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Sample records for tall oil fatty

  1. 21 CFR 172.862 - Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.862 Oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids. The food additive oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids may be safely used in food and as...

  2. Alternative fuel properties of tall oil fatty acid methyl ester-diesel fuel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altiparmak, D.; Keskin, A.; Koca, A. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Technical Education Faculty; Guru, M. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Engineering and Architectural Faculty

    2007-01-15

    In this experimental work, tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends as alternative fuels for diesel engines were studied. Tall oil methyl ester was produced by reacting tall oil fatty acids with methyl alcohol under optimum conditions. The blends of tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load conditions. The effects of the new fuel blends on the engine performance and exhaust emission were tested. It was observed that the engine torque and power output with tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends increased up to 6.1% and 5.9%, respectively. It was also seen that CO emissions decreased to 38.9% and NO{sub x} emissions increased up to 30% with the new fuel blends. The smoke capacity did not vary significantly. (author)

  3. Alternative fuel properties of tall oil fatty acid methyl ester-diesel fuel blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altiparmak, Duran; Keskin, Ali; Koca, Atilla; Gürü, Metin

    2007-01-01

    In this experimental work, tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends as alternative fuels for diesel engines were studied. Tall oil methyl ester was produced by reacting tall oil fatty acids with methyl alcohol under optimum conditions. The blends of tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load condition. The effects of the new fuel blends on the engine performance and exhaust emission were tested. It was observed that the engine torque and power output with tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends increased up to 6.1% and 5.9%, respectively. It was also seen that CO emissions decreased to 38.9% and NO(x) emissions increased up to 30% with the new fuel blends. The smoke opacity did not vary significantly.

  4. 40 CFR 454.40 - Applicability; description of manufacture of tall oil rosin, pitch and fatty acids subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability; description of manufacture of tall oil rosin, pitch and fatty acids subcategory. 454.40 Section 454.40 Protection of... CHEMICALS MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Tall Oil Rosin, Pitch and Fatty Acids Subcategory § 454.40...

  5. Usage of methyl ester of tall oil fatty acids and resinic acids as alternative diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskin, Ali; Yasar, Abdulkadir; Guerue, Metin; Altiparmak, Duran

    2010-01-01

    In the experimental study, tall oil fatty and resinic acids were investigated as alternative diesel fuels. The fatty acids, obtained by distilling the crude tall oil, were esterified with methanol in order to obtain tall oil methyl ester (biodiesel). Blends of the methyl ester, resinic acids and diesel fuel were prepared for test fuels. Performance and emission tests of the test fuels were carried out in an unmodified direct injection diesel engine on full load conditions. The results showed that the specific fuel consumption (SFC) with the blend fuels did not show a significant change. CO emission and smoke level decreased up to 23.91% and 19.40%, respectively. In general, NO x emissions showed on trend of increasing with the blend fuels (up to 25.42%). CO 2 emissions did not vary with the blend fuels significantly.

  6. Usage of methyl ester of tall oil fatty acids and resinic acids as alternative diesel fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Ali; Yasar, Abdulkadir [Tarsus Technical Education Faculty, Mersin University, 33500 Mersin (Turkey); Guerue, Metin [Engineering and Architectural Faculty, Gazi University, 06570 Maltepe, Ankara (Turkey); Altiparmak, Duran [Technical Education Faculty, Gazi University, 06500 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    In the experimental study, tall oil fatty and resinic acids were investigated as alternative diesel fuels. The fatty acids, obtained by distilling the crude tall oil, were esterified with methanol in order to obtain tall oil methyl ester (biodiesel). Blends of the methyl ester, resinic acids and diesel fuel were prepared for test fuels. Performance and emission tests of the test fuels were carried out in an unmodified direct injection diesel engine on full load conditions. The results showed that the specific fuel consumption (SFC) with the blend fuels did not show a significant change. CO emission and smoke level decreased up to 23.91% and 19.40%, respectively. In general, NO{sub x} emissions showed on trend of increasing with the blend fuels (up to 25.42%). CO{sub 2} emissions did not vary with the blend fuels significantly. (author)

  7. 21 CFR 186.1557 - Tall oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Tall oil. 186.1557 Section 186.1557 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1557 Tall oil. (a) Tall oil (CAS Reg. No. 8002-26-4) is essentially the sap... consists mainly of tall oil resin acids and tall oil fatty acids. (b) In accordance with § 186.1(b)(1), the...

  8. Tall oil fatty acid inclusion in the diet improves performance and increases ileal density of lactobacilli in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienola, K; Jurgens, G; Vuorenmaa, J; Apajalahti, J

    2018-03-22

    1. Studies were conducted with tall oil fatty acids (TOFA) to determine their effect on broiler chicken performance and ileal microbiota. TOFA, a product originating from coniferous trees and recovered by fractional distillation of side-streams from pulp production, mainly comprises free long-chain fatty acids (~90%) and resin acids (~8%). Conjugated linolenic acids and pinolenic acid are characteristic fatty acid components of TOFA. 2. TOFA products at 750 mg/kg feed were tested in two 35-day broiler chicken trials, each using a wheat soya-based diet and with 12 replicate pens per treatment. In both trials, TOFA improved body weight gain at all time points (P250 mg/l. The in vitro results were thus in line with in vivo observations. 5. The mechanisms behind the bacterial shifts and their role in performance improvement are unknown. Further purification of TOFA components is needed to identify the effective agents.

  9. Optimized Tall Oil Production; Optimerad talloljeproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Ulrica

    2007-12-15

    Tall oil has always been a sought-after product, especially within the painting industry, but also as an efficient fuel. The resent focus on renewable energy has again increased the interest for tall oil production. Tall oil is one of the more interesting by-products in the pulp industry. The background to write this report was to explore the potential improvement of a pulp mill's economy by increasing the production of tall oil. The purpose with this report is to look at the potential to increase tall oil production and to identify the parameters that affect the production the most. The goal is to define parameters which the mills can have an influence on, and to see where the largest impact lies. The target group is Swedish mills and they are the ones behind all information presented in this report. A questionnaire was sent out to all the Swedish Kraft mills. The questions were divided into three groups: Woodhandling; Black Liquor- and soap handling; and tall oil separation. No straight forward conclusions can be made on the storing of wood and chips. The wood species used and its growth place is of larger importance, these parameters can however not be influenced to any large extent. The incoming soap to each mill is varying quite noticeably and so is also the tall oil production. The optimization of the tall oil production; i.e. the amount of tall oil produced from a certain amount of soap, shows that the soap separation in black liquor is of greater importance than the choice of tall oil separation equipment. The de-soaping procedure is in many cases not too difficult to adjust without any huge investments. The differences between the tall oil separation methods used today seem to be more about personnel- and maintenance costs than about separation efficiency. Availability is difficult to define since most mills run their tall oil plants intermittently depending on soap availability. The availability is a matter of having sufficient capacity in the tall

  10. Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, C.J.

    1983-07-25

    A process and compositions for enhancing the recovery of acid crudes are disclosed. The process involves injecting caustic solutions into the reservoir to maintain a pH of 11 to 13. The fluid contains an effective amount of multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. A tall oil pitch soap is added as a polymeric mobility control agent. (DMC)

  11. Hydrogen solubility measurements of analyzed tall oil fractions and a solubility model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uusi-Kyyny, Petri; Pakkanen, Minna; Linnekoski, Juha; Alopaeus, Ville

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen solubility was measured in four tall oil fractions between 373 and 597 K. • Continuous flow synthetic isothermal and isobaric method was used. • A Henry’s law model was developed for the distilled tall oil fractions. • The complex composition of the samples was analyzed and is presented. - Abstract: Knowledge of hydrogen solubility in tall oil fractions is important for designing hydrotreatment processes of these complex nonedible biobased materials. Unfortunately measurements of hydrogen solubility into these fractions are missing in the literature. This work reports hydrogen solubility measured in four tall oil fractions between 373 and 597 K and at pressures from 5 to 10 MPa. Three of the fractions were distilled tall oil fractions their resin acids contents are respectively 2, 20 and 23 in mass-%. Additionally one fraction was a crude tall oil (CTO) sample containing sterols as the main neutral fraction. Measurements were performed using a continuous flow synthetic isothermal and isobaric method based on the visual observation of the bubble point. Composition of the flow was changed step-wise for the bubble point composition determination. We assume that the tall oil fractions did not react during measurements, based on the composition analysis performed before and after the measurements. Additionally the densities of the fractions were measured at atmospheric pressure from 293.15 to 323.15 K. A Henry’s law model was developed for the distilled tall oil fractions describing the solubility with an absolute average deviation of 2.1%. Inputs of the solubility model are temperature, total pressure and the density of the oil at 323.15 K. The solubility of hydrogen in the CTO sample can be described with the developed model with an absolute average deviation of 3.4%. The solubility of hydrogen increases both with increasing pressure and/or increasing temperature. The more dense fractions of the tall oil exhibit lower hydrogen

  12. 78 FR 76567 - Tall Oil, Polymer With Polyethylene Glycol and Succinic Anhydride Monopolyisobutylene Derivs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Tall Oil, Polymer With Polyethylene Glycol and Succinic Anhydride... oil, polymer with polyethylene glycol and succinic anhydride monopolyisobutylene derivs. (CAS Reg. No... residues of tall oil, polymer with polyethylene glycol and succinic anhydride monopolyisobutylene derivs...

  13. Upgrading of raw tall oil soap into fuel oils and lubricants; Raakasuovan jalostus poltto- ja voiteluoeljyksi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oasmaa, A.; Arpiainen, V.; McKeough, P.; Tapola, E.; Haekkinen, R.; Kuoppala, E.; Koskela, K. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-01

    Thermochemical processing of tall oil soap originating from various mixtures of birch and pine has been experimentally investigated. The organic matter of tall oil soap, which is a by- product of Kraft pulping, originates mainly from wood extractives. Conventional processing of tall oil soap involves acidulation with sulphuric acid to yield crude tall oil and subsequent distillation of the oil at centralised refineries. Because tall oil originating from birch wood is far less valuable than that from pine, there is an economic incentive in the Nordic countries to develop alternative conversion processes for the tall oil soap produced at pulp mills where birch is widely used as feedstock. Furthermore, thermochemical processing of tall oil soap does not introduce sulphur into the chemical recovery cycle. This would be a significant advantage in future mills employing closure of water circuits and/or sulphur-free pulping. In small-scale experiments tall oil soaps from wood mixtures with high birch content have been processed using both liquid-phase thermal treatment and pyrolysis. The liquid-phase thermal treatment at 450 deg C under a nitrogen atmosphere yielded a good-quality oil product at high yield (about 50 % of the energy content of the tall oil soap). In the atmospheric pyrolysis of birch tall oil soap a separation of inorganic and organic constituents was obtained. The energy value of the product gases was high. Both processes are promising, but the pyrolysis alternative has the greater economic potential, providing that the promising preliminary experimental results have given a true picture of the performance of the full-scale pyrolysis process. (orig.)

  14. Heterogeneous acid-catalyzed biodiesel production from crude tall oil: a low-grade and less expensive feedstock

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mkhize, NM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study indicates that solid acid catalysis of crude tall oil (CTO) over a WO3/ZrO2 catalyst is effective in converting the CTO fatty acids components into biodiesel in high yield. Preparation of the catalyst by an impregnation method...

  15. Physicochemical and Phytochemical Analyses of Copra and Oil of Cocos nucifera L. (West Coast Tall Variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probir Kumar Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut copra from West coast tall variety, cultivated in Kerala, India, was subjected to aqueous and solvent extractions (using n-hexane. Additionally, oil was extracted from the copra in Soxhlet assembly using petroleum ether (b.p. 60–80°C. Physicochemical and phytochemical analyses were conducted for the extracts and the oil, with commercial coconut oil as the experimental control. The physicochemical analyses showed that the aqueous extract of copra was milky-white in color with a sweet odor, while the solvent extract was pale yellow and odorless. The commercial oil had 0.08±0.02% oleic acid and a TOTOX value of 7.73±0.78, lower than the Soxhlet extracted oil. Among all the extracts and oils, best phytochemical properties, antioxidant activity (DPPH activity, IC50 value 0.04±0.01 mg/mL, total phenol (0.96±0.04 mg gallic acid eq./g dry copra, reducing power (40.49±1.84 mg BHT eq./g dry copra, and anti-inflammatory activity (NO activity, IC50  value 0.77±0.06 mg/mL were obtained in the commercial coconut oil, followed by the Soxhlet extracted oil, aqueous extract, and solvent extract. Fatty acid composition analyses showed mainly medium chain fatty acids in the copra oil with lauric acid as the predominant fatty acid (51.88% and 44.84% in Soxhlet extracted and commercial oils, resp..

  16. Biodiesel production from tall oil with synthesized Mn and Ni based additives: effects of the additives on fuel consumption and emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Keskin; Metin Guru; Duran Altiparmak [Mersin University, Mersin (Turkey). Technical Education Faculty

    2007-05-15

    In this study, biodiesel fuel and fuel additives were produced from crude tall oil that is a by-product in the pulp manufacturing by craft or sulphate pulping process. Fatty acids and resinic acids were obtained from crude tall oil by distillation method. Tall oil methyl ester (biodiesel) was produced from fatty acids. Resinic acids were reacted with NiO and MnO{sub 2} stoichiometrically for production of metallic fuel additives. Each metallic fuel additive was added at the rate of 8 {mu}mol/l and 12 {mu}mol/l to make mixtures of 60% tall oil methyl ester/40% diesel fuel (TE60) for preparing test fuels. Metallic fuel additives improved properties of biodiesel fuels, such as pour point and viscosity values. Biodiesel fuels were tested in an unmodified direct injection diesel engine at full load condition. Specific fuel consumption of biodiesel fuels increased by 6.00%, however, in comparison with TE60, it showed trend of decreasing with adding of additives. Exhaust emission profile of biodiesel fuels improved. CO emissions and smoke opacity decreased up to 64.28% and 30.91% respectively. Low NOx emission was also observed in general for the biodiesel fuels. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Variability in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) germplasm and hybrids for fatty acid profile of oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Naresh

    2011-12-28

    Coconut oil, the main product of coconut fruit, is the richest source of glycerol and lauric acid and hence is called lauric oil. This paper reports the fatty acid profile of oil from 60 Talls, 14 Dwarfs, and 34 hybrids. These include collections from 13 countries covering a large coconut-growing area of the world, apart from the indigenous ones. Capillary gas chromatography analysis of oil indicated a wider variation for the fatty acid profile than earlier reported. Apart from this, for the first time other fatty acids such as behenic and lignoceric acids were detected. Oil from cultivars and hybrids of coconut has significantly differed, particularly for commercially important fatty acids such as lauric acid and unsaturated fatty acids. However, coconut oil seems to have a conserved fatty acid profile, mainly because of low unsaturated fatty acids, indicating the possibility of grouping cultivars on the basis of their fatty acid profiles. The cluster analysis based on fatty acid profile indicated grouping together of geographically and typically closely related cultivars. Cultivars with high concentrations of specific fatty acids can be of potential use for industrial exploitation, whereas those with high concentrations of short- and medium-chain fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids are more suitable for human consumption. Cultivars and hybrids with high and low values for each of the fatty acids are also identified.

  18. Extraction of Phytosterols from Tall Oil Soap Using Selected Organic Solvents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rousková, Milena; Heyberger, Aleš; Tříska, Jan; Krtička, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2011), s. 805-812 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS400720504; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : liquid-liquid extraction * tall oil soap * phytosterols Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.096, year: 2011

  19. Volatiles and fatty oil of Cucurbita maxima

    OpenAIRE

    Veličković, Dragan T.; Ristić, Mihailo S.; Karabegović, Ivana T.; Stojičević, Saša S.; Nikolić, Nada Č.; Lazić, Miodrag L.

    2015-01-01

    The subjects of this study are volatile fractions from the fruit, leaf and seed of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima), as well as the oil extracted from the seeds of the above plant, with its fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity. The isolation of volatiles was performed by the hydrodistillation process with the Clevenger type apparatus. Seed oil was extracted in a Soxhlet extractor using petroleum ether. The preparation of fatty acid methyl esters was performed according to the AOAC me...

  20. Genotoxic effects of fumes from asphalt modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Hanna K; Väänänen, Virpi; Järventaus, Hilkka; Suhonen, Satu; Nygren, Jonas; Hämeilä, Mervi; Valtonen, Jarkko; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Norppa, Hannu

    2008-05-31

    As the use of recycled materials and industrial by-products in asphalt mixtures is increasing, we investigated if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of fumes emitted from asphalt. Fumes were generated in the laboratory at paving temperature from stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) and from SMA modified with waste plastic (90% polyethylene, 10% polypropylene) and tall oil pitch (SMA-WPT). In addition, fumes from SMA, SMA-WPT, asphalt concrete (AC), and AC modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch (AC-WPT) were collected at paving sites. The genotoxicity of the fumes was studied by analysis of DNA damage (measured in the comet assay) and micronucleus formation in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro and by counting mutations in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and YG1024. DNA damage was also assessed in buccal leukocytes from road pavers before and after working with SMA, SMA-WPT, AC, and AC-WPT. The chemical composition of the emissions was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The SMA-WPT fume generated in the laboratory induced a clear increase in DNA damage in BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. The laboratory-generated SMA fume increased the frequency of micronucleated BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes collected at the paving sites produced DNA damage with or without metabolic activation. Fumes from SMA and SMA-WPT from the paving sites increased micronucleus frequency without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes studied showed mutagenic activity in Salmonella. No statistically significant differences in DNA damage in buccal leukocytes were detected between the pre- and post-shift samples collected from the road pavers. However, a positive correlation was found between DNA damage and the urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) after work shift, which suggested an association between occupational exposures during road paving and genotoxic effects. Our

  1. Influence of tall oil biodiesel with Mg and Mo based fuel additives on diesel engine performance and emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Ali; Gürü, Metin; Altiparmak, Duran

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate influences of tall oil biodiesel with Mg and Mo based fuel additives on diesel engine performance and emission. Tall oil resinic acids were reacted with MgO and MoO(2) stoichiometrically for the production of metal-based fuel additives (combustion catalysts). The metal-based additives were added into tall oil biodiesel (B60) at the rate of 4 micromol/l, 8 micromol/l and 12 micromol/l for preparing test fuels. In general, both of the metal-based additives improved flash point, pour point and viscosity of the biodiesel fuel, depending on the rate of additives. A single cylinder DI diesel engine was used in the tests. Engine performance values did not change significantly with biodiesel fuels, but exhaust emission profile was improved. CO emissions and smoke opacity decreased by 56.42% and by 30.43%, respectively. In general, low NO(x) and CO(2) emissions were measured with the biodiesel fuels.

  2. 21 CFR 172.856 - Propylene glycol mono- and diesters of fats and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... fatty acids. 172.856 Section 172.856 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... diesters of fats and fatty acids. Propylene glycol mono- and diesters of fats and fatty acids may be safely... and/or fatty acids in compliance with § 172.860 and/or oleic acid derived from tall oil fatty acids in...

  3. Fatty acid composition of maize germ oil from high-oil hybrids wet-milling processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Petar Lj.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Maize germ was obtained by wet-milling laboratory processing of domestic high-oil maize hybrids. After separation, the germ was subjected to extraction of maize oil. Fatty acid composition of maize germ oil was determined by gas chromatography. The results showed very high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and a constant sum of oleic and linoleic acids in oils of different maize hybrids.

  4. TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL ENRICHED BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    OpenAIRE

    K. Leshukov; K. Klimov; O. Kuprina

    2012-01-01

    The technology of butter with the "OmegaTrin" complex with the balanced content of polynonsaturated fat acids is developed. Studied the fatty acid composition of milk - raw materials, optimal amount of insertion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, organoleptic characteristics of enriched butter; studied physico-chemical properties and biological value (biological effectiveness) of the final product, fatty acid composition of a new product, set the shelf life and developed an oil recipe.

  5. TECHNOLOGY FOR OIL ENRICHED BY POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leshukov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The technology of butter with the "OmegaTrin" complex with the balanced content of polynonsaturated fat acids is developed. Studied the fatty acid composition of milk - raw materials, optimal amount of insertion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, organoleptic characteristics of enriched butter; studied physico-chemical properties and biological value (biological effectiveness of the final product, fatty acid composition of a new product, set the shelf life and developed an oil recipe.

  6. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester M Den Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term 3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated 3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated 3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (3 or sunflower oil (9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered 3-PUFAs. Plasma of 3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of 3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, 3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than 9 myocytes. In the 9 myocytes, but not in the 3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated 3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered 3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac 3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term 3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  7. Fatty acids profile of chia oil-loaded lipid microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Encapsulation of poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFAis an alternative to increase its stability during processing and storage. Chia (Salvia hispanica L. oil is a reliable source of both omega-3 and omega-6 and its encapsulation must be better evaluated as an effort to increase the number of foodstuffs containing PUFAs to consumers. In this work chia oil was extracted and encapsulated in stearic acid microparticles by the hot homogenization technique. UV-Vis spectroscopy coupled with Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares methodology demonstrated that no oil degradation or tocopherol loss occurred during heating. After lyophilization, the fatty acids profile of the oil-loaded microparticles was determined by gas chromatography and compared to in natura oil. Both omega-3 and omega-6 were effectively encapsulated, keeping the same omega-3:omega-6 ratio presented in the in natura oil. Calorimetric analysis confirmed that encapsulation improved the thermal stability of the chia oil.

  8. Fatty Acid And Essential Oil Compositions Of The Seed Oil Of Five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fatty acid and essential oil compositions of the seed oil of Annona cherimola, A. muricata, A. reticulata, A. senegalensis and A. squamosa were investigated by GC and GC/MS spectra. About eleven fatty acids were identified of which oleic, gondoic, palmitic and stearic acids predominated in each sample, and others ...

  9. Evaluation of Pistacia lentiscus Fatty Oil Effects on Glycemic Index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil (PLFO) is a well known natural remedy in eastern Algeria folk medicine. It is widely used in the treatment of respiratory disorders and dermal burns. The present study has been carried out to investigate effects of this oil on fasting glucose and some functional parameters of the liver and kidney in ...

  10. Seed oil content and fatty acid composition of annual halophyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suaeda acuminata produces two morphologically distinct types of seeds on the same plant. This study was conducted to compare oil content and fatty acid composition of the two seed morphs. Though oil characteristics between dimorphic seeds showed statistically significant difference, these differences were relatively ...

  11. Fatty Acid Profile and Bioactivity from Annona hypoglauca Seeds Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plants from Annona (Annonaceae) genus are present in tropical regions, where they have economic and medicinal potential. Information on the fatty acids profile and bioactivity from seed oil of Annona species are incipient. The objective of this work was to investigate Annona hypoglauca seeds oil in terms of its yield, ...

  12. Essential Oils and Fatty Acids Composition of Dry Fruits of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fatty acid was about 54% saturated and 46% unsaturated with omega-6 and omega-3 constituting 27% and omega-9 (20%). The effectiveness of T.tetraptera to the treatment of variety of ailments does not depend largely on the essential oils composition of the plant since the oil is dominated by acetic acid. Any essential ...

  13. [Fatty acid of Rkatsiteli grape seed oil, Phellodendron lavallei oil and Amaranthus seeds oil and its comparative byological activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikalishvili, B Iu; Zurabashvili, D Z; Zurabashvili, Z A; Turabelidze, D G; Shanidze, L A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study is individual qualitively and quantitatively identification of fatty acids in Pkatsiteli grape seed oil, Phellodendron lavallei oil and Amaranthus seed oil and prediction of its biological activity. Using high-effective liquid chromatogramphy fatty acids were franctionated. Their relative concentrations are expressed as percentages of the total fatty acid component. Identification of the fatty acids consituents is based on comparison of their retention time with that of known standards. The predominant fatty acids in the oils were palmitic, oleic and stearic acids. The investigation demonstrated that fatty acids composition takes marked part in lipid metabolism of biological necessary components. The most interesting result of the investigation was the detection of unusual for the essentain oil begenic acid.

  14. Thai jute seed oil: a potential polyunsaturated fatty acid source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitree Suttajit

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined lipid and fatty acid compositions of different varieties of jute (Po-kra-jao, Corchorus olitorius L. seed grown in Thailand. Four different jute seeds (Nonn-Soong, Keaw-Yai, Cuba and Khonkaen harvested from northeastern Thailand were ground, their lipid was extracted with chloroform: methanol (2:1, v/v, and lipid composition was determined by Iatroscan (TLC/FID. Fatty acid composition was analyzed using GLC with standard methods. Triacylglycerol was a predominant lipid in jute seed oil, ranging from 70% to 74%, and other two minor components were phytosterol (12% to 28% and diacylglycerol (0% to 9%. The ratio of saturates: monounsaturates: polyunsaturates, was approximately 2: 3: 4. Most predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA was linoleic acid (18:2n-6, accounting for 40-67% of total fatty acid. Nonn-Soong had the highest amount of PUFA (67.7%, followed by Khonkaen (44.53%, Keaw-Yai (41.14%, and Cuba (40.19%. Another PUFA found was α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3, accounting for about 1% of total fatty acid. The results indicated that jute seed oil was a potential edible PUFA source. The oils obtained from different kinds of jute seeds had significantly different lipid and fatty acid compositions.

  15. 77 FR 65834 - Residues of Fatty Acids, Tall-Oil, Ethoxylated Propoxylated; Tolerance Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... docket identification (ID) number EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0278, is available at http://www.regulations.gov or at.... In the case of certain chemical substances that are defined as polymers, the Agency has established a set of criteria to identify categories of polymers expected to present minimal or no risk. The...

  16. Fatty acid fragmentation of triacylglycerol isolated from crude nyamplung oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparamarta, Hakun Wirawasista; Anggraini, Desy; Istianingsih, Della; Susanto, David Febrilliant; Widjaja, Arief; Ju, Yi-Hsu; Gunawan, Setiyo

    2017-05-01

    Nyamplung (Calophylluminophyllum) has many benefits ranging from roots, stems, leaves, until seeds. In this seed, C. inophyllum contained significantly high amount of crude oil (70.4%). C. inophyllum oil is known as non edible. Therefore Indonesian people generally only know that seeds can produce oil that can be used for biodiesel. In this work, the fragmentation of fatty acid in triacylglycerols (TAG) was studied. The isolation process was started with separation of non polar lipid fraction (NPLF) from crude C. inophyllum oil via batchwise multistage liquid extraction. TAG was obtained in high purity (99%) and was analyzed by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) and Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GCMS). It was found that fatty acids of TAG are palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), oleic acid (C18:1c), linoleic acid (C18:2c), and linolenic acid (C18:3c). Moreover, TAG isolated from C. inophyllum oil was promising as edible oil.

  17. Drought and heat stress effects on soybean fatty acid composition and oil stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that oil concentration and fatty acid profile (composition) change with genotype, environment (mainly heat and drought), and geographical location. The changes in fatty acid composition under these conditions affect fatty acid stability, creating a challenge to oil proces...

  18. Production of fatty alcohol from palm oil methyl ester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongurai, C.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fatty alcohol is an important raw material for the production of surfactants, and is currently in demand by markets and has a high potential for growth. Moreover, fatty alcohol can be made from methylester that is produced from fats and natural oil. The production of fatty alcohol involved hydrogenation using the suspension method process and methyl ester in palm oil as the raw material. Copper chromite was used as the catalyst for the hydrogenationreaction and the experiment was proceeded in a close system pressure reaction vessel. The reaction was conducted at approximately 150-250oC, 1100-1700 psig, 2-8% catalyst W/V of methyl ester and reaction timefrom 5-20 hr. After the reaction, the products were analysed to check for percent conversion using gas chromatography (GC. The hydrogenation reaction began at 200oC. The best hydrogenation reaction for theproduction of fatty alcohol occurred at 250oC, 1700 psig, 6% catalyst and reaction time of 20 hr, which gave a purity greater than 97%.

  19. Improving Vegetable Oil Properties by Transforming Fatty Acid Chain Length in Jatropha Oil and Coconut Oil Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to improve the physical and chemical properties of vegetable oils as diesel fuels such as viscosity and calorific value are indispensable with the depletion of fossil oil reserves. Jatropha oil with long chain fatty acids and high degree of unsaturation is mixed with short chain saturated fatty acid coconut oil in various compositions. The mixture was heated and stirred for 30 min at 90 °C. This mixing leads to a decrease in viscosity which allows for the breaking of the bond. The fatty acid molecule structure undergoes transformation that changes the degree of unsaturation and the average length of the carbon chain. Consequently, the kinematic viscosity and flash point of the mixture decreases while its calorific value increases.

  20. Methods of refining and producing isomerized fatty acid esters and fatty acids from natural oil feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.; Beltran, Leslie V.; Kunz, Linda A.; Pals, Tessa M.; Quinn, Jordan R; Behrends, Jr., Raymond T.; Bernhardt, Randal J.

    2016-07-05

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing isomerized esters and acids. The methods comprise providing a C4-C18 unsaturated fatty ester or acid, and isomerizing the fatty acid ester or acid in the presence of heat or an isomerization catalyst to form an isomerized fatty ester or acid. In some embodiments, the methods comprise forming a dibasic ester or dibasic acid prior to the isomerizing step. In certain embodiments, the methods further comprise hydrolyzing the dibasic ester to form a dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin is formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having unsaturated esters.

  1. Effects of dietary oil sources on egg quality, fatty acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of this study demonstrated that olive oil improved egg weight and egg shell quality compared to the other oils tested; fish and soyabean oil increased the omega-3 fatty acid level of egg yolk, and soyabean oil had positive effects on serum lipid concentrations. Incorporation of these oils into the diets of Japanese ...

  2. Coconut oil and sesame oil affect lymphatic absorption of cholesterol and fatty acids in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchithanandam, S; Reicks, M; Calvert, R J; Cassidy, M M; Kritchevsky, D

    1993-11-01

    Five groups of male Wistar rats weighing approximately 200 g consumed 12 or 24% sesame oil or coconut oil diets or a control diet (14% corn oil) ad libitum for 4 wk. The thoracic ducts of these rats were cannulated, and a lipid emulsion containing [3H]cholesterol and [14C]oleic acid was given through a duodenal catheter. Lymph was collected for 24 h and the isotopic tracers for cholesterol and fatty acid were measured. Rats fed the 24% sesame oil diet had significantly lower lymphatic cholesterol and fatty acid compared with the control group. Absorption of oleic acid in rats fed 24% coconut oil was significantly greater than in controls during 0-8 h but was not significantly different during 0-24 h. There were no differences among groups in the distribution of cholesterol and oleic acid either in the lymph lipoproteins or in the lipid classes. The significant reduction in lymph cholesterol and fatty acids due to sesame oil feeding may be an important factor in reducing hypercholesterolemia.

  3. Effect of vegetable oils on fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of chicken frankfurters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belichovska, D.; Pejkovski, Z.; Belichovska, K.; Uzunoska, Z.; Silovska-Nikolova, A.

    2017-09-01

    To study the effect of pork adipose tissue substitution with vegetable oils in chicken frankfurters, six frankfurter formulations were produced: control; with pork backfat; with olive oil; with rapeseed oil; with sunflower oil; with palm oil, and; with a mixture of 12% rapeseed oil and 8% palm oil. Fatty acid composition and cholesterol content and some oxides thereof were determined in the final products. The use of vegetable oils resulted in improvement of the fatty acid composition and nutritional of frankfurters. Frankfurters with vegetable oils contained significantly less cholesterol and some of its oxides, compared to the frankfurters with pork fat. The formulation with palm oil had the least favourable fatty acid composition. The use of 12% rapeseed oil improved the ratio of fatty acids in frankfurters with a mixture of rapeseed and palm oils. Complete pork fat replacement with vegetable oils in chicken frankfurter production is technologically possible. The mixture of 12% rapeseed oil and 8% palm oil is a good alternative to pork fat from health aspects. Further research is needed to find the most appropriate mixture of vegetable oils, which will produce frankfurters with good sensory characteristics, a more desirable fatty acid ratio and high nutritional value.

  4. BREAD SPREADS PREPARED FROM VEGETABLE OIL BLENDS HAVING BALANCED FATTY ACID PROFILE

    OpenAIRE

    SAGARIKA BHATTACHARYYA

    2013-01-01

    Palm oil and mowrah oil are semi solid at room temperature in tropical countries. The oils are blended separately with til oil and rice bran oil respectively in formulation of bread spreads. Moreover, the fatty acid profile of the experimental oil blends are more balanced compared to that of butter or margarine. The experiment shows that the margarines prepared from the blend of palm oil and til oil and mowrah oil and rice bran oil in different proportion like 85:15 and 80:20 respectively are...

  5. Relationship between fatty acid composition and biodiesel quality for nine commercial palm oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanida Lamaisri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel consisting of alkyl esters of fatty acids from vegetable oils or animal fats. The fatty acid compositions in the oils used as feedstock can influence quality of the biodiesel. In the present study, oil content and fatty acid composition of mesocarp and kernel oil were examined from nine commercial oil palm Elaeis guineensis cultivars. Saponification number, iodine value and cetane number were calculated from palm oil fatty acid methyl ester compositions. Fruits of tenera oil palm were collected from a farmer’s plantation in Dan Makham Tia District, Kanchanaburi Province in 2009. Variation between cultivars was observed in oil content and fatty acid profile of mesocarp oil rather than kernel oil. The percentage of oil in dry mesocarp ranged from 63.8% to 74.9%. The mesocarp oil composed of 41.5 - 51.6% palmitic acid, 3.58-7.10% stearic acid, 32.8-42.5% oleic acid and 9.3-13.0% linoleic acid. Likewise saponification number, iodine value and cetane number of mesocarp oil fatty acid methyl ester showed more variation among cultivars, ranging from 196.5-198.9, 45.7-54.6 and 61.8-63.6, respectively. While those of kernel oil fatty acid methyl ester showed no different among cultivars, ranging from 229-242, 13.6-16.4 and 65.3-66.5, respectively. The cetane number of fatty acid methyl ester positively correlated with contents of myristic, palmitic and stearic acids in palm oil and saponification number of biodiesel, but negatively correlated with iodine value

  6. Hypolipidemic effect of oils with balanced amounts of fatty acids obtained by blending and interesterification of coconut oil with rice bran oil or sesame oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reena, Malongil B; Lokesh, Belur R

    2007-12-12

    Blended oils comprising coconut oil (CNO) and rice bran oil (RBO) or sesame oil (SESO) with saturated fatty acid/monounsaturated fatty acid/polyunsaturated fatty acid at a ratio of 1:1:1 and polyunsaturated/saturated ratio of 0.8-1 enriched with nutraceuticals were prepared. Blended oils (B) were subjected to interesterification reaction using sn-1,3 specific Lipase from Rhizomucor miehei. Fatty acid composition and nutraceutical contents of the blended oil were not affected by interesterification reaction. Male Wistar rats were fed with AIN-76 diet containing 10% fat from CNO, RBO, SESO, CNO+RBO blend (B), CNO+SESO(B), CNO+RBO interesterified (I), or CNO+SESO(I) for 60 days. Serum total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerols (TAGs) were reduced by 23.8, 32.4, and 13.9%, respectively, in rats fed CNO+RBO(B) and by 20.5, 34.1, and 12.9%, respectively, in rats fed CNO+SESO(B) compared to rats given CNO. Rats fed interesterified oils showed a decrease in serum TC, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and TAGs in CNO+RBO(I) by 35, 49.1, and 23.2 and by 33.3, 47, and 19.8% in CNO+SESO(I), respectively, compared to rats given CNO. Compared to rats fed CNO+RBO blended oils, rats on CNO+RBO interesterified oil showed a further decrease of 14.6, 24.7, and 10% in TC, LDL-C, and TAG. Rats fed CNO+SESO interesterified oils showed a decrease in serum TC, LDL-C, and TAG by 16.2, 19.6, and 7.8%, respectively, compared to rats given blended oils of CNO+SESO (B). Liver lipid analysis also showed significant change in the TC and TAG concentration in rats fed blended and interesterified oils of CNO+RBO and CNO+SESO compared to the rats given CNO. The present study suggests that feeding fats containing blended oils with balanced fatty acids lowers serum and liver lipids. Interesterified oils prepared using Lipase have a further lowering effect on serum and liver lipids even though the fatty acid composition of blended and interesterified

  7. Impact of climate changes and correlations on oil fatty acids in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onemli, F.

    2012-01-01

    Sunflower oil is a major important vegetable oil because it is widely used in human nutrition and in many industrial productions depends on fatty acid composition. Field studies were conducted during in two years on the same soil to investigate changes of climate induced oil fatty acid composition of a traditional sunflower, and to obtain correlations among oil fatty acids. Seed oil content and twelve fatty acid percentages of sunflower oil were analyzed. Variations for years were significant for seed oil content and palmitic acid (C16:0), oleic (C18:1), linoleic (C18:2), linolenic (C18:3), miristic (C14:0) and eicosenoic acids (C20:1). Higher temperatures during seed development in 2010 resulted with 68.38 % increasing in oleic content of the traditional sunflower hybrid. The highest negative correlations (r= -0.99) were noted between oleic and linoleic acids. (author)

  8. EB curable coating based on soy-oil fatty acid modified acrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi min; Li Jun; Zhang Jianbo; Wang Weijing

    1998-01-01

    Soy-oil fatty acid was used to synthesize the soy-oil fatty acid modified acrylic coating by esterification reaction. After coating and EB curing, the results showed that the properties of the film were excellent, and it was suitable for the coating of wood furniture cured by EB

  9. variations of the fatty acid composition in the oil from the larval ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    A determination of the fatty acid composition of the two oil samples by capillary GC and NMR studies however showed that the two oil samples were in fact very similar [2]. It was however felt that the age difference between early V instars and late V instars phane was too close for any significant variations in their fatty.

  10. Fatty acid profile of eggs of semi-heavy layers fed feeds containing linseed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JG Souza

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of polyunsaturated fatty acids in chicken eggs by adding oils to the diets has been extensively studied. This experiment aimed at evaluating possible changes in the fatty acid profile of the eggs of layers fed diets supplemented with linseed and soybean oils. The experiment was performed using 192 29 week-old laying hens, distributed in a completely randomized design, into six treatments with four replicates of eight birds each. Treatments consisted of a control diet (no vegetable oil and diets including 2% of vegetable oil. Linseed oil replaced 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% soybean oil in the diets, corresponding to 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% of linseed oil in the diet. A pool of two egg yolks from each treatment was submitted to lipid extraction and fatty acid methylation, and subsequent gas chromatography (GC analysis to detect seven fatty acids. Saturated (myristic and palmitic fatty acids concentration was affected by lipid dietary source, with the lowest concentration in birds were fed feeds containing linseed oil. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA concentration in the eggs was influenced by different levels of linseed oil inclusion. Linoleic acid egg content increased when linseed oil was used on diet as compared to the control diet. Linseed oil was considered an excellent source of linolenic acid incorporation in the eggs.

  11. EFFECT OF SOME PLANT OILS ON THE FATTY ACIDS OF HUMP BEETLE GIBBIUM PSYLLOIDES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABBASY, S.A.; ALY, W.M.; REZK, S.A.

    2008-01-01

    The efficiency of some plant oils (sesame oil, camphor oil, castor oil and camomile oil) as insecticides were studied on newly emerged males and females Gibbium psylloids and also the effect of LC50 of each plant oils on fatty acids composition and relative concentration were determined. The obtained results showed that sesame oil had proved to be more effective with it's advantage over other tested oils of being used at lower concentration and it followed by chamomile oil then camphor oil and finally castor oil. The susceptibility of the males and females to plant oils was the same. There were differences in the number and relative concentration of fatty acids between males and females. Nine fatty acids were detected by the analysis of the whole body of untreated males , these fatty acids are capric (C10) , lauric (C12) , myristic (C14), palmiloleic (C16), margic (C17), stearic (C18) , oleic (C18:1) , linoleic (C18:2) and linolenic (C18:3) . Treatments of males with LC50 sesame oil lead to the appearance of ten fatty acids with increase of caprylic acid (C8) while LC50 chamomile oil lead to the appearance of six fatty acids and fatty acid with C10 , C18:1 and C18:2 were disappeared as compared to control. LC50 of camphor oil lead to the appearance of ten fatty acids and castor oil lead to the appearance of six fatty acids. In untreated females, five fatty acids with C12 , C16 , C17 , C18 and C18:1 were detected. Treatments with sesame oil lead to the appearance of new fatty acid with C18:2 and chamomile oil lead to the appearance of nine fatty acids with increase of C8 , C10 , C14 and C18:2 as compared with untreated females. Camphor oil treatment lead to the appearance of nine fatty acids with increase of four fatty acids with C6 , C8 , C10 and C18:2 as compared to untreated females and fatty acid with C18:1 was disappeared in the treatments. Castor oil leads to the appearance of seven fatty acids. The relative concentration of C12 was the highest fatty acid in

  12. Nutritional evaluation of structured lipid containing omega 6 fatty acid synthesized from coconut oil in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Reena; Lokesh, Belur R

    2003-06-01

    Coconut oil is rich in medium chain fatty acids, but deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Structured lipids (SL) enriched with omega 6 PUFA were synthesized from coconut oil triglycerides by employing enzymatic acidolysis with free fatty acids obtained from safflower oil. Rats were fed a diet containing coconut oil, coconut oil-safflower oil blend (1:0.7 w/ w) or structured lipid at 10% levels for a period of 60 days. The SL lowered serum cholesterol levels by 10.3 and 10.5% respectively in comparison with those fed coconut oil and blended oil. Similarly the liver cholesterol levels were also decreased by 35.9 and 26.6% respectively in animals fed structured lipids when compared to those fed on coconut oil or the blended oil. Most of the decrease observed in serum cholesterol levels of animals fed structured lipids was found in LDL fraction. The triglyceride levels in serum showed a decrease by 17.5 and 17.4% while in the liver it was reduced by 45.8 and 23.5% in the structured lipids fed animals as compared to those fed coconut oil or blended oil respectively. Differential scanning calorimetric studies indicated that structured lipids had lower melting points and solid fat content when compared to coconut oil or blended oils. These studies indicated that enrichment of coconut oil triglycerides with omega 6 fatty acids lowers its solid fat content. The omega 6 PUFA enriched structured lipids also exhibited hypolipidemic activity.

  13. Encapsulation of vegetable oils as source of omega-3 fatty acids for enriched functional foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Ruiz, Jorge Carlos; Ortiz Vazquez, Elizabeth De La Luz; Segura Campos, Maira Rubi

    2017-05-03

    Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids (PUFAs), a functional component present in vegetable oils, are generally recognized as being beneficial to health. Omega-3 PUFAs are rich in double bonds and unsaturated in nature; this attribute makes them highly susceptible to lipid oxidation and unfit for incorporation into long shelf life foods. The microencapsulation of oils in a polymeric matrix (mainly polysaccharides) offers the possibility of controlled release of the lipophilic functional ingredient and can be useful for the supplementation of foods with PUFAs. The present paper provides a literature review of different vegetable sources of omega-3 fatty acids, the functional effects of omega-3 fatty acids, different microencapsulation methods that can possibly be used for the encapsulation of oils, the properties of vegetable oil microcapsules, the effect of encapsulation on oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of vegetable oils, and the incorporation of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods.

  14. 75 FR 20785 - Polyglyceryl Phthalate Ester of Coconut Oil Fatty Acids; Exemption from the Requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Phthalate Ester of Coconut Oil Fatty Acids; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance; Technical... ester of coconut oil fatty acids; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. This document is being... requirement of a tolerance for ``polyglyceryl phthalate ester of coconut oil fatty acids'' pursuant to a...

  15. 21 CFR 172.225 - Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Methyl and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils. Methyl esters and ethyl esters of fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils may be safely used in food, subject to the... fatty acids produced from edible fats and oils and meets the following specifications: (1) Not less than...

  16. The effects of olive oil, hydrogenated palm oil, and omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diets on megakaryocytes and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, P K; Wojenski, C M; Walker, J

    1993-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are thought to prevent thrombotic and arteriosclerotic disease, whereas saturated fatty acids are thought to increase the incidence of these disorders. However, the effects of these diets on megakaryocytes and platelets are not well understood. We compared the effects of diets enriched with 8.4% olive oil, 8.4% hydrogenated palm oil, or 10.2% omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters on guinea pig megakaryocytes and platelets. In plasma, changes in fatty acid composition reflected the composition of each diet. However, in platelets and megakaryocytes, hydrogenated palm oil induced a decrease in 16:0 and an increase in 18:2 while the olive oil diet caused a marked increase in 18:1 and a decrease in most other fatty acids. The differences in the effects of the diets on cellular versus plasma fatty acids suggest that megakaryocytes and platelets have an extensive capacity to regulate their fatty acid composition. Thrombocytosis occurred with the omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diet: 12.9 +/- 1.78 x 10(5) compared with 7.45 +/- 1.08 x 10(5) platelets per microliter of platelet-rich plasma in control animals. There was an increase in megakaryocyte size, ploidy, and morphological stage (cytoplasmic maturation) with the omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diet but not with the other diets. The omega-3 fatty acid-enriched diet decreased platelet thromboxane production while the other diets had no effect. Platelet hypersensitivity was suggested in collagen aggregation studies with olive oil but not with the hydrogenated palm oil diet. Although saturated fatty acid diets are thought to be atherogenic, this diet had no affect on platelet function.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Assessment of oil content and fatty acid composition variability in two economically important Hibiscus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming Li; Morris, Brad; Tonnis, Brandon; Davis, Jerry; Pederson, Gary A

    2012-07-04

    The Hibiscus genus encompasses more than 300 species, but kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) and roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) are the two most economically important species within the genus. Seeds from these two Hibiscus species contain a relatively high amount of oil with two unusual fatty acids: dihydrosterculic and vernolic acids. The fatty acid composition in the oil can directly affect oil quality and its utilization. However, the variability in oil content and fatty acid composition for these two species is unclear. For these two species, 329 available accessions were acquired from the USDA germplasm collection. Their oil content and fatty acid composition were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. Using NMR and GC analyses, we found that Hibiscus seeds on average contained 18% oil and seed oil was composed of six major fatty acids (each >1%) and seven minor fatty acids (each Hibiscus cannabinus seeds contained significantly higher amounts of oil (18.14%), palmitic (20.75%), oleic (28.91%), vernolic acids (VA, 4.16%), and significantly lower amounts of stearic (3.96%), linoleic (39.49%), and dihydrosterculic acids (DHSA, 1.08%) than H. sabdariffa seeds (17.35%, 18.52%, 25.16%, 3.52%, 4.31%, 44.72%, and 1.57%, respectively). For edible oils, a higher oleic/linoleic (O/L) ratio and lower level of DHSA are preferred, and for industrial oils a high level of VA is preferred. Our results indicate that seeds from H. cannabinus may be of higher quality than H. sabdariffa seeds for these reasons. Significant variability in oil content and major fatty acids was also detected within both species. The variability in oil content and fatty acid composition revealed from this study will be useful for exploring seed utilization and developing new cultivars in these Hibiscus species.

  18. Fermentative Extraction of Coconut Oil to Maintain a Quality of Medium Chain Fatty Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Salahudin, Farid; Supriyatna, Nana

    2014-01-01

    Coconut oil is healthy vegetable oil because it contains Medium Chain Fatty Acid (MCFA). The used of bleaching agent and excessive heating in coconut oil process will produce low quality oil (rancid). Therefore, it is necessary to processing that does not use chemicals and excessive heating such as fermentation using microbe and enzyme. The aim of this study was to find out the effect of bromelin enzyme concentration and Saccharomyces cereviceae fermentation to MCFA content in coconut oil. Th...

  19. Effects of microencapsulation on bioavailability of fish oil omega-3 fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten B; Yang, Mingshi; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Increased research interest in the health benefits of fish oils and the wide publicity of these studies have led to the marketing and launch of a wide array of new and traditional food and beverage products enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. This chapter focuses on the impact of microencapsulation...... and other factors on the bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oils. To help understand the impact of microencapsulation on bioavailability of omega-3 fatty acids, it presents a brief overview of encapsulation techniques and excipients used. Microencapsulation of fish oil improves its chemical...... stability by preventing oxidation and ensuring satisfactory organoleptic properties. Even though encapsulation excipients food matrices and lipid structures can affect the absorption rate of omega-3 fatty acids in short-term studies, microencapsulated fish oil and omega-3 fatty acids enriched foods...

  20. ESTERIFICATION OF FATTY ACID FROM PALM OIL WASTE (SLUDGE OIL BY USING ALUM CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamrin Usman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Esterification of fatty acids from palm oil waste (sludge oil as biodiesel liquid base has been done by using alum [Al2(SO43.14H2O] catalyst. Some reaction variables like reaction time, catalyst quantity, and molar ratio of sample-reactant was applied for optimal reaction. Yield of 94.66% was obtained at reaction condition 65 °C, 5 h, sample-reactant ratio 1:20, and catalyst quantity 3% (w/w. GC-MS analysis request showed that composition of methyl esters biodiesel are methyl caproic (0.67%, methyl lauric (0.21%, methyl miristic (1.96%, methyl palmitic (49.52%, methyl oleic (41.51%, and methyl stearic (6.13%. Physical properties of synthesized product (viscosity, refraction index and density are similar with those of commercial product.   Keywords: alum, biodiesel, esterification, sludge oil

  1. Modification of egg yolk fatty acids profile by using different oil sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Mohsen; Rahimi, Shaban; Karimi Torshizi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different dietary oil sources supplementation on laying hens' performance and fatty acids profile of egg yolks. Seventy-two 23-week-old laying hens (Tetra-SL) divided into six experimental diets (four replicates and three birds per replication) in a completely randomized design for nine weeks. Experimental diets were included: 1) control (no oil), 2) 3.00% fish oil, 3) 3.00% olive oil, 4) 3.00% grape seed oil, 5) 3.00% canola oil, and 6) 3.00% soybean oil. The diets were similar in terms of energy and protein. Egg production, egg mass, egg weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio and fatty acid composition of egg yolk were determined at the end of the trial. The results indicated that the performance parameters were not significantly different between treatments in the entire period (p > 0.05). However, fatty acids profiles of yolk were affected by experimental diets (p oil significantly reduced omega-6 fatty acids and increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in egg yolk. Also canola oil increased linolenic acid content in the egg yolk. In conclusion, fish oil increased omega-3 long-chain fatty acids and decreased omega-6 to omega-3 ratio in eggs which may have beneficial effects on human health.

  2. The interaction of the soybean seed high oleic acid oil trait with other fatty acid modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oil value is determined by the functional qualities imparted from the fatty acid profile. Soybean oil historically had excellent utilization in both food and industrial uses, but the need to increase the stability of the oil without negative health consequences has led to a significant decline in s...

  3. Characterization of european virgin olive oils using fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso García, María V.

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of discriminating between extra virgin olive oils from different regions of Spain, Italy and Portugal, by means of their fatty acid content, has been investigated. A dendrogram allowed discrimination between the oils starting from their initial grouping and progressing to differentiation on the basis of regions. Multivariant statistical analyses were applied to determine the actual discriminatory capacity of this group of compounds. The confidence associated with the final discrimination was ascertained using the theory of evidence.

    Se ha estudiado la posibilidad de discriminación entre aceites de oliva virgen procedentes de diferentes regiones de España, Italia y Portugal, mediante sus ácidos grasos. Para llevar a cabo la discriminación entre los aceites, desde su agrupación inicial hasta la diferenciación por regiones, se empleó una estructura arborescente. Fueron aplicados procedimientos estadísticos multivariantes para determinar la capacidad discriminante actual de este grupo de compuestos. La certeza asociada a la discriminación final fue calculada mediante la teoría de la evidencia.

  4. Selective Enrichment of Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Oils by Phospholipase A1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Ranjan Moharana

    Full Text Available Omega fatty acids are recognized as key nutrients for healthier ageing. Lipases are used to release ω-3 fatty acids from oils for preparing enriched ω-3 fatty acid supplements. However, use of lipases in enrichment of ω-3 fatty acids is limited due to their insufficient specificity for ω-3 fatty acids. In this study use of phospholipase A1 (PLA1, which possesses both sn-1 specific activity on phospholipids and lipase activity, was explored for hydrolysis of ω-3 fatty acids from anchovy oil. Substrate specificity of PLA1 from Thermomyces lenuginosus was initially tested with synthetic p-nitrophenyl esters along with a lipase from Bacillus subtilis (BSL, as a lipase control. Gas chromatographic characterization of the hydrolysate obtained upon treatment of anchovy oil with these enzymes indicated a selective retention of ω-3 fatty acids in the triglyceride fraction by PLA1 and not by BSL. 13C NMR spectroscopy based position analysis of fatty acids in enzyme treated and untreated samples indicated that PLA1 preferably retained ω-3 fatty acids in oil, while saturated fatty acids were hydrolysed irrespective of their position. Hydrolysis of structured triglyceride,1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol, suggested that both the enzymes hydrolyse the fatty acids at both the positions. The observed discrimination against ω-3 fatty acids by PLA1 appears to be due to its fatty acid selectivity rather than positional specificity. These studies suggest that PLA1 could be used as a potential enzyme for selective concentrationof ω-3 fatty acids.

  5. Fatty acid profile and oxidation tests of fat extracted from yogurt using rose hip seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Katarzyna; Domagała, Jacek; Wszołek, Monika

    2018-01-01

    Yogurt is a dairy product with a high nutritional value. However, like all milk products, it contains milk fat and is rich in saturated fatty acids. It would be desirable to enrich dairy products in poly- unsaturated fatty acids to increase dietary intake amongst consumers and improve their health. Also, some LAB bacteria are able to produce CLA and CLnA isomers from linoleic and linolenic acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical properties and fatty acid profile of yogurt with the addition of 3.5% of rose hip seed oil. Yogurt was made from skimmed milk and yogurt starter culture YC-180 Ch. Hansen (Denmark), with the addition of 3.5% of rose hip seed oil. The peroxide value, acid value, iodine value, TBA rate and fatty acid profile were determined in fat extracted from the yogurt after 1 and 14 days of storage and in fresh rose hip seed oil. The fatty acid profile was determined using gas chromatographic methods with mass spectrometric detectors. Fat extracted from the yogurts had lower levels of peroxides than the fresh oil. It was more acidic and the iodine value was higher than in the fresh oil. Rose hip seed oil enriched the product with polyunsaturated fatty acids. After 14 days of storage, linoleic and linolenic acid levels had increased. Moreover, the content of myristic and palmitic acids had decreased. The rose hip seed oil added to the yogurt was less susceptible to oxidation. The content of un- saturated fatty acids in the yogurt increased with the addition of the oil, making yogurt with rose hip seed oil an excellent source of Ω-3 and Ω-6 fatty acids. Conjugated linoleic (CLA) and linolenic (CLnA) acids were not detected. However, yogurt manufactured with appropriate adjunct cultures and with the correct oil addition could be a natural source of CLA and CLnA in the human diet.

  6. Determination expediency of the omega-3 unsaturated acids in fatty oils by NMR 1H spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananikyan, H.S.

    2016-01-01

    1 H NMR spectra of fatty oils obtained from seeds of 55 plants were investigated 8 groups of signals were identified in all NMR spectra. Omega-3 fatty acids CH 3 groups signals were noticed in some of the spectra as a triplet in the area of 0.85-1.05 p.p.m. (oil CH 3 groups signals area). Integral intensities of omega-3 fatty acids CH 3 groups signals were calculated by using integral intensities of oils all CH 3 groups signals. Percents of omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids in each of the investigated oils were then calculated. Theoretical percents of omega-3 fatty acids in oils were calculated. For that it was assumed that the signals of 2 CH 2 groups corresponds to 4 H signal and the signals of 3CH 3 group corresponds to 9 H signal. The experimental and theoretical percents of omega-3 fatty acids calculations were compared, and the accuracy of omega-3 fatty acids percent in oil was determined

  7. Effects of frying in various cooking oils on fatty acid content of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our goal was to describe the effects of frying with various oils on the fatty acid content of rainbow trout. Four different oils were evaluated (peanut oil, high oleic sunflower oil, corn oil, and canola oil). Farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets were sliced into three portions and eac...

  8. Analytical Characterization of Butter Oil Enriched with Omega-3 and 6 Fatty Acid Sthrough Chia (Salvia hispanica L. Seed Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nadeem

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytical characterization of blends of butter oil and chia (Salvia hispanica L. seed oil was performed. Chia oil was added in butter oil at four different levels i.e. 6.25%, 12.5%, 18.75% and 25% (T1, T2, T3 and T4, butter oil without any addition of chia oil served as control. Blends of butter oil and chia oil were packaged in tin containers, stored at ambient temperature (34±2oC for 90-days. Iodine values of control, T1, T2, T3 and T4 were 36.85, 45.63, 57.22, 67.45 and 76.37 (cg/g.Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in T1, T2, T3 and T4 were 4.17%, 7.39%, 12.55% and 16.74%. The extent of omega-6 fatty acids in T1, T2, T3 and T4 was 2.81%, 2.94%, 3.15% and 3.32%.Concentration of omega-3 and 6 fatty acids in butter oil can be increased by chia oil.

  9. Analytical Characterization of Butter Oil Enriched with Omega-3 and 6 Fatty Acids Through Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) Seed Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeem, M.; Ajmal, M.; Rehman, F.; Ayaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical characterization of blends of butter oil and chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed oil was performed. Chia oil was added in butter oil at four different levels i.e. 6.25 percentage, 12.5 percentage, 18.75 percentage and 25 percentage (T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/), butter oil without any addition of chia oil served as control. Blends of butter oil and chia oil were packaged in tin containers, stored at ambient temperature (34±2 degree C) for 90-days. Iodine values of control, T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ were 36.85, 45.63, 57.22, 67.45 and 76.37 (cg/g percentage). Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ were 4.17 percentage, 7.39 percentage, 12.55 percentage and 16.74 percentage. The extent of omega-6 fatty acids in T/sub 1/, T/sub 2/, T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/ was 2.81 percentage, 2.94 percentage, 3.15 percentage and 3.32 percentage. Concentration of omega-3 and 6 fatty acids in butter oil can be increased by chia oil. (author)

  10. Estimation of Fatty Acids in Corn Oil by Gas Capillary Chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Mohammad A; Klein Peter

    2007-01-01

    Fatty acids provide energy as well as play important role in some cellular structures like cell membrane and certain hormones. Saturated fatty acids are usually found in animal products and in some vegetable oils as well. These saturated fatty acids may be a factor in weight gain and obesity but eating them in moderate amounts may not be damaging to health of every person. Monounsaturated fatty acids can lower blood levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol and have potential to increase blood levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and by this way plays protective role against heart disease. The omega 3 and 6 fatty acids have vital roles in many biological systems such as nervous, immune, cardiovascular, dermal and vision systems. Therefore, it is essential to optimize the instrumental conditions and column specification for the estimation of various fatty acids in the oil, which was considered in the current study using Gas Capillary Chromatography. (author)

  11. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (fish oil) supplementation and the prevention of clinical cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have assessed the effects of supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, commonly called fish oils) on the occurrence of clinical cardiovascular diseases. Although the effects of supplementati...

  12. Hydrocarbon-soluble epoxidized fatty acid esters as lubricity modifiers for lubricating oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coupland, K.; Smith, C.R.

    1981-01-13

    Hydrocarbon-soluble epoxidized fatty acid esters prepared by the epoxidation of unsaturated carboxylic acid esters are useful hydrocarbon additives. Their incorporation into a suitable hydrocarbon functional fluid such as a lubricating oil gives improved antiwear and antifriction properties.

  13. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (...

  14. Effects of dietary intake of red palm oil on fatty acid composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AYELESO

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... From the nutritional point of view, the major concern for. RPO has to do with their degree of saturation and the effect they have on blood lipids (Hayes and Khosla,. 2007). Palmitic and stearic acids are saturated fatty acids which account for 45 and 5% of total fatty acids in red palm oil respectively (Hayes and ...

  15. Influence of the esterification method on the quantification of olive oil fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Milinsk

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To analyze fatty acids by gas chromatography, it is necessary to apply esterification procedures to convert fatty acids into more volatile compounds, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME. Esterification methods are usually subdivided into two categories: acidic catalysis and basic catalysis. Due to the possibility of obtaining different concentrations of fatty acids for the same sample as a function of the esterification method used, the efficiency of eight different esterification methods that involve acidic and basic catalysis in the quantitative determination of FAME in olive oil was verified. The selected methods were described by Metcalfe, 1966 (MET; Bannon, 1982 (BAN; Joseph and Ackman, 1992 (JAC; Hartman and Lago, 1973 (HLA; Jham, 1982 (JHA; ISO 5509, 1978 (ISO; Bannon, 1982 (BBA and Schuchardt and Lopes, 1988 (SLO. The results showed the efficiency of the esterification methods for the main saturated fatty acids that were present in the olive oil analyzed. The most efficient methods for the esterification of unsaturated fatty acids in the oils analyzed were JAC, ISO, and BBA. Nevertheless, the reagent BF3 in methanol, used in the JAC method, is extremely toxic. Thus, when the oil to be analyzed has low acidity, the basic catalysis methods ISO and BBA can be used instead, since they use inexpensive reagents of low toxicity. The results obtained showed that the choice of a method for the analysis of fatty acids also depends on the composition of the oil to be studied.

  16. Fatty Acids Analysis, Antioxidant and Biological Activity of Fixed Oil of Annona muricata L. Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaha A. Elagbar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The total oil yield and the fatty acid composition were determined in the Annona muricata L. fixed oil using organic solvent extraction and GC-FID. The seeds were found to contain about ~21.5% of crude fixed oil on a dry weight basis. The crude oil containing fatty acid was converted into methyl esters and analysed by GC-FID. Fourteen fatty acids were identified using GC-FID. The major monounsaturated and saturated fatty acids were oleic acid (39.2% and palmitic acid (19.1–19.2%, respectively, whereas the α-linolenic acid (1.2% and linoleic acid (34.9% were polyunsaturated fatty acid. The other saturated acids were stearic acid (3.3%, arachidic acid (0.4%, myristic acid (0.1%, heptadecanoic acid (0.1%, behenic acid (0.1%, and lignoceric acid (0.1%. Some of the fatty acids have not been reported earlier from the oil of Annona muricata L. Fixed oil exhibited significant free radical scavenging activity which was measured using DPPH and is also known to inhibit the gastrointestinal motility significantly.

  17. GC-MS study of Artabotrys odoratissimus fatty oil (leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta, B. K.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available GC-MS study of two fatty oil fractions from Artabotrys odoratissimus (leaves indicated the presence of fifteen compounds namely, nonanoic acid; methyl phenyl propanoate; decanoic acid; diethyl phthalate; dibutyl phthalate; 2-amino-3-ethyl biphenyl; 5-methyl-9-phenylnonan-3-ol; hexadeca-2,7,11-triene; 2,6-dimethyl-1-phenylhepta-1-one; 2,5-dimethyltetradecahydrophenenthrene; 1-phenylundecane; 1-isopropyl-4,6-dimethyl naphthalene; 5-(2-butyl phenylpent-3-en-2-ol; 1-phenyldeca-1-one and 1-phenylundecan-1-one. Some of the compounds are rare occurring and biologically activeEl estudio por GC-MS de dos fracciones del aceite de la hoja de Artabotrys odoratissimus indicó la presencia de quince compuestos tales como: ácido nonanoico; fenil propanoato de metilo; ácido decanoico; ftalato de dietilo; ftalato de dibutilo; 2-amino-3-etil bifenilo; 5-metil-9-fenilnonan-3-ol; hexadeca-2,7,11-trieno; 2,6-dimetil-1-fenilheptan-1-ona; 2,5-dimetiltetradecahidrofenantreno; 1-fenilundecano; 1-isopropil-4,6-dimetil naftaleno; 5-(2-butilfenil-3-penten-2-ol; 1-fenildecan-1-ona y 1-fenilundecan-1-ona. Algunos de estos compuestos son poco frecuentes y activos biológicamente.

  18. GC-MS study of Nigella sativa (seeds fatty oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta, B. K.

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The GC-MS study of N. sativa (seeds fatty oil revealed the presence of 26 compounds which were identified as methyl hept-6-enoate,1-phenylhepta-2,4-dione, pentadecane, hexadec-1-ene, 1-phenyldecan-2-one, octadec-1-ene, octadecane, methyl pentadecanoate, bis(3-chlorophenyl ketone, diethyl phthalate, ethyl octadec-7-enoate, methyl octadecanoate, tricos-9-ene, octadeca-9,12-dienoic acid, hexadecanoic acid, methyl hexadecanoate, methyl octadec-15-enoate, henicosan-10-one, 2-methyl octadecanoic acid, docos-1-ene, ethyl octadecanoate, methyl octadecanoate, pentacos-5-ene,12-methyltricosane, dibutyl phthalate and 2-methyltetracosane.El estudio por GC-MS del aceite de la semilla de Nigella sativa reveló la presencia de 26 compuestos los cuales fueron identificados como: hept-6-enoato de metilo, 1-fenilhepta-2,4-diona, pentadecano, hexadec-1-eno, 1-fenildecan-2-ona, octadec-1-eno, octadecano, pentadecanoato de metilo, bis(3-clorofenil cetona, ftalato de dietilo, octadec-7-enoato de etilo, octadecanoato de metilo, tricos-9-eno, ácido octadeca-9,12-dienoico, ácido hexadecanoico, hexadecanoato de metilo, octadec-15-enoato de metilo, henicosan-10-ona, ácido 2-metil octadecanoico, docos-1-eno, octadecanoato de etilo, octadecanoato de metilo, pentacos-5-eno, 12-metiltricosano, ftalato de dibutilo y 2-metiltetracosano.

  19. Emulsification of waste cooking oils and fatty acid distillates as diesel engine fuels: An attractive alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliezer Ahmed Melo Espinosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this paper is to analyze the possibility and feasibility of the use of emulsification method applied to waste cooking oils and fatty acid distillates as diesel engine fuels, compared with other commonly used methods. These waste products are obtained from the refining oil industry, food industry and service sector, mainly. They are rarely used as feedstock to produce biofuels and other things, in spite of constitute a potential source of environmental contamination. From the review of the state of arts, significant decreases in exhaust emissions of nitrogen oxides, cylinder pressure as well as increases of the ignition delay, brake specific fuel consumption, hydrocarbon, smoke opacity, carbon monoxide, particulate matters to emulsified waste cooking oils and fatty acid distillates compared with diesel fuel are reported. In some experiments the emulsified waste cooking oils achieved better performance than neat fatty acid distillates, neat waste cooking oils and their derivatives methyl esters.

  20. Esterification of Free Fatty Acid in Crude Palm Oil Off Grade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dani Supardan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The esterification of free fatty acids (FFA found in crude palm oil (CPO off grade with methanol is a promising technique to convert FFA into valuable fatty acid methyl ester (FAME, biodiesel and obtain a FFA-free oil that can be further transesterified using alkali bases. In this work, the effects of the main variables involved in the esterification process i.e. alcohol to oil molar ratio, reaction temperature, agitation speed and the initial amount of FFA of oil, were studied in the presence of sulphuric acid as catalyst at concentration of 1%-w. The experimental results show that the esterification process could lead to a practical and cost effective FFA removal unit in front of typical oil transesterification for biodiesel production. Keywords: CPO off grade, esterification, free fatty acid

  1. Fermentative Extraction of Coconut Oil to Maintain A Quality of Medium Chain Fatty Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Salahudin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Coconut oil is healthy vegetable oil because it contains Medium Chain Fatty Acid (MCFA. The used of bleaching agent and excessive heating in coconut oil process will produce low quality oil (rancid. Therefore, it is necessary to processing that does not use chemicals and excessive heating such as fermentation using microbe and enzyme. The aim of this study was to find out the effect of bromelin enzyme concentration and Saccharomyces cereviceae fermentation to MCFA content in coconut oil. This research was done by adding the enzyme bromelain at 0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm and S. cereviceae inoculated in coconut milk. The resulting oil is then tested the water content, acid number and fatty acid content. The result showed that fermentation with 200 ppm bromeline enzyme and S. cereviceae inoculation can produce the best quality coconut oil containing MCFA that meet the APCC standard.

  2. Chemical and fatty acids composition of rump cap from young bulls fed protected or unprotected oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Almeida de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to improve the nutritional aspects of beef, mainly the fatty acids composition, have become an important goal to the scientific community. The use of different oils sources could be an interesting device due its polyunsaturated fatty acids composition. The chemical and fatty acid composition of rump cap (Biceps femoris from 35 Nellore young bulls finished at feedlot (96 days were analyzed. These animals were fed a control diet with sugar cane and concentrate without oil or diets containing sugar cane and concentrate with different sources of oil (soybean or linseed, protected or not from ruminal degradation. A randomized block design was adopted with five treatments and seven replications. The means were compared using orthogonal contrasts at 0.05 significance level. Animals fed diets with oil showed higher levels (P<0.05 of protein and lower levels (P<0.05 of ash than control diet. Lower cholesterol (P<0.05 levels resulted from linseed oil added treatment compared to soybean oil (37.70 and 43.80 mg/100 g, respectively; on the other hand, cholesterol levels increased (P<0.05 for protected oils compared to non-protected (44.53 and 33.97 mg/100 g. Oil added diets resulted in higher (P<0.05 linolenic acid levels. Linseed oil increased (P<0.05 the levels of the fatty acids C14:1, C16:1 and C18:1 n9. Addition of linseed oil, whether protected or not, to the animal diets improves the fatty acid composition of the rump cap by increasing the amount of omega-3 fatty acids and improving the omega-6:omega-3 ratio.

  3. Genetic variability for phenotype, seed production, oil content, and fatty acid composition among 17 Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed oil and fatty acids in plants have human health implications. Oil from roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) seeds are used in Taiwan as a diuretic, laxative, and tonic. The objectives of this study were to evaluate seeds from 17 roselle accessions for oil and fatty acid variation in a greenhouse. S...

  4. Fatty acid compositions of seed oils of Haematostaphis barteri and Ximenia americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eromosele, C O; Eromosele, I C

    2002-05-01

    The fatty acid compositions of the seed oils of Haematostaphis barteri (blood plum) and Ximenia americana (Wild olive) plants were determined by the Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS) technique. H. barteri contained six fatty acids with oleic (69.35%) and stearic (15.40%) the most abundant unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, respectively. Unsaturated higher fatty acids, namely Eicosadienoic (6.92%) and Erucic acid (2.74%) were detected and the total unsaturation for the oil was 79.01%. For X. americana, 10 fatty acids were identified of which seven were unsaturated yielding a total unsaturation of 92.42%. The oil contained essential fatty acids that is, Linoleic (1.34%), Linolenic (10.31%), Arachidonic (0.60%) and varying levels of unsaturated higher fatty acids, namely, Eicosatrienoic (3.39%), Erucic (3.46%) and Nervonic (1.23%) acids. The level of Oleic acid (72.09%) in the oil was close to the value for H. barteri.

  5. Effect of dietary vegetable oils on the fatty acid profile of plasma lipoproteins in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Íñiguez-González, Gonzalo; Cancino-Padilla, Nathaly

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary supplementation of soybean oil (SO) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO) on the transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Three lactating and three non-lactating Holstein cows were...

  6. [Oil contents and fatty acid composition in Jatropha curcas seeds collected from different regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao-Yu; Lin, Jing-Ming; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2008-06-01

    To compare the oil contents and fatty acid composition among the samples of Jatropha curcas L. seeds collected from China (Guangdong, Hainan, and Guizhou Provinces) and India. Soxhlet extraction method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were employed to determine the oil contents of Jatropha seeds and the fatty acid composition of Jatropha oil. The seed oil contents (dry basis) were 32.43% (Guangdong), 31.41% (Hainan), 37.56% (Guizhou) and 41.04% (India), respectively. Twelve different fatty acids were detected by GC-MS, and the content of total unsaturated fatty acids accounted for 80.93%, 79.53%, 77.24% and 78.22% of the total fatty acids in the samples collected from Guangdong, Hainan, Guizhou and India, respectively. There are differences in the oil contents and fatty acid composition among the J. curcas seeds collected from different regions, and attention should be given to these differences in the introduction and breeding of J. curcas.

  7. Incorporation of medium chain fatty acids into fish oil triglycerides by chemical and enzymatic inter esterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feltes, M. M. C.; Oliveira de Pilot, L.; Gomes Correira, F.; Grimaldi, R.; Mara Block, J.; Ninow, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    Structured triglycerides (STs) containing both medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the same molecule offer nutritional and therapeutic benefits. The aim of this work was to establish the incorporation of MCFA into fish oil triglycerides (TAGs), while maintaining substantial levels of docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids. The effects of different acyl donors (capric acid methyl ester/MeC10 or medium chain triglyceride/TCM) and of the catalyst (chemical or enzymatic) on the fatty acid composition of the reaction product were studied. The fatty acid composition of the fish oil TAG was modified after inter esterification to contain MCFA, and it depended on the catalyst and on the substrates. Thermo grams obtained by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) showed that inter esterification promoted noteworthy changes in the melting profile of the samples. STs of clinical nutrition interest containing both EPA and DHA obtained from fish oil along with MCFA were successfully produced. (Author) 70 refs.

  8. Production of free fatty acids from waste oil by application of ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Larissa P.; Santos, Francisco F.P.; Costa, Enio; Fernandes, Fabiano A.N. [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    This paper evaluates the production of free fatty acids (FFAs) from waste oil by means of low-frequency high-intensity ultrasound application under atmospheric pressure. To evaluate the potential of this technology, the reaction between waste palm oil and ethanol was carried out. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to evaluate the influence of alcohol-to-oil weight ratio, potassium hydroxide-to-oil weight ratio, and temperature on the yield of waste oil into FFA. Analysis of the operating conditions by RSM showed that the most important operating conditions affecting the reaction were ethanol-to-oil weight ratio and potassium hydroxide-to-oil weight ratio. The highest yield observed was of 97.3 % after 45 min of reaction. The best operating condition was obtained by applying an ethanol-to-oil weight ratio of 2.4, a potassium hydroxide-to-oil weight ratio of 0.3, and temperature of 60 C. (orig.)

  9. Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Rahman; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has been regarded as good source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids with cardiac, hepatic, hypotensive, antiallergic and antidiabetic role. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in chia oil can be enhanced by fractionation. Olein/low melting fraction of chia oil has higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, main objective of current investigation was determination of various concentration effect of olein fraction of chia oil on omega-3 fa...

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on fatty acids of tomato seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sayed, S.A.; Raouf, M.S.; Morad, M.M.; Rady, A.H.

    1979-01-01

    Since gamma irradiation of tomatoes is investigated as a tool for increasing tomato shelf-lefe, in this study the tomato seed oil produced from irradiated tomatoes was compared with that produced from industrial tomato seeds and with cotton seeds. Fatty acid contents of tomato seed oil, produced from industrial tomato seed waste and from tomato seeds (Variety Ace), were found nearly the same as in the edible cotton seed oil. Hence, both tomato seed oils may be considered as an additional source of essential fatty acids especially linoleic. Gamma irradiation doses ranged from 50-200 Krad had no significant effect on total saturated and total unsaturated fatty acids. 200 Krad led to significant increases in lenolic acid on the account of insignificant decrease in palmatic acid. Essentail and non essential amino acids of tomato seed meal seem to be equivalent to these of cotton seed meal. This suggests the possible use of tomato seed meal in animal feeding

  11. [The fatty acid composition of peach oil and its biological activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikalishvili, B Iu; Zurabashvili, D Z; Turabelidze, D G; Shanidze, L A; Nikolaĭshvili, M N

    2013-05-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography methods (Cromatograph PTC-1, repractometer R-401, column Bondopaс C18) were quantitatively and qualitatively identified most biological important high fatty acids, contained in peach oil (Persica Vulgaris) from ost region of Georgia (Kacheti). Their relative concentrations are expressed as percentages of the total fatty acids components. The chromatography investigation shaved, that the oil contained 12,98±1,0mg% linoleic, 9,97±0,3 mg% palmitic, 4,82±0,2 mg% linolenic, 3,58±0,1 mg% begenic and 2,16±0,1 mg% arachinic acids. The predominant fatty acids of peach oil were linoleic, palmitic and oleinic acids. The investigation showed different sensitivity of components contained in peach oil.

  12. EXTRACTION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF FATTY ACIDS IN CARNAÚBA SEED OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WELLINSON GADÊLHA GUIMARÃES

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the composition of fatty acids in oil extracted from seeds of carnaúba ( Copernicia prunifera (Miller H. E. Moore, an important palm species native to Northeastern Brazil. After extracting the crude oil, the physico - chemical characteristics (density, refraction index, pH, acidity and saponi- fication index were registered and the chemical composition of the fatty acids was determined by gas chroma- tography (GC - FID. The predominance of saturated fatty acids does not make carnaúba seed oil a promising alternative for the food industry, and the small yield obtained (approx. 5% may constitute a limiting factor for commercial exploitation, but carnauba seed oil could potentially be used in the production of biofuels, cosmet- ics and detergents.

  13. Fatty acid composition of seed oil of different Sorghum bicolor varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Sajid; Orhan, Ilkay; Ahsan, Zaheer; Aslan, Sinem; Gulfraz, Muhammad

    2008-08-15

    In order to find out new sources of premium quality edible oil in the country, seeds of ten varieties of Sorghum bicolor were initially analyzed for their total oil contents. The seed oil was later fractionated into eight fatty acids including two new saturated fatty acids. The oil contents were determined by Soxhlet method and compared with the results obtained by NMR analysis. The total oil contents in the seeds of sorghum ranged from 5.0 to 8.2 % (w/w), indicating non significant difference obtained by two different techniques. The results revealed that oleic acid (31.12-48.99%), Palmitoleic acid (0.43-0.56%), linoleic acids (27.59-50.73%), linolenic acid (1.71-3.89%), stearic acid (1.09-2.59%) and palmitic acid (11.73-20.18%) was present in the seed oil of different sorghum varieties when analyzed by GC-MS. It was observed that in most of the varieties polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were higher than monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). The two atypical SFAs, octanedioic (C8:0) and azelaic acid (C9:0) were found in some varieties. These results suggest that these S. bicolor varieties could be additional sources of edible oil due to presence of clinically important saturated and high concentration of unsaturated fatty acids. A large scale production of the seed oil after refining process can contribute towards alleviation of edible oil shortage in the country with increased use of premium quality oil. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oil and Fatty Acid Content Among Diverse Sesame Genetic Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesame, Sesamum indicum contains oil used for salads, cooking while the seeds are used on hamburger buns, candies, and are used to make tahini. Sesame oil is known to reduce cholesterol due to the high polyunsaturated fat content in the oil. Oil content ranges from about 40 to 63% among sesame acces...

  15. Effects of dietary intake of red palm oil on fatty acid composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Little is known about the effects of the dietary intake of red palm oil (RPO) on fatty acid composition in the liver of rats. Male Wistar rats randomly divided into four groups were fed with different doses of red palm oil. The control group received no red palm oil; while the experimental groups were fed with 1 ml, 2 ml and 4 ml of ...

  16. Fatty Acid Digestibility in Lactating Cows Fed Increasing Amounts of Protected Vegetable Oil, Fish Oil or Saturated Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Christian Friis; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Hvelplund, Torben

    1992-01-01

    Fatty acid digestion was studied in three dairy cows cannulated in the rumen, duodenum and ileum. Cows were fed encapsulated fat sources (vegetable oil, saturated fat and fish oil). A preperiod diet was fed with no added fat. In a graeco-latin design nine diets comprising three levels of each...... of the three fat sources were fed. The preperiod diet contained 230 g fatty acids (FA), whereas the three other fats were fed at about 550, 850 and 1150 g FA/day. The feed-ileùm true digestibility of total FA was 95, 47 and 86% for vegetable, saturated and fish fat, respectively. The true digestibility of FA...

  17. Physico-chemical properties and fatty acid composition of pomegranate, cherry and pumpkin seed oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siano, Francesco; Straccia, Maria C; Paolucci, Marina; Fasulo, Gabriella; Boscaino, Floriana; Volpe, Maria G

    2016-03-30

    Nut and seed oils are often considered waste products but in recent years they have been receiving growing interest due to their high concentration of hydrophilic and lipophilic bioactive components, which have important pharmacological properties on human health. The aim of this work was to compare the physico-chemical and biochemical properties of pomegranate (Punicagranatum), sweet cherry (Prunusavium) and pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) seed oils obtained by solvent extraction. High amount of linoleic acid was found in the cherry and pumpkin seed oils, while pomegranate seed oil showed relevant content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) along to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and nervonic acid. Pumpkin seed oil had high concentration of carotenoids, while pomegranate oil was the best absorber in the UV-A and UV-B ranges. Pomegranate, cherry and pumpkin seed oils can be an excellent source of bioactive molecules and antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols, carotenoids and unsaturated fatty acids. These seed oils can be included both as preservatives and functional ingredients in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic fields and can contribute to disease prevention and health promotion. Moreover, high absorbance of UV light indicates a potential use of these oils as filters from radiations in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic fields. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, morpholinepropanamine...-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, morpholinepropanamine, propylene glycol diamine and aliphatic polyamine, N... products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether, morpholinepropanamine...

  19. Copper extraction by fatty hydroxamic acids derivatives synthesized based on palm kernel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Jelas; Jahangirian, Hossein; Silong, Sidik; Yusof, Nor Azah; Kassim, Anuar; Moghaddam, Roshanak Rafiee; Peyda, Mazyar; Abdollahi, Yadollah; Amin, Jamileh; Gharayebi, Yadollah

    2012-01-01

    Fatty hydroxamic acids derivatives based on palm kernel oil which are phenyl fatty hydroxamic acids (PFHAs), methyl fatty hydroxamic acids (MFHAs), isopropyl fatty hydroxamic acids (IPFHAs) and benzyl fatty hydroxamic acids (BFHAs) were applied as chelating agent for copper liquid-liquid extraction. The extraction of copper from aqueous solution by MFHAs, PFHAs, BFHAs or IPFHAs were carried out in hexane as an organic phase through the formation of copper methyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-MFHs), copper phenyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-PFHs), copper benzyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-BFHs) and copper isopropyl fatty hydroxamate (Cu-IPFHs). The results showed that the fatty hydroxamic acid derivatives could extract copper at pH 6.2 effectively with high percentage of extraction (the percentages of copper extraction by MFHAs, PFHAs, IPFHs and BFHAs were found to be 99.3, 87.5, 82.3 and 90.2%, respectively). The extracted copper could be quantitatively stripped back into sulphuric acid (3M) aqueous solution. The obtained results showed that the copper recovery percentages from Cu-MFHs, Cu-PFHs, Cu-BFHs and Cu-IPFHs are 99.1, 99.4, 99.6 and 99.9 respectively. The copper extraction was not affected by the presence of a large amount of Mg (II), Ni (II), Al (III), Mn (II) and Co (II) ions in the aqueous solution.

  20. Reaction parameters for the synthesis of N,N-dimethyl fatty hydrazides from oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Norashikin; Azizul Hasan, Zafarizal Aldrin; Hassan, Hazimah Abu; Ahmad, Mansor; Zin Wan Yunus, Wan Md

    2015-01-01

    Hydrazide derivatives have been synthesized from methyl esters, hydrazones and vegetable oils. They are important due to their diverse applications in pharmaceutical products, detergents as well as in oil and gas industries. The chemical synthesis of fatty hydrazides is well-established; however, only a few publications described the synthesis of fatty hydrazide derivatives, particularly, when produced from refined, bleached and deodorized palm olein. Here, the synthesis and characterization of N,N-dimethyl fatty hydrazides are reported. The N,N-dimethyl fatty hydrazides was successfully synthesized from fatty hydrazides and dimethyl sulfate in the presence of potassium hydroxide with the molar ratio of 1:1:1, 6 hours reaction time and 80℃ reaction temperature in ethanol. The product yield and purity were 22% and 89%, respectively. The fatty hydrazides used were synthesized from refined, bleached and deodorized palm olein with hydrazine monohydrate at pH 12 by enzymatic route. Fourier transform infrared, gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques were used to determine the chemical composition of N,N-dimethyl fatty hydrazides. Proton NMR confirmed the product obtained were N,N-dimethyl fatty hydrazides.

  1. Physicochemical Properties and Fatty Acid Profiles of Elaeagnus mollis Diels Nut Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaohua; Yang, Ruinan; Dong, Caiwen; Yang, Qingping

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties, fatty acid profiles, content of tocopherol and sterol of the oils extracted from the nuts of Elaeagnus mollis Diels grown in different regions of China were studied in this work. The results indicated that the Elaeagnus mollis Diels nut oils contained about 0.2% sterols and the tocopherol contents were in the range of 119.6-128.6mg/100g. The nut oils were all rich in unsaturated fatty acids, especially oleic acid and linoleic acid. Furthermore, the main triacylglycerols species of the nut oils were all dilinoleoyl-monoolein (LOL), dioleoyl-monolinoleoyl (OLO) and trilinoleate (LLL). This work might be useful for developing applications for Elaeagnus mollis Diels nut oil.

  2. Seed oil content and fatty acid composition of annual halophyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... providing of growth materials (Mayer and Poljakoff-Mayer,. 1989). The data presented here clearly indicate the potential to extract high-quality edible oil from seeds of desert halophyte S. acuminata. Oil quality is related to its degree of unsaturation (Ariffin et al., 2009). Oil with high unsaturation is considered ...

  3. Fatty acid profile and bioactivity from Annona hypoglauca seeds oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... 2Post-Graduate in Chemistry Program, Center for Research and Post-Graduate Studies in Science and Technology,. NPPGCT ... seeds oil in terms of its yield, composition and biological activity (acetylcholinesterase enzyme inhibition, .... extracts, essential oils and fixed oils with potential for inhibition of ...

  4. Heating Quality and Stability of Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction of Fatty Acid-Balanced Oil in Comparison with Other Blended Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The heating performance of enzyme-assisted aqueous processing-extracted blended oil (EAEPO, hexane-extracted blended oil (HEBO, and three kinds of blended oils was investigated by varying the heating times. Oil degradation was monitored by analysis of the acid value (AV, peroxide value (PV, p-anisidine value (p-AV, color, and trans-fatty acid composition. The fatty acid ratios of EAEPO, HEBO, and the three kinds of blended oils were very similar (0.27 : 1.03 : 0.96, 0.27 : 1.08 : 1.16, 0.27 : 0.65 : 0.8, 0.27 : 0.6 : 0.84, and 0.27 : 0.61 : 0.79, resp.. The AV and color increased in proportion to the heating time for all the oils. There was a rapid increase in the PV and p-AV of EAEPO and HEBO after heating for only 1 h, whereas the other three blended oils showed a rapid increase after heating for 2 h or 6 h. Despite the highest trans-fatty acid content found for HEBO, this content was relatively low and remained low up to a heating time of 8 h. It was found that after heating, a fatty acid ratio relatively close to its ideal value (0.27 : 0.48 : 0.49 was maintained by EAEPO, which indicates that EAEPO is tolerant to heat treatment and is suitable for maintaining a healthy diet.

  5. Quantification of methyl esters of fatty acids in the oil of Physalis minima by GC-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nasimullah Qureshi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate quantification of methyl esters of fatty acids in the oil extracted from Physalis minima (P. minima using gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. Methods: Oil was extracted from the shade dried plant with n-hexane through Soxhlet extraction. Fatty acids that present in the oil were derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters and analysed through gas chromatography-mass spectrometer. Results: A total of nine fatty acids were detected in quantifiable amount in the oil. Both the saturated fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids were identified. Palmitic acid was found in the highest concentration as 46.83%. Linoleic acid (ω-6 and linolenic acid (ω-3 were obtained in appreciable amount as 16.98% and 14.80% respectively among the unsaturated fatty acids in the oil under study. From the literature review, it appeared that fatty acids were determined for the first time in the oil of P. minima. Conclusions: Presence of these important fatty acids in high amount makes P. minima oil beneficial for health, which can be used in the preparation of phytopharmaceutical or pharmaceutical preparations. Moreover, the results of this study are useful for the phytopharmaceutical industries to establish their quality control profile.

  6. Camelina sativa Oil Deodorization: Balance Between Free Fatty Acids and Color Reduction and Isomerized Byproducts Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrastar, Robert; Cheong, Ling-Zhi; Xu, Xuebing

    2011-01-01

    Camelina sativa oil is characterized by its high content (up to 40 wt%) of α-linolenic acid and its unique flavor. It is considered to have beneficial health properties and is suitable for food and cosmetic uses. In the present study, response surface methodology was used to optimize processing...... parameters for bench-scale deodorization of camelina oil. The mathematical models generated described the effects of process parameters (temperature, steam flow, time) on several deodorization quality indicators: free fatty acids (FFA), trans fatty acids (TFA), color, and polymerized triglycerides (PTG...

  7. Accumulation of medium-chain, saturated fatty acyl moieties in seed oils of transgenic Camelina sativa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Hu

    Full Text Available With its high seed oil content, the mustard family plant Camelina sativa has gained attention as a potential biofuel source. As a bioenergy crop, camelina has many advantages. It grows on marginal land with low demand for water and fertilizer, has a relatively short life cycle, and is stress tolerant. As most other crop seed oils, camelina seed triacylglycerols (TAGs consist of mostly long, unsaturated fatty acyl moieties, which is not desirable for biofuel processing. In our efforts to produce shorter, saturated chain fatty acyl moieties in camelina seed oil for conversion to jet fuel, a 12:0-acyl-carrier thioesterase gene, UcFATB1, from California bay (Umbellularia californica Nutt. was expressed in camelina seeds. Up to 40% of short chain laurate (C12:0 and myristate (C14:0 were present in TAGs of the seed oil of the transgenics. The total oil content and germination rate of the transgenic seeds were not affected. Analysis of positions of these two fatty acyl moieties in TAGs indicated that they were present at the sn-1 and sn-3 positions, but not sn-2, on the TAGs. Suppression of the camelina KASII genes by RNAi constructs led to higher accumulation of palmitate (C16:0, from 7.5% up to 28.5%, and further reduction of longer, unsaturated fatty acids in seed TAGs. Co-transformation of camelina with both constructs resulted in enhanced accumulation of all three medium-chain, saturated fatty acids in camelina seed oils. Our results show that a California bay gene can be successfully used to modify the oil composition in camelina seed and present a new biological alternative for jet fuel production.

  8. Optimization of reaction parameters for enzymatic glyceride synthesis from fish oil: Ethyl esters versus free fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Helle Christine; Damstrup, Marianne L.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic conversion of fish oil free fatty acids (FFA) or fatty acid ethyl esters (FAE) into glycerides via esterification or transesterification was examined. The reactions catalyzed by Lipozyme™ 435, a Candida antarctica lipase, were optimized. Influence on conversion yields of fatty acid chai...

  9. Cholesterol and triglyceride reduction in rats fed Matthiola incana seed oil rich in (n-3) fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Z; Schafferman, D; Shamir, I; Madar, Z

    1999-02-01

    Seeds of Matthiola incana contain oil rich (55-65%) in (n-3) linolenic acid. Selected lines were developed and evaluated for their agronomic and chemical parameters. Extracted oil was fed for 6 weeks to rats, which were compared with rats fed a diet containing coconut oil or sunflower oil. Cholesterol levels were significantly lowest in rats fed diets rich in M. incana oil (27% reduction), and triglycerides were significantly lower in rats receiving either M. incana or sunflower oil (36% reduction). The contents of arachidonic acid and other (n-6) fatty acids were significantly the lowest in the liver and plasma of rats that had received M. incana oil. The levels of (n-3) fatty acids were significantly greater in both the liver and plasma of rats fed M. incana oil. The ratio of (n-3)/(n-6) long-chain fatty acids in the plasma was 7 times higher in rats fed with M. incana oil than in those fed with sunflower oil and 6 times higher than in those fed coconut oil. The results demonstrate for the first time a beneficial effect of dietary M. incana oil in reducing cholesterol levels and increasing (n-3) fatty acid levels in the plasma. This new, terrestrial plant source of (n-3) fatty acids could replace marine oils and thereby contribute beneficially to the human diet.

  10. Fish Oil Microencapsulation as Omega-3 Fatty Acids Fortification Material for Cream of Crab Soup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiara Putri Pramesti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids have important roles in improvement of intelligent and health of human. Microencapsulation of fish oil as source of omega-3 fatty acids is an effort to maintain flavor, aroma, stability, and also to successfully transfer bioactive component from the fish oil as fortification material for foods or medicines. Improvement of instant crab cream soup enriched with fish oil as source of omega-3 fatty acid has never been conducted before. The purpose of this research was to improve microencapsulation method for fish oil as source of omega-3 fatty acids as fortification material for instant cream of crab soup. Microencapsulation methods in this research are homogenization and spray drying. The results showed that the best microcapsule was obtained from homogenization treatment for 10 minutes with efficiency of 90.41±0.64%. The shape of the obtained microcapsule was spherical with average size of 6.52 μm, with induction time up to 26.09±0.01 hours. The best cream of crab soup formula was at fish oil microcapsule concentration of 3.30%, with 8.19% daily value of omega-3, inclusion 11.32% of EPA and DHA at serving size of 17.56 gram.

  11. Alkyl esters of fatty acids a useful tool to detect soft deodorized olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Camino, María del Carmen; Cert, Arturo; Romero-Segura, Ana; Cert-Trujillo, Rosa; Moreda, Wenceslao

    2008-08-13

    Fatty acid alkyl esters (FAAEs) are a family of natural neutral lipids present in olive oils and formed by esterification of free fatty acids (FFAs) with low molecular alcohols. Inappropriate practices during the olive oil extraction process and bad quality of the olive fruits promote their formation. Quantification can be done by isolation with a silica gel solid phase extraction cartridge followed by analysis on a gas chromatograph equipped with a programmed temperature vaporizer injector using a polar capillary column. The application of the method to more than 100 Spanish olive oils from different categories, varieties, and geographical origin allowed for establishing the average content of FAAEs and distinguishing the Spanish protected denomination of origin (PDO) and extra virgin olive oils from other categories of olive oils. Those other categories of oils can be subjected to a mild refining process, which leads to blending with extra virgin olive oils. Studies on low quality oils subjected to mild refining showed that FAAEs remain after that process. Thereby, blends of extra virgin olive and mildly refined low quality olive oils can be detected by their alkyl ester concentrations.

  12. Other factors to consider in the formation of chloropropandiol fatty esters in oil processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramli, Muhamad Roddy; Siew, Wai Lin; Ibrahim, Nuzul Amri; Kuntom, Ainie; Abd Razak, Raznim Arni

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the processing steps of extracting palm oil from fresh fruit bunches in a way that may impact on the formation of chloropropandiol fatty esters (3-MCPD esters), particularly during refining. Diacylglycerols (DAGs) do not appear to be a critical factor when crude palm oils are extracted from various qualities of fruit bunches. Highly hydrolysed oils, in spite of the high free fatty acid (FFA) contents, did not show exceptionally high DAGs, and the oils did not display a higher formation of 3-MCPD esters upon heat treatment. However, acidity measured in terms of pH appears to have a strong impact on 3-MCPD ester formation in the crude oil when heated at high temperatures. The differences in the extraction process of crude palm oil from current commercial processes and that from a modified experimental process showed clearly the effect of acidity of the oil on the formation of 3-MCPD esters. This paper concludes that the washing or dilution step in palm oil mills removes the acidity of the vegetative materials and that a well-optimised dilution/washing step in the extraction process will play an important role in reducing formation of 3-MCPD esters in crude palm oil upon further heat processing.

  13. Cyclic fatty acid monomer formation in domestic frying of frozen foods in sunflower oil and high oleic acid sunflower oil without oil replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A; Bastida, S; Sánchez-Muniz, F J

    2006-10-01

    During the frying process, oxidation, hydrolysis, polymerization, isomerization, and cyclization occur. Polymers and Cyclic fatty acid monomers (CFAM) are potentially toxic, and the latter are detected at relatively low levels (0.01-0.7%) in used frying oils. Twenty fryings of different frozen foods were carried out over 10 consecutive days in sunflower oil (SO) and in high oleic acid sunflower oil (HOSO). Fatty acid methyl ester derivates were hydrogenated with platinum oxide catalyst under hydrogen. Ethyl palmitate was added as an internal standard before hydrogenation. The CFAM obtained were isolated, concentrated and quantified by HPLC using a reverse-phase column followed by gas chromatography. Linear adjustments between total and individual CFAM content and the number of frying operations performed with both oils were established by analysis of variance. The comparison between linear equation adjustments of both oils was performed by a two-way analysis of covariance. After 20 fryings 15.4 +/- 0.06 g polar content/100 g oil, 7.15 +/- 0.08 g polymers/ oil, 11.52 +/- 0.08 g polymers/100g oil and 855 +/- 8.9 mg CFAM/kg oil were detected in SO. A 10 mg/100 mg oil of altered fatty acid content correspond to 700 mg/kg CFAM, while 25% polar material and 10% polymer content would correspond to about 850-1,000 mg CFAM/kg oil. Data suggest that frying with SO produces in each new frying 9 mg CFAM/kg more than frying with HOSO (p oils. Bicyclic compound formation was significantly higher in SO (p < 0.001). Because digestion and absorption of polar material, polymers and CFAM occur, data clearly show the advantageousness and advisability of frying with HOSO rather than SO.

  14. Tissue Fatty Acid Profile is Differently Modulated from Olive Oil and Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in ApcMin/+ Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutino, Valeria; Caruso, Maria G; De Leonardis, Giampiero; De Nunzio, Valentina; Notarnicola, Maria

    2017-11-16

    Fatty acid profile can be considered an appropriate biomarker for investigating the relations between the patterns of fatty acid metabolism and specific diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular and degenerative diseases. Aim of this study was to test the effects of diets enriched with olive oil and omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs) on fatty acid profile in intestinal tissue of ApcMin/+ mice. Three groups of animals were considered: control group, receiving a standard diet; olive oilgroup, receiving a standard diet enriched with olive oil; omega-3 group, receiving a standard diet enriched with salmon fish. Tissue fatty acid profile was evaluated by gas chromatography method. Olive oil and omega-3 PUFAs in the diet differently affect the tissue fatty acid profile. Compared to control group, the levels of Saturated Fatty Acids (SFAs) were lower in olive oil group, while an increase of SFAs was found in omega-3 group. Monounsaturated Fatty Acids (MUFAs) levels were enhanced after olive oil treatment, and in particular, a significant increase of oleic acid levels was detected; MUFAs levels were instead reduced in omega-3 group in line with the decrease of oleic acid levels. The total PUFAs levels were lower in olive oil respect to control group. Moreover, a significant induction of Saturation Index (SI) levels was observed after omega-3 PUFAs treatment, while its levels were reduced in mice fed with olive oil. Our data demonstrated a different effect of olive oil and omega-3 PUFAs on tissue lipid profile in APCMin/+ mice. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Emulsifaction of waste cooking oils and fatty acid distillates as diesel engine fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Melo-Espinosa, Eliezer Ahmed; Piloto-Rodríguez, Ramón; Goyos-Pérez, Leonardo; Verhelst, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to analyze the possibilities and feasibilities, as well as the main experimental results reported about the emulsification method applied to waste cooking oils and fatty acid distillates as diesel engine fuels, compared with other commonly used methods. These waste products are obtained in the refining oil industry, food industry and service sector from the frying process, mainly. However, they are a little used as feedstocks to produce biofuels and constitute a pot...

  16. Fatty acid, protein and energy gain of broilers fed different dietary vegetable oils

    OpenAIRE

    Kavouridou, Katerina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess energy, nitrogen, fat and fatty acid deposition in broilers fed diets containing different vegetable oil sources. Forty female broiler chickens were fed five diets, with different fats [coconut, palm, olive, soybean (SO) and linseed oil (LO)] at 10% from 30 to 50 days of age. The animals consuming the LO diet presented the lowest body fat content. There were no differences among treatments regarding nitrogen balance. The greater percentage of apparent...

  17. Oil Biotechnology: Value-Added Products and Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    During my 40+ years research career, I have been working on "biocatalysis" of hydrophobic organic compounds, both petroleum oil and vegetable oil, to convert them to value-added products. "Biocatalysis" is defined as the use of a biocatalyst such as whole microbial cells or enzymes, in an aqueous o...

  18. Salt effects on Origanum majorana fatty acid and essential oil composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baâtour, Olfa; Kaddour, Rym; Mahmoudi, Hela; Tarchoun, Imen; Bettaieb, Iness; Nasri, Nawel; Mrah, Sabah; Hamdaoui, Ghaith; Lachaâl, Mokhtar; Marzouk, Brahim

    2011-11-01

    The effects of salt on the essential oil yield and fatty acid composition of aerial parts of two marjoram varieties were investigated. Plants with 6 leaves were treated with NaCl (75mM). Salt treatment led to a reduction in aerial part growth. Salinity increased the fatty acid content more significantly in Tunisian variety (TV) than in Canadian variety (CV). CV showed an increase in double-bond index (DBI) and a decrease in malondialdehyde content under salt stress, while the opposite was observed in TV. The DBI was mainly affected by a strong reduction in oleic and linoleic acids in TV, whereas a strong stimulation of linoleic acid in CV was observed. Salt decreased and increased the essential oil yield in TV and CV respectively. The main constituents of the essential oil of TV were trans-hydrate sabinene and terpinen-4-ol, which showed a significant decrease under salt stress. In contrast, the main constituents of the essential oil of CV were sabinene and trans-hydrate sabinene, which showed a significant decrease and increase respectively under salt stress. Marjoram oil is a rich source of many compounds such as essential oils and fatty acids, but the distribution of these compounds differed significantly between the two varieties studied. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis for fatty acid of cooking oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Seung Man

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate possibility for chemical changes analysis of the Soybean and Olive oil using a medical magnetic resonance imaging/spectrometer. The two edible oils including soybean and olive oil were selected for manufacturing the phantom series. For the acquisition of data without any physical environment change, 5 ml was transferred to a sealed plastic vial. All MRI and 1H-MRS experiments were performed on a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner using a 32-channel brain array coil. The total lipid ((-CH2-)n/noise), total saturated fatty acid, total unsaturated fatty acid, total unsaturated bond, and poly unsaturated bond were quantified by separating each peak area of -CH 3 , (-CH 2 -)n, -CH 2 -C=C-CH 2 -, =C-CH 2 -C=, and -CH=CH-byCH 3 by MRS analysis. Soybean oil had the highest concentration of methyl protons and methane protons, expressed as 0.9 and 5.3 ppm compared to olive oil. However, its methylene protons at 1.3 ppm were the lowest. Olive oil had the highest amount of methylene protons and allylic protons and the lowest amount of methyl protons. Through the magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis it was to analyze the chemical characteristics of Olive oil and soybean oil. And it was confirmed that it is possible to proceed to an extended study using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  20. Extraction and the Fatty Acid Profile of Rosa acicularis Seed Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huanan; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Ruchun; Zhang, Lu; Yu, Dianyu; Jiang, Lianzhou

    2017-12-01

    Rosa acicularis seed oil was extracted from Rosa acicularis seeds by the ultrasonic-assisted aqueous enzymatic method using cellulase and protease. Based on a single experiment, Plackett-Burman design was applied to ultrasonic-assisted aqueous enzymatic extraction of wild rose seed oil. The effects of enzyme amount, hydrolysis temperature and initial pH on total extraction rate of wild rose seed oil was studied by using Box-Behnken optimize methodology. Chemical characteristics of a sample of Rosa acicularis seeds and Rosa acicularis seed oil were characterized in this work. The tocopherol content was 200.6±0.3 mg/100 g oil. The Rosa acicularis seed oil was rich in linoleic acid (56.5%) and oleic acid (34.2%). The saturated fatty acids included palmitic acid (4%) and stearic acid (2.9%). The major fatty acids in the sn-2 position of triacylglycerol in Rosa acicularis oil were linoleic acid (60.6%), oleic acid (33.6%) and linolenic acid (3.2%). According to the 1,3-random-2-random hypothesis, the dominant triacylglycerols were LLL (18%), LLnL (1%), LLP (2%), LOL (10%), LLSt (1.2%), PLP (0.2%), LLnP (0.1%), LLnO (0.6%) and LOP (1.1%). This work could be useful for developing applications for Rosa acicularis seed oil.

  1. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis for fatty acid of cooking oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Man [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Gimcheon University, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate possibility for chemical changes analysis of the Soybean and Olive oil using a medical magnetic resonance imaging/spectrometer. The two edible oils including soybean and olive oil were selected for manufacturing the phantom series. For the acquisition of data without any physical environment change, 5 ml was transferred to a sealed plastic vial. All MRI and 1H-MRS experiments were performed on a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner using a 32-channel brain array coil. The total lipid ((-CH2-)n/noise), total saturated fatty acid, total unsaturated fatty acid, total unsaturated bond, and poly unsaturated bond were quantified by separating each peak area of -CH{sub 3}, (-CH{sub 2}-)n, -CH{sub 2}-C=C-CH{sub 2}-, =C-CH{sub 2}-C=, and -CH=CH-byCH{sub 3} by MRS analysis. Soybean oil had the highest concentration of methyl protons and methane protons, expressed as 0.9 and 5.3 ppm compared to olive oil. However, its methylene protons at 1.3 ppm were the lowest. Olive oil had the highest amount of methylene protons and allylic protons and the lowest amount of methyl protons. Through the magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis it was to analyze the chemical characteristics of Olive oil and soybean oil. And it was confirmed that it is possible to proceed to an extended study using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  2. Total Oil Content and Fatty Acid Profile of some Almond (Amygdalus Communis L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildirim Adnan Nurhan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the total oil contents and fatty acid compositions of some commercial almond cultivars. The total oil contents changed significantly (p<0.05 by year in all cultivars with the exception of cultivar Ferrastar. Total oil contents were changed from 50.90% (Picantili to 62.01% (Supernova in 2008 and from 52.44% (Lauranne to 63.18% (Cristomorto in 2009. While predominant unsaturated fatty acids were oleic and linoleic acids, predominant saturated fatty acid was palmitic acid. The highest amount of oleic acid was obtained in Glorieta in both 2008 (83.35% and 2009 (72.74%. Linoleic acid content varied by year and the highest content was recorded in Picantili (26.08% in 2008 and Yaltinski (30.01% in 2009. The highest amount of palmitic acid was detected in cultivar Sonora in both years, i.e. as 7.76% in 2008 and 10.11% in 2009. The mean UFA:SFA ratio was 11.73 in 2008 but 7.59 in 2009. Principal component (PC analysis indicated that palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, arachidic acid, unsaturated fatty acid (UFA, saturated fatty acid (SFA and UFA:SFA ratio were primarily responsible for the separation on PC1

  3. Evaluation of fatty acid profiles and mineral content of grape seed oil of some grape genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangolar, Serpil Gök; Ozoğul, Yeşim; Tangolar, Semih; Torun, Ayfer

    2009-01-01

    The grape seeds of seven grape cultivars (Alphonse Lavallée, Muscat of Hamburg, Alicante Bouschet, Razaki, Narince, Oküzgözü and Horoz karasi) and two rootstocks (Salt creek and Cosmo 2) were evaluated in terms of quality properties including protein, oil, moisture, ash, fatty acid composition and mineral contents. The oil contents were found to be different for each cultivar, which ranged from 10.45% (Razaki) to 16.73% (Salt creek). Saturated fatty acid values were less than the values of monounsaturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated fatty acids in all genotypes. Among the identified fatty acids, linoleic acid (C18:2) was the predominant fatty acid and followed by oleic acid (C18:1) and palmitic acid (C16:0) in all varieties. The results of mineral analysis showed that all varieties contained considerable amount of macro and micro elements. These grape seeds could be used as a food supplement to improve the nutritive value of the human diet.

  4. Effects of dietary fish oil and flax seed on cholesterol and fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of the supplementation of different levels of fish oil (FO) and flax seed (FS) in the diets of layers on the content of egg yolk fatty acid, cholesterol, blood parameters, egg production and egg quality criteria. In the experiment, a total of 120 Isa-White laying hens of 34 weeks of ...

  5. Coriander Seed Oil Methyl Esters as Biodiesel Fuel: Unique Fatty Acid Composition and Excellent Oxidative Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid (FA) hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt %) acid. Most of the remaining FA...

  6. Phosphorus fertilization differentially influences fatty acids, protein and oil in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information is limited about phosphorus (P) fertilization effects on soybean seed composition. A field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of P application rates on the concentrations of various fatty acids, protein, and oil in soybean under no-tillage on low and high testing P soils...

  7. Determination of free fatty acids in cooking oil: traditional spectrophotometry and optothermal window assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goyrik, M.; Ajtony, Z.; Doka, O.; Alebic-Juretic, A.; Bicanic, D.D.; Koudijs, A.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of optothermal window (OW) (with 632.8 nm He-Ne laser used as a radiation source), combined with copper soap based colorimetry, was proposed as a new analytical tool to determine total free fatty acid (FFA) content in thermally treated cooking oil. The results obtained were compared to

  8. Effect of virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus on experimental burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to assess the efficiency of the virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus (PLVFO) for burn wounds healing. It was carried out on 6 adult male New Zealand rabbits. Four burn wounds of deep third degree were made on the back of each animal. The first was not treated and served as control (CRL group); the others ...

  9. Dietary linseed oil and selenate affect the concentration of fatty acids in selected tissues of sheep

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Czauderna, M.; Kowalczyk, J.; Marounek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 9 (2012), s. 389-401 ISSN 1212-1819 Grant - others:State Committee for Scientific Research(PL) 3PO6Z 034 22 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : selenium * linseed oil * fatty acid Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.922, year: 2012

  10. Effects of dietary flaxseed oil on the muscle fatty acid composition in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary flaxseed oil on the fatty acid (FA) composition of two types of muscles, longissimus dorsi (LD) and semitendinosus (ST), of Mangalitsa pigs reared in an extensive system. Fourteen Mangalitsa castrated pigs, 55 ± 8 kg, 240 ± 12 days of age, were randomly assigned ...

  11. ADS genes for reducing saturated fatty acid levels in seed oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Ingo H.; Shanklin, John

    2010-02-02

    The present invention relates to enzymes involved in lipid metabolism. In particular, the present invention provides coding sequences for Arabidopsis Desaturases (ADS), the encoded ADS polypeptides, and methods for using the sequences and encoded polypeptides, where such methods include decreasing and increasing saturated fatty acid content in plant seed oils.

  12. Effect of heating on oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of microwave roasted groundnut seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Ali, M; Anowarul Islam, M; Othman, Noor Hidayu; Noor, Ahmadilfitri Md

    2017-12-01

    The oxidative stability and fatty acid composition of groundnut seed oil (GSO) exposed to microwaves were evaluated during heating at 170 °C. During heating, the oxidative indices such as free fatty acid, peroxide value, p -anisidine value, TOTOX, thiobarbituric acid value, specific extinctions, and color value were increased. The increments were found to be higher in unroasted seed oils compared to roasted ones indicating lower release of lipid oxidation products in roasted GSO. After 9 h heating, the relative content of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) decreased to 89.53% and that of saturated fatty acid (SFA) increased to 117.46% in unroasted sample. The relative content of PUFA decreased to 92.05% and that of SFA increased to 105.76% in 7.5 min roasted sample after 9 h of heating. However, the roasting process slowed down the oxidative deterioration of PUFA. With increased heating times, an appreciable loss was more apparent in the triacylglycerol species OLL and OOL in unroasted samples compared to roasted ones. In FTIR, the peak intensities in unroasted samples were markedly changed in comparison with roasted samples during heating. The roasting of groundnut seed prior to the oil extraction reduced the oxidative degradation of oil samples; thereby increasing heat stability.

  13. Incorporated sarcolemmal fish oil fatty acids shorten pig ventricular action potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, A.O.; Ginneken, van A.C.G.; Berecki, G.; Ruijter, den H.M.; Schumacher, C.A.; Veldkamp, M.W.; Baartscheer, A.; Casini, S.; Opthof, T.; Hovenier, R.; Fiolet, J.W.T.; Zock, P.L.; Coronel, R.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (W-PUFAs) from fish oil reduce the risk of sudden death presumably by preventing life-threatening arrhythmias. Acutely administered omega 3-PUFAs modulate the activity of several cardiac ion channels, but the chronic effects of a diet enriched with

  14. Synthesis of fatty monoester lubricant base oil catalyzed by Fe-Zn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    proper choice of fatty acid and long-chain alcohol, a wide variety of lubricants with custom design properties ... etable oil with a long-chain alcohol in presence of a homogeneous acid/base catalyst8–10 or by using an ..... Satyarthi J K and Srinivas D 2010 Energy Fuel 24 2154. 23. Srivastava R, Srinivas D and Ratnasamy P ...

  15. Chemical modification of nanocellulose with canola oil fatty acid methyl ester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liqing Wei; Umesh P. Agarwal; Kolby C. Hirth; Laurent M. Matuana; Ronald C. Sabo; Nicole M. Stark

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), produced from dissolving wood pulp, were chemically functionalized by transesterification with canola oil fatty acid methyl ester (CME). CME performs as both the reaction reagent and solvent. Transesterified CNC (CNCFE) was characterized for their chemical structure, morphology, crystalline structure, thermal stability, and hydrophobicity...

  16. Genetic control of protein, oil and fatty acids content under partial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study was to map quantitative trait locus (QTLs) associated with percentage of seed protein, oil and fatty acids content under different conditions in a population of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of sunflower. Three independent field experiments were conducted with well-, partial-irrigated and ...

  17. Fatty acids characterization, oxidative perspectives and consumer acceptability of oil extracted from pre-treated chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Imran, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad; Manzoor, Muhammad Faisal; Javed, Amna; Ali, Zafar; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Ali, Muhammad; Hussain, Yasir

    2016-01-01

    Background Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds have been described as a good source of lipids, protein, dietary fiber, polyphenolic compounds and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The consumption of chia seed oil helps to improve biological markers related to metabolic syndrome diseases. The oil yield and fatty acids composition of chia oil is affected by several factors such as pre-treatment method and size reduction practices. Therefore, the main mandate of present investigate was to study ...

  18. Lipase catalyzed synthesis of neutral glycerides rich in micronutrients from rice bran oil fatty acid distillate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumit; Gangopadhyay, Sarbani; Ghosh, Santinath

    2008-01-01

    Neutral glycerides with micronutrients like sterols, tocopherols and squalene may be prepared from cheap raw material like rice bran oil fatty acid distillate (RBO FAD). RBO FAD is an important byproduct of vegetable oil refining industries in the physical refining process. Glycerides like triacylglycerols (TAG), diacylglycerols (DAG) and monoacylglycerols (MAG) containing significant amounts of unsaponifiable matter like sterols, tocopherols and hydrocarbons (mainly squalene) may certainly be considered as novel functional food ingredients. Fatty acids present in RBO FAD were esterified with glycerol of varying amount (1:0.33, 1:0.5, 1:1 and 1:1.5 of FAD : glycerol ratio) for 8 h using non-specific enzyme NS 40013 (Candida antartica). After esterification the product mixture containing mono, di- and triglycerides was purified by molecular distillation to remove excess free fatty acids and also other volatile undesirable components. The purified product containing sterols, tocopherols and squalene can be utilized in various food formulations.

  19. Choice of solvent extraction technique affects fatty acid composition of pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolshahi, Anna; Majd, Mojtaba Heydari; Rad, Javad Sharifi; Taheri, Mehrdad; Shabani, Aliakbar; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-04-01

    Pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) oil has important nutritional and therapeutic properties because of its high concentration of essential fatty acids. The extraction method used to obtain natural compounds from raw material is critical for product quality, in particular to protect nutritional value. This study compared the fatty acid composition of pistachio oil extracted by two conventional procedures, Soxhlet extraction and maceration, analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID). Four solvents with different polarities were tested: n-hexane (Hx), dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate (EtAc) and ethanol (EtOH). The highest unsaturated fatty acid content (88.493 %) was obtained by Soxhlet extraction with EtAc. The Soxhlet method extracted the most oleic and linolenic acids (51.99 % and 0.385 %, respectively) although a higher concentration (36.32 %) of linoleic acid was extracted by maceration.

  20. Effect of shortening replacement with flaxseed oil on physical, sensory, fatty acid and storage characteristics of cookies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangrej, V; Shah, V; Patel, J; Ganorkar, P M

    2015-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acid imparted good evidence of health benefits. Flaxseed oil, being the richest vegetarian source of alpha linolenic acid (omega-3 fatty acid), was incorporated in cookies by replacing shortening at level of 5 %, 10 %, 20 %, 30 %, 40 % and 50 %. Effect of shortening replacement with flaxseed oil on physical, textural and sensory attributes were investigated. Spread ratio and breaking strength of cookies increased as flaxseed oil level increased. Sensory score was not significantly affected up to 30 % shortening replacement with flaxseed oil as compared with the control cookies. Above 30 % flaxseed oil, sensory score was adversely affected. Fatty acid profile confirmed the enhancement of omega-3 fatty acid from 0 (control) to 14.14 % (30 % flaxseed oil cookies). The poly-unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratio (P/S) increased from 0.088 (control) to 0.57 while ω - 6 to ω -3 fatty acid ratio of flaxseed oil cookies decreased from 4.51 (control) to 0.65 in the optimized cookies. The data on storage characteristics of the control and 30 % flaxseed oil cookies showed that there was significant change in the moisture content, Peroxide value (PV) and overall acceptability (OAA) up to 28 days of storage at 45 °C packed in polyethylene bags. Flaxseed oil cookies were acceptable up to 21 days of storage and afterwards noticeable off flavour was perceived.

  1. Changes of membrane fatty acids and proteins of Shewanella putrefaciens treated with cinnamon oil and gamma irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Lyu, Fei; Gao, Fei; Wei, Qianqian; Liu, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to detect the antimicrobial mechanism of combined treatment of cinnamon oil and gamma irradiation (GI), the membrane fatty acids and proteins characteristics of Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) treated with cinnamon oil and GI, and the distribution of cinnamon oil in S. putrefaciens were observed in this study. Results The membrane lipid profile of S. putrefaciens was notably damaged by treatments of cinnamon oil and the combination of cinnamon oil and GI, with si...

  2. PHOSPHOLIPIDS FROM PUMPKIN (Cucurbita moschata (Duch. Poir SEED KERNEL OIL AND THEIR FATTY ACID COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Joko Raharjo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The phospholipids (PL of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata (Duch Poir seed kernel and their fatty acid composition were investigated. The crude oil was obtained by maceration with isopropanol followed by steps of extraction yielded polar lipids. The quantitative determination of PLs content of the dried pumpkin seed kernel and their polar lipids were calculated based on the elemental phosphorus (P contents which was determined by means of spectrophotometric methods. PL classes were separated from polar lipids via column chromatography. The fatty acid composition of individual PL was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The total of PL in the pumpkin seed kernels was 1.27% which consisted of phosphatidylcholine (PC, phosphatidylserine (PS and phosphatidyletanolamine (PE. The predominant fatty acids of PL were oleic and palmitic acid in PC and PE while PS's fatty acid were dominantly consisted of oleic acid and linoleic acid.

  3. Antinociceptive Activity and Toxicity Evaluation of the Fatty Oil from Plukenetia polyadenia Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Amanda S; de Lima, Anderson B; Albuquerque, Thayana Lucy F; Silveira, Tiago S; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; da Silva, Joyce Kelly R; Ribeiro, Alcy F; Maia, José Guilherme S; Bastos, Gilmara N T

    2015-04-30

    Seed oil (Pp-oil) of Plukenetia polyadenia is used by native people of the Brazilian Amazon against arthritis and rheumatism, spreading it on the arms and legs to reduce the pain and inflammation. Pp-oil was obtained by pressing dried seeds at room temperature to give a 47.0% yield of oil. It was then subjected to fatty acid composition analysis. The principal fatty acids were linoleic acid (46.5%), α-linolenic acid (34.4%) and oleic acid (13.9%). Then, it was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in mice, using the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot plate and formalin test models. Additionally, its toxicity was determined. The Pp-oil proved to have no toxicological effects, showing dose-dependent antinociceptive effect under chemical stimulation. At oral doses of 25-100 mg/kg, Pp-oil significantly reduced the abdominal writhes in the writhing test. A higher oral dose of 200 mg/kg did not induce alterations in the latency time of the hot plate test when compared to the control, suggesting an analgesic activity of peripheral origin. At oral doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, the Pp-oil significantly reduced the second phase of the algic stimulus in the formalin test. In addition, the antinociception of Pp-oil was reversed by naloxone in the evaluation of its mechanism of action. Therefore, the Pp-oil proved to be safe at very high doses and to show significant analgesic properties. The role of Pp-oil is still being investigated with respect the mechanism of action, but the results suggest that opiod receptors could be involved in the antinociception action observed for the oil of P. polyadenia.

  4. Antinociceptive Activity and Toxicity Evaluation of the Fatty Oil from Plukenetia polyadenia Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Mota

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seed oil (Pp-oil of Plukenetia polyadenia is used by native people of the Brazilian Amazon against arthritis and rheumatism, spreading it on the arms and legs to reduce the pain and inflammation. Pp-oil was obtained by pressing dried seeds at room temperature to give a 47.0% yield of oil. It was then subjected to fatty acid composition analysis. The principal fatty acids were linoleic acid (46.5%, α-linolenic acid (34.4% and oleic acid (13.9%. Then, it was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in mice, using the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot plate and formalin test models. Additionally, its toxicity was determined. The Pp-oil proved to have no toxicological effects, showing dose-dependent antinociceptive effect under chemical stimulation. At oral doses of 25–100 mg/kg, Pp-oil significantly reduced the abdominal writhes in the writhing test. A higher oral dose of 200 mg/kg did not induce alterations in the latency time of the hot plate test when compared to the control, suggesting an analgesic activity of peripheral origin. At oral doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, the Pp-oil significantly reduced the second phase of the algic stimulus in the formalin test. In addition, the antinociception of Pp-oil was reversed by naloxone in the evaluation of its mechanism of action. Therefore, the Pp-oil proved to be safe at very high doses and to show significant analgesic properties. The role of Pp-oil is still being investigated with respect the mechanism of action, but the results suggest that opiod receptors could be involved in the antinociception action observed for the oil of P. polyadenia.

  5. Discrimination of Pulp Oil and Kernel Oil from Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense) by Fatty Acid Methyl Esters Fingerprinting, Using GC-FID and Multivariate Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faria-Machado, A.F.; Tres, Alba; Ruth, Van S.M.; Antoniassi, Rosemar; Junqueira, N.T.V.; Lopes, P.S.N.; Bizzo, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    Pequi is an oleaginous fruit whose edible oil is composed mainly by saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. The biological and nutritional properties of pequi oil are dependent on its composition, which can change according to the oil source (pulp or kernel). There is little data in the

  6. The Influence of Different Vegetable Oils on Some ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Broiler Chickens Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş-Sorin Fota

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration that the vegetable oils added to the combined fodder can significantly modify the fatty acids profile in broiler food, through its redirection even the fatty acids profile of carcasses can be modified through enrichment in certain fatty acids and obtaining functional foods. Therefore an experiment was conduced on broilers, made up of three experimental groups, fed with a combined base fodder in which 2% of different fat sources have been incorporated (sunflower oil, soybean oil, linseed oil. After the 42 days growth period, the fatty acids profile, % of fatty acids in 100 g product (EPA, DPA, DHA, ∑ SFA, ∑ MUFA, ∑ PUFA of the chicken from the experimental groups, were determined. Fatty acids were determined using gascromatography. The data obtained after statistic processing and interpretation have highlighted the fact that, concerning the fatty acids profile in the chickens breast, we can observe variations of the determined fatty acids content, what shows us that they can be influenced through dietary factors, but there quantity being determined by the participation % of the energy sources (vegetable oils, but also by the fatty acids content of the participating raw materials.

  7. Combined Analysis of Stable Isotope, (1)H NMR, and Fatty Acid To Verify Sesame Oil Authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongeun; Jin, Gyungsu; Lee, Yunhee; Chun, Hyang Sook; Ahn, Sangdoo; Kim, Byung Hee

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to verify the authenticity of sesame oils using combined analysis of stable isotope ratio, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and fatty acid profiles of the oils. Analytical data were obtained from 35 samples of authentic sesame oils and 29 samples of adulterated sesame oils currently distributed in Korea. The orthogonal projection to latent structure discriminant analysis technique was used to select variables that most effectively verify the sesame oil authenticity. The variables include δ(13)C value, integration values of NMR peaks that signify the CH3 of n-3 fatty acids, CH2 between two C═C, protons from sesamin/sesamolin, and 18:1n-9, 18:3n-3, 18:2t, and 18:3t content values. The authenticity of 65 of 70 blind samples was correctly verified by applying the range of the eight variables found in the authentic sesame oil samples, suggesting that triple analysis is a useful approach to verify sesame oil authenticity.

  8. Gas Chromatographic Determination of Fatty Acids in Oils with Regard to the Assessment of Fire Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartošová, Alica; Štefko, Tomáš

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the paper was to study and research the application of processing gas chromatographic method for the rapid and accurate determination of the composition of different types of oils, such as substances with the possibility of an adverse event spontaneous combustion or self-heating. Tendency to spontaneous combustion is chemically characterized mainly by the amount of unsaturated fatty acids, which have one or more double bonds in their molecule. Vegetable oils essentially consist of the following fatty acids: palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linoleic. For the needs of assessment, the fire hazard must be known, in which the double bond is present, as well as their number in a molecule. As an analytical method, GCMS was used for determination of oils content. Three types of oil were used - rapeseed, sunflower, and coconut oil. Owing to the occurrence of linoleic acid C18:2 (49.8 wt.%) and oleic acid C18:1 (43.3 wt.%) with double bonds, sunflower oil is the most prone to self-heating. The coconut and rapeseed oils contain double bond FAME in lesser amount, and their propensity to self-heating is relatively low.

  9. Effect of Lorenzo's Oil on Hepatic Gene Expression and the Serum Fatty Acid Level in abcd1-Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masashi; Honda, Ayako; Kobayashi, Akira; Watanabe, Yuichi; Watanabe, Shiro; Kawaguchi, Kosuke; Takashima, Shigeo; Shimozawa, Nobuyuki; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2017-05-31

    Lorenzo's oil is known to decrease the saturated very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) level in the plasma and skin fibroblasts of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) patients. However, the involvement of Lorenzo's oil in in vivo fatty acid metabolism has not been well elucidated. To investigate the effect of Lorenzo's oil on fatty acid metabolism, we analyzed the hepatic gene expression together with the serum fatty acid level in Lorenzo's oil-treated wild-type and abcd1-deficient mice. The change in the serum fatty acid level in Lorenzo's oil-treated abcd1-defcient mice was quite similar to that in the plasma fatty acid level in ALD patients supplemented with Lorenzo's oil. In addition, we found that the hepatic gene expression of two peroxisomal enzymes, Dbp and Scp2, and three microsomal enzymes, Elovl1, 2, and 3, were significantly stimulated by Lorenzo's oil. Our findings indicate that Lorenzo's oil activates hepatic peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation at the transcriptional level. In contrast, the transcriptional stimulation of Elovl1, 2, and 3 by Lorenzo's oil does not cause changes in the serum fatty acid level. It seems likely that the inhibition of these elongation activities by Lorenzo's oil results in a decrease in saturated VLCFA. Thus, these results not only contribute to a clarification of the mechanism by which the saturated VLCFA level is reduced in the serum of ALD patients by Lorenzo's oil-treatment, but also suggest the development of a new therapeutic approach to peroxisomal β-oxidation enzyme deficiency, especially mild phenotype of DBP deficiency.

  10. Formation of trans fatty acids during the frying of chicken fillet in corn oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meiyan; Yang, Ying; Nie, Shaoping; Xie, Mingyong; Chen, Feng; Luo, Pengju George

    2014-05-01

    To assess effects of heated edible oils on intake of trans fatty acids (TFAs); the formation of TFAs in cooking conditions was investigated by a frying system model, in which chicken fillet was fried in a commercial corn oil at 170 °C, for 12 frying cycles. The main TFAs detected in chicken fillet were trans C18:2 fatty acids (FAs) and trans C18:3 FAs, which exhibited no significant differences among the frying cycles. Besides, the content of trans C18:1 FAs were very low in all samples on different frying cycles. The intake of TFAs was estimated to be 0.06 g/100 g when chicken fillet fried in this process was consumed. These results suggest that an ordinary frying process upon a commercial corn oil has little impact on the daily TFAs intake.

  11. Chemotaxonomic Evaluation of Species of Turkish Salvia: Fatty Acid Composition of Seed Oils. II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Kılıç

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acids composition of seed oil of Salvia viridis, S. hydrangea, S. blepharochleana, S. chianantha, S. staminea, S. hypergeia,, S. cilicica, S. caespitosa, S. sclarea, S. cadmica, S. microstegia, S. pachystachys and S. verticillata were analyzed by GC/MS. The main compound were found to be as linoleic acid (18:2; 12.8 % to 52.2 %, linolenic acid (18:3; 3.2 % to 47.7 %, oleic acid (18:1; 11.3 % to 25.6 %, palmitic acid (16:0; 0.7 % to 16.8 % and stearic acid (18:0; 1.8 % to 4.8 %. A phylogenetic tree of species of Salvia were reported and compared to 18:3/18:2 ratio of the seed oils. Fatty acid composition of Salvia seed oils could be used as a chemotaxonomical marker.

  12. Evaluation of Major Fatty Acids Determination in Palm Oil by Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Taufik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of palm oil is the major factor influencing its physical and chemical properties. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the analytical performance of major fatty acids (palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, and linoleic acid analysis in palm oil. Triglycerides of palm oil were derivatized to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs by using boron trifluoride (BF3 in methanol. FAMEs were determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID using DB-23 capillary column as stationary phase. The studied parameters were instrument performance analysis, the efficiency of fatty acid derivatization, stability of derivatized analytes, accuracy, repeatability, intra-lab reproducibility, ruggedness, and method uncertainty. The evaluation results showed the instrument linearity at a working range of 5 to 40 mg/mL marked by coefficient of determination (R2 between 0.991-0.995. Instrument limits of detection (LOD and instrument limits of quantification (LOQ for 4 major fatty acids analysis were 26-35 µg/mLand 86-128 µg/mL, respectively. The increase of fatty acid concentration led to the decrease of derivatization efficiency in the fatty acids analysis. The result also showed that derivatized analytes were stable during 24 h storage at freeze temperature. The average recovery values by spiking method with the spiking concentration at 50 and 90 mg/g sample were at 75-94 % for stearic and linoleic acids analysis, however those for palmitic and oleic acids analysis were considered very low (<40 %, due to their low derivatization efficiency. Repeatability and intra-lab reproducibility of 4 major fatty acids analysis were at acceptable ranges, 0.45-1.38 % and 1.15-2.03 %, respectively. Determination by varying the volume of derivatizing agent showed the rugged method. Uncertainty of repeatability (Ur and uncertainty of reproducibility (Ur were ranged at 1.84-9.02 mg/g and 1.40-10.65 mg/g, respectively. This method was

  13. Effect of microencapsulated fish oil on blood metabolites and rumen fatty acids in Sannan Lactating dairy goat

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    Rashid Safari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the effect of microencapsulated fish oil on blood metabolites, rumen and blood plasma fatty acids concentrations twelve Sannan dairy goats with 30 ± 5 days in milk (DIM were allocated to 3 treatments in a 3×2 change over design with 2 periods of 30 days. Treatments were: 1 the control (without fish oil, 2 microencapsulated fish oil (2% fish oil capsulated in 6% treated whey protein concentrate, 3 fish oil (2% fish oil and 6% whey protein concentrate. Concentration of C18:0 in the rumen for microencapsulated fish oil decreased significantly in comparison with the control. The same manner was observed in goat’s blood plasma for microencapsulated fish oil. Microencapsulated fish oil led to a significant increase in polyunsaturated fatty acids concentration, hence concentration of C18:3, C20:5 EPA, C22:5 DPA and C22:6 DHA as a source of ω3 fatty acids increased 10, 20, 10 and 13 folds in comparison with the control and 10, 20, 2 and 2.5 folds in comparison with the fish oil treatment, respectively. HDL concentration in protected fish oil was significantly higher than that for the control and unprotected fish oil treatments. It seems that fish oil supplementation caused significant changes in blood fatty acids composition of ruminants as well as ω3 fatty acids in their products. Significant increase of ω3 fatty acids in blood plasma of microencapsulated fish oil treatment showed the protective effect of capsulation against rumen microbial biohydrogenation.

  14. Study of the changes in the dietary fatty acids and physicochemical values of sweet and bitter apricot oils in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, H.; Hamid, S.

    2007-01-01

    The quantity of oil in local varieties of sweet and bitter apricot was found to be more than that earlier reported for the Indian varieties. Both, sweet and bitter apricot oils, were semi-drying type. Refractive index of bitter apricot oil was higher whereas, free fatty acids were more in sweet apricot oil. Amount of cyanide, cadmium, antimony, arsenic, lead and copper as well as of palmitic acid insignificantly increased with ripening, being more in bitter apricot oil. Major difference was noted in fatty acid composition. Linoleic acid was present in higher amount in sweet apricot oil (21.4%) than in bitter apricot oil (19.6%). Concentration of palmitic acid in sweet oil was 5.0%, while in bitter oil, it was 6.4%. (author)

  15. Oils of insects and larvae consumed in Africa: potential sources of polyunsaturated fatty acids

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    Womeni Hilaire Macaire

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present the beneficial aspects of some insects consumed in sub-Saharan Africa, based on examples of insects consumed in Cameroon, to present their potential as sources of lipids and essential fatty acids. In Africa, termites, larvae of raphia weevil, caterpillars, crickets, bees, maggots, butterflies, weevil, etc. are significant sources of food. These insects belong mainly to the orders of : Isoptera, Orthoptera, Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. Depending on the species, insects are rich in proteins, minerals (K, Ca, Mg, Zn, P, Fe and/or vitamins (thiamine/B1, riboflavine/B2, pyridoxine/B6, acid pantothenic, niacin. The composition of oils extracted from the following six insects consumed in Cameroon was investigated : larvaes of raphia weevil (Rhynchophorus phoenicis, crickets (Homorocoryphus nitidulus, grasshopper (Zonocerus variegates, termites (Macrotermes sp., a variety of caterpillars (Imbrasia sp. and an unidentified caterpillar from the forest (UI carterpillar. The extraction yields of oil were 53.75%, 67.25%, 9.12%, 49.35%, 24.44% and 20.17% respectively for raphia weevil larvae, crickets, devastating crickets, termites, Imbrasia and UI caterpillar. The oil from raphia weevil mainly contains 37.60% of palmitoleic acid and 45.46% of linoleic acid. The oil from crickets is principally made up of palmitoleic acid (27.59%, linoleic acid (45.63% and α-linolenic acid (16.19%. The oil from grasshoppers is composed of palmitoleic acid (23.83%, oleic acid (10.71%, linoleic acid (21.07%, α-linolenic acid (14.76% and γ-linolenic acid (22.54%. The main components of termite oil are : palmitic acid (30.47%, oleic acid (47.52% and linoleic acid (8.79%. Palmitic acid (36.08% and linolenic acid (38.01% are the two dominant fatty acids of Imbrasia oil. As Imbrasia oil, UI caterpillar oil is composed of palmitic acid (30.80% and linolenic acid (41.79%. Stearic acid (7.04%, oleic acid

  16. Physico-chemical properties, fatty acid and tocopherol composition of oils from some Sudanese oil bearing sources

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    Matthäus, Bertrand

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven oils, obtained from seven Sudanese oil bearing sources that are Albizia lebbek Oil (ALO, Cassia obtusifolia Oil (COO, Cassia occidentalis Oil (CCO, Abutilon pannosum Oil (APO, Mitracarpus villous Oil (MVO, Ipomea indica Oil (IIO and Sesamum alatum Oil (SAO, were investigated. The seeds were collected in Sudan from Ghibaish, North Kordofan state. In addition to the oil content, the fatty acid was determined by capillary gas chromatography and the tocopherols were evaluated by highperformance liquid chromatography. The oil content of the seven seeds amounted to 12.8, 7.0, 3.2, 7.1, 11.5, 8.8, and 21.3%, respectively.The oils contained 16.4, 20.0, 14.3, 16.8, 19.4, 19.9 and 10.9 % palmitic acid and 21.0, 24.4, 22.1, 10.9, 27.7, 34.0, 45.1 % oleic acid, and 43.8, 38.2, 45.0, 63.9, 34.6, 33.5, 36.3 % linoleic acid and traces of linolenic acid, respectively.The tocopherol content of these oils amounted to 85.6, 48.2, 32.7, 163.5, 52.5, 30.9, and 26.4 mg/100 g oil, respectively. Alpha-tocopherol was the predominant tocopherol in the oil of Albizia lebbek, Cassia obtusifolia, Cassia occidentalis, and Abutilon pannosum, while gamma-tocopherol was the predominant tocopherol in the oil of Mitracarpus villous, Ipomea indica and Sesamum alatum.Se analizan siete aceites procedentes de plantas y semillas de Sudán: Albizia lebbek Oil (ALO, Cassia obtusifolia Oil (COO, Cassia occidentalis Oil (CCO, Abutilon pannosum Oil (APO, Mitracarpus villous Oil (MVO, Ipomea indica Oil (IIO y Sesamum alatum Oil (SAO. Las semillas se recolectaron en el estado de Ghibaish, North Kordofan. Además del contenido en aceite (12.8, 7.0, 3.2, 7.1, 11.5, 8.8, y 21.3 %, respectivamente, se determinaron los ácidos grasos mediante cromatografía de gases y los tocoferoles mediante HPLC. Los aceites contenían, respectivamente, 16.4, 20.0, 14.3, 16.8, 19.4, 19.9 y 10.9 % de ácido palmitito, 21.0, 24.4, 22.1, 10.9, 27.7, 34.0, 45.1 % de ácido oleico, 43.8, 38.2, 45.0, 63.9, 34

  17. INFLUENCE OF THERMAL HEATING ON THE FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF TURKEY MEAT ENRICHED WITH LINSEED OIL

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    V. V. Gushchin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The paper examines the problem of optimization of the fatty acid composition of lipids in poultry meat, which is widely used in nutrition. The omega-6 content is significantly higher than the omega-3 content in the composition of poultry meat lipids, which is not optimal for assimilation and needs a correction. The possibility of turkey meat enrichment with linseed oil was investigated with the aim of ensuring the omega-6 to omega-3 ratio in the minced meat formulations, which provides for the nutritionally adequate balance not higher than 10 units. The paper also presents the results of the investigation of the fatty acids composition and fatty acid balance of the lipid fraction of minced meat as well as the changes due to thermal heating of meat formulations in the water medium with a temperature of 95±2  °C to a product core temperature of 70±1  °C. According to the data of the investigations, the omega-6 : omega-3 ratio in the minced meat formulations before thermal treatment was 6.5 to 7.7 units compared to the control (42 units; after thermal treatment, it was 6.5 to 8.0 units for the minced meat formulations, which included vegetable oils with linseed oil. The data on the fatty acid composition of the formulations correspond to the indicators of the fatty acid balance which was RL1…3=0.47 – 0.57 and RL1…6 = 0.32 – 0.37 units for enriched minced meat before thermal treatment and 0.48 – 0.57 and 0.31 – 0.38 units after thermal treatment, respectively. The results confirm the possibility to enrich minced meat formulations with linseed oil when producing meat balls, which can be extended to other types of products.

  18. Fatty acids and sterols composition, and antioxidant activity of oils extracted from plant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Gruczyńska, Eliza; Ścibisz, Iwona; Rudzińska, Magdalena

    2016-12-15

    This study determined and compared the contents of bioactive components in plant seed oils extracted with n-hexane (Soxhlet method) and chloroform/methanol (Folch method) from coriander, caraway, anise, nutmeg and white mustard seeds. Oleic acid dominated among unsaturated fatty acids in nutmeg and anise seed oils while petroselinic acid was present in coriander and caraway oils. Concerning sterols, β-sitosterol was the main component in seed oils extracted with both methods. The content of total phenolics in nutmeg, white mustard and coriander seed oils extracted with chloroform/methanol was higher than in their counterparts prepared with n-hexane. The seed oil samples extracted according to the Folch method exhibited a higher ability to scavenge DPPH radicals compared to the oil samples prepared with the Soxhlet method. DPPH values of the methanolic extracts derived from oils produced with the Folch method were also higher than in the oils extracted with n-hexane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In Vitro Rumen Fermentation Characteristics and Fatty Acid Profiles Added with Calcium Soap of Canola/Flaxseed Oil

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    S. Suharti

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to assess the effect of adding canola oil and flaxseed oil which were protected with calcium soap (Ca-soap on the fermentation characteristics, rumen microbial population, and the profile of fatty acids in the rumen during 4 and 8 hours in the in vitro fermentation. The research design used in this study was a completely randomized block design with 3 treatments and 4 replications. The treatments consisted of control ration (Napier grass and concentrate at the ratio of 60 : 40, control + 6% of Ca-soap of canola oil, and control + 6% of Ca-soap of flaxseed oil. Variables observed were pH value, NH3 concentration, volatile fatty acid (VFA, dry matter and organic matter digestibility, and fatty acid profile.  The results showed that the addition of Ca-soap of canola or flaxseed oil did not affect the pH value, NH3 concentration, dry matter digestibility, organic matter digestibility, total population of bacteria and protozoa in the rumen. However, the total production of ruminal VFA was increased (P<0.05 with the addition of Ca soap of canola oil/flaxseed oil. The use of Ca-soap of flaxseed oil increased (P<0.05 the content of unsaturated fatty acids in the rumen at 4 h incubation. The addition of Ca-soap of flaxseed oil resulted the lowest (P<0.05 level of unsaturated fatty acids biohydrogenation compared to the other treatments at 4 h incubation. In conclusion, the addition of Ca soap of canola/flaxseed oil could improve VFA total production. Vegetable oils protected using calcium soap could inhibit unsaturated fatty acid biohidrogenation by rumen microbes. Ca-soap of flaxseed oil could survive from rumen biohydrogenation in the rumen better than Ca-soap of canola oil.

  20. Short communication: A nanoemulsified form of oil blends positively affects the fatty acid proportion in ruminal batch cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sherbiny, M; Cieslak, A; Pers-Kamczyc, E; Szczechowiak, J; Kowalczyk, D; Szumacher-Strabel, M

    2016-01-01

    Two consecutive rumen batch cultures were used to study the effect of nanoemulsified oils as a new type of supplement, on the in vitro fatty acid proportion and vaccenic acid formation. Three levels (3, 5, and 7%) of 2 different oil blends [soybean:fish oil (SF) or rapeseed-fish oil (RF)] were used. Both oil blends were used either in the raw form (SF or RF, respectively) or in the nanoemulsified form (NSF or NRF, respectively). The diets were the control (0%), which consisted of a dry total mixed ration without any supplements, the control plus 3, 5, or 7% of the SF or RF oil blend in appropriate form (raw or nanoemulsified). For each treatment, 6 incubation vessels were used. Each batch culture was incubated for 24h and conducted twice in 2 consecutive days. All supplements were calculated as a percentage of the substrate dry matter (400mg). Nanoemulsified supplements were recalculated to make sure the oil amount was equal to the raw oil supplementation levels. The results from both experiments indicated that the proportions of vaccenic acid and cis-9,trans-11 C18:2 increased when a raw oil blend was supplemented; on the other hand, no influence of nanoemulsified form of oil blend was observed on the proportion cis-9,trans-11 C18:2. Generally, supplementation with the nanoemulsified oil blends had less effect on biohydrogenation intermediates than the raw form of oil blends. However, the nanoemulsified form had a greater effect on the increase of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Nanoemulsified oil blends had a positive effect on decreasing the transformation rate of polyunsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids in the biohydrogenation environment. Supplements of nanoemulsified oil blends tended to be more effective than supplements of raw oils in preserving a greater proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the fermentation culture. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oil and fatty acid composition of peanut cultivars grown in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, F.; Ahmed, M.

    2012-01-01

    Quality and flavor of edible peanuts and its products are affected by fatty acid composition of oil. The information related to chemical composition of Peanut grown in the country are scarce, therefore, the present investigation was designed to determine the oil and fatty acid composition of some commonly grown peanut cultivars in Pakistan. Seven Peanut cultivars were grown during 2008 in randomized complete block design replicated thrice. The tested cultivars differed significantly for oil content which ranged from 49.83 to 53.06% on dry weight basis, thus showing differences of 7% among cultivars. The saturated fatty acids (Palmetic and Stearic acid) in different cultivars ranged between 9.95 to 10.79% and 1.63 to 2.19%, respectively. Differences among cultivars for oleic acid exhibited significance which ranged between 49.34 to 54.83%. Similarly, cultivars differed statistically for linoleic ac id which showed a range of 28.99 to 34.23%, thus depicted difference of 7%. Significant differences among tested cultivars may be attributed to the place of origin of particular cultivar. An inverse relationship was exhibited between oleic and linoleic acid, similar to other edible oils. (author)

  2. Study of Trans Fatty Acid Formation in Oil by Heating Using Model Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Naohiro; Kagiono, Satoshi; Yoshinaga, Kazuaki; Mizobe, Hoyo; Nagai, Toshiharu; Yoshida, Akihiko; Beppu, Fumiaki; Nagao, Koji

    2018-03-01

    The intake of trans fatty acids (TFAs) in foods changes the ratio of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in blood, which causes cardiovascular disease. TFAs are formed by trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). The most recognized formation mechanisms of TFAs are hydrogenation of liquid oil to form partially hydrogenated oil (PHO,) and biohydrogenation of UFAs to form TFA in ruminants. Heating oil also forms TFAs; however, the mechanism of formation, and the TFA isomers formed have not been well investigated. In this study, the trans isomerization mechanism of unsaturated fatty acid formation by heating was examined using the model compounds oleic acid, trioleate, linoleic acid, and trilinoleate for liquid plant oil. The formation of TFAs was found to be suppressed by the addition of an antioxidant and argon gas. Furthermore, the quantity of formed TFAs correlated with the quantity of formed polymer in trioleate heated with air and oxygen. These results suggest that radical reactions form TFAs from UFAs by heating. Furthermore, trans isomerization by heating oleic acid and linoleic acid did not change the original double bond positions. Therefore, the distribution of TFA isomers formed was very simple. In contrast, the mixtures of TFA isomers formed from PHO and ruminant UFAs are complicated because migration of double bonds occurs during hydrogenation and biohydrogenation. These findings suggest that trans isomerization by heating is executed by a completely different mechanism than in hydrogenation and biohydrogenation.

  3. Bioactive compounds from palm fatty acid distillate and crude palm oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estiasih, T.; Ahmadi, K.

    2018-03-01

    Crude palm oil (CPO) and palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) are rich sources of bioactive compounds. PFAD is a by-product of palm oil refinery that produce palm frying oil. Physical refining of palm oil by deodorization produces palm fatty acid distillate. CPO and PFAD contain some bioactive compounds such as vitamin E (tocopherol and tocotrienols), phytosterol, and squalene. Bioactive compounds of CPO and PFAD are vitamin E, phytosterols, and squalene. Vitamin E of CPO and PFAD mainly comprised of tocotrienols and the remaining is tocopherol. Phytosterols of CPO and PFAD contained beta sitosterol, stigmasterol, and campesterol. Tocotrienols and phytosterols of CPO and PFAD, each can be separated to produce tocotrienol rich fraction and phytosterol rich fraction. Tocotrienol rich fraction from PFAD has both antioxidant and cholesterol lowering properties. Bioactive compounds of PFAD silmultaneously have been proven to improve lipid profile, and have hepatoprotector effect, imunomodulator, antioxidant properties, and lactogenic effect in animal test experiment. It is possible to develop separation of bioactive compounds of CPO and PFAD integratively with the other process that utilizes fatty acid.

  4. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Rapeseed and Linseed Oil on the Composition of Fatty Acids in Porcine Muscle Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Kralik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary supplementation with rapeseed and linseed oils on changes of the fatty acid profile in porcine meat. The research was conducted on 45 fattening pigs divided into three groups. Group 1 was given a diet with 2% of sunflower oil, group 2 was given a diet with 2% of rapeseed oil and group 3 was given a diet supplemented with 2% of linseed oil. The highest content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and the most favourable ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFA was determined in the meat of pigs that were fed diets with linseed oil (P < 0.001, whereas the meat of pigs that were fed diets with sunflower oil had an unfavourable ratio of these acids. The results point out the necessity of finding out optimal portions of forages rich in PUFA to improve the ratio of fatty acids in porcine muscle tissue.

  5. Serum fatty acids, biochemical indices and antioxidant status in goats fed canola oil and palm oil blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Kazeem D; Sabow, Azad B; Aghwan, Zeiad A; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Samsudin, Anjas A; Alimon, Abdul R; Sazili, Awis Q

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplementation of unsaturated fats in ruminants, if not stabilized, can instigate oxidative stress which can have negative impact on production performance and enhance the susceptibility to various diseases. The current study examined the effect of dietary 80 % canola oil and 20 % palm oil blend (CPOB) on serum fatty acids, antioxidant profile and biochemical indices in goats. Thirty Boer bucks (4-5 months old; initial BW, 20.34 ± 0.77 kg) were randomly assigned to diets containing 0, 4 or 8 % CPOB and fed daily for a period of 90 days. Blood was sampled from the goats on 0, 30, 60 and 90 days of the trial and the serum was analyzed for fatty acids, cholesterol, glucose, total protein, antioxidants and lipid oxidation. Neither diet nor sampling time influenced serum TBARS value, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose and total protein. Goats fed 4 and 8 % CPOB had higher (P oil and palm oil blend could be supplemented in diets without instigating oxidative stress in goats.

  6. Fatty acid composition of Brunfelsia uniflora (Solanaceae seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán, C. A.

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The seeds of Brunfelsia uniflora contained 30.5% of oil. The oil was analysed and components were identified by infrared (IR, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and chemical methods. Linoleic acid predominated (75.5% followed by oleic (11.8% and palmitic (7.25% acids. Ricinoleic acid was present in small quantities (0.52%.Las semillas de Brunfelsia uniflora contuvieron 30.5% de aceite. El aceite fue analizado y los componentes fueron indentificados por espectroscopia de infrarrojo (IR, cromatografía gaseosa-espectrometría de masa (CGEM y métodos químicos. Predominó el ácido linoleico (75.5% seguido por el oleico (11.8% y el palmítico (7.25%. El ácido ricinoleico estuvo presente en pequeñas cantidades (0.52%.

  7. Effect of Processing on Physiochemical Properties and Fatty Acid Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia occidentails) Seed Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alademeyin, J. O.; Arawande, J. O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the physicochemical properties and fatty acid composition of the seed oil extracted from fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis). The extracted oil was degummed, neutralised and bleached. The oil yield was 42.26±0.20%. The specific gravity (at 25 degree C) of the oil was 0.923±0.003 and the refractive index (at 25 degree C) was 1.475±0.002. Processing of the crude oil resulted in progressive decrease in turbidity, colour, free fatty acid, acid value, peroxide value and saponification value. However, there was increase in smoke point (243.00±0.03 to 253.00±0.03 degree C), flash point (285.00±1.20 to 304.0 1.10 degree C) and fire point (345.001.10 to 358.0 1.55 degree C) as well as iodine value (113.00 to 121.50 g/100 g) and fatty acid composition during the processing of the oil. The fatty acids detected in the oil samples were myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, arachidic, behenic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The predominant fatty acid was oleic acid (47.40-47.90%) followed by linoleic acid (26.36-30.44%) while the least fatty acid was linolenic acid (0.01-0.05%). (author)

  8. Fatty acid composition and anticancer activity in colon carcinoma cell lines of Prunus dulcis seed oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mericli, Filiz; Becer, Eda; Kabadayı, Hilal; Hanoglu, Azmi; Yigit Hanoglu, Duygu; Ozkum Yavuz, Dudu; Ozek, Temel; Vatansever, Seda

    2017-12-01

    Almond oil is used in traditional and complementary therapies for its numerous health benefits due to high unsaturated fatty acids content. This study investigated the composition and in vitro anticancer activity of almond oil from Northern Cyprus and compared with almond oil from Turkey. Almond oil from Northern Cyprus was obtained by supercritical CO 2 extraction and analyzed by GC-MS. Almond oil of Turkey was provided from Turkish pharmacies. Different concentrations of almond oils were incubated for 24 and 48 h with Colo-320 and Colo-741 cells. Cell growth and cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assays. Anticancer and antiprolifetarive activities of almond oils were investigated by immunocytochemistry using antibodies directed against to BMP-2, β-catenin, Ki-67, LGR-5 and Jagged 1. Oleic acid (77.8%; 75.3%), linoleic acid (13.5%; 15.8%), palmitic acid (7.4%; 6.3%), were determined as the major compounds of almond oil from Northern Cyprus and Turkey, respectively. In the MTT assay, both almond oils were found to be active against Colo-320 and Colo-741 cells with 1:1 dilution for both 24 h and 48 h. As a result of immunohistochemical staining, while both almond oils exhibited significant antiproliferative and anticancer activity, these activities were more similar in Colo-320 cells which were treated with Northern Cyprus almond oil. Almond oil from Northern Cyprus and Turkey may have anticancer and antiproliferative effects on colon cancer cells through molecular signalling pathways and, thus, they could be potential novel therapeutic agents.

  9. Some physical and chemical properties of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L. seed and fatty acid composition of seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem GÖLÜKÇÜ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edible part and leaves of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L. are used as food or medicine to control some diseases because of its antioxidant, antibacterial, anticancer, anti-hepatotoxic, antiviral, antiulcerogenic and larvicidal effects. Although fruits have considerable amount of seeds, they have not received much attention. In this study, some physical and chemical properties of the seed and also fatty acid composition of seed oil were determined. Oil content of the sample was determined by soxhlet apparatus as 26.10% in dried sample. Fatty acid composition was analyzed by GC-MS and seven fatty acids were identified and their ratios were determined in this seed oil. The main fatty acid was determined as α-eleostearic (45.60%. The other fatty acids were palmitic (3.69%, stearic (28.00%, oleic (12.45%, linoleic (8.90%, arachidic (0.71% and gadoleic acids (0.65%.

  10. Anti-fatty liver effects of oils from Zingiber officinale and Curcuma longa on ethanol-induced fatty liver in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwozo, Sarah Onyenibe; Osunmadewa, Damilola Adeola; Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    The present study is aimed at evaluating the protective effects of oils from Zingiber officinale (ginger) and Curcuma longa (turmeric) on acute ethanol-induced fatty liver in male Wistar rats. Ferric reducing antioxidant power activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity of the oils were evaluated ex vivo. Rats were pretreated for 28 d with standard drug (Livolin Forte) and oils from Z. officinale and C. longa before they were exposed to 45% ethanol (4.8 g/kg) to induce acute fatty liver. Histological changes were observed and the degree of protection was measured by using biochemical parameters such as alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities. Serum triglyceride (TG) level, total cholesterol (TC) level and the effects of both oils on reduced gluthatione (GSH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were estimated. Oils from Z. officinale and C. longa at a dose of 200 mg/kg showed hepatoprotection by decreasing the activities of serum enzymes, serum TG, serum TC and hepatic MDA, while they significantly restored the level of GSH as well as GST and SOD activities. Histological examination of rats tissues was related to the obtained results. From the results it may be concluded that oils from Z. officinale and C. longa (200 mg/kg) exhibited hepatoprotective activity in acute ethanol-induced fatty liver and Z. officinale oil was identified to have better effects than C. longa oil.

  11. Blends of olive oil and seeds oils: characterisation and olive oil quantification using fatty acids composition and chemometric tools. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfreda, M; Gobbi, L; Grippa, A

    2014-02-15

    A method to verify the percentage of olive oil in a blend, in compliance with the Commission Regulation EU No. 29/2012, was developed by GC-FID analysis of methyl esters of fatty acids, followed by chemometric tools (PCA, TFA, SIMCA and PLS). First of all, binary blends of twelve olive oils and one sunflower oil were studied, in order to evaluate the variability associated to the fatty acids profile of olive oils (Monfreda, Gobbi, & Grippa, 2012). In this study, binary blends of twelve olive oils with four types of seeds oils (peanut, corn, rice and grape seed oils) were evaluated. These four groups of blends were analysed and processed separately, each group consisting of 36 samples with 40%, 50% and 60% of olive oil content. Chemometric tools were also applied to the global data set (180 samples, including those analysed in the previous paper). Outstanding results were achieved, showing that the proposed method would be capable to discriminate blends with a difference in concentration of olive oil lower than 5% (a standard error of prediction of 3.97% was obtained with PLS). Therefore blends containing 45% and 55% of olive oil were also analysed with the current method and added to the data sets for chemometric assessment with supervised tools. SIMCA still provided good models; however the best performance was achieved by processing each group of binary blends (consisting of 60 samples) separately, rather than applying SIMCA to the overall data set (300 samples). On the other hand PLS did not show significant improvements. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzymatic catalysis for transesterification of high free fatty acid oil (waste cooking oil) to biodiesel: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Man Kee; Lee, Keat Teong; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman

    2010-01-01

    In the last few years, biodiesel has emerged as one of the most potential renewable energy to replace current petrol-derived diesel. It is a renewable, biodegradable and non-toxic fuel which can be easily produced through transesterification reaction. However, current commercial usage of refined vegetable oils for biodiesel production is impractical and uneconomical due to high feedstock cost and priority as food resources. Low-grade oil, typically waste cooking oil can be a better alternative; however, the high free fatty acids (FFA) content in waste cooking oil has become the main drawback for this potential feedstock. Therefore, this review paper is aimed to give an overview on the current status of biodiesel production and the potential of waste cooking oil as an alternative feedstock. Advantages and limitations of using homogeneous, heterogeneous and enzymatic transesterification on oil with high FFA (mostly waste cooking oil) are discussed in detail. It was found that using heterogeneous acid catalyst and enzyme are the best option to produce biodiesel from oil with high FFA as compared to the current commercial homogeneous base-catalyzed process. However, these heterogeneous acid and enzyme catalyze system still suffers from serious mass transfer limitation problems and therefore are not favorable for industrial application. Nevertheless, towards the end of this review paper, a few latest technological developments that have the potential to overcome the mass transfer limitation problem such as oscillatory flow reactor (OFR), ultrasonication, microwave reactor and co-solvent are reviewed. With proper research focus and development, waste cooking oil can indeed become the next ideal feedstock for biodiesel.

  13. [Inhibition of oxidation of unsaturated fatty acid methyl esters by essential oils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Alinkina, E S; Vorobjeva, A K; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I

    2016-01-01

    The essential oils from 16 various spice plants were studied as natural antioxidants for the inhibition of autooxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids methyl esters isolated from linseed oil. The content of methyl oleate, methyl linoleate, and methyl linolenoate after 1, 2, and 4 months of autooxidation were used as criteria to estimate the antioxidant efficiencies of essential oils. In 4 months, 92% of the methyl linolenoate and 79% of the methyl linoleate were oxidized in a control sample of a model system. It was found that the most effective antioxidants were essential oils from clove bud, cinnamon leaves, and oregano. They inhibited autooxidation of methyl linolenoate by 76–85%. The antioxidant properties of these essential oils were due to phenols— eugenol, carvacrol, and thymol. Essential oil from coriander did not contain phenols, but it inhibited methyl linolenoate oxidation by 38%. Essential oils from thyme, savory, mace, lemon, and tea tree inhibited methyl linolenoate oxidation by 17–24%. The other essential oils had no antioxidant properties.

  14. Enzymatic synthesis of cocoa butter equivalent from olive oil and palmitic-stearic fatty acid mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ibrahim O

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of the present research is to restructure olive oil triacylglycerol (TAG) using enzymatic acidolysis reaction to produce structured lipids that is close to cocoa butter in terms of TAG structure and melting characteristics. Lipase-catalyzed acidolysis of refined olive oil with a mixture of palmitic-stearic acids at different substrate ratios was performed in an agitated batch reactor maintained at constant temperature and agitation speed. The reaction attained steady-state conversion in about 5 h with an overall conversion of 92.6 % for the olive oil major triacylglycerol 1-palmitoy-2,3-dioleoyl glycerol (POO). The five major TAGs of the structured lipids produced with substrate mass ratio of 1:3 (olive oil/palmitic-stearic fatty acid mixture) were close to that of the cocoa butter with melting temperature between 32.6 and 37.7 °C. The proposed kinetics model used fits the experimental data very well.

  15. Wheat germ oil extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide with ethanol: Fatty acid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parczewska-Plesnar, B.; Brzozowski, R.; Gwardiak, H.; Białecka-Florjańczyk, E.; Bujnowski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) using CO2 with ethanol as entrainer was performed at a temperature of 40 o C under a pressure of 21 MPa. For comparison, a similar extraction without the entrainer was carried out. The extraction yield of wheat germ using supercritical CO2 with ethanol was slightly higher (10.7 wt%) than that of extraction without the entrainer (9.9 wt%). Fractions of SFE extracts were collected separately during the experiments and the composition of fatty acids in each fraction was analyzed. The SFE extracted oils were rich (63.4-71.3%) in the most valuable polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and their content in all collected fractions was approximately constant. Similar PUFA contents were found in the reference samples of oils extracted by n-hexane (66.2-67.0%), while the commercial cold-pressed oil contained significantly less PUFA (60.2%). These results show a higher nutritional value of the oil obtained by extraction with supercritical CO2 than cold pressed oil which is generally considered to be very valuable. [es

  16. Fatty Acid Methyl Esters of Melon Seed Oil: Characterisation for Potential Diesel Fuel Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. EJIKEME

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME, biodiesel, are alternative diesel fuels usually obtained from renewable sources, mainly, vegetable and animal oils through transesterification among other processes. Melon seed oil was extracted from melon seeds bought from a local market, degummed and alkali refined using standard methods. FAME of the oil was produced using methanol in the molar ration of 1:6, 1% sodium hydroxide catalyst at the reaction temperature of 60 deg C for the duration of 1h. Results obtained showed that the fatty acid methyl esters had a specific gravity of 0.8786, viscosity of 6.24 centistokes, pH of 7.23, heating value of 36.34 J/g and flash point of 148 deg C. The FAME yield was 87.35% under the reaction conditions that applied. The infrared spectra of both the refined oil and the methyl esters from it, showed peaks at 1721.3cm-1 and 1167.8cm-1 (C=O and C-O stretches large and medium absorbance's for oils and methyl esters. Generally, the fuel properties of the FAME compared with values obtained under the same conditions for conventional petroleum diesel that was sourced from a retail outlet; suggesting that biodiesel from MSO could be used alone or in blends with petrodiesel to power compression ignition (diesel engines.

  17. Fatty acid composition of Achene oils from five Moroccan climatic cultivars of Cannabis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merzouki, A.

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of achene oil from five Cannabis climatic cultivars cultivated in the nort of Morrocco is determined. Linoleic acid predominated (40 to 45%, followed by linolenic (12 to 17% and oleic (7 to 10% acids. Differences in the fatty acid composition of oils are attributed to environmental factors.

    Se estudia la composición en ácidos grasos del aceite de los aquenios de cinco variedades climáticas del cáñamo (Cannabis sativa L cultivadas en el norte de Marruecos. Predomina el ácido linoleico (40 a 45% seguido por el linolénico (12 a 17% y el oleico (7 a 10%. Las diferencias en la composición de los ácidos grasos del aceite se atribuyen a factores ambientales.

  18. Fatty Amides from Crude Rice Bran Oil as Green Corrosion Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Reyes-Dorantes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its high oil content, this research proposes the use of an agroindustrial byproduct (rice bran as a sustainable option for the synthesis of corrosion inhibitors. From the crude rice bran oil, the synthesis of fatty amide-type corrosion inhibitors was carried out. The corrosion inhibitory capacity of the fatty amides was evaluated on an API X-70 steel using electrochemical techniques such as real-time corrosion monitoring and potentiodynamic polarization curves. As a corrosive medium, a CO2-saturated solution (3.5% NaCl was used at three temperatures (30, 50, and 70°C and different concentrations of inhibitor (0, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 ppm. The results demonstrate that the sustainable use of agroindustrial byproducts is a good alternative to the synthesis of environmentally friendly inhibitors with high corrosion inhibition efficiencies.

  19. Fatty acid digestion and deposition in broiler chickens fed diets containing either native or randomized palm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, W; Gerrits, W J J; Hovenier, R; Geelen, M J H; Lobee, H W J; Verstegen, M W A; Beynen, A C

    2008-03-01

    The hypothesis tested was that randomization of palm oil would increase its digestibility, especially that of its palmitic acid (C16:0) component, with subsequent changes in the fatty acid composition in body tissues. Broiler chickens were fed diets containing either native or randomized palm oil. Diets with either native or a 50/50 mix of native and hydrogenated sunflower oil were also fed. Randomization of palm oil raised the fraction of C16:0 at the sn-2 position of the glycerol molecule from 14 to 32%. Hydrogenation of sunflower oil reduced fat and total saturated fatty acid digestibility, whereas no change in digestibility of total unsaturated fatty acids was found. Randomization of palm oil raised the group mean apparent digestibility of C16:0 by 2.6 and 5.8% units during the starter and grower-finisher phase, respectively. On the basis of the observed digestibilities in the grower-finisher period, it was calculated that the digestibility for C16:0 at the sn-2 and sn-1,3 position was 90 and 51%, respectively. The feeding of randomized instead of native palm oil significantly raised the palmitic acid content of breast meat and abdominal fat and lowered the ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acids. It is concluded that randomized palm oil may be used as vegetable oil in broiler nutrition with positive effect on saturated fatty acid digestibility when compared with native palm oil and positive effect on firmness of meat when compared with vegetable oils rich in unsaturated fatty acids.

  20. Synthesis of fatty monoester lubricant base oil catalyzed by Fe-Zn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fatty monoester lubricant base oils as high as 96.7 mol% were prepared by reacting methyl oleate with long-chain alcohols viz., 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (C8−OH), 1-decanol (C10OH) and 1-dodecanol (C12OH) in the presence of a solid Fe-Zn double-metal cyanide (DMC) complex catalyst. Unlike many other acid catalysts, DMC ...

  1. Fatty acid composition and some physicochemical characteristics of Sterculia apetala seed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrera-Meza, S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the tropical rain forests of southeastern Mexico, the use of Sterculia mexicana and Sterculia apetala seed oils for human and animal nutrition is common. However, the seeds contain cyclopropene fatty acids, whose consumption is related with beneficial as well as detrimental physiological effects. The aim of this study was to determine the fatty acid profile and the physicochemical characteristics of S. apetala seed oil and to evaluate the effect of roasting on both aspects. Cyclopropenoic fatty acids, sterculic acid and malvalic acid were identified in the natural and roasted seed oils. The major component in the seed oil was sterculic acid, as has been reported for Sterculia mexicana and Sterculia foetida. The roasting process modified some physicochemical properties and the fatty acid composition of the seed oil, particularly by decreasing its content of sterculic acid. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the fatty acid composition of S. apetala seed oil.En zonas tropicales del sureste de México, el uso de semillas de Sterculia mexicana y Sterculia apetala es común para consumo humano y animal. Sin embargo, dichas semillas contienen ácidos grasos ciclopropenoicos, los cuales se les ha relacionado tanto con efectos fisiológicos beneficiosos como adversos para la salud. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el perfil de ácidos grasos y las características fisicoquímicas de la especie S. apetala, así como la evaluación del aceite sometido a un proceso de tostado. Se identificaron ácidos grasos ciclopropenoicos como el ácido estercúlico y malválico, en el aceite natural y tostado. Para las especies S. mexicana y S. foetida, el componente mayoritario en las semillas fue el ácido estercúlico. El proceso de tostado modificó algunas propiedades fisicoquímicas y la composción de los ácidos grasos, especificamente disminuyó el contenido de ácido estercúlico. Para nuestro conocimiento, este es la primera informaci

  2. Effects of fatty acids composition and microstructure properties of fats and oils on textural properties of dough and cookie quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Amita; Khatkar, B S

    2018-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effect of fatty acid composition and microstructure properties of fats and oils on the textural properties of cookie dough and quality attributes of cookies. Fatty acid composition and microstructure properties of six fats and oils (butter, hydrogenated fat, palm oil, coconut oil, groundnut oil, and sunflower oil) were analyzed. Sunflower oil was found to be the most unsaturated oil with 88.39% unsaturated fatty acid content. Coconut oil and palm oil differed from other fats and oils by having an appreciable amount of lauric acid (59.36%) and palmitic acid (42.14%), respectively. Microstructure size of all fats and oils ranged from 1 to 20 μm being the largest for coconut oil and the smallest for palm oil. In palm oil, small rod-shaped and randomly arranged microstructures were observed, whereas sunflower oil and groundnut oil possessed large, scattered ovule shaped microstructures. It was reported that sunflower oil produced the softest dough, the largest cookie spread and the hardest cookie texture, whereas hydrogenated fat produced the stiffest dough, the lowest spread and most tender cookies. Statistical analysis depicted that palmitic acid and oleic acid demonstrated a positive correlation with dough hardness. Linoleic acid exhibited positive link with cookie spread ratio (r = 0.836**) and breaking strength (r = 0.792**). Microstructure size showed a significant positive relationship with dough density (r = 0.792**), cookie density (r = 0.386*), spread ratio (r = 0.312*), and breaking strength (r = 0.303*).

  3. [The fatty acid composition of large pumpkin seed oil (Curucbitae maxima Dich) cultivated in Georgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to identify qualitatively and quantitatively fatty acid composition of large pumpkin seed oil cultivated in Georgia (Cucurbitae maxima Duch) and evaluate its biological activities. Evaluation was conducted using high-performance liquid chromatography method. Fatty acids ranging from C12:0 to C22:0 were identified in the probe. The oil contained 0,2В±0,01mg% lauric, 0,3В±0,01 mg% miristic, 9,0В±0,7mg% palmitic, 5,5В±0,4 mg% stearic, 28,1В±1,0 mg% oleic, 40,2В±1,9 mg% linolic, 12,1В±1,0 mg% linolenic, 2,0В±0,2mg% arachinic and 1,2В±0,1 mg% begenic acids. The investigation showed that large pumpkin seed oil contains a range of biologically significant fatty acids, unique proportion of which attaches great value to the vegetative material.

  4. Automatic 1H-NMR Screening of Fatty Acid Composition in Edible Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castejón, David; Fricke, Pascal; Cambero, María Isabel; Herrera, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we introduce an NMR-based screening method for the fatty acid composition analysis of edible oils. We describe the evaluation and optimization needed for the automated analysis of vegetable oils by low-field NMR to obtain the fatty acid composition (FAC). To achieve this, two scripts, which automatically analyze and interpret the spectral data, were developed. The objective of this work was to drive forward the automated analysis of the FAC by NMR. Due to the fact that this protocol can be carried out at low field and that the complete process from sample preparation to printing the report only takes about 3 min, this approach is promising to become a fundamental technique for high-throughput screening. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, the fatty acid composition of extra virgin olive oils from various Spanish olive varieties (arbequina, cornicabra, hojiblanca, manzanilla, and picual) was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy according to this protocol. PMID:26891323

  5. Automatic 1H-NMR Screening of Fatty Acid Composition in Edible Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Castejón

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce an NMR-based screening method for the fatty acid composition analysis of edible oils. We describe the evaluation and optimization needed for the automated analysis of vegetable oils by low-field NMR to obtain the fatty acid composition (FAC. To achieve this, two scripts, which automatically analyze and interpret the spectral data, were developed. The objective of this work was to drive forward the automated analysis of the FAC by NMR. Due to the fact that this protocol can be carried out at low field and that the complete process from sample preparation to printing the report only takes about 3 min, this approach is promising to become a fundamental technique for high-throughput screening. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, the fatty acid composition of extra virgin olive oils from various Spanish olive varieties (arbequina, cornicabra, hojiblanca, manzanilla, and picual was determined by 1H-NMR spectroscopy according to this protocol.

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids, phenolic compounds and antioxidant characteristics of chia oil supplemented margarine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Taj, Imran; Ajmal, Muhammad; Junaid, Muhammad

    2017-05-31

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) is known as power house of omega fatty acids which has great health benefits. It contains up to 78% linolenic acid (ω-3) and 18% linoleic acid (ω-6), which could be a great source of omega-3 fatty acids for functional foods. Therefore, in this study, margarines were prepared with supplementation of different concentrations of chia oil to enhance omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidant characteristics and oxidative stability of the product. Margarines were formulated from non-hydrogenated palm oil, palm kernel and butter. Margarines were supplemented with 5, 10, 15 and 20% chia oil (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 ), respectively. Margarine without any addition of chia oil was kept as control. Margarine samples were stored at 5 °C for a period of 90 days. Physico-chemical (fat, moisture, refractive index, melting point, solid fat index, fatty acids profile, total phenolic contents, DPPH free radical scavenging activity, free fatty acids and peroxide value) and sensory characteristics were studied at the interval of 45 days. The melting point of T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 developed in current investigation were 34.2, 33.8, 33.1 and 32.5 °C, respectively. The solid fat index of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were 47.21, 22.71, 20.33, 18.12 and 16.58%, respectively. The α-linolenic acid contents in T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were found 2.92, 5.85, 9.22, 12.29%, respectively. The concentration of eicosanoic acid in T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was 1.82, 3.52, 6.43 and 9.81%, respectively. The content of docosahexanoic acid in T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was present 1.26, 2.64, 3.49 and 5.19%, respectively. The omega-3 fatty acids were not detected in the control sample. Total phenolic contents of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 samples were 0.27, 2.22, 4.15, 7.23 and 11.42 mg GAE/mL, respectively. DPPH free radical scavenging activity for control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was noted 65.8, 5.37, 17.82, 24.95, 45.42 and 62.8%, respectively. Chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid

  7. Study on preparation method of Zanthoxylum bungeanum seeds kernel oil with zero trans-fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Yao, Shi-Yong; Yin, Zhong-Yi; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Shen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    The seed of Zanthoxylum bungeanum (Z. bungeanum) is a by-product of pepper production and rich in unsaturated fatty acid, cellulose, and protein. The seed oil obtained from traditional producing process by squeezing or extracting would be bad quality and could not be used as edible oil. In this paper, a new preparation method of Z. bungeanum seed kernel oil (ZSKO) was developed by comparing the advantages and disadvantages of alkali saponification-cold squeezing, alkali saponification-solvent extraction, and alkali saponification-supercritical fluid extraction with carbon dioxide (SFE-CO2). The results showed that the alkali saponification-cold squeezing could be the optimal preparation method of ZSKO, which contained the following steps: Z. bungeanum seed was pretreated by alkali saponification under the conditions of adding 10 %NaOH (w/w), solution temperature was 80 °C, and saponification reaction time was 45 min, and pretreated seed was separated by filtering, water washing, and overnight drying at 50 °C, then repeated squeezing was taken until no oil generated at 60 °C with 15 % moisture content, and ZSKO was attained finally using centrifuge. The produced ZSKO contained more than 90 % unsaturated fatty acids and no trans-fatty acids and be testified as a good edible oil with low-value level of acid and peroxide. It was demonstrated that the alkali saponification-cold squeezing process could be scaled up and applied to industrialized production of ZSKO.

  8. Diets enriched in menhaden fish oil, seal oil, or shark liver oil have distinct effects on the lipid and fatty-acid composition of guinea pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M G; Wright, V; Ackman, R G; Horackova, M

    1997-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether diets supplemented with oils from three different marine sources, all of which contain high proportions of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), result in qualitatively distinct lipid and fatty acid profiles in guinea pig heart. Albino guinea pigs (14 days old) were fed standard, nonpurified guinea pig diets (NP) or NP supplemented with menhaden fish oil (MO), harp seal oil (SLO) or porbeagle shark liver oil (PLO) (10%, w/w) for 4-5 weeks. An n-6 PUFA control group was fed NP supplemented with corn oil (CO). All animals appeared healthy, with weight gains marginally lower in animals fed the marine oils. Comparison of relative organ weights indicated that only the livers responded to the diets, and that they were heavier only in the marine-oil fed guinea pigs. Heart total cholesterol levels were unaffected by supplementing NP with any of the oils, whereas all increased the triacylglycerol (TAG) content. The fatty-acid profiles of total phospholipid (TPL), TAG and free fatty acid (FFA) fractions of heart lipids showed that feeding n-3 PUFA significantly altered the proportions of specific fatty-acid classes. For example, all marine-oil-rich diets were associated with increases in total monounsaturated fatty acids in TPL (p docosahexacnoic acid (DHA), ratios of DHA/EPA in the hearts were 1.2, 2.2 and 1.5 in TPL, TAG and FFA, respectively. In SLO-fed guinea pigs in which dietary EPA approximately DHA, ratios of DHA/EPA were 0.9, 3.4 and 2.1 in TPL, TAG and FFA, respectively. Feeding NP + PLO (DHA/EPA = 4.8), resulted in values for DHA/EPA in cardiac tissue of 2.1, 10.6 and 2.9 in TPL, TAG and FFA, respectively. In the TAG and FFA, proportions of n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (n-3 DPA) were equal to or higher than EPA in the SLO- and PLO-fed animals. The latter group exhibited the greatest difference between the DHA/n-3 DPA ratio in the diet and in cardiac TAG and FFA fractions (7, 3.4 and 3

  9. The new database “Seed oil Fatty Acids” (SOFA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthäus, B.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 30 years i n formation about the fatty acid composit ion of wi ld plant seeds was collected f rom the appropriate pharmaceutical, botanical and chemical literature by the former Institute for Chemistry and Physics of Lipids of the Federal Center for Cereal, Potato and Lipid Research in Münster. Since it was very difficult to search this unique source of information, the collection was transferred into an electronically searchable database. This plan was supported by financial assistance of the German Ministry of Consumer Protection, Food and Agriculture. Since some month the database is available in the internet (http:www.bagkf.de/sofa free of charge. Up to now more than 18.000 different tables with about 110.000 individual data are recallable from the database, by different types of search forms. An overview about the application of the different search forms as well as some examples for searches is given in this publication.Mas de 30 años de información sobre la composición en ácidos grasos de semillas de plantas silvestres ha sido recogida de la literatura farmacéutica, botánica y química por el antiguo Institute for Chemistry and Physics del Federal Center for Cereal, Potato and Lipid Research en Münster. Desde hace varios meses la base de datos está ya disponible sin cargo alguno en Internet (http:www.bagkf.de/sofa. Hasta ahora más de 18.000 tablas diferentes con alrededor de 110.000 datos individuales pueden obtenerse a partir de esa base de datos mediante diferentes tipos de búsquedas. Una panorámica de la aplicación de las diferentes posibles formas de búsquedas así como algunos ejemplos de búsquedas se dan en este artículo.

  10. Production, composition, fatty acid profile and sensory analysis of goat milk in goats fed buriti oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, J S; Bezerra, L R; Silva, A M A; Araújo, M J; Oliveira, R L; Edvan, R L; Torreão, J N C; Lanna, D P D

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of replacing ground corn with buriti oil ( L.) on feed intake and digestibility and on the production, composition, fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of goat milk. A double Latin square (4 × 4) was used; eight goats were distributed in a completely randomized design. The square comprised four periods and four buriti oil concentration (0.00; 1.50; 3.00 and 4.50% of total DM) replacing corn. Intakes of DM, CP, NDF, ADF, non-fibrous carboydrates (NFC) and TDN were not affected by the replacement of corn with oil in the diet. However, lipids intake was increased ( goats with 4.50% oil inclusion, as total DM. DM and CP digestibility were similar between the buriti oil concentrations. However, lipid digestibility increased linearly ( = 0.01) and may have contributed to a quadratic reduction in NDF digestibility ( = 0.01) and a linear reduction of NFC ( = 0.04) with buriti oil content in the goat feed. Goat milk production, corrected production and chemical composition were not influenced by the concentration of buriti oil replacement; however, milk fat concentration ( = 0.04) and feed efficiency ( goat's diet. In contrast, the fatty acids C18:0 ( milk of goats that were fed with buriti oil. However, CLA ( milk were not changed ( > 0.05) by the replacement of corn with buriti oil in the goats' diet. It is recommended to replace corn with buriti oil in goat feed by up to 4.5% of total DM, resulting in improved feed efficiency and milk fat without affecting production; this recommendation satisfies the minimum requirements of the industry and preserves the organoleptic characteristics of the milk and its acceptability for human consumption. In addition, buriti oil replacing ground corn by up to 4.5% DM in the diet of lactating goats decrease medium-chain SFA which are hypercholesterolemic and increase the concentrations of the C18:19, CLA and DFA in goat milk fat, helping to protect against cardiovascular disease.

  11. Oil content and fatty acids composition of poppy seeds cultivated in two localities of Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lančaričová Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oil content, fatty acids profile, acid and saponification values of poppy seeds grown on two localities of the Slovak Republic were evaluated in the study. Statistically significant effects of locality, genotype and their interaction (P < 0.05 for numerous descriptors were proved by non-parametric tests. Results confirmed that variation in the analysed parameters was influenced by the colour of seeds. Ochre variety Redy contained the highest oil level in both localities (49.9 and 52.4% and linoleic acid level (74.3 and 71.6%. White-seeded Racek and Albín had the highest acid value (2.8 and 2.4% of free fatty acids and grey-seeded Malsar and blue-seeded Maratón contained the highest saponification value. Buddha, a high-morphine poppy variety, differed significantly in all monitored parameters. High negative interrelation between linoleic and oleic acids levels was observed. Oil content was positively correlated with linoleic acid and negatively with oleic acid. Weather conditions at the end of vegetation influenced the accumulation of oil and essential linoleic acid.

  12. Fatty acid profile and nutritional composition of table eggs after supplementation by pumpkin and flaxseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert Herkeľ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of pumpkin and flaxseed oils on the fatty acid profile and nutrient changes in table eggs. At 38 weeks of age, Lohmann Brown Lite hens were divided into three groups depending up the diet. The birds were housed in individual cages (6 hens per cage with a space allowance of 943.2 cm2 per hen, and given diet standard complete feed mixture for laying hens. Hens from experimental groups were fed with complete feed mixtures supplemented by pumpkin (group E1 or flaxseed (group E2 oils at a dosage of 3%. The experiment lasted 52 days. In the last week of the trial, the eggs were collected for chemical analysis. Twelve eggs from each dietary treatment were randomly selected and analysed. Significant differences between control and group E1 in the content of crude protein (P < 0.05, between both experimental groups (E1 and E2 in the content of ash (P < 0.01 in yolk, and between control and the experimental groups in the content of dry matter (P < 0.05 in albumen were detected. Significant (P < 0.01 differences were found in contents of myristic, palmitic, heptadecanoic, oleic, linoleic, and cis-11,14-eicosadienoic acids between control and experimental groups E1 and E2. Compared to control, higher (P < 0.01 concentrations of monounsaturated fatty acids, lower concentrations of saturated fatty acids and also lower contents of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the experimental groups were observed. The supplementation of flaxseed oil had a positive effect on the content of n-3 α-linolenic acid.

  13. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs for fatty acid composition in an interspecific cross of oil palm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mukesh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marker Assisted Selection (MAS is well suited to a perennial crop like oil palm, in which the economic products are not produced until several years after planting. The use of DNA markers for selection in such crops can greatly reduce the number of breeding cycles needed. With the use of DNA markers, informed decisions can be made at the nursery stage, regarding which individuals should be retained as breeding stock, which are satisfactory for agricultural production, and which should be culled. The trait associated with oil quality, measured in terms of its fatty acid composition, is an important agronomic trait that can eventually be tracked using molecular markers. This will speed up the production of new and improved oil palm planting materials. Results A map was constructed using AFLP, RFLP and SSR markers for an interspecific cross involving a Colombian Elaeis oleifera (UP1026 and a Nigerian E. guinneensis (T128. A framework map was generated for the male parent, T128, using Joinmap ver. 4.0. In the paternal (E. guineensis map, 252 markers (199 AFLP, 38 RFLP and 15 SSR could be ordered in 21 linkage groups (1815 cM. Interval mapping and multiple-QTL model (MQM mapping (also known as composite interval mapping, CIM were used to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs controlling oil quality (measured in terms of iodine value and fatty acid composition. At a 5% genome-wide significance threshold level, QTLs associated with iodine value (IV, myristic acid (C14:0, palmitic acid (C16:0, palmitoleic acid (C16:1, stearic acid (C18:0, oleic acid (C18:1 and linoleic acid (C18:2 content were detected. One genomic region on Group 1 appears to be influencing IV, C14:0, C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1 content. Significant QTL for C14:0, C16:1, C18:0 and C18:1 content was detected around the same locus on Group 15, thus revealing another major locus influencing fatty acid composition in oil palm. Additional QTL for C18:0 was detected on Group 3

  14. Treatments of free fatty acids to prevent or decrease colour fixation in cottonseed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmy, H. E.

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Some treatments have been investigated to prevent or remove colour fixation of cottonseed oil containing high level of free fatty acids without using excess of sodium hydroxide in the refining step. The treatments included use of sodium carbonate and ethanolamine before and after subjecting a crude cottonseed oil containing excess of free fatty acid to a colour fixation treatment.
    The results revealed that the carbonate/ethanolamine treatment improved the oil colour by decreasing the free fatty acids and gossypol in the oil, without using any excess of sodium hydroxide.
    Carrying out the carbonate/ethanolamine treatment on cottonseed oil with high levels of free fatty acid before colour fixation takes place is more recommended than carrying out the same treatment on the same oil after it has been fixed.

    Se han investigado algunos tratamientos para prevenir o eliminar la fijación del color de aceite de semilla de algodón que contienen alto nivel de ácidos grasos libres, sin utilizar un exceso de hidróxido sódico en la etapa de refinación.
    Los tratamientos incluyeron el uso de carbonato sódico y etanolamina antes y después, sometiendo un aceite crudo de semilla de algodón que contiene exceso de ácidos grasos libres a tratamiento de fijación del color.
    Los resultados mostraron que el tratamiento carbonato/etanolamina mejoró el color del aceite por disminución de los ácidos grasos libres y gosipol en el aceite, sin utilizar un exceso de hidróxido sódico.
    Llevar a cabo el tratamiento con carbonato/etanolamina sobre aceite de semilla de algodón con niveles altos de ácidos grasos libres antes que tenga lugar la fijación del color es más recomendable que llevar a cabo el mismo tratamiento sobre el mismo aceite después de que se haya fijado.

  15. Fatty Acid Digestion and Deposition in Broiler Chickens Fed Diets Containing Either Native or Randomized Palm Oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, W.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Hovenier, R.; Geelen, M.J.H.; Lobee, H.W.J.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Beynen, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis tested was that randomization of palm oil would increase its digestibility, especially that of its palmitic acid (C16:0) component, with subsequent changes in the fatty acid composition in body tissues. Broiler chickens were fed diets containing either native or randomized palm oil.

  16. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of effects of dietary fish oil on total fatty acid composition in mouse skin

    OpenAIRE

    Peiru Wang; Min Sun; Jianwei Ren; Zora Djuric; Gary J. Fisher; Xiuli Wang; Yong Li

    2017-01-01

    Altering the fatty acid (FA) composition in the skin by dietary fish oil could provide therapeutic benefits. Although it has been shown that fish oil supplementation enhances EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) abundance in the skin, comprehensive skin FA profiling is needed. We established a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method, which allows precise quantification of FA profile using small (

  17. Comparison of Oil Content and Fatty Acids Profile of Western Schley, Wichita, and Native Pecan Nuts Cultured in Chihuahua, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Rivera-Rangel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two different extraction processes, Soxhlet and ultrasound, were used to obtain the oil extracts of Western Schley, Wichita, and Native pecan nuts cultured in Chihuahua, Mexico. The aspects evaluated in this study were the extraction yield of the processes and fatty acids’ profile of the resulting extracts. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS was used to identify and determine the composition percentage of fatty acids present in pecan nuts oils extracted. The results obtained show that higher oil extraction yields were obtained by Soxhlet method with hexane (69.90% in Wichita varieties. Wichita, Western Schley, and Native pecan nuts from Chihuahua are rich in PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids and MUFA (monounsaturated fatty acids and have low levels of SFA (saturated fatty acids. The predominant fatty acid present in all pecan nuts oils was linoleic acid followed by oleic acid. Myristic acid, palmitic acid, and linolenic acid were also identified in representative quantities. The results from this study suggest that there are statistically significant differences in the chemical composition of the pecan nuts oils extracted from the varieties cultured in Chihuahua, Mexico, and those cultivated in other regions of the world.

  18. Assesment of spineless safflower (Carthamus tinctorius, L.) mutant lines for seed oil content and fatty acid profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, A.I.; Kassem, M.; Moustafa, H.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the new spineless mutants that previously induced through gamma radiation and hybridization techniques in the advanced generation for seed oil content and fatty acid profiles The obtained results cleared that oil percentages of all seven safflower mutants were increased than local variety Giza (1) and the new mutant hybrid 2 line (white petals) had the highest increase value of oil percentage (10%) but the mutant line M14 (dark red petals) had the lowest increase value of oil percentage (3.1 %) The mutant line M7 (yellow petals) had the highest value of total saturated fatty acid (40.38%), because it had the highest value of palmitic fatty acid (25.16%), comparing to 10.01% value for local variety Giza (1), followed by mutant line hybrid 2 (white petals) which had (39.88%) because it had the highest value of caprylic, capric, lauric, myristic and stearic fatty acids. All safflower mutant lines had higher value of oleic fatty acid than that of the local variety Giza (1) the two new safflower mutant lines M7 (yellow petals) and hybrid 2 (white petal) had the highest value of oleic fatty acid 41.22% and 39.88% respectively in comparison with 13.5% for local variety Giza (1), the obtained results are indicating to seed oil content negative correlation between oleic and linoleic acids

  19. Screening of the entire USDA castor germplasm collection for oil content and fatty acid composition for optimum biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming Li; Morris, J Bradley; Tonnis, Brandon; Pinnow, David; Davis, Jerry; Raymer, Paul; Pederson, Gary A

    2011-09-14

    Castor has tremendous potential as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The oil content and fatty acid composition in castor seed are important factors determining the price for production and affecting the key fuel properties of biodiesel. There are 1033 available castor accessions collected or donated from 48 countries worldwide in the USDA germplasm collection. The entire castor collection was screened for oil content and fatty acid composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography (GC), respectively. Castor seeds on the average contain 48.2% oil with significant variability ranging from 37.2 to 60.6%. Methyl esters were prepared from castor seed by alkaline transmethylation. GC analysis of methyl esters confirmed that castor oil was composed primarily of eight fatty acids: 1.48% palmitic (C16:0), 1.58% stearic (C18:0), 4.41% oleic (C18:1), 6.42% linoleic (C18:2), 0.68% linolenic (C18:3), 0.45% gadoleic (C20:1), 84.51% ricinoleic (C18:1-1OH), and 0.47% dihydroxystearic (C18:0-2OH) acids. Significant variability in fatty acid composition was detected among castor accessions. Ricinoleic acid (RA) was positively correlated with dihydroxystearic acid (DHSA) but highly negatively correlated with the five other fatty acids except linolenic acid. The results for oil content and fatty acid composition obtained from this study will be useful for end-users to explore castor germplasm for biodiesel production.

  20. Expression of genes controlling unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis and oil deposition in developing seeds of Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-10-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L., Euphorbiaceae) seed oil is rich in α-linolenic acid, a kind of n-3 fatty acids with many health benefits. To discover the mechanism underlying α-linolenic acid accumulation in sacha inchi seeds, preliminary research on sacha inchi seed development was carried out from one week after fertilization until maturity, focusing on phenology, oil content, and lipid profiles. The results suggested that the development of sacha inchi seeds from pollination to mature seed could be divided into three periods. In addition, investigations on the effect of temperature on sacha inchi seeds showed that total oil content decreased in the cool season, while unsaturated fatty acid and linolenic acid concentrations increased. In parallel, expression profiles of 17 unsaturated fatty acid related genes were characterized during seed development and the relationships between gene expression and lipid/unsaturated fatty acid accumulation were discussed.

  1. GC-MS evaluation of fatty acid profile and lipid bioactive of partially hydrogenated cooking oil consumed in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandhroab, A.A.; Sherazi, S.T.H.; Mahesar, S.A.; Talpura, M.Y.; Bhutto, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of fatty acid profile including trans fat and lipid bioactive (tocopherol and sterol contents) of most commonly used vanaspati ghee and cooking oil brands was made by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MSD). Among the saturated fatty acids (SFA), palmitic and stearic acid were dominant fatty acids; the mean value of SFA in ghee and oil was 44.98 and 30.83%, respectively. Mean values of monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and trans fatty acids in ghee were 47.51, 7.49 and 8.08%, and in oil 49.26, 19.90 and 0.91%, respectively. alpha-tocopherol was the major tocopherol while campesterol, stigmasterol and sitosterol were main phytosterols in terms of their quantity. (author)

  2. Effect of Type of Food on the Trans Fatty Acids Formation and Characteristic of Oil during Frying Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, N.M.M.; Esmail, A.E.; Shams El Din, N.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the physical and chemical changes which take place in blended oil (sunflower oil: soy bean oil 75: 25 w/w), therefore frying different types of food, such as fresh foods (potatoes, falafel, fish, meat and chicken) and semi-fried Foods (chicken bites koki (nuggets), shish pan koki and farm frites potato) during frying process for 20, 40 and 60 minutes at (180±5 degree C), also studying the effect of different types of food on the oil uptake and formation of trans fatty acids in oils during frying process. The obtained results as follows: the color (red unit), viscosity, acidity and peroxide value of investigated oils were increased during frying all foods (fresh and semi-fried foods), but the increase was more pronounced in case of frying semi-fried foods, while the refractive index of frying oil of semi-fried foods was decreased compared with control oil and frying oils of fresh food. The results indicated that a considerable range of oil uptake quantities during frying as a result of variation type of foods, among all food, finger potato extensive absorption of the frying oil during frying process compared with the other fresh foods, as a results the semi-fried foods will contain a higher percent of oil included the oil of its formation, that during its frying, it was absorbed a few amount of oil. These results indicated that, the percentage of formation trans fatty acid (eliadic acid) in frying oils after 20 and 60 minutes during frying semi-fried foods was more that than frying fresh foods. Also, the results observed that, the percentage of eliadic acid in frying oil of fresh potato was lower than the other frying oils of fresh food, additionally the quality of frying oil of fresh potato finger was the best compared to frying oil of the other food material

  3. Chemical variability of fatty acid composition of seabuckthorn berries oil from different locations by GC-FID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, N.; Kanwal, F.; Siddique, M.; Ghauri, E.G.; Akram, M.

    2008-01-01

    For determining the chemical composition of seabuckthorn oil of different origins, samples of seabuckthorn berries (red and yellow varieties) were collected from different locations of northern areas of Pakistan. Among eight different fatty acids, palmitoleic acid (32.4%) and palmitic acid (36.52 %) were found to be the major fatty acids present along with other important fatty acids i.e., oleic acid (37.07%), linoleic acid (12.36%) and linolenic acid (0.73%). Quantities of unsaturated fatty acids were higher than that of saturated analogues. (author)

  4. Characterization and authentication of a novel vegetable source of omega-3 fatty acids, sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Natalie E; Hatta-Sakoda, Beatriz; Pascual-Chagman, Gloria; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2012-09-15

    Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3's), whether from fish oils, flax or supplements, can protect against cardiovascular disease. Finding plant-based sources of the essential ω-3's could provide a sustainable, renewable and inexpensive source of ω-3's, compared to fish oils. Our objective was to develop a rapid test to characterize and detect adulteration in sacha inchi oils, a Peruvian seed containing higher levels of ω-3's in comparison to other oleaginous seeds. A temperature-controlled ZnSe ATR mid-infrared benchtop and diamond ATR mid-infrared portable handheld spectrometers were used to characterize sacha inchi oil and evaluate its oxidative stability compared to commercial oils. A soft independent model of class analogy (SIMCA) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) analyzed the spectral data. Fatty acid profiles showed that sacha inchi oil (44% linolenic acid) had levels of PUFA similar to those of flax oils. PLSR showed good correlation coefficients (R(2)>0.9) between reference tests and spectra from infrared devices, allowing for rapid determination of fatty acid composition and prediction of oxidative stability. Oils formed distinct clusters, allowing the evaluation of commercial sacha inchi oils from Peruvian markets and showed some prevalence of adulteration. Determining oil adulteration and quality parameters, by using the ATR-MIR portable handheld spectrometer, allowed for portability and ease-of-use, making it a great alternative to traditional testing methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance and Fatty Acid Profile of Japanese Quails Fed on Diets Supplemented with Used Restaurant Oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Faramawy, A.A.; Fahmy, M.O.

    2005-01-01

    The experiment was designed to study the effects of replacing cotton seed oil (CSO) with Used Restaurant Oil (URO) in Japanese quail diets on performance, fatty acid composition of the carcass and egg and concentration of iodine metabolites. URO was added to the diets at 0, 1, 2 or 4 % at the expense of CSO (4 %) in the control diet during a 10-week trial period. Feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion, mortality rate, triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroxine (T4) were not significantly (p>0.05) affected by the levels of used restaurant ,oi). Replacing 25,% or 50 % of CSO with URO had no significant (p>0.05) effect on linoleic acid content of carcass and egg. In contrary, linoleic acid content was reduced significantly (p<0.05) in the carcass and egg of the group which fed on the diet with 4 % URO. It can be concluded that used restaurant oil can be supplemented to the Japanese quail diets at the levels of 1 % and 2 % without any determine effect on the performance and the fatty acid profile of carcass and egg. rat supplementation to broiler chicken is a long standing practice for improving the consistency and palatability of the diets; increasing the energy density of broiler meat; stimulating growth and utilization of food and energy; feed efficiency; egg size, yield, and hatch ability (Carew and Hill, 1964; Vermeersch and Vanschoubroek, 1968 and Summers and Lesson, 1979 ). Poultry required fat in the diet as a source of essential fatty acids and to facilitate supply and absorption of vitamins (Clarke et al, 1977). Oil may be added to poultry diets in order to meet the 1% linoleic acid requirements

  6. Coriander seed oil methyl esters as biodiesel fuel: Unique fatty acid composition and excellent oxidative stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Bryan R.; Vaughn, Steven F. [United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, 1815 N. University St, Peoria, IL 61604 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt%) acid. Most of the remaining fatty acid profile consisted of common 18 carbon constituents such as linoleic (9Z,12Z-octadeca-dienoic; 13.0 wt%), oleic (9Z-octadecenoic; 7.6 wt%) and stearic (octadecanoic; 3.1 wt%) acids. A standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst was used to provide C. sativum oil methyl esters (CSME). Acid-catalyzed pretreatment was necessary beforehand to reduce the acid value of the oil from 2.66 to 0.47 mg g{sup -1}. The derived cetane number, kinematic viscosity, and oxidative stability (Rancimat method) of CSME was 53.3, 4.21 mm{sup 2} s{sup -1} (40 C), and 14.6 h (110 C). The cold filter plugging and pour points were -15 C and -19 C, respectively. Other properties such as acid value, free and total glycerol content, iodine value, as well as sulfur and phosphorous contents were acceptable according to the biodiesel standards ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Also reported are lubricity, heat of combustion, and Gardner color, along with a comparison of CSME to soybean oil methyl esters (SME). CSME exhibited higher oxidative stability, superior low temperature properties, and lower iodine value than SME. In summary, CSME has excellent fuel properties as a result of its unique fatty acid composition. (author)

  7. Coriander seed oil methyl esters as biodiesel fuel: Unique fatty acid composition and excellent oxidative stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Bryan R.; Vaughn, Steven F.

    2010-01-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt%) acid. Most of the remaining fatty acid profile consisted of common 18 carbon constituents such as linoleic (9Z,12Z-octadeca-dienoic; 13.0 wt%), oleic (9Z-octadecenoic; 7.6 wt%) and stearic (octadecanoic; 3.1 wt%) acids. A standard transesterification procedure with methanol and sodium methoxide catalyst was used to provide C. sativum oil methyl esters (CSME). Acid-catalyzed pretreatment was necessary beforehand to reduce the acid value of the oil from 2.66 to 0.47 mg g -1 . The derived cetane number, kinematic viscosity, and oxidative stability (Rancimat method) of CSME was 53.3, 4.21 mm 2 s -1 (40 o C), and 14.6 h (110 o C). The cold filter plugging and pour points were -15 o C and -19 o C, respectively. Other properties such as acid value, free and total glycerol content, iodine value, as well as sulfur and phosphorous contents were acceptable according to the biodiesel standards ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Also reported are lubricity, heat of combustion, and Gardner color, along with a comparison of CSME to soybean oil methyl esters (SME). CSME exhibited higher oxidative stability, superior low temperature properties, and lower iodine value than SME. In summary, CSME has excellent fuel properties as a result of its unique fatty acid composition.

  8. Production and Characterization of Ethyl Ester from Crude Jatropha curcas Oil having High Free Fatty Acid Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Dixit, Anoop; Singh, Shashi Kumar; Singh, Gursahib; Sachdeva, Monica

    2015-09-01

    The two step process was carried out to produce biodiesel from crude Jatropha curcas oil. The pretreatment process was carried out to reduce the free fatty acid content by (≤2 %) acid catalyzed esterification. The optimum reaction conditions for esterification were reported to be 5 % H2SO4, 20 % ethanol and 1 h reaction time at temperature of 65 °C. The pretreatment process reduced the free fatty acid of oil from 7 to 1.85 %. In second process, alkali catalysed transesterification of pretreated oil was carried and the effects of the varying concentrations of KOH and ethanol: oil ratios on percent ester recovery were investigated. The optimum reaction conditions for transesterification were reported to be 3 % KOH (w/v of oil) and 30 % (v/v) ethanol: oil ratio and reaction time 2 h at 65 °C. The maximum percent recovery of ethyl ester was reported to be 60.33 %.

  9. [Rapid determination of fatty acids in soybean oils by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Zhang, Feng-ping; Liu, Yao-min; Wu, Zong-wen; Suo, You-rui

    2012-08-01

    In the present research, a novel method was established for determination of five fatty acids in soybean oil by transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy. The optimum conditions of mathematics model of five components (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3) were studied, including the sample set selection, chemical value analysis, the detection methods and condition. Chemical value was analyzed by gas chromatography. One hundred fifty eight samples were selected, 138 for modeling set, 10 for testing set and 10 for unknown sample set. All samples were placed in sample pools and scanned by transmission reflection-near infrared spectrum after sonicleaning for 10 minute. The 1100-2500 nm spectral region was analyzed. The acquisition interval was 2 nm. Modified partial least square method was chosen for calibration mode creating. Result demonstrated that the 1-VR of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.8839, 0.5830, 0.9001, 0.9776 and 0.9596, respectively. And the SECV of five fatty acids between the reference value of the modeling sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.42, 0.29, 0.83, 0.46 and 0.21, respectively. The standard error of the calibration (SECV) of five fatty acids between the reference value of testing sample set and the near infrared spectrum predictive value were 0.891, 0.790, 0.900, 0.976 and 0.942, respectively. It was proved that the near infrared spectrum predictive value was linear with chemical value and the mathematical model established for fatty acids of soybean oil was feasible. For validation, 10 unknown samples were selected for analysis by near infrared spectrum. The result demonstrated that the relative standard deviation between predict value and chemical value was less than 5.50%. That was to say that transmission reflection-near infrared spectroscopy had a good veracity in analysis of fatty acids of soybean oil.

  10. Preparation and Thermal Properties of Fatty Alcohol/Surfactant/Oil/Water Nanoemulsions and Their Cosmetic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Toru; Tomomasa, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Physicochemical properties of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing fatty alcohols and surfactants have been investigated with the aim of developing new formulations that are less viscous and more transparent than conventional milky lotions, as well as for providing greater skin-improving effects. O/W-based creams can be converted to low viscosity milky lotions following their emulsification with a homogenizer at temperatures greater than the transition temperatures of their molecular assemblies (α-gel). The stability of the O/W emulsions evaluated in the current study increased as the transition temperatures of the molecular assemblies formed from their fatty alcohol and surfactant constituents increased. A decrease in the emulsion droplet size led to the formation of a new formulation, which was transparent in appearance and showed a very low viscosity. The absence of a molecular assembly (α-gel) formed by the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules in the aqueous phase allowed for the formation of a stable transparent and low viscosity nanoemulsion. Furthermore, this decrease in droplet size led to an increase in the interfacial area of the emulsion droplets, with almost all of the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules being adsorbed on the surfaces of the emulsion droplets. This was found to be important for preparing a stable transparent formulation. Notably, this new formulation exhibited high occlusivity, which was equivalent to that of an ordinary cosmetic milky lotion, and consequently provided high skin hydration. The nanoemulsion was destroyed following its application to the skin, which led to the release of the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules from the surface of the nanoemulsion into the aqueous phase. These results therefore suggest that the fatty alcohol and surfactant molecules organized the molecular assembly (α-gel) and allowed for the reconstruction of the network structure.

  11. [The fatty acid composition of Ruta graveolens seed oil and its byological activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikalishvili, B Iu; Zurabishvili, D Z; Turabelidze, D G; Shanidze, L A; Nikolaĭshvili, M N

    2013-11-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography methods are qualitatively and quantitatively identified most biological important high fatty acids, contained in Ruta graveolens seed oil grown on the experimental plot of Kutateladze Institute of Pharmakochemistry (Georgia) and compare its biological activity. Their relative concentration is expressed as percentages of the total fatty acid component. The sample contained the range of fatty acids from С12:0 to С22:0. The investigation showed different sensitivity of components. In order of elution the list of compound are reported. The oil contained 2,08±0,1 mg% lauric, 2,18±0,1 mg% miristic, 3,98±0,1 mg% palmitic, 30,90±1,2 mg% stearic, 41,92±1,8 mg% oleic, 10,14±0,4 mg% linolic, 6,50±0,3 mg% linolenic, 2,00±0,1 mg% arachinic and 2,10±0,1 mg% begenic acid. The chromatography signals with retention values 7,96 and 14,08 minuts are qualitatively not identified.

  12. Effects of Short Term Supplementation of Fish Oil Capsules on the Blood Fatty Acid Profile of Vegetarians: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahida A Khan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for cardio vascular as well as overall health. Therefore, fish oil which is a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids namely EPA and DHA is recommended. We supplemented vegetarian volunteers, not consuming fish, with fish oil capsules to observe the changes in lipo-protein metabolism. Methods and Results: Commercially available fish oil capsules were given to normal healthy volunteers for two weeks and lipid profiles analyzed. Lipid profile normalizing effect of triglycerides and cholesterol was observed in the consuming subjects. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids increased in the plasma and RBC of all volunteers. Conclusion: Consumption of omega-3 fish oil capsules is beneficial and heart healthy

  13. Determination of thermally induced trans-fatty acids in soybean oil by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Ha, Yiming; Wang, Feng; Li, Weiming; Li, Qingpeng

    2012-10-24

    The intake of edible oil containing trans-fatty acids has deleterious effects mainly on the cardiovascular system. Thermal processes such as refining and frying cause the formation of trans-fatty acids in edible oil. This study was conducted to investigate the possible formation of trans-fatty acids because of the heat treatment of soybean oil. The types of trans-fatty acids in heated soybean oil are determined by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The effects of the heating temperature on the trans-fatty acids in soybean oil were evaluated using gas chromatography flame ionization detection analysis. Results show that heat treatment at 240 °C causes the formation of trans-fatty acids in soybean oil and the amount of trans-fatty acids increases with heating time. The only peak observed at 966 cm(-1) of the samples indicates the formation of nonconjugated trans isomers in the heated soybean oil. The major types of trans-fatty acids formed were trans-polyunsaturated fatty acids. Significant increases (P oil heated to temperatures exceeding 200 °C were compared with those of the control sample. The heating temperature and duration should be considered to reduce the formation of trans-fatty acids during thermal treatment.

  14. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and solvent extraction of papaya seed oil: yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaram, Shadi; Mirhosseini, Hamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Ghazali, Hasanah Mohd

    2013-10-10

    The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE) and solvent extraction (SE)). In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively). Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%-74.7%), palmitic (16:0, 14.9%-17.9%), stearic (18:0, 4.50%-5.25%), and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%-4.6%). Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO), palmitoyl diolein (POO) and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL). In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) significantly (p oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE) and conditions.

  15. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction (UAE and Solvent Extraction of Papaya Seed Oil: Yield, Fatty Acid Composition and Triacylglycerol Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanah Mohd Ghazali

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the current work was to evaluate the suitability of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE for the recovery of oil from papaya seed as compared to conventional extraction techniques (i.e., Soxhlet extraction (SXE and solvent extraction (SE. In the present study, the recovery yield, fatty acid composition and triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil obtained from different extraction methods and conditions were compared. Results indicated that both solvent extraction (SE, 12 h/25 °C and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE methods recovered relatively high yields (79.1% and 76.1% of total oil content, respectively. Analysis of fatty acid composition revealed that the predominant fatty acids in papaya seed oil were oleic (18:1, 70.5%–74.7%, palmitic (16:0, 14.9%–17.9%, stearic (18:0, 4.50%–5.25%, and linoleic acid (18:2, 3.63%–4.6%. Moreover, the most abundant triacylglycerols of papaya seed oil were triolein (OOO, palmitoyl diolein (POO and stearoyl oleoyl linolein (SOL. In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE significantly (p < 0.05 influenced the triacylglycerol profile of papaya seed oil, but no significant differences were observed in the fatty acid composition of papaya seed oil extracted by different extraction methods (SXE, SE and UAE and conditions.

  16. Acute postprandial effect of hydrogenated fish oil, palm oil and lard on plasma cholesterol, triacylglycerol and non-esterified fatty acid metabolism in normocholesterolaemic males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, Marie M; Flynn, Mary A T; Gibney, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    The majority of research has focused on the association between trans unsaturated fatty acids (TUFA) from hydrogenated vegetable oils and heart disease even though TUFA are also produced from hydrogenated fish oil. We compared the acute effect of three solid fats on postprandial cholesterol, triacylglycerol (TAG) and NEFA concentrations in normocholesterolaemic males. Eight healthy male volunteers consumed each of the three 40 g fat meals (partially hydrogenated fish oil (PHFO), palm oil and lard) in random order and blood samples were drawn at 2, 4, 6 and 8 h thereafter for lipid analysis. The postprandial response in plasma TAG, TAG-rich lipoprotein-TAG (TRL-TAG), total cholesterol and plasma NEFA, measured as the area under the postprandial curve, was not significantly different between the three meals (P>0.05), which varied in MUFA, PUFA and TUFA content. There was no marked elevation of longer-chain fatty acids (C20-22, cis or trans isomers) into the TRL-TAG fraction following the PHFO meal even though they provided 40 % of the total fatty acids in the PHFO meal. The postprandial TRL-TAG response to PHFO was expected to be higher, as it is higher in TUFA, lower in PUFA and similar in saturated fatty acid composition compared with the lard and palm oil test meals. The absence of a higher postprandial response following ingestion of PHFO could be as a result of reduced absorption and increased oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (both cis and trans isomers).

  17. Production of medium chain fatty acid rich mustard oil using packed bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Avery; Roy, Susmita; Mukherjee, Sohini; Ghosh, Mahua

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study was done on the production of different medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) rich mustard oil using a stirred tank batchreactor (STBR) and packed bed bio reactor (PBBR) using three commercially available immobilised lipases viz. Thermomyces lanuginosus, Candida antarctica and Rhizomucor meihe. Three different MCFAs capric, caprylic and lauric acids were incorporated in the mustard oil. Reaction parameters, such as substrate molar ratio, reaction temperature and enzyme concentration were standardized in the STBR and maintained in the PBBR. To provide equal time of residence between the substrate and enzyme in both the reactors for the same amount of substrates, the substrate flow rate in the PBBR was maintainedat 0.27 ml/min. Gas liquid chromatography was used to monitor the incorporation of MCFA in mustard oil. The study showed that the PBBR was more efficient than the STBR in the synthesis of structured lipids with less migration of acyl groups. The physico-chemical parameters of the product along with fatty acid composition in all positions and sn-2 positions were also determined.

  18. Study on the Spectrophotometric Detection of Free Fatty Acids in Palm Oil Utilizing Enzymatic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Hidayah Azeman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a comprehensive study has been made on the detection of free fatty acids (FFAs in palm oil via an optical technique based on enzymatic aminolysis reactions. FFAs in crude palm oil (CPO were converted into fatty hydroxamic acids (FHAs in a biphasic lipid/aqueous medium in the presence of immobilized lipase. The colored compound formed after complexation between FHA and vanadium (V ion solution was proportional to the FFA content in the CPO samples and was analyzed using a spectrophotometric method. In order to develop a rapid detection system, the parameters involved in the aminolysis process were studied. The utilization of immobilized lipase as catalyst during the aminolysis process offers simplicity in the product isolation and the possibility of conducting the process under extreme reaction conditions. A good agreement was found between the developed method using immobilized Thermomyces lanuginose lipase as catalyst for the aminolysis process and the Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB standard titration method (R2 = 0.9453.

  19. DETERMINATION OF Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn AND FREE FATTY ACIDS IN PEQUI OIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. S. Mimura

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pequi (Caryocar brasiliense Camb., a typical fruit of the Brazilian Cerrado, is an important source of micronutrients and fatty acids. In this work, a new approach for the acid digestion (using H2SO4, HNO3 and H2O2 of pequi oil samples and the determination of Cu, Fe, Zn and Mn by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS was employed. Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE was used for free fatty acid (FFA determination after simple and fast extraction with heated ethanol. Good results regarding precision (RSD < 10%, in most cases, sensitivity and adequate LOD and LOQ values were obtained. The accuracy was evaluated using spike tests and the recoveries were from 97 to 107%. The analytes were investigated in four different pequi oil samples. Fe was the trace element with the highest concentration (from 1.99 to 10.3 mg/100 g, followed by Zn, Mn and Cu (1.15 to 3.19, 0.42 to 0.91 and 0.31 to 0.56 mg/100 g, respectively. The main FFA found were oleic acid and palmitic acid (1.61 to 10.7 and 0.82 to 2.69 g/100 g, respectively, while linoleic acid (0.50 g/100 g was detected in only one sample. The pequi oil chemical composition showed good characteristics to be used as a food additive, in cosmetic formulations and for traditional medicine.

  20. Structural Determination and Occurrence in Ahiflower Oil of Stearidonic Acid Trans Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmonte, Pierluigi; Milani, Andrea; Bhangley, Shivani

    2018-02-01

    Several marine oils and seed oils on the market contain relevant quantities of stearidonic acid (18:4n-3, SDA). The formation of 18:4n-3 trans fatty acids (tFA) during the refining of these oils necessitates the development of a method for their quantification. In this study, 18:4n-3 was isolated from Ahiflower and isomerized to obtain its 16 geometric isomers. The geometric isomers of 18:4n-3 were isolated by silver ion HPLC (Ag + -HPLC) and characterized by partial reduction with hydrazine followed by gas chromatography analysis. The elution order of all 16 isomers was established using a 100 m × 0.25 mm 100% poly(biscyanopropyl siloxane) capillary column and at the elution temperature of 180 °C. The 4 mono-trans-18:4n-3 isomers produced during the refining of oils rich in 18:4n-3 were chromatographically resolved from each other, but c6,t9,c12,c15-18:4 coeluted with the tetra-cis isomer. These 2 fatty acids (FA) were resolved by reducing the separation temperature to 150 °C, but this change caused tetra-cis-18:4n-3 to coelute with t6,c9,c12,c15-18:4. Combining the results from 2 isothermal separations (180 and 150 °C) was necessary to quantify the 4 mono-trans 18:4n-3 FA in Ahiflower oil. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Metal oxides as heterogeneous catalysts for esterification of fatty acids obtained from soybean oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Vinicius M.; Pousa, Gabriella P.A.G.; Pereira, Mirian S.C.; Dias, Ingrid M.; Suarez, Paulo A.Z. [Laboratorio de Materiais e Combustiveis, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Brasilia (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    The growing demand for renewable energy sources stimulates the development of new technologies for biofuel production. Biodiesel synthesis by esterification of fatty acids is a favorable route, because, differently from transesterification, it does not produce glycerin and uses cheaper raw materials. In this work the study of metal oxides and their performance as Lewis acid catalysts in the esterification of fatty acids obtained from soybean oil presented promising results in heterogeneous catalysis, with reaction yields as high as 89%. The influence of variables such as temperature, reaction time and the amount of catalyst in the reaction yield was also evaluated. The possibility of recycling tin oxide was also studied, showing that it was possible to reuse the catalyst up to ten times without significant losses in its catalytic activity. (author)

  2. Effects of corn oil on the volatile fatty acids in horses with induced gastric ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martínez A

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objetive. To determine the influence of corn oil on the volatile fatty acids (VFA concentrations in the gastric juice in horses with phenylbutazone (PBZ induced gastric ulcers and Correlate the gastroscopic findings with the VFA concentrations. Materials and methods. 15 horses were allotted in 3 groups. Group I (control received placebo during first 6 days (induction period and was treated with sucralfate for 2 weeks (treatment period. Groups II and III received PBZ during the induction phase. After 6 days, horses from group II received 70 mL of corn oil /100 kg of body weight/ po, twice a day, for 2 weeks and horses from group III received 90 mL of corn oil/100 kg of body weight/ po, twice a day, for 2 weeks. All horses were examined by gastroscopy at days 0, 7 and 21. The lesions were recorded and classified according to the number and severity. Samples from gastric fluid were taken to measure the concentrations of the acetic, propionic, butyric and lactic acids. Results. Both PBZ protocols produced lesions in the both non-glandular and glandular areas of the stomach. All the treatments produced healing of the injured mucosa glandular. Neither of the two corn oil treatments affected healing of the gastric ulcers located in the non-glandular area. Conclusions. The concentrations of acetic and butyric acids were highest in the gastric juice. The corn oil and sucralfate did not lead to differences in the concentration of acetic acid and butyric acid.

  3. Transfer of dietary fatty acids from butyric acid fortified canola oil into the meat of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Rapaccini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature reported positive beneficial effects of butyric acid and canola oil on production performance traits of broiler chickens. Three hundred hybrid Ross 708 (150 males and 150 females were randomly allotted to 10 pens per treatment with 5 males and 5 females per pen. Ten pens were administered a diet supplemented with soybean oil (control, ten pens the same basal diet but supplemented with a blend of mono-, di-, tri-glyceride of butyric acid added to soybean oil (T1 and ten pens the same basal diet supplemented with a mix of soybean and canola oil containing butyrate (T2. No differences in final body weight, dressing percentage, liver and thigh weight were found be- tween groups. The T2 birds showed the highest feed/gain ratio (P<0.05. The control group showed the highest value for breast weight while the highest quantity of abdominal fat was in T2 carcasses. Fatty acid profile was significantly influenced by the presence of oil supplements, not only quantitatively but also qualitatively.

  4. Modulation of hepatic lipid metabolism by olive oil and its phenols in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priore, Paola; Cavallo, Alessandro; Gnoni, Antonio; Damiano, Fabrizio; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Siculella, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents the most common chronic liver disease in western countries, being considered the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. Cumulative lines of evidence suggest that olive oil, used as primary source of fat by Mediterranean populations, may play a key role in the observed health benefits on NAFLD. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of the knowledge on the protective role of both major and minor components of olive oil on lipid metabolism during NAFLD. In particular, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the increase or decrease in hepatic lipid content are critically analyzed, taking into account that several studies have often provided different and/or conflicting results in animal models fed on olive oil-enriched diet. In addition, new findings that highlight the hypolipidemic and the antisteatotic actions of olive oil phenols are presented. As mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of NAFLD, the targeting of these organelles with olive oil phenols as a powerful therapeutic approach is also discussed. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Fatty acid composition, oxidative stability, antioxidant and antiproliferative properties of selected cold-pressed grape seed oils and flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterodt, Herman; Slavin, Margaret; Whent, Monica; Turner, Ellen; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2011-09-15

    Cold-pressed chardonnay, muscadine, ruby red, and concord grape seed oils and their defatted flours were studied for their fatty acid composition, oxidative stability and antioxidant and antiproliferative activities. The phenolic profiles of the seed flours were also measured. The most abundant fatty acid in the oils was linoleic acid, ranging from 66.0g/100g of total fatty acids in ruby red seed oil to 75.3g/100g of total fatty acids in concord seed oil. The oils were also high in oleic acid and low in saturated fat. Ruby red grape seed oil recorded the highest oxidative stability index of 40h under the accelerated conditions. Total phenolic content (TPC) was up to 100 times lower in the oils than in the flours. Lutein, zeaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, β-carotene, and α-tocopherol levels were also measured. DPPH radical-scavenging capacity ranged from 0.07 to 2.22mmol trolox equivalents (TE)/g of oil and 11.8 to 15.0mmol TE/g of flour. Oxidative stability of menhaden fish oil containing extracts of the seed flours was extended by up to 137%. HPLC analysis was conducted to determine the levels of free soluble, soluble conjugated and insoluble bound phenolics in the seed flours. The phenolic compounds analyzed included catechin, epicatechin, epicatechin gallate, quercetin, gallic acid, and procyanidins B1 and B2. Antiproliferative activity was tested against HT-29 colon cancer cells. All of the seed flours and muscadine seed oil registered significant (Pseed oils and flours as dietary sources of natural antioxidants and antiproliferative agents for optimal health. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemical composition and antibacterial properties of essential oil and fatty acids of different parts of Ligularia persica Boiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohadjerani, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Rahman; Hosseini, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the chemical composition and antibacterial activities of the fatty acids and essential oil from various parts of Ligularia persica Boiss (L. persica) growing wild in north of Iran. Essential oils were extracted by using Clevenger-type apparatus. Antibacterial activity was tested on two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria by using micro dilution method. GC and GC∕MS analysis of the oils resulted in detection of 94%, 96%, 93%, 99% of the total essential oil of flowers, stems, roots and leaves, respectively. The main components of flowers oil were cis-ocimene (15.4%), β-myrcene (4.4%), β-ocimene (3.9%), and γ-terpinene (5.0%). The major constituents of stems oil were β-phellandrene (5.4%), β-cymene (7.0%), valencene (3.9%). The main compounds of root oil were fukinanolid (17.0%), α-phellandrene (11.5%) and Β-selinene (5.0%) and in the case of leaves oil were cis-ocimene (4.8%), β-ocimene (4.9%), and linolenic acid methyl ester (4.7%). An analysis by GC-FID and GC-MS on the fatty-acid composition of the different parts of L. persica showed that major components were linoleic acid (11.3-31.6%), linolenic acid (4.7-21.8%) and palmitic acid (7.2-23.2%). Saturated fatty acids were found in lower amounts than unsaturated ones. The least minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of the L. persica was 7.16 μg/ml against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our study indicated that the essential oil from L. persica stems and flowers showed high inhibitory effect on the Gram negative bacteria. The results also showed that fatty acids from the stems and leaves contained a high amount of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs).

  7. Time trend investigation of PCBs, PBDEs, and organochlorine pesticides in selected n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid rich dietary fish oil and vegetable oil supplements; nutritional relevance for human essential n-3 fatty acid requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Miriam N; Covaci, Adrian; Gheorghe, Adriana; Schepens, Paul

    2004-03-24

    In addition to being used in the food and animal feed industry, fish oils have also been used traditionally as dietary supplements. Due to the presence of long-chain n-3 fatty acids, fish oils have therapeutic benefits in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular, immunological, and arthritic diseases, as well as childhood deficiency diseases such as rickets, because of a high content of vitamin D. However, fish oils are also susceptible to contamination with lipophilic organic chemicals that are now ubiquitous contaminants of marine ecosystems. Many vegetable oils are sources of the shorter chain precursor forms of n-3 fatty acids, and in recent years the specialist dietary supplement market has expanded to include these oils in a variety of different formulations. This paper reports analytical results of selected contaminants, including polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers, for a range of commercially available n-3 fatty acid rich fish and vegetable oil dietary supplements. Using principal component analysis, the values are compared with historic samples to elucidate time trends in contamination profiles. Levels of contaminants are discussed in relation to the nutritional benefits to the consumer of long- and short-chain forms of n-3 fatty acids.

  8. Characterization of fatty acids, bioactive lipids, and radical scavenging activity of Canterbury bells seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanien, M. F.R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the chemical composition and radical scavenging activity of Canterbury bells (Campanula medium seed oil. C. medium seeds contained 9.2% extractable oil. The lipid classes, fatty acids, phytosterol and tocopherol composition of C. medium seed oil were determined. The amount of neutral lipids in the oil was the highest, followed by glycolipids and phospholipids. Linoleic and oleic were the main fatty acids. C. medium oil is characterized by high levels of phytosterols and β-sitosterol was the main compound. β-Tocopherol constituted 42.5% of the total tocopherol content followed by γ-tocopherol. The radical scavenging activity (RSA toward 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals and galvinoxyl radicals of C. medium oil were higher than those of extra virgin olive oil. The diverse potential uses of C. medium oil may make this plant industrially important.El objetivo de este estudio fue caracterizar la composición química y la actividad de captación de radicales de aceites de semillas de campanillas de Canterbury (Campanula medium. Las semillas de C. medium contenían 9,2 % de aceite extraíble. Se determinó la composición de las diferentes clases de lípidos, ácidos grasos, fitoesteroles y tocoferoles. La cantidad de lípidos neutros en el aceite fue mayoritario, seguido de glicolípidos y fosfolípidos. Linoleico y oleico fueron los ácidos grasos principales. El aceite de C. medium se caracteriza por altos niveles de fitoesteroles y β-sitosterol fue el compuesto principal. β-tocoferol constituía 42,5 % del contenido total de tocoferol seguido de γ-tocoferol. La actividad de captación de radicales (RSA a 1,1-difenil-2- picrilhidrazil (DPPH y radicales galvinoxil de C. medium fueron superiores a las de aceite de oliva virgen extra. Los diversos usos potenciales de los aceites de C. medium pueden hacer que esta planta pueda ser importante industrialmente.

  9. Effect of dietary oil supplementation on fatty acid profile of backfat and intramuscular fat in finishing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pulina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two groups of finishing gilts were fed, for 4 weeks, a commercial feed enriched (2% with either rapeseed oil or sunflower oil. Pig growth was monitored bi-weekly and the fatty acid composition of backfat and Longissimus muscle was determined after slaughtering. Type of dietary oil affected significantly the fatty acid profile of pork fat, especially the C18:3n-3 concentration which was higher in pigs fed rapeseed oil than in those fed sunflower oil. The content of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA of Longissimus muscle was significantly higher than that of backfat, due to the its higher concentration of C18:1cis9 and C16:1. Differently, the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA content was higher in backfat than in Longissimus muscle. These results confirm that it is possible to manipulate the fatty acid composition of the diet, in order to improve the health properties of the adipose tissues of pork meat.

  10. Analysis of fatty acids in Ghee and olive oil and their probable causal effect in lipoid pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein Mirghani

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyze and identify the fatty acids found in homemade ghee and in olive oil and compare those to fatty acids found in bronchoalevolar lavage of children with lipoid pneumonia.Methods: The fatty acids found in homemade fat ”Ghee” and olive oil were analyzed by gas chromatography. Methyl ester derivatives suitable for GC analysis were prepared directly from olive oil or from Ghee using anhydrous methanolic-HCl. Bronchoscopy and bronchoalevolar lavage was performed in eight children aged between 2 and 4 years, all with history of using homemade ghee and/or olive oil in the recumbent position.Results: The analysis of fatty acids in Ghee and olive oil show similar gas chromatographic pattern as those of bronchoalevolar lavage.Conclusion: The three fatty acids responsible for the deleterious effects of lipoid pneumonia were identified. Lipoid pneumonia should be one of the differentials diagnosis in children  presenting with respiratory distress. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:252-7Keywords: Bronchoalevolar lavage, gas chromatography, Ghee, methyl esters, lipoid pneumonia

  11. Lipids of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IIPL32 with biodiesel potential: Oil yield, fatty acid profile, fuel properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khot, Mahesh; Ghosh, Debashish

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzes the single cell oil (SCO), fatty acid profile, and biodiesel fuel properties of the yeast Rhodotorula mucilaginosa IIPL32 grown on the pentose fraction of acid pre-treated sugarcane bagasse as a carbon source. The yeast biomass from nitrogen limiting culture conditions (15.3 g L -1 ) was able to give the SCO yield of 0.17 g g -1 of xylose consumed. Acid digestion, cryo-pulverization, direct in situ transesterification, and microwave assisted techniques were evaluated in comparison to the Soxhlet extraction for the total intracellular yeast lipid recovery. The significant differences were observed among the SCO yield of different methods and the in situ transesterification stood out most for effective yeast lipid recovery generating 97.23 mg lipid as FAME per gram dry biomass. The method was fast and consumed lesser solvent with greater FAME yield while accessing most cellular fatty acids present. The yeast lipids showed the major presence of monounsaturated fatty esters (35-55%; 18:1, 16:1) suitable for better ignition quality, oxidative stability, and cold-flow properties of the biodiesel. Analyzed fuel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, cetane number) of the yeast oil were in good agreement with international biodiesel standards. The sugarcane bagasse-derived xylose and the consolidated comparative assessment of lab scale SCO recovery methods highlight the necessity for careful substrate choice and validation of analytical method in yeast oil research. The use of less toxic co-solvents together with solvent recovery and recycling would help improve process economics for sustainable production of biodiesel from the hemicellulosic fraction of cheap renewable sources. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Lipase immobilization and production of fatty acid methyl esters from canola oil using immobilized lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuecel, Yasin; Demir, Cevdet; Dizge, Nadir; Keskinler, Buelent

    2011-01-01

    Lipase enzyme from Aspergillus oryzae (EC 3.1.1.3) was immobilized onto a micro porous polymeric matrix which contains aldehyde functional groups and methyl esters of long chain fatty acids (biodiesel) were synthesized by transesterification of crude canola oil using immobilized lipase. Micro porous polymeric matrix was synthesized from styrene-divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) copolymers by using high internal phase emulsion technique and two different lipases, Lipozyme TL-100L ® and Novozym 388 ® , were used for immobilization by both physical adsorption and covalent attachment. Biodiesel production was carried out with semi-continuous operation. Methanol was added into the reactor by three successive additions of 1:4 M equivalent of methanol to avoid enzyme inhibition. The transesterification reaction conditions were as follows: oil/alcohol molar ratio 1:4; temperature 40 o C and total reaction time 6 h. Lipozyme TL-100L ® lipase provided the highest yield of fatty acid methyl esters as 92%. Operational stability was determined with immobilized lipase and it indicated that a small enzyme deactivation occurred after used repeatedly for 10 consecutive batches with each of 24 h. Since the process is yet effective and enzyme does not leak out from the polymer, the method can be proposed for industrial applications. -- Research highlights: → Lipozyme TL-100L and Novozym 388 were immobilized onto micro porous polymeric matrix by both physical adsorption and covalent linking. → Immobilized enzymes were used for synthesis of fatty acid methyl esters by transesterification of canola oil and methanol using semi-continuous operation system. → According to chromatographic analysis, Lipase Lipozyme TL-100L resulted in the highest yield of methyl ester as 92%.

  13. Analysis of total oil and fatty acids composition by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy in edible nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandala, Chari V.; Sundaram, Jaya

    2014-10-01

    Near Infrared (NIR) Reflectance spectroscopy has established itself as an important tool in quantifying water and oil present in various food materials. It is rapid and nondestructive, easier to use, and does not require processing the samples with corrosive chemicals that would render them non-edible. Earlier, the samples had to be ground into powder form before making any measurements. With the development of new soft ware packages, NIR techniques could now be used in the analysis of intact grain and nuts. While most of the commercial instruments presently available work well with small grain size materials such as wheat and corn, the method present here is suitable for large kernel size products such as shelled or in-shell peanuts. Absorbance spectra were collected from 400 nm to 2500 nm using a NIR instrument. Average values of total oil contents (TOC) of peanut samples were determined by standard extraction methods, and fatty acids were determined using gas chromatography. Partial least square (PLS) analysis was performed on the calibration set of absorption spectra, and models were developed for prediction of total oil and fatty acids. The best model was selected based on the coefficient of determination (R2), Standard error of prediction (SEP) and residual percent deviation (RPD) values. Peanut samples analyzed showed RPD values greater than 5.0 for both absorbance and reflectance models and thus could be used for quality control and analysis. Ability to rapidly and nondestructively measure the TOC, and analyze the fatty acid composition, will be immensely useful in peanut varietal improvement as well as in the grading process of grain and nuts.

  14. Oxidative stability of fish and algae oils containing long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in bulk and in oil-in-water emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, E.N.; Satue-Gracia, T.; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2002-01-01

    The oxidative stability of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing fish and algae oils varies widely according to their fatty acid composition, the physical and colloidal states of the lipids, the contents of tocopherols and other antioxidants, and t...... high iron:EDTA ratios. Therefore, to be effective as a metal chelator, EDTA must be added at molar concentrations higher than that of iron to inhibit oxidation of foods containing long-chain PUFA from either fish or algae and fortified with iron.......The oxidative stability of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-containing fish and algae oils varies widely according to their fatty acid composition, the physical and colloidal states of the lipids, the contents of tocopherols and other antioxidants......-chain PUFA-containing fish oils and DHA-containing algal oils. The relatively high oxidative stability of an algal oil containing 42% DHA was completely lost after chromatographic purification to remove tocopherols and other antioxidants. Therefore, this evidence does not support the claim that DHA-rich oils...

  15. Saturated fatty acids, palm oil and cardiovascular health – where do we stand today?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Khosla

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For  almost  sixty years dietary fat  has  been  the  focal  point  for reducing the risk  from  coronary  heart  disease (CHD.  With  evidence  based  largely on  animal  and  observational  studies documenting that  saturated fatty acids (SFA  increase LDL-C (with the latter being associated with increased CHD risk, the notion that SFA increased CHD, became etched in folklore. As a consequence,   decreasing   SFA   to   <10%   of   total   calories,   became   the corner-stone   of   global   dietary recommendations. Ironically, the fact that SFA increased the large buoyant LDL particles (as opposed to small-dense atherogenic LDL particles, or that they increased the cardio-protective HDL-C and in some instances, lowered the atherogenic Lp(a, went largely unnoticed. However a spate of studies starting in 2009 has dramatically challenged our thinking on the “widely accepted” role of SFA.  Twenty year follow up data from prospective epidemiologic studies suggest that only two classes of fatty acids affect CHD risk, namely trans monounsaturated fatty acids (resulting principally from the partial hydrogenation of vegetable oils and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA – which increase and decrease risk, respectively. These studies suggested that when  replacing/removing  SFA   from  the  diet,  the  replacement  nutrient  may  be  as important. Thus SFA replacement with PUFA may provide small benefits, but the replacement represents a dramatic shift in dietary regimen. The effects of replacing SFA with MUFA were inconclusive. If SFA are replaced with carbohydrates, then the quality of the carbohydrate (as measured by the glycemic index is also important. Earlier this year, a highly publicized study found no benefit on CHD even when SFA were replaced by PUFA, and questioned the usefulness of this public health message. The data on SFA has had a profound effect on the perceived role of

  16. Prospects and potential of fatty acid methyl esters of some non-traditional seed oils for use as biodiesel in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohibbe Azam, M.; Waris, Amtul; Nahar, N.M. [Central Arid Zone Research Institute, Jodhpur 342003 (India)

    2005-10-01

    Fatty acid profiles of seed oils of 75 plant species having 30% or more fixed oil in their seed/kernel were examined. Saponification number (SN), iodine value (IV) and cetane number (CN) of fatty acid methyl esters of oils were empirically determined and they varied from 169.2 to 312.5, 4.8 to 212 and 20.56 to 67.47, respectively. Fatty acid compositions, IV and CN were used to predict the quality of fatty acid methyl esters of oil for use as biodiesel. Fatty acid methyl ester of oils of 26 species including Azadirachta indica, Calophyllum inophyllum, Jatropha curcas and Pongamia pinnata were found most suitable for use as biodiesel and they meet the major specification of biodiesel standards of USA, Germany and European Standard Organization. The fatty acid methyl esters of another 11 species meet the specification of biodiesel standard of USA only. These selected plants have great potential for biodiesel. (author)

  17. Obtention of Free Fatty Acids of Macauba Oil (Acrocomia Aculeata in Organic Solvent Free System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Portilho Trentini

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the enzymatic hydrolysis of oil Macaúba, to obtain a hydrolyzate rich in free fatty acids (FFA for later use in step esterification. The effect of process variables (percentage of catalyst, temperature and water content was evaluated in the FFA yield, using a factorial experimental design 23, where the positive and significant effect of the variables was observed. The results reported yields of 50.5% in FFA in 6 hours of reaction at 60ºC, water percentage of 15 wt% and catalyst percentage of 5 wt%.

  18. Antifungal activity of essential oils when associated with sodium chloride or fatty acids

    OpenAIRE

    Tantatoui-Elaraki, Abdelthafour; Errifi, Aziza

    1994-01-01

    The inhibition of mycelium growth in a Zygorhynchus sp. and an Aspergillus niger isolates was studied. The inhibition rates (IR) caused by 4 essential oils (EO), 5 fatty acids and sodium chloride at various concentrations were determined in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar.
    A synergy of action was observed between sodium chloride at 7.5% and the EO of thyme (0.04%), camomile (0.4%) and mugwort (0.2 and 0.1%) on A. niger and between ...

  19. An intensified esterification process of palm oil fatty acid distillate catalyzed by delipidated rice bran lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Fui Chin; Tey, Beng Ti; Dom, Zanariah Mohd; Ibrahim, Nordin; Rahman, Russly Abd; Ling, Tau Chuan

    2006-09-07

    An intensified esterification process was operated by circulating 10 l of reaction mixtures, consisting of palm oil fatty acid distillate (PFAD) and glycerol in hexane, through a packed-bed reactor (PBR) filled with 10 kg of delipidated rice bran lipase (RBL). The influence of the process parameters, such as reaction temperature and type of water-removal agent, on the performance of this intensified esterification process were investigated. The highest degree of esterification (61%) was achieved at a reaction temperature of 65 masculineC, using silica gels as the water-removal agent. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis showed that the major composition of the esterified product was diacylglycerol.

  20. Foaming properties of monoglycerol fatty acid esters in nonpolar oil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Aramaki, Kenji; Kato, Hiroyuki; Takase, Yoshihiko; Kunieda, Hironobu

    2006-09-26

    Foaming properties of monoglycerol fatty acid esters that have different alkyl chain lengths were studied in different nonpolar oils, namely liquid paraffin (LP 70), squalane, and squalene. The effect of the hydrocarbon chain length of the surfactant, the concentration, the nature of the oil, and the temperature on the nonaqueous foam stability was mainly studied. Five weight percent of glycerol alpha-monododecanoate (monolaurin) formed highly stable foams in squalane at 25 degrees C, and the foams were stable for more than 14 h. Foam stability of the monolaurin/LP 70 and the monolaurin/squalene systems are almost similar, and the foams were stable for more than 12 h. Foam stability was decreased as the hydrocarbon chain length of the monoglyceride decreased. In the glycerol alpha-monodecanoate (monocaprin)-oil systems, the foams were stable only for 3-4 h, depending on the nature of the oil. However, the foams formed in the glycerol alpha-monooctanoate (monocaprylin)-oil systems coarsened very quickly, leading to the progressive destruction of foam films, and all of the foams collapsed within a few minutes. Foam stability decreased when the oil was changed from squalane to squalene, in both monocaprin and monolaurin systems. It was observed that, in the dilute regions, these monoglycerides form fine solid dispersions in the aforementioned oils at 25 degrees C. At higher temperatures, the solid melts to isotropic single-liquid or two-liquid phases and the foams formed collapsed within 5 min. Judging from the wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and the foaming test, it is concluded that the stable foams are mainly caused by the dispersion of the surfactant solids (beta-crystal) and foam stability is largely influenced by the shape and size of the dispersed solid particles.

  1. Fatty acids profile of Sacha Inchi oil and blends by 1H NMR and GC-FID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Juarez; de Carvalho, Mario Geraldo; Garcia-Rojas, Edwin E

    2015-08-15

    This study aimed at the characterization of blends of Sacha Inchi oil (SIO) with different ratios of SO (soybean oil) and CO (corn oil) by nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), compared with the data obtained by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The (1)H NMR and GC-FID data from different ratios of SIO were adjusted by a second order polynomial equation. The two techniques were highly correlated (R(2) values ranged from 0.995 to 0.999), revealing that (1)H NMR is an efficient methodology for the quantification of omega-3 fatty acids in oils rich in omega-6 fatty acids or vice versa such as SO and CO and, on the other hand, can be used to quantify ω-6 in oils rich in ω-3, such as SIO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [The fatty acid composition of Rkatsiteli grape seed oil and its effect as a food-additive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikalishvili, B Iu; Zurabashvili, D Z; Nikolaĭshvili, M N; Zurabashvili, Z A; Giorgobiani, I B

    2011-02-01

    In this paper high fatty acids in the Rkatsiteli grape seed oil were qualitatively and quantitatively identified. In the Rkatsiteli grape seed oil linolenic, oleic, palmitic, stearic, palmitooleinovaya, linoleic and arachidonic acids were identified. The impact of Rkatsiteli grape seed oil as a dietary supplement on the contents of fatty acid synthase and lipids in the livers of mice were determined. Investigations were carried out on 120 inbred mice: for 15 days to a standard diet grape seed oil was added as a food additive. The investigation showed that the optimal use of food additives in the form of oil from Rkatsiteli grape seed plays an important role in maintaining the physiological needs of the human organism.

  3. Analysis of moisture, oil, and fatty acid composition of olives by near-infrared spectroscopy: development and validation calibration models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Uttam; Jackson, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Olive is a new, expanding crop in Georgia. Its oil content steadily increases with maturity, but eventually plateaus at the maximum when the olives should be promptly harvested, avoiding overripening and quality degradation. This requires frequent testing. However, olive quality analysis by wet chemistry is laborious, slow and costly, whereas near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS), being precise, accurate, rapid and cheap, could be suitable. We developed and validated NIRS calibration models for moisture, fresh-matter-oil (oil-FMO), dry-matter-oil (oil-DMO) and major fatty acid composition analyses. Of the12 models developed, seven constituents - moisture, oil-FMO, oil-DMO, and palmitic, palmitoleic, oleic and linoleic acids (representing 88-97% of the total fatty acids) had low standard errors and high coefficients of determination (R 2 = 0.81-0.98; 1 - VR = 0.74-0.86) for both calibration and cross-validation. For these seven constituents, predictions of an independent validation set yielded excellent agreement between the NIRS predicted values and the reference values with low standard error of prediction (SEP), low bias, high coefficient of determination (r 2 = 0.80-0.93) and high ratios of performance to deviation (RPD = SD/SEP; 2.21-3.85). Precise, accurate and rapid analysis of fresh olives for moisture, oil and major fatty acid composition can be done at a low cost using NIRS, meeting the analytical needs of the industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Effects of rapeseed and soybean oil dietary supplementation on bovine fat metabolism, fatty acid composition and cholesterol levels in milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhofer, Christian; Spornraft, Melanie; Kienberger, Hermine; Rychlik, Michael; Herrmann, Julia; Meyer, Heinrich H D; Viturro, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    The main goal of this experiment was to study the effect of milk fat depression, induced by supplementing diet with plant oils, on the bovine fat metabolism, with special interest in cholesterol levels. For this purpose 39 cows were divided in three groups and fed different rations: a control group (C) without any oil supplementation and two groups with soybean oil (SO) or rapeseed oil (RO) added to the partial mixed ration (PMR). A decrease in milk fat percentage was observed in both oil feedings with a higher decrease of -1·14 % with SO than RO with -0·98 % compared with the physiological (-0·15 %) decline in the C group. There was no significant change in protein and lactose yield. The daily milk cholesterol yield was lower in both oil rations than in control ration, while the blood cholesterol level showed an opposite variation. The milk fatty acid pattern showed a highly significant decrease of over 10 % in the amount of saturated fatty acids (SFA) in both oil feedings and a highly significant increase in mono (MUFA) and poly (PUFA) unsaturated fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) included. The results of this experiment suggest that the feeding of oil supplements has a high impact on milk fat composition and its significance for human health, by decreasing fats with a potentially negative effect (SFA and cholesterol) while simultaneously increasing others with positive (MUFA, PUFA, CLA).

  5. The effect of linseed oil supplementation of the diet on the content of fatty acids in the egg yolk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hudečková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two different types of oils in diet on the fatty acid profile in the eggs of layers and to include a particular type of oil as a supplement of feeding mixtures for layers in order to support the development of functional foodstuffs. Thirty layers fed a diet containing soybean oil constituted the control group (soybean oil is the most frequently used oil added to feeding mixtures. In the experimental group (thirty layers, soybean oil was replaced with linseed oil at the same amount (3 kg of oil per 100 kg of feeding mixture. Feeding was provided ad libitum for all days of the month. After one month, egg yolks were analysed and the fatty acid profile was compared. Significant differences (P ≤ 0.05 were found in the concentration of myristic acid that belongs to the group of saturated fatty acids. Eggs in the experimental group showed higher concentrations of myristic acid compared to the control group (0.20 g/100 g of fat and 0.18 g/100 g of fat, respectively. Highly significant differences (P ≤ 0.01 were found for heptadecanoic acid but the trend was opposite to that of myristic acid; concentrations of heptadecanoic acid in the experimental group were lower than those in the control group. Highly significant differences (P ≤ 0.01 were found for n-9 monounsaturated fatty acids where egg yolks in eggs from layers fed linseed oil contained higher concentrations of oleic acid, myristoleic acid, and palmitoleic acid. Lower concentrations of n-6 fatty acids (P ≤ 0.01 were found after the addition of linseed oil in eggs. Linseed oil showed a positive effect on n-3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid, its concentration in the control and experimental group was 0.82 g/100 g of fat and 5.63 g/100 g of fat, respectively. The possibility of influencing the fatty acid profile in eggs is very important for the development of functional foods.

  6. Authentication of Tunisian virgin olive oils by chemometric analysis of fatty acid compositions and NIR spectra. Comparison with Maghrebian and French virgin olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi-Mezghani, S; Vanloot, P; Molinet, J; Dupuy, N; Hammami, M; Grati-Kamoun, N; Artaud, J

    2015-04-15

    Six Tunisian virgin olive oil (VOO) varieties, Chemlali Sfax, Chetoui, Chemchali, Oueslati, Zarrazi and Zalmati, were characterised by two analytical methods. The gas chromatography allowed the determination of 14 fatty acids and squalene amounts. With fatty acids of each variety, a characteristic "morphotypes" for each oil variety was established. Chemlali Sfax and Zalmati showed strong similarities. Gas chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) and near infrared (NIR) spectra of oils, associated to chemometric treatment, allowed the study of the inter-varietal variability and the verification of the variety origins of some Tunisian commercial VOOs. The specificity of Tunisian VOOs was evaluated by comparing the samples to Algerian, Moroccan and French Protected Designation of Origin VOOs. Classification in varietal origins by SIMCA used the FAME compositions and NIR spectra of the most represented varieties (Chemlali Sfax, Chetoui and Oueslati) showed a high potential to authenticate the varietal origin of Tunisian VOOs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of dietary sunflower oil and coconut oil on adipose tissue gene expression, fatty acid composition and serum lipid profile of grower pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Mohan N Harihara; Sarmah, Babul C; Tamuli, Madan K; Das, Anubrata; Kalita, Dhireswar

    2012-08-01

    The present study was conducted to assess whether the partial replacement of feed energy by vegetable oils containing high medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MCFA) and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) would modify lipogenic gene expression and other parameter of fat metabolism in pigs. Eighteen pigs (17-19 kg body weight) received one of three experimental diets for 60 days (six animals per group): (i) Control diet; (ii) a diet with sunflower oil (SO) or (iii) a diet with coconut oil (CO). In diets SO and CO, 10% of the feed energy was replaced by the respective oils. The experimental treatment did not influence the performance of the pigs. In blood serum, an increased content of total cholesterol was observed for SO and CO fed animals, whereas no significant changes for total triglycerides and different lipoprotein fractions were detected. The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue was significantly modified, with an increased content of MCFA and n-6 PUFA in CO and SO fed pigs, respectively. The gene expression for fatty acid synthase was decreased for SO and CO fed pigs; for stearoyl CoA desaturase and sterol regulatory element binding protein, a depression was observed in SO but not in CO fed pigs. The results of present study suggest that the type of dietary fat can modulate the adipose tissue gene expression and fatty acid composition differentially, with minimal effect on serum lipid profile.

  8. EFFECT OF CRUDE PALM OIL PROTECTION WITH FORMALDEHYDE ON HYDROGENATION OF RUMEN FLUID UNSATURATED FATTY ACID: ITS EFFECT ON BLOOD AND MEAT FATTY ACID

    OpenAIRE

    Tiven, Nafly C.; Yusiati, Lies Mira; Rusman, Rusman; Santoso, Umar

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the effect of crude palm oil protected with formaldehyde on the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids in the rumen and its effect on blood and meat fatty acids. Fifteenth local male lambs aged 9-12 months weighing 14-17 kg, were divided into 3 groups ration treatment. The first group received only the basal ration (R0), the 2nd group received the basal ration and 3% CPO (R1), while the 3rd group received the basal ration and 3% CPO protected with 2% formald...

  9. A Comparative Study on Formation of Polar Components, Fatty Acids and Sterols during Frying of Refined Olive Pomace Oil Pure and Its Blend Coconut Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hammouda, Ibtissem; Triki, Mehdi; Matthäus, Bertrand; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2018-04-04

    The frying performance of pure refined olive-pomace oil (ROPO) and blended with refined coconut oil (RCO) (80:20) was compared during a frying operation of French fries at 180 °C. Blending polyunsaturated oils with highly saturated or monounsaturated oils has been studied extensively, however in literature there is no study has been reported so far on blending ROPO (rich in monounsaturated fatty acids) with RCO (rich in saturated fatty acids) to formulate new frying oils. At the end of the frying process, the blend of ROPO/RCO exhibited a higher chemical stability than the pure ROPO based on total polar compounds (TPC), and polymers. The rate of TPC formation was achieved 23.3% and 30.6% for the blend and the pure oil, respectively. Trans and free fatty acids content, as well as anisidine value were also observed to be the highest in the pure ROPO. This study evaluated the frying performance in the search for appropriate frying oils to deliver healthy fried products with optimized nutritional qualities.

  10. Unique occurrence of unusual fatty acid in the seed oil of Aegle marmelos Corre: Screening the rich source of seed oil for bio-energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagi, Kariyappa S.; Munnolli, Ravindra S.; Hosamani, Kallappa M.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, an attempt has been made to characterize, isolate and elucidate the structure of unusual fatty acid in the seed oil of Aegle marmelos Corre. Further, this nonedible seed oil is screened for its bio-diesel or industrial feedstock property. The Aegle marmelos Corre seeds yielded 49.0% oil. The seed oil contains 12.5% of 12-hydroxyoctadec-cis-9-enoic acid (ricinoleic acid) along with other normal fatty acids. The identification and characterization was supported by FTIR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, MS, GC analysis and chemical degradation technique. A good agreement is seen between the calculated and experimental results of iodine value (IV) and saponification value (SV). The prominent parameters of bio-diesel such as cetane number (CN), lower heating value (LHV) and higher heating value (HHV) are deployed to envisage the quality of oil for use as bio-diesel. This seed oil is nonedible and is found to be the alternative feed stock for the production of bio-diesel since it convenes the major specifications of bio-diesel. The bio-diesel property of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) of this seed oil is compared with other bio-diesels.

  11. Synthesis of Monoacylglycerol Rich in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids from Tuna Oil with Immobilized Lipase AK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawongrat, Ratchapol; Xu, Xuebing; H-Kittikun, Aran

    2007-01-01

    -Butyl methyl ether (MTBE) was the most suitable organic solvent after screening a list of different solvents and their mixtures. The optimum conditions for MAG production were: 10% w/v of tuna oil in MTBE; mole ratio of glycerol to tuna oil 3:1, water added 4 wt% in glycerol; the amount of IM-AK 30 wt%, based......The aim of this study was to produce monoacylglycerols (MAG) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), by glycerolysis of tuna oil with lipase AK from Pseudomonas fluorescence immobilized on Accurel EP-100 (IM-AK). tert...... on tuna oil. The temperature was controlled at 45 degrees C. Under these conditions, with a 24 h reaction, the yield of MAG was 24.6%, but containing 56.0 wt% PUFA (EPA and DHA). Stability of the IM-AK was also studied. The hydrolytic activity of the enzyme remained at 88% and 80% of initial activity...

  12. Triacylglycerols and fatty acids composition of egusi seed oil (Cucumeropsis Mannii Naudin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamga, R.

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerols were determined from a Cameroonian (African white egusi seed oil (Cucumeropsis Mannii Naudin using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. The fatty acid composition of two types of seed (red and white is obtained by capillary gas chromatography. The study of the triacyiglycerol composition obtained in white egusi seed oil revealed that only nine triacylglycerols were present in amounts above 1% (area. The first five triglycerides represent more than 80% of the total triacylglycerols, and the major triacyiglycerol was palmitoyldilinoleoylglycerol, accounting for 23.6% of the oil. This oil contains a high proportion of linoleic acid (60% wt/wt.Se determinó la composición en triacilgliceroles del aceite de semilla de egusi del Camerún (Cucumeropsis Mannii Naudin utilizando cromatografía líquida de alta eficacia en fase inversa. La composición en ácidos grasos de dos tipos de semillas de egusi (roja y blanca fue obtenida por cromatografía de gases en columna capilar. El estudio de la composición en triacilgliceroles del aceite obtenido de semilla blanca de egusi reveló que sólo nueve de ellos se encontraban en proporción superior al 1% (en área. Cinco triacilgliceroles representaron más del 80% del total y el mayoritario fue el palmitoildilinoleoilglicerol (23,6%. Este aceite contiene una alta proporción de ácido linoleico (60%.

  13. Effect of structured lipids based on fish oil on the growth and fatty acid composition in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Gøttsche, Jesper; Holm, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    containing DAG. A feeding experiment where groups of rainbow trout were fed six diets containing different types of oils for 61 days was performed. The lipid fraction of the six diets was as follows: 1) Fish oil and rapeseed oil (FO diet), 2) Specific structured lipid and rapeseed oil (SL diet), 3....... There was no additional effect of incorporating the medium chain fatty acids in specific positions and no weight reducing effect of adding DAG to the diets. (C) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  14. Differential changes in the fatty acid composition of the main lipid classes of chick plasma induced by dietary coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fuentes, E; Gil-Villarino, A; Zafra, M F; García-Peregrín, E

    2002-10-01

    For a better understanding of the hyperlipidemic function of saturated fat, we have studied the comparative effects of diet supplementation with 10 and 20% coconut oil on the main lipid classes of chick plasma. Changes in fatty acid composition of free fatty acid and triglyceride fractions were parallel to that of the experimental diet. Thus, the increase in the percentages of 12:0 and 14:0 acids may contribute to the hypercholesterolemic effects of coconut oil feeding. Plasma phospholipids incorporated low levels of 12:0 and 14:0 acids whereas 18:0, the main saturated fatty acid of this fraction, also increased after coconut oil feeding. The percentage of 20:4 n-6 was higher in plasma phospholipids than in the other fractions and was significantly decreased by our dietary manipulations. Likewise, minor increases were found in the percentages of 12:0 and 14:0 acids in plasma cholesterol esters. However, the percentage of 18:2 acid significantly increased after coconut oil feeding. Our results show a relationship between fatty acid composition of diets and those of plasma free fatty acid and triglyceride fractions, whereas phospholipids and cholesterol esters are less sensitive to dietary changes.

  15. The influence of feed supplementation with linseed oil and linseed extrudate on fatty acid profile in goat yoghurt drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markéta Borková

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Feed composition is one of the most influential factors affecting fatty acid profile of milk products. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of linseed oil and linseed extrudate supplementation on fatty acid composition of goat prebiotic and probiotic yogurt drinks. Thirty six White Shorthaired dairy goats at the beginning of their third lactation period were divided into two experimental and one control group, each comprising twelve animals. Goats in the experimental groups were given either 55 mL/day of linseed oil or 120 g/day of linseed extrudate over a three week period. The results suggest that feed supplementation with linseed oil and linseed extrudate caused considerable changes in fatty acid profile of goat yoghurt drinks. The most important nutritional change which was observed was increased n-3 fatty acid content (P<0.001 and decreased saturated fatty acid content (P<0.001. α-linolenic acid was significantly elevated (P<0.001 in both groups (in particular in goats which feed was supplemented with linseed oil.

  16. Influence of different irrigation and nitrogen levels on crude oil and fatty acid composition of maize (Zea mays L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.; Kale, H.; Karaman, K.; Unlukara, A.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of irrigation and nitrogen fertilizer levels on the crude oil and fatty acid composition of maize cultivars was studied. Three levels of irrigation (50, 75 and 100% of field capacity) and nitrogen (100, 200 and 300 kg·ha-1) were used for treatment groups. After harvest, the crude oils were extracted and fatty acid profiles were determined by Gas Chromatography system. The study was repeated for two years and the interaction effects of fertilizer and irrigation were determined. Our results show that the crude oil content was affected positively by the fertilizer and the irrigation applications. As expected, the most abundant fatty acid was linoleic and the harvest year did not alter it. The highest linoleic acid content value was obtained with a 50% field capacity and 300 kg·ha-1 fertilizer treatment combination. In addition, fatty acid contents varied with the changing of interaction effects except for myristic and palmitic acid. Oleic acid was the second abundant fatty acid in the oil samples and the lowest oleic acid value was obtained with a 50% field capacity and 300 kg·ha-1 fertilizer treatment combination. Oleic acid content tended to increase with 75% field capacity but 100% field capacity treatment decreased in it. [es

  17. Fatty acids, essential oil, and phenolics modifications of black cumin fruit under NaCl stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgou, Soumaya; Bettaieb, Iness; Saidani, Moufida; Marzouk, Brahim

    2010-12-08

    This research evaluated the effect of saline conditions on fruit yield, fatty acids, and essential oils compositions and phenolics content of black cumin (Nigella sativa). This plant is one of the most commonly found aromatics in the Mediterranean kitchen. Increasing NaCl levels to 60 mM decreased significantly the fruits yield by 58% and the total fatty acids amount by 35%. Fatty acids composition analysis indicated that linoleic acid was the major fatty acid (58.09%) followed by oleic (19.21%) and palmitic (14.77%) acids. Salinity enhanced the linoleic acid percentage but did not affect the unsaturation degree of the fatty acids pool and thus the oil quality. The essential oil yield was 0.39% based on the dry weight and increased to 0.53, 0.56, and 0.72% at 20, 40, and 60 mM NaCl. Salinity results on the modification of the essential oil chemotype from p-cymene in controls to γ-terpinene/p-cymene in salt-stressed plants. The amounts of total phenolics were lower in the treated plants. Salinity decreased mainly the amount of the major class, benzoics acids, by 24, 29, and 44% at 20, 40, and 60 mM NaCl. The results suggest that salt treatment may regulate bioactive compounds production in black cumin fruits, influencing their nutritional and industrial values.

  18. Fish Oil-Derived Fatty Acids in Pregnancy and Wheeze and Asthma in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Hans; Stokholm, Jakob; Chawes, Bo L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced intake of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) may be a contributing factor to the increasing prevalence of wheezing disorders. We assessed the effect of supplementation with n-3 LCPUFAs in pregnant women on the risk of persistent wheeze and asthma in their off......Background: Reduced intake of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) may be a contributing factor to the increasing prevalence of wheezing disorders. We assessed the effect of supplementation with n-3 LCPUFAs in pregnant women on the risk of persistent wheeze and asthma...... in their offspring. Methods: We randomly assigned 736 pregnant women at 24 weeks of gestation to receive 2.4 g of n-3 LCPUFA (fish oil) or placebo (olive oil) per day. Their children formed the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 (COPSAC2010) cohort and were followed prospectively...... end point was persistent wheeze or asthma, and the secondary end points included lower respiratory tract infections, asthma exacerbations, eczema, and allergic sensitization. Results: A total of 695 children were included in the trial, and 95.5% completed the 3-year, double-blind follow-up period...

  19. Microbial oils as food additives: recent approaches for improving microbial oil production and its polyunsaturated fatty acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellou, Stamatia; Triantaphyllidou, Irene-Eva; Aggeli, Dimitra; Elazzazy, Ahmed Mohammed; Baeshen, Mohammed Nabih; Aggelis, George

    2016-02-01

    In this short review, we summarize the latest research in the production of polyunsaturated microbial oils that are of interest in food technology. The current research targets the productivity of oleaginous microorganisms, as well as the biosynthesis of particular polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). The most important efforts target the efficiency of the oleaginous machinery, via overexpression of key-enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, as well as the minimization of lipid degradation, by repressing genes involved in the β-oxidation pathway. The production of specific PUFAs is approached by homologous or heterologous expression of specific desaturases and elongases involved in PUFA biosynthesis in oleaginous microorganisms. New perspectives, such as the production of triacylglycerols of specific structure and the employment of adaptive experimental evolution for creating robust oleaginous strains able to produce PUFAs are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Callus Growth Kinetics of Physic Nut (Jatropha curcas L.) and Content of Fatty Acids from Crude Oil Obtained In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz Costa, Jefferson; da Silva, André Luís Lopes; Bier, Mário César Jucoski; Brondani, Gilvano Ebling; Gollo, André Luiz; Letti, Luiz Alberto Junior; Erasmo, Eduardo Andrea Lemus; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    The callus growth kinetics allows identifying the appropriate moment for callus pealing and monitoring the accumulation of primary and secondary metabolites. The physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) is a plant species used for biofuel production due to its high oil content; however, this plant presents a great amount of bioactive compounds which can be useful for industry. The aim of this research was to establish a calli growth curve and to evaluate the fatty acid profile of crude oil extracted from callus. The callus growth kinetics presented a sigmoid standard curve with six distinct phases: lag, exponential, linear, deceleration, stationary, and decline. Total soluble sugars were higher at the inoculation day. Reducing sugars were higher at the inoculation day and at the 80th day. The highest percentage of ethereal extract (oil content) was obtained at the 120th day of culture, reaching 18 % of crude oil from the callus. The calli produced medium-chain and long-chain fatty acids (from 10 to 18 carbon atoms). The palmitic acid was the fatty acid with the highest proportion in oil (55.4 %). The lipid profile obtained in callus oil was different from the seed oil profile.

  1. Sucrose fatty esters from underutilized seed oil of Terminalia catappa as potential steel corrosion inhibitor in acidic medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Adewuyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion of metals is a common problem which requires definite attention. In response to this, the oil was extracted from the seed of Terminalia catappa and used to synthesize sucrose fatty esters via simple reaction mechanism which was considered eco-friendly and sustainable. The corrosion inhibition capacity of sucrose fatty esters for mild steel in 1 M HCl was studied using the weight loss method. It was shown that sucrose fatty ester inhibited corrosion process of mild steel and obeyed Langmuir isotherm. Corrosion rate and inhibition efficiency of sucrose fatty esters were found to reduce with increase of immersion time. The study presented sucrose fatty ester as a promising inhibitor of mild steel corrosion in acidic medium.

  2. A lumped model of the lipase catalyzed hydrolysis of sardine oil to maximize polyunsaturated fatty acids content in acylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Medina, R; Munio, M; Guadix, A; Guadix, E M; Camacho, F

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this work was to produce diacylglycerols (DAG) and monoacylglycerols (MAG) with a high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Rhizomucor miehei lipase mediated-hydrolysis of sardine oil was conducted at several water activities. The system was mechanistically modeled to predict the time evolution of the concentration of triacylglycerols, DAG, MAG and free fatty acids (FFA) and the concentration of saturated, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The release of the first fatty acid from the triacylglycerol was independent on the unsaturation degree. Contrary, the hydrolysis of the second one was highly affected by the degree of unsaturation, PUFA being the fatty acids that showed the highest resistance to hydrolysis. MAG percentage was maximum (7mol%) at lower water activities, while DAG content was favored at higher water activities (35mol%), achieving a 2-fold concentration of DHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutral Lipid Biosynthesis in Engineered Escherichia coli: Jojoba Oil-Like Wax Esters and Fatty Acid Butyl Esters

    OpenAIRE

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant E...

  4. Fatty acid profile and elemental content of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) oil--effect of extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Mageshni; Moodley, Roshila; Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B

    2012-01-01

    Interest in vegetable oil extracted from idioblast cells of avocado fruit is growing. In this study, five extraction methods to produce avocado oil have been compared: traditional solvent extraction using a Soxhlet or ultrasound, Soxhlet extraction combined with microwave or ultra-turrax treatment and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE). Traditional Soxhlet extraction produced the most reproducible results, 64.76 ± 0.24 g oil/100 g dry weight (DW) and 63.67 ± 0.20 g oil/100 g DW for Hass and Fuerte varieties, respectively. Microwave extraction gave the highest yield of oil (69.94%) from the Hass variety. Oils from microwave extraction had the highest fatty acid content; oils from SFE had wider range of fatty acids. Oils from Fuerte variety had a higher monounsaturated: saturated FA ratio (3.45-3.70). SFE and microwave extraction produced the best quality oil, better than traditional Soxhlet extraction, with the least amount of oxidizing metals present. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  5. Esterification free fatty acid in sludge palm oil using ZrO2/SO42- - rice husk ash catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayat, Arif; Sutrisno, Bachrun

    2017-05-01

    Indonesia, as one of the biggest palm oil producers and exporters in the world, is producing large amounts of low-grade oil such as sludge palm oil (SPO) from palm oil industries. The use of SPO can lower the cost of biodiesel production significantly, which makes SPO a highly potential alternative feedstock for biodiesel production. In this paper, the esterification of free fatty acid on sludge palm oil was studied using rice husk ash as heterogeneous solid catalysts. Heterogeneous solid catalysts offer significant advantages of eliminating separation, corrosion, toxicity and environmental problems. In this paper the esterification of SPO, a by-product from palm oil industry, in the presence of modified rice husk ash catalysts was studied. The rice husk ash catalysts were synthesized by impregnating of Zirconia (Zr) on rice husk ash followed by sulfonation. The rice husk ash catalysts were characterized by using different techniques, such as FT-IR, XRD, and porous analysis. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1 - 10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (4:1 - 10:1), and the reaction temperature (40 - 60°C) were studied for the conversion of free fatty acids (FFAs) to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimal conditions were an methanol to oil molar ratio of 10:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60°C.

  6. In Vitro Rumen Fermentation Characteristics and Fatty Acid Profiles Added with Calcium Soap of Canola/Flaxseed Oil

    OpenAIRE

    S. Suharti; A. R. Nasution; K. G. Wiryawan

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the effect of adding canola oil and flaxseed oil which were protected with calcium soap (Ca-soap) on the fermentation characteristics, rumen microbial population, and the profile of fatty acids in the rumen during 4 and 8 hours in the in vitro fermentation. The research design used in this study was a completely randomized block design with 3 treatments and 4 replications. The treatments consisted of control ration (Napier grass and concentrate at the ratio of 60...

  7. Enrichment of spreadable fats with polyunsaturated fatty acids omega-3 using fish oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolanowski, W; Swiderski, F; Lis, E; Berger, S

    2001-11-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids of the omega-3 series, especially very long chain--eicosapenta- and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA, DHA)--exert a strongly desirable influence on health. However, their intake with the western-style diet is usually too low which favours development of many diseases (CVD, cancers, allergies, etc.). Nowadays elevation of EPA and DHA intake is commonly recommended, but almost the only dietary source of them is seafoods, especially fish. A new way to increase the intake of long-chain omega-3 without radical changes of eating patterns is enrichment of regularly consumed foods with unhydrogenated fish oil. The aim of this study was to establish sensory and nutritionally acceptable enrichment level of low-calorie spreadable fats (soft margarine and mix of butter and vegetable oil) with EPA and DHA by addition of fish oil preparations (ROPUFA--30% EPA, DHA and MARITEX--10%), and evaluation of the stability of enriched spreads during storage (sensory and chemical). It was shown that tested spreadable fats might be enriched up to 1% EPA, DHA (i.e. 3% ROPUFA, 8% MARITEX), and that this had no significant influence on sensory acceptability. Both used fish oils which exerted similar influence on the quality of fats. An enriched mix of butter and vegetable oil and margarine may be stored up to 3 and 6 weeks respectively without significant decrease of quality. Peroxide value and acid numbers were not much affected by enrichment and storage. Daily portion (25-30 g/day) of spreadable fats enriched on the level established in the study may provide 0.2-0.3 g EPA, DHA, significantly increasing the amount of long-chain omega-3 in the diet above those eaten normally.

  8. Effects of the heating process of soybean oil and seeds on fatty acid biohydrogenation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troegeler-Meynadier, A; Puaut, S; Farizon, Y; Enjalbert, F

    2014-09-01

    Heating fat is an efficient way to alter ruminal biohydrogenation (BH) and milk fat quality. Nevertheless, results are variable among studies and this could be due to various heating conditions differently affecting BH. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of type and duration of heating of soybean oil or seeds on BH in vitro. Ruminal content cultures were incubated to first investigate the effects of roasting duration (no heating, and 0.5- and 6-h roasting) at 125°C and its interaction with fat source (soybean seeds vs. soybean oil), focusing on linoleic acid BH and its intermediates: conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and trans-C18:1. Additionally, we compared the effects of seed extrusion with the 6 combinations of unheated and roasted oils and seeds. None of the treatments was efficient to protect linoleic acid from BH. Soybean oil resulted in higher trans-11 isomer production than seeds: 5.7 and 1.2 times higher for cis-9,trans-11 CLA and trans-11 C18:1, respectively. A 125°C, 0.5-h roasting increased trans-11 isomer production by 11% compared with no heating and 6-h roasted fat. Extrusion of seeds was more efficient to increase trans-11 C18:1 production than seed roasting, leading to values similar to oils. For other fatty acids, including cis-9,trans-11 CLA, extrusion resulted in similar balances to seeds (mainly 0.5-h-roasted seeds). Extruded oilseeds would be more efficient than roasted seeds to produce trans-11 C18:1; nevertheless, effects of conditions of extrusion need to be explored. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Wheat germ oil extracted by supercritical carbon dioxide with ethanol: Fatty acid composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parczewska-Plesnar, B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE using CO2 with ethanol as entrainer was performed at a temperature of 40 oC under a pressure of 21 MPa. For comparison, a similar extraction without the entrainer was carried out. The extraction yield of wheat germ using supercritical CO2 with ethanol was slightly higher (10.7 wt% than that of extraction without the entrainer (9.9 wt%. Fractions of SFE extracts were collected separately during the experiments and the composition of fatty acids in each fraction was analyzed. The SFE extracted oils were rich (63.4-71.3% in the most valuable polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and their content in all collected fractions was approximately constant. Similar PUFA contents were found in the reference samples of oils extracted by n-hexane (66.2-67.0%, while the commercial cold-pressed oil contained significantly less PUFA (60.2%. These results show a higher nutritional value of the oil obtained by extraction with supercritical CO2 than cold pressed oil which is generally considered to be very valuable.En este trabajo, la extracción con fluidos supercríticos (SFE usando CO2 con etanol como agente de arrastre se realizó a 40 °C bajo una presión de 21 MPa. Se ha llevado a cabo la comparación con una extracción similar sin agente de arrastre. El rendimiento de la extracción de germen de trigo usando CO2 supercrítico con etanol fue ligeramente mayor (10,7% en peso que la de extracción sin agente de arrastre (9,9% en peso. Se recogieron por separado fracciones de extractos SFE durante los experimentos y se analizó la composición de ácidos grasos en cada fracción. Los aceites extraídos mediante SFE eran ricos en los ácidos grasos poliinsaturados más valiosos (63,4-71,3%, (PUFA y su contenido en todas las fracciones recogidas fue aproximadamente constante. Un contenido similar de PUFA fueron encontrados en muestras de referencia de los aceites extraídos con n-hexano (66,2-67,0%, mientras que el

  10. Characterization of long-chain fatty-acid-degrading syntrophic associations from a biodegraded oil reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Agnès; Blanchet, Denis; Jeanthon, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Molecular methods were used to characterize stearate- and heptadecanoate-degrading methanogenic consortia enriched from a low-temperature biodegraded oil field. Stearate- and heptadecanoate-degrading cultures formed acetate. Growth on heptadecanoate was also accompanied by the production of propionate. These fermentation products were transiently accumulated at the beginning of the exponential phase and were further consumed with the concomitant production of methane. Clone libraries of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes were generated for each stable enrichment. Our 16S rRNA gene-cloning analysis combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that the predominant microorganisms in the associations were affiliated with a clone cluster close to the genus Syntrophus in the class "Deltaproteobacteria" and with the methanogenic genera Methanocalculus and Methanosaeta. Confocal scanning laser microscopy showed that the bacterial and archaeal cells formed compact aggregates around the insoluble substrates. No layered structure was observed in the aggregate organization. This study reports the presence of new fatty-acid-degrading syntrophic consortia in oil fields and our results suggest that such associations may have an important ecological role in oil fields under methanogenic conditions.

  11. Effect of controlled crossing on the triglyceride and fatty acid composition of virgin olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbou, Samia; Rjiba, Imed; Echbili, Adel; Gazzah, Noureddine; Mechri, Beligh; Hammami, Mohamed

    2010-07-01

    Our study reports the triglyceride (triacylglycerol, TAG) composition of five new Tunisian virgin olive oil cultivars obtained through controlled crossings of the cultivar (cv.) Chemlali Sfax. These cultivars have been selected among a progeny of 500 olive descendants, based on an evaluation of the fatty-acid (FA) composition of their oils. Among these samples, two were derived from the crossing with the cv. Sigoise as pollinator (SM634) or pollen acceptor (SM1110) and the others from the crossing with the cv. Meski as pollen acceptor (SM513, SM514, and SM517). The five descendants were characterized by a good fat value, a balanced FA composition, and a high content of triolein, varying between 26.9 (SM514) and 45.46% (SM1110). They had an improved FA composition as compared to that of the cv. Chemlali Sfax and their fruits were slightly bigger. The principal component analysis suggested that the TAG variables were more suitable than the total FAs for an optimum classification of the cultivar samples analyzed. The cultivars obtained through the crossing with the cv. Sigoise (as pollen acceptor or pollinator) had a more favorable composition of FAs and TAG than those obtained through the crossing with the cv. Meski, which indicated that genetic factors had the most important influence on the quality of the virgin olive oils.

  12. Study on fatty acids composition of lipid class in fish oil, proximate analysis and calorie value of kijar in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Aberoumand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 This aim of this research was to determine fatty acids and raw proximate composition and calorie value of fish Kijar in Iran. The fatty acids and proximate composition Kijar was determined. The established AOAC (Association of Official Agricultural Chemist, USA methods were followed for composition bio chemical of fish. Mean moisture, fat, protein, ash, carbohydrate contents and calorie value of raw fish were 70.81%, 5.88%, 17.80%, 3.41%, 2.1% and 132.52 kcal, respectively. Among fatty acids, palmitic acid was a major fatty acid while stearic acid was the other major constituent. Unsaturated monoenoic fatty acids (oleic and palmitoleic acids were major constituents. Important unsaturated fatty acids such as EPA and DHA, were also identified. percentage composition of fatty acids in the lipid classes of oil of Saurida undosquamis which the saturated fatty acids ranges from 58% to 72.14%. Palmitic acid is predominant and its composition ranges 38.64% to 48.98% while stearic acid ranges from 11.35% to 19.50%. Among unsaturated fatty acids, monoenoic are the major fatty acids. Oleic acid ranges from 12.15% to 27.48%. It is concluded that fish kijar found as health seafood for Iranian southern peoples form point of view of nutritional values and valuable fatty acids. Therefore it is recommended people put this fish in diet basket and it consumed three times in the week. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA

  13. Canola Oil in Lactating Dairy Cow Diets Reduces Milk Saturated Fatty Acids and Improves Its Omega-3 and Oleic Fatty Acid Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiéli Caroline Welter

    Full Text Available To produce milk that is healthier for human consumption, the present study evaluated the effect of including canola oil in the diet of dairy cows on milk production and composition as well as the nutritional quality of this milk fat. Eighteen Holstein cows with an average daily milk yield of 22 (± 4 kg/d in the middle stage of lactation were used. The cows were distributed in 6 contemporary 3x3 Latin squares consisting of 3 periods and 3 treatments: control diet (without oil, 3% inclusion of canola oil in the diet and 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet (dry matter basis. The inclusion of 6% canola oil in the diet of lactating cows linearly reduced the milk yield by 2.51 kg/d, short-chain fatty acids (FA by 41.42%, medium chain FA by 27.32%, saturated FA by 20.24%, saturated/unsaturated FA ratio by 39.20%, omega-6/omega-3 ratio by 39.45%, and atherogenicity index by 48.36% compared with the control treatment. Moreover, with the 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet of cows, there was an increase in the concentration of long chain FA by 45.91%, unsaturated FA by 34.08%, monounsaturated FA by 40.37%, polyunsaturated FA by 17.88%, milk concentration of omega-3 by 115%, rumenic acid (CLA by 16.50%, oleic acid by 44.87% and h/H milk index by 94.44% compared with the control treatment. Thus, the inclusion of canola oil in the diet of lactating dairy cows makes the milk fatty acid profile nutritionally healthier for the human diet; however, the lactating performance of dairy cows is reduce.

  14. Canola Oil in Lactating Dairy Cow Diets Reduces Milk Saturated Fatty Acids and Improves Its Omega-3 and Oleic Fatty Acid Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Katiéli Caroline; Martins, Cristian Marlon de Magalhães Rodrigues; de Palma, André Soligo Vizeu; Martins, Mellory Martinson; Dos Reis, Bárbara Roqueto; Schmidt, Bárbara Laís Unglaube; Saran Netto, Arlindo

    2016-01-01

    To produce milk that is healthier for human consumption, the present study evaluated the effect of including canola oil in the diet of dairy cows on milk production and composition as well as the nutritional quality of this milk fat. Eighteen Holstein cows with an average daily milk yield of 22 (± 4) kg/d in the middle stage of lactation were used. The cows were distributed in 6 contemporary 3x3 Latin squares consisting of 3 periods and 3 treatments: control diet (without oil), 3% inclusion of canola oil in the diet and 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet (dry matter basis). The inclusion of 6% canola oil in the diet of lactating cows linearly reduced the milk yield by 2.51 kg/d, short-chain fatty acids (FA) by 41.42%, medium chain FA by 27.32%, saturated FA by 20.24%, saturated/unsaturated FA ratio by 39.20%, omega-6/omega-3 ratio by 39.45%, and atherogenicity index by 48.36% compared with the control treatment. Moreover, with the 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet of cows, there was an increase in the concentration of long chain FA by 45.91%, unsaturated FA by 34.08%, monounsaturated FA by 40.37%, polyunsaturated FA by 17.88%, milk concentration of omega-3 by 115%, rumenic acid (CLA) by 16.50%, oleic acid by 44.87% and h/H milk index by 94.44% compared with the control treatment. Thus, the inclusion of canola oil in the diet of lactating dairy cows makes the milk fatty acid profile nutritionally healthier for the human diet; however, the lactating performance of dairy cows is reduce.

  15. Influence of fish oil alone or in combination with hydrogenated palm oil on sensory characteristics and fatty acid composition of bovine cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Íñiguez-González, Gonzalo; Fehrmann-Cartes, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of dietary supplementation of fish oil (FO) alone or in combination with hydrogenated palm oil (FOPO) on the fatty acid (FA) profile of milk and cheese from dairy cows, and the sensory characteristics of cheese. Nine Holstein cows (173...... treatments than with control. Compared with control and FOPO, FO treatment increased VA and DHA content in milk and cheese. In conclusion, supplementation of dairy cow diets with FO alone or in combination with hydrogenated palm oil can enhance the FA profile of milk and cheese without deleterious effects...

  16. Fatty acid composition of commercial vegetable oils from the French market analysed using a long highly polar column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vingering Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The increasing concern for consumed fat by western populations has raised the question of the level and the quality of fat intake, especially the composition of fatty acids (FA and their impact on human health. As a consequence, consumers and nutritionists have requested updated publications on FA composition of food containing fat. In the present study, fourteen different kinds of edible oils (rapeseed, olive, hazelnut, argan, groundnut, grape seed, sesame, sunflower, walnut and organic walnut, avocado, wheat germ, and two combined oils were analysed for FA determination using a BPX-70 60 m highly polar GC column. Oils were classified according to the classification of Dubois et al. (2007, 2008. Monounsaturated FA (MUFA group oils, including rapeseed, olive, hazelnut, and avocado oils, contained mainly oleic acid (OA. Groundnut and argan oils, also rich in MUFA, showed in addition high linoleic acid (LA contents. In the polyunsaturated (PUFA group, grape seed oil presented the highest LA content while sunflower, sesame, and wheat germ oils showed noticeable MUFA amounts in addition to high PUFA contents. Walnut oils, also rich in LA, showed the highest linolenic acid (ALA content. The n-6/n-3 ratio of each oil was calculated. Trans-FA (TFA was also detected and quantified. Results were compared with the data published during the past decade, and the slight discrepancies were attributed to differences in origin and variety of seed-cultivars, and in seed and oil processes.

  17. Omega-3 fatty acid profile of eggs from laying hens fed diets supplemented with chia, fish oil, and flaxseed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorey, Ranil; Novinda, Agnes; Williams, Hannah; Jayasena, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of diets supplemented with fish oil, flaxseed, and chia seed on the omega-3 fatty acid composition and sensory properties of hens' eggs. No significant difference in yolk fat content was found between treatments. The fatty acid composition of egg yolk was significantly affected by the dietary treatments. Inclusion of chia at 300 g/kg into the diet produced eggs with the highest concentration of omega-3 fatty acid. Eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were only detected in eggs from laying hens fed the diet supplemented with fish oil. Diet had a significant effect on color, flavor and overall acceptability of eggs. Types and levels of omega-3 fatty acids in feed influence the level of yolk omega-3 fatty acids in egg yolk. Inclusion of chia into the hens' diet significantly increased the concentration of yolk omega-3 fatty acid without significant change in sensory properties. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Butter blend containing fish oil improves the level of n-3 fatty acids in biological tissues of hamster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsgaard, Trine; Overgaard, Jesper; Krogh, Anne Louise

    2007-01-01

    Syrian hamsters received hamster feed blended with one of the three butter products. After 6 weeks of feeding, the fatty acid compositions of plasma, erythrocytes, liver, brain, and visceral fat were determined. The intake of butter product with fish oil resulted in a higher level of n-3 PUFA in plasma...

  19. Effect of water stress and foliar boron application on seed protein oil fatty acids and nitrogen metabolism in soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of water stress and foliar boron (FB) application on soybean (Glycine max (L) Merr.) seed composition and nitrogen metabolism have not been well investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of water stress and FB on seed protein, oil, fatty acids, nitra...

  20. Influence of Supplementation of Vegetable Oil Blends on Omega-3 Fatty Acid Production in Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesan Vadivelan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives of this study were designed for improved production of mycelial omega-3 fatty acids with particular reference to EPA and DHA from the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15 under submerged low temperatures fermentation supplemented with linseed oil and garden cress oil as an additional energy source. The fungus was grown at 20°C temperature for four days initially followed by 12°C temperature for next five days. The basal medium contained starch, yeast extract, and a blend of linseed oil (LSO and garden cress oil (GCO in the ratio 1 : 1. Results of the study revealed that, after nine days of total incubation period, the enhancement of biomass was up to 16.7 g/L dry weight with a total lipid content of 55.4% (v/w. Enrichment of omega-3 fatty acids indicated a significant increase in fatty acid bioconversion (ALA 32.2±0.42%, EPA 7.9±0.1%, and DHA 4.09±0.2% by 2.5-fold. The two-stage temperature cultivation alters the fatty acid profile due to activation of the desaturase enzyme in the cellular levels due to which arachidonic acid (AA content reduced significantly. It can be concluded that Mortierella alpina CFR-GV15 is a fungal culture suitable for commercial production of PUFAs with enriched EPA and DHA.

  1. Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Rahman; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-02-07

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has been regarded as good source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids with cardiac, hepatic, hypotensive, antiallergic and antidiabetic role. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in chia oil can be enhanced by fractionation. Olein/low melting fraction of chia oil has higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, main objective of current investigation was determination of various concentration effect of olein fraction of chia oil on omega-3 fatty acids, oxidative stability and sensory characteristics of ice cream. Ice cream samples were prepared by partially replacing the milk fat with olein fraction of chia oil at 5, 10, 15 and 20% concentrations (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 ), respectively. Ice cream prepared from 100% milk fat was kept as control. Ice cream samples stored at -18 °C for 60 days were analysed at 0, 30 and 60 days of the storage period. Fatty acid profile, total phenolic contents, total flavonoids, free fatty acids, peroxide value, anisidine value and sensory characteristics of ice cream samples was studied. Concentration of α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in T 4 was 13.24, 0.58, 0.42 and 0.31%, respectively. Total phenolic contents of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were recorded 0.12, 1.65, 3.17, 5.19 and 7.48 mg GAE/mL, respectively. Total flavonoid content of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were found 0.08, 0.64, 1.87, 3.16 and 4.29 mg Quercetin Equivalent/mL. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was noted 5.61, 17.43, 36.84, 51.17 and 74.91%, respectively. After 60 days of storage period, the highest peroxide value of 1.84 (MeqO 2 /kg) was observed in T 4 , which was much less than allowable limit of 10 (MeqO 2 /kg). Flavour score was non-significant after 30 days of storage period. Supplementation of ice cream with olein fraction of chia oil enhanced the concentration of

  2. Pattern recognition of acorns from different Quercus species based on oil content and fatty acid profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu, José M.F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was (i to characterize different species of Quercus genus and (ii to discriminate among them on the basis of the content and fatty acid composition of the oil in their fruits and/or their morphological aspects via pattern recognition techniques (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Cluster Analysis, CA, and Discriminant Analysis, DA. Quercus rotundifolia Lam., Quercus suber L. and Quercus pyrenaica Willd., grown in the same stand in the centre of Portugal, were investigated. When oil content and respective fatty acid composition were used to characterize samples, well-separated groups corresponding to each of the species were observed by PCA and confirmed by CA and DA. The ‘‘width’’ and ‘‘length’’ of acorns exhibited a low discriminant power. Acorns from Q. rotundifolia showed the highest average oil content followed by Q. suber and Q. pyrenaica acorns (9.1, 5.2 and 3.8%, respectively. Fatty acid profiles of Q. rotundifolia and Q. suber oils are similar to olive oil while the oil from Q. pyrenaica acorns is more unsaturated.El objetivo de este estudio fué (i la caracterización de diferentes especies del género Quercus y (ii la clasificación de las mismas en base al contenido y composición de ácidos grasos del aceite de sus frutos y/o en sus caracteres morfológicos, via técnicas de patrón de reconocimiento (Análisis de Componentes Principales, ACP, Análisis de Cluster, AC, y Análisis Discriminante, AD. Se han estudiado Quercus rotundifolia Lam., Quercus suber L. y Quercus pyrenaica Willd., pertenecientes a la misma zona del centro de Portugal. Al emplear el contenido de aceite y sus respectivas composiciones de ácidos grasos para caracterizar a las muestras, el ACP reveló grupos bien separados correspondientes a cada especie, los cuales, a su vez, se confirmarón con el AC y el AD. El ‘‘ancho’’ y ‘‘longitud’’ de las bellotas

  3. The physicochemical and thermal properties of Malaysian high free fatty acid crude palm oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadi, Murad Awadh; Salimon, Jumat; Japir, Abd-Wali M.

    2016-11-01

    This study was carried out to determine the physicochemical properties and the thermal behavior of Malaysian high free fatty acid crude palm oil (HFFA-CPO). The physicochemical properties showed that the free fatty acid (FFA %), acid value, iodine value, saponification value, unsaponifiable matter, hydroxyl value, specific gravity, refractive index at 28°C, moisture content, viscosity at 28°C and colour at 28°C values were 9.4±0.1 %, 21.3±0.1 mg/g, 50.6±0.2 mg/g, 203.1±0.1 mg/g, 0.7±0.1%, 43.4±0.2 mg/g, 0.878 g/ml, 1.4669, 0.6 %, 52 cP and 50R-40Y respectively. Gas chromatography (GC) was used to determine the fatty acid (FA) composition in HFFA-CPO. The fatty acids were found to be comprised mostly with 45.7 % palmitic acid (C16:0), 39.5 % oleic acid (C18:1), 9.4 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 4.3 % stearic acid (C18:0). The analysis of triacylglycerol components with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has resulted with 3.5 % triunsaturated (OOO, OLL and OLO), 32.7 % monosaturated (POO, PLO, SOO and PLL), 35.7 % disaturated (MLP, PPL, PPO, POS and SOS) and 2.32 % trisaturated fatty acids (PPP and PPS). The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the crystallization of TAG displayed two major exothermic regions of HFFA-CPO with the di and trisaturated TAG at 23.11°C and the di and triunsaturated TAG at 9.31 °C. The melting curve displayed multiple endothermic peak regions at 25.13 °C and 35.31 °C could be attributed to the di and trisaturated TAGs. While the peaks at 0.95 °C, 6.94 °C and 9.77 °C could be attributed to the mono, di and triunsaturated TAGs.

  4. The fatty acid and tocopherol constituents of the seed oil extracted from 21 grape varieties (Vitis spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Ali; Unver, Ahmet; Kara, Zeki

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acids and tocopherols in appropriate quantities are invaluable attributes that are desirable in seeds of agricultural products. Studies have generally focused on the evaluation of the oil and tocopherol components of oil crops. Recently, investigations revealed that the grape seed has robust potential in the production of healthy fatty acids as well as tocopherols. This study was thus conducted to determine the oil and tocopherol components of grape seeds, obtained from various grape cultivars of different species, including two rootstock varieties. The grape seed oil concentration of the studied varieties ranged from 7.3 to 22.4%. The determined fatty acid profiles of the genotypes conformed to the pattern described in the literature for grapes. Linoleic acid is the major component comprising 53.6-69.6% of the total, followed by oleic (16.2-31.2%), palmitic (6.9-12.9%) and stearic (1.44-4.69%). The oils of all the seeds analysed showed a preponderance of α-tocopherol (ranging from 260.5 to 153.1 mg kg⁻¹ oil extract). β-Tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and δ-tocopherol were also detected with the general means of 0.98, 22.2 and 0.92 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. Linoleic acid showed a significantly negative correlation with all the fatty acids analysed. The strongest negative correlation existed between linoleic and oleic acids (r = -0.834, P grape seed show great variation among the genotypes. Markedly higher proportions of linoleic acid with considerable amounts of tocopherols found in the oil samples suggest that grape seed is a good source for culinary, pharmaceutical and cosmetic uses. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Effect of Vegetable Oil Fortified Feeds on the Content of Fatty Acids in Breast and Thigh Muscles in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Krejčí-Treu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to compare the effect of six vegetable oils added to feeding mixtures that were administered to broiler chickens on the content of major fatty acids in chicken meat. The experiment started with 90 one-day-old Ross 308 meat hybrid male chickens that were divided into six groups. Chickens were fed complete feeding mixtures for the prefattening (BR1, fattening (BR2, and post-fattening (BR3 of broiler chickens. The BR1 feeding mixture was administered to chickens aged 1-10 days, the BR2 feeding mixture was given from Day 11 to Day 30, and the BR3 feeding mixture was then administered until Day 42. The BR1 feeding mixture that was administered to all six groups during the first ten days of the experiment was supplemented with soybean oil. BR2 and BR3 feeding mixtures used to feed chickens aged 11-42 days were fortified with soybean oil (SO Group, rapeseed oil (RO Group, sunflower oil (SFO Group, flaxseed oil (FO Group, olive oil (OO Group, and evening primrose oil (EPO Group. The vegetable oils used differed by the composition of fatty acids, particularly by the content of oleic acid, linoleic acid, α-linolenic acid. The use of the above-described experimental diets in young broilers from Day 11 to 42 had a significant effect on the content of fatty acids in the fat from breast and thigh muscles. The content of α-linolenic acid in breast and thigh muscles of broilers that received the feed containing flaxseed oil (21.16 g/100 g of oil and 17.13 g/100 g of oil, respectively significantly increased (p ⪬ 0.01. The highest content of linoleic acid (p ⪬ 0.01 in breast and thigh muscles was found in chickens that were fed the feed containing primrose oil (59.13 g/100 g and 51.71 g/100 g. A significant increase (p ⪬ 0.01 in the level of oleic acid was detected in both breast and thigh muscles of broilers that received olive oil fortified feed (52.44 g/100 g and 43.70 g/100 g of oil. No significant variation was

  6. Identification and characterization of single nucleotide polymorphism markers in FADS2 gene associated with olive oil fatty acids composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Rayda Ben; Ennouri, Karim; Hlima, Hajer Ben; Smaoui, Slim; Hanana, Mohsen; Mzid, Rim; Ercişli, Sezai; Rebai, Ahmed

    2017-07-12

    Genotyping of the FAD2.1 and FAD2.3 polymorphisms in the fatty acid desaturase 2 gene (FADS2) shows that they are associated with the fatty acids composition of olive oil samples. However, these associations require further confirmation in the Tunisian olive oil cultivars, and little is known about the effect of polymorphisms in fatty acid-related genes on olive oil mono- and poly- unsaturated fatty acids distribution. A set of olive oils from 12 Tunisian cultivars was chosen. The fatty acid composition of each olive oil sample was determined by gas chromatography. Statistical and modeling Bayesian analyses were used to assess whether the FAD2.1 and FAD2.3 genotypes were associated with fatty acids composition. The TT-FAD2.1 and the GG-FAD2.3 genotypes were found to be associated with a lower proportion of oleic acid (C18:1) (r = -0.778, p = 0.003; r = -0.781, p= 0.003) as well as higher proportion of linoleic (C18:2) (r = 0.693, p = 0.012; r = -0.759, p= 0.004) and palmitic acids (C16:0) (r = 0.643, p = 0.024; r = -0.503, p= 0.095), making varieties with this haplotype (i.e. Chemlali Sfax and Meski) producing more saturated (C16: 0) and polyunsaturated acids than oleic acid. The latter plays a major role in preventing several diseases. The two associations FADS2 FAD2.1 and FADS2 FAD2.3 with the fatty acid compositions of olive oil samples were identified among the studied olive cultivars. These associations differed between studied cultivars, which might explain variability in lipidic composition among them and consequently reflecting genetic diversity through differences in gene expression and biochemical pathways. FADS2 locus would constitute thus a good marker for detecting interesting lipidic chemotypes among commercial olive oils.

  7. Effect of dietary inclusion of lampante olive oil on milk and cheese fatty acid profiles of ewes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E.; Vera, R. R.; Aguilar, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of a dietary supplementation of lampant olive oil on the fatty aid profiles of the milk and cheese of ewes. Nine lactating ewes were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Dietary treatments were supplemented with 0 (control; T0), 36 (T1...... as the concentration of lampante olive oil was increased in dietary rations. Overall, the supplementation of lampante olive oil in the diets of lactating ewes increased monounsaturated FA and decreased saturated FA concentrations in milk and cheese, thus improving their quality from the human health standpoint....

  8. Neutral lipid biosynthesis in engineered Escherichia coli: jojoba oil-like wax esters and fatty acid butyl esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Luftmann, Heinrich; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2006-02-01

    Wax esters are esters of long-chain fatty acids and long-chain fatty alcohols which are of considerable commercial importance and are produced on a scale of 3 million tons per year. The oil from the jojoba plant (Simmondsia chinensis) is the main biological source of wax esters. Although it has a multitude of potential applications, the use of jojoba oil is restricted, due to its high price. In this study, we describe the establishment of heterologous wax ester biosynthesis in a recombinant Escherichia coli strain by coexpression of a fatty alcohol-producing bifunctional acyl-coenzyme A reductase from the jojoba plant and a bacterial wax ester synthase from Acinetobacter baylyi strain ADP1, catalyzing the esterification of fatty alcohols and coenzyme A thioesters of fatty acids. In the presence of oleate, jojoba oil-like wax esters such as palmityl oleate, palmityl palmitoleate, and oleyl oleate were produced, amounting to up to ca. 1% of the cellular dry weight. In addition to wax esters, fatty acid butyl esters were unexpectedly observed in the presence of oleate. The latter could be attributed to solvent residues of 1-butanol present in the medium component, Bacto tryptone. Neutral lipids produced in recombinant E. coli were accumulated as intracytoplasmic inclusions, demonstrating that the formation and structural integrity of bacterial lipid bodies do not require specific structural proteins. This is the first report on substantial biosynthesis and accumulation of neutral lipids in E. coli, which might open new perspectives for the biotechnological production of cheap jojoba oil equivalents from inexpensive resources employing recombinant microorganisms.

  9. Effects of dietary cottonseed oil and tannin supplements on protein and fatty acid composition of bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianita, Aprianita; Donkor, Osaana N; Moate, Peter J; Williams, S Richard O; Auldist, Martin J; Greenwood, Jae S; Hannah, Murray C; Wales, William J; Vasiljevic, Todor

    2014-05-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of diets supplemented with cottonseed oil, Acacia mearnsii-condensed tannin extract, and a combination of both on composition of bovine milk. Treatment diets included addition of cottonseed oil (800 g/d; CSO), condensed tannin from Acacia mearnsii (400 g/d; TAN) or a combination of cottonseed oil (800 g/d) and condensed tannin (400 g/d; CPT) with a diet consisting of 6·0 kg dry matter (DM) of concentrates and alfalfa hay ad libitum, which also served as the control diet (CON). Relative to the CON diet, feeding CSO and CPT diets had a minor impact on feed intake and yield of lactose in milk. These diets increased yields of milk and protein in milk. In contrast to the TAN diet, the CSO and CPT diets significantly decreased milk fat concentration and altered milk fatty acid composition by decreasing the proportion of saturated fatty acids but increasing proportions of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids. The CPT diet had a similar effect to the CSO diet in modifying fatty acid profile. Overall, reduction in milk fat concentration and changes in milk fatty acid profile were probably due to supplementation of linoleic acid-rich cottonseed oil. The TAN diet had no effect on feed intake, milk yield and milk protein concentration. However, a reduction in the yields of protein and lactose occurred when cows were fed this diet. Supplemented tannin had no significant effect on fat concentration and changes in fatty acid profile in milk. All supplemented diets did not affect protein concentration or composition, nitrogen concentration, or casein to total protein ratio of the resulting milk.

  10. Preparation of interesterified plastic fats from fats and oils free of trans fatty acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C; Himmelsbach, David S; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2008-06-11

    Interesterified plastic fats were produced with trans-free substrates of fully hydrogenated soybean oil, extra virgin olive oil, and palm stearin in a weight ratio of 10:20:70, 10:40:50, and 10:50:40, respectively, by lipase catalysis. The major fatty acids of the products were palmitic (32.2-47.4%), stearic (12.0-12.4%), and oleic acid (33.6-49.5%). After storage at 5 degrees C (refrigerator temperature) or 24 degrees C (room temperature) for 16 h, the physical properties were evaluated for solid fat content, texture, melting, and crystallization behavior, viscoelastic properties, crystal polymorphism, and crystal microstructure. The interesterified fats contained desirable crystal polymorphs (beta' form) as determined by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. They exhibited a wide plastic range of solid fat content of 52-58% at 10 degrees C and 15% at 40 degrees C. The physical properties were influenced by the ratio of palm stearin and olive oil. Harder and more brittle texture, crystallization and melting at higher temperature, higher solid fat contents, and more elastic (G') or viscous (G') characteristics were observed in the produced fats containing a higher content of palm stearin and lower content of olive oil. The produced fats stored at 5 degrees C consisted mostly of beta' form crystal together with a small content of beta form, while those at 24 degrees C had only beta' form. The produced fat with a higher amount of palm stearin appeared to have more beta' form crystal and small size crystal clusters. Thus, the physical properties of the produced plastic fats may be desirable for use in a bakery product.

  11. Effect of micella interesterification on fatty acids composition and volatile components of soybean and rapeseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifi, Sherine M.

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Micella interesterification of soybean and rapeseed oils was carried out using 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 percentages of nickel catalyst, each at different temperatures of 60, 90 and 120ºC for 2, 4, and 6 hours. The proposed interesterification reaction conditions to obtain an oil with low linoleic acid level were 0.2 % nickel catalyst at 120ºC for 4 hours, 0.4% nickel catalyst at 90ºC for 4 hours and 0.6% at 60ºC for 4 hours. Fatty acid composition and chemical analysis of the interesterified and non-esterified oils were estimated. Selected samples undergo heating at 180ºC for 4 hours determining the volatile components. The appearance of some components supported the interesterification process for modification of fatty acid constituents of the oils.Se ha llevado a cabo la interesterificación en fase miscelar de aceites de soja y de colza usando un 0.2%, 0.4% y 0.6% de níquel como catalizador, a diferentes temperaturas (60, 90 y 120ºC durante 2, 4 y 6 horas. Las condiciones de reacción de interesterificación propuestas para obtener un aceite con niveles de ácidos linolénicos bajos fueron 0.2 % de níquel a 120ºC durante 4 horas, 0.4 % de níquel a 90ºC durante 4 horas y 0.6 % a 60ºC durante 4 horas. Se han estimado la composición en ácidos grasos y el análisis químico de los aceites interesterificados y no-esterificados. Las muestras seleccionadas se sometieron a calentamiento a 180ºC durante 4 horas determinando los componentes volátiles. La aparición de algunos componentes apoyó el proceso de interesterificación por modificación de los ácidos grasos constituyentes de los aceites.

  12. An Intensified Esterification Process of Palm Oil Fatty Acid Distillate Catalyzed by Delipidated Rice Bran Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fui Chin Chong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An intensified esterification process was operated by circulating 10 l of reaction mixtures, consisting of palm oil fatty acid distillate (PFAD and glycerol in hexane, through a packed-bed reactor (PBR filled with 10 kg of delipidated rice bran lipase (RBL. The influence of the process parameters, such as reaction temperature and type of water-removal agent, on the performance of this intensified esterification process were investigated. The highest degree of esterification (61% was achieved at a reaction temperature of 65°C, using silica gels as the water-removal agent. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC analysis showed that the major composition of the esterified product was diacylglycerol.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of odour-active methionyl esters of fatty acids via esterification and transesterification of butter oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Sun, Jingcan; Fu, Caili; Yu, Bin; Liu, Shao Quan; Li, Tianhu; Huang, Dejian

    2014-02-15

    Methionol-derived fatty acid esters were synthesised by both chemical and lipase catalysed esterification between fatty acids and methionol. Beneficial effects of both methods were compared qualitatively and quantitatively by GC-MS/GC-FID results. And the high acid and heat stability of our designed methionyl esters meet the requirement of the food industry. Most importantly, the sensory test showed that fatty acid carbon-chain length had an important effect on the flavour attributes of methionyl esters. Moreover, through Lipozyme TL IM-mediated transesterification, valuable methionol-derived esters were synthesised from the readily available natural material butter oil as the fatty acid source. The conversion of methionol and yield of each methionyl ester were also elucidated by GC-MS-FID. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Olives and olive oil are sources of electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fazzari

    Full Text Available Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO and olives, key sources of unsaturated fatty acids in the Mediterranean diet, provide health benefits to humans. Nitric oxide (•NO and nitrite (NO2 (--dependent reactions of unsaturated fatty acids yield electrophilic nitroalkene derivatives (NO2-FA that manifest salutary pleiotropic cell signaling responses in mammals. Herein, the endogenous presence of NO2-FA in both EVOO and fresh olives was demonstrated by mass spectrometry. The electrophilic nature of these species was affirmed by the detection of significant levels of protein cysteine adducts of nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA-cysteine in fresh olives, especially in the peel. Further nitration of EVOO by NO2 (- under acidic gastric digestive conditions revealed that human consumption of olive lipids will produce additional nitro-conjugated linoleic acid (NO2-cLA and nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA. The presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FA in both mammalian and plant lipids further affirm a role for these species as signaling mediators. Since NO2-FA instigate adaptive anti-inflammatory gene expression and metabolic responses, these redox-derived metabolites may contribute to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet.

  15. Olives and olive oil are sources of electrophilic fatty acid nitroalkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzari, Marco; Trostchansky, Andrés; Schopfer, Francisco J; Salvatore, Sonia R; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Vitturi, Dario; Valderrama, Raquel; Barroso, Juan B; Radi, Rafael; Freeman, Bruce A; Rubbo, Homero

    2014-01-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and olives, key sources of unsaturated fatty acids in the Mediterranean diet, provide health benefits to humans. Nitric oxide (•NO) and nitrite (NO2 (-))-dependent reactions of unsaturated fatty acids yield electrophilic nitroalkene derivatives (NO2-FA) that manifest salutary pleiotropic cell signaling responses in mammals. Herein, the endogenous presence of NO2-FA in both EVOO and fresh olives was demonstrated by mass spectrometry. The electrophilic nature of these species was affirmed by the detection of significant levels of protein cysteine adducts of nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA-cysteine) in fresh olives, especially in the peel. Further nitration of EVOO by NO2 (-) under acidic gastric digestive conditions revealed that human consumption of olive lipids will produce additional nitro-conjugated linoleic acid (NO2-cLA) and nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA). The presence of free and protein-adducted NO2-FA in both mammalian and plant lipids further affirm a role for these species as signaling mediators. Since NO2-FA instigate adaptive anti-inflammatory gene expression and metabolic responses, these redox-derived metabolites may contribute to the cardiovascular benefits associated with the Mediterranean diet.

  16. Butter blend containing fish oil improves the level of n-3 fatty acids in biological tissues of hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsgaard, Trine; Overgaard, Julie; Krogh, Anne Louise; Jensen, Mette Behrmann; Guo, Zheng; Mu, Huiling

    2007-09-05

    Many studies have shown beneficial effects of long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on human health. Regardless of the positive effects of n-3 PUFA, the intake of these fatty acids remains low. An approach to increase the intake of n-3 PUFA in the population is to incorporate fish oil into food. In the present study, fish oil was incorporated into butter blends by enzymatic interesterification. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of this butter product in comparison with a commercial butter blend and a product produced by interesterification but without fish oil. Golden Syrian hamsters received hamster feed blended with one of the three butter products. After 6 weeks of feeding, the fatty acid compositions of plasma, erythrocytes, liver, brain, and visceral fat were determined. The intake of butter product with fish oil resulted in a higher level of n-3 PUFA in plasma, erythrocytes, and liver. The incorporation of n-3 PUFA was significantly higher in phospholipids than in triacylglycerols. The results suggest that enriching butter blends with small amounts of fish oil can be used as an alternative method for improving the level of n-3 PUFA in biological tissues.

  17. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Three Oil Palm Fruit and Seed Tissues That Differ in Oil Content and Fatty Acid Composition1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussert, Stéphane; Guerin, Chloé; Andersson, Mariette; Joët, Thierry; Tranbarger, Timothy J.; Pizot, Maxime; Sarah, Gautier; Omore, Alphonse; Durand-Gasselin, Tristan; Morcillo, Fabienne

    2013-01-01

    Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) produces two oils of major economic importance, commonly referred to as palm oil and palm kernel oil, extracted from the mesocarp and the endosperm, respectively. While lauric acid predominates in endosperm oil, the major fatty acids (FAs) of mesocarp oil are palmitic and oleic acids. The oil palm embryo also stores oil, which contains a significant proportion of linoleic acid. In addition, the three tissues display high variation for oil content at maturity. To gain insight into the mechanisms that govern such differences in oil content and FA composition, tissue transcriptome and lipid composition were compared during development. The contribution of the cytosolic and plastidial glycolytic routes differed markedly between the mesocarp and seed tissues, but transcriptional patterns of genes involved in the conversion of sucrose to pyruvate were not related to variations for oil content. Accumulation of lauric acid relied on the dramatic up-regulation of a specialized acyl-acyl carrier protein thioesterase paralog and the concerted recruitment of specific isoforms of triacylglycerol assembly enzymes. Three paralogs of the WRINKLED1 (WRI1) transcription factor were identified, of which EgWRI1-1 and EgWRI1-2 were massively transcribed during oil deposition in the mesocarp and the endosperm, respectively. None of the three WRI1 paralogs were detected in the embryo. The transcription level of FA synthesis genes correlated with the amount of WRI1 transcripts and oil content. Changes in triacylglycerol content and FA composition of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infiltrated with various combinations of WRI1 and FatB paralogs from oil palm validated functions inferred from transcriptome analysis. PMID:23735505

  18. Trans fatty acids: chemical synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid isomers and detection in rats fed a deodorized fish oil diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Carla; Grabovskiy, Stanislav A; Aoun, Manar; Melchiorre, Michele; Kabal'nova, Natalia; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Fouret, Gilles; Coudray, Charles; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos

    2012-03-19

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in fish oils used for omega-3 enriched diets. The natural cis double bond geometry can be transformed to the trans configuration during the deodorization process utilized in the food industry. The analytical discrimination of the possible five monotrans regioisomers represents a limiting step for the recognition and structure-activity relationship in connection with the harmful effects of trans fatty acids in health. We carried out a dual synthetic strategy, providing new access to monotrans EPA isomers and valuable information on GC and NMR characteristics for further applications in metabolomics and lipidomics. This small library was used as an analytical reference for isomer determination in deodorized fish oils and the follow-up of rats fed fish oil diets, evidencing for the first time that monotrans EPA isomers are incorporated in liver mitochondrial membranes after dietary intake. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  19. [The fatty acid composition of ordinary flax seed oil (Linum usitatissimum L.) cultivated in Georgia and its byological activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakilashvili, B Iu; Zurabashvili, D Z; Turabelidze, D G; Shanidze, L A; Parulava, G K

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was individual quantitatively and qualitatively determination of fatty acids in ordinary flax seed oil (Linum usitatissimum L.), cultivated in Georgia. The neutral lipids extracts were fractionated and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (PTC-1, Waters) with refractory detector R-401. Analitical column (150,0x3,0 mm) was filled with reversphase Bondopak C18). Software OASIS-740 is used. The correction retention times of each fatty acids is compared with comformity standard. The investigation showed that in flax seed oil linoleic (31,3±2,1 mg%) and linolenic (40,2±2,9 mg%) acids were predominant and together constitute principal basic of research composition. The flax seed oil contained also palmitic and stearic acids in less quantitaty.

  20. Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction of Raspberry Seed Oil and Evaluation of Its Physicochemical Properties, Fatty Acid Compositions and Antioxidant Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Hui; Chen, Lei; Huang, Qun; Wang, Jinli; Lin, Qiyang; Liu, Mingxin; Lee, Won Young; Song, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted extraction was employed for highly efficient separation of aroma oil from raspberry seeds. A central composite design with two variables and five levels was employed and effects of process variables of sonication time and extraction temperature on oil recovery and quality were investigated. Optimal conditions predicted by response surface methodology were sonication time of 37 min and extraction temperature of 54°C. Specifically, ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) was able to provide a higher content of beneficial unsaturated fatty acids, whereas conventional Soxhlet extraction (SE) resulted in a higher amount of saturated fatty acids. Moreover, raspberry seed oil contained abundant amounts of edible linoleic acid and linolenic acid, which suggest raspberry seeds could be valuable edible sources of natural γ-linolenic acid products. In comparison with SE, UAE exerted higher free radical scavenging capacities. In addition, UAE significantly blocked H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation.

  1. Ultrasonic-Assisted Extraction of Raspberry Seed Oil and Evaluation of Its Physicochemical Properties, Fatty Acid Compositions and Antioxidant Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Teng

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic-assisted extraction was employed for highly efficient separation of aroma oil from raspberry seeds. A central composite design with two variables and five levels was employed and effects of process variables of sonication time and extraction temperature on oil recovery and quality were investigated. Optimal conditions predicted by response surface methodology were sonication time of 37 min and extraction temperature of 54°C. Specifically, ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE was able to provide a higher content of beneficial unsaturated fatty acids, whereas conventional Soxhlet extraction (SE resulted in a higher amount of saturated fatty acids. Moreover, raspberry seed oil contained abundant amounts of edible linoleic acid and linolenic acid, which suggest raspberry seeds could be valuable edible sources of natural γ-linolenic acid products. In comparison with SE, UAE exerted higher free radical scavenging capacities. In addition, UAE significantly blocked H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation.

  2. Effect of heating/reheating of fats/oils, as used by Asian Indians, on trans fatty acid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Swati; Passi, Santosh Jain; Misra, Anoop; Pant, Kamal K; Anwar, Khalid; Pandey, R M; Kardam, Vikas

    2016-12-01

    Heating/frying and reuse of edible fats/oils induces chemical changes such as formation of trans fatty acids (TFAs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of heating/frying on formation of TFAs in fats/oils. Using gas chromatography with flame ionisation detector, TFA was estimated in six commonly used fat/oils in India (refined soybean oil, groundnut oil, olive oil, rapeseed oil, clarified butter, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil), before and after subjecting them to heating/frying at 180°C and 220°C. All six fats/oils subjected to heating/frying demonstrated an increase in TFAs (poils (after subjecting to heating/reheating) ranged between 2.30±0.89g/100g and 4.5±1.43g/100g; amongst edible fats it ranged between 2.60±0.38g/100g and 5.96±1.94g/100g. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups (heating and frying; p=0.892). Considering the undesirable health effects of TFA, appropriate guidelines for heating/re-frying of edible fats/oils by Asian Indians should be devised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of oil extraction assisted by ultrasound on the physicochemical properties and fatty acid profile of pumpkin seed oil (Cucurbita pepo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Santos, Betsabé; Rodríguez-Miranda, Jesús; Herman-Lara, Erasmo; Torruco-Uco, Juan G; Carmona-García, Roselis; Juárez-Barrientos, José M; Chávez-Zamudio, Rubí; Martínez-Sánchez, Cecilia E

    2016-07-01

    The effects of amplitude and time of ultrasound-assisted extraction on the physicochemical properties and the fatty acid profile of pumpkin seed oil (Cucurbita pepo) were evaluated. Ultrasound time (5-30 min) and the response variables amplitude (25-100%), extraction yield, efficiency, oxidative stability in terms of the free fatty acids (FFA) of the plant design comprising two independent experiments variables, peroxide (PV), p-anisidine (AV), totox value (TV) and the fatty acid profile were evaluated. The results were analyzed by multiple linear regression. The time and amplitude showed significant differences (P<0.05) for all variables. The highest yield of extraction was achieved at 5 min and amplitude of 62.5% (62%). However, the optimal ultrasound-assisted extraction conditions were as follows: ultrasound time of 26.34 min and amplitude of 89.02%. All extracts showed low FFA (2.75-4.93% oleic acid), PV (1.67-4.68 meq/kg), AV (1.94-3.69) and TV (6.25-12.55) values. The main fatty acids in all the extracts were oleic and linoleic acid. Therefore, ultrasound-assisted oil extraction had increased performance and reduced extraction time without affecting the oil quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between seed size, protein and oil contents, and fatty acid composition in soybean genotypes

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    Maestri, Damián M.

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen soybean genotypes (Glycine max (L. Merrill with maturity groups IV, V, VI or VII were grown in 1995/96 at the Estación Experimental Agropecuaria (EEA-INTA of Manfredi and Marcos Juárez, Argentina. The aim of this research was to determine possible associations between seed size, protein and oil contents, and fatty composition. Seed size varied between 13.9-21.0 g/100 seeds. Protein and oil contents ranged from 331 to 448 and from 198 to 267 g kg-1, respectively, and showed no significant correlation with seed size. There were significant correlations between seed size and individual fatty adds: positive with stearic and oleic and negative with linoleic. The results obtained suggest that seed size and its relationship with individual fatty acids must be considered in soybean breeding programs.

    Se analizaron 18 genotipos de soja (Glycine max (L. Merrill con grupos de madurez IV, V, VI o VIl, cultivados en 1995/96 en la Estación Experimental Agropecuaria (EEA-INTA de Manfredi y Marcos Juárez, Argentina. El propósito de la investigación fue determinar posibles asociaciones entre el tamaño del grano, los contenidos de proteínas y aceite y la composición de ácidos grasos del mismo. El tamaño del grano varió entre 13.9-21.0 g/100 granos. Los porcentajes de proteínas y aceite estuvieron comprendidos entre 331-448 y entre 198-267 g kg-1 respectivamente, y no mostraron correlaciones significativas con el tamaño del grano. Se observaron correlaciones significativas entre el tamaño del grano y determinados ácidos grasos: positivas con esteárico y oleico y negativa con linoleico. Las asociaciones encontradas podrían ser de utilidad en programas de mejoramiento de soja.

  5. Fatty Acids Composition of Vegetable Oils and Its Contribution to Dietary Energy Intake and Dependence of Cardiovascular Mortality on Dietary Intake of Fatty Acids

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    Jana Orsavova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterizations of fatty acids composition in % of total methylester of fatty acids (FAMEs of fourteen vegetable oils—safflower, grape, silybum marianum, hemp, sunflower, wheat germ, pumpkin seed, sesame, rice bran, almond, rapeseed, peanut, olive, and coconut oil—were obtained by using gas chromatography (GC. Saturated (SFA, monounsaturated (MUFA and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, palmitic acid (C16:0; 4.6%–20.0%, oleic acid (C18:1; 6.2%–71.1% and linoleic acid (C18:2; 1.6%–79%, respectively, were found predominant. The nutritional aspect of analyzed oils was evaluated by determination of the energy contribution of SFAs (19.4%–695.7% ERDI, PUFAs (10.6%–786.8% ERDI, n-3 FAs (4.4%–117.1% ERDI and n-6 FAs (1.8%–959.2% ERDI, expressed in % ERDI of 1 g oil to energy recommended dietary intakes (ERDI for total fat (ERDI—37.7 kJ/g. The significant relationship between the reported data of total fat, SFAs, MUFAs and PUFAs intakes (% ERDI for adults and mortality caused by coronary heart diseases (CHD and cardiovascular diseases (CVD in twelve countries has not been confirmed by Spearman’s correlations.

  6. Comparison of geometrical isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids in selected commercially refined oils

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    Tasan, M.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Four different commercially refined vegetable oils were analyzed by capillary gas-liquid chromatography for their trans fatty acid contents. The results obtained showed that the total trans FA contents in refined sunflower, corn, soybean, and hazelnut oils were 0.68 ± 0.41, 0.51 ± 0.24, 1.27 ± 0.57, and 0.26 ± 0.07% of total FA, respectively. The total trans FA comprised isomers of the C18:1, C18:2 and C18:3 FA. Meanwhile, five brands of the refined sunflower oil and two brands of hazelnut oil contained no measurable amounts of total trans C18:3 acids. The total trans C18:2 acid was the predominant trans FA found in the refined sunflower and corn oils, while trans polyunsaturated FAs for the refined soybean oils were found at high levels. However, total trans C18:1 acid was the major trans FA for refined hazelnut oils. The commercially refined vegetable oils with a relatively high total polyunsaturated FA contained considerable amounts of trans polyunsaturated isomers. This study indicates that it is necessary to optimize industrial deodorization, especially the time and temperature, for each different FA composition of oil used.

    Cuatro aceites vegetales refinados comerciales diferentes fueron analizados por cromatografía de gases para determinar el contenido en ácidos grasos trans. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que el contenido total de los FA trans de aceites refinados de girasol, maíz, soja y avellana fueron 0.68 ± 0.41, 0.51 ± 0.24, 1.27 ± 0.57, y 0.26 ± 0.07% de FA totales, respetivamente. Los ácidos grasos totales trans comprenden a isómeros de FA C18:1, C18:2 y C18:3. Cinco marcas de aceites de girasol refinado y dos marcas de aceite de avellana contenían cantidades no medibles de ácidos trans C18:3 totales. Los ácidos C18:2 trans totales fueron los FA trans predominantes en el aceite de girasol y ma

  7. Yee-e-e-Haw!: Tall Tales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the characteristics of "tall tales." Fills in the historical background of tall tales, from the ancient myth of Gilgamesh to Baron Munchausen, the closest European progenitor of American tall tales. Opines that tall tales appear to have been created as a response to challenges posed by building a new nation. Lists 11…

  8. EFFECT OF CRUDE PALM OIL PROTECTION WITH FORMALDEHYDE ON HYDROGENATION OF RUMEN FLUID UNSATURATED FATTY ACID: ITS EFFECT ON BLOOD AND MEAT FATTY ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafly C. Tiven

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the effect of crude palm oil protected with formaldehyde on the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids in the rumen and its effect on blood and meat fatty acids. Fifteenth local male lambs aged 9-12 months weighing 14-17 kg, were divided into 3 groups ration treatment. The first group received only the basal ration (R0, the 2nd group received the basal ration and 3% CPO (R1, while the 3rd group received the basal ration and 3% CPO protected with 2% formaldehyde (R2. Basal feed consisted of 60% grass, 30% bran and 10% soybean meal, with the nutrient content of 62.98% TDN, 45.5% DM, 14.48% CP, 4.70% EE and 21.93% CF. Parameters observed were the fatty acid from rumen fluid, blood and meat of sheep. Data were analyzed by complete randomized design direction patterns. Differences between treatments were tested further using Duncan's New Multiple Range Test. The results showed that treatment of R2 can increase unsaturated fatty acids in the rumen, blood and meat (P

  9. Differential regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis in two Chlorella species in response to nitrate treatments and the potential of binary blending microalgae oils for biodiesel application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Thye San; Chen, Jian Woon; Goh, Eng Giap; Aziz, Ahmad; Loh, Saw Hong

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different nitrate concentrations in culture medium on oil content and fatty acid composition of Chlorella vulgaris (UMT-M1) and Chlorella sorokiniana (KS-MB2). Results showed that both species produced significant higher (pdifferentially regulated fatty acid accumulation patterns in response to nitrate treatments at early stationary growth phase. Their potential use for biodiesel application could be enhanced by exploring the concept of binary blending of the two microalgae oils using developed mathematical equations to calculate the oil mass blending ratio and simultaneously estimated the weight percentage (wt.%) of desirable fatty acid compositions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity and major fatty acid constituents of Amazonian native flora oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel da Silva Teixeira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to treat hyperpigmentation-related problems, there has been a global trend in developing cosmetics claiming to have skin-whitening properties, which act by inhibiting melanin biosynthesis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the in vitro mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity of five Amazonian native flora oils, and so to verify the possibility of their incorporation into cosmetic products. In addition, the fatty acid composition of the essential oils was determined by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection in order to determine the main components of these oils. The tyrosinase inhibitory activity of the tested oils was found to be in the following order: açaí (IA50 = 66.08 µg mL-1 > tucumã > patauá > pracaxi > castanha do Brasil. This study suggests that açaí oil has great potential in the treatment of hyperpigmentation and other related disorders, due to its considerable tyrosinase inhibitory activity.Com o intuito de se tratar problemas dermatológicos de hiperpigmentação, há uma tendência mundial no desenvolvimento de cosméticos que possuam propriedades despigmentantes, os quais agem inibindo a biossíntese de melanina. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar in vitro a atividade de inibição da tirosinase de cogumelo de cinco óleos de plantas nativas da Amazônia e, desta forma, verificar a possibilidade de sua incorporação em produtos cosméticos. Ainda, a composição de ácidos graxos dos óleos foi determinada por cromatografia gasosa com detecção por ionização de chama, no intuito de determinar os principais componentes destes óleos. A atividade de inibição da tirosinase dos óleos testados foi encontrada na seguinte ordem: açaí (IA50 = 66,08 µg mL-1 > tucumã > patauá > pracaxi > castanha do Brasil. Este estudo sugere que o óleo de açaí possui grande potencial para o tratamento da hiperpigmentação cutânea e doenças correlatas, devido à sua considerável atividade de inibi

  11. Determination of Fatty Acids Profile and Physicochemical Study of Sea Lettuce (Ulva lactuca Oil from Bushehr City Coasts

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    Soror Shaghuli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sea lettuce is a kind green alga with scientific name "Ulva lactuca", has many uses in many countries. With Notice to the presence of this alga in the coasts of Bushehr and its ease of propagation and cultivation, we can take advantage of beneficial interest. The objectives of this current study was to determine the amount of total fat, survey the quality and quantity of some physicochemical parameters and the profile of fatty acids in its oil. Materials and Methods: After samples collecting of sea lettuce (Sea lettuce from Bushehr coasts, sample preparation and extraction of fat, quantity of some physicochemical parameters according to AOAC method; and fatty acid profile were analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID. Results: The acidity index in extracted oil in Shoraye-shahr, Bandargah and Naftkesh regions were, 0.73, 0.73 and 0.72 respectively, and the peroxide value was 0.75, 0.74 and 0.75 respectively. The refractive index and average oil contents for all areas were reported 3 % and 1412, respectively. In the three mentioned regions, sixteen fatty acids including (C6, (C10, (C12, (C13, (C14, (C15, (C16, (C17, (C18, (C19, (C20, (C21, (C18: 1, (C18: 2, (C18: 3 were identified with different amounts. Palmitic acid had the highest levels in all three regions. Conclusion: Sea lettuce contains different fatty acids that each of them has different applications in food industry, medicine and cosmetics. The favorable amounts of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in the sea lettuce oil increase their nutritional importance. Caltivating of this beneficial alga is suggested due to the appropriate geographic climate of Bushehr.

  12. Fatty Acid Composition and Antioxidant Activity of Tea (Camellia sinensis L. Seed Oil Extracted by Optimized Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

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    Ping Xu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Seeds are another product in addition to leaves (raw materials for teas of tea (Camellia sinensis L. plant. The great increase of tea consumption in recent years raises the challenge of finding commercial applications for tea seeds. In the present study, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 extraction edible oil from tea seed was carried out, response surface methodology (RSM was used to optimize processing parameters including time (20–90 min, temperature (35–45 °C and pressure (50–90 MPa. The fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of the extracted oil was also investigated. The highest yield of oil (29.2 ± 0.6% was obtained under optimal SC-CO2 extraction conditions (45 °C, 89.7 min and 32 MPa, respectively, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05 than that (25.3 ± 1.0% given by Soxhlet extraction. Meanwhile, tea seed oil extracted by SC-CO2 contained approximately 80% unsaturated fatty acids and showed a much stronger scavenging ability on the DPPH radical than that extracted by Soxhlet. SC-CO2 is a promising alternative for efficient extraction of edible oil from tea seed. Moreover, tea seed oil extracted by SC-CO2 is highly edible and has good antioxidant activity, and therefore may play a potential role as a health-promoting food resource in human diets.

  13. Predicted changes in fatty acid intakes, plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease risk following replacement of trans fatty acid-containing soybean oil with application-appropriate alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Michael; Mensink, Ronald P; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Petersen, Barbara; Smith, Kim; Flickinger, Brent D

    2012-10-01

    The varied functional requirements satisfied by trans fatty acid (TFA)--containing oils constrains the selection of alternative fats and oils for use as potential replacements in specific food applications. We aimed to model the effects of replacing TFA-containing partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSBO) with application-appropriate alternatives on population fatty acid intakes, plasma lipids, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 24-hour dietary recalls for 1999-2002, we selected 25 food categories, accounting for 86 % of soybean oil (SBO) and 79 % of TFA intake for replacement modeling. Before modeling, those in the middle quintile had a mean PHSBO TFA intake of 1.2 % of energy. PHSBO replacement in applications requiring thermal stability by either low-linolenic acid SBO or mid-oleic, low-linolenic acid SBO decreased TFA intake by 0.3 % of energy and predicted CVD risk by 0.7-0.8 %. PHSBO replacement in applications requiring functional properties with palm-based oils reduced TFA intake by 0.8 % of energy, increased palmitic acid intake by 1.0 % of energy, and reduced predicted CVD risk by 0.4 %, whereas replacement with fully hydrogenated interesterified SBO reduced TFA intake by 0.7 % of energy, increased stearic acid intake by 1.0 % of energy, and decreased predicted CVD risk by 1.2 %. PHSBO replacement in both thermal and functional applications reduced TFA intake by 1.0 % of energy and predicted CVD risk by 1.5 %. Based solely on changes in plasma lipids and lipoproteins, all PHSBO replacement models reduced estimated CVD risk, albeit less than previously reported using simpler replacement models.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of a mixture of fatty acids isolated and purified from sugar cane wax oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledón, N; Casacó, A; Rodríguez, V; Cruz, J; González, R; Tolón, Z; Cano, M; Rojas, E

    2003-04-01

    The anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of FAM, a defined mixture of fatty acids isolated from sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum L.), was evaluated. Oral administration of this mixture showed anti-inflammatory activity in the cotton pellet granuloma assay and in the carrageenin-induced pleurisy test, both in rats, as well as in the peritoneal capillary permeability test in mice. In addition, FAM showed analgesic properties in the hot-plate model and in the acetic acid-induced writhings test, both in mice. In conclusion, these results provide evidence on the potential usefulness of the mixture of fatty acids from sugar cane wax oil in inflammatory disorders.

  15. Chemical Characterization and Oxidative Stability of Medium- and Long-Chain Fatty Acid Profiles in Tree-Borne Seed Oils

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    Da-Som Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate chemical characteristics and oxidative stability of tree-borne seed oils. A total of 15 different fatty acids were identified in six tree-borne seed oils, which included seven types of saturated fatty acids, four types of monounsaturated fatty acids, and four types of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Japanese camphor tree (JCT had a high content of medium-chain fatty acids (97.94 ± 0.04%, in which fatty acid composition was distinct from those of the other five plant seed oils. Overall, contents of tocopherols, a type of fat-soluble vitamin, ranged between 3.82 ± 0.04 mg/100 g and 101.98 ± 1.34 mg/100 g, respectively. Phytosterol contents ranged from 117.77 ± 1.32 mg/100 g to 479.45 ± 4.27 mg/100 g, respectively. Of all tree-borne seed oils, β-sitosterol was the phytosterol at the highest concentration. Contents of unsaponifiables were between 0.13 ± 0.08 and 2.01 ± 0.02, and values of acid, peroxide, and p-anisidine were between 0.79 ± 0.01 and 38.94 ± 0.24 mg KOH/g, 3.53 ± 0.21 and 127.67 ± 1.79 meq/kg, and 2.07 ± 0.51 and 9.67 ± 0.25, respectively. Oxidative stability of tree-borne seed oils was assessed through measurement of oxidation-induction periods. These results should serve as a foundation to identify the potential of tree-borne seed oils in industrial application as well as in providing fundamental data.

  16. Solvent Extraction and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Annona squamosa L. Seeds for Determination of Bioactives, Fatty Acid/Fatty Oil Composition, and Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Mohammad; Arif, Muhammad; Rahman, Md Akhlaquer; Singh, Kuldeep; Mujahid, Mohd

    2017-11-02

    The yield and fatty oil components of the seed kernels of Annona squamosa L. (Family: Annonaceae) were determined by solvent extraction method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Seeds were extracted with ethanol and further fractionated with n-hexane. The free radical-scavenging activities of both ethanolic and n-hexane fraction against 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) were determined by UV spectrophotometer at 517 nm. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of numerous bioactive compounds including steroids, flavonoids, terpenoids, fatty acids, and different types of ester compounds. The prevailing compounds found in ethanolic fraction were n-hexadecanoic acid (10.08%), heptadecene-(8)-carbonic acid-(1) (29.68%), octadecanoic acid (3.61%), 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl ester (5.14%), ergost-5-en-3-ol (3.68%), stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-ol (5.93%), and y-sitosterol (8.25%). Compounds found in n-hexane fraction were mainly n-hexadecanoic acid (14.42%), 9,12-octadecadienoic acid (2.87%), cis-vaccenic acid (10.39%), 9-octadecenoic acid (7.03%), hexadecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-1-(hydroxymethyl) ethyl ester (4%), 9-octadecenoic acid (Z)-, 2,3-dihydroxypropyl ester (13.33%), ergost-5-en-3-ol (4.04%), stigmasta-5,22-dien-3-ol, (3.beta.,22e) (6.07%), and y-sitosterol (10.87%). The crude fatty oil was converted into methyl esters and analyzed by GC-MS. Eleven compounds constituting 99.9% of the oil were identified. The presence of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in ethanolic and n-hexane fraction of A. squamosa seed extract justify the use of this plant to treat many ailments in folk and herbal medicine. Both the fractions have shown significant antioxidant activity. The presence of phenolic compounds and unsaturated fatty acids are reported as possible contributors for antioxidant activity of seed extract.

  17. Sensorial and fatty acid profile of ice cream manufactured with milk of crossbred cows fed palm oil and coconut fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, S A S; Madrona, G S; Visentainer, J V; Bonafe, E G; Carvalho, C B; Roche, P M; Prado, I N

    2014-11-01

    This work was carried out to study the nutritional quality of milk of cows fed palm oil (PAL) or coconut fat (COC), and the use of that milk as raw material for ice cream production. Three treatments were tested with 23 healthy cows: control (CON), PAL, and COC. The milk was collected at d 21 and 36 of the experimental diet. Proximate composition (moisture, ash, fat, protein, and carbohydrates) and fatty acid composition were evaluated on milk and ice cream, and sensorial analysis, color (lightness, green/red, and blue/yellow), overrun, and texture were evaluated on the ice cream. Fatty acids present in milk and ice cream were determined by gas chromatography. Sensory analysis results showed that the ice cream acceptability index was above 70%. No difference was observed for proximate composition in milk and ice cream. Chromatographic analysis showed an increase in saturated fatty acid concentration in CON and lower levels in PAL; polyunsaturated fatty acid concentration was higher in PAL and lower in CON, in milk and ice cream; monounsaturated fatty acid concentration in milk was higher in PAL and lower in CON but no difference was found in ice cream. Comparing n-3 content in milk and ice cream, we observed that PAL had higher levels than CON and COC. The results indicate that it is feasible to add sources of fat to the animal feed for fatty acid composition modulation of milk and ice cream. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  19. Adsorption of Free Fatty Acid (FFA) in Low-Grade Cooking Oil Used Activated Natural Zeolite as Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larasati Tres Ayu Putranti, Monika; Kompiang Wirawan, Sang; Made Bendiyasa, I.

    2018-01-01

    Adsorption of free fatty acid (FFA) in low-grade cooking oil using active natural zeolite adsorbent was done as an effort to improve the quality of low-grade cooking oil so that it can fulfill the standard of fried oil which has been set on SNI 01-3741-2013. Adsorption was carried out with natural zeolite which activated with HCl and NaOH solution followed by the calcination process. The results showed that the NaOH activated zeolite decreased FFA content in low-grade cooking oil more than the HCl activated natural zeolite, with optimum NaOH concentration was 0.75 M. In the adsorption equilibrium analysis with temperature variation (25 °C, 40 °C, 80 °C ), obtained that adsorption of FFA with NaOH activated natural zeolite follows Adsorption Isotherm Freundlich Model with equilibrium constant value was 20,5873; 0,9629 dan 0,8053.

  20. Sequential microwave-assisted extraction of oil from layer poultry feeds and GC-MS quantification of the fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahesar, S.A.; Sherazi, S.T.H.; Bhanger, M.I.; Abro, K.; Kandhro, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    The present study reports the effect of sequential microwave-assisted extraction (SeMAE) on fatty acids composition (FAC) of layer poultry feed oil as compared to conventional Soxhlet extraction (SE) method. The FAC of extracted oil was determined by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). There was no significant difference found in the amount of total extracted oil and FAC by SeMAE and SE. However, slightly greater content of trans fat in the samples revealed that SE lead to the formation of a little higher level of trans fat as compare to SeMAE. Therefore, the SeMAE could be used as a remarkable substitute to conventional SE for extraction of oil from the poultry feeds due to its faster speed, lesser solvent consumption, more environmental friendly. (author)

  1. Sequential Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Oil from Layer Poultry Feeds and GC-MS Quantification of the Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Mahesar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the effect of sequential microwave-assisted extraction (SeMAE on fatty acids composition (FAC of layer poultry feed oil as compared to conventional Soxhlet extraction (SE method. The FAC of extracted oil was determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS. There was no significant difference found in the amount of total extracted oil and FAC by SeMAE and SE. However, slightly greater content of trans fat in the samples revealed that SE lead to the formation of a little higher level of trans fat as compare to SeMAE. Therefore, the SeMAE could be used as a remarkable substitute to conventional SE for extraction of oil from the poultry feeds due to its faster speed, lesser solvent consumption, more environmental friendly.

  2. Milk fatty acid profile from grazing buffaloes fed a blend of soybean and linseed oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Gagliostro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the changes in milk fatty acid (FA profile of grazing buffaloes fed either low (L, 276g/d or high (H, 572g/d doses of a blend (70:30, wt/wt of soybean and linseed oils. Fourteen multiparous Mediterranean buffaloes grazing on a native pasture were fed 4 kg/day of a commercial concentrate containing no supplemental oil over a pre-experimental period of ten days. The baseline milk production and composition and milk FA profile were measured over the last three days. After this pre-experimental period the animals received the same concentrate added with either the L or H oil doses for 26 additional days. Milk yield (g/animal/day did not differ at the start (1776 ± 522 and 1662 ± 291 for L and H, respectively, P<0.622 or at the end of the trial (4590 ± 991 and 4847 ± 447 in L and H, respectively, P<0.543. Baseline milk fat content (g/kg averaged 77.1 (±20.5 in L and 74.3 (±9.9 in H (P<0.10 and was reduced (P<0.031 to 60.7 (±23.6 and 49.4 (±11.2 (P<0.0031 respectively after L and H with no differences between treatments (P<0.277. Baseline milk protein content (L=43.2 ± 3.4 and H= 44.3 ± 6.9g/kg increased after oil supplementation (P<0.0001 in both L (73.2 ± 6.0g/kg and H (68.4 ± 4.9g/kg without differences between oil doses (P<0.123. Milk fat content of 14:0 decreased after oil supplementation only in the H treatment (5.29 to 4.03, P<0.007 whereas that of 16:0 was reduced (P<0.001 at both L (24.49 to 19.75g/100g FA and H (25.92 to 19.17g/100g FA doses. The reduction of total content of 12:0 to 16:0 was higher (P<0.052 in H (32.02 to 23.93g/100g FA than L (30.17 to 25.45g/100g FA. Vaccenic acid content increased (P<0.001 from 5.70 to 13.24g/100g FA in L and from 5.25 to 16.77 in H, with higher results in the in H treatment (P<0.001. Baseline rumenic acid was sharply increased (P<0.001 in L (1.80 to 4.09g/100g FA, +127% and H (1.60 to 4.61g/100g FA, +187% with no differences between L and H (P<0

  3. The effect of dietary menhaden, olive, and coconut oil fed with three levels of vitamin E on plasma and liver lipids and plasma fatty acid composition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ali I.; Hussein, Ahmed S.; Bhathena, Sam J.; Hafez, Y S.

    2002-07-01

    The effect of dietary fats with varying degrees of unsaturation in the presence of different concentrations of vitamin E on tissue lipid levels was studied in rats. Rats were fed either menhaden oil, olive oil or coconut oil at 15% levels with either 0.1, 0.3 or 0.6 mg/g of vitamin E as alpha-tocopherol for four weeks. Rat serum and liver were analyzed for total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol and phospholipids. In addition, fatty acid composition of serum lipids was also analyzed. Serum total cholesterol and triacylglycerol were significantly lower in rats fed menhaden oil than in those fed olive or coconut oil, while the HDL-cholesterol was significantly higher in serum of rats fed menhaden and olive oil than in those fed coconut oil. Levels of vitamin E in the diet had only a significant effect on serum cholesterol and liver phospholipids. The Pearson correlation coefficient showed a significant positive relationship between serum triacylglycerol and total cholesterol, and a negative correlation between triacylglycerol and HDL-cholesterol, and between total and HDL-cholesterol.In the liver, total cholesterol was significantly higher in rats fed coconut oil than in rats fed menhaden oil. Total liver phospholipids were lower in rats fed either coconut oil or olive oil compared to those fed menhaden oil, especially with higher levels of vitamin E intake. Higher levels of vitamin E in the diet appear to increase triacylglycerol and phospholipids in livers of rats fed menhaden oil. In the liver a significant negative correlation was observed between phospholipids and cholesterol. The type and degree of unsaturation (polyunsaturated fatty acids in menhaden oil, monounsaturated fatty acids in olive oil and saturated fatty acids in coconut oil) significantly affected plasma and tissue lipids.

  4. Component Fatty Acid And Mineral Composition Of Rice Bran Oil Extracted By Multistage With Hexane And Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajriyati Masud

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rice bran oil RBO has been extracted from Celebes rice bran by multistage extraction with hexane solvent followed by ethanol to see the component profile of fatty acids and mineral contained in both of them. As a comparison RBO directly extracted with ethanol was also presented. Extraction process was performed using reflux method at 55oC for 5 hours with bran and solvent ratio of 17. Analysis of components and fatty acids of RBO was conducted with GC-MS QP 2010 Shimadzu. Oleic linoleic and palmitic were found dominant in first stage extraction by hexane with concentration of 3716.56 1630.78 and 1021.89 mgL respectively. Palmitic 6.34 mgL lauric 4.78 mgL and linoleic 3.52 mgL were dominant in the second stage extraction by ethanol. Linoleic 28.85 mgL stearic 2.88 mgL and myristic 2.02 mgL were found in extracted directly by ethanol. RBO extracted with hexane had 18.6 of saturated fatty acid and 81.4 of unsaturated fatty acids with ratio of saturated fatty acids monounsaturated fatty acids polyunsaturated fatty acids of approximately 1 2.3 1.3. It contained about 56.7 of monounsaturated 24.7 of polyunsaturated and 18.6 of saturated fatty acids. In the present paper we provide also an analysis of mineral composition of RBO by X-ray Spectrometer and melting point of RBO by Differential Scanning Calorimeter DSC instrument.

  5. Enzymatic modification of phosphatidylcholine with n-3 PUFA from silkworm oil fatty acids

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    Shanker Kaki, Shiva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Linolenic acid (ALA containing phosphatidylcholine (PC was prepared by an enzymatic method employing natural substrates comprising of egg and eri silkworm oil. Eri silkworm oil extracted from eri pupae was saponified to obtain the fatty acid mixture which was further subjected to urea complexation to obtain an ALA rich fraction with a purity of about 93%. Transesterification of PC with the ALA rich fraction with three immobilized lipases namely Lipozyme TL IM, Lipozyme RM IM and lipase from Candida Antarcticaz showed that only the lipase from Candida antarctica was successful for the incorporation of ALA into egg yolk PC. It was found that ALA was incorporated by up to 27% in the sn-1 position of egg PC and the positional distribution analysis of fatty acids in the modified PC showed that the sn-1 position was found to contain about 59% ALA.El ácido α-linolénico (ALA contenido en fosfatidilcolina (PC se preparó mediante un método enzimático empleando sustratos naturales que comprenden huevo y aceite de gusanos de seda. El aceite extraído de las crisálidas de gusanos de seda se saponificó para obtener la mezcla de ácidos grasos que se sometió a complejación con urea para obtener la fracción rica en ALA, con una pureza aproximadamente del 93%. La transesterificación de PC con fracción rica en ALA con tres lipasas inmovilizadas, Lipozyme TL IM, Lipozyme RM IM y lipasa de Candida antárctica, mostró que sólo la lipasa de Candida antarctica tuvo éxito en la incorporación de ALA en PC de yema de huevo. Se encontró que el ALA fue incorporado hasta 27% en la posición sn-1 de PC de huevo y el análisis de la distribución de los ácidos grasos en PC modificado mostró que la posición sn-1 que contenía aproximadamente 59% de ALA.

  6. Compositional Shift in Fatty Acid Profiles of Lipids Obtained from Oleaginous Yeasts upon the Addition of Essential Oil from Citrus sinensis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uprety, Bijaya K; Rakshit, Sudip K

    2017-12-01

    Tailoring lipids from oleaginous yeasts to contain specific types of fatty acid is of considerable interest to food, fuel, and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, the essential oil obtained from Citrus sinesus L. has been used to alter the fatty acid composition of two common oleaginous yeasts, Rhodosporidium toruloides and Cryptococcus curvatus. With increasing levels of essential oil in the medium, the metabolic flux of the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway shifted towards saturated fatty acid production. Essential oil reduced the activities of elongase and ∆9 desaturase. This made the lipid obtained from both these yeasts rich in saturated fatty acids. At certain specific concentrations of the essential oil in the medium, the lipid obtained from R. toruloides and C. curvatus cultures was similar to mahuwa butter and palm oil, respectively. Limonene is the major constituents of orange essential oil. Its effect on one of the oleaginous yeasts, R. toruloides, was also studied separately. Effects similar to orange essential oil were obtained with limonene. Thus, we can conclude that limonene in orange essential oil brings about compositional change of microbial lipid produced in this organism.

  7. Fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of oils from two cultivars of Cantaloupe extracted by supercritical fluid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.; Mariod, A.; Bagalkotkar, G.; Ling, H. S

    2010-07-01

    The effect of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) fractionation of three oil fractions (1st, 2nd, 3rd fraction) on the fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of oils from two cultivars of cantaloupe were investigated. Rock melon oil (RMO) and Golden Langkawi oil (GLO) were extracted using SFE and the major fatty acids for both cultivars were linoleic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic acid. The SFA decreased from 15.78 to 14.14% in RMO 1st fraction, and MUFA decreased from 18.30 to 16.56% in RMO 2nd fraction, while PUFA increased from 65.9 to 69.30% in RMO 3rd fraction. On the other hand SFA decreased from 16.35 to 13.91% in GLO 1{sup s}t fraction, and MUFA decreased from 17.50 to 15.57% in GLO 2nd fraction, while PUFA increased from 66.15 to 70.52% in GLO 3rd fraction. The different fractions of the two oils showed high antioxidant activity in reducing the oxidation of {beta}-carotene in beta-carotene bleaching assay (BCB) and the quenching of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). (Author) 41 refs.

  8. Fish oil regulates blood fatty acid composition and oxylipin levels in healthy humans: A comparison of young and older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulyniak, Michael A; Roke, Kaitlin; Gerling, Christopher; Logan, Samantha L; Spriet, Lawrence L; Mutch, David M

    2016-03-01

    Increased consumption of fish oils rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with improved cardiometabolic health and inflammatory status; however, age-related responses remain poorly described. In a placebo-controlled study, healthy young and older men consumed five fish oil capsules daily, providing 2.0 g/d EPA and 1.0g/d DHA, for three months. Both young and older men experienced a ∼30% reduction in blood triglycerides with fish oil supplementation. A significant group × time interaction was observed for DHA, with young men experiencing a ∼twofold increase in DHA in serum and RBCs, while older men showed negligible increases. Other fatty acids were differentially regulated between young and older men, most notably osbond acid and several saturates. Small changes were observed in serum oxylipins, with both groups of men responding similarly: 5-HETE was reduced, while PGF2α and 17-HDoHE were increased. Changes in oxylipins occurred independent of changes in whole blood expression of key genes regulating oxylipin production. Our study suggests that both young and older men experience the triglyceride-lowering benefits associated with fish oil supplements, but show differential responses in blood fatty acids. Additionally, fish oil promotes an improved oxylipin profile in both groups of men. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Animal performance and milk fatty acid profile of dairy goats fed diets with different unsaturated plant oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Marín, A L; Gómez-Cortés, P; Gómez Castro, A G; Juárez, M; Pérez Alba, L M; Pérez Hernández, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2011-11-01

    The effect of supplementing a basal diet with 1 of 3 plant oils on productive efficiency and milk fatty acid composition was studied in dairy goats. Sixteen Malagueña goats were used in a 4×4 Latin square experiment with 21-d periods and 4 goats per treatment. The basal diet comprised 30% alfalfa hay and 70% pelleted concentrate. Experimental treatments were control (basal diet without added oil) and the basal diet supplemented with 48g/d of high oleic sunflower oil (HOSFO), regular sunflower oil (RSFO), or linseed oil (LO). Dry matter intake and body weight were not affected by treatments. Milk production was higher in HOSFO treatment and milk fat content was higher in RSFO and LO treatments, although no differences in milk energy production or milk renneting properties were found. The RSFO and LO treatments increased the proportion of vaccenic acid in milk fat more so than the HOSFO diet, and rumenic acid followed the same pattern. The content of trans10-18:1 remained low in all experimental diets (milk fat substantially decreased with the LO, increased with RSFO, and did not change with HOSFO. The addition of moderate amounts of LO to the diets of dairy goats has favorable effects on milk fatty acid composition from the point of view of the human consumer, without negative effects on animal performance. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of heating oils and fats in containers of different materials on their trans fatty acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kala, A L Amrutha; Joshi, Vishal; Gurudutt, K N

    2012-08-30

    The nature of the container material and temperature employed for deep-frying can have an influence on the development of trans fatty acids (TFAs) in the fat used. The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of heating vegetable oils and partially hydrogenated vegetable fats with different initial TFA content in stainless steel, Hindalium (an aluminium alloy), cast iron and glass containers. Ground nut oil (oil 1), refined, bleached and deodorised (RBD) palmolein (oil 2) and two partially hydrogenated vegetable oils with low (fat 1) and high (fat 2) TFA content were uniformly heated at 175-185 °C over a period of 12 h. An increase in TFA content to 20 g kg⁻¹ was observed in oil 2 in the cast iron container, while a decrease in TFA content of 20-30 g kg⁻¹ was observed in fat 2 in all containers. The heating process of fats and oils also led to an increase in Butyro refractometer reading and colour values. This study showed that the TFA 18:1t content of oil 1, oil 2 and fat 1 increased with repeated or prolonged heating. The cast iron container showed the highest increase in TFA 18:1t for RBD palmolein (oil 2). The amount of linoleic acid trans isomers formed in the heating process was negligible. Fat 2 with high initial TFA content showed a decrease in TFA 18:1 and 18:2 on heating in all containers. Oils heated in glass and stainless steel containers showed less TFA 18:1t formation. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Analysis of fatty acid methyl esters and oxidative stability of seed purpose watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) genotypes for edible oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahla, H R; Rathore, S S; Venkatesan, K; Sharma, R

    2018-04-01

    World's vegetable oil demand is increasing day by day and oil seed supply is limited to a dozen oil seed crops on commercial scale. Efforts were made to explore the potential of water melon a traditionally grown native crop of Indian arid zone having oil content over 30% and seed yield potential of 500-600 kg per hectare under rainfed conditions. An analysis was carried out to explore the suitability of watermelon [ Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.)] oil for human consumption on the basis of fatty acid (FA) composition in selected genotypes. Total oil content ranged between 10.0 and 31.0%. Eleven FA were identified in seed oil. Linoleic, stearic, palmitic and oleic acid were found as major FA while myristic, heptadecanoic, arachidic, 9-hexadecenoic and 14-eicosenoic acid was present in traces. Linoleic acid single polyunsaturated FA contributor found in the range of 43.95% (WM-44) to 55.29% (WM-18). Saturated FA content ranged between 32.24 and 37.61%. Significant genetic variation was observed for mono-unsaturated FA. Metabolic capacity to inter-conversion of FA and nutritive value of watermelon oil was described on the basis of ratio of FA group. Total phenolics, antioxidant activity, peroxide value and oxidizability were also estimated along with oxidative stability of oil. Multivariate analysis showed that, oil content has positive correlation with linoleic acid. The Euclidean based UPGMA clustering revealed that genotypes WM-18 is most suitable for trait specific breeding program for high linoleic acid ( n -6), desaturation ratio and oleic desaturation ratio with higher oil content and lowest palmitic acid.

  12. [Quantitative determination of trans-fatty acids in oils and fats by capillary gas chromatography: results of a JOCS collaborative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Seiichi; Shiota, Makoto; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Shigematsu, Yasuhiko; Yokomizo, Kazuhisa; Shionoya, Noriko; Okamoto, Takahisa; Miyazaki, Yousuke; Takahashi, Shigeyuki; Himata, Katsuichi

    2007-01-01

    Excessive intake of trans-fatty acids increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Much attention is drawn to the consumption of trans-fatty acids worldwide, and regulations for trans-fatty acids are instituted in several countries. Precise and convenient methods for determination of trans-fatty acid level are required, but there is no standard method using capillary Gas Chromatography in Japan. Therefore, for the new standard method, collaborative studies were carried out. The results were as follows: 1) Heptadecanoate (C17:0 free fatty acid) was chosen for internal standard substance. 2) Two Gas Chromatography columns, SP2560 (100 m) column (100% cyanopropyl polysiloxane liquid phase) and TC-70 (60 m) column (70% cyanopropyl polysilphenylene-siloxane liquid phase), were examined in the collaborative studies. We measured the edible oil samples containing 2-45 g/100 g of trans-fatty acids, and trans-fatty acid contents were quantitatively the same with both columns. The range of reproducibility coefficient of variation were below 10%. 3) Fats and oils sampled were soybean, rapeseed, palm, palm kernel, beef tallow, pork fat and their hydrogenated forms, for which good peak resolution was achieved. From the above results, the technique evaluated in the present study was considered to be suitable for determination of the content of trans-fatty acids in fats and oils exclusive of fish oil and milk fat.

  13. NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS OF SOME SELECTED FISH AND CRAB MEATS AND FATTY ACID ANALYSIS OF OIL EXTRACTED FROM PORTUNUS PELAGICUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D Premarathna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The meat of male P.pelagicusn3 was analyzed for protein fat moisture and ash contents by proximate analysis. The flesh of shark Caracharhinus spp.n 3thalapath Istiophorus spp.n 3 were also analyzed for water-soluble protein content. Peptide-mapping was also carried out for the water-soluble protein fraction of all three types of samples. Moreoverthe sub-samples n3 of the crab meat samples and commercial fish oil samples n3 were also analyzed for fatty acid profile and content using gas chromatography. The results of proximate analysis revealed a composition of 89.40.072 mean SE moisture 75.70.069 protein 13.00.002 ash and 02.20.047 fat in crab meat. The analysis water-soluble fraction revealed species-specific patterns on SDS-PAGE demonstrating greater amounts of myosin heavy chain and fimbrin compared to that of shark and thalapath flesh. As it was expected a high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids were found in crab oil representing 40.68 of the total fatty acid content. The fatty acid profile exhibited greater percentages of oleic acid 28.03 and eicosapentaenoic acid EPA 12.12 when compared to existing data related to that of commercial fish oil. In conclusion the study revealed high protein content and a low fat content in the meat of P. pelagicus. The water-soluble protein profile meat of P. pelagicus could possibly be differentiated by peptide mapping which shows thick bands for the myosin heavy chain MHC and fimbrin. Oil of P. pelagicus carries relatively greater amounts of EPA and oleic acid. Thus the consumption of crabs would help to prevent nutritional deficiencies in the future.

  14. Metabolism and fatty acid profile in fat and lean rainbow trout lines fed with vegetable oil: effect of carbohydrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Sam Kamalam

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of dietary carbohydrates on metabolism, with special focus on fatty acid bioconversion and flesh lipid composition in two rainbow trout lines divergently selected for muscle lipid content and fed with vegetable oils. These lines were chosen based on previously demonstrated potential differences in LC-PUFA synthesis and carbohydrate utilization. Applying a factorial study design, juvenile trout from the lean (L and the fat (F line were fed vegetable oil based diets with or without gelatinised starch (17.1% for 12 weeks. Blood, liver, muscle, intestine and adipose tissue were sampled after the last meal. Feed intake and growth was higher in the L line than the F line, irrespective of the diet. Moderate postprandial hyperglycemia, strong induction of hepatic glucokinase and repressed glucose-6-phosphatase transcripts confirmed the metabolic response of both lines to carbohydrate intake. Further at the transcriptional level, dietary carbohydrate in the presence of n-3 LC-PUFA deficient vegetable oils enhanced intestinal chylomicron assembly, disturbed hepatic lipid metabolism and importantly elicited a higher response of key desaturase and elongase enzymes in the liver and intestine that endorsed our hypothesis. PPARγ was identified as the factor mediating this dietary regulation of fatty acid bioconversion enzymes in the liver. However, these molecular changes were not sufficient to modify the fatty acid composition of muscle or liver. Concerning the genotype effect, there was no evidence of substantial genotypic difference in lipid metabolism, LC-PUFA synthesis and flesh fatty acid profile when fed with vegetable oils. The minor reduction in plasma glucose and triglyceride levels in the F line was linked to potentially higher glucose and lipid uptake in the muscle. Overall, these data emphasize the importance of dietary macro-nutrient interface in evolving fish nutrition strategies.

  15. Fatty acids profile and alteration of lemon seeds extract (Citrus limon) added to soybean oil under thermoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzia, Débora Maria Moreno; Jorge, Neuza

    2013-10-01

    This paper aimed at evaluating fatty acids profile and the total alteration of lemon seeds extract added to soybean oil under thermoxidation, verifying the isolated and synergistic effect of these antioxidants. Therefore, Control treatments, LSE (2,400 mg/kg Lemon Seeds Extract), TBHQ (mg/kg), Mixture 1 (LSE + 50 mg/kg TBHQ) and Mixture 2 (LSE + 25 mg/kg TBHQ) were subjected to 180°C for 20 h. Samples were taken at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 h intervals and analyzed as for fatty acid profile and total polar compounds. Results were subjected to variance analyses and Tukey tests at a 5% significance level. An increase in the percentage of saturated fatty acids and mono-unsaturated, and decrease in polyunsaturated fatty acids was observed, regardless of the treatments studied. For total polar compounds, it was verified that Mixtures 1 and 2 presented values lower than 25% with 20 h of heating, not surpassing the limits established in many countries for disposal of oils and fats under high temperatures, thus proving the synergistic effect of antioxidants.

  16. Effect of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana oil administered by gavage on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stress of mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Silva

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of daily intragastric administration of bullfrog oil (oleic, linoleic and palmitoleic acid-rich oil, corresponding to 0.4% of body weight for four weeks, on fatty acid composition and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in mouse liver. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, biomarkers of tissue injury, were determined in liver homogenates and serum. The proportions of 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6, 20:5n-3, and 22:6n-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids, from 37 to 60% in the total fatty acid content were increased in the liver of the bullfrog oil-treated group (P < 0.05 compared to control. At the same time, a significant decrease in the relative abundance of 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0 (saturated fatty acids, from 49 to 25% was observed. The hepatic content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was increased from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.3 nmol TBA-MDA/mg protein and catalase activity was increased from 840 ± 32 to 1110 ± 45 µmol reduced H2O2 min-1 mg protein-1 in the treated group. Bullfrog oil administration increased AST and ALP activities in the liver (from 234.10 ± 0.12 to 342.84 ± 0.13 and 9.38 ± 0.60 to 20.06 ± 0.27 U/g, respectively and in serum (from 95.41 ± 6.13 to 120.32 ± 3.15 and 234.75 ± 11.5 to 254.41 ± 2.73 U/l, respectively, suggesting that this treatment induced tissue damage. ALT activity was increased from 287.28 ± 0.29 to 315.98 ± 0.34 U/g in the liver but remained unchanged in serum, whereas the GGT activity was not affected by bullfrog oil treatment. Therefore, despite the interesting modulation of fatty acids by bullfrog oil, a possible therapeutic use requires care since some adverse effects were observed in liver.

  17. Economic feasibility study of biodiesel production by direct esterification of fatty acids from the oil and soap industrial sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. El-Galad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial production of biodiesel fuel in Egypt by the transesterification of vegetable oils is being faced with the problem of feedstock shortage. Egypt imports annually about 90% of its needs as edible oils for human consumption. The production of biodiesel by direct esterification of fatty acids that can be obtained from the oil and soap industrial sector in huge quantities each year (around 16 thousand tons may be a proper solution to this problem. According to results of a previous study [1], the biodiesel produced following this approach and using methyl alcohol was quite efficient as an alternative fuel for diesel engines. However, the process should be economically feasible for application on an industrial scale. The present study assessed the economic feasibility of biodiesel production by direct fatty acid esterification. Complete process simulation was first carried out using the process simulation software, Aspen HYSYS V7.0. The process was then designed comprising four main steps being esterification, solvent recovery, catalyst removal and water removal. The main processing units include the reactor, distillation column, heat exchangers, pumps and separators. Assuming that the rate of fatty acids esterified was 2 ton/h, all process units required have been sized. Total capital investment, total manufacturing cost and return on investment were all estimated. The latter was found to be 117.1% which means that the production process is quite economically feasible.

  18. Regiospecific Analysis of Fatty Acids and Calculation of Triglyceride Molecular Species in Marine Fish Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijun Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The regiospecific distribution of fatty acids (FAs and composition of triglyceride (TAG molecular species of fishes were analyzed and calculated by pancreatic lipase (PL hydrolysis and Visual Basic (VB program. DHA was preferentially located at sn-2 position in TAG molecule, whereas EPA was almost equally distributed in each position of glycerol backbone. DOP, DPP, EPP, PoPP, PPO, and PPP were the predominant TAG species. MPP in anchovy, DDP, DOP, DPP in tuna, and EOO and OOO in salmon were the characteristic TAG molecules, which were meaningful to differentiate marine fish oils. Furthermore, the data management, according to TCN and ECN, was firstly applied to classify the TAG molecular species. The ECN42, ECN46, and ECN48 groups were rich in TAGs. The lower ECN values, compared to the higher TCN values, indicated that the most abundant TAGs exhibited a higher unsaturated degree. Therefore, our study not only offered a simple and feasible approach for the analysis of TAG composition but also firstly summarized the information by data management within ECN and TCN.

  19. Resilience of small intestinal beneficial bacteria to the toxicity of soybean oil fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzi, Sara C; Jacobson, Juliet; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Bell, Mary E; Shi, Qiaojuan; Waters, Jillian L; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J Thomas; Britton, Robert A; Walter, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Over the past century, soybean oil (SBO) consumption in the United States increased dramatically. The main SBO fatty acid, linoleic acid (18:2), inhibits in vitro the growth of lactobacilli, beneficial members of the small intestinal microbiota. Human-associated lactobacilli have declined in prevalence in Western microbiomes, but how dietary changes may have impacted their ecology is unclear. Here, we compared the in vitro and in vivo effects of 18:2 on Lactobacillus reuteri and L. johnsonii. Directed evolution in vitro in both species led to strong 18:2 resistance with mutations in genes for lipid biosynthesis, acid stress, and the cell membrane or wall. Small-intestinal Lactobacillus populations in mice were unaffected by chronic and acute 18:2 exposure, yet harbored both 18:2- sensitive and resistant strains. This work shows that extant small intestinal lactobacilli are protected from toxic dietary components via the gut environment as well as their own capacity to evolve resistance. PMID:29580380

  20. Antifungal and antioxidant activity of fatty acid methyl esters from vegetable oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA E.A. PINTO

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs were obtained from vegetable oils of soybean, corn and sunflower. The current study was focused on evaluating the antifungal activity of FAMEs mainly against Paracoccidioides spp., as well as testing the interaction of these compounds with commercial antifungal drugs and also their antioxidant potential. FAMEs presented small IC50 values (1.86-9.42 μg/mL. All three FAMEs tested showed antifungal activity against isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. with MIC values ranging from 15.6-500 µg/mL. Sunflower FAMEs exhibited antifungal activity that extended also to other genera, with an MIC of 15.6 μg/mL against Candida glabrata and C. krusei and 31.2 μg/mL against C. parapsilosis. FAMEs exhibited a synergetic effect with itraconazole. The antifungal activity of the FAMEs against isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. is likely due to the presence of methyl linoleate, the major compound present in all three FAMEs. The results obtained indicate the potential of FAMEs as sources for antifungal and antioxidant activity.

  1. Simple Synthesis Hydrogenated Castor Oil Fatty Amide Wax and Its Coating Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuzhu; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Zhong

    2017-07-01

    A simple method for incorporating amine groups in hydrogenated castor oil (HCO) to produce wax for beeswax or carnauba wax substitution in packaging and coating was developed. From the conversion rate of the products, HCO was reacted with ethanolamine at 150°C for 5 h, and the molar ratio of HCO and ethanolamine was 1:4. The hardness of the final product was seven times higher than that of beeswax, the cohesiveness of the final product was 1.3 times higher than that of beeswax and approximately one half of that of carnauba wax, and the melting point of the final product is 98°C. The Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy showed that the amide groups were incorporated to form the amide products. In coating application, the results showed that the force of the final product coating cardboard was higher than that of beeswax and paraffin wax and less than that of carnauba wax. After 24 h soaking, the compression forces were decreased. HCO fatty acid wax can be an alternative wax for carnauba wax and beeswax in coating applications.

  2. Geographical Discrimination of Virgin Olive Oils from the Tunisian Coasts by Combining Fatty Acids and Phenolic Acids Profiles within a Multivariate Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlima, Hajer Ben; Ayed, Rayda Ben; Ennouri, Karim; Smaoui, Slim

    2017-09-01

    Virgin olive oils extracted from three principal Tunisian olive cultivars (Chemlali, Chetoui and Zarrazi) and coming from four different regions (Sfax, Beja, Gabes and Medenine) along the Tunisian costs were analysed. The quality indices as well as fatty acids and phenolic acids content of oil samples were examined using univariate and multivariate statistical analysis. The finding demonstrated that significant differences (p olive oils from production sites that are different by geographical and climatic parameters. In fact, southern cultivars (Zarrazi Gabes and Zarrazi Medenine) have the best fatty acid combination according to their oxidative effect. Besides, phenolic acids content was not useful in discriminating olive oil samples and could depend not only on geographic location but also on olive variety and agronomic practices. Nevertheless, Principal Component Analysis allowed us to highlight the Chemlali Beja olive oil for its interesting oxidative stability, fatty acid composition and its richness in phenolic acids content.

  3. Microwave-assisted extraction of silkworm pupal oil and evaluation of its fatty acid composition, physicochemical properties and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Qing; Zhu, Yadong; Su, Zhao; Chen, Yizi

    2017-09-15

    Microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) of oil from silkworm pupae was firstly performed in the present research. The response surface methodology was applied to optimize the parameters for MAE. The yield of oil by MAE was 30.16% under optimal conditions of a mixed solvent consisting of ethanol and n-hexane (1:1, v/v), microwave power (360W), liquid to solid ratio (7.5/1mL/g), microwave time (29min). Moreover, oil extracted by MAE was quantitatively (yield) and qualitatively (fatty acid profile) similar to those obtained using Soxhlet extraction (SE), but oil extracted by MAE exhibited favourable physicochemical properties and oxidation stability. Additionally, oil extracted by MAE had a higher content of total phenolic, and it showed stronger antioxidant activities. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that microwave technique efficiently promoted the release of oil by breaking down the cell structure of silkworm pupae. Therefore, MAE can be an effective method for the silkworm pupal oil extraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrogenation impairs the hypolipidemic effect of corn oil in humans. Hydrogenation, trans fatty acids, and plasma lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, A H; Ausman, L M; Carrasco, W; Jenner, J L; Ordovas, J M; Schaefer, E J

    1993-02-01

    The effects of plasma lipoproteins and apolipoproteins of replacing corn oil with corn-oil margarine in stick form as two thirds of the fat in the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Step 2 diet were assessed in 14 middle-aged and elderly women and men (age range, 44-78 years) with moderate hypercholesterolemia (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] range, 133-219 mg/dl [3.45-5.67 mmol/l] at screening). During each 32-day study phase, subjects received all their food and drink from a metabolic kitchen. Subjects were first studied while being fed a diet approximating the composition of the current US diet (baseline), which contained 35% of calories as fat (13% saturated fatty acids [SFAs], 12% monounsaturated fatty acids [MUFAs; 0.8% 18:1n-9 trans], and 8% polyunsaturated fatty acids [PUFAs]) and 128 mg cholesterol/1,000 kcal. This baseline phase was followed by a corn oil-enriched diet containing 30% fat (6% SFA, 11% MUFA [0.4% 18:1n-9 trans], and 10% PUFA) and 83 mg cholesterol/1,000 kcal, and then a corn-oil margarine-enriched diet containing 30% fat (8% SFA, 12% MUFA [4.2% 18:1n-9 trans], and 8% PUFA) and 77 mg cholesterol/1,000 kcal. All diets were isocaloric. Mean fasting LDL-C and apolipoprotein (apo) B levels were 153 mg/dl (3.96 mmol/l) and 101 mg/dl on the baseline diet, 17% and 20% lower (both p oil-enriched diet, and 10% and 10% lower (both p < 0.01) on the margarine-enriched diet.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Effects of alternative oil sources in feed on growth and fatty acid composition of juvenile giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanpim Kangpanich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To relieve the pressure on the future use of fish oil (FO, alternative oil sources need to be explored. Alternative oil sources were evaluated—Schizochytrium sp. (SZ and soybean oil (SO—on the growth performance and flesh quality of juvenile river prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Five experimental diets differed in the types of oil used (oil comprised 3% of dietary ingredients: 3% FO, 1% SZ + 2% SO, 1.5% SZ + 1.5% SO, 2% SZ +1% SO and 3% SZ. After 60 d of the experiment, the survival rates of prawns fed non-FO diets did not significantly (p > 0.05 differ from those fed the FO diet (77.82 ± 4.45–93.38 ± 0.00%. Moreover, prawns fed diets containing both SZ and SO had significantly (p < 0.05 better growth performance than those fed a single oil source. Prawns fed 2% SZ+1% SO showed the best final weight, percentage weight gain, absolute daily weight gain, specific growth rate and feed conversion ratio (p < 0.05 while those fed 1.5% SZ +1.5% SO or 3% SZ had the highest survival. Tissues of prawns fed the non-FO diets contained higher amounts of n−6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA but were lower in n−3 long-chain PUFAs (eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid than those fed the FO diet. Among the non-FO groups, prawns fed 3% SZ had the most similar flesh fatty acid profile to those fed 3% FO. Substitution of FO with combinations of SZ and SO significantly improved growth performance and feed utilization. The study recommended diets containing 2% SZ + 1% SO or 1.5% SZ + 1.5% SO for M. rosenbergii juveniles.

  6. A diet rich in monounsaturated rapeseed oil reduces the lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and increases the relative content of n-3 fatty acids in serum in hyperlipidemic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, I B; Vessby, B; Ohrvall, M; Nydahl, M

    1994-03-01

    The effects of 3 wk on a diet rich in monounsaturated rapeseed oil were compared with those of a diet containing sunflower oil within a lipid-lowering diet. Ninety-five subjects with moderate hyperlipoproteinemia were randomly assigned to one of the two well-controlled diets prepared at the hospital kitchen. Total serum, low-density- and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased by 15%, 16%, and 11% (P oil diet and by 16%, 14%, and 13% (P oil diet. Serum triglycerides decreased more markedly (by 29%, P oil than on the rapeseed oil diet (14%, P oil diet but decreased on the sunflower oil diet. There was an increase in the alpha-tocopherol concentrations after both diets. The findings indicate that low erucic acid rapeseed oil can replace oils and fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids in a lipid-lowering diet.

  7. Influence of fatty acid composition on the formation of polar glycerides and polar fatty acids in sunflower oils heated at frying temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge, N.

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Conventional and high oleic sunflower oils as well as 50% mixture of both of them were heated at different temperatures under well-controlled conditions. Total polar compounds, the main groups of polar glycerides, total polar fatty acids, the main groups of polar fatty acids and the loss of initial fatty acids were quantitated. The most outstanding results demonstrated the primacy of the formation of glyceridic polymerization compounds during heating at high temperatures. After transesterification of the samples dimeric fatty acids was the most significant group of compounds obtained. As expected, linoleic acid was preferentially involved in the formation of polar fatty acids, although the participation of oleic acid became very important at low concentration of linoleic acid. Finally good statistical figures were obtained for the regression of polar fatty acids on polar compounds.

    Aceites de girasol convencional y alto oleico así como una mezcla al 50% de ambos fueron calentados a diferentes temperaturas bajo condiciones controladas. Se cuantificaron los compuestos polares totales, los grupos principales de glicéridos, ácidos grasos polares totales, los grupos principales de ácidos grasos polares y la pérdida de ácidos grasos iniciales. Los resultados más relevantes demostraron la primacía de la formación de compuestos de polimerización glicerídicos durante el calentamiento a altas temperaturas. Después de la transesterificación de las muestras, los ácidos diméricos constituyeron el grupo más significativo de compuestos obtenidos. Como era esperado, el ácido linoleico contribuyó preferentemente en la formación de los ácidos grasos polares, si bien la participación del ácido oleico fue muy importante a bajas concentraciones de ácido linoleico. Finalmente, se obtuvieron buenos resultados estadísticos para la regresión entre ácidos grasos polares y compuestos polares.

  8. Butter composition and texture from cows with different milk fatty acid compositions fed fish oil or roasted soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobe, G; Zimmerman, S; Hammond, E G; Freeman, A E; Porter, P A; Luhman, C M; Beitz, D C

    2007-06-01

    Changing the milk fatty acid composition can improve the nutritional and physical properties of dairy products and their acceptability to consumers. A more healthful milk fatty acid composition can be achieved by altering the cow's diet, for example, by feeding supplemental fish oil (FO) or roasted soybeans (RSB), or by selecting cows with a more unsaturated milk fatty acid composition. We examined whether feeding supplemental FO or RSB to cows that had a more unsaturated milk fatty acid composition acted additively to produce butter with improved fatty acid composition and texture. Using a 3 x 3 Latin square design with 2 replications, we fed diets to multiparous Holstein cows (60 to 200 DIM) chosen for producing either more or less unsaturated milk fatty acid composition (n = 6 for each group) for three 3-wk periods. The control diet contained 3.7% crude fat and the 2 experimental diets contained, on a dry matter basis, 0.8% of additional lipids in the form of 0.9% of FO or 5% of RSB. The milk, collected in the third week of feeding, was used to make butter, which was analyzed for its fatty acid composition and physical properties. Dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk composition were not significantly affected by cow diet or by cow selection. Cows that produced a more unsaturated and healthful milk fat prior to the feeding study, according to a "health-promoting index" [HPI = (sum of % of unsaturated fatty acids)/ (%12:0 + 4 x %14:0 + %16:0)], maintained a higher HPI in their butter during the feeding study than did cows with a low HPI. Milk from cows fed supplemental FO or RSB yielded more unsaturated butters with a higher HPI. This butter also was softer when the cows were fed RSB. Feeding RSB to cows chosen for their high milk HPI yielded the most unsaturated butter with the highest HPI and softest texture. Thus, selecting cows with a more health-promoting milk fatty acid composition and feeding supplemental RSB can be used in combination to produce butter

  9. Two-step synthesis of fatty acid ethyl ester from soybean oil catalyzed by Yarrowia lipolytica lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jinnan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymatic biodiesel production by transesterification in solvent media has been investigated intensively, but glycerol, as a by-product, could block the immobilized enzyme and excess n-hexane, as a solution aid, would reduce the productivity of the enzyme. Esterification, a solvent-free and no-glycerol-release system for biodiesel production, has been developed, and two-step catalysis of soybean oil, hydrolysis followed by esterification, with Yarrowia lipolytica lipase is reported in this paper. Results First, soybean oil was hydrolyzed at 40°C by 100 U of lipase broth per 1 g of oil with approximately 30% to 60% (vol/vol water. The free fatty acid (FFA distilled from this hydrolysis mixture was used for the esterification of FFA to fatty acid ethyl ester by immobilized lipase. A mixture of 2.82 g of FFA and equimolar ethanol (addition in three steps were shaken at 30°C with 18 U of lipase per 1 gram of FFA. The degree of esterification reached 85% after 3 hours. The lipase membranes were taken out, dehydrated and subjected to fresh esterification so that over 82% of esterification was maintained, even though the esterification was repeated every 3 hours for 25 batches. Conclusion The two-step enzymatic process without glycerol released and solvent-free demonstrated higher efficiency and safety than enzymatic transesterification, which seems very promising for lipase-catalyzed, large-scale production of biodiesel, especially from high acid value waste oil.

  10. Determination of fatty acid, tocopherol and phyto sterol contents of the oils of various poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) seeds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enric, H.; Tekin, A.; Musa Ozcan, M.

    2009-07-01

    The fatty acid, tocopherol and sterol contents of the oils of several poppy seeds were investigated. The main fatty acids in poppy seed oils were linoleic (687.6-739.2 g kg{sup -}1), oleic (141.3-192.8 g kg{sup -}1) and palmitic (76.8-92.8 g kg{sup -}1). The oils contained an appreciable amount of {gamma}-tocopherol (195.37-280.85 mg kg{sup -}1), with a mean value of 261.31 mg kg-1 and {alpha}-tocopherol (21.99-45.83 mg kg{sup -}1), with a mean value of 33.03 mg kg{sup -}1. The concentrations of total sterol ranged from 1099.84 mg kg{sup -}1 (K.pembe) to 4816.10 mg kg-1 (2. sinif beyaz), with a mean value of 2916.20 mg kg{sup -}1. The major sterols were {beta}-sitosterol, ranging from 663.91 to 3244.39 mg kg{sup -}1; campesterol, ranging from 228.59 to 736.50 mg kg{sup -}1; and {delta}{sup 5}-avenasterol, ranging from 103.90 to 425.02 mg kg{sup -}1. The studied varieties of poppy seeds from Turkey were found to be a potential source of valuable oil. (Author) 31 refs.

  11. Dietary Flaxseed Oil Prevents Western-Type Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD has dramatically increased globally during recent decades. Intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3, is believed to be beneficial to the development of NAFLD. However, little information is available with regard to the effect of flaxseed oil rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA, C18:3n-3, a plant-derived n-3 PUFA, in improving NAFLD. This study was to gain the effect of flaxseed oil on NAFLD and further investigate the underlying mechanisms. Apolipoprotein-E knockout (apoE-KO mice were given a normal chow diet, a western-type high-fat and high-cholesterol diet (WTD, or a WTD diet containing 10% flaxseed oil (WTD + FO for 12 weeks. Our data showed that consumption of flaxseed oil significantly improved WTD-induced NAFLD, as well as ameliorated impaired lipid homeostasis, attenuated oxidative stress, and inhibited inflammation. These data were associated with the modification effects on expression levels of genes involved in de novo fat synthesis (SREBP-1c, ACC, triacylglycerol catabolism (PPARα, CPT1A, and ACOX1, inflammation (NF-κB, IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1, and oxidative stress (ROS, MDA, GSH, and SOD.

  12. Influence of temperature and time during malaxation on fatty acid profile and oxidation of centrifuged avocado oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica del Pilar RAMÍREZ-ANAYA

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virgin oil from avocados (Persea americana Mill. is obtained by mechanical processes after pulp malaxation at temperatures that minimize oxidation and improve separation. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of time (0, 20, 30, 40, 60, 120 and 180 min and temperature (40 and 50 °C conditions during pulp malaxation on extraction yield, nutritional value (normalized fatty acid profile and specific extintion (K232 and K270 of virgin oil extracted under laboratory conditions from avocados cultivated in southern Jalisco, Mexico. When pulp was malaxated for 120 min at 40 and 50 °C, a larger proportion of oil was extracted (82.9 ± 0.3% and 80.2 ± 0.8%, respectively. We observed that the normalized percentage of the fatty acids linoleic (18 ± 2% and linolenic (1.2 ± 0.2% decreased with mixing time, while that of palmitoleic (9 ± 1%, oleic (51.6 ± 1.2% and stearic (0.5 ± 0.1% remained without change. The ω-6:ω-3 ratio (15 ± 1 was higher than the recommended values but similar to those reported as favorable for health. Specific extinction (K232, 2.2 ± 0.3 and K270, 0.20 ± 0.03 indicate that the oxidation level remained low. Malaxation at 40 or 50 °C did not significantly alter the characteristics of the oil, but time significantly affected yield.

  13. Linseed oil supplemented concentrate fed to Brahman crossbred fattening steers on carcass quality traits and intramuscular fatty acid profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitunart Noosen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the linseed oil supplemented concentrate fed to Brahman crossbred fattening steers on carcass quality trait and intramuscular fatty acid (FA profiles. All steers were fed 14% CP concentrate. The treatments included: (1 7 kg/d concentrate; (2 4 kg/d concentrate supplemented with 200 g/d palm oil (PO; (3 4 kg/d concentrate supplemented with 100 g/d PO and 100 g/d linseed oil (LSO; and (4 4 kg/d concentrate supplemented with 200 g/d LSO. The animals in the treatment 1 were fed ad libitum rice straw (RS, whereas the animals in other treatments were fed ad libitum fresh grass (FG. Dietary treatments had no effect on nutrient intake while oil supplement decreased dry matter intake (DMI. Inclusion of LSO did not negatively affect carcass quality, but increasing amount of LSO supplement increased the n-3 fatty acids and lowered the n-6/n-3 ratio in beef

  14. Analytical Characterization of Butter Oil Enriched with Omega-3 and 6 Fatty Acid Sthrough Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) Seed Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Nadeem; Muhammad Ajmal; Fazal Rahman; Muhammad Ayaz

    2015-01-01

    Analytical characterization of blends of butter oil and chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seed oil was performed. Chia oil was added in butter oil at four different levels i.e. 6.25%, 12.5%, 18.75% and 25% (T1, T2, T3 and T4), butter oil without any addition of chia oil served as control. Blends of butter oil and chia oil were packaged in tin containers, stored at ambient temperature (34±2oC) for 90-days. Iodine values of control, T1, T2, T3 and T4 were 36.85, 45.63, 57.22, 67.45 and 76.37 (cg/g).Co...

  15. Screening and identification of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids in inhibiting inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in fat stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Diana; So, Shui-Ping

    2012-08-31

    The molecular mechanisms of dietary oils (such as fish oil) and unsaturated fatty acids, which are widely used by the public for anti-inflammation and vascular protection, have not been settled yet. In this study, prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-mediated calcium signaling was used to screen dietary oils and eight unsaturated fatty acids for identification of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Isolated fat/stromal cells expressing endogenous PGE(2) receptors and an HEK293 cell line specifically expressing the recombinant human PGE(2) receptor subtype-1 (EP(1)) were cultured and used in live cell calcium signaling assays. The different dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids were used to affect cell signaling under the specific stimulation of a pathological amount of inflammatory PGE(2). It was identified that fish oil best inhibited the PGE(2) signaling in the primary cultured stromal cells. Second, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), found in abundance in fish oil, was identified as a key factor of inhibition of PGE(2) signaling. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), another major fatty acid found in fish oil and tested in this study was found to have small effect on EP(1) signaling. The study suggested one of the four PGE(2) subtype receptors, EP(1) as the key target for the fish oil and DHA target. These findings were further confirmed by using the recombinant EP(1) expressed in HEK293 cells as a target. This study demonstrated the new mechanism behind the positive effects of dietary fish oils in inhibiting inflammation originates from the rich concentration of DHA, which can directly inhibit the inflammatory EP(1)-mediated PGE(2) receptor signaling, and that the inflammatory response stimulated by PGE(2) in the fat stromal cells, which directly related to metabolic diseases, could be down regulated by fish oil and DHA. These findings also provided direct evidence to support the use of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids for protection against heart disease, pain, and cancer

  16. SB-ATR FTIR Spectroscopic Monitoring of Free Fatty Acids in Commercially Available Nigella sativa (Kalonji Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Mahesar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Free fatty acids (FFA in Nigella sativa (N. sativa commercial and seed oil were determined using single-bounce attenuated total reflectance (SB-ATR Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Gravimetrical mixing was done by adding 0.1–40% oleic acids in neutralized N. sativa oil containing 0.1% FFA. FTIR spectroscopy technique and partial least square (PLS calibration were used to detect the absorption region of carbonyl (C=O which is in the range of 1690–1727 cm−1. The results of PLS calibration model and root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC are 0.999 and 0.449, respectively. Comparing the FFA obtained in N. sativa oil by using FTIR with the FFA obtained using AOCS titrimetric method shows a positive correlation and confirms that the described method is a useful procedure.

  17. Evaluation of tall rice mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    One tall mutant (Mut NS1) of rice variety Nizersail was put to multilocation on-farm trial. It showed improvement over the parent in respect of by earlier maturity and higher grain yield at all locations and thus it appears as an improved mutant of Nizersail. (author). 6 refs

  18. Association of SSR markers with contents of fatty acids in olive oil and genetic diversity analysis of an olive core collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, M; Ipek, A; Seker, M; Gul, M K

    2015-03-27

    The purpose of this research was to characterize an olive core collection using some agronomic characters and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to determine SSR markers associated with the content of fatty acids in olive oil. SSR marker analysis demonstrated the presence of a high amount of genetic variation between the olive cultivars analyzed. A UPGMA dendrogram demonstrated that olive cultivars did not cluster on the basis of their geographic origin. Fatty acid components of olive oil in these cultivars were determined. The results also showed that there was a great amount of variation between the olive cultivars in terms of fatty acid composition. For example, oleic acid content ranged from 57.76 to 76.9% with standard deviation of 5.10%. Significant correlations between fatty acids of olive oil were observed. For instance, a very high negative correlation (-0.812) between oleic and linoleic acids was detected. A structured association analysis between the content of fatty acids in olive oil and SSR markers was performed. STRUCTURE analysis assigned olive cultivars to two gene pools (K = 2). Assignment of olive cultivars to these gene pools was not based on geographical origin. Association between fatty acid traits and SSR markers was evaluated using the general linear model of TASSEL. Significant associations were determined between five SSR markers and stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids of olive oil. Very high associations (P olive.

  19. Crystal network for edible oil organogels: Possibilities and limitations of the fatty acid and fatty alcohol systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaink, H.M.; Malssen, van K.; Morgado-Alves, S.; Kalnin, D.J.E.; Linden, van der E.

    2007-01-01

    The textural and structural properties of organogels made by structuring liquid oil with mixtures of stearic acid (octadecanoic acid) and stearyl alcohol (octadecanol) have been studied. Optical, rheological and X-ray diffraction measurements have been used to investigate the influence of

  20. A new direct Fourier transform infrared analysis of free fatty acids in edible oils using spectral reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiuzhu; van de Voort, F R; Sedman, Jacqueline; Gao, Jin-ming

    2011-07-01

    A new transmission-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method for the direct determination of free fatty acids (FFA) in edible oils has been developed using the developed spectral reconstitution (SR) technique. Conventional neat-oil and SR calibrations were devised by spiking hexanoic acid into FFA-free canola oil and measuring the response to added FFA at 1,712 cm(-1) referenced to a baseline at 1,600 cm(-1)(1,712 cm(-1)/1,600 cm(-1)). To compensate for the known oil dependency of such calibration equations resulting from variation of the triacylglycerol ester (C═O) absorption with differences in oil saponification number (SN), a correction equation was devised by recording the spectra of blends of two FFA-free oils (canola and coconut) differing substantially in SN and correlating the intensity of the ester (C═O) absorption at the FFA measurement location with the intensity of the first overtone of this vibration, measured at 3,471 cm(-1)/3,427 cm(-1). Further examination of the spectra of the oil blends by generalized 2D correlation spectroscopy revealed an additional strong correlation with an absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) combination band region, which led to the development of a second correction equation based on the absorbance at 4,258 cm(-1)/4,235 cm(-1). The NIR-based correction equation yielded superior results and was shown to completely eliminate biases due to variations in oil SN, thereby making a single FFA calibration generally applicable to oils, regardless of SN. FTIR methodology incorporating this correction equation and employing the SR technique has been automated.

  1. Efficient production of fatty acid methyl ester from waste activated bleaching earth using diesel oil as organic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Seiji; Du, Dongning; Sato, Masayasu; Park, Enoch Y

    2004-01-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) production from waste activated bleaching earth (ABE) discarded by the crude oil refining industry was investigated using fossil fuel as a solvent in the esterification of triglycerides. Lipase from Candida cylindracea showed the highest stability in diesel oil. Using diesel oil as a solvent, 3 h was sufficient to obtain a yield of approximately 100% of FAME in the presence of 10% lipase from waste ABE. Kerosene was also a good solvent in the esterification of triglycerides embedded in the waste ABE. Fuel analysis showed that the FAME produced using diesel oil as a solvent complied with the Japanese diesel standard and the 10% residual carbon amount was lower than that of FAME produced using other solvents. Use of diesel oil as solvent in the FAME production from the waste ABE simplified the process, because there was no need to separate the organic solvent from the FAME-solvent mixture. These results demonstrate a promising reutilization method for the production of FAME, for use as a biodiesel, from industrial waste resources containing waste vegetable oils.

  2. Content of fatty acids and phenolics in Coratina olive oil from Tunisia: influence of irrigation and ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbou, Samia; Dabbou, Sihem; Chehab, Hechmi; Taticchi, Agnese; Servili, Maurizio; Hammami, Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    The quality indices and chemical composition of Coratina olive oil produced in the northern region of Tunisia were evaluated, to determine the effect of three different irrigation regimes of the trees on the olive oils. The olives were sampled at two different stages of maturity, the oils were extracted, and standard methods were used to analyze the composition and quality of the oils. The fatty-acid contents and quality parameters were only slightly affected by the irrigation regime. The contents of palmitic, oleic, and linoleic acids were above 12, 72, and 8%, respectively, for the second harvest, regardless of the irrigation level of the olive trees. Parameters such as the α-tocopherol content and the phenolic profile were found to be significantly affected by the harvesting time; however, inconsistent changes were observed for the irrigation regimes, especially for the oil of the second harvest. It was shown that the irrigation conditions of the olive trees as well as the harvesting time of the fruits gave rise to a diverse range of olive oils in Tunisia. Copyright © 2015 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  3. Evaluation of the use of esterified fatty acid oils enriched in medium-chain fatty acids in weight loss diets for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragua, V; Barroeta, A C; Manzanilla, E G; Codony, R; Villaverde, C

    2015-04-01

    Esterified fatty acid oils (EAOs) are obtained from esterification of vegetable acid oils with glycerol. These fat sources have the same fatty acid (FA) composition as their respective native oils but new chemical properties. Several studies have confirmed the potential of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) to reduce fat mass (FM) in humans and rodents. This study investigates the use of EAOs with different MCFA proportions on food preferences, digestibility and weight loss management in dogs. A basal diet was supplemented with 8% of three different fat sources: C0: soya bean-canola EAO, C20: soya bean-canola (80%) coconut (20%) EAO and C40: soya bean-canola (60%) coconut (40%) EAO. Food preference of these EAOs was tested using a two-pan preference test. Dogs presented a higher daily food intake of C20 and C40 compared to C0 (C20: 155 ± 18.6 g vs. C0: 17 ± 7.0 g, p < 0.001; C40: 117 ± 13.9 g vs. C0: 28 ± 10.5 g, p < 0.05 respectively). Also, the digestibility of the three experimental diets was tested. C20 and C40 showed higher ether extract, total FA and saturated FA digestibilities (p < 0.05) than C0 diet. Lastly, the three diets were investigated in a 14-week weight loss study, following 16 weeks of ad libitum feeding to induce overweight condition. Body weight (BW) reduction was lower (C0: 20.1 ± 2.32%, C20: 14.6 ± 1.43% and C40: 15.7 ± 1.23%, p < 0.05) and FM was higher (FM, 18.7 ± 3.42%, 27.9 ± 3.90% and 28.2 ± 2.88% for C0, C20 and C40, respectively, p < 0.05) for diets C20 and C40 than for C0. Feeding diets with MCFA at these inclusion levels to experimentally overweight dogs during 14 weeks do not result in faster weight loss compared to unsaturated long-chain FA. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. The fatty acid and cholesterol composition of enriched egg yolk lipids obtained by modifying hens’ diets with fish oil and flaxseed

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçyn, Hasan; Basmacyoolu, Hatice; Kemal Ünal, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The effects of fish oil and flaxseed in the diets of laying hens on the cholesterol and fatty acid composition of egg lipids were studied. Isa-White laying hens and five experimental diets were used. The first diet was used as the control. Fish oil (1.5%), flaxseed (4.32% and 8.64) or both of them (1.5% fish oil and 4.32% flaxseed) were added to the others and hens were fed for 30 and 60 days. The cholesterol and fatty acid composition of the yolks were determined. No significant difference (p

  5. Effect of dietary vegetable oils on the fatty acid profile of plasma lipoproteins in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, Einar; Íñiguez-González, Gonzalo; Cancino-Padilla, Nathaly; Loor, Juan J; Garnsworthy, Philip C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary supplementation of soybean oil (SO) and hydrogenated palm oil (HPO) on the transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Three lactating and three non-lactating Holstein cows were used in two different 3 × 3 Latin square experiments that included three periods of 21 d. Dietary treatments for lactating cows consisted of a basal diet (control; no fat supplement) and fat-supplemented diets containing SO (500 g/d per cow) or HPO (500 g/d per cow). For non-lactating cows, dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (control; no fat supplement) and fat-supplemented diets containing SO (170 g/d per cow) or HPO (170 g/d per cow). Compared with the control and SO diet, HPO addition increased (p < 0.05) the concentration of C16:0, C18:0, C18:2cis-9,12, C18:3cis-9,12,15 and total saturated and polyunsaturated FA in the plasma of lactating cows. In non-lactating cows, the SO addition increased the plasma concentration of C18:1trans-11. In lactating cows, concentrations of C16:0, C18:0 and total saturated FA were increased (p < 0.05) by HPO addition in the high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Total saturated FA were increased (p < 0.05) by HPO in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). In non-lactating cows, the concentration of C18:0 was increased (p < 0.05) by HPO in HDL, whereas C18:1trans-11 was increased (p < 0.05) by SO in the low-density lipoprotein. Overall, it was found that distribution and transport of FA within the bovine plasma lipoproteins may be influenced by chain length and degree of unsaturation of dietary lipids. Also, the distribution of individual FA isomers such as C18:1trans-11 and C18:2cis-9,trans-11 may vary depending on the physiological state of the cow (lactating or non-lactating), and are increased in plasma (lactating cows) and the HDL (non-lactating cows) when cows are fed SO.

  6. Effect of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on muscle fatty acid composition in goats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahim Abubakr

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the effects of feeding palm oil by-products based diets on different muscle fatty acid profiles in goats. Thirty-two Cacang × Boer goats were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments: (1 control diet (CD, (2 80% decanter cake diet (DCD, (3 80% palm kernel cake diet (PKCD and (4 CD plus 5% palm oil (PO supplemented diet (CPOD. After 100 days of feeding, four goats from each group were slaughtered and longissimus dorsi (LD, infraspinatus (IS and biceps femoris (BF were sampled for analysis of fatty acids. Goats fed the PKCD had higher (P<0.05 concentration of lauric acid (C12:0 than those fed the other diets in all the muscles tested. Compared to the other diets, the concentrations of palmitic acid (C16:0 and stearic acid (C18:0 were lower (P<0.05 and that of linoleic acid (C18:2 n-6 was higher (P<0.05 in the muscles from goats fed the CD. It was concluded that palm kernel cake and decanter cake can be included in the diet of goats up to 80% with more beneficial than detrimental effects on the fatty acid profile of their meat.

  7. Fatty acid composition, fat deposition, lipogenic gene expression and performance of broiler fed diet supplemented with different sources of oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Jannatara; Loh, Teck Chwen; Akit, Henny; Foo, Hooi Ling; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2017-09-01

    The present study assessed the effect of feeding palm oil (PO), sunflower oil (SO) and their combination on performance, fat deposition, fatty acid composition and lipogenic gene expression of broilers reared for 42 days. A total of 144 1-day-old broilers (Cobb500) were randomly allotted into four treatment diets with each having six replicates of six chicks in each replicate following a completely randomized design. Live weight gain and feed efficiency was significantly (P fat. Higher (P acids (UFA) and lower concentrations of palmitic acid and saturated fatty acid (SFA) was found in birds fed SO alone and combinations of SO and PO. Furthermore, the outcomes showed that birds fed diet supplemented with SO and the combination of SO and PO down-regulated gene expression of key hepatic lipogenic enzymes of fatty acids synthase (FAS), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD). These findings suggest that the diet containing the combination of 2% PO and 4% SO may reduce hepatic lipogenesis, as well as lower abdominal fat content of broilers. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Characterization of Arbequina virgin olive oils produced in different regions of Brazil and Spain: Physicochemical properties, oxidative stability and fatty acid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Thays H; Pereira, José Alberto; Cabrera-Vique, Carmen; Lara, Luis; Oliveira, Adelson F; Seiquer, Isabel

    2017-01-15

    Production of virgin olive oil is beginning in Brazil. This paper analyzes the characteristics of the EVOO Arbequina from Brazil in comparison with Spanish Arbequina from different regions. Quality parameters, oxidative stability, pigments, colour and fatty acid profile were assessed, and relationships with geographic and climatic conditions were studied. All the samples presented good quality and met EU standards for extra-virgin olive oil, but there were significant differences between regions and countries for many of the parameters evaluated. Major differences between Brazilian and Spanish samples were observed for free acidity and colour of the oils, as well as minor variations in the fatty acid profile. The colour differences were related to rainfall, whereas the fatty acid content was strongly influenced by altitude and temperature. These results highlight the fact that geographic area and environmental factors influence the characteristics of Arbequina oil and play an important role in newly introduced cultivars. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Fatty acids of grape seed oil and its biological activity as 1,0% and 2,5% food-additive].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikalishvili, B Iu; Zurabashvili, D Z; Turabelidze, D G; Zurabashvili, Z A; Giorgobiani, I B

    2012-06-01

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography were qualitatively and quantitatively identified high fatty acids contained in grape seed oil and compare its biological activity as 1,0% and 2,5% food-additive an fatty acids composition contained in lipids of mice livers. Investigation were carried out on 90 inbred mice 5,0 g weight. Using high-performance liquid chromatography methods in grape seed oil is identified linoleic (65,0%), linolenic (1,5%), oleic (17,0%), palmitic (8,0%), stearic (4,4%) and arachidonic (0,6%) acids. After 15 days fatty acids are carried out from mouse liver and individual identified. In paper is showed that 1,0% and 2,5% grape seed oil food-additive have a different biological activity. The investigation demonstrated that after 15 days the grape seed oil takes marked part in lipid metabolism of biological necessary components.

  10. KARAKTERISTIK MIKROKAPSUL MINYAK KAYA ASAM LEMAK OMEGA-3 DARI HASIL SAMPING PENEPUNGAN LEMURU [Characteristics of Microcapsule of omega-3 Fatty Acids Enriched Oil from Lemuru Meal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teti Estiasih 1

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids enriched fish oil from lemuru fishmeal processing met the quality standard of food grade fish oil, but it was susceptible to oxidation. Microencapsulation by spray drying was one method that could protect this oil against oxidation and the microcapsule could be applied more widely and easier to handle. The important factor that affected microencapsulation process by spray drying method was encapsulant to core ratio. The objective of research was to elucidate the effect of encapsulant to core ratio (2:1; 3:1; 4:1; 5:1; and 6:1 (w/w on characteristics of omega-3 fatty acids enriched fish oil microcapsule. The increase of microencapsulation efficiency and the decrease of surface oil proportion were related to better emulsion stability prior to spray drying and film forming ability around oil globule as the sodium caseinate proportion increased. Emulsification and heating during spray drying could induce hydrolysis of triglycerides in fish oil. Therefore, the quantity of free fatty acids relatively unchanged although the proportion of encapsulated oil decreased. The decrease of oxidation degree is caused by better protective effect of sodium caseinate during emulsification and spray drying due to better film forming ability as proportion of encapsulant increased. However, it was followed by the decrease of omega-3 fatty acids content that related to decreasing proportion of fish oil. This phenomenon was supported by unchanging omega-3 fatty acids retention that showed protective effect of sodium caseinate on oxidation during microencapsulation. Different encapsulant to core ratio did not change yield of microcapsule. Different proportion of surface oil did not affect microcapsule recovery.

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Essential Oil Components and Fatty Acids in Fennel using Gas Chromatography with a Polar Capillary Column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdoska-Bogdanov, Menče; Bogdanov, Jane B; Stefova, Marina

    2015-09-01

    Cultivated and wild growing samples of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill., Apiaceae) from R. Macedonia were studied for their volatiles and fatty acid composition. The main essential oil components isolated via hydrodistillation were: trans-anethole (>80%), estragole (method for characterization of both the non-polar volatile and non volatile fractions was developed using n-hexane and dichloromethane (3:1, v/v) in a Soxhlet extraction followed by transesterification. The obtained extracts were then characterized and the dominant fatty acid was 18:1 (petroselinic and oleic acid) 75.0-82.8%, followed by 18:2 (linoleic acid) 10.8-16.2% and other fatty acids: palmitic (4.3-6.9%), stearic (1.2-1.7%) and myristic (0-2.9%). The results for the volatile fraction after Soxhlet extraction and transesterification did not significantly differ from results obtained after hydrodistillation, especially for the main components (trans-anethole, estragole, fenchone and limonene), implying that the developed method can be used for simultaneous determination of volatiles and fatty acids.

  12. Effects of frying oils' fatty acids profile on the formation of polar lipids components and their retention in French fries over deep-frying process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jinwei; Wang, Yong; Cao, Peirang; Liu, Yuanfa

    2017-12-15

    The effects of frying oils' fatty acids profile on the formation of polar components and their retention in French fries and corresponding deep-fried oils were investigated in the present study, using oils with different fatty acids composition. Our analysis showed that the total polar compounds (TPCs) content in French fries was only slightly lower than that in deep-fried oils, indicating that there was no significant difference considering the amounts of TPCs in French fries and deep-fried oils. Our further analysis showed that different polar components in TPCs distributed differently in deep-fried oils and oils extracted from French fries. Specifically, the level of oligomeric and dimeric triacylglycerols was higher in French fries while oxidized triacylglycerols and diacylglycerols content was higher in deep-fried oils. The different retention of TPCs components in French fries may be explained by their interactions with carbohydrates, which are shown to enhance with the increase of hydrophobic property. Chemometric analysis showed that no correlation between the polar compounds level and saturated fatty acids profile was observed. Meanwhile, the polar compounds content was highly correlated with the formation of trans-C18:1, and a highly positive association between polar compounds and C18:2 content was also observed in palm oil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extraction of unsaturated fatty acid-rich oil from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) roe and production of defatted roe hydrolysates with functional, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelichi, Sakhi; Shabanpour, Bahareh; Pourashouri, Parastoo; Hajfathalian, Mona; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2018-03-01

    Common carp roe is a rich protein and oil source, which is usually discarded with no specific use. The aims of this study were to extract oil from the discarded roe and examine functional, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties of defatted roe hydrolysates (CDRHs) at various degrees of hydrolysis (DH). Gas chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters revealed that common carp roe oil contained high levels of unsaturated fatty acids. The results of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated that enzymatic hydrolysis of defatted roe yielded higher content of essential amino acids. CDRHs displayed higher solubility than untreated defatted roe, which increased with DH. Better emulsifying and foaming properties were observed at lower DH and non-isoelectric points. Furthermore, water and oil binding capacity decreased with DH. CDRHs exhibited antioxidant activity both in vitro and in 5% roe oil-in-water emulsions and inhibited the growth of certain bacterial strains. Common carp roe could be a promising source of unsaturated fatty acids and functional bioactive agents. Unsaturated fatty acid-rich oil extracted from common carp roe can be delivered into food systems by roe oil-in-water emulsions fortified by functional, antioxidant, and antibacterial hydrolysates from the defatted roe. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Effect of plant oils in the diet on performance and milk fatty acid composition in goats fed diets based on grass hay or maize silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Laurence; Shingfield, Kevin J; Rouel, Jacques; Ferlay, Anne; Chilliard, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Based on the potential benefits to long-term human health there is interest in developing sustainable nutritional strategies for reducing saturated and increasing specific unsaturated fatty acids in ruminant milk. The impact of plant oil supplements to diets containing different forages on caprine milk fatty acid composition was examined in two experiments using twenty-seven Alpine goats in replicated 3 x 3 Latin squares with 28 d experimental periods. Treatments comprised of no oil (control) or 130 g/d of sunflower-seed oil (SO) or linseed oil (LO) supplements added to diets based on grass hay (H; experiment 1) or maize silage (M; experiment 2). Milk fat content was enhanced (Pdiets, resulting in 17, 15 and 14% increases in milk fat secretion, respectively. For both experiments, plant oils decreased (Pplant oil composition and forage in the diet. In conclusion, plant oils represent an effective strategy for altering the fatty acid composition of caprine milk, with evidence that the basal diet is an important determinant of ruminal unsaturated fatty acid metabolism in the goat.

  15. Supercritical fluid extraction of grape seed oil and subsequent separation of free fatty acids by high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xueli; Ito, Yoichiro

    2003-12-22

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of grape seed oil was performed to study the effect of various parameters such as pressure, temperature and the particle size of the sample on the yield and composition of oil using an analytical-scale SFE system. Then the extraction was scaled up by 125 times using a preparative SFE system under the optimized conditions of high pressure (30-40 MPa) and low temperature (35-40 degrees C) with medium particle size (20-40 mesh). The maximum yield of the oil can reach 6.2% with pure supercritical CO2 and 4.0% more oil can be obtained by adding 10% of ethanol as modifier. The unsaturated fatty acids (UFSs) make up about 70% in the oil on the basis of free fatty acids. The grape seed oil was then subjected to separation and purification for free fatty acids after saponification by high-speed counter-current chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD). The separation of 1.0 g of oil can yield about 430 mg pure linoleic acid at 99% purity. The fatty acids were analyzed by HPLC-ELSD.

  16. Exposure of fatty acids after a single oral administration of sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) and sunflower oil in human adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Gonzales, Carla; Villegas, Leon

    2014-01-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.) is a potential oilseed crop because it is rich in α-linolenic acid (ALA) (omega-3 fatty acid). To evaluate the exposure of fatty acids after a single oral administration of sacha inchi or sunflower oil in healthy volunteers. Plasma fatty acids concentrations were assayed by Gas Chromatography with Flame Ionization Detector in 18 adult subjects. After fasting, blood samples were obtained at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after ingestion of 10 or 15 ml of sacha inchi oil or sunflower oil. The proportion ALA/linoleic acid was 1.37 in sacha inchi oil and 0.01 in sunflower oil. ALA, lauric acid, palmitic acid, linolelaidic acid, cis-8,11,14-eicosatrienoic acid, cis-13,16-docosadienoic acid and cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels changed over time after sacha inchi oil ingestion but not with sunflower oil. The time at maximal concentration (tmax) for ALA was 2 h after sacha inchi oil ingestion. No ALA in plasma was observed after sunflower oil consumption. The maximal concentration of ALA was 2.84 ± 0.36 mg/ml in women and 0.94 ± 0.57 mg/ml in men, p  0.05). There is a trend for higher plasma ALA levels with 15 ml sacha inchi oil. After 2 h of consumption, plasma delta triacylglycerol were reduced with sunflower oil but slightly increased with sacha inchi oil. A reduction in plasma delta triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein cholesterol was observed with both oils. Consumption of sacha inchi oil increased ALA and DHA in plasma.

  17. Effect of fish oil supplementation on fatty acid status, coordination, and fine motor skills in children with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beblo, Skadi; Reinhardt, Hannes; Demmelmair, Hans; Muntau, Ania C; Koletzko, Berthold

    2007-05-01

    To investigate effects of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) on motor skills in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU). Thirty-six patients with PKU (1-11 years of age, good metabolic control: plasma phenylalanine or = 6 months). We determined plasma phospholipid fatty acids, and in patients > 4 years of age (N = 24) the motometric Rostock-Oseretzky Scale (ROS), before and after supplementation with fish oil for 3 months (15 mg docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]/kg body weight daily). ROS was also assessed in 22 age-matched controls. Patients had low n-3 LC-PUFA in plasma phospholipids (DHA, 2.37 +/- 0.10%; eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], 0.4 +/- 0.03%) and poorer ROS performance than controls (motor development index [MQ] 107 +/- 3 vs 117 +/- 3, P = .010). Supplementation increased phospholipid n-3 LC-PUFA (DHA 7.05 +/- 0.24%; EPA 3.31 +/- 0.19%; P oil well. Plasma phenylalanine remained unchanged. In patients with PKU, fish oil supplementation enhances n-3 LC-PUFA levels and improves motor skills.

  18. Splice Variants of the Castor WRI1 Gene Upregulate Fatty Acid and Oil Biosynthesis When Expressed in Tobacco Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xia-Jie; Mao, Xue; Hao, Qing-Ting; Liu, Bao-Ling; Xue, Jin-Ai; Li, Run-Zhi

    2018-01-05

    The plant-specific WRINKLED1 (WRI1) is a member of the AP2/EREBP class of transcription factors that positively regulate oil biosynthesis in plant tissues. Limited information is available for the role of WRI1 in oil biosynthesis in castor bean ( Ricinus connunis L.), an important industrial oil crop. Here, we report the identification of two alternatively spliced transcripts of RcWRI1 , designated as RcWRI1-A and RcWRI1-B . The open reading frames of RcWRI1-A (1341 bp) and RcWRI1-B (1332 bp) differ by a stretch of 9 bp, such that the predicted RcWRI1-B lacks the three amino acid residues "VYL" that are present in RcWRI1-A. The RcWRI1-A transcript is present in flowers, leaves, pericarps and developing seeds, while the RcWRI1-B mRNA is only detectable in developing seeds. When the two isoforms were individually introduced into an Arabidopsis wri1-1 loss-of-function mutant, total fatty acid content was almost restored to the wild-type level, and the percentage of the wrinkled seeds was largely reduced in the transgenic lines relative to the wri1-1 mutant line. Transient expression of each RcWRI1 splice isoform in N. benthamiana leaves upregulated the expression of the WRI1 target genes, and consequently increased the oil content by 4.3-4.9 fold when compared with the controls, and RcWRI1-B appeared to be more active than RcWRI1-A . Both RcWRI1-A and RcWRI1-B can be used as a key transcriptional regulator to enhance fatty acid and oil biosynthesis in leafy biomass.

  19. A Single-step Process to Convert Karanja Oil to Fatty Acid Methyl Esters Using Amberlyst15 as a Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Gupta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Karanja oil was successfully converted to fatty acid methyl esters (FAME in a single- step process using Amberlyst15 as a catalyst. A methanol to oil ratio of 6 was required to retain the physical structure of the Amberlyst15 catalyst. At higher methanol to oil ratios, the Amberlyst15 catalyst disintegrated. Disintegration of Amberlyst15 caused an irreversible loss in catalytic activity. This loss in activity was due to a decrease in surface area of Amberlyst15, which was caused by a decrease in its mesoporous volume. It appeared that the chemical nature of Amberlyst15 was unaffected. Reuse of Amberlyst15 with a methanol to oil ratio of 6:1 also revealed a loss in FAME yield. However, this loss in activity was recovered by heating the used Amberlyst15 catalyst to 393 K. The kinetic parameters of a power law model were successfully determined for a methanol to oil ratio of 6:1. An activation energy of 54.9 kJ mol–1 was obtained.

  20. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of seed oil from winter melon (Benincasa hispida) and its antioxidant activity and fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimakr, Mandana; Rahman, Russly Abdul; Taip, Farah Saleena; Adzahan, Noranizan Mohd; Sarker, Md Zaidul Islam; Ganjloo, Ali

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) extraction of seed oil from winter melon (Benincasa hispida) was investigated. The effects of process variables namely pressure (150-300 bar), temperature (40-50 °C) and dynamic extraction time (60-120 min) on crude extraction yield (CEY) were studied through response surface methodology (RSM). The SC-CO(2) extraction process was modified using ethanol (99.9%) as co-solvent. Perturbation plot revealed the significant effect of all process variables on the CEY. A central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize the process conditions to achieve maximum CEY. The optimum conditions were 244 bar pressure, 46 °C temperature and 97 min dynamic extraction time. Under these optimal conditions, the CEY was predicted to be 176.30 mg-extract/g-dried sample. The validation experiment results agreed with the predicted value. The antioxidant activity and fatty acid composition of crude oil obtained under optimized conditions were determined and compared with published results using Soxhlet extraction (SE) and ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE). It was found that the antioxidant activity of the extract obtained by SC-CO(2) extraction was strongly higher than those obtained by SE and UAE. Identification of fatty acid composition using gas chromatography (GC) showed that all the extracts were rich in unsaturated fatty acids with the most being linoleic acid. In contrast, the amount of saturated fatty acids extracted by SE was higher than that extracted under optimized SC-CO(2) extraction conditions.

  1. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Seed Oil from Winter Melon (Benincasa hispida and Its Antioxidant Activity and Fatty Acid Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ganjloo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 extraction of seed oil from winter melon (Benincasa hispida was investigated. The effects of process variables namely pressure (150–300 bar, temperature (40–50 °C and dynamic extraction time (60–120 min on crude extraction yield (CEY were studied through response surface methodology (RSM. The SC-CO2 extraction process was modified using ethanol (99.9% as co-solvent. Perturbation plot revealed the significant effect of all process variables on the CEY. A central composite design (CCD was used to optimize the process conditions to achieve maximum CEY. The optimum conditions were 244 bar pressure, 46 °C temperature and 97 min dynamic extraction time. Under these optimal conditions, the CEY was predicted to be 176.30 mg-extract/g-dried sample. The validation experiment results agreed with the predicted value. The antioxidant activity and fatty acid composition of crude oil obtained under optimized conditions were determined and compared with published results using Soxhlet extraction (SE and ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE. It was found that the antioxidant activity of the extract obtained by SC-CO2 extraction was strongly higher than those obtained by SE and UAE. Identification of fatty acid composition using gas chromatography (GC showed that all the extracts were rich in unsaturated fatty acids with the most being linoleic acid. In contrast, the amount of saturated fatty acids extracted by SE was higher than that extracted under optimized SC-CO2 extraction conditions.

  2. Oil characteristics and fatty acid profile of seeds from three varieties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, flame ionization based detection gas chromatography (GC-FID) revealed that oleic acid was the primary fatty acid in all varieties. It was followed by lauric, myristic, palmitic, linoleic and stearic acids and trace amounts of the other fatty acids like undecylic, capric, nonanoic (pelargonic) and caprylic acids. Depending on ...

  3. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Juntao; Chen, Yiqiang; Yang, Wenjun; Zhang, Liying

    2015-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0) was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21) and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42). Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100). Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (pcoconut oil level increased (poil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers.

  4. Effects of olive scale (Parlatoria oleae (Colvée attack on yield, quality and fatty acid profile of virgin olive oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapac

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Olive scale (Parlatoria oleae (Colvée is a common pest in Mediterranean olive orchards which primarily causes damage on olive fruits. The quality of virgin olive oil is strongly related to the health status of the olive fruits from which is extracted. In this paper the effects of olive scale (Parlatoria oleae (Colvée attack on the oil yield, chemical and sensorial quality, as well as on the fatty acid profile of virgin olive oil were studied. Olive fruits (Olea europea L. from Bova cultivar (Istria, Croatia were collected and divided into different groups according to the presence or absence of infestation by the olive scale. Olive scale attack did not induce ripening process nor stimulate oil synthesis in the infested fruits. Healthy and infested fruit groups were processed separately to produce corresponding olive oils. As regards the oil acidity, the oil samples obtained from infested fruits had similar values as samples obtained from healthy fruits. However, olive scale attack led to slight oxidative deterioration of oil, but had no effect on sensory characteristics of obtained olive oils. Fatty acid profile was slightly affected by olive scale attack: an increase of linoleic (about 13 % and palmitoleic acid (about 8 %, but a decrease of oleic (about 3 % and stearic acid (about 4 % in oils obtained from infested fruits was detected. Oleic to linoleic ratio was lower in oils obtained from infested fruits indicating its lower oxidative stability.

  5. Effects of essential oils on performance, egg quality, nutrient digestibility and yolk fatty acid profile in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Ding

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate the effect of essential oils on performance, egg quality, nutrient digestibility and yolk fatty acid profile in laying hens. A total of 960 Lohmann laying hens aged 53 weeks were enrolled, under 4 different treatment diets supplemented with 0, 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg essential oils (Enviva EO, Dupont Nutrition Biosciences ApS, Denmark, respectively. Each treatment was replicated 8 times with 30 birds each. Birds were fed dietary treatment diets for 12 weeks (54 to 65 weeks. For data recording and analysis, a 12-week period was divided into 3 periods of 4 weeks' duration each: period 1 (54 to 57 weeks, period 2 (58 to 61 weeks, and period 3 (62 to 65 weeks. For the diet supplemented with Enviva EO, hen-day egg production and the feed conversion ratio (FCR were significantly improved (P < 0.05 at weeks 58 to 61, and the eggshell thickness was significantly increased (P < 0.05 at week 65. However, egg production, egg weight, feed intake, FCR and other egg quality parameters (albumen height, Haugh unit, egg yolk color and eggshell strength were not affected by the dietary treatment. In addition, compared with the control diet, protein digestibility in the 100 mg/kg Enviva EO treatment group was significantly increased (P < 0.05, and fat digestibility in the 100 and 150 mg/kg Enviva EO treatment groups was significantly decreased (P < 0.05, but Enviva EO had no effect on energy apparent digestibility. Saturated fatty acid (SFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA gradually decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA increased with Enviva EO supplementation, but the difference was not significant. The data suggested that the supplementation of essential oils (Enviva EO in laying hen diet did not show a significant positive effect on performance and yolk fatty acid composition but it tended to increase eggshell thickness and protein digestibility, especially at the dose of 50 mg/kg.

  6. Assessment of the fatty acid patterns in vegetable oils, fats and fat-rich foods commonly consumed in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantellops, Dennis

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Forty-one individual food samples were analyzed for their fatty acid contents by gas-liquid chromatography using capillary tubes. The samples belonged to 5 different food groups and included vegetable oils, butter & ghee, animal fats, dairy products, fishes, chicken & meats and other popular dishes. The results show that maize oil was lowest in its total saturated fatty acid content (11% and richest in linolenic acid. On the other hand, total saturated fatty acids made up 42-62 % of the total fatty acid patterns of the lamb and camel fat tallow, respectively. Long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (C20-C22 with two to six double bonds were present only in fishes. Estimate of fat intake amounted to 36 grams per subject per day and the % contribution of the analyzed fats was presented. The ratio of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids amounted to 0.96; which falls within the optimum dietary goals.Cuarenta y una muestras de alimentos individuales fueron analizadas por su contenido en ácidos grasos mediante cromatografía gas-líquido usando columnas capilares. Las muestras pertenecieron a 5 grupos diferentes, incluyendo aceites vegetales, mantequilla y «ghee», grasas animales, productos lácteos, pescados, pollo y carnes, y otros platos populares. Los resultados mostraron que el aceite de maíz fue el que tuvo el más bajo contenido en ácidos grasos saturados totales (11% y el más rico en ácido linolénico. Por otro lado, los ácidos grasos saturados totales alcanzaron el 42-62% de los ácidos grasos totales del sebo de cordero y camello respectivamente. Los ácidos grasos poliinsaturados de cadena larga (C20-C22 con dos a seis dobles enlaces estuvieron presentes solo en pescados. La estimación de la ingesta ascendió a 36 g por sujeto y día, y se presenta el porcentaje de contribución de las grasas analizadas. La relación de ácidos grasos poliinsaturados a saturados ascendió a 0.96; estando dentro del óptimo alimenticio.

  7. Fatty acid methyl esters synthesis from non-edible vegetable oils using supercritical methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamba, Neha; Modak, Jayant M.; Madras, Giridhar

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • FAMEs were synthesized from non-edible oils using supercritical MeOH and MTBE. • Effect of time, temperature, pressure and molar ratio on conversions was studied. • Rate constants of reaction with methanol and MTBE differ by an order of magnitude. • Non-catalytic supercritical reactions are one order faster than acid catalyzed synthesis. - Abstract: Fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) are useful as biodiesel and have environmental benefits compared to conventional diesel. In this study, these esters were synthesized non-catalytically from non-edible vegetable oils: neem oil and mahua oil with two different methylating agents: methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The effects of temperature, pressure, time and molar ratio on the conversion of triglycerides were studied. The temperature was varied in the range of 523–723 K with molar ratios upto 50:1 and a reaction time of upto 150 min. Conversion of neem and mahua oil to FAMEs with supercritical methanol was found to be 83% in 15 min and 99% in 10 min, respectively at 698 K. Further, a conversion of 46% of mahua oil and 59% of neem oil was obtained in 15 min at 723 K using supercritical MTBE. The rate constants evaluated using pseudo first order reaction kinetics were in the range of 4.7 × 10 −6 to 1.0 × 10 −3 s −1 for the investigated range of temperatures. The activation energies obtained were in the range of 62–113 kJ/mol for the reaction systems investigated. The supercritical synthesis was found to be superior to the catalytic synthesis of the corresponding FAMEs.

  8. Optimization of catalyst-free production of biodiesel from Ceiba pentandra (kapok) oil with high free fatty acid contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Lu Ki; Effendi, Chintya; Kurniawan, Alfin; Lin, Chun Xiang; Zhao, Xiu Song; Ismadji, Suryadi

    2013-01-01

    Catalyst-free biodiesel production from non-edible Ceiba pentandra (kapok) oil via supercritical methanol transesterification was demonstrated in this work. The supercritical transesterification experiments were performed in a batch reactor at temperatures of 250–350 °C, pressures of 10–18 MPa, reaction times of 120–600 s, and methanol to oil molar ratios of 15:1–35:1. Response surface methodology (RSM) and four-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were applied for the design and optimization of the experiments with respect to temperature, pressure, reaction time, and molar ratio of methanol to oil simultaneously. The response (i.e., FAME yield) was fitted by a quadratic polynomial regression model using least square analysis in a five-level-four-factor central composite design (CCD). The optimum conditions were found as follows: methanol to oil molar ratio of 30:1, temperature of 322 °C, pressure of 16.7 MPa, and reaction time of 476 s with FAME (fatty acid methyl ester) yield of 95.5%. The significance of the reaction parameters toward FAME yield was in the order of methanol to oil molar ratio > reaction time > pressure > temperature. - Highlights: • Transesterification of non-edible kapok oil into biodiesel via a non-catalytic route. • Methanol to oil molar ratio, temperature, pressure, and reaction time were optimized. • Experimental design in a five-level-four-factor central composite design. • Application of quadratic polynomial model for fitting the response (FAME yield)

  9. Extraction of unsaturated fatty acid-rich oil from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) roe and production of defatted roe hydrolysates with functional, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghelichi, Sakhi; Shabanpour, Bahareh; Pourashouri, Parastoo

    2017-01-01

    Common carp roe is a rich protein and oil source, which is usually discarded with no specific use. The aims of this study were to extract oil from the discarded roe and examine functional, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties of defatted roe hydrolysates (CDRHs) at various degrees...... antioxidant activity both in vitro and in 5% roe oil-in-water emulsions and inhibited the growth of certain bacterial strains. Common carp roe could be a promising source of unsaturated fatty acids and functional bioactive agents. Unsaturated fatty acid-rich oil extracted from common carp roe can be delivered...... into food systems by roe oil-in-water emulsions fortified by functional, antioxidant, and antibacterial hydrolysates from the defatted roe....

  10. Synthesis of Fatty Alcohols from Oil Palm Using a Catalyst of Ni-Cu Supported onto Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Giraldo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Ni-Cu supported onto zeolite type ZSM-5 has been synthesized by direct hydrothermal method without template agent and characterized using XRD, FT-IR, NRM mass, SEM, CG and N2 adsorption techniques. The catalytic performance of the obtained materials was evaluated and utilized for the hydrogenation of palm oil at 453 K and 40 atmospheres of pressure. The results show that the samples exhibited typical hexagonal arrangement of mesoporous structure with high surface area and the heteroatoms were probably incorporated into the framework of ZSM-5. Catalytic tests show that the bimetallic incorporated materials were effective as catalysts in the hydrogenation of oil palm producing fatty alcohols typical.

  11. Combusting vegetable oils in diesel engines: the impact of unsaturated fatty acids on particle emissions and mutagenic effects of the exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Jürgen; Bünger, Jörn F; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Schröder, Olaf; Brüning, Thomas; Hallier, Ernst; Westphal, Götz A

    2016-06-01

    High particle emissions and strong mutagenic effects were observed after combustion of vegetable oil in diesel engines. This study tested the hypothesis that these results are affected by the amount of unsaturated or polyunsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils. Four different vegetable oils (coconut oil, CO; linseed oil, LO; palm tree oil, PO; and rapeseed oil, RO) and common diesel fuel (DF) were combusted in a heavy-duty diesel engine. The exhausts were investigated for particle emissions and mutagenic effects in direct comparison with emissions of DF. The engine was operated using the European Stationary Cycle. Particle masses were measured gravimetrically while mutagenicity was determined using the bacterial reverse mutation assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Combustion of LO caused the largest amount of total particulate matter (TPM). In comparison with DF, it particularly raised the soluble organic fraction (SOF). RO presented second highest TPM and SOF, followed by CO and PO, which were scarcely above DF. RO revealed the highest number of mutations of the vegetable oils closely followed by LO. PO was less mutagenic, but still induced stronger effects than DF. While TPM and SOF were strongly correlated with the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the vegetable oils, mutagenicity had a significant correlation with the amount of total unsaturated fatty acids. This study supports the hypothesis that numbers of double bounds in unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils combusted in diesel engines influence the amount of emitted particles and the mutagenicity of the exhaust. Further investigations have to elucidate the causal relationship.

  12. Transport of fatty acids within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows fed on fish oil and hydrogenated palm oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E.; Íñiguez-González, G.; Garnsworthy, P. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary fish oil (FO) and a blend of FO and hydrogenated palm oil (FOPO) on transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Two trials were conducted (one with lactating and another with non......-lactating dairy cows) in two 3 × 3 Latin squares that included three periods of 21 days. Dietary treatments for lactating cows consisted of a basal diet (Control; no fat supplement), and fat-supplemented diets containing FO (500 g/day/cow) and FOPO (250 FO + 250 g/day/cow hydrogenated palm oil). For non......-lactating cows, dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (Control; no fat supplement), and fat-supplemented diets containing FO (170 g/day/cow) and FOPO (85 FO + 85 hydrogenated palm oil g/day/cow). In lactating cows, compared with control and FOPO, FO increased C16:0, C18:3 cis-9, 12, 15, C18:2 cis-9, trans...

  13. Methyl esters from vegetable oils with hydroxy fatty acids: Comparison of lesquerella and castor methyl esters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The search for alternative feedstocks for biodiesel as partial replacement for petrodiesel has recently extended to castor oil. In this work, the castor oil methyl esters were prepared and their properties determined in comparison to the methyl esters of lesquerella oil, which in turn is seen as alt...

  14. Maternal intake of dietary virgin coconut oil modifies essential fatty acids and causes low body weight and spiky fur in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, Renuka; Shaker, Mohammed Rafid; Mohd-Zin, Siti Waheeda; Abdullah, Aminah; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Abdul-Aziz, Noraishah Mydin

    2017-01-28

    Coconut oil is commonly used as herbal medicine worldwide. There is limited information regarding its effects on the developing embryo and infant growth. We investigated the effect of virgin coconut oil post-natally and until 6 weeks old in mice (age of maturity). Females were fed with either standard, virgin olive oil or virgin coconut oil diets 1 month prior to copulation, during gestation and continued until weaning of pups. Subsequently, groups of pups borne of the respective diets were continuously fed the same diet as its mother from weaning until 6 weeks old. Profiles of the standard and coconut oil diets were analysed by gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GCFID). Analysis of the mean of the total weight gained/ loss over 6 weeks revealed that in the first 3 weeks, pups whose mothers were fed virgin coconut oil and virgin olive oil have a significantly lower body weight than that of standard diet pups. At 6 weeks of age, only virgin coconut oil fed pups exhibited significantly lower body weight. We report that virgin coconut oil modifies the fatty acid profiles of the standard diet by inducing high levels of medium chain fatty acids with low levels of essential fatty acids. Furthermore, pups borne by females fed with virgin coconut oil developed spiky fur. Our study has demonstrated that virgin coconut oil could affect infant growth and appearance via maternal intake; we suggest the use of virgin coconut oil as herbal medicine to be treated with caution.

  15. Fatty acids characterization, oxidative perspectives and consumer acceptability of oil extracted from pre-treated chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad; Manzoor, Muhammad Faisal; Javed, Amna; Ali, Zafar; Akhtar, Muhammad Nadeem; Ali, Muhammad; Hussain, Yasir

    2016-09-20

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) seeds have been described as a good source of lipids, protein, dietary fiber, polyphenolic compounds and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. The consumption of chia seed oil helps to improve biological markers related to metabolic syndrome diseases. The oil yield and fatty acids composition of chia oil is affected by several factors such as pre-treatment method and size reduction practices. Therefore, the main mandate of present investigate was to study the effect of different seed pre-treatments on yield, fatty acids composition and sensory acceptability of chia oil at different storage intervals and conditions. Raw chia seeds were characterized for proximate composition. Raw chia seeds after milling were passed through sieves to obtain different particle size fractions (coarse, seed particle size ≥ 10 mm; medium, seed particle size ≥ 5 mm; fine, seed particle size ≤ 5 mm). Heat pre-treatment of chia seeds included the water boiling (100 C°, 5 min), microwave roasting (900 W, 2450 MHz, 2.5 min), oven drying (105 ± 5 °C, 1 h) and autoclaving (121 °C, 15 lbs, 15 min) process. Extracted oil from pre-treated chia seeds were stored in Tin cans at 25 ± 2 °C and 4 ± 1 °C for 60-days and examined for physical (color, melting point, refractive index), oxidative (iodine value, peroxide value, free fatty acids), fatty acids (palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, α-linolenic) composition and sensory (appearance, flavor, overall acceptability) parameters, respectively. The proximal composition of chia seeds consisted of 6.16 ± 0.24 % moisture, 34.84 ± 0.62 % oil, 18.21 ± 0.45 % protein, 4.16 ± 0.37 % ash, 23.12 ± 0.29 % fiber, and 14.18 ± 0.23 % nitrogen contents. The oil yield as a result of seed pre-treatments was found in the range of 3.43 ± 0.22 % (water boiled samples) to 32.18 ± 0.34 % (autoclaved samples). The oil samples at day 0 indicated the

  16. Studies on changes in patterns of fatty acids, sterols and tocopherols of oil during seed maturation of oil crops. Part I. Sunflower seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shami, S. M.

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available The variation of lipid constituents in maturing sunflower oil seeds has been investigated with the aim of determination of the proper harvesting time as well as the oil quality. Marked variations in fatty acid, sterol and tocopherol constituents of the oil were observed. Capillary gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography were used in the analysis which enabled the determination of major as well as minor constituents in the oil. In addition, gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to confirm the structure of cycloartenol sterol. Postulations on the key compounds of fatty acids, sterols, and tocopherols were proposed in the frame of the main biosynthetic pathways. The proper harvesting time was found to be 118 days after plantation since the oil content was high and the constituents of the oil were balanced.

    Se ha investigado la variación de los constituyentes lipídicos en aceites de semillas de girasol en distintos estados de maduración, con el objetivo de determinar el tiempo de recolección apropiado así como la calidad del aceite. Se observaron variaciones apreciables en los ácidos grasos, esteroles y tocoferoles del aceite. La cromatografía gaseosa capilar y la cromatografía líquida de alta eficacia se usó en el análisis que permitió la determinación tanto de los componentes mayoritarios como minoritarios en el aceite. Además, se utilizó la cromatografía gaseosa acoplada a la espectrometría de masas para confirmar la estructura del esterol cicloartenol. Se han propuesto en el marco de la ruta biosintética principal postulados sobre los compuestos clave de ácidos grasos, esteroles y tocoferoles. Se encontró como tiempo de recolección apropiado el de 118 días después de la plantación, ya que el contenido de aceite fue elevado y los constituyentes fueron equilibrados.

  17. Monounsaturated fatty acid ether oligomers formed during heating of virgin olive oil show agglutination activity against human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrikios, Ioannis S; Mavromoustakos, Thomas M

    2014-01-29

    The present work focuses on the characterization of molecules formed when virgin olive oil is heated at 130 °C for 24 h open in air, which are found to be strong agglutinins. The hemagglutinating activity of the newly formed molecule isolated from the heated virgin olive oil sample was estimated against human red blood cells (RBCs). Dimers and polymers (high molecular weight molecules) were identified through thin layer chromatography (TLC) of the oil mixture. (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) were the methods used for structural characterization. Among others, oligomerization of at least two monounsaturated fatty acids (FA) by an ether linkage between the hydrocarbon chains is involved. Light microscopy was used to characterize and visualize the agglutination process. Agglutination without fusion or lysis was observed. It was concluded that the heating of virgin olive oil open in air, among other effects, produces oligomerization as well as polymerization of unsaturated FA, possibly of monohydroxy, monounsaturated FA that is associated with strong hemagglutinating activity against human RBCs. The nutritional value and the effects on human health of such oligomers are not discussed in the literature and remain to be investigated.

  18. THE EGG – FUNCTIONAL FOOD.COMPARATIVE STUDY ON VARIOUS NUTRITIONAL SOLUTIONS TO ENRICH THE EGG POLYUNSATURATED FATTY ACIDS. II YOLK FATTY ACIDS PROFILE RESULTING FROM THE DIETARY USE OF SAFFLOWER OIL AND FLAX SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CRISTE RODICA. D.

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results obtained in a study on the comparative evaluation of the effect of a diet with safflower oil and flax seeds compared to a control soybean oil diet given to layers on the bioproductive effects, egg characteristics and yolk fatty acids profile. The trial involved 32 Lowman Brown layers during the age period 23- 28 weeks (1 week of accommodation and 4 experimental weeks. The layers, assigned to 2 groups (16 layers/group, 4 layers/cage received diets based on corn, wheat and soybean meal. The diets differed by the source of fatty acids: soybean oil for the control group (SO; safflower oil and flax seeds for SSO+FS. The diets were supplemented with 250 ppm vitamin E. Twelve eggs per group were collected randomly 10 and 30 days, respectively, after the beginning of the experiment. The paper presents comparative data on the: average egg weight, egg component (egg shell, yolk, egg white weight, intensity of yolk colour (Hoffman – La Roche colour range, yolk protein, fat yolk pH (measured one week after collection, the eggs being kept at 50C and yolk fatty acids. All data show that the profile of yolk unsaturated fatty acids can be handled quite easily by the nature of the dietary fats, their level of inclusion and their dietary ratio.

  19. Identification of a novel delta9-fatty acid desaturase gene and its promoter from oil-producing fungus Rhizopus arrhizus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dongsheng; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Zhe; Zhang, Xinxin; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Transcriptional Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Rapid Amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE) and Thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR were used successfully to clone the open reading frame (1,377 bp) of delta9-fatty acid desaturase gene (named as RAD9) and its promoter region from oil-producing fungi Rhizopus arrhizus. Functional identification of the protein was done by sub-cloning RAD9 into the expression vector pYES2.0 to generate a recombinant plasmid pYRAD9, which was then subsequently transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae delta9-fatty acid desaturase mutation strain L8-14C to be expressed under the control of GAL1 promoter. The transformant containing RAD9 named as L8-14C-pYRAD9 could grow on the synthetic minimal medium plate with out oleic acid supplement. Fatty acid analysis also showed that the transformant contained 16:1 and 18:1. This indicated that pYRAD9 could successfully complement the mutation of L8-14C. Computational analysis of the nucleotide sequence of RAD9 promoter showed several basic transcriptional elements including a CAAT box, a GC box, a CACCC box, two TATA boxes and also several putative target-binding sites for transcription factors, which have been reported to be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Preliminary functional analysis of this promoter in S. cerevisiae was done using lacZ report gene.

  20. Chlorella sp : Extraction of fatty acid by using avocado oil as solvent and its application as an anti-aging cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, T. W.; Raya, I.; Natsir, H.; Mayasari, E.

    2018-03-01

    The study aimed to analyze the fatty acid content of Chlorella sp crude extract by using avocado oil solvent and determining the effectiveness of fatty acids Chlorella sp as the anti-aging cream The extraction of fatty acids from Chlorella sp using avocado oil as a solvent with three ratios were 1:10, 1:20 and 1:25 w/V. The highest lipid content was obtained at 1:20 w/V (gram microalgae: mL avocado oil) yielding 52.73%. Crude extracted were analysis by GC-MS and FTIR, and skin condition was determined by skin analyzer. The effectiveness test of Chlorella sp cream was applicated on the face of the panelists aged 20-60 years. From 10 panelists, the applied of Chlorella sp cream was 90% increased on the facial skin yielded moisture and oil content, 70% repair the skin structure. The composition of fatty acids Chlorella sp extract was palmitic acid, linoleic, oleic and stearate. Fatty acids crude extract of Chlorella sp can improve the effectiveness of anti-aging cream. The cream from Chlorella sp was more effective than the cream without containing microalgae. This is very promising because it is alternative to organic solvents i.e. green chemistry.

  1. Further studies on a mixture of fatty acids from sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) wax oil in animal models of hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledón, N; Romay, Ch; Rodríguez, V; Cruz, J; Rodríguez, S; Ancheta, O; González, A; González, R; Tolón, Z; Cano, M; Rojas, E; Capote, A; Valdes, T

    2005-02-01

    A mixture of fatty acids obtained from sugar cane wax oil, the main components of which are palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids, was evaluated topically in two experimental models of hypersensitivity: the ear swelling response to ovalbumin in sensitized mice (ED50 edema: 0.63 +/- 0.06 mg/ear, ED50 myeloperoxidase: 0.56 +/- 0.04 mg/ear, ED50 degranulated cells: 0.70 +/- 0,08 mg/ear) and oxazolone-induced contact hypersensitivity in mice (ED50 edema: 1.63 +/- 0.26 mg/ear, ED50 myeloperoxidase: 1.50 +/- 0.28 mg/ear, ED50 degranulated cells: 1.69 +/- 0.08 mg/ear). Also, the effect of this mixture was studied on the chemotaxis induced by fmlp (ED50: 25 +/- 3 microg/mL). The mixture showed anti-inflammatory activity in both in vivo models of allergy and in the chemotaxis test. Therefore, these results provide evidence about the potential usefulness of the mixture of fatty acids from sugar cane wax oil in cutaneous inflammatory and allergic disorders.

  2. A Study on the Production Process Control of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim Seed Kernel Oil without Trans-Fatty Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyi Yin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process control of the production of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim seed kernel oil (ZSKO with no trans-fatty acids (TFAs was investigated. Results revealed that drying temperature and time had a small effect on TFA formation in ZSKO. And high concentrations of sodium hydroxide solution had some effect on TFA formation in ZKSO, but there were no TFAs when the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution was lower than 20% and even at boiling temperature for one hour. The roasting temperature and duration for Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim seed (ZS should be properly controlled at 100°C for six hours or 150°C for two hours. ZS, which has a moisture content of 18%, was pressed four times (two hours at less than 60°C, and ZSKO was obtained by collection through centrifuge separation. This contained 90.84% unsaturated fatty acids, which mainly include 32.49%  α-linolenic acid, 29.88% linoleic acid, and 27.52% oleic acids; and there was no TFA. Its acidic value and peroxide value conformed to China standards for edible oil. Therefore, ZKSO could be used as a healthy food for further development.

  3. Associations between major fatty acids in plant oils fed to dairy goats and C18 isomers in milk fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Marín, Andrés L; Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Núñez Sánchez, Nieves; Juárez, Manuela; Garzón Sigler, Ana I; Peña Blanco, Francisco; de la Fuente, Miguel Angel

    2015-05-01

    Relationships between fatty acids (FAs) in plant oils included in goat diets and milk fat C18 isomers were determined by Principal Factor Analysis (PFA). The three first principal factors (PF1, PF2 and PF3) accounted for 64.5% of the total variation in milk FAs contents. Fatty acids with a double bond at carbons 13, 14, 15 or 16 had high (>0.6) and positive loadings for PF1, trans-4 to trans-8 C18:1 for PF2, whereas trans-10 C18:1, trans-11 C18:1 and cis-9 trans-11 C18:2 showed high and positive loadings for PF3. Pearson's correlations supported that PF1, PF2 and PF3 were related to α-linolenic, oleic and linoleic acid intakes, respectively. Our results show that the quantitatively main FAs in plant lipids supplemented to dairy ruminants are often the main cause of the observed changes in milk C18 isomer contents. However, sometimes the observed changes are caused, or at least are influenced, by other FAs present in lower quantities in the plant lipids. Thus, using mixtures of plant oils with differently unsaturated main FAs could be a way of tailoring milk fat composition to a pre-designed pattern.

  4. Variations of the fatty acid composition in the oil from the larval stages of the emperor moth caterpillar, Imbrasia belina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Pharithi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The mophane caterpillar, phane, the larval stage of the emperor moth, Imbrasia belina, is an important food source, with increasing popularity, in the southern African region. The protein and fat contents of phane have been estimated as 55% and 33% (w/w, respectively. Unsaturation content is about 60%, with α-linolenic acid being the dominant fatty acid in the lipid content of phane. An earlier investigation showed that the iodine values of two oil samples from two batches of phane at different ages, i.e., instars, varied significantly. The proximate fatty acid composition has now been determined by capillary GC for five oil samples from five batches of mophane caterpillar, ranging between early III and late V instars in order to investigate any differences in the nature of the lipid content due to age. The oil yield increased steadily from 19.8% (w/w for early III instars to 38.3% for late V instars. The contents of palmitic and linoleic acids were 8.5% and 24%, respectively, for early III instars, and 31.1% and 10.7%, respectively, for late V instars. The composition of α-linolenic acid peaked at 39.1% for III/IV instars but decreased to 32.5% for late V instars. The lipid content of the leaves of the mophane tree, the principal food source of the mophane caterpillar, was found to be composed of 24% palmitic acid, 4.1% palmitoleic acid, 5.6% stearic acid, 14.85% oleic acid, 15. 6% linoleic acid and 32.9% linolenic acid, a fatty acid composition quite similar to that of mature phane, late V instars. Crude protein content varied irregularly with early III and late V instars being 59.3% and 62.0% (w/w, respectively. This study has demonstrated a dramatic variation in the composition of palmitic and linoleic acids in the lipid content from early III to late V instars of the larvae of Imbrasia belina. The study has also confirmed the larvae of Imbrasia belina as a rich source of protein and α-linolenic acid, the precursor of the 3 essential

  5. Investigation of Hydrodeoxygenation of Oils and Fats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anders Theilgaard; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    -atom shorter) also yielding alkanes. In all routes propane is formed as a by-product from the glycerol in the fats. The hydrotreatment of a model fat mixture is studied in a stainless steel autoclave between 250 and 375°C, at moderate hydrogen pressures and over catalysts of 5 wt% Pt, Pd or Ni supported on γ......-chain alkanes. This would allow direct integration of biofuel production in existing refineries and allow use of feedstock with high amounts of free fatty acids (abattoir wastes, used fats, greases, etc.) [1], or even tall oils from the Kraft process [2]. The reaction network from oils and fats in H2 atmosphere......-Al2O3. Hydrolysis or hydrogenation of glycerides to free fatty acids is observed to be part of the alkane formation from esters. It was seen that Pt and Pd almost exclusively facilitate the decarbonylation or decarboxylation routes. Ni also facilitated the hydrogenation route, but with a considerably...

  6. Recovery of Oil with Unsaturated Fatty Acids and Polyphenols from Chaenomelessinensis (Thouin) Koehne: Process Optimization of Pilot-Scale Subcritical Fluid Assisted Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Rui; Zhan, Shaoying; He, Jingren; Barba, Francisco J; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Wu, Weizhong; Li, Shuyi

    2017-10-22

    The potential effects of three modern extraction technologies (cold-pressing, microwaves and subcritical fluids) on the recovery of oil from Chaenomelessinensis (Thouin) Koehne seeds have been evaluated and compared to those of conventional chemical extraction methods (Soxhlet extraction). This oil contains unsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols. Subcritical fluid extraction (SbFE) provided the highest yield-25.79 g oil/100 g dry seeds-of the three methods. Moreover, the fatty acid composition in the oil samples was analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This analysis showed that the percentages of monounsaturated (46.61%), and polyunsaturated fatty acids (42.14%), after applying SbFE were higher than those obtained by Soxhlet, cold-pressing or microwave-assisted extraction. In addition, the oil obtained under optimized SbFE conditions (35 min extraction at 35 °C with four extraction cycles), showed significant polyphenol (527.36 mg GAE/kg oil), and flavonoid (15.32 mg RE/kg oil), content, had a good appearance and was of high quality.

  7. Changes in LDL fatty acid composition as a response to olive oil treatment are inversely related to lipid oxidative damage: The EUROLIVE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Nascetti, Simona; López-Sabater, Maria C

    2008-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the changes in the fatty acid composition of low density lipoproteins (LDL) after sustained consumption of olive oil at real-life doses (25 mL/day) and their relationship with lipid oxidative damage.......The aim of our study was to assess the changes in the fatty acid composition of low density lipoproteins (LDL) after sustained consumption of olive oil at real-life doses (25 mL/day) and their relationship with lipid oxidative damage....

  8. Effects of olive oil calcium soaps and phase of lactation on the fatty acid composition in the milk of Massese ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Verità

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A basic diet of hay and concentrate, the latter supplemented with olive oil calcium soap (7% as fed was given to 11Massese ewes (group S for a 3-month period, while a basic diet without the supplement was given to 11 control Masseseewes (group C during the same period. Fatty acid composition of milk produced from the 5th to the 16th week post-partumwas evaluated monthly.In group S, the fatty acids C6:0, C8:0, C10:0, C12:0, C14:0, C14:1, C18:3n-6 and C20:3n-3 (Pand C16:0, C18:1, total CLA, C20:0, C20:1, C20:2, C20:5n-3 (EPA, C23:0 (Pincreased with respect to the control group C. This trend lead to a decrease in short-chain fatty acids (Pincrease in unsaturated fatty acids (Plactation phase also significantly influenced fatty acid composition: the unsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio was higherat the end of the lactation period.It can be concluded that the addition of protected olive oil fats to the diet of lactating ewes may improve fatty acid milkcomposition. In addition, the final phase of production positively affects milk quality relative to human health.

  9. Effect of the inclusion of fish residue oils in diets on the fatty acid profile of muscles of males and females lambari (Astyanax altiparanae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Uribe Gonçalves

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of two lipids sources of fish residue (tilapia and salmon compared with a vegetable oil source (soybean oil on the fatty acid profiles of male and female lambari. This experiment was developed in a completely randomized experimental design in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement, totaling 6 treatments resulting from the combination of the three experimental diets for both sexes, with four replications for each treatment. This study involved 120 male (2.58±0.13 g and 72 female lambari (4.00±0.09 g, fed the experimental diets twice a day until apparent satiation for a period of 60 days. Oleic, linoleic, palmitic and stearic fatty acids were found at higher concentrations in all experimental oils and diets, as well in the muscle of male and female lambari. The low amounts of arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in the experimental diets and subsequent greater concentrations in muscle tissue, suggested that lambari are able to desaturate and elongate the chain of fatty acids with 18 carbons. The fish of both sexes that received the diet with soybean oil showed high levels of n-6 fatty acids, especially of C18: 2n-6 and low levels of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. The diet with salmon residue oil promoted higher levels of fatty acids of the n-3 series and resulted in the best n-3/n-6 ratio in the muscle of male and female lambari. The oils from fish residues can be a substitute for traditional fish oil and its use in the lambari diets does not impair its growth.

  10. Focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction of acorn oil for determination of the fatty acid profile by GC-MS. Comparison with conventional and standard methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Serradilla, J A; Ortiz, M C; Sarabia, L; de Castro, M D Luque

    2007-05-01

    A study of the feasibility of focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction of acorn oil and comparison of results from analysis of trans fatty acids in the oil thus obtained with those for oils obtained by use of other methods commonly used for oil extraction are reported here. The proposed method was optimized by means of a 21-experiment screening design to determine, by means of a reduced number of experiments, which factors affect both extraction efficiency and the degree of unsaturation of the fatty acids in the oil. The proposed method enables total extraction of the fatty acids in 30 min, which is much less than the time required by the Folch (4.5 h), Soxhlet (16 h), and ISO (8 h) reference methods and the stirring-extraction method (56 h). The efficiency of extraction achieved by use of the proposed method is statistically equivalent to that achieved by use of the other methods; the composition of the extracts obtained by use of the proposed method and the Folch and stirring reference methods are also statistically similar. No trans fatty acids were present in the extracts obtained by use of the Folch, stirring, and proposed methods but they were detected in the extracts obtained by use of both the Soxhlet and ISO methods.

  11. Megacities and tall buildings: symbiosis

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    Safarik Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anyone concerned with the development of human civilization in the 21st Century will likely have heard the term «megacity». It is – as it should be – increasingly prevalent in both mainstream and academic discussions of the great trends of our time: urbanization, rising technological and physical connectivity, increasingly polarized extremes of wealth and poverty, environmental degradation, and climate change. It is a subject as large and far-reaching as its name implies. This paper sets the scene on how megacities and the built environment are growing together, and examines the implications for those who plan, design, develop and operate tall buildings and urban infrastructure.

  12. Megacities and tall buildings: symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarik, Daniel; Ursini, Shawn; Wood, Antony

    2018-03-01

    Anyone concerned with the development of human civilization in the 21st Century will likely have heard the term «megacity». It is - as it should be - increasingly prevalent in both mainstream and academic discussions of the great trends of our time: urbanization, rising technological and physical connectivity, increasingly polarized extremes of wealth and poverty, environmental degradation, and climate change. It is a subject as large and far-reaching as its name implies. This paper sets the scene on how megacities and the built environment are growing together, and examines the implications for those who plan, design, develop and operate tall buildings and urban infrastructure.

  13. Variability in fatty acid and triacylglycerol composition of the oil of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) hybrids and their parentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laureles, Lucita R; Rodriguez, Felicito M; Reaño, Consorcia E; Santos, Gerardo A; Laurena, Antonio C; Mendoza, Evelyn Mae Tecson

    2002-03-13

    The fatty acid profiles and triacylglycerol (TAG) compositions of oils from the solid endosperm of different Philippine coconut hybrids and their parentals were determined by using gas chromatography (GC) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In general, varietal differences in fatty acid composition were observed. Lauric acid (C12) content was significantly higher in the hybrids PCA 15-8 (50.45%) and PCA 15-9 (50.26%) by about 3.16% points as compared to other hybrids, and higher in Tacunan Green Dwarf (50.50%) among the parentals. Among the fatty acids, lauric acid exhibited the least variation. In general, none of the hybrids had higher fatty acid content than their parentals. The HPLC chromatogram of triacylglycerols (TAG) showed 8 major peaks which differ in carbon number (CN) by two: identified as TAG CN 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, and 44. TAGs CN 30 (4.08%) and CN 34 (19.20%) were found to be significantly higher in PCA 15-9 than in the other hybrids. CN 36 was highest (21.94-23.66%) in all hybrids and parentals. The TAG CNs varied significantly among hybrids and parents, i.e., in CN 30, 32, and 34, which are high in medium chain triacylglycerols (MCTs), and in CN 30 (for parentals only), 40, 42, and 44 (the latter two for parentals only), and none in CN 36. MCTs calculated for two hybrids and their parents ranged from 13.81% to 20.55%.

  14. Impact of different inclusion levels of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) fronds on fatty acid profiles of goat muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, M; Rajion, M A; Goh, Y M; Sazili, A Q

    2012-12-01

    The effects of different inclusion levels of oil palm fronds (OPF) on the fatty acid profile of the longissimus dorsi (LD), biceps femoris (BF) and infraspinatus (IS) muscle of goats fed for 100 days are described. Twenty-four individually housed Kacang crossbred male goats (averaged 21.7 ± 0.97 kg BW) were allocated to three groups receiving either a 100% concentrate control diet (CON), diet with 25% inclusion level of OPF (HAF) or a diet with 50% inclusion of OPF. The diets were adjusted to be isocaloric and isonitrogenous and fed at 3.0% of BW daily. Samples of LD, BF and IS muscles were taken at slaughter for the determination of fatty acid profiles. The total saturated fatty acids (SFA) in the LD and BF muscles of the OPF group were significantly (p muscles, C18:3n-3 and total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) were significantly higher (p muscle had a significantly higher conjugated linoleic acid 18:2 c19t11 compared to other muscles. There were no interactions between muscle x diet except for total SFA. It is concluded that OPF at 25-50% inclusion levels may decrease the SFA and increase the n-3PUFA content in chevon, with no apparent adverse effects on the growth performance of the animals, can be used as a feed ingredient to support goat farming in countries that lack grazing pasture. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Δ6-fatty acid desaturase and fatty acid elongase mRNA expression, phagocytic activity and weight-to-length relationships in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fed alternative diets with soy oil and a probiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santerre, A; Téllez-Bañuelos, M C; Casas-Solís, J; Castro-Félix, P; Huízar-López, M R; Zaitseva, G P; Horta-Fernández, J L; Trujillo-García, E A; de la Mora-Sherer, D; Palafox-Luna, J A; Juárez-Carrillo, E

    2015-09-22

    A time-course feeding trial was conducted for 120 days on juvenile channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) to study the effects of diets differing in oil source (fish oil or soy oil) and supplementation with a commercial probiotic. Relative levels of Δ6-fatty acid desaturase (Δ6-FAD) and fatty acid elongase (FAE) expression were assessed in brain and liver tissues. Both genes showed similar expression levels in all groups studied. Fish weight-to-length relationships were evaluated using polynomial regression analyses, which identified a burst in weight and length in the channel catfish on day 105 of treatment; this increase was related to an increase in gene expression. Mid-intestinal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) count was determined according to morphological and biochemical criteria using API strips. There was no indication that intestinal LAB count was affected by the modified diets. The Cunningham glass adherence method was applied to evaluate phagocytic cell activity in peripheral blood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed through the respiratory burst activity of spleen macrophages by the NBT reduction test. Probiotic-supplemented diets provided a good substrate for innate immune system function; the phagocytic index was significantly enhanced in fish fed soy oil and the probiotic, and at the end of the experimental period, ROS production increased in fish fed soy oil. The substitution of fish oil by soy oil is recommended for food formulation and will contribute to promoting sustainable aquaculture. Probiotics are also recommended for channel catfish farming as they may act as immunonutrients.

  16. Impact of tall buildings in environmental pollution

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    H. Hayati

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, tall building is a phenomenon that the world particularly large cities are facing. The tall buildings in order to exploit the land with having the negative affects in the environment create new problems including increasing congestion population, environmental pollution, reduce citizen access to fresh air and sunlight. However, regarding to population increasing and land shortage, tall buildings could not be avoided. This paper investigates the relationship of tall buildings with urban air pollution as well as the possible reducing of negative affects of tall building on environmental pollution with respect to geographical position, technicalrules, immunization, green space, direct of wind, appropriate distance to other buildings, design in terms of visibility and landscape and urban appearance were reviewed. The study showed that the tall buildings cause increasing the air pollution in large urban area due to changing in wind and its direction and also congestion of tall buildings as a pollution sources. Therefore some techniques to design the tall building must be considered to reduce the negative affects of the tall buildings on environmental pollution. Unfortunately the lack of the construction roles in term of environmental protection and also control of the rules in construction process causing the environmental pollution particularly air pollution. It is suggested that the re-evaluate of the rules with restricted control can improve the air quality in the large cities and also utilization of green spaces in floors and roofs of buildings as environmentally friendly buildings which are attempt to reduce environmental problems.

  17. Antifungal activity of essential oils when associated with sodium chloride or fatty acids

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    Tantatoui-Elaraki, Abdelthafour

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of mycelium growth in a Zygorhynchus sp. and an Aspergillus niger isolates was studied. The inhibition rates (IR caused by 4 essential oils (EO, 5 fatty acids and sodium chloride at various concentrations were determined in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar.
    A synergy of action was observed between sodium chloride at 7.5% and the EO of thyme (0.04%, camomile (0.4% and mugwort (0.2 and 0.1% on A. niger and between sodium chloride (5% and the EO of camomile (0.1% and mugwort (0.1 and 0.01% and sodium chloride (7.5% and eucalyptus EO (0.4 and 0.2% on Zygorhynchus sp.
    Camomile EO (0.13% associated with propionic acid (0.075%, lauric acid (0.05% or oleic acid (0.15% led to synergetic effect on Zygorhynchus sp. as well as thyme EO (0.04 and 0.05%, respectively with propionic acid (0.1% and linolenic acid (0.075% on A. niger. Other combinations exerted no higher effects than each of the substances used alone.
    Practical applications of the results observed were discussed

    Se ha estudiado la inhibición del crecimiento miceliar en un aislamiento de Zygorhynchus sp. y otro de Aspergillus niger. Se determinaron las tasas (o índices de inhibición (IR en Agar Sabouraud Dextrosa provocados por varias concentraciones de 4 aceites esenciales (EG, 5 ácidos grasos y cloruro sódico.
    Se observó un efecto sinérgico entre cloruro sódico al 7.5% y los aceites esenciales de tomillo (0.04%, manzanilla (0.4% y artemisa (0.2 y 0.1% sobre A. niger, y entre cloruro sódico (5% y los aceites esenciales de manzanilla (0.1% y de artemisa (0.1 y 0.01%, así como cloruro sódico (7.5% y aceite esencial de eucalipto (0.4 y 0.2%, sobre Zygorhynchus sp.
    El aceite esencial de manzanilla (0.13% en asociación con ácido propiónico (0.075%, ácido láurico (0.05% o ácido oleico (0.15% provocó un efecto sinérgico sobre Zygorhynchus sp., de la misma forma

  18. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids in multiple sclerosis patients and hot-nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp-seed and evening-primrose oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezapour-Firouzi, Soheila; Arefhosseini, Seyed Rafie; Ebrahimi-Mamaghani, Mehrangiz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Baradaran, Behzad; Ali, Torbati Mohammad; Zamani, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    The risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with increased dietary intake of saturated fatty acids. For many years it has been suspected that this disease might be associated with an imbalance between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids. We determined erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels in Hot nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils in multiple sclerosis patients. To determine the erythrocyte membrane fatty acids levels and correlate it with expanded disability status scale (EDSS) at baseline after 6 months intervention in MS patients by gas chromatography, in this double blind, randomized trial, 100 RRMS patients with EDSShemp seed and evening primrose oils with advised Hot nature diet. "Group B" received olive oil and "Group C" received the co-supplemented oils. The results showed that the mean follow-up was 180 ± 2.9SD days (N=65, 23 M and 42 F aged 34.25 ± 8.07 years with disease duration of 6.80 ± 4.33 years). There was no significant difference in the study parameters at baseline. After 6 months, EDSS, Immunological parameters and the erythrocyte cell membrane with regard to specific fatty acids showed improvement in the group A and C, whereas there was worsening condition for the group B after the intervention. We concluded that Hot-nature dietary intervention with co-supplemented hemp seed and evening primrose oils caused an increase PUFAs in MS patients and improvement in the erythrocyte membrane fatty acids composition. This could be an indication of restored plasma stores, and a reflection of disease severity reduction.

  19. Effect of conventional and pressure frying on lipids and fatty acid composition of fried chicken and oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Deepthi P; Boomathi, S; Hathwar, Swapna C; Rai, Amit Kumar; Modi, Vinod Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Lipid class and fatty acid profile of pressure fried (PF) and conventionally fried (CF) chicken and medium of frying were evaluated. Depending on the frying cycle, neutral lipid (NL) content of PF chicken varied from 75-86% as compared to that of CF (84-90%). Similarly, glycolipid (GL) content varied from 11-21% in PF and from 9-12% in case of CF. Phospholipid (PL) was the least among lipid classes in both the products. The fresh frying medium (oil before frying cycle started), NL, GL and PL were 89, 10 and 0.33%, respectively. After the frying cycles were over, NL content of oil used for CF decreased to 82% and GL content increased from 10 to 17%. There was no significant difference (p ≥ 0.05) between the contents of lipid classes of oil used for PF or CF. Fried chicken and frying medium had higher concentration of linoleic acid and oleic acid irrespective of the frying cycle or frying method. PF chicken had moisture content in the range of 56-58% and total fat was 14% whereas in case of CF chicken it ranged from 49-52% and 18% respectively. TBA and FFA values of CF chicken and oil on repeated frying were higher (p ≤ 0.05) than PF. In comparison to conventional frying, pressure frying resulted in relatively tender and juicier product presumably due to better retention of moisture (p ≤ 0.05) and low oil uptake.

  20. Inter-tissue differences in fatty acid incorporation as a result of dietary oil manipulation in Port Jackson sharks (Heterodontus portusjacksoni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Crystal L; Mitchell, James G; Stone, David A J; Huveneers, Charlie

    2014-06-01

    Fatty acid profile analysis is a tool for dietary investigation that may complement traditional stomach contents analysis. While recent studies have shown that the liver of sharks fed different diets have differing fatty acid profiles, the degree to which diet is reflected in shark blood serum and muscle tissue is still poorly understood. An 18-week controlled feeding experiment was undertaken using captive Port Jackson sharks (Heterodontus portusjacksoni). Sharks were fed exclusive diets of artificial pellets treated with fish or poultry oil and sampled every 6 weeks. The fatty acid profiles from liver, blood serum, and muscle were affected differently, with the period from which significant differences were observed varying by tissue and diet type. The total fatty acid profiles of fish oil and poultry oil fed sharks were significantly different from week 12 onwards in the liver and blood serum, but significant differences were only observed by week 18 in the muscle tissue of sharks fed different diets. The drivers of dissimilarity which aligned with dietary input were 14:0, 18:2n-6, 20:5n-3, 18:1n-9 and 22:6n-3 in the liver and blood serum. Dietary fatty acids accumulated more consistently in the liver than in the blood plasma or muscle, likely due to its role as the central organ for fat processing and storage. Blood serum and muscle fatty acid profiles were influenced by diet, but fluctuated over-time. The low level of correlation between diet and muscle FA profiles is likely a result of low levels of fat (shark muscle tissues. Our findings describe inter-tissue differences in the incorporation of fatty acids from the diet to consumer, which should be taken into account when interpreting dietary patterns from fatty acid profiles.

  1. Enzymatic production of zero-trans plastic fat rich in α-linolenic acid and medium-chain fatty acids from highly hydrogenated soybean oil, Cinnamomum camphora seed oil, and perilla oil by lipozyme TL IM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Man-Li; Tang, Liang; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Hu, Jiang-Ning; Li, Hong-Yan; Luo, Li-Ping; Lei, Lin; Deng, Ze-Yuan

    2013-02-13

    In the present study, zero-trans α-linolenic acid (ALA) and medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA)-enriched plastic fats were synthesized through enzymatic interesterification reactions from highly hydrogenated soybean oil (HSO), Cinnamomum camphora seed oil (CCSO), and perilla oil (PO). The reactions were performed by incubating the blending mixtures of HSO, CCSO, and PO at different weight ratios (60:40:100, 70:30:100, 80:20:100) using 10% (total weight of substrate) of Lipozyme TL IM at 65 °C for 8 h. After reaction, the physical properties (fatty acids profile, TAG composition, solid fat content, slip melting point, contents of tocopherol, polymorphic forms, and microstructures) of the interesterified products and their physical blends were determined, respectively. Results showed that the fatty acid compositions of the interesterified products and physical blends had no significant changes, while the content of MCFA in both interesterified products and physical blends increased to 8.58-18.72%. Several new types of TAG species were observed in interesterified products (SSL/SLS, PLO/LLS, and OLLn/LnLO/LOLn). It should be mentioned that no trans fatty acids (TFA) were detected in all products. As the temperature increased, the solid fat content (SFC) of interesterified products was obviously lower than that of physical blends. The SFCs of interesterified products (60:40:100, 70:30:100, and 80:20:100, HSO:CCSO:PO) at 25 °C were 6.5%, 14.6%, and 16.5%, respectively, whereas the counterparts of physical blends were 32.5%, 38.5%, and 43.5%, respectively. Meanwhile, interesterified products showed more β' polymorphs than physical blends, in which β' polymorph is a favorite form for production of margarine and shortening. Such zero-trans ALA and MCFA-enriched fats may have desirable physical and nutritional properties for shortenings and margarines.

  2. Antioxidant status, lipoprotein profile and liver lipids in rats fed on high-cholesterol diet containing currant oil rich in n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecera, R; Skottová, N; Vána, P; Kazdová, L; Chmela, Z; Svagera, Z; Walterá, D; Ulrichová, J; Simánek, V

    2003-01-01

    Plant-based n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) possess a prospective antiatherogenic potential. Currant oil from Ribes nigrum L. is one of the few plant oils containing PUFAn-3 (15.3 mol%) in addition to PUFAn-6 (60.5 mol%). This study was aimed at comparing the effects of currant oil with those of lard fat, rich in saturated (43.8 mol%) and monounsaturated (47.0 mol%) fatty acids, on antioxidant parameters, the lipoprotein profile and liver lipids in rats fed on 1 % (w/w) cholesterol diets containing either 10 % of currant oil (COD) or lard fat (LFD). After 3 weeks of feeding, the COD induced a significant decrease in blood glutathione (GSH) and an increase in Cu(2+) induced oxidizability of serum lipids, but did not affect liver GSH and t-butyl hydroperoxide-induced lipoperoxidation of liver microsomes. Although the COD did not cause accumulation of liver triacylglycerols as LFD, the lipoprotein profile (VLDL, LDL, HDL) was not significantly improved after COD. The consumption of PUFAn-3 was reflected in LDL as an increase in eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid. These results suggest that currant oil affects positively the lipid metabolism in the liver, above all it does not cause the development of a fatty liver. However, adverse effects of currant oil on the antioxidant status in the blood still remain of concern.

  3. Pineapple by-product and canola oil as partial fat replacers in low-fat beef burger: Effects on oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Rasera, Mariana L; Marabesi, Amanda C; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-05-01

    The effect of freeze-dried pineapple by-product and canola oil as fat replacers on the oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile of low-fat beef burgers was evaluated. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple by-product (PA), canola oil (CO), and pineapple by-product and canola oil (PC). Low-fat cooked burgers showed a mean cholesterol content reduction of 9.15% compared to the CN. Canola oil addition improved the fatty acid profile of the burgers, with increase in the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio and decrease in the n-6/n-3 ratio, in the atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes. The oxidative stability of the burgers was affected by the vegetable oil addition. However, at the end of the storage time (120 days), malonaldehyde values of CO and PC were lower than the threshold for the consumer's acceptance. Canola oil, in combination with pineapple by-product, can be considered promising fat replacers in the development of healthier burgers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalytic Transesterification of Starch with Plant Oils: A Sustainable and Efficient Route to Fatty Acid Starch Esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söyler, Zafer; Meier, Michael A R

    2017-01-10

    The transesterification of maize starch with olive oil or high oleic sunflower oil was studied under homogeneous conditions in the presence of 1,5,7-triazabicyclo[4.4.0]dec-5-ene (TBD) as catalyst. Most importantly, this method used two renewable resources directly, without any pretreatment or derivatization, for the synthesis of polymeric materials with desirable properties. Moreover, the solvent, oils, and catalyst could be recovered through facile work-up and reused for further modifications. The obtained fatty acid starch esters (FASEs) were highly soluble in common organic solvents and were thoroughly characterized. Degrees of substitution (DS) were calculated using 31 P NMR spectroscopy, and DS values of approximately 1.3 were obtained. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis revealed thermal transitions of the modified starches at approximately 80-90 °C. Films were produced from these FASEs, and their hydrophobic surfaces were characterized using contact-angle measurements. Furthermore, mechanical properties were examined using tensile strength measurements and showed approximately 40 and 80 % elongation at break for modified maize starch and modified amylose from maize, respectively. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Bio-availability and metabolism of n-3 fatty acid rich garden cress (Lepidium sativum) seed oil in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, B T; Dutta, P K; Lokesh, B R; Naidu, K A

    2008-02-01

    The ratio of fatty acids namely linoleic acid (LA, 18:2, n-6) and alpha linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3, n-3) in the diet plays an important role in enrichment of ALA in tissues and further conversion to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) like eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5, n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6, n-3). Garden cress seed oil (GCO) is one of the richest sources of omega-3 fatty acid and contains 29-34.5% of ALA. In this study, dietary supplementation of GCO on bio-availability and metabolism of alpha-linolenic acid was investigated in growing rats. Male wistar rats were fed with semi-purified diets supplemented with 10.0% sunflower oil (SFO 10%); 2.5% GCO and 7.5% SFO (GCO 2.5%); 5% GCO and 5% SFO (GCO 5.0%); 10% GCO (GCO 10%) for a period of 8 weeks. There was no significant difference with regard to the food intake, body weight gain and organ weights of rats in different dietary groups. Rats fed with GCO showed significant increase in ALA levels in serum and tissues compared to SFO fed rats. Feeding rats with 10% GCO lowered hepatic cholesterol by 12.3% and serum triglycerides by 40.4% compared to SFO fed group. Very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels decreased by 9.45% in serum of 10% GCO fed rats, while HDL remained unchanged among GCO fed rats. Adipose tissue showed incorporation of 3.3-17.4% of ALA and correlated with incremental intake of ALA. Except in adipose tissue, the EPA, DHA levels increased significantly in serum, liver, heart and brain tissues in GCO fed rats. A maximum level of DHA was registered in brain (11.6%) and to lesser extent in serum and liver tissues. A significant decrease in LA and its metabolite arachidonic acid (AA) was observed in serum and liver tissue of rats fed on GCO. Significant improvement in n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio was observed in GCO based diets compared to diet containing SFO. This is the first study to demonstrate that

  6. Screening and identification of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids in inhibiting inflammatory prostaglandin E2 signaling in fat stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Diana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms of dietary oils (such as fish oil and unsaturated fatty acids, which are widely used by the public for anti-inflammation and vascular protection, have not been settled yet. In this study, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2-mediated calcium signaling was used to screen dietary oils and eight unsaturated fatty acids for identification of their anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Isolated fat/stromal cells expressing endogenous PGE2 receptors and an HEK293 cell line specifically expressing the recombinant human PGE2 receptor subtype-1 (EP1 were cultured and used in live cell calcium signaling assays. The different dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids were used to affect cell signaling under the specific stimulation of a pathological amount of inflammatory PGE2. Results It was identified that fish oil best inhibited the PGE2 signaling in the primary cultured stromal cells. Second, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, found in abundance in fish oil, was identified as a key factor of inhibition of PGE2 signaling. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, another major fatty acid found in fish oil and tested in this study was found to have small effect on EP1 signaling. The study suggested one of the four PGE2 subtype receptors, EP1 as the key target for the fish oil and DHA target. These findings were further confirmed by using the recombinant EP1 expressed in HEK293 cells as a target. Conclusion This study demonstrated the new mechanism behind the positive effects of dietary fish oils in inhibiting inflammation originates from the rich concentration of DHA, which can directly inhibit the inflammatory EP1-mediated PGE2 receptor signaling, and that the inflammatory response stimulated by PGE2 in the fat stromal cells, which directly related to metabolic diseases, could be down regulated by fish oil and DHA. These findings also provided direct evidence to support the use of dietary oils and unsaturated fatty acids for protection against heart

  7. Replacement of Dietary Saturated Fat by PUFA-Rich Pumpkin Seed Oil Attenuates Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Atherosclerosis Development, with Additional Health Effects of Virgin over Refined Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Morrison

    Full Text Available As dietary saturated fatty acids are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease, a potentially interesting strategy to reduce disease risk is modification of the quality of fat consumed. Vegetable oils represent an attractive target for intervention, as they largely determine the intake of dietary fats. Furthermore, besides potential health effects conferred by the type of fatty acids in a vegetable oil, other minor components (e.g. phytochemicals may also have health benefits. Here, we investigated the potential long-term health effects of isocaloric substitution of dietary fat (i.e. partial replacement of saturated by unsaturated fats, as well as putative additional effects of phytochemicals present in unrefined (virgin oil on development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and associated atherosclerosis. For this, we used pumpkin seed oil, because it is high in unsaturated fatty acids and a rich source of phytochemicals.ApoE*3Leiden mice were fed a Western-type diet (CON containing cocoa butter (15% w/w and cholesterol (1% w/w for 20 weeks to induce risk factors and disease endpoints. In separate groups, cocoa butter was replaced by refined (REF or virgin (VIR pumpkin seed oil (comparable in fatty acid composition, but different in phytochemical content.Both oils improved dyslipidaemia, with decreased (VLDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels in comparison with CON, and additional cholesterol-lowering effects of VIR over REF. While REF did not affect plasma inflammatory markers, VIR reduced circulating serum amyloid A and soluble vascular adhesion molecule-1. NAFLD and atherosclerosis development was modestly reduced in REF, and VIR strongly decreased liver steatosis and inflammation as well as atherosclerotic lesion area and severity.Overall, we show that an isocaloric switch from a diet rich in saturated fat to a diet rich in unsaturated fat can attenuate NAFLD and atherosclerosis development. Phytochemical-rich virgin

  8. Effect of dietary alpha-linolenic fatty acid derived from chia when fed as ground seed, whole seed and oil on lipid content and fatty acid composition of rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza, Ricardo; Coates, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death in the Western world. In both the USA and the EU it accounts for over 600,000 deaths yearly. Early data showing the benefits n-3 fatty acids provide in preventing CHD disease were obtained using 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 fatty acids derived from fish. Recently, however, it has been shown that reduced risks of CHD and other cardiovascular diseases are found with 18:3n-3 fatty acid as well. To determine if 18:3n-3 fatty acids positively influence plasma composition, 32 male Wistar rats were fed ad libitum four isocaloric diets with the energy derived from corn oil (T(1)), whole chia seed (T(2)), ground chia seed (T(3)), or chia oil (T(4)) for 30 days. At the end of the feeding period the rats were sacrificed, and blood samples were analyzed to determine serum CHOL, HDL, LDL, TG content, hemogram, and fatty acid composition. Chia decreased serum TG content and increased HDL content. Only with the T(2) diet was TG significantly (p Chia significantly (p chia diets detected. Significant (p chia diets when compared to the control. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Effects of Dietary Coconut Oil as a Medium-chain Fatty Acid Source on Performance, Carcass Composition and Serum Lipids in Male Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary coconut oil as a medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA source on performance, carcass composition and serum lipids in male broilers. A total of 540, one-day-old, male Arbor Acres broilers were randomly allotted to 1 of 5 treatments with each treatment being applied to 6 replicates of 18 chicks. The basal diet (i.e., R0 was based on corn and soybean meal and was supplemented with 1.5% soybean oil during the starter phase (d 0 to 21 and 3.0% soybean oil during the grower phase (d 22 to 42. Four experimental diets were formulated by replacing 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the soybean oil with coconut oil (i.e., R25, R50, R75, and R100. Soybean oil and coconut oil were used as sources of long-chain fatty acid and MCFA, respectively. The feeding trial showed that dietary coconut oil had no effect on weight gain, feed intake or feed conversion. On d 42, serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were linearly decreased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01. Lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and total lipase activities were linearly increased as the coconut oil level increased (p<0.01. Abdominal fat weight/eviscerated weight (p = 0.05, intermuscular fat width (p<0.01 and subcutaneous fat thickness (p<0.01 showed a significant quadratic relationship, with the lowest value at R75. These results indicated that replacement of 75% of the soybean oil in diets with coconut oil is the optimum level to reduce fat deposition and favorably affect lipid profiles without impairing performance in broilers.

  10. n-3 Fatty acid derived endocannabinoids: a new link between fish oil and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balvers, M.G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory processes are critical components of many illnesses, and dietary n-3 fatty acids have been shown to contribute to a reduction of the inflammatory status, both in in vivo and in vitro studies. The mechanisms underlying the modulation of inflammation are not completely understood, but it

  11. Green diesel production via catalytic hydrogenation/decarboxylation of triglycerides and fatty acids of vegetable oil and brown grease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Elvan

    Increase in the petroleum prices, projected increases in the world's energy demand and environmental awareness have shifted the research interest to the alternative fuel technologies. In particular, green diesel, vegetable oil/animal fat/waste oil and grease derived hydrocarbons in diesel boiling range, has become an attractive alternative to biodiesel---a mixture of fatty acid methyl esters, particularly due to its superior fuel properties that are similar to petroleum diesel. Hence, green diesel can be used as a drop-in fuel in the current diesel engines. The current technology for production of green diesel-hydrodeoxygenation of triglycerides and fatty acids over conventional hydrotreating catalysts suffers from fast catalyst deactivation in the absence of hydrogen combined with high temperatures and high fatty acid content in the feedstock. Additionally, excess hydrogen requirement for hydrodeoxygenation technique leads to high production costs. This thesis proposes a new technology-selective decarboxylation of brown grease, which is a mixture of fats and oils collected from waste water trap and rich in fatty acids, over a supported noble metal catalyst that overcomes the green diesel production challenges. In contrast to other feedstocks used for liquid biofuel production, brown grease is inexpensive and non-food competing feedstock, therefore the process finds solution to waste management issues, reduces the renewable fuel production cost and does not add to the global food shortage problems. Special catalyst formulations were developed to have a high activity and stability in the absence of hydrogen in the fatty acid decarboxylation process. The study shows how catalyst innovations can lead to a new technology that overcomes the process challenges. First, the effect of reaction parameters on the activity and the selectivity of brown grease decarboxylation with minimum hydrogen consumption over an activated carbon supported palladium catalyst were

  12. Improvement of medium chain fatty acid content and antimicrobial activity of coconut oil via solid-state fermentation using a Malaysian Geotrichum candidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramnia, Anahita; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Ghanbari, Raheleh; Ajdari, Zahra; Lai, Oi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Coconut oil is a rich source of beneficial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) particularly lauric acid. In this study, the oil was modified into a value-added product using direct modification of substrate through fermentation (DIMOSFER) method. A coconut-based and coconut-oil-added solid-state cultivation using a Malaysian lipolytic Geotrichum candidum was used to convert the coconut oil into MCFAs-rich oil. Chemical characteristics of the modified coconut oils (MCOs) considering total medium chain glyceride esters were compared to those of the normal coconut oil using ELSD-RP-HPLC. Optimum amount of coconut oil hydrolysis was achieved at 29% moisture content and 10.14% oil content after 9 days of incubation, where the quantitative amounts of the modified coconut oil and MCFA were 0.330 mL/g of solid media (76.5% bioconversion) and 0.175 mL/g of solid media (53% of the MCO), respectively. MCOs demonstrated improved antibacterial activity mostly due to the presence of free lauric acid. The highest MCFAs-rich coconut oil revealed as much as 90% and 80% antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively. The results of the study showed that DIMOSFER by a local lipolytic G. candidum can be used to produce MCFAs as natural, effective, and safe antimicrobial agent. The produced MCOs and MCFAs could be further applied in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  13. Improvement of Medium Chain Fatty Acid Content and Antimicrobial Activity of Coconut Oil via Solid-State Fermentation Using a Malaysian Geotrichum candidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Khoramnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut oil is a rich source of beneficial medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs particularly lauric acid. In this study, the oil was modified into a value-added product using direct modification of substrate through fermentation (DIMOSFER method. A coconut-based and coconut-oil-added solid-state cultivation using a Malaysian lipolytic Geotrichum candidum was used to convert the coconut oil into MCFAs-rich oil. Chemical characteristics of the modified coconut oils (MCOs considering total medium chain glyceride esters were compared to those of the normal coconut oil using ELSD-RP-HPLC. Optimum amount of coconut oil hydrolysis was achieved at 29% moisture content and 10.14% oil content after 9 days of incubation, where the quantitative amounts of the modified coconut oil and MCFA were 0.330 mL/g of solid media (76.5% bioconversion and 0.175 mL/g of solid media (53% of the MCO, respectively. MCOs demonstrated improved antibacterial activity mostly due to the presence of free lauric acid. The highest MCFAs-rich coconut oil revealed as much as 90% and 80% antibacterial activities against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, respectively. The results of the study showed that DIMOSFER by a local lipolytic G. candidum can be used to produce MCFAs as natural, effective, and safe antimicrobial agent. The produced MCOs and MCFAs could be further applied in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  14. Effect of three low-dose fish oil supplements, administered during pregnancy, on neonatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status at birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzing-Aarts, FV; van der Klis, FRM; van der Dijs, FPL; van Beusekom, CM; Landman, H; Capello, JJ; Muskiet, FAJ

    Adequate long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCP) status during pregnancy is important. We studied the effect of three low-dose fish oil supplements, administered during uncomplicated pregnancy, on neonatal LCP status at term delivery. Supplements were administered from the second trimester to

  15. Genetic resources of the functional food, teramnus labialis (L.f.) spreng for improving seed number, flavonol content, oil %, and fatty acid compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramnus labialis is used as food in India and has potential to be used as a functional food vegetable in the U.S.A. Photoperiod-sensitive T. labialis accessions were grown in the greenhouse from 2010 to 2011 and evaluated for flavonol content, oil %, and fatty acid compositions. Significant variati...

  16. Influence of pomegranate seed oil and bitter melon aqueous extract on polyunsaturated fatty acids and their lipoxygenase metabolites concentration in serum of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Agnieszka; Jelińska, Małgorzata; Tokarz, Andrzej; Pergół, Aleksandra; Pinkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    Competition with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and an impact on eicosanoid biosynthesis may be one of mechanisms of conjugated linolenic acids (CLnA) action. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of diet supplementation with pomegranate seed oil, containing punicic acid (PA)-one of CLnA isomers, and an aqueous extract of dried bitter melon fruits, administered separately or together, on PUFA and their lipoxygenase metabolites' concentration in serum of rats. Percentage share of fatty acids was diversified in relation to applied supplementation. PA was only detected in serum of pomegranate seed oil supplemented group, where it was about 1%. Cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (rumenic acid, RA) level tended to increase in group supplemented simultaneously with both dietary supplements whereas its highest share in total fatty acids pool was detected in group receiving solely bitter melon dried fruits aqueous extract. This indicates that consumption of bitter melon tea significantly increased RA content in fatty acids pool in serum. However, pomegranate seed oil elevated procarcinogenic 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid concentration. Taking into account that pomegranate seed oil and bitter melon dried fruits are dietary supplements accessible worldwide and willingly consumed, the biological significance of this phenomenon should be further investigated. We presume, that there may be a need for some precautions concerning the simultaneous use of these products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of supplementing coconut or krabok oil, rich in medium-chain fatty acids on ruminal fermentation, protozoa and archaeal population of bulls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panyakaew, P.; Boon, N.; Goel, G.; Yuangklang, C.; Schonewille, J.T.; Hendriks, W.H.; Fievez, V.

    2013-01-01

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA), for example, capric acid (C10:0), myristic (C14:0) and lauric (C12:0) acid, have been suggested to decrease rumen archaeal abundance and protozoal numbers. This study aimed to compare the effect of MCFA, either supplied through krabok (KO) or coconut (CO) oil, on

  18. Identification of very long chain unsaturated fatty acids from Ximenia oil by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezanka, Tomáš; Sigler, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 68, - (2007), s. 925-934 ISSN 0031-9422 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : ximenia oil * very long chain unsaturated fatty acids * liquid chromatography Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.322, year: 2007

  19. Effect of different extraction methods on fatty acids, volatile compounds, and physical and chemical properties of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alicia Ortiz; Dorantes, Lidia; Galíndez, Juvencio; Guzmán, Rosa I

    2003-04-09

    Because Mexico is the number one producer of avocados in the world, this fruit has potential as a source for oil extraction. It is appropriate to further investigate the detailed changes that the oil undergoes when different extraction methods are applied. This research paper presents the study of the physical and chemical changes, the fatty acids profile, the trans fatty acid content, and the identification of volatile compounds of the oils from avocado pulp (Persea americana Mill.), obtained by four different extraction methods. The method with the greatest extraction yield was the combined microwave-hexane method. The amount of trans fatty acids produced in the microwave-squeezing treatment was <0.5 g/100 g. On the other hand, the amounts of trans fatty acids produced with the hexane and acetone treatments were 0.52 and 0.87 g/100 g, respectively. The method that caused the slightest modification to the oil quality was a novel combined extraction method of microwave-squeezing proposed by the authors.

  20. Does supplementation of formula with evening primrose and fish oils augment long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status of low birthweight infants to that of breast-fed counterparts?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltil, HA; van Beusekom, CM; Schaafsma, A; Okken, A; Muskiet, FAJ

    We investigated whether formulae with evening primrose and fish oils raise long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in plasma cholesterol esters (CE), erythrocytes (RSC) and platelets (PLT) to levels encountered in breast-fed infants. Low birthweight infants (less than or equal to 2500 g)

  1. Alterations in the molecular species of rat liver lecithin by corn-oil feeding to essential fatty acid-deficient rats as a function of time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golde, L.M.G. van; Pieterson, W.A.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1968-01-01

    The present paper describes, as a function of time, the qualitative and quantitative alterations in the molecular species pattern of rat liver lecithin which are observed when corn oil is fed to essential fatty acid-deficient rats. One of the most important changes observed was a very rapid

  2. Quantification of the molecular species of acylglycerols containing hydroxy fatty acids in lesquerella oils using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten molecular species of diacylglycerols (DAG), 54 of triacylglycerols (TAG) and 13 of tetraacylglycerols (tetraAG, triacylglycerol estolides) containing hydroxy fatty acids (FA) as well as 20 of TAG containing three normal FA (non-hydroxylated) in lesquerella oil were quantified by a newly improved...

  3. Vegetable oils rich in alpha linolenic acid increment hepatic n-3 LCPUFA, modulating the fatty acid metabolism and antioxidant response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Cervera, Miguel Ángel; Valenzuela, Rodrigo; Hernandez-Rodas, María Catalina; Barrera, Cynthia; Espinosa, Alejandra; Marambio, Macarena; Valenzuela, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3, ALA) is an essential fatty acid and the metabolic precursor of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from the n-3 family with relevant physiological and metabolic roles: eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 n-3, DHA). Western diet lacks of suitable intake of n-3 LCPUFA and there are recommendations to increase the dietary supply of such nutrients. Seed oils rich in ALA such as those from rosa mosqueta (Rosa rubiginosa), sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubis) and chia (Salvia hispanica) may constitute an alternative that merits research. This study evaluated hepatic and epididymal accretion and biosynthesis of n-3 LCPUFA, the activity and expression of Δ-5 and Δ-6 desaturase enzymes, the expression and DNA-binding activity of PPAR-α and SREBP-1c, oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidative enzymes in rats fed sunflower oil (SFO, 1% ALA) as control group, canola oil (CO, 10% ALA), rosa mosqueta oil (RMO, 33% ALA), sacha inchi oil (SIO, 49% ALA) and chia oil (ChO, 64% ALA) as single lipid source. A larger supply of ALA increased the accretion of n-3 LCPUFA, the activity and expression of desaturases, the antioxidative status, the expression and DNA-binding of PPAR-α, the oxidation of fatty acids and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, whereas the expression and DNA-binding activity of SREBP-1c transcription factor and the biosynthetic activity of fatty acids declined. Results showed that oils rich in ALA such as SIO and ChO may trigger metabolic responses in rats such as those produced by n-3 PUFA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Continuous production of fatty acid ethyl esters from soybean oil at supercritical conditions - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i2.11255

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila da Silva

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the production of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE from the transesterification of soybean oil in supercritical ethanol in a continuous catalyst-free process using different reactor configurations. Experiments were performed in a tubular reactor in one-step reaction and experimentally simulating two reactors, one operated in series and the other a recycle reactor. The reaction products were analyzed for their content of residual triglycerides, glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters and decomposition. Results show that the configurations studied with intermediate separation of glycerol afford higher conversions of vegetable oil to their fatty acid ethyl esters derivatives when compared to the one-step reaction, with relatively low decomposition of fatty acids (< 5.0 wt%.

  5. Effects of Feeding Garlic and Juniper Berry Essential Oils on Milk Fatty Acid Composition of Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils (EOs from plant extracts have been reported to have an antibacterial activity against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Several of the gram-positive bacteria are involved in ruminal biohydrogenation of fatty acids (FAs, thus suggesting that feeding EOs could lower biohydrogenation of FA because of a decrease in the number of bacteria involved in that process. As a result, milk FA profiles are expected to be modified. In addition, monensin was approved as an antibiotic to be fed in dairy cattle, and it was reported that dairy cows supplemented with monensin produced milk containing higher concentration of 18:1 t10 and 18:1 t11. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two EOs (garlic and juniper berry oils and monensin on FA profiles of milk fat. Four ruminally fistulated Holstein dairy cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment. Cows were fed for ad libitum intake a total mixed ration without supplementation (control, or supplemented with monensin (330 mg/head per day, garlic oil (5 g/head per day, or juniper berry oil (2 g/head per day. The FA composition of saturated, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated was not affected by supplementation of EO and monensin. However, proportion of conjugated linoleic acid trans 10, cis 12 (CLA t10, c12 was higher ( P < 0.05 for cows fed EO or monensin than for control cows. Supplementation of monensin increased ( P < 0.05 the proportion of total trans FA compared with the control. These results indicate that supplementation of the dairy cow diet with garlic or juniper berry EO or monensin had the potential to increase the proportion of CLA t10, c12 in milk fat with minimal overall effects on FA of milk fat. The results also confirm the increase of 18:1 t10 in milk fat by feeding monensin to dairy cows.

  6. Models for the prediction of the cetane index of biofuels obtained from different vegetable oils using their fatty acid composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Borroto, Yisel; Piloto Rodriguez, Ramon; Goyos Perez, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to obtain a physical-mathematical model that establishes a relationship between the cetane index of biofuels obtained from different vegetable oils and its composition of essential fatty acid. This model is based on experimental data obtained by the authors of the present work and an experimental data reported by different extracted authors of indexed databases. The adjustment of the coefficients of the model is based on the obtaining of residual minima in the capacity of prediction of the model. Starting from these results it is established a very useful tool for the determination of such an important parameter for the fuel diesel as it is the cetane index obtained from an analysis of chemical composition and not obtained from tests in engines banks, to save time and economic resources. (author)

  7. Effect of dietary soybean oil and antioxidants on fatty acids and volatile compounds of tail subcutaneous and perirenal fat tissues in fattening lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yongjia; Wang, Jiakun; Lin, Jia; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Fat is the primary source of the volatiles that determine the characteristic flavors of animal products. Because unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) contribute to changes in flavor as a result of the oxidation process, a feeding trial was performed to investigate the effects of dietary soybean oil or antioxidants on the fatty acid and volatile profiles of the tail subcutaneous (SF) and perirenal fat tissues (PF) of fattening lambs. Thirty-six Huzhou lambs were assigned to four dietary treatments in a randomized block design. The lambs' diets were supplemented with soybean oil (0 or 3 % of DM) or antioxidants (0 or 0.025 % of DM). Neither soybean oil nor antioxidant supplementation had an effect on lamb growth (P > 0.05). In regard to tail SF, soybean oil supplementation increased the 18:2n6t (P < 0.05) and the total amount of volatile acids, whereas antioxidant supplementation increased the content of C18:2n6c and C18:3n3 (P < 0.05) but had no effect on the volatiles profile. In regard to PF, dietary soybean oil supplementation increased the C18:0 content (P < 0.01); decreased the C18:1 (P = 0.01), C22:1 n9 (P < 0.01) and total UFA (P = 0.03) contents; and tended to decrease the E-2-octenal (P = 0.08), E, E-2, 4-decadienal (P = 0.10), 2-undecenal (P = 0.14) and ethyl 9-decenoate (P = 0.10) contents. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect either the fatty acid content or the volatiles profile in the PF. Tail SF and PF responded to dietary soybean oil and antioxidant supplementation in different ways. For SF, both soybean oil and antioxidant supplementation increased the levels of unsaturated fatty acids but triggered only a slight change in volatiles. For PF, soybean oil supplementation decreased the levels of unsaturated fatty acids and oxidative volatiles, but supplementation with antioxidants had little effect on PF fatty acids and the volatiles profile.

  8. Exploration of a mechanism for the production of highly unsaturated fatty acids in Scenedesmus sp. at low temperature grown on oil crop residue based medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qian; Li, Jun; Wang, Jinghan; Li, Kun; Li, Jingjing; Han, Pei; Chen, Paul; Zhou, Wenguang

    2017-11-01

    The ability of algae to produce lipids comprising of unsaturated fatty acids varies with strains and culture conditions. This study investigates the effect of temperature on the production of unsaturated fatty acids in Scenedesmus sp. grown on oil crop residue based medium. At low temperature (10°C), synthesis of lipids compromising of high contents of unsaturated fatty acids took place primarily in the early stage while protein accumulation mainly occurred in the late stage. This stepwise lipid-protein synthesis process was found to be associated with the contents of acetyl-CoA and α-KG in the algal cells. A mechanism was proposed and tested through simulation experiments which quantified the carbon flux allocation in algal cells at different cultivation stages. It is concluded that low culture temperature such as 10°C is suitable for the production of lipids comprising of unsaturated fatty acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ginger Essential Oil Ameliorates Hepatic Injury and Lipid Accumulation in High Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi-Syuan; Lee, Wan-Ching; Lin, Yu-En; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Lin, Shih-Hang; Panyod, Suraphan; Chu, Yung-Lin; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-03-16

    The objective of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective efficacy and mechanism of action of ginger essential oil (GEO) against the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Mice were maintained on either a control diet or high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with GEO (12.5, 62.5, and 125 mg/kg) or citral (2.5 and 25 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that GEO and its major component (citral) lowered HFD-induced obesity in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by anti-hyperlipidemic effects by reducing serum free fatty acid, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels. Moreover, liver histological results showed that administration of 62.5 and 125 mg/kg GEO and 25 mg/kg citral significantly reduced hepatic lipid accumulation. Further assessment by Western blotting and investigation of the lipid metabolism revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) were down-regulated by GEO and citral, indicating that GEO and citral suppressed HFD-stimulated lipid biosynthesis and oxidative stress. Furthermore, GEO and citral effectively enhanced the antioxidant capacities and reduced inflammatory response in mouse liver, which exerted protective effects against steatohepatitis. Collectively, GEO and citral exhibited potent hepatoprotective effects against NAFLD induced by HFD in obese mice. Thus, GEO might be an effective dietary supplement to ameliorate NAFLD-related metabolic diseases, and citral could play a vital role in its management.

  10. Supplementing long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in canned wild Pacific pink salmon with Alaska salmon oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapis, Trina J; Oliveira, Alexandra C M; Crapo, Charles A; Himelbloom, Brian; Bechtel, Peter J; Long, Kristy A

    2013-01-01

    Establishing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid contents in canned wild Alaska pink salmon products is challenging due to ample natural variation found in lipid content of pink salmon muscle. This study investigated the effect of adding salmon oil (SO) to canned pink salmon produced from fish exhibiting two opposite degrees of skin watermarking, bright (B) and dark (D). Specific goals of the study were to evaluate the benefits of adding SO to canned pink salmon with regard to nutritional value of the product, sensory characteristics, and the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of the lipids over thermal processing. Six groups of canned pink salmon were produced with variable levels of SO, either using bright (with 0, 1, or 2% SO) or dark (with 0, 2, or 4% SO) pink salmon. Compositional analysis revealed highest (P  0.05) ranging from 5.7% to 6.8%. Consequently, addition of SO to canned pink salmon allowed for consistent lipid content between bright and dark fish. Addition of 1% or 2% SO to canned bright pink salmon was not detrimental to the sensory properties of the product. It is recommended that canned bright pink salmon be supplemented with at least 1% SO, while supplementation with 2% SO would guarantee a minimum quantity of 1.9 g of n-3 fatty acids per 100 g of product. Addition of 4% SO to canned dark pink salmon was detrimental to product texture and taste, while supplementation with 2% SO did not negatively affect sensorial properties of the product. Accordingly, canned dark pink salmon should be supplemented with 2% SO so that a minimum n-3 fatty acids content of 1.5 g per 100 g of product.

  11. Used frying oils and fats and their utilization in the production of methyl esters of higher fatty acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvengros, J. Jan; Cvengrosova, Zuzana [Slovak Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Chemical and Food Technology, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2004-08-01

    From the point of view price and available capacity used frying oils or fats (UFO) represent an attractive raw material for the production of methyl esters (ME) of higher fatty acids as alternative fuels for diesel engines. If they are treated such that the required quality, with an acidity number up to 3.0 mg KOH/g and a water content up to 0.1 wt%, is achieved they can be processed to ME using standard techniques of alkali-catalysed transesterification with methanol which are utilized for production of the ME from new oils/fats. The problematic waste can thus be converted to an ecologically friendly fuel. Vacuum distillation of free fatty acids in a film evaporator is an effective method for simultaneously decreasing the content of FFA and water in UFO. Final distillation of raw ME in a film vacuum evaporator results in practically all parameters required by the standard, in the final ME being achieved. Undesirable low-temperature properties of ME derived from UFO, due to higher fraction of saturated acyls, can be adjusted by the addition of depressants-flow improvers for winterization. Some simplified methods for the quality control of UFO and ME are discussed. The conversion of acylglycerols to ME is monitored by GLC with a packed column, where the peak areas of ME in the sample before and after the reaction with an effective methylation agent are compared. The method for the determination of the water content in esters utilizes the reaction of calcium carbide with water, the volume of acetylene being measured. (Author)

  12. Vascular effects of the Mediterranean diet-part II: role of omega-3 fatty acids and olive oil polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoditti, Egeria; Capurso, Cristiano; Capurso, Antonio; Massaro, Marika

    2014-12-01

    The lower occurrence of cardiovascular disease and cancer in populations around the Mediterranean basin as detected in the 1950s was correctly attributed to the peculiar dietary habits of those populations. Essentially, until the mid-20th century, typical Mediterranean diets were rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole-wheat bread, nuts, fish, and, as a common culinary trait, the routine use of extra-virgin olive oil. Nowadays, the regular adoption of such dietary patterns is still thought to result in healthful benefits. Such patterns ensure the assumption of molecules with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, among which ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), ω-9 monounsaturated fatty acids (oleic acid), and phenolic compounds. The aim of this review is to provide an update of the vasculo-protective pathways mediated by ω-3 PUFAs and polyphenols in the context of the modern Mediterranean dietary habits, including the possible cross-talk and synergy between these typical components. This review complements a parallel one focusing on the role of dietary nitrates and alimentary fats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of fat replacement by olive oil on the physico-chemical properties, fatty acids, cholesterol and tocopherol content of pâté

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, R.; Agregan, R.; GonCalves, A.; Lorenzo, J.M.

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the effects of olive oil when used as back fat replacers on the physico-chemical properties, fatty acids, cholesterol and α-tocopherol content of pâté. The replacement of back fat by olive oil at 50 and 100% did not affect the moisture, fat or protein contents, while it increased yellowness. According to texture parameters, reformulated pâté presented lower values for hardness, cohesiveness, gumminess and chewiness. The use of olive oil significantly (P<0.05) affected the fatty acid content. The amount of MUFA increased, while the content of SFA and PUFA decreased as the back fat was replaced by olive oil. The replacement of fat resulted in an improvement in all nutritional indexes. Atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes decreased while the h/H ratio increased with fat replacement. At the same time, the content of α-tocopherol increased and the amount of cholesterol decreased with the addition of olive oil. Therefore, olive oil provides pâté with high levels of C18:1n9c and MUFA, natural antioxidants such as α-tocopherol and reduces cholesterol levels. As a general conclusion, the replacement of back fat by olive oil allows us to obtain a healthier product. (Author)

  14. Effect of ω-3 and ω-9 fatty acid rich oils on lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases enzymes and on the growth of a mammary adenocarcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Undurti N

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutritional factors play a major role in cancer initiation and development. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs have the ability to induce modifications in the activity of lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase (COX enzymes that affect tumour growth. We studied the effect of two diets enriched in 6% Walnut and Peanut oils that are rich in ω-3 and ω9 PUFAs respectively on a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma as compared with the control (C that received commercial diet. Results Peanut oil enriched diet induced an increase in membrane arachidonic acid (AA content and the cyclooxygenase enzyme derived 12-HHT (p Conclusions The results of the present study showed that Peanut oil-enriched diet protects against mammary cancer development by modulating tumour membrane fatty acids composition and LOX and COX enzyme activities.

  15. Fish oil alleviated high-fat diet-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease via regulating hepatic lipids metabolism and metaflammation: a transcriptomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fahu; Wang, Hualin; Tian, Yu; Li, Qi; He, Lei; Li, Na; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    Intake of fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is believed to be beneficial against development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study was to gain further understanding of the potential mechanisms of the protective effects of fish oil against NAFLD. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control diet (CON), a Western style high-fat and high-cholesterol diet (WD), or a WD diet containing fish oil (FOH) for 16 weeks respectively. The development of liver steatosis and fibrosis were verified by histological and biochemical examination. Hepatic transcriptome were extracted for RNA-seq analysis, and particular results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The consumption of fish oil significantly ameliorated WD-induced dyslipidemia, transaminase elevation, hepatic steatosis, inflammatory infiltration, and fibrosis. Hepatic RNA-Seq analysis showed that long-term intake of fish oil restored the expression of circadian clock-related genes per2 and per3, which were reduced in WD fed animals. Fish oil consumption also corrected the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism, such as Srebf1, Fasn, Scd1, Insig2, Cd36, Cyp7a1, Abcg5, Abcg8 and Pcsk9. Moreover, the expression levels of pro-inflammation genes Mcp1, Socs2, Sema4a, and Cd44 in the FOH group were lower than that of WD group, implying that fish oil protects the liver against WD-induced hepatic inflammation. The present study demonstrates fish oil protects against WD-induced NALFD via improving lipid metabolism and ameliorating hepatic inflammation. Our findings add to the current understanding on the benefits of n-3 PUFAs against NAFLD.

  16. Plant oil supplements reduce methane emissions and improve milk fatty acid composition in dairy cows fed grass silage-based diets without affecting milk yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, A R; Tapio, I; Vilkki, J; Shingfield, K J; Leskinen, H

    2018-02-01

    Four lipid supplements varying in chain length or degree of unsaturation were examined for their effects on milk yield and composition, ruminal CH 4 emissions, rumen fermentation, nutrient utilization, and microbial ecology in lactating dairy cows. Five Nordic Red cows fitted with rumen cannulas were used in a 5 × 5 Latin square with five 28-d periods. Treatments comprised total mixed rations based on grass silage with a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 60:40 supplemented with no lipid (CO) or 50 g/kg of diet dry matter (DM) of myristic acid (MA), rapeseed oil (RO), safflower oil (SO), or linseed oil (LO). Feeding MA resulted in the lowest DM intake, and feeding RO reduced DM intake compared with CO. Feeding MA reduced the yields of milk, milk constituents, and energy-corrected milk. Plant oils did not influence yields of milk and milk constituents, but reduced milk protein content compared with CO. Treatments had no effect on rumen fermentation characteristics, other than an increase in ammonia-N concentration due to feeding MA, RO, and SO compared with CO. Lipid supplements reduced daily ruminal CH 4 emission; however, the response was to some extent a result of lower feed intake. Lipids modified microbial community structure without affecting total counts of bacteria, archaea, and ciliate protozoa. Dietary treatments had no effect on the apparent total tract digestibility of organic matter, fiber, and gross energy. Treatments did not affect either energy secreted in milk as a proportion of energy intake or efficiency of dietary N utilization. All lipids lowered de novo fatty acid synthesis in the mammary gland. Plant oils increased proportions of milk fat 18:0, cis 18:1, trans and monounsaturated fatty acids, and decreased saturated fatty acids compared with CO and MA. Both SO and LO increased the proportion of total polyunsaturated fatty acids, total conjugated linolenic acid, and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid. Feeding MA clearly increased the Δ 9

  17. Mammary inflammation around parturition appeared to be attenuated by consumption of fish oil rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sen; Hou, Jia; Xiang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoling; Che, Lianqiang; Lin, Yan; Xu, Shengyu; Tian, Gang; Zeng, Qiufeng; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Keying; Chen, Daiwen; Wu, De; Fang, Zhengfeng

    2013-12-31

    Mastitis endangers the health of domestic animals and humans, and may cause problems concerning food safety. It is documented that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) play significant roles in attenuating saturated fatty acids (SFA)-induced inflammation. This study was therefore conducted to determine whether mammary inflammation could be affected by consumption of diets rich in n-3 PUFA. Forty-eight rats after mating began to receive diets supplemented with 5% fish oil (FO) or 7% soybean oil (SO). Blood and mammary tissue samples (n = 6) at day 0 and 14 of gestation and day 3 postpartum were collected 9 hours after intramammary infusion of saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to determine free fatty acids (FFA) concentration and FA composition in plasma and inflammation mediators in mammary tissues. At day 14 of gestation and day 3 postpartum, the FO-fed rats had lower plasma concentrations of C18:2n6, C20:4n6, total n-6 PUFA and SFA, and higher plasma concentrations of C20:5n3 and total n-3 PUFA than the SO-fed rats. Plasma C22:6n3 concentration was also higher in the FO-fed than in the SO-fed rats at day 3 postpartum. Compared with the SO-fed rats, the FO-fed rats had lower mammary mRNA abundance of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and protein level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, but had higher mammary mRNA abundances of interleukin (IL)-10 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ at day 14 of gestation. Following LPS infusion at day 3 postpartum, the SO-fed rats had increased plasma concentrations of FFA, C18:1n9, C18:3n3, C18:2n6 and total n-6 PUFA, higher mammary mRNA abundances of IL-1β, TNF-α and XOR but lower mammary mRNA abundance of IL-10 than the FO-fed rats. Mammary inflammation around parturition appeared to be attenuated by consumption of a diet rich in n-3 PUFA, which was associated with up-regulated expression of IL-10 and PPAR-γ.

  18. Similar changes in clinical and pathological parameters in Wistar Kyoto rats after a 13-week dietary intake of canola oil or a fatty acid composition-based interesterified canola oil mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Naoki; Naito, Yukiko; Kasama, Kikuko; Shindo, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hiromichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Okuyama, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    Canola oil (CO) given as a dietary fat deteriorates hypertension-related condition and shortens the life of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Although substances other than fatty acids have been presumed as causatives, CO mimics consisting of oils other than CO also shorten the life. In this study we intended to examine whether or not fatty acid composition unique to CO participates in the adverse effect. CO or an interesterified CO mimic (ICOM) consisting of safflower oil, flaxseed oil and erucic acid was fed as a dietary fat for 13 weeks to Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, and clinical and pathological signs were compared. WKY rats were used to avoid the difficulty in evaluating the results in SHRSP due to irregular deterioration in conditions by stroke. Compared to a standard diet, both diets containing CO or ICOM similarly elevated blood pressure, increased plasma lipids, activated hepatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreased platelets, shortened blood coagulation times and induced abnormalities in the kidney. Thus, CO-specific fatty acid composition appeared to affect the pathophysiology of the rat and produce consequent aggravation of pathological status, especially in SHRSP. However, the existence of causative factors other than fatty acids was suggested by increased neutrophil count exclusively induced by CO.

  19. Replacement of Dietary Saturated Fat by PUFA-Rich Pumpkin Seed Oil Attenuates Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Atherosclerosis Development, with Additional Health Effects of Virgin over Refined Oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, P.; Stavro, P.M.; Manuel Suárez, M.; Arola-Arnal, A.; Duyvenvoorde, W. van; Kooistra, T.; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kleemann, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims As dietary saturated fatty acids are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease, a potentially interesting strategy to reduce disease risk is modification of the quality of fat consumed. Vegetable oils represent an attractive target for intervention, as they largely

  20. Replacement of dietary saturated fat by PUFA-rich pumpkin seed oil attenuates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and atherosclerosis development, with additional health effects of virgin over refined oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, M.C.; Mulder, Petra; Stavro, P.M.; Suárez, Manuel; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Duyvenvoorde, Van Wim; Kooistra, Teake; Wielinga, P.Y.; Kleemann, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: As dietary saturated fatty acids are associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease, a potentially interesting strategy to reduce disease risk is modification of the quality of fat consumed. Vegetable oils represent an attractive target for intervention, as they largely

  1. Solutions for Foaming Problems in Biogas Reactors Using Natural Oils or Fatty Acids as Defoamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Boe, Kanokwan; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Foaming is one of the most common and important problems in biogas plants, leading to severe operational, economical, and environmental drawbacks. Because addition of easily degradable co-substrates for boosting the biogas production can suddenly raise the foaming problem, the full-scale biogas...... results from our previous extensive research along with some unpublished data on defoaming by rapeseed oil and oleic acid in manure-based biogas reactors. It was found that both compounds exhibited remarkable defoaming efficiency ranging from 30 to 57% in biogas reactors suffering from foaming problems...... promoted by the addition of protein, lipid, or carbohydrate co-substrates. However, in most cases, the defoaming efficiency of rapeseed oil was greater than that of oleic acid, and therefore, rapeseed oil is recommended to be used in biogas reactors to solve foaming problems....

  2. Performance of a domestic cooking wick stove using fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oil plants in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagutu, Agatha W.; Thoruwa, Thomas F.N.; Chhabra, Sumesh C.; Lang'at-Thoruwa, Caroline C.; Mahunnah, R.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    With depletion of solid biomass fuels and their rising costs in recent years, there has been a shift towards using kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for domestic cooking in Kenya. However, the use of kerosene is associated with health and safety problems. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a clean, safe and sustainable liquid bio-fuel. Plant oil derivatives fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) present such a promising solution. This paper presents the performance of a wick stove using FAME fuels derived from oil plants: Jatropha curcus L. (Physic nut), Croton megalocarpus Hutch, Calodendrum capense (L.f.) Thunb., Cocos nucifera L. (coconut), soyabeans and sunflower. The FAME performance tests were based on the standard water-boiling tests (WBT) and compared with kerosene. Unlike kerosene all FAME fuels burned with odorless and non-pungent smell generating an average firepower of 1095 W with specific fuel consumption of 44.6 g L -1 (55% higher than kerosene). The flash points of the FAME fuels obtained were typically much higher (2.3-3.3 times) than kerosene implying that they are much safer to use than kerosene. From the results obtained, it was concluded that the FAME fuels have potential to provide safe and sustainable cooking liquid fuel in developing countries.

  3. Performance of a domestic cooking wick stove using fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oil plants in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagutu, Agatha W.; Chhabra, Sumesh C.; Lang' at-Thoruwa, Caroline C. [Department of Chemistry, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844-0100, Nairobi (Kenya); Thoruwa, Thomas F.N. [Department of Energy Engineering, Kenyatta University, P.O. Box 43844, Nairobi (Kenya); Mahunnah, R.L.A. [University of Dar-es Salaam, Muhimbili College of Medicine, P.O. Box 53486, Dar-es Salaam (Tanzania)

    2010-08-15

    With depletion of solid biomass fuels and their rising costs in recent years, there has been a shift towards using kerosene and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) for domestic cooking in Kenya. However, the use of kerosene is associated with health and safety problems. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a clean, safe and sustainable liquid bio-fuel. Plant oil derivatives fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) present such a promising solution. This paper presents the performance of a wick stove using FAME fuels derived from oil plants: Jatropha curcus L. (Physic nut), Croton megalocarpus Hutch, Calodendrum capense (L.f.) Thunb., Cocos nucifera L. (coconut), soyabeans and sunflower. The FAME performance tests were based on the standard water-boiling tests (WBT) and compared with kerosene. Unlike kerosene all FAME fuels burned with odorless and non-pungent smell generating an average firepower of 1095 W with specific fuel consumption of 44.6 g L{sup -1} (55% higher than kerosene). The flash points of the FAME fuels obtained were typically much higher (2.3-3.3 times) than kerosene implying that they are much safer to use than kerosene. From the results obtained, it was concluded that the FAME fuels have potential to provide safe and sustainable cooking liquid fuel in developing countries. (author)

  4. Analysis of monoglycerides, diglycerides, sterols, and free fatty acids in coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) oil by 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayrit, Fabian M; Buenafe, Olivia Erin M; Chainani, Edward T; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S

    2008-07-23

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (31)P NMR) was used to differentiate virgin coconut oil (VCO) from refined, bleached, deodorized coconut oil (RCO). Monoglycerides (MGs), diglycerides (DGs), sterols, and free fatty acids (FFAs) in VCO and RCO were converted into dioxaphospholane derivatives and analyzed by (31)P NMR. On the average, 1-MG was found to be higher in VCO (0.027%) than RCO (0.019%). 2-MG was not detected in any of the samples down to a detection limit of 0.014%. On the average, total DGs were lower in VCO (1.55%) than RCO (4.10%). When plotted in terms of the ratio [1,2-DG/total DGs] versus total DGs, VCO and RCO samples grouped separately. Total sterols were higher in VCO (0.096%) compared with RCO (0.032%), and the FFA content was 8 times higher in VCO than RCO (0.127% vs 0.015%). FFA determination by (31)P NMR and titration gave comparable results. Principal components analysis shows that the 1,2-DG, 1,3-DG, and FFAs are the most important parameters for differentiating VCO from RCO.

  5. Effects of foal presence at milking and dietary extra virgin olive oil on jennet milk fatty acids profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alabiso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available TwelveRagusanajennetswerestudiedtoinvestigatetheeffectsof dietaryextra Twelve Ragusana jennets were studiedtoinvestigatetheeffectsof dietaryextra studied to investigatetheeffectsof dietaryextra the effects of dietaryextra dietary extra virgin olive oil and thepresenceofthefoal duringmilkingonmilkfattyacids(FAprofile.At20, 50 thepresenceofthefoal duringmilkingonmilkfattyacids(FAprofile.At20, 50 he presence of the foal during milking on milk fatty acids (FA profile. At 20, 50 and 90 days post-foaling, each jennet was milked 4 times per day. The feeding system and the milking procedures are given by Alabiso et al. (2009. FA profiles of the composites from milkings without foals (1MNF+3MNF and with foals (2MYF+4MYF were analyzed by gas chromatography. Dietary oil had no significant effect on milk yield or fat content but increased the proportion of C18:1 (n-9 in milk. Jen- net milk had a beneficial FA profile compared to bovine milk and thus would be suitable for consump- tion by infants suffering from cows milk protein allergy, however, augmentation of the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated FA content warrants further study.

  6. Incorporation and fatty acid composition in liver of Nile tilapia fed with flaxseed oil - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v33i2.7970

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polyana Batoqui França

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most consumed freshwater fish in South America is Nile tilapia. The present study examined the effects of flaxseed oil (FO, source of alfa-linolenic acid (LNA, on the total lipid composition and polyunsaturated fatty acid, n-6 and n-3 PUFA, contents on Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus liver. Tilapias were given diets with increasing levels 0.00, 1.2, 2.50, 3.75 and 5.00% (w w-1 of FO as a replacement of sunflower oil for five months. Fatty acids analysis of methyl esters revealed 45 fatty acids common to all treatments. The increase of flaxseed oil resulted in a decrease in total n-6 PUFA (35.1 to 21.1% and an increase in n-3 PUFA (3.3 to 18.5%. The diet with LNA underwent sequential desaturation and elongation in liver, leading to an increase in all n-3 PUFA and a decrease in n-6/n-3 ratios (10.7 to 1.1. The manipulation of fatty acids with FO may be used to increase n-3 PUFA and to help balance n-6/n-3 PUFA in dietary supplements, thus, the liver tilapia becomes one product with major nutritional value.

  7. Mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for fatty acid composition in an interspecific cross of oil palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, R.; Tan, S.G.; Panandam, L.M.; Rahman, R.A.; Ooi, L.C.L.; Low, E.T.L.; Sharma, M.; Jansen, J.; Cheah, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    Marker Assisted Selection (MAS) is well suited to a perennial crop like oil palm, in which the economic products are not produced until several years after planting. The use of DNA markers for selection in such crops can greatly reduce the number of breeding cycles needed. With the use of DNA

  8. Impact of botanical oils on polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and leukotriene generation in mild asthmatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Dietary supplementation with botanical oils that contain n-6 and n-3 eighteen carbon chain (18C)-PUFA such as γ linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6), stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4n-3) and α linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3) have been shown to impact PUFA metabolism, alter inflammatory processes including arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and improve inflammatory disorders. Methods The diet of mild asthmatics patients was supplemented for three weeks with varying doses of two botanical seed oils (borage oil [Borago officinalis, BO] and echium seed oil [Echium plantagineum; EO]) that contain SDA, ALA and GLA. A three week wash out period followed. The impact of these dietary manipulations was evaluated for several biochemical endpoints, including in vivo PUFA metabolism and ex vivo leukotriene generation from stimulated leukocytes. Results Supplementation with several EO/BO combinations increased circulating 20–22 carbon (20–22C) PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and dihommo-gammalinolenic acid (DGLA), which have been shown to inhibit AA metabolism and inflammation without impacting circulating AA levels. BO/EO combinations also inhibited ex vivo leukotriene generation with some combinations attenuating cysteinyl leukotriene generation in stimulated basophils by >50% and in stimulated neutrophils by >35%. Conclusions This study shows that dietary supplementation with BO/EO alters 20–22C PUFA levels and attenuates leukotriene production in a manner consistent with a reduction in inflammation. PMID:24088297

  9. Effect of palm oil supplementation on carcass yield and fatty acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results obtained showed that palm oil supplementation did not significantly affect (P> 0.05) carcass and organ yields. Percent analysis however showed that in the heart, myristic acid was highest in the control diet (78.58%), lauric acid in 3% PO (41.56%) and stearic acid in 5% PO (84.43%) groups. In the kidney, there was ...

  10. Methyl esters (biodiesel) from and fatty acid profile of Gliricidia sepium seed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing the supply of biodiesel by defining and developing additional feedstocks is important to overcome the still limited amounts available of this alternative fuel. In this connection, the methyl esters of the seed oil of Gliricidia sepium were synthesized and the significant fuel-related prop...

  11. Chemical characteristics and fatty acid composition on oils and fats stored in different packaging materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shattory, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Bleached cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated palm oil and margarine were stored in metal (tin cans and white plastic (polyethylene bottles with air in head space and served at room temperature during the whole period of investigation. The analytical techniques used to analyse these materials has been done at zero time storing (control, after four and seven months of storage. This study showed that storing oils in metal cans have better results than plastic packages specially for bleached cottonseed and hydrogenated oils.

    Aceite de semilla de algodón decolorado, aceite de palma parcialmente hidrogenado y margarina fueron almacenados en latas metálicas (estaño y en botellas de plástico blanco (polietileno con aire en el espacio de cabeza y a temperatura ambiente durante todo el período de investigación. Las técnicas analíticas usadas para analizar estos materiales fueron ensayados a tiempo cero de almacenamiento (control, y después de cuatro y siete meses de almacenamiento. Este estudio mostró que los aceites almacenados en latas metálicas tienen mejores resultados que los envases de plástico, especialmente para los aceites hidrogenados y de semilla de algodón decolorado.

  12. Estimation of Stereospecific Fatty Acid Distribution in Vegetable Oils from Liquid Chromatography Data.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovová, Helena; Lísa, M.; Holčapek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 3 (2008), s. 266-276 ISSN 1438-7697 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) GA203/04/0120 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : vegetable oils * triacylglycerol * stereospecificity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.354, year: 2008

  13. Synthesis of fatty monoester lubricant base oil catalyzed by Fe-Zn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    phenyl phosphonate phosphite are a few solid cata- lysts reported for biolubricants' preparation.13–18 Ear- lier, we reported the application of Fe-Zn double- metal cyanide (DMC) complex as an efficient cata- lyst for producing biolubrciants by transesterification of vegetable oils with linear chain monohydric C8. 997 ...

  14. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R.; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account. PMID:27736913

  15. The seed's protein and oil content, fatty acid composition, and growing cycle length of a single genotype of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) as affected by environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayerza, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    As a botanical source, variability in chia seed composition could be expected between growing locations, and between years within a location, due to genotype and environment effects as well genetic x environment's interactions. The objective of the present study was to determine the location effect on the growing cycle length, and seed's protein content, lipid content, and fatty acid profiles, of a single chia genotype. Seeds of chia genotype Tzotzol grown on eight sites in five different ecosystems were tested. One site was in Argentina, in the Semi-Arid Chaco ecosystem (T(5)); one was in Bolivia, in the Sub-Humid Chaco ecosystem (T(4)); and six in Ecuador, one in the Coastal Desert (T(3)), two on the Tropical Rain Forest (T(2)), and three in the Inter-Andean Dry Valley ecosystem (T(1)). Seeds from plants grown in T(4) and in T(3) contained significantly (P seeds from the other three ecosystems. No significant (P Seeds from T(1) and T(5) ecosystems, with 33.5 and 32.2%, respectively, were the numerically highest oil content producers, but their results were only significantly (P seeds. Significant (P oils from seeds grown in different ecosystems were detected, however. Oil of seeds grown in the T(3) ecosystem had the palmitic, stearic and oleic fatty acids' highest contents. Palmitic and oleic fatty acid levels were significantly (P seeds grown in the T(1) ecosystem, and stearic when was compared to that of seeds grown in the T(5) ecosystem; omega-6 linoleic fatty acid content was significantly (P oils of seeds produced in T(1), and T(2) than in those produced in T(3), T(4), and T(5) ecosystems; omega-3 alpha-linolenic fatty acid content was significantly (P seeds produced in T(1), than in those produced in T(3), T(4), and T(5), but not in those produced in T(2).

  16. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account.

  17. Quick method (FT-NIR) for the determination of oil and major fatty acids content in whole achenes of milk thistle (Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koláčková, Pavla; Růžičková, Gabriela; Gregor, Tomáš; Šišperová, Eliška

    2015-08-30

    Calibration models for the Fourier transform-near infrared (FT-NIR) instrument were developed for quick and non-destructive determination of oil and fatty acids in whole achenes of milk thistle. Samples with a range of oil and fatty acid levels were collected and their transmittance spectra were obtained by the FT-NIR instrument. Based on these spectra and data gained by the means of the reference method - Soxhlet extraction and gas chromatography (GC) - calibration models were created by means of partial least square (PLS) regression analysis. Precision and accuracy of the calibration models was verified via the cross-validation of validation samples whose spectra were not part of the calibration model and also according to the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP), root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC), root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) and the validation coefficient of determination (R(2) ). R(2) for whole seeds were 0.96, 0.96, 0.83 and 0.67 and the RMSEP values were 0.76, 1.68, 1.24, 0.54 for oil, linoleic (C18:2), oleic (C18:1) and palmitic (C16:0) acids, respectively. The calibration models are appropriate for the non-destructive determination of oil and fatty acids levels in whole seeds of milk thistle. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Effects of Oils Rich in Linoleic and α-Linolenic Acids on Fatty Acid Profile and Gene Expression in Goat Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ebrahimi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alteration of the lipid content and fatty acid (FA composition of foods can result in a healthier product. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of flaxseed oil or sunflower oil in the goat diet on fatty acid composition of muscle and expression of lipogenic genes in the semitendinosus (ST muscle. Twenty-one entire male Boer kid goats were fed diets containing different levels of linoleic acid (LA and α-linolenic acid (LNA for 100 days. Inclusion of flaxseed oil increased (p < 0.05 the α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3 concentration in the ST muscle. The diet high in α-linolenic acid (p < 0.05 decreased the arachidonic acid (C20:4n-6 and conjugated linolenic acid (CLA c-9 t-11 content in the ST muscle. There was a significant (p < 0.05 upregulation of PPARα and PPARγ gene expression and downregulation of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD gene in the ST muscle for the high α-linolenic acid group compared with the low α-linolenic acid group. The results of the present study show that flaxseed oil as a source of α-linolenic acid can be incorporated into the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with n-3 fatty acids, upregulate the PPARα and PPARγ, and downregulate the SCD gene expression.

  19. Transport of fatty acids within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows fed on fish oil and hydrogenated palm oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Bello-Pérez, E; Íñiguez-González, G; Garnsworthy, P C; Loor, J J

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of dietary fish oil (FO) and a blend of FO and hydrogenated palm oil (FOPO) on transport of fatty acids (FA) within plasma lipoproteins in lactating and non-lactating cows. Two trials were conducted (one with lactating and another with non-lactating dairy cows) in two 3 × 3 Latin squares that included three periods of 21 days. Dietary treatments for lactating cows consisted of a basal diet (Control; no fat supplement), and fat-supplemented diets containing FO (500 g/day/cow) and FOPO (250 FO + 250 g/day/cow hydrogenated palm oil). For non-lactating cows, dietary treatments consisted of a basal diet (Control; no fat supplement), and fat-supplemented diets containing FO (170 g/day/cow) and FOPO (85 FO + 85 hydrogenated palm oil g/day/cow). In lactating cows, compared with control and FOPO, FO increased C16:0, C18:3 cis-9, 12, 15, C18:2 cis-9, trans-11 and total saturated and polyunsaturated FA in plasma and increased C16:0, C18:2 cis-9, trans-11, total polyunsaturated and total polyunsaturated n-6 in high-density lipoprotein (HDL), whereas in non-lactating cows, compared with control and FOPO, FO increased C16:0, C18:1 trans-11, C18:2 trans-9, 12, C18:2 cis-9, trans-11, C20:5 n-3 and total saturated and polyunsaturated FA in plasma; C16:0, C18:1 trans-11, C18:1 cis-9, C18:2 trans-9, 12, C20:5 n-3 and total monounsaturated FA in HDL; and C18:1 trans-6-8, C18:1 trans-9, C18:1 trans-10, C18:1 trans-11, C18:3 cis-9, 12, 15 and C20:5 n-3 in low-density lipoprotein (LDL). FO increased C20:5 n-3 in plasma and lipoproteins in non-lactating cows and increased C18:3 cis-9, 12, 15 in plasma (in lactating cows) and LDL (in non-lactating cows). We concluded from results of this study that in bovine plasma, the LDL fraction appears to be the main lipoprotein transporting C18:1 trans isomers and is more responsive than other lipoprotein fractions to variation in supply of dietary lipids. Journal of Animal Physiology and

  20. Fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of oils from two cultivars of Cantaloupe extracted by supercritical fluid extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sy Ling, Hoe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE fractionation of three oil fractions (1st, 2nd, 3rd fraction on the fatty acid composition and antioxidant activity of oils from two cultivars of cantaloupe were investigated. Rock melon oil (RMO and Golden Langkawi oil (GLO were extracted using SFE and the major fatty acids for both cultivars were linoleic, oleic, palmitic, and stearic acid. The SFA decreased from 15.78 to 14.14% in RMO 1st fraction, and MUFA decreased from 18.30 to 16.56% in RMO 2nd fraction, while PUFA increased from 65.9 to 69.30% in RMO 3rd fraction. On the other hand SFA decreased from 16.35 to 13.91% in GLO 1st fraction, and MUFA decreased from 17.50 to 15.57% in GLO 2nd fraction, while PUFA increased from 66.15 to 70.52% in GLO 3rd fraction. The different fractions of the two oils showed high antioxidant activity in reducing the oxidation of β-carotene in beta-carotene bleaching assay (BCB and the quenching of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH.El efecto del fraccionamiento mediante extracción con fluido supercrítico de tres fracciones (fracción 1ª, 2ª y 3ª sobre la composición de ácidos grasos y actividad antioxidante de aceites de dos variedades de melón fué investigado. Aceites de melón de los cultivares Rock (RMO y Golden Langkawi GLO fueron extraídos usando SFE y los principales ácidos grasos en cada cultivar fueron ácido linoleico, oleico, palmítico y esteárico. Los ácidos grasos saturados (SFA disminuyeron desde 15.78 a 14.14% en la 1ª fracción de RMO y los ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA disminuyeron desde 18.30 a 16.56% en la 2ª fracción de RMO, mientras que los ácidos grasos poliinsaturados (PUFA aumentaron de 65.9 a 69.30% en la 3ª fracción de RMO. Por otra parte, SFA disminuyo de 16.35 a 13.91% en la primera fracción de GLO y MUFA disminuyo de 17.50 a 15.57% en la 2ª fracción de GLO, mientras que PUFA aumento de 66.15 a 70.52% en la 3ª fracción de GLO. Las diferentes

  1. Substitution of fish oil with camelina oil and inclusion of camelina meal in diets fed to Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and their effects on growth, tissue lipid classes, and fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, S M; Parrish, C C

    2014-03-01

    Developing a commercially relevant Atlantic cod aquaculture industry will require improvements in feed sustainability. Camelina oil and meal are potential replacements of fish oil and fish meal in aquaculture feeds. Camelina oil is high in 18:3ω3 (30%), with an ω3/ω6 ratio > 1. Camelina meal has a considerable crude protein level (38%), which includes significant amounts of methionine and phenylalanine. Four diets were tested; each diet was fed to triplicate tanks (3 tanks per diet) of Atlantic cod (14.4 g/fish; 70 fish per tank) for 13 wk. The diets included a fish oil/fish meal control (FO) and three diets which replaced 100% of fish oil with camelina oil: one diet contained fish meal (100CO), another solvent extracted fish meal (100COSEFM), and another had fish meal partially reduced by 15% inclusion of camelina meal (100CO15CM). Growth was measured (length and weight) and tissue samples were collected for lipid analysis (muscle, liver, brain, gut, spleen, skin, and carcass) at wk 0 (before feeding the experimental diet) and at wk 13. Cod fed camelina oil had a lower (P replacement of fish oil with camelina oil, plus solvent extracted fish meal had an overarching effect on the entire fatty acid profile of the whole animal. Fatty acid mass balance calculations indicated that cod fed 100COSEFM elongated 13% of 18:3ω3 to 20:3ω3 and oxidized the remaining 87%, whereas cod fed fish oil showed a much lower (P meal caused the greatest change in cod lipid composition and utilization.

  2. Effect of ruminally unprotected Echium oil on milk yield, composition and fatty acid profile in mid-lactation goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, Manuela; Lussiana, Carola; Cornale, Paolo; Battaglini, Luca Maria; Fortina, Riccardo; Mimosi, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects on goat milk yield and composition of a diet supplemented with Echium plantagineum oil (EPO). Twenty-four mid-lactation multiparous Camosciata goats were divided into two balanced groups and fed for 44 d a diet based on hay and concentrate, supplemented (EPO group, Echium) or not (CON group, control) with 40 ml of ruminally unprotected EPO. Individual milk yield was recorded and individual milk samples were collected at 11, 22, 33, and 44 d after supplementation. Milk samples were analysed for milk components and fatty acids (FA). Data were statistically analysed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Milk yield, protein and lactose contents were significantly higher in EPO than CON group. The inclusion of EPO significantly decreased total saturated FA and total branched-chain FA, and contemporarily sharply increased trans biohydrogenation intermediates (P ⩽ 0.001). Milk concentration of α-linolenic, stearidonic and γ-linolenic acids increased by 23, 1000 and 67%, respectively (P ⩽ 0.001). Due to extensive ruminal biohydrogenation, their apparent transfer rate was less than 3%. As a consequence, the milk concentrations of very long-chain (VLC) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), such as eicosapentaenoic (20:5 n-3) and dihomo-γ-linolenic (20:3 n-6) acids, significantly increased with EPO treatment, but values remained very low. Docosahexaenoic acid (22:6 n-3) was undetectable in all analysed milk samples. Results show that ruminally unprotected EPO can enhance milk yield and protein and improve the overall goat milk FA profile. However, this kind of supplementation cannot be considered a valuable strategy to develop goat functional dairy products enriched with VLC n-3 PUFA for human consumption.

  3. Co-fermentation of oil palm lignocellulosic residue with pig manure in anaerobic leach bed reactor for fatty acid production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saritpongteeraka, Kanyarat; Boonsawang, Piyarat; Sung, Shihwu; Chaiprapat, Sumate

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Pig manure helped stimulate degradation of EFB in the co-fermentation in ALBR. • High manure mixing and long fermentation time favored VFA production. • Derived quadratic model could satisfactorily explain the relationship of parameters. • Species of fatty acids produced were influenced by flooding interval of reactor bed. - Abstract: Batch experiments were performed to investigate the co-fermentation of palm oil empty fruit bunch (EFB) and pig manure (PM) at various PM mixing ratios (%PM) and flushing intervals (FI) over 60-day fermentation time (FT) using anaerobic leach bed reactors. Addition of PM promoted hydrolysis yield (η h ) and acidification yield (η a ) due to the more degradable and soluble nature of PM that gave out organic acids, and nutrients it supplemented. The highest η h and η a found were 27.9 ± 0.3% and 51.7 ± 2.6%, respectively. Longer FI that delayed bed flushing prolonged the dry condition where hydrolytic reaction could be enhanced. The developed multiple regression model with R 2 = 0.87 and p < 0.0001 suggested a good fit to the data and able to describe the interactive relationship of the parameters on total volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. The longer chain acids, i.e. propionic (C3), butyric (C4), and valeric (C5) acids, were found in higher concentrations with longer FI and higher pig manure mixing ratios. The mixing of an easier biodegradable pig manure as co-substrate could help induce higher degree of fermentation of the recalcitrant EFB

  4. Role of fatty acids in the formation of Estonian oil shale (kukersite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klesment, I.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the composition of the tar from semicoking of Estonian kukersite, by separation and chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis, showed that approximately 40 percent of the carbon of the bituminous material existed as linear chains. At the beginning of fossilization the original biological material for the formation of the kerogen of the kukersite (saturated and unsaturated fatty acids C/sub 14/-C/sub 18/) was oxidized at the double bonds of the unsaturated acids, and carbonyl and ..beta..-polycarbonyl groups were formed. During pyrolysis of the polycarbonyl chains, alkylresorcinols were formed containing linear alkyl chains with less than or equal to 10 carbon atoms. The phenols, boiling at 280/sup 0/-430/sup 0/C, have a much higher alkylresorcinols content than those obtained during semicoking of other solid fuels.

  5. New Approaches to Target T-ALL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni eRoti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common malignancy in children. Although it is now curable in 80-90% of cases, patients with T-ALL experience a higher frequency of induction failure and early relapse. Despite aggressive treatment approaches, including transplantation and new salvage regimens, most children with relapsed T-ALL will not be cured. As such, we are in need of new targeted therapies for the disease. Recent advances in the molecular characterization of T-ALL have uncovered a number of new therapeutic targets. This review will summarize recent advancements in the study of inhibiting the NOTCH1, PI3K-AKT and Cyclin D3:CDK4/6 pathways as therapeutic strategies for T-ALL<