join in new groups. The results indicated that participants in the social exclusion condition avoided groups that resembled the previous excluder, whereas groups that fit their characteristics were preferred. In experiment 2, the cognitive load was manipulated. Heavy cognitive load made participants in the social exclusion condition only avoid groups that resembled the excluder; in contrast, they exhibited no preference for groups that may be suitable for them.

  1. Inclusion/exclusion and Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tække, Jesper

    Observations I Danish upper secondary schools show social media as either an attention distracting factor or as a factor drawing attention back to teaching again. The cursing point is if the teacher can manage to use social media in a constructive way, or if (s)he tries to prohibit or ignores...... the media use. At the same time social media has extensive scoop for improving both the organization and the quality of the teaching. In this paper we will put forward and analyze empirical findings showing that the community of the class also are challenged by informal networks, based on social media......, in the class, sometimes excluding the teacher form the class-interaction, sometimes excluding single students or groups from social interactions during school time....

  2. Preparation of phosphorus targets using the compound phosphorus nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Komor, P.

    1987-01-01

    Commercially available phosphorus nitride (P 3 N 5 ) shows a high oxygen content. Nevertheless, this material is attractive for use as phosphorus targets in experiments where red phosphorus would disappear due to its high vapor pressure and where a metal partner in the phosphide must be excluded due to its high atomic number. Methods are described to produce phosphorus nitride targets by vacuum evaporation condensation. (orig.)

  3. Circumstances for excluding unlawfulness and the legal institute of necessary defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albulena U. Ukimeraj

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There are reasons or circumstances provided for by the legal-criminal norms which in the concrete case and situation due to coexistence of certain circumstances make the offence permissible despite the fact that it contains all the traits of a criminal offence. The need for selfdefense, remains present considering the scale in which terrorism has spread, and considering that there are criminal individuals and organizations which endanger public safety by attacking people and buildings for the purpose of perpetrating a robbery, retaliation or other acts in pursuit of economic or political ends. The necessary defense is a lawful action of every individual or group in protection of itself from undue attacks which pose a threat to social order, life, health, property or other rights and interests, whereby the criminal liability and guilt is suspended as defense is considered as a “right” of a person whose rights were under attack. Alongside the punishments and measures imposed by the state against perpetrators of crimes, the criminal law also provides for individual defense, which can be done by citizens themselves under certain conditions and circumstances, a defense that is in line with the fundamental principles of a democratic state, international law and fundamental human rights and freedoms.

  4. Intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Taishi; Ura, Mitsuhiro; Nittono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    People have a fundamental need to belong with others. Social exclusion impairs this need and has various effects on cognition, affect, and the behavior of excluded individuals. We have previously reported that activity in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (rVLPFC) could be a neurocognitive index of social exclusion (Kawamoto et al., 2012). In this article, we provide an integrative framework for understanding occurrences during and after social exclusion, by reviewing neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and behavioral studies of dACC and rVLPFC, within the framework of intrapersonal and interpersonal processes of social exclusion. As a result, we have indicated directions for future studies to further clarify the phenomenon of social exclusion from the following perspectives: (1) constructional elements of social exclusion, (2) detection sensitivity and interpretation bias in social exclusion, (3) development of new methods to assess the reactivity to social exclusion, and (4) sources of social exclusion.

  5. Size, flexibility, and scattering functions of semiflexible polyelectrolytes with excluded volume effects: Monte Carlo simulations and neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannavacciuolo, L.; Sommer, C.; Pedersen, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    outlined in the Odijk-Skolnick-Fixman theory, in which the behavior of charged polymers is described only in terms of increasing local rigidity and excluded volume effects. Moreover, the Monte Carlo data are found to be in very good agreement with experimental scattering measurements with equilibrium......We present a systematic Monte Carlo study of the scattering function S(q) of semiflexible polyelectrolytes at infinite dilution, in solutions with different concentrations of added salt. In the spirit of a theoretical description of polyelectrolytes in terms of the equivalent parameters, namely......, persistence length and excluded volume interactions, we used a modified wormlike chain model, in which the monomers are represented by charged hard spheres placed at distance a. The electrostatic interactions are approximated by a Debye-Huckel potential. We show that the scattering function is quantitatively...

  6. Should Controls With Respiratory Symptoms Be Excluded From Case-Control Studies of Pneumonia Etiology? Reflections From the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Melissa M; Hammitt, Laura L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Driscoll, Amanda J; Karron, Ruth A; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2017-06-15

    Many pneumonia etiology case-control studies exclude controls with respiratory illness from enrollment or analyses. Herein we argue that selecting controls regardless of respiratory symptoms provides the least biased estimates of pneumonia etiology. We review 3 reasons investigators may choose to exclude controls with respiratory symptoms in light of epidemiologic principles of control selection and present data from the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study where relevant to assess their validity. We conclude that exclusion of controls with respiratory symptoms will result in biased estimates of etiology. Randomly selected community controls, with or without respiratory symptoms, as long as they do not meet the criteria for case-defining pneumonia, are most representative of the general population from which cases arose and the least subject to selection bias. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social anxiety disorder (social phobia) Overview It's normal to feel nervous in some social situations. For example, going ... feeling of butterflies in your stomach. But in social anxiety disorder, also called social phobia, everyday interactions cause ...

  8. Target-Centric Network Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Dr. William L.; Clark, Dr. Robert M.

    reporting formats, along with a tested process that facilitates the production of a wide range of analytical products for civilian, military, and hybrid intelligence environments. Readers will learn how to perform the specific actions of problem definition modeling, target network modeling......, and collaborative sharing in the process of creating a high-quality, actionable intelligence product. The case studies reflect the complexity of twenty-first century intelligence issues by dealing with multi-layered target networks that cut across political, economic, social, technological, and military issues...

  9. Social Set Visualizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesch, Benjamin; Hussain, Abid; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a state-of-the art visual analytics dash-board, Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi), of approximately 90 million Facebook actions from 11 different companies that have been mentioned in the traditional media in relation to garment factory accidents in Bangladesh. The enterprise...... application domain for the dashboard is Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and the targeted end-users are CSR researchers and practitioners. The design of the dashboard was based on the "social set analytics" approach to computational social science. The development of the dash-board involved cutting...

  10. From Social Practices to Social Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Krummheuer, Antonia Lina; Rodil, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that the development of social robots for the elder care sector is primarily technology driven and relying on stereotypes about old people.We are focusing instead on the actual social practices that will be targeted by social robots. We provide details of this interdisciplinary...... approach and highlight its applicability and usefulness with field examples from an elder care home. These examples include ethnographic field studies as well as workshops with staff and residents. The goal is to identify and agree with both groups on social practices, where the use of a social robot might...... be beneficial. The paper ends with a case study of a robot, which frees staff from repetitive and time consuming tasks while at the same time allowing residents to reclaim some independence....

  11. Social opdrift - social arv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, Morten; Gabrielsen, G.; Nørrung, Per

    "Social opdrift - social arv" stiller på flere måder spørgsmål ved begrebet social arv. Bogen konkluderer blandt andet, at langt de fleste børn, der opvokser i en socialt belastet familie, bliver velfungerende voksne. Professionelle, der møder socialt belastede familier, har derfor et stort ansvar....... Naturligvis skal der tages hånd om udsatte børn, men det kræver samtidig stor opmærksomhed at sørge for, at fokuseringen på den sociale arv ikke tager overhånd, så det bliver en selvopfyldende profeti."Social opdrift - social" arv viser, hvordan forskningsresultater er blevet fremlagt på en måde, som har...... medvirket til at skabe en skæv opfattelse af, at forældrenes problemer er hovedårsag til børns sociale problemer. I selvstændige analyser vises, hvordan data, der normalt bruges som "bevis" for den sociale arvs betydning, tydeligt illustrerer, at det er en undtagelse, at børn får sociale problemer af samme...

  12. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  13. The Social Economy. An Integrating Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin CACE

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The first part of this article analyses the normative approach of the social economy. The social economy is developed in order to create an alternative economic and social space for the people excluded from life necessities and, furthermore, it is not a recent phenomenon; it relies on historical practices which have developed over several centuries in order to meet people’s needs. The social economy institutions from Romania and Greece are then presented. The purpose is to show that clear regulations contribute to the acceptance of the social economy as an alternative and complementary form of producing social welfare. In order to accomplish the normative purposes of meeting life’s necessities and of changing the existing social conditions, the social economy actors must start to think of themselves not as individual agents, but as belonging to a large movement acting within the continuum between the market and state intervention for welfare production.

  14. Trends in Deaths Involving Heroin and Synthetic Opioids Excluding Methadone, and Law Enforcement Drug Product Reports, by Census Region - United States, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Julie K; Gladden, R Matthew; Seth, Puja

    2017-09-01

    Opioid overdose deaths quadrupled from 8,050 in 1999 to 33,091 in 2015 and accounted for 63% of drug overdose deaths in the United States in 2015. During 2010-2015, heroin overdose deaths quadrupled from 3,036 to 12,989 (1). Sharp increases in the supply of heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) are likely contributing to increased deaths (2-6). CDC examined trends in unintentional and undetermined deaths involving heroin or synthetic opioids excluding methadone (i.e., synthetic opioids)* by the four U.S. Census regions during 2006-2015. Drug exhibits (i.e., drug products) obtained by law enforcement and reported to the Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA's) National Forensic Laboratory Information System (NFLIS) that tested positive for heroin or fentanyl (i.e., drug reports) also were examined. All U.S. Census regions experienced substantial increases in deaths involving heroin from 2006 to 2015. Since 2010, the South and West experienced increases in heroin drug reports, whereas the Northeast and Midwest experienced steady increases during 2006-2015. † In the Northeast, Midwest, and South, deaths involving synthetic opioids and fentanyl drug reports increased considerably after 2013. These broad changes in the U.S. illicit drug market highlight the urgent need to track illicit drugs and enhance public health interventions targeting persons using or at high risk for using heroin or IMF.

  15. SOCIAL EXCLUSION AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROXANA PLEŞA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last half of the century, significant technological, economic, demographic, political, and ideological changes took place; advanced democracies went to a process of deep economic restructurings. While universal social policies still provide for protection against predictable risks of a life cycle, individual carrier models and welfare standardization can no longer be assumed. There are more and more people suffering from insecurity, or lacking protection of any kind. Excluded populations are therefore more affected than any other categories of social actors and their poverty is more obvious; in a certain sense, it is less “natural” than it has ever been.

  16. Social Networks and Students' Orthography

    OpenAIRE

    E. Azizovic; M. Kacka; M. Saracevic; A, Bihorac

    2017-01-01

    The paper studied spelling and technical errors of students on social networks (facebook, twitter, e-mail). Social networks have over the last decade become the primary means of communication, which have more than ever made real the idea of "one world - one village". Their usage is in the most part based on language, i.e. on the writing itself and reading of the same as its most complex parts. New aspects of the use of writing, which exclude handwriting, are already using some new writing pla...

  17. Heterogeneous social preferences, screening, and employment contracts

    OpenAIRE

    Ferdinand A. von Siemens

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies a monopsonistic firm's optimal employment contracts if workers have private information on both their propensity for social comparisons and their ability. Employees of the firm are taken to form their own distinct reference group. It is shown that screening workers with equal ability according to their social preferences is then not possible within the firm. In consequence, the firm distorts production by its employees with low ability, or it excludes workers with low abili...

  18. Smile! Social reward drives attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Dana A; Pereira, Effie J; Otto, A Ross; Ristic, Jelena

    2018-02-01

    Human social behavior is fine-tuned by interactions between individuals and their environments. Here we show that social motivation plays an important role in this process. Using a novel manipulation of social reward that included elements of real-life social exchanges, we demonstrate the emergence of attentional orienting for coincidental spatial associations that received positive social reward. After an interaction with the experimenter, participants completed a computerized task in which they received positive, negative, or no social reward for their performance to spatially congruent, spatially incongruent, and neutral cue-target pairings, respectively. Even though cue-target spatial correspondences remained at chance, attentional benefits emerged and persisted a day later for targets that received positive social reward. Our data further revealed that participants' level of social competence, as measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient scale, was predictably related to the magnitude of their reward-driven attentional benefits. No attentional effects emerged when the social interaction and social reward manipulations were removed. These results show that motivational incentives available during social exchanges affect later individual cognitive functioning, providing one of the first insights into why seemingly ambiguous social signals produce reliable and persistent attentional effects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Target-Centric Network Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Dr. William L.; Clark, Dr. Robert M.

    In Target-Centric Network Modeling: Case Studies in Analyzing Complex Intelligence Issues, authors Robert Clark and William Mitchell take an entirely new approach to teaching intelligence analysis. Unlike any other book on the market, it offers case study scenarios using actual intelligence...... reporting formats, along with a tested process that facilitates the production of a wide range of analytical products for civilian, military, and hybrid intelligence environments. Readers will learn how to perform the specific actions of problem definition modeling, target network modeling......, and collaborative sharing in the process of creating a high-quality, actionable intelligence product. The case studies reflect the complexity of twenty-first century intelligence issues by dealing with multi-layered target networks that cut across political, economic, social, technological, and military issues...

  20. Whatever? The effect of social exclusion on adopting persuasive messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfundmair, Michaela; Aydin, Nilüfer; Frey, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    The aversive state of social exclusion can result in a broad range of cognitive deficits. Being unable or unmotivated to process relevant information, we assumed that social exclusion would also affect the success of persuasive attempts. We hypothesized that socially excluded people would adopt attitudes regardless of persuasion quality. In three studies using different manipulations of social exclusion and persuasion, we showed that participants who were socially excluded adopted persuasive messages regardless of argument quality. In contrast, this undifferentiated response was not shown by socially included participants who were more persuaded by high- compared to low-quality arguments. In Study 3, we moreover revealed that this pattern could only be replicated in reliable situations-that is, when the communicator appeared credible. These findings support the assumption that social exclusion can lead to reduced processing of information.

  1. Changing Attitudes Through Social Influence: Does Social Distance Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffey, Amanda L; Bryan, Angela D

    2016-01-01

    To test the effects of social influence and social distance on attitudes, we assessed judgments of gay and lesbian targets in various contexts over three studies (n = 814, 51% female). We compared the impact of a derogatory message to a relatively favorable message ostensibly written by another participant. Participants were robustly moved by the feedback; social influence was a significant predictor in final evaluations of the target, as was social distance. Discrimination against gay men and lesbian women appears not to be a fixed behavior; seemingly anyone can be persuaded to discriminate or not to discriminate by mere peer suggestion.

  2. Social capital

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys research on social capital. We explore the concepts that motivate the social capital literature, efforts to formally model social capital using economic theory, the econometrics of social capital, and empirical studies of the role of social capital in various socioeconomic outcomes. While our focus is primarily on the place of social capital in economics, we do consider its broader social science context. We argue that while the social capital literature has produced many i...

  3. [Segment analysis of the target market of physiotherapeutic services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaskin, D V

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the possibilities to analyse selected segments of the target market of physiotherapeutic services provided by medical and preventive-facilities of two major types. The main features of a target segment, such as provision of therapeutic massage, are illustrated in terms of two characteristics, namely attractiveness to the users and the ability of a given medical facility to satisfy their requirements. Based on the analysis of portfolio of the available target segments the most promising ones (winner segments) were selected for further marketing studies. This choice does not exclude the possibility of involvement of other segments of medical services in marketing activities.

  4. Social Support and Social Networks in COPD: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Christopher; Effing, Tanya W; Cafarella, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to determine the size and nature of the evidence describing associations between social support and networks on health, management and clinical outcomes amongst patients with COPD. Searches of PubMed, PsychInfo and CINAHL were undertaken for the period 1966-December 2013. A descriptive synthesis of the main findings was undertaken to demonstrate where there is current evidence for associations between social support, networks and health outcomes, and where further research is needed. The search yielded 318 papers of which 287 were excluded after applying selection criteria. Two areas emerged in which there was consistent evidence of benefit of social support; namely mental health and self-efficacy. There was inconsistent evidence for a relationship between perceived social support and quality of life, physical functioning and self-rated health. Hospital readmission was not associated with level of perceived social support. Only a small number of studies (3 articles) have reported on the social network of individuals with COPD. There remains a need to identify the factors that promote and enable social support. In particular, there is a need to further understand the characteristics of social networks within the broader social structural conditions in which COPD patients live and manage their illness.

  5. Social engineering attack examples, templates and scenarios

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, Francois

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available link. A social engineering attack targets this weakness by using various manipulation techniques to elicit sensitive information. The field of social engineering is still in its early stages with regard to formal definitions, attack frameworks...

  6. Type specimens of Hymenoptera deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil (excluding Aculeata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena C. Onody

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper lists the type specimens of Hymenoptera, excluding Aculeata, deposited in the Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil. We record all labels contents and also additional information from MZSP registers, published material, and other available sources. High resolution photographs of holotypes, lectotypes and syntypes are available through links to Specimage - the image database of The Ohio State University, where they are archived. The collection comprises a total of 332 type-specimens (32 holotypes, 266 paratypes, 12 syntypes, 20 paralectotypes and two lectotypes of eight superfamilies, 18 families, 31 subfamilies, 43 genera and 83 species.

  7. Processes and effects of targeted online advertising among children

    OpenAIRE

    Reijmersdal, E.A. van; Rozendaal, E.; Smink, N.; Noort, G. van; Buijzen, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, information from children's profile pages on social network sites is being used to target online advertising, a phenomenon known as profile targeting. This practice has raised concerns in society and academia; however, its effects among children remain unstudied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of profile targeting on children's brand responses (i.e., brand attitude and purchase intention). We examined two types of targeting: targeting of product and of form (i.e., color)...

  8. A conservative's social psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Clark

    2015-01-01

    I suggest that social psychologists should stick to studying positive and negative attitudes and give up stigmatizing some attitudes as "prejudice." I recommend that we avoid assuming that race and ethnicity have no biological foundations, in order to avoid a collision course with modern biology. And I wonder how much difference the target article recommendations can make in the context of hiring a social psychologist for an academic position.

  9. Social Structure and Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.

    1971-01-01

    Drawing on examples and evidence from social science research on the diffusion of ideas, social movements, and several other related fields, nine propositions dealing with the interrelationships between social structure and social change are explored. (Author/MB)

  10. Drugs and social exclusion in ten European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Joan Carles; Oviedo-Joekes, Eugenia; Romero, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    To describe social characteristics seen among socially excluded drug users in 10 cities from 9 European countries, and identify which social exclusion indicators (i.e. housing, employment, education) are most closely linked to intravenous drug use. Cross-sectional survey. Interviews were held in social services centers, town halls, streets, squares and other usual meeting points of the target population. The sample comprises 1,879 participants who have used heroin and/or cocaine and certain derivatives (92.3%) over the last year. Males accounted for 69.7% of the sample, and the mean age was 30.19 years. Participants were recruited in 10 cities: Seville and Granada, Spain; Cologne, Germany; Vienna, Austria; Brussels, Belgium; Athens, Greece; Dublin, Ireland; London, England; Lisbon, Portugal, and Perugia, Italy. Structured face-to-face questionnaire, conducted by privileged access interviewers. Cannabis, heroin and cocaine are the most widely used substances. In the total sample, 60.2% injected drugs during the last year, 45.9% reported having hepatitis C; 54.9% have been in prison; 14.2% are homeless; 11.3% have a regular job, and 35.2% are involved in illegal activities. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis (injectors and non-injectors) showed that older participants have a greater likelihood of injecting than younger ones. Social exclusion variables associated with intravenous drug use are incarceration, homelessness, irregular employment, and delinquency. Participants who abandoned or were expelled from a drug treatment program are at greater risk of injecting drugs than participants who have never had treatment, are currently in treatment or have been released. Personal, social, and economic conditions are all linked in a process of social exclusion that compounds problem drug misuse. Given the findings of this study, we believe that there is a clear need for specific programs targeting specific groups, i.e., distinct strategies must be set in place, in

  11. [Drug addiction and social exclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solal, J F; Schneider, M C

    1996-10-01

    Destitute drug addicts have not deliberately chosen to be socially excluded; it's more the consequence of a sanitary and social policy which has given a greater importance to the treatment of addiction than to the drug addict's health. Facing Aids, physicians, with their pragmatic attitude, have reversed this drift. On the streets, the drug addict holds handicaps concurrently; medicinal addiction leads to harder sevrance and substitution. Having access to social rights allows to regain an identity, compulsory for an access to health care; but public hospitals have to make casier both the admission and the stay of patients whose therapeutic observance is dependent on a preliminary substitution. Drug addiction and precarity represent a double social challenge that a democratic society must take up without any segregation.

  12. Social exclusion leads to attentional bias to emotional social information: Evidence from eye movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuohao; Du, Jinchen; Xiang, Min; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Shuyue

    2017-01-01

    Social exclusion has many effects on individuals, including the increased need to belong and elevated sensitivity to social information. Using a self-reporting method, and an eye-tracking technique, this study explored people's need to belong and attentional bias towards the socio-emotional information (pictures of positive and negative facial expressions compared to those of emotionally-neutral expressions) after experiencing a brief episode of social exclusion. We found that: (1) socially-excluded individuals reported higher negative emotions, lower positive emotions, and stronger need to belong than those who were not socially excluded; (2) compared to a control condition, social exclusion caused a longer response time to probe dots after viewing positive or negative face images; (3) social exclusion resulted in a higher frequency ratio of first attentional fixation on both positive and negative emotional facial pictures (but not on the neutral pictures) than the control condition; (4) in the social exclusion condition, participants showed shorter first fixation latency and longer first fixation duration to positive pictures than neutral ones but this effect was not observed for negative pictures; (5) participants who experienced social exclusion also showed longer gazing duration on the positive pictures than those who did not; although group differences also existed for the negative pictures, the gaze duration bias from both groups showed no difference from chance. This study demonstrated the emotional response to social exclusion as well as characterising multiple eye-movement indicators of attentional bias after experiencing social exclusion.

  13. Excluded volume effects caused by high concentration addition of acid generators in chemically amplified resists used for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Watanabe, Kyoko; Matsuoka, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Komuro, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi

    2017-08-01

    The resolution of lithography used for the high-volume production of semiconductor devices has been improved to meet the market demands for highly integrated circuits. With the reduction in feature size, the molecular size becomes non-negligible in the resist material design. In this study, the excluded volume effects caused by adding high-concentration acid generators were investigated for triphenylsulfonium nonaflate. The resist film density was measured by X-ray diffractometry. The dependences of absorption coefficient and protected unit concentration on acid generator weight ratio were calculated from the measured film density. Using these values, the effects on the decomposition yield of acid generators, the protected unit fluctuation, and the line edge roughness (LER) were evaluated by simulation on the basis of sensitization and reaction mechanisms of chemically amplified extreme ultraviolet resists. The positive effects of the increase in acid generator weight ratio on LER were predominant below the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3, while the negative effects became equivalent to the positive effects above the acid generator weight ratio of 0.3 owing to the excluded volume effects.

  14. Excluding scalar gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, K.; Krasemann, H.

    1979-08-01

    We investigate the Dalitz plot population and thrust angular distribution for the Orthoquarkonium decay Q anti Q → 3 scalar gluons. The Dalitz plot for scalar gluons is populated in corners where events are 2 jet like and this disagrees with existing Upsilon data. The scalar gluon thrust angular distribution is also in striking disagreement with the UPSILON data and so scalar gluons are completely ruled out. (orig.)

  15. Being Included and Excluded

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korzenevica, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Following the civil war of 1996–2006, there was a dramatic increase in the labor mobility of young men and the inclusion of young women in formal education, which led to the transformation of the political landscape of rural Nepal. Mobility and schooling represent a level of prestige that rural p...

  16. Targeted School Violence and the Web of Causes: Risk Factors and the Problems of Specificity. Commentary on: "Bullying, Romantic Rejection, and Conflicts with Teachers: The Crucial Role of Social Dynamics in the Development of School Shootings--A Systematic Review"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckler, Nils; Roth, Viktoria; Stetten, Lina; Zick, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The authors begin their commentary by saying that looking at the phenotypical characteristics of a school shooting, which focus on the perpetrators' experiences in school contexts seems to be overdue. In spite of methodological problems, the studies involved in the review seem to paint a clear picture with regard to social ostracism and harassment…

  17. Targets and teamwork

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, Timothy C.; Lange, Karin S.; Hoey, Hilary

    2017-01-01

    with less disagreement about recommended targets. Multiple regression analysis indicated that teams reporting higher HbA1c targets and more target disagreement had parents reporting higher treatment targets. This seemed to partially account for center differences in Hb1Ac. Conclusions: The diabetes care...

  18. SPECIFICITY OF SOCIAL COOPERATIVES ACTIVITY AS A SUBJECTS OF SOCIAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Mierzwa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the role of social enterprises on the labour market, exemplified by social cooperatives. In market economy, basing on experiences of a number of EU states, it is possible to state that there is a reason for existence of that type of enterprises, which can be proved by their continuous development and supporting policy of the European Parliament. These enterprises are often the only chance for marginalized and socially excluded people. The work made use of provisions of the law regarding operation of social cooperatives, different types of elaborations, as well as scientific literature.

  19. Social Economy and Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Abramuszkinová Pavlíková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the importance of entrepreneurial activities as an engine of economic growth and poverty alleviation, the issue of business development and entrepreneurial activities, has received increasing attention from a number of interested parties worldwide and also in the Czech Republic. The focus of this paper is on a social economy, a social responsibility and social enterprises. The development of the social economy framework will be introduced in the European context and specifically in the Czech Republic. A case study of a Czech social entrepreneur will be introduced based on qualitative research, namely the biographical narrative method.Social enterprises can support activities of various target groups, such as economic activities of mentally and physically handicapped people, which often operate in economically and socially marginalized situations, including stereotyped images. They give them a chance to become active members of society. In this way they can help to reduce the poverty on a local level. The aim of this paper is to introduce a social entrepreneurship as important part of social economy development in the Czech Republic.

  20. Social security systems in Uganda | Kasente | Journal of Social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following social security systems exist in Uganda: formal social security schemes targeting the employed, community groups that serve only group members, kinship-based solidarity groups that serve the extended family and village residents' mutual assistance groups, which are compulsory for all adults in the villages ...

  1. Cyberbullying via Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Robin M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a surge of research on cyberbullying. In this article, three studies examined prevalence rates of cyberbullying among college-age students, venues through which cyberbullying occurs, with a particular focus on social media, and perceptions of cyberbullying as a function of features of the target (e.g., peer, celebrity,…

  2. Skam som social utopi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Christa Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Shame as a social utopia In this article I discuss the Norwegian teen drama series Shame, broadcast by the public service broadcaster NRK 2015-2017. In the Scandinavian countries the series was targeted to a young audience around 16 years old but it went extremely popular among viewers of all ages...

  3. Radiographic signs of radiolesions of the pelvis (excluding the femur) after irradiation for epithelioma of the cervix uteri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenny, J.C.; Bergiron, C.; Chassagne, D.; Couanet, D.; Ibrahim, E.; Masselot, J.

    1980-01-01

    Radiolesions of the pelvic bones (excluding the femur) were observed in 29 patients after irradiation therapy for cervix uteri cancer. Three regions can be affected corresponding to the areas irradiated: the sacrum and internal part of the iliac wings, the pubis, and the cotyles. In most cases the lesions appeared after 1 to 4 years. Their radiological appearances are characteristic, the principal sign being irregular bone condensation in a demineralized bone, without true cavitation. The only lytic lesions observed were in the pubis. Calcification of soft tissues may occur and fractures are frequent. There is a slow progression of the lesions over long periods. Clinical, radiological, and progression signs differentiate radiolesions from other affections: metastases, invasion by contiguity, infections, and radio-induced sarcoma [fr

  4. Recommendation to Exclude Bile-Duct-Cannulated Rats with Hyperbilirubinemia for Proper Conduct of Biliary Drug Excretion Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koji; Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Iwata, Katsuya; Ichikawa, Takuya; Yahara, Tohru; Tsuji, Satoshi; Sugiura, Masayuki; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Hyperbilirubinemia (HB) is sometimes encountered following bile-duct cannulation in rats. It possibly originates from the reduced functioning of multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) and subsequent adaptive alterations in the expression of Mrp3 and the organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps). Our aim was to clarify the importance of excluding bile-duct-cannulated (BDC) rats with HB for proper conduct of drug excretion studies. We detected HB [serum total bilirubin concentration (TBIL) ≥0.20 mg/dl] in 16% of all BDC rats prepared. The serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, leucine aminopeptidase, and alkaline phosphatase were within the respective normal ranges in the BDC rats with mild HB (TBIL, 0.20-0.79 mg/dl), indicating the absence of hepatic failure. In the pharmacokinetics of pravastatin, an Oatps/Mrp2 probe drug in the BDC rats, the apparent volume of distribution and the clearance were smaller in the mild HB group as compared with the normal group, suggesting the reduction of apparent hepatic uptake and hepatobiliary elimination. The biliary excretion (percentage of dose) was significantly reduced by 54%, suggesting that the biliary efflux activity via Mrp2 was reduced to a greater extent relative to metabolic activity in hepatocytes. The serum γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity correlated with TBIL and inversely correlated with biliary excretion of pravastatin, a finding which could serve as a clue to uncover the regulatory system involving cooperation between GGT and Mrp2. In conclusion, BDC rats with HB, however mild, should be excluded from drug excretion studies to avoid the risk of underestimation of the biliary excretion of drugs. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  5. Ion-ion correlation, solvent excluded volume and pH effects on physicochemical properties of spherical oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Aljzmi, Amal; Almusaynid, Manal; Khan, Asrar; Valderrama, Esteban; Nash, Kelly L; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-01-15

    One major source of complexity in the implementation of nanoparticles in aqueous electrolytes arises from the strong influence that biological environments has on their physicochemical properties. A key parameter for understanding the molecular mechanisms governing the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles is the formation of the surface charge density. In this article, we present an efficient and accurate approach that combines a recently introduced classical solvation density functional theory for spherical electrical double layers with a surface complexation model to account for ion-ion correlation and excluded volume effects on the surface titration of spherical nanoparticles. We apply the proposed computational approach to account for the charge-regulated mechanisms on the surface chemistry of spherical silica (SiO2) nanoparticles. We analyze the effects of the nanoparticle size, as well as pH level and electrolyte concentration of the aqueous solution on the nanoparticle's surface charge density and Zeta potential. We validate our predictions for 580Å and 200Å nanoparticles immersed in acid, neutral and alkaline mono-valent aqueous electrolyte solutions against experimental data. Our results on mono-valent electrolyte show that the excluded volume and ion-ion correlations contribute significantly to the surface charge density and Zeta potential of the nanoparticle at high electrolyte concentration and pH levels, where the solvent crowding effects and electrostatic screening have shown a profound influence on the protonation/deprotonation reactions at the liquid/solute interface. The success of this approach in describing physicochemical properties of silica nanoparticles supports its broader application to study other spherical metal oxide nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, Carolyn A.; Harold, Rena D.; Ahmedani, Brian K.; Cramer, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted mentoring refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and protégés responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for targeted mentoring, although some disparities of experience for mentors and protégés in this program are apparent. In general, mentors felt positive abo...

  7. Assessing Trustworthiness in Social Media: A Social Computing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-17

    by leveraging data mining and machine learning techniques to enable the computational understanding of distrust with social media data. The first task...applications such as targeted advertisements or real- time monitoring of political opinions. Huge amounts of data generated by social media users present...research on information provenance, explores exciting research opportunities to address pressing needs, and shows how data mining can enable a social media

  8. [Social anxiety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabel-Sarron, Christine

    2010-06-20

    Social anxiety disorders are various, frequent and invalidant. Social phobia is characterized by marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment may occur including, for example, fear of public speaking. In clinical setting, the majority of social phobics report fears of more than one type of social situation. Social phobia tends to develop early in life, with a life time prevalence of 2-4%. Pharmacotherapy and behavioural and cognitive therapy are communly used.

  9. Social renewal

    OpenAIRE

    A.W. van der Pennen; V. Veldheer; E. ter Borg; M. Kunst; J. Boelhouwer; F.A. Knol

    1998-01-01

    Original title: Sociale vernieuwing. Social renewal began in Rotterdam in 1989, as a response to the presence of stubborn social disadvantage. The Idenburg Committee produced recommendations in that year suggesting how these social problems could best be tackled at local level. Central government adopted these ideas in 1990, since when social renewal policy has really taken off. Most municipalities have joined in, developing social renewal policy and creating an administrative apparatus for i...

  10. Why Multilingualism and Multilingual Communication Jeopardize a Common Social Policy for Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marácz László

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the consequences of European multilingualism and multilingual communication for a common social policy in the Europe Union. In the past fifty years, the main focus of the Europeanization project has been on financial-economic developments and less on a common social policy. Even today, there is no common framework for social protection in the European Union. Common minimum income or wages for European citizens are lacking. In this paper, it will be argued that the lack of social protection has to do with Europe’s linguistic diversity. Language is seen as a building block of national communities and their political cultures. The European integration project can only continue if different European political cultures are shared. However, due to the fact that a neutral lingua franca is lacking, this has been unsuccessful so far. The interaction of social groups that have a different language repertoire with the structures of multilevel governance are responsible for the fact that some of these social groups, including the ‘Eurostars’, and national cosmopolitans benefit from social protection, whereas other groups lacking relevant language skills, such as anti-establishment forces, commoners, and migrants, are excluded from the European power domains. These power configurations can be fruitfully studied in the floral figuration model. Consequently, due to these patterns of inclusion and exclusion, true solidarity among European citizens is not within reach. These claims will be illustrated by a case study on the Netherlands, a country that has been pursuing neoliberal policies counterbalancing Eurozone and economic crises and is trying to assimilate migrants and other newcomers. Apart from assimilatory policies targeting migrants, language games used by competing forces are playing an important role in the discourse in order to set up power structures.

  11. Social phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 32. Schneier FR, Bruce LC, Heimberg RG. Social anxiety disorder (social phobia). In: Gabbard ... by: Fred K. Berger, MD, addiction and forensic psychiatrist, Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, ...

  12. When It's Okay That I Don't Play: Social Norms and the Situated Construal of Social Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudert, Selma C; Greifeneder, Rainer

    2016-07-01

    Being excluded and ignored has been shown to threaten fundamental human needs and cause pain. Such reflexive reactions to social exclusion have been conceptualized as direct and unmoderated (temporal need threat model of ostracism). Here, we propose an extension and argue that reflexive reactions depend on how social exclusion situations are construed. If being excluded is understood as a violation of an inclusion norm, individuals will react with pain and threat. In contrast, if being excluded is consistent with the prevailing norm, the exclusion situation is interpreted as less threatening, and negative reflexive reactions to ostracism should be attenuated. Four studies empirically support this conceptual model. Studies 3 and 4 further show that to guide situated construal, the norm has to be endorsed by the individual. In both Studies 1 and 3, the effect of the norm is mediated by the objective situation's subjective construal. © 2016 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  13. Building a Marketing Curriculum to Support Courses in Social Entrepreneurship and Social Venture Competitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlee, Regina Pefanis; Curren, Mary T.; Harich, Katrin R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the implications of the increased popularity of social enterprise programs and social venture competitions for the marketing curriculum. Social enterprise programs and competitions are often offered outside the school of business and target students from a variety of academic backgrounds. Although social enterprises use…

  14. Are community midwives addressing the inequities in access to skilled birth attendance in Punjab, Pakistan? Gender, class and social exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Zubia; O'Brien, Beverley; Bhatti, Afshan; Jhangri, Gian S

    2012-09-19

    of the special needs of socially excluded women, an otherwise invisible group. Another expectation is that the poor, socially excluded women will be targeted for provision of maternity care. The research will support the achievement of the 5th Millennium Development Goal in Pakistan.

  15. Are community midwives addressing the inequities in access to skilled birth attendance in Punjab, Pakistan? Gender, class and social exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Zubia

    2012-09-01

    community midwifery care. One key outcome will be an increased sensitization of the special needs of socially excluded women, an otherwise invisible group. Another expectation is that the poor, socially excluded women will be targeted for provision of maternity care. The research will support the achievement of the 5th Millennium Development Goal in Pakistan.

  16. Molecular Targets for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular targeted radionuclide cancer therapy is becoming of increasing importance, especially for disseminated diseases. Systemic chemotherapies often lack selectivity while targeted radionuclide therapy has important advantages as the radioactive cytotoxic unit of the targeting vector is specifically directed to the cancer, sparing normal tissues. The principle strategy to improve cancer selectivity is to couple therapeutic agents to tumour-targeting vectors. In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), the cytotoxic portion of the conjugates normally contains a therapeutic radiometal immobilised by a bifunctional chelator. The aim is therefore to use as ligand-targeted therapeutics vectors coupled to Auger-, alpha- and/or beta-emitting radionuclides. An advantage of using radiation instead of chemotherapeutics as the cytotoxic agent is the so called 'crossfire effect'. This allows sterilisation of tumour cells that are not directly targeted due to heterogeneity in target molecule expression or inhomogeneous vector delivery. However, before the targeting ligands can be selected, the target molecule on the tumour has to be selected. It should be uniquely expressed, or at least highly overexpressed, on or in the target cells relative to normal tissues. The target should be easily accessible for ligand delivery and should not be shed or down- regulated after ligand binding. An important property of a receptor (or antigen) is its potential to be internalized upon binding of the ligand. This provides an active uptake mechanism and allows the therapeutic agent to be trapped within the tumour cells. Molecular targets of current interest include: Receptors: G-protein coupled receptors are overexpressed on many major human tumours. The prototype of these receptors are somatostatin receptors which show very high density in neuroendocrine tumours, but there are many other most interesting receptors to be applied for TRT. The targeting ligands for these receptors are

  17. Compendium of shock wave data. Section C. Organic compounds excluding hydrocarbons. Section D. Mixtures. Section E. Mixtures and solutions without chemical characterization. Compendium index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Thiel, M.; shaner, J.; Salinas, E.

    1977-06-01

    This volume lists thermodynamic data for organic compounds excluding hydrocarbons, mixtures, and mixtures and solutions without chemical characterization. Alloys and some minerals are included among the mixtures. This volume also contains the index for the three-volume compendium

  18. Human target acquisition performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  19. Social costs of energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmeyer, O.

    1988-01-01

    This study systematically compares the external costs and benefits of different electricity generating technologies. It covers environmental and employment effects, the depletion of natural resources, and public subsidies. Electricity production based on fossil fuels and nuclear energy compared with electricity production based on wind energy and photovoltaic systems. The study shows that wind and photovoltaic solar energy induce far less social costs than conventionally generated electricity. The impact of excluding social costs on the competitive position of the different energy technologies is analyzed. It is shown that the allocation process is seriously distorted resulting in sub-optimal investment decisions concerning competing energy technologies. This exclusion of social costs can delay the introduction of renewable energy sources by more than ten years and results in considerable losses to society. (orig./HSCH) With 17 figs., 24 tabs

  20. A descriptive analysis of demographic and behavioral data from Internet gamblers and those who self-exclude from online gambling platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic, Simo; Percy, Christian; Kudic, Aleksandar; Parke, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    As the popularity of internet gambling increases, the increased opportunities to participate serve to heighten concerns about the potential for gambling related harm. This paper focuses on self-exclusion as one of the main responsible gaming interventions, and is split into three sections. Firstly, we set out a three-tier model for assessing at-risk gambling behaviors which examines player exhibited, declared and inferred behavior. Secondly, we present a literature review relating to who self-excludes and whether self-exclusion is effective. Finally, we report the results of an analysis of the exhibited behavior of internet self-excluders as sampled from a research cohort of over 240,000 internet gaming accounts. Our analysis of self-excluders (N = 347) versus a control group (N = 871) of gamblers indicates self-excluders are younger than the control group, more likely to suffer losses and more likely to adopt riskier gambling positions. Unlike some previous studies, there was little difference in terms of mean gambling hours per month or minutes per session. Some self-excluders (N = 306) can be tracked from the date their account was created through their self-exclusion history, indicating a large number of very quick self-exclusions (e.g., 25 % within a day) and a small set of serial self-excluders. Younger and older males are likely to self-exclude faster than middle-aged males (N = 242), but there is no such age pattern across female self-excluders (N = 63).

  1. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    cardiac rehabilitation programme. Methods: From 1 September 2002 to 31 December 2005, 388 first-incidence MI patients ≤75 years were hospitalised. Register check for newly hospitalised MI patients, screening interview, and systematic referral were conducted by a project nurse. Patients were referred...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......Aim: The comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme after myocardial infarction (MI) improves quality of life and results in reduced cardiac mortality and recurrence of MI. Hospitals worldwide face problems with low participation rates in rehabilitation programmes. Inequality...

  2. Social renewal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.W. van der Pennen; V. Veldheer; E. ter Borg; M. Kunst; J. Boelhouwer; F.A. Knol

    1998-01-01

    Original title: Sociale vernieuwing. Social renewal began in Rotterdam in 1989, as a response to the presence of stubborn social disadvantage. The Idenburg Committee produced recommendations in that year suggesting how these social problems could best be tackled at local level. Central

  3. Proyectos sociales

    OpenAIRE

    Orellana Zambrano, Waldo E.

    2011-01-01

    Explica qué es un Proyecto social, su formulación , y la importancia de los indicadores de desarrollo humano en la formulación de proyectos sociales. Explain what a social project, its formulation, and the importance of human development indicators in the formulation of social projects.

  4. Targeted therapies for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kummar S, Murgo AJ, Tomaszewski JE, Doroshow JH. Therapeutic targeting of cancer cells: era of molecularly targeted agents. ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  5. Reflectance Reference Targets (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Spectral reflectance measurements of flat field targets as reference points representative of pseudo-invariant targets as measured by Spectron SE590...

  6. Reflectance Reference Targets (OTTER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral reflectance measurements of flat field targets as reference points representative of pseudo-invariant targets as measured by Spectron SE590 spectrophotometer

  7. Social Anxiety and Social Support in Romantic Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Eliora; Chambless, Dianne L

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the quality of socially anxious individuals' romantic relationships. In the present study, we examine associations between social anxiety and social support in such relationships. In Study 1, we collected self-report data on social anxiety symptoms and received, provided, and perceived social support from 343 undergraduates and their romantic partners. One year later couples were contacted to determine whether they were still in this relationship. Results indicated that men's social anxiety at Time 1 predicted higher rates of breakup at Time 2. Men's and women's perceived support, as well as men's provided support, were also significantly predictive of breakup. Social anxiety did not interact with any of the support variables to predict breakup. In Study 2, a subset of undergraduate couples with a partner high (n=27) or low (n=27) in social anxiety completed two 10-minute, lab-based, video-recorded social support tasks. Both partners rated their received or provided social support following the interaction, and trained observers also coded for support behaviors. Results showed that socially anxious individuals received less support from their partners during the interaction according to participant but not observer report. High and lower social anxiety couples did not differ in terms of the target's provision of support. Taken together, results suggest that social anxiety is associated with difficulties even in the context of established romantic relationships. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. TARGET COSTING FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    OFILEANU Dimi

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to highlight the concept of Target Costing. Based on the characteristics of Target Costing, identified in specialized literature, the article presents its main advantages and disadvantages. Also, a comparison is being made between Target Cost and Traditional Cost (in its traditional form, the cost represents an independent variable on the basis of which the sell price is established; and in the Target Cost form the cost represents a dependent variable which is determined on ...

  9. Targeting outcomes redux

    OpenAIRE

    Coady, David P.; Grosh, Margaret; Hoddinott, John

    2002-01-01

    "...There are sharply divergent views as to how much narrowly targeted interventions actually benefit the poor. These result from differing assessments of three issues: whether better targeting outcomes are likely to be achieved, whether such methods are cost-effective, and whether the living standards of the poor are improved by such targeted interventions. This paper focuses on the first issue. Using a newly constructed database of targeted interventions, it addresses three questions: (1) W...

  10. Social relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, P; Holstein, B; Lund, R

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a conceptual framework with social relations as the main concept and the structure and the function of social relations as subconcepts. The structure of social relations covers aspects of formal relations and social network. The function of social relations covers social support......, social anchorage and relational strain. We use this conceptual framework to describe social relations in the Danish population, with questionnaire data from the Danish Longitudinal Health Behaviour Study including a random sample of each of the age groups 25-, 50-, 60-and 70-year olds, N = 2......,011. The postal questionnaires were answered by a random sample in each of the age groups. The results show marked age and gender differences in both the structure and the function of social relations. The social network, measured as weekly contacts, weakens with age and so does instrumental support. Emotional...

  11. Graphite targets at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Rotating polycrystalline and stationary pyrolytic graphite target designs for the LAMPF experimental area are described. Examples of finite element calculations of temperatures and stresses are presented. Some results of a metallographic investigation of irradiated pyrolytic graphite target plates are included, together with a brief description of high temperature bearings for the rotating targets

  12. The Social Newsroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmerman, Chris; Vatrapu, Ravi

    phenomenon that presents an ongoing, ever-changing challenge to companies and creates a unique set of risks as well as advantages to decision-makers. At the same time expansion into the online social space offers tremendous potential strategic advantages including demographic targeting from a new, pervasive...... reflection of consumers and brand advocates. Social media thus takes on a new relevance in forging relationships of brand co-creation. This research project, in its entirety, seeks to derive business value from social data by designing and developing a series of dashboards for those who struggle to interpret...... and keep up with the social data created around a brand and marketing campaign. This tool prototype demo first outlines the foundation of the tool development with focus on the main perspectives guiding the research. A presentation of the actual tool development is subsequently put forward highlighting...

  13. TLR activation excludes circulating naive CD8+ T cells from gut-associated lymphoid organs in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidegger, Simon; Kirchner, Sophie-Kathrin; Stephan, Nicolas; Bohn, Bernadette; Suhartha, Nina; Hotz, Christian; Anz, David; Sandholzer, Nadja; Stecher, Bärbel; Rüssmann, Holger; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole

    2013-05-15

    The trafficking of effector T cells is tightly regulated by the expression of site-specific sets of homing molecules. In contrast, naive T cells are generally assumed to express a uniform pattern of homing molecules and to follow a random distribution within the blood and secondary lymphoid organs. In this study, we demonstrate that systemic infection fundamentally modifies the trafficking of circulating naive CD8(+) T cells. We show that on naive CD8(+) T cells, the constitutive expression of the integrin α4β7 that effects their entry into GALT is downregulated following infection of mice with Salmonella typhimurium. We further show that this downregulation is dependent on TLR signaling, and that the TLR-activated naive CD8(+) T cells are blocked from entering GALT. This contrasts strongly with Ag-experienced effector T cells, for which TLR costimulation in the GALT potently upregulates α4β7 and enhances trafficking to intestinal tissues. Thus, TLR activation leads to opposite effects on migration of naive and effector CD8(+) T cells. Our data identify a mechanism that excludes noncognate CD8(+) T cells from selected immune compartments during TLR-induced systemic inflammation.

  14. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello

    2014-01-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z ' boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings

  15. Are Concerns About Irremediableness, Vulnerability, or Competence Sufficient to Justify Excluding All Psychiatric Patients from Medical Aid in Dying?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, William; Schuklenk, Udo; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2017-06-17

    Some jurisdictions that have decriminalized assisted dying (like Canada) exclude psychiatric patients on the grounds that their condition cannot be determined to be irremediable, that they are vulnerable and in need of protection, or that they cannot be determined to be competent. We review each of these claims and find that none have been sufficiently well-supported to justify the differential treatment psychiatric patients experience with respect to assisted dying. We find bans on psychiatric patients' access to this service amount to arbitrary discrimination. Proponents of banning the practice ignore or overlook alternatives to their proposal, like an assisted dying regime with additional safeguards. Some authors have further criticized assisted dying for psychiatric patients by highlighting allegedly problematic practices in those countries which allow it. We address recent evidence from the Netherlands, showing that these problems are either misrepresented or have straightforward solutions. Even if one finds such evidence troubling despite our analysis, other jurisdictions need not adopt every feature of the Dutch system.

  16. World wide web-based cytological analysis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade intraepithelial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washiya, Kiyotada; Takamizu, Ryuichi; Kumagai, Yukie; Himeji, Yukari; Kobayashi, Takako; Iwai, Muneo; Watanabe, Jun

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that the low level of consistency of diagnosis of atypical squamous cells cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ASC-H) in uterine cervical cancer screening using the Bethesda System, indicating the necessity of a large-scale survey. We presented cases cytologically judged as ASC-H on our website and invited our members to give their opinions regarding the diagnosis by voting online. The Web voting results were analyzed and ASC-H was cytologically investigated. Virtual slides of atypical cells in cytology preparations of 53 cases were prepared and presented on a website. ASC-H cases were divided into 42 cases sampled by brush scraping and 11 cases sampled by cotton swab scraping. Fifty-three cases cytologically judged as ASC-H were classified into benign and CIN2/3, and their patterns of arrangement of atypical cells and 8 cytological parameters were morphologically investigated. The frequency of ASC-H diagnosis in the Web votes was low: 29.2% for brush-scraped and 26.2% for cotton swab-scraped cases. Three-dimensionality, coarse chromatin and irregular nuclei were significantly different between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. Web-based surveys showed the difference of cytological findings between high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and benign cases. To increase interobserver consistency, it may be useful to share information online, which avoids geographical and temporal limitations. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Social economy and social enterprise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The social policy agenda in the decades to come will be marked an ageing population on a global scale and by increased and diversified expectations from citizens in the need of work and social service. Public budgets for social service such as health, education and welfare including social work...

  18. Social group buying pricing decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Oren Gil-Or; Prof. Gabor Rekettye

    2012-01-01

    Social buying became an extremely popular phenomenon in the last year and this study examined the factors that can lead vendors to be successful using this trend. We’ve found that coupon’s category, coupon’s website and coupon’s prices have an effect on the number of coupons purchased, one of the success criteria of group buying. In the different coupons categories, restaurants and bars were more successful compared to other various products and services (excluding spas, self-care, fashion an...

  19. Opening a Side-Gate: Engaging the Excluded in Chilean Higher Education through Test-Blind Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koljatic, Mladen; Silva, Monica

    2013-01-01

    The article describes a test-blind admission initiative in a Chilean research university aimed at expanding the inclusion of talented, albeit educationally and socially disadvantaged, students. The outcomes of the test-blind admission cohort were compared with those of students admitted via the regular admission procedure to the same academic…

  20. Niños, niñas y adolescentes excluidos y procesos de subjetivación: Una perspectiva desde los protagonistas Excluded children and teenagers and subjectivation processes: A protagonist's perspectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Zaldúa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde una perspectiva crítica se analizan relatos de vida de adolescentes en situación de calle y su relación con los discursos sociales sobre la infancia y adolescencia. La hegemonía discursiva social que exige aumento de la punibilidad y encierro, relega a la niñez excluida al campo de la minoridad como figura sacrificial. Con una metodología cualitativa se trabajó en un diseño de estudio de caso para el abordaje de narrativas de niños, niñas y adolescentes en situación de vulnerabilidad social, con el objetivo de analizar procesos de subjetivación de dicha población. La ausencia de registro de necesidades y demandas, la sobredeterminación y goce del cuerpo infantil por el mundo adulto, las violencias desde los discursos sociales y los estereotipos de género, reproducen discriminaciones y desigualdades redeiniendo los límites de lo decible y pensable de los chicos y chicas en situación de calle. Dispositivos que propician otras historizaciones y la real eficacia de la Convención de los Derechos del Niño posibilitan otras identidades y otras trayectorias subjetivas.From a critical perspective, stories of homeless teenager's lives are analyzed including their relationship with social discourse about infancy and adolescence. The hegemony of social discourses, that demands punishment and confinement excludes childhood and fosters children's sacrifice. Qualitative methodology was employed to design case studies to generate narratives from children and teenagers in vulnerable social situations, to research the processes exploring processes of their subjectivity. The reproduction of discrimination and social inequality, are constructed from the lack of known needs and demands, the control and possession of children's bodies by adults, violence in social discourse and gender stereotypes. This is turn redefines what can be said and thought by homeless children and teenagers. Other identities and subjective change are made possible by

  1. The theoretical and empirical basis of a BioPsychoSocial (BPS) risk screener for detection of older people's health related needs, planning of community programs, and targeted care interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildon, Zoe J-L; Tan, Chuen Seng; Shiraz, Farah; Ng, Wai Chong; Deng, Xiaodong; Koh, Gerald Choon Huat; Tan, Kelvin Bryan; Philp, Ian; Wiggins, Dick; Aw, Su; Wu, Treena; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2018-02-17

    This study introduces the conceptual basis and operational measure, of BioPyschoSocial (BPS) health and related risk to better understand how well older people are managing and to screen for risk status. The BPS Risk Screener is constructed to detect vulnerability at older ages, and seeks to measure dynamic processes that place equal emphasis on Psycho-emotional and Socio-interpersonal risks, as Bio-functional ones. We validate the proposed measure and describe its application to programming. We undertook a quantitative cross-sectional, psychometric study with n = 1325 older Singaporeans, aged 60 and over. We adapted the EASYCare 2010 and Lubben Social Network Scale questionnaires to help determine the BPS domains using factor analysis from which we derive the BPS Risk Screener items. We then confirm its structure, and test the scoring system. The score is initially validated against self-reported general health then modelled against: number of falls; cognitive impairment; longstanding diseases; and further tested against service utilization (linked administrative data). Three B, P and S clusters are defined and identified and a BPS managing score ('doing' well, or 'some', 'many', and 'overwhelming problems') calculated such that the risk of problematic additive BPS effects, what we term health 'loads', are accounted for. Thirty-five items (factor loadings over 0.5) clustered into three distinct B, P, S domains and were found to be independently associated with self-reported health: B: 1.99 (1.64 to 2.41), P: 1.59 (1.28 to 1.98), S: 1.33 (1.10 to 1.60). The fit improved when combined into the managing score 2.33 (1.92 to 2.83, change sensitive.

  2. Effects of the Youth Fit 4 Life physical activity/nutrition protocol on body mass index, fitness and targeted social cognitive theory variables in 9- to 12-year-olds during after-school care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Walsh, Stephanie M; Greenwood, Brittney L; Mareno, Nicole; Unruh-Rewkowski, Jennifer L

    2017-04-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity is unacceptably high in industrialised nations. School-based interventions have largely been atheoretical and ineffective. This study aimed to test a new theory-based protocol for its effects on measures of fitness and body mass index (BMI), and its proposed psychosocial mediators, during elementary after-school (out-of-school hours) care. Nine- to 12-year-old participants of YMCA-based after-school care in the southeastern Unites States were randomised into either the experimental Youth Fit 4 Life (YF4L) treatment group (n = 86) or a typical care group (n = 55) for 45 min/day. YF4L is based on social cognitive theory, emphasising mastery over physical activities and the development of self-management/self-regulatory skills to support healthy behaviours. Physiological and psychosocial variables were assessed over a 9-month elementary school year. Of the overall sample, 28% were overweight or obese at baseline. YF4L was associated with significantly greater improvements in BMI, and measures of self-regulation, mood, self-efficacy, cardiovascular endurance and strength over both 3 and 9 months. Changes in self-regulation, mood and self-efficacy significantly mediated the treatment type-BMI relationship over both 3 months (R 2 = 0.12, P = 0.002) and 9 months (R 2 = 0.13, P = 0.001), with change in self-regulation being a significant independent mediator. Changes in BMI and self-regulation reciprocally reinforced one another. Gender was not a significant moderator of those relationships. The YF4L treatment mitigated rise in BMI in 9- to 12-year-old enrollees of after-school care. The treatment's basis in social cognitive theory was supported. Because of its positive effects and ability to utilise existing staff, large-scale application is warranted after sufficient replication. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  3. Development of distributed target

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Hai Jun; Li Qin; Zhou Fu Xin; Shi Jin Shui; Ma Bing; Chen Nan; Jing Xiao Bing

    2002-01-01

    Linear introduction accelerator is expected to generate small diameter X-ray spots with high intensity. The interaction of the electron beam with plasmas generated at the X-ray converter will make the spot on target increase with time and debase the X-ray dose and the imaging resolving power. A distributed target is developed which has about 24 pieces of thin 0.05 mm tantalum films distributed over 1 cm. due to the structure adoption, the distributed target material over a large volume decreases the energy deposition per unit volume and hence reduces the temperature of target surface, then reduces the initial plasma formalizing and its expansion velocity. The comparison and analysis with two kinds of target structures are presented using numerical calculation and experiments, the results show the X-ray dose and normalized angle distribution of the two is basically the same, while the surface of the distributed target is not destroyed like the previous block target

  4. Experimental social engineering : investigation and prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullee, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Social engineering is the usage of social manipulation and psychological tricks to make the targets assist offenders in their attack. This practice manifests itself in e.g. phishing emails or cold call telephone scams. The aim of the thesis was to investigate the understanding of social engineering

  5. Social Television for the modern nomads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2008-01-01

    This is a paper about the ongoing project of Ambient Shared Live Media positioned in the field of social television. It illustrates a scenario of social television that exemplifies how media sharing/TV watching can be a facilitator for social TV across physical locations. It also addresses a spec...... a specific target of users, being the modern nomad....

  6. Social mechanisms and social causation

    OpenAIRE

    Friedel Weinert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to examine the notion of social mechanisms by comparison with the notions of evolutionary and physical mechanisms. It is argued that social mechanisms are based on trends, and not lawlike regularities, so that social mechanisms are different from mechanisms in the natural sciences. Taking as an example of social causation the abolition of the slave trade, this paper argues that social mechanisms should be incorporated in Weber’s wider ...

  7. Social marketing of contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellstede, W P; Derr, B B

    1986-12-01

    Application of commercial marketing techniques has not only increased awareness, acceptability, and use of modern contraceptives in developing countries, but also overcome logistic problems in service delivery. The ability of contraceptive social marketing to reach large numbers and to treat contraceptives as common consumer products has helped to diminish social and religious constraints associated with family planning. Each contraceptive social marketing program is built around a theme tailored to meet specific cultural, social, and management requirements. The primary target populations are those who cannot afford regular commercial products and those who are not adequately reached by government programs. In countries such as Sri Lanka and Jamaica, profit is not a primary sales objective and retail prices are highly subsidized to make products affordable to low-income people. In contrast, the Colombian and Thai programs use contraceptive social marketing to help offset the operating costs of rural community-based programs and seek profits. The most impressive contraceptive social marketing sales performances have been recorded in Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, and Jamaica. The main reason contraceptive social marketing is more cost-efficient than other modes of contraceptive distribution is that the cost of product delivery is assumed by the commercial system. Although there has been some interest in making these programs self-sufficient financially, this step has tended to undermine the purpose of serving lower income groups.

  8. Chronic stress moderates the impact of social exclusion on pain tolerance: an experimental investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieritz, Karoline; Schäfer, Sarina J; Strahler, Jana; Rief, Winfried; Euteneuer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Experiences of social pain due to social exclusion may be processed in similar neural systems that process experiences of physical pain. The present study aimed to extend the findings on social exclusion and pain by examining the impact of social exclusion on an affective (ie, heat pain tolerance) and a sensory component of pain (ie, heat pain intensity). Whether a potential effect may be moderated by chronic life stress, social status, or social sup-port was further examined. A community-based sample of 59 women was studied. Social exclusion and inclusion were experimentally manipulated by using a virtual ball-tossing game called Cyberball in which participants were randomly assigned to either being excluded or being included by two other virtual players. Heat pain tolerance and intensity were assessed before and after the game. Potential psychosocial moderators were assessed via a questionnaire. The main finding of this study is that chronic stress moderates the impact of social exclusion on pain tolerance ( p socially excluded participants showed a lower heat pain tolerance than participants who were socially included. Contrary to the authors' hypothesis, pain sensitivity was increased in socially included participants compared with socially excluded participants after the game ( p social exclusion.

  9. Loneliness, depression, social support, and quality of life in older chronically ill Appalachians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeke, Laurie A; Goins, R Turner; Moore, Julia; Campbell, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe loneliness and to examine the relationships between loneliness, depression, social support, and QOL in chronically ill, older Appalachians. In-person interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 60 older, chronically ill, community-dwelling, and rural adults. Those with dementia or active grief were excluded. The UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1985), Geriatric Depression Scale (Shiekh & Yesavage, 1986), Katz ADL scale (Katz, Down, & Cash, 1970), MOS Social Support Scale (Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991), and a visual analog scale for Quality of Life (Spitzer et al., 1981) scale were used. Diagnoses were obtained through chart reviews. SPSS was used for data analyses. The majority of the 65% female sample (M age = 75 years) were married and impoverished. Participants' number of chronic illnesses averaged more than 3. Over 88% of participants reported at least 1 area of functional impairment. Loneliness was prevalent with UCLA loneliness scores indicating moderate to high loneliness, ranging from 39 to 62 (possible scores were 20-80). Higher loneliness scores correlated with depression, lower Qol, and lower social support, particularly lower emotional support. This study provides evidence that loneliness is a significant problem for older chronically ill Appalachian adults and that it may be related to low emotional support. Further, it provides evidence that this population may be significantly lonely and may not self-identify as lonely. Screening for loneliness and designing interventions that target the emotional aspects of loneliness could be important in this population.

  10. Bar coded retroreflective target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  11. Alternative preparation of inclusion bodies excludes interfering non-protein contaminants and improves the yield of recombinant proinsulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    The goal of simple, high-yield expression and purification of recombinant human proinsulin has proven to be a considerable challenge. First, proinsulin forms inclusion bodies during bacterial expression. While this phenomenon can be exploited as a capture step, conventionally prepared inclusion bodies contain significant amounts of non-protein contaminants that interfere with subsequent chromatographic purification. Second, the proinsulin molecules within the inclusion bodies are incorrectly folded, and likely cross-linked to one another, making it difficult to quantify the amount of expressed proinsulin. Third, proinsulin is an intermediate between the initial product of ribosomal translation (preproinsulin) and the final product secreted by pancreatic beta cells (insulin). Therefore, to be efficiently produced in bacteria, it must be produced as an N-terminally extended fusion protein, which has to be converted to authentic proinsulin during the purification scheme. To address all three of these problems, while simultaneously streamlining the procedure and increasing the yield of recombinant proinsulin, we have made three substantive modifications to our previous method for producing proinsulin:.•Conditions for the preparation of inclusion bodies have been altered so contaminants that interfere with semi-preparative reversed-phase chromatography are excluded while the proinsulin fusion protein is retained at high yield.•Aliquots are taken following important steps in the procedure and the quantity of proinsulin-related polypeptide in the sample is compared to the amount present prior to that step.•Final purification is performed using a silica-based reversed-phase matrix in place of a polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based matrix.

  12. Patterns of severe acute renal failure in a referral center in Sudan: Excluding intensive care and major surgery patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaballo, Babikir G.; Khogali, Mohamed S.; Khalifa, Eman H.; Khalil, Eltahir A.G.; El-Hasaan, Ahmad M.; Abu-Aisha, H.

    2007-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003 to February 2004.Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites, and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerural diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16(18%) died and 14(16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated PPD poisoning. (author)

  13. Laboratory parameter-based machine learning model for excluding non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, T C-F; Ma, A J; Wong, V W-S; Tse, Y-K; Chan, H L-Y; Yuen, P-C; Wong, G L-H

    2017-08-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects 20%-40% of the general population in developed countries and is an increasingly important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma. Electronic medical records facilitate large-scale epidemiological studies, existing NAFLD scores often require clinical and anthropometric parameters that may not be captured in those databases. To develop and validate a laboratory parameter-based machine learning model to detect NAFLD for the general population. We randomly divided 922 subjects from a population screening study into training and validation groups; NAFLD was diagnosed by proton-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. On the basis of machine learning from 23 routine clinical and laboratory parameters after elastic net regulation, we evaluated the logistic regression, ridge regression, AdaBoost and decision tree models. The areas under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of models in validation group were compared. Six predictors including alanine aminotransferase, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglyceride, haemoglobin A 1c , white blood cell count and the presence of hypertension were selected. The NAFLD ridge score achieved AUROC of 0.87 (95% CI 0.83-0.90) and 0.88 (0.84-0.91) in the training and validation groups respectively. Using dual cut-offs of 0.24 and 0.44, NAFLD ridge score achieved 92% (86%-96%) sensitivity and 90% (86%-93%) specificity with corresponding negative and positive predictive values of 96% (91%-98%) and 69% (59%-78%), and 87% of overall accuracy among 70% of classifiable subjects in the validation group; 30% of subjects remained indeterminate. NAFLD ridge score is a simple and robust reference comparable to existing NAFLD scores to exclude NAFLD patients in epidemiological studies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. In a long-term experimental demography study, excluding ungulates reversed invader's explosive population growth rate and restored natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisz, Susan; Spigler, Rachel B; Horvitz, Carol C

    2014-03-25

    A major goal in ecology is to understand mechanisms that increase invasion success of exotic species. A recent hypothesis implicates altered species interactions resulting from ungulate herbivore overabundance as a key cause of exotic plant domination. To test this hypothesis, we maintained an experimental demography deer exclusion study for 6 y in a forest where the native ungulate Odocoileus virginianus (white-tailed deer) is overabundant and Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) is aggressively invading. Because population growth is multiplicative across time, we introduce metrics that correctly integrate experimental effects across treatment years, the cumulative population growth rate, λc, and its geometric mean, λper-year, the time-averaged annual population growth rate. We determined λc and λper-year of the invader and of a common native, Trillium erectum. Our results conclusively demonstrate that deer are required for the success of Alliaria; its projected population trajectory shifted from explosive growth in the presence of deer (λper-year = 1.33) to decline toward extinction where deer are excluded (λper-year = 0.88). In contrast, Trillium's λper-year was suppressed in the presence of deer relative to deer exclusion (λper-year = 1.04 vs. 1.20, respectively). Retrospective sensitivity analyses revealed that the largest negative effect of deer exclusion on Alliaria came from rosette transitions, whereas the largest positive effect on Trillium came from reproductive transitions. Deer exclusion lowered Alliaria density while increasing Trillium density. Our results provide definitive experimental support that interactions with overabundant ungulates enhance demographic success of invaders and depress natives' success, with broad implications for biodiversity and ecosystem function worldwide.

  15. Sensitivity of Early Brain Computed Tomography to Exclude Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosh, Nicole M; Bellolio, M Fernanda; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Edlow, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrating the high sensitivity of early brain computed tomography (CT) brings into question the necessity of always performing lumbar puncture after a negative CT in the diagnosis of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Our objective was to determine the sensitivity of brain CT using modern scanners (16-slice technology or greater) when performed within 6 hours of headache onset to exclude SAH in neurologically intact patients. After conducting a comprehensive literature search using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Web of Science, and Scopus, we conducted a meta-analysis. We included original research studies of adults presenting with a history concerning for spontaneous SAH and who had noncontrast brain CT scan using a modern generation multidetector CT scanner within 6 hours of symptom onset. Our study adheres to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA). A total of 882 titles were reviewed and 5 articles met inclusion criteria, including an estimated 8907 patients. Thirteen had a missed SAH (incidence 1.46 per 1000) on brain CTs within 6 hours. Overall sensitivity of the CT was 0.987 (95% confidence intervals, 0.971-0.994) and specificity was 0.999 (95% confidence intervals, 0.993-1.0). The pooled likelihood ratio of a negative CT was 0.010 (95% confidence intervals, 0.003-0.034). In patients presenting with thunderclap headache and normal neurological examination, normal brain CT within 6 hours of headache is extremely sensitive in ruling out aneurysmal SAH. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. The accuracy of Gram stain of respiratory specimens in excluding Staphylococcus aureus in ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, Tamar; Yossepowitch, Orit; Lerner, Evgenia; Schwartz-Harari, Orna; Soroksky, Arie; Yekutieli, Daniel; Dan, Michael

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the Gram stain of deep tracheal aspirate as a tool to direct empiric antibiotic therapy, and more specifically as a tool to exclude the need for empiric antibiotic coverage against Staphylococcus aureus in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). A prospective, single-center, observational, cohort study. All wards at a community hospital. Adult patients requiring mechanical ventilation, identified as having VAP in a 54-month prospective surveillance database. Sampling of lower airway secretions by deep endotracheal aspiration was taken from each patient who developed VAP. Samples were sent immediately for Gram stain and qualitative bacterial cultures. Demographic and relevant clinical data were collected; Gram stain, culture, and antibiotic susceptibility results were documented; and outcome was followed prospectively. The analysis included 114 consecutive patients with 115 episodes of VAP from June 2007 to January 2012. Sensitivity of Gram stain compared with culture was 90.47% for gram-positive cocci, 69.6% for gram-negative rods, and 50% for sterile cultures. Specificity was 82.5%, 77.8%, and 79%, respectively. Negative predictive value was high for gram-positive cocci (97%) and sterile cultures (96%) but low for gram-negative rods (20%). Acinetobacter baumanii (45%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (38 %) were the prevailing isolates. S aureus was found in 18.3% of the patients. Most isolates were multiresistant. Absence of gram-positive bacteria on Gram stain had a high negative predictive value. These data can be used to narrow the initial empiric antibiotic regimen and to avoid unnecessary exposure of patients to vancomycin and other antistaphyloccocal agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Target Selection Models with Preference Variation Between Offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Townsley, Michael; Birks, Daniel; Ruiter, Stijn; Bernasco, Wim; White, Gentry

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study explores preference variation in location choice strategies of residential burglars. Applying a model of offender target selection that is grounded in assertions of the routine activity approach, rational choice perspective, crime pattern and social disorganization theories,

  18. "Being a Therapist Doesn't Exclude You From Real Life": Family Therapists' Beliefs and Barriers to Political Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lorien S; Seponski, Desiree M

    2018-01-01

    A crucial and overlooked facet of social justice in family therapy is political and policy advocacy. Family therapists have unique insight into how social policies and political discourse shapes clients' lives and the life of our profession. Such knowledge can inform policymakers and political debate, yet few family therapists are trained to engage in political action. In this randomized, national survey of licensed family therapists' (N = 174), we explore beliefs about and barriers to engagement in political and policy processes. The findings suggest that there are significant barriers and uncertainties surrounding family therapists' engagement, including time, feelings of efficacy, and interest. Given these barriers we discuss practical suggestions for clinicians and family therapy training programs. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  19. Social Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    development and exploration of courses of action. Recent events suggest the great potential of social media as an important input for this 21st century...unrestricted data domain consisting of open source English and foreign language data of varying types, including social media  Engineering to process and...Ideology identification in multiple languages  Emotion analysis of social media for instability monitoring Social Radar RTA HFM-201/RSM

  20. Business Targets and Compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Albers, Felicitas G.

    2014-01-01

    The finding and setting of a business target is the starting point whenever dealing with corporate governance; the autonomy of companies to define those targets is one constitutive characteristic of any market economy. Regulatory demands as the standardization of the German ‘Unternehmensinteresse’ (interest of the company) in the German stock corporation laws as well as ethical-theoretical approaches in the process of forming targets gain relevance both in theory and practice in the context o...

  1. The ISOLDE target robots

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilein Brice

    2002-01-01

    ISOLDE targets need to be changed frequently, around 80 times per year. The high radiation levels do not permit this to be done by human hands and the target changes are effected by 2 industrial robots (picture _01). On the left, in the distance, the front-end of the GPS (General Purpose Separator) is seen, while the HRS (High Resolution Separator) is at the right. Also seen are the doors to the irradiated-target storage.

  2. Targeting and Persuasive Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Egli, Alain (Autor/in)

    2015-01-01

    Firms face a prisoner's dilemma when advertising in a competitive environment. In a Hotelling framework with persuasive advertisingfirms counteract this prisoner's dilemma with targeting. The firms even solve the prisoner's problem if targeted advertising is effective enough. Advertising turns from wasteful competition into profits. This is in contrast to wasteful competition as argument for regulations. A further result is maximum advertising differentiation: thefirms target their advertisin...

  3. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  4. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  5. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  6. Targeted interventions for improved equity in maternal and child health in low- and middle-income settings: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Målqvist, Mats; Yuan, Beibei; Trygg, Nadja; Selling, Katarina; Thomsen, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Targeted interventions to improve maternal and child health is suggested as a feasible and sometimes even necessary strategy to reduce inequity. The objective of this systematic review was to gather the evidence of the effectiveness of targeted interventions to improve equity in MDG 4 and 5 outcomes. We identified primary studies in all languages by searching nine health and social databases, including grey literature and dissertations. Studies evaluating the effect of an intervention tailored to address a structural determinant of inequity in maternal and child health were included. Thus general interventions targeting disadvantaged populations were excluded. Outcome measures were limited to indicators proposed for Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. We identified 18 articles, whereof 15 evaluated various incentive programs, two evaluated a targeted policy intervention, and only one study evaluated an intervention addressing a cultural custom. Meta-analyses of the effectiveness of incentives programs showed a pooled effect size of RR 1.66 (95% CI 1.43-1.93) for antenatal care attendance (four studies with 2,476 participants) and RR 2.37 (95% CI 1.38-4.07) for health facility delivery (five studies with 25,625 participants). Meta-analyses were not performed for any of the other outcomes due to scarcity of studies. The targeted interventions aiming to improve maternal and child health are mainly limited to addressing economic disparities through various incentive schemes like conditional cash transfers and voucher schemes. This is a feasible strategy to reduce inequity based on income. More innovative action-oriented research is needed to speed up progress in maternal and child survival among the most disadvantaged populations through interventions targeting the underlying structural determinants of inequity.

  7. Neural processing of social participation in borderline personality disorder and social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutz, Lea; Renneberg, Babette; Roepke, Stefan; Niedeggen, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD) are known to be highly sensitive to social rejection. Social information processing is assumed to play a key role for this shared psychopathological phenomenon. The first steps in social information processing are to encode social cues and to create a mental representation of the social situation. The aim of the current study was to test whether the perception of social participation in patients with BPD and patients with SAD is biased in this initial stage of social processing. Focus was on the P3b, a brain potential related to stimulus evaluation that has been shown to be a sensitive indicator for the processes of interest. Twenty five unmedicated patients with BPD, 25 unmedicated patients with SAD and 25 healthy controls (HC) played an EEG-compatible version of Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing paradigm that experimentally induces social inclusion and exclusion. All participants showed a pronounced P3b when excluded. Only patients with BPD showed an enhanced P3b also during the inclusion condition, indicating altered processing of social inclusion. The EEG results for the BPD group were consistent with their self-report data. Patients with BPD felt more excluded during the inclusion condition of Cyberball than both HC and patients with SAD. Furthermore, heightened rejection expectancy (subscale of the Rejection Sensitivity Questionnaire) was associated with a smaller difference in the P3b amplitude between inclusion and exclusion. Results indicate a negatively biased perception of social inclusion in BPD already during the initial stage of social processing. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Community-level antibiotic access and use (ABACUS in low- and middle-income countries: Finding targets for social interventions to improve appropriate antimicrobial use – an observational multi-centre study [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiman F.L. Wertheim

    2017-07-01

    expected to conclude by 2019. ABACUS will provide important new insights into antibiotic practices in LMICs to inform social interventions aimed at promoting optimal antibiotic use, thereby preserving antibiotic effectiveness.

  9. Social anxiety and eating disorder comorbidity: The role of negative social evaluation fears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Cheri A.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.

    2011-01-01

    Social anxiety and eating disorders are highly comorbid. However, it is unknown how specific domains of social anxiety relate to disordered eating. We provide data on these relationships and investigate social appearance anxiety and fear of negative evaluation as potential vulnerabilities linking social anxiety with eating disorders. Specifically, we examined five domains of social anxiety: Social interaction anxiety, fear of scrutiny, fear of positive evaluation, fear of negative evaluation, and social appearance anxiety. Results indicated that social appearance anxiety predicted body dissatisfaction, bulimia symptoms, shape concern, weight concern, and eating concern over and above fear of scrutiny, social interaction anxiety, and fear of positive evaluation. Fear of negative evaluation uniquely predicted drive for thinness and restraint. Structural equation modeling supported a model in which social appearance anxiety and fear of negative evaluation are vulnerabilities for both social anxiety and eating disorder symptoms. Interventions that target these negative social evaluation fears may help prevent development of eating disorders. PMID:22177392

  10. Social Media Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    L'obiettivo del laboratorio è pensare in modo strategico all'interno dei social network, attraverso i tre pilastri chiave del marketing: - analitico. Come indagare l’audience e comprendere il nostro target, esplorando gli strumenti a disposizione di Facebook per ottimizzare questo processo; - strategico. Come costruire una strategia di contenuto per la nostra attività, a partire da un obiettivo; - operativo. Ragionare sul budget, la lettura dei risultati, capire se la nostra strateg...

  11. Diagnostic performance of computed tomography coronary angiography to detect and exclude left main and/or three-vessel coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dharampal, Anoeshka S; Papadopoulou, Stella L; Rossi, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in detecting and excluding left main (LM) and/or three-vessel CAD ("high-risk" CAD) in symptomatic patients and to compare its discriminatory value with the Duke risk score and calcium score.......To determine the diagnostic performance of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in detecting and excluding left main (LM) and/or three-vessel CAD ("high-risk" CAD) in symptomatic patients and to compare its discriminatory value with the Duke risk score and calcium score....

  12. A revised checklist species of the Curculionoidea (Coleoptera, excluding Scolytinae of Rostov Oblast and Kalmykia, the southern part of European Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri G. Arzanov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work provides a list of 703 species of weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea, excluding Scolytinae recorded in two adjacent administrative regions in the southern part of European Russia: Rostov Oblast and the Republic of Kalmykia. The species diversity of the ten recorded families is as follows: Nemonychidae (1, Anthribidae (10, Rhynchitidae (12, Attelabidae (2, Apionidae (70, Nanophyidae (12, Brachyceridae (2, Dryophthoridae (4, Erirhinidae (13, Curculionidae (577, excluding Scolytinae. In total, 151 species are added to the faunal list of the southern European Russia.

  13. Social Anxiety Disorder (Social Phobia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fear response, causing increased anxiety in social situations. Environment. Social anxiety disorder may be a learned behavior — ... harder to treat if you wait. Keep a journal. Keeping track of your personal life can help ...

  14. NIKEI: a new inexpensive and non-invasive scoring system to exclude advanced fibrosis in patients with NAFLD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münevver Demir

    Full Text Available AIMS: To develop, validate and compare a non-invasive fibrosis scoring system for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD derived from routinely obtained clinical and biochemical parameters. METHODS: 267 consecutive patients with biopsy proven fatty liver or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were randomly assigned to the estimation (2/3 or validation (1/3 group to develop a model for the prediction of advanced fibrosis. Univariate statistics were performed to compare patients with and without advanced fibrosis, and following a multivariate logistic regression analysis a new scoring system was constructed. This non-invasive Koeln-Essen-index (NIKEI was validated and compared to the FIB-4 index by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. We evaluated a stepwise combination of both scoring systems for the precise prediction of advanced fibrosis. To set in contrast, we additionally tested the diagnostic accuracy of the AST/ALT ratio, BARD score and the NAFLD fibrosis score in our cohort. RESULTS: Age, AST, AST/ALT ratio, and total bilirubin were identified as significant predictors of advanced fibrosis and used to construct the NIKEI with an AUC of 0.968 [0.937; 0.998] compared to 0.929 [0.869; 0.989] for the FIB-4 index. The absence of advanced fibrosis could be confirmed with excellent accuracy (99-100%. The positive predictive value of the FIB-4 index was higher (100% vs. 60%, however, the false negative rate was also high (33%. With a stepwise combination of both indices 82%-84% of biopsies would have been avoidable without a single misclassification. The AUROC for AST/ALT ratio, the NAFLD fibrosis score, and the BARD score were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72-0.90, 0.96 (95% CI 0.92-0.99, and 0.67 (95% CI 0.55-0.78, respectively. CONCLUSION: The NIKEI can reliably exclude advanced fibrosis in subjects with NAFLD. In combination with the FIB-4 index misclassification with inadequate clinical management can be avoided while

  15. Endovascular repair of posttraumatic multiple femoral-femoral and popliteal-popliteal arteriovenous fistula with Viabahn and excluder stent graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šarac Momir

    2011-01-01

    . Also, numerous metallic balls - grains of shotgun were present. After the preoperative preparation under local infiltrative anesthesia, transfemoral endovascular reconstruction was done of the surface femoral and popliteal artery by the use of stent grafts Viabahn 6 × 50 mm and excluder PXL 161 007. Within the immediate postoperative course a significant reduction of the leg edema and disappearance of thrill occurred, and, latter, healing of ulceration, and disappearance of signs of the foot ischemia. Also, patient's both cardiac and breathing functions became normal. Conclusion. In patients with chronic traumatic AV fistulas in the femoropopliteal region, especially with multiple fistulas, the gold standard is their endovascular reconstruction which, although being minimally traumatic and invasive, offers a complete reconstruction besides keeping integrity of both distal and proximal circulation in the leg.

  16. Mapping the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon using parasitological, serological, and clinical evidence to exclude other causes of lymphedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebede Deribe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Podoconiosis is a non-filarial elephantiasis, which causes massive swelling of the lower legs. It was identified as a neglected tropical disease by WHO in 2011. Understanding of the geographical distribution of the disease is incomplete. As part of a global mapping of podoconiosis, this study was conducted in Cameroon to map the distribution of the disease. This mapping work will help to generate data on the geographical distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon and contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis.We used a multi-stage sampling design with stratification of the country by environmental risk of podoconiosis. We sampled 76 villages from 40 health districts from the ten Regions of Cameroon. All individuals of 15-years old or older in the village were surveyed house-to-house and screened for lymphedema. A clinical algorithm was used to reliably diagnose podoconiosis, excluding filarial-associated lymphedema. Individuals with lymphoedema were tested for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigen and specific IgG4 using the Alere Filariasis Test Strips (FTS test and the Standard Diagnostics (SD BIOLINE lymphatic filariasis IgG4 test (Wb123 respectively, in addition to thick blood films. Presence of DNA specific to W. bancrofti was checked on night blood using a qPCR technique.Overall, 10,178 individuals from 4,603 households participated in the study. In total, 83 individuals with lymphedema were identified. Of the 83 individuals with lymphedema, two were found to be FTS positive and all were negative using the Wb123 test. No microfilaria of W. bancrofti were found in the night blood of any individual with clinical lymphedema. None were found to be positive for W. bancrofti using qPCR. Of the two FTS positive cases, one was positive for Mansonella perstans DNA, while the other harbored Loa loa microfilaria. Overall, 52 people with podoconiosis were identified after applying the clinical algorithm. The overall prevalence of podoconiosis was

  17. Surgical management for the first 48 h following blunt chest trauma: state of the art (excluding vascular injuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lesquen, Henri; Avaro, Jean-Philippe; Gust, Lucile; Ford, Robert Michael; Beranger, Fabien; Natale, Claudia; Bonnet, Pierre-Mathieu; D'Journo, Xavier-Benoît

    2015-03-01

    This review aims to answer the most common questions in routine surgical practice during the first 48 h of blunt chest trauma (BCT) management. Two authors identified relevant manuscripts published since January 1994 to January 2014. Using preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses statement, they focused on the surgical management of BCT, excluded both child and vascular injuries and selected 80 studies. Tension pneumothorax should be promptly diagnosed and treated by needle decompression closely followed with chest tube insertion (Grade D). All traumatic pneumothoraces are considered for chest tube insertion. However, observation is possible for selected patients with small unilateral pneumothoraces without respiratory disease or need for positive pressure ventilation (Grade C). Symptomatic traumatic haemothoraces or haemothoraces >500 ml should be treated by chest tube insertion (Grade D). Occult pneumothoraces and occult haemothoraces are managed by observation with daily chest X-rays (Grades B and C). Periprocedural antibiotics are used to prevent chest-tube-related infectious complications (Grade B). No sign of life at the initial assessment and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration >10 min are considered as contraindications of Emergency Department Thoracotomy (Grade C). Damage Control Thoracotomy is performed for either massive air leakage or refractive shock or ongoing bleeding enhanced by chest tube output >1500 ml initially or >200 ml/h for 3 h (Grade D). In the case of haemodynamically stable patients, early video-assisted thoracic surgery is performed for retained haemothoraces (Grade B). Fixation of flail chest can be considered if mechanical ventilation for 48 h is probably required (Grade B). Fixation of sternal fractures is performed for displaced fractures with overlap or comminution, intractable pain or respiratory insufficiency (Grade D). Lung herniation, traumatic diaphragmatic rupture and pericardial rupture are life

  18. Explaining the effects of targeted online advertising on children's cognitive, affective, and behavioral brand responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijmersdal, E.; Rozendaal, E.; Smink, N.; van Noort, G.; Buijzen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, information from children's profile pages on social network sites is used to target online advertising. This practice has raised concerns in society and academia, however, effects of profile targeting on children remained unstudied. Therefore, this study focused on children's

  19. Social Networks and Students' Orthography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Azizovic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper studied spelling and technical errors of students on social networks (facebook, twitter, e-mail. Social networks have over the last decade become the primary means of communication, which have more than ever made real the idea of "one world - one village". Their usage is in the most part based on language, i.e. on the writing itself and reading of the same as its most complex parts. New aspects of the use of writing, which exclude handwriting, are already using some new writing platform, such as keyboards, smart - touch surfaces, etc., provide new opportunities for redefining, as well as challenges for the writings. This paper aims to give a modest contribution in this direction.

  20. Bioethics, theology, and social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lisa Sowle

    2003-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a concern among theological bioethicists that secular debate has grown increasingly "thin," and that "thick" religious traditions and their spokespersons have been correspondingly excluded. This essay disputes that analysis. First, religious and theological voices compete for public attention and effectiveness with the equally "thick" cultural traditions of modern science and market capitalism. The distinctive contribution of religion should be to emphasize social justice in access to the benefits of health care, challenging the for-profit global marketing of research and biotechnology to wealthy consumers. Second, religion and theology have been and are still socially effective in sponsoring activism for practical change, both locally and globally. This claim will be supported with specific examples; with familiar concepts like subsidiarity and "middle axioms"; and with recent analyses of "participatory democracy" and of emerging, decentralized forms of global governance.

  1. Mapping 'Social Responsibility' in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Cecilie; Horst, Maja

    2014-01-01

    aims to exclude the social from the scientific production in order to make it objective and thereby responsible; the Reflexivity rationality, which sees it as science's responsibility to let itself be guided by problems in society in choice of research focus and methods; the Contribution rationality......, which insists that responsible science should live up to public demands for innovation and democracy; and the Integration rationality, which advocates that science should be co-constructed with societal actors in order to be socially responsible. While each rationality is distinct, the article argues......This article employs the Foucauldian notion of ‘political rationality’ to map discussions and ideals about the responsibility of science toward society. By constructing and analyzing an archive of 263 journal papers, four political rationalities were identified: the Demarcation rationality, which...

  2. Catholic social thought on citizenship : No place for exclusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenvoorde, R.A.J.; Hirsch Ballin, E.M.H.; Derkse, W.; van der Lans, J.; Waanders, S.

    2000-01-01

    The effects of globalisation have made us aware that our traditional concepts of citizenship are barely adequate ro cover the still growing gap between the included and the excluded, the rich and the poor. We will look at the process of social in- and exclusion because citizenship and exclusion are

  3. Social Bricks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Can social sustainability be built? In this paper the potentialities and challenges of the concept of social sustainability are explored based on a collaboration project between the Danish Building Research Institute, a Danish social housing association and the Green Building Council Denmark......, aiming to better integrate standards of social sustainability in the application of certification systems like DGNB. The paper relates theory on social sustainability to the ways it is used in practice, and discusses whether and how social sustainability can be measured and certified in renewal...... and construction of housing and neighbourhoods. It is put forward that a certification has to take into account the housing complex’ or neighbourhood’s relation to the surrounding city, its development over time, its flexibility towards future needs and its social organisation and operation. Further, the interplay...

  4. The CNGS target

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) target ‘magazine’ of five target units. Each unit contains a series of 10-cm long graphite rods distributed over a length of 2 m. It is designed to maximize the number of secondary particles produced and hence the number of neutrinos. One unit is used at a time to prevent over heating.

  5. Modelling Recycling Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Amanda Louise; Leinikka Dall, Ole; Andersen, Frits M.

    2014-01-01

    % for household waste, and sets an ambitious goal of a 50% recycling rate by 2020. This study integrates the recycling target into the FRIDA model to project how much waste and from which streams should be diverted from incineration to recycling in order to achieve the target. Furthermore, it discusses how...

  6. Strategic Targeted Advertising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Galeotti; J.L. Moraga-Gonzalez (José Luis)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe present a strategic game of pricing and targeted-advertising. Firms can simultaneously target price advertisements to different groups of customers, or to the entire market. Pure strategy equilibria do not exist and thus market segmentation cannot occur surely. Equilibria exhibit

  7. Seedling root targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  8. Internal targets for LEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilian, K.; Gspann, J.; Mohl, D.; Poth, H.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter considers the use of thin internal targets in conjunction with phase-space cooling at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR). Topics considered include the merits of internal target operation; the most efficient use of antiprotons and of proton synchrotron (PS) protons, highest center-of-mass (c.m.) energy resolution; highest angular resolution and access to extreme angles; the transparent environment for all reaction products; a windowless source and pure targets; highest luminosity and count rates; access to lowest energies with increasing resolution; internal target thickness and vacuum requirements; required cooling performance; and modes of operation. It is demonstrated that an internal target in conjunction with phase-space cooling has the potential of better performance in terms of the economic use of antiprotons and consequently of PS protons; energy resolution; angular resolution; maximum reaction rate capability (statistical precision); efficient parasitic operation; transparency of the target for reaction products; access to low energies; and the ease of polarized target experiments. It is concluded that all p - experiments which need high statistics and high p - flux, such as studies of rare channels or broad, weak resonance structures, would profit from internal targets

  9. SOCIAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION NETWORKS FOR INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ace vedo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to describe the social management of knowledge through research and innovation networks to promote social inclusion. The reflection of the exploratory stage is presented within the doctoral thesis analyzing the challenges of the universities in the achievement of social inclusion with networks of research and innovation. A descriptive work was done, with documentary tracking, systematization and analysis. The findings show that it is necessary to articulate efforts in interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary networks with different actors: state, company, education, scientists, technologists and vulnerable, excluded populations, to build policies and strategies for social inclusion.

  10. Advanced Targeted Nanomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchige, Mohan C M; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery has been the major topic in drug formulation and delivery. As nanomedicine emerges to create nano scale therapeutics and diagnostics, it is still essential to embed targeting capability to these novel systems to make them useful. Here we discuss various targeting approaches for delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic nano materials in view of search for more universal methods to target diseased tissues. Many diseases are accompanied with hypoxia and acidosis. Coating nanoparticles with pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) increases efficiency of targeting acidic diseased tissues. It has been showing promising results to create future nanotheranostics for cancer and other diseases which are dominating in the present world. PMID:25615945

  11. Electron beam fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauser, M.J.; Sweeney, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    R The behavior of the DT filled gold shells when irradiated by a variety of pulse shapes was studied. In these pulses the power (and beam current) was varied, but the voltage was kept constant at 1 MeV. In general the performance of the target, for a given peak power, was not significantly affected by the pulse shape. Pulses with rise times of up to half the implosion time do not significantly degrade the target performance. The use of the ''optimal pulse'' of laser fusion with a fixed peak power does not appear to improve the performance of these targets. The main function of the ''optimal pulse'' is to produce a large rho r of the target during the thermonuclear burn. In e-beam targets a total rho r of 5--10 g/cm 2 can be obtained without pulse shaping; the problem here is one of achieving high enough temperatures to ignite the DT. (U.S.)

  12. Targeted therapy in lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalli Franco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Discovery of new treatments for lymphoma that prolong survival and are less toxic than currently available agents represents an urgent unmet need. We now have a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma, such as aberrant signal transduction pathways, which have led to the discovery and development of targeted therapeutics. The ubiquitin-proteasome and the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathways are examples of pathological mechanisms that are being targeted in drug development efforts. Bortezomib (a small molecule protease inhibitor and the mTOR inhibitors temsirolimus, everolimus, and ridaforolimus are some of the targeted therapies currently being studied in the treatment of aggressive, relapsed/refractory lymphoma. This review will discuss the rationale for and summarize the reported findings of initial and ongoing investigations of mTOR inhibitors and other small molecule targeted therapies in the treatment of lymphoma.

  13. What Is Commercial Social Marketing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Thomas Boysen; Stead, Martine

    of CSM. In relation to the benchmark criteria, the second section focuses on 3 key ethical challenges in CSM. a) We describe the problem of paternalism and suggest that CSM can deal with it by anchoring social campaigns in the target groups’ world-view. b) We address the problem of power imbalances......The aim of this paper is to introduce the concept of commercial social marketing (CSM) and discuss some major ethical aspects of CSM. In the first section, we introduce 6 social marketing benchmark criteria. Against this background, we demonstrate Dove’s ‘Campaign for Real Beauty’ to be an instance...... and argue why it is more severe in non-profit social marketing. c) We argue that CSM could create a new and unethical kind of social competition due to its inherent motivation to gain ownership of the social cause it addresses....

  14. Processes and effects of targeted online advertising among children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reijmersdal, E.A.; Rozendaal, E.; Smink, N.; van Noort, G.; Buijzen, M.

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, information from children's profile pages on social network sites is being used to target online advertising, a phenomenon known as profile targeting. This practice has raised concerns in society and academia; however, its effects among children remain unstudied. Therefore, we

  15. Social Reconnection Revisited: The Effects of Social Exclusion Risk on Reciprocity, Trust, and General Risk-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfler-Rozin, Rellie; Pillutla, Madan; Thau, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that people at risk of exclusion from groups will engage in actions that can socially reconnect them with others and test the hypothesis in four studies. We show that participants at risk of exclusion reciprocated the behavior of an unknown person (Study 1a) and a potential excluder (Study 1b) more compared to two control groups…

  16. A critical feminist approach to social inclusion and citizenship in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Issues of social inclusion and difference within the co-curriculum are crucial. This article draws on themes central to a critical feminist framework of social inclusion and citizenship in HE to argue that the way in which co-curricular opportunities are traditionally structured at universities may exclude those students who are ...

  17. Talking (and Not Talking) about Race, Social Class and Dis/Ability: Working Margin to Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Beth A.; Connor, David J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine some of the omnipresent yet unacknowledged discourses of social and economic disadvantage and dis/ability within schools in the US. First, we document ways that social class, race, and dis/ability function within schools to further disadvantage and exclude already marginalized students. Next, we show how particular ways…

  18. Increasing Inequality in Social Exclusion Occurrence: The Case of Sweden during 1979-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bask, Miia

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the risk of social exclusion among the Swedish population from a longitudinal perspective. In the empirical analysis, a person is considered socially excluded if he or she suffers from at least two of the following six welfare problems: chronic unemployment, economic problems, health problems, experiences of threat or…

  19. The Temporal Fabric of Research Methods: Posthuman Social Science and the Digital Data Deluge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to adumbrate methods more suitable to a posthuman social science, so as to better attend to the digital datafication of life. Five core functions of research method are presented. The first three--the desire for origins, the need to exclude, and the establishment of a regime of labour--often reinstate social orders and…

  20. Exploring Children's Perceptions of Two School-Based Social Inclusion Programs: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Sally; McPherson, Amy C.; Aslam, Henna; McKeever, Patricia; Wright, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although social exclusion among typically developing school-aged children has been well explored, it is under-researched for children with disabilities even though they are at a higher risk for being excluded. While there are a number of different programs available to improve social inclusion at school, the appeal of these programs to…