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Sample records for t2-weighted magnetic resonance

  1. Reactive Sclerosis: Hyperintense Appearance on T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanberoglu, K.; Kantarci, F.; Yilmaz, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Osteosclerosis is defined as increased density of bone on X-ray imaging studies. It is known that osteosclerosis appears hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences. In this review, we present our experience in various sclerotic skeletal pathologies that appear hyperintense on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. We emphasize the possible pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause this appearance, such as bone marrow edema and/or composition of newly formed bone

  2. Reactive Sclerosis: Hyperintense Appearance on T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Kanberoglu, K.; Kantarci, F.; Yilmaz, M.H. [Istanbul Univ., Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Osteosclerosis is defined as increased density of bone on X-ray imaging studies. It is known that osteosclerosis appears hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences. In this review, we present our experience in various sclerotic skeletal pathologies that appear hyperintense on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. We emphasize the possible pathophysiological mechanisms that may cause this appearance, such as bone marrow edema and/or composition of newly formed bone.

  3. High-Quality T2-Weighted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Radiation Therapy Applications

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    Du, Dongsu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Glide-Hurst, Carri [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Li, H. Harold; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Hu, Yanle, E-mail: Hu.Yanle@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Phoenix, Arizona (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to improve triggering efficiency of the prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) method and to develop a 4DMRI imaging protocol that could offer T2 weighting for better tumor visualization, good spatial coverage and spatial resolution, and respiratory motion sampling within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications. Methods and Materials: The respiratory state splitting (RSS) and multi-shot acquisition (MSA) methods were analytically compared and validated in a simulation study by using the respiratory signals from 10 healthy human subjects. The RSS method was more effective in improving triggering efficiency. It was implemented in prospective respiratory amplitude-triggered 4DMRI. 4DMRI image datasets were acquired from 5 healthy human subjects. Liver motion was estimated using the acquired 4DMRI image datasets. Results: The simulation study showed the RSS method was more effective for improving triggering efficiency than the MSA method. The average reductions in 4DMRI acquisition times were 36% and 10% for the RSS and MSA methods, respectively. The human subject study showed that T2-weighted 4DMRI with 10 respiratory states, 60 slices at a spatial resolution of 1.5 × 1.5 × 3.0 mm{sup 3} could be acquired in 9 to 18 minutes, depending on the individual's breath pattern. Based on the acquired 4DMRI image datasets, the ranges of peak-to-peak liver displacements among 5 human subjects were 9.0 to 12.9 mm, 2.5 to 3.9 mm, and 0.5 to 2.3 mm in superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and left-right directions, respectively. Conclusions: We demonstrated that with the RSS method, it was feasible to acquire high-quality T2-weighted 4DMRI within a reasonable amount of time for radiation therapy applications.

  4. Intensity of prolactinoma on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: towards another gender difference

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    Kreutz, Julie [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Radiology, Liege (Belgium); Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Liege, Domaine Universitaire du Sart Tilman, Service d' Imagerie Medicale, Liege (Belgium); Vroonen, Laurent; Petrossians, Patrick; Rostomyan, Liliya; Beckers, Albert [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Endocrinology, Liege (Belgium); Cattin, Francoise [University Hospital Besancon, Department of Radiology, Besancon (France); Thiry, Albert [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Pathology, Liege (Belgium); Tshibanda, Luaba [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Radiology, Liege (Belgium); Bonneville, Jean-Francois [University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Radiology, Liege (Belgium); University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Department of Endocrinology, Liege (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    Clinical presentations of prolactinomas are quite different between genders. In comparison with women's prolactinoma, those in men showed predominance of large tumors with high prolactin (PRL) levels. This preponderance could be attributed to a greater proliferative potential of the tumors. Differences in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal at diagnosis have not been yet clearly evaluated. We conduct a retrospective study comparing MRI signal intensity (SI) on T2-weighted images (T2-WI) between 41 men and 41 women to investigate whether or not men prolactinoma present specific features. In addition to the size of the adenoma and PRL levels (P < 0001), prolactinomas in men also exhibit differences from those in women in signal on T2-WI on MRI (P < 0001). Women's prolactinomas are mostly of high SI on T2-WI while men's prolactinomas exhibit a more heterogeneous pattern of SI on T2-WI. Prolactinomas presenting with low SI on T2-WI are almost exclusively encountered in men. Presence of T2-WI hypointensities in pituitary adenoma can be predictive of a different subtype of prolactinoma almost encountered in men and possibly translate the presence of spherical amyloid deposits, in agreement with the literature. (orig.)

  5. Atlas-Free Cervical Spinal Cord Segmentation on Midsagittal T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

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    Chun-Chih Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic atlas-free method for segmenting the cervical spinal cord on midsagittal T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI is presented. Pertinent anatomical knowledge is transformed into constraints employed at different stages of the algorithm. After picking up the midsagittal image, the spinal cord is detected using expectation maximization and dynamic programming (DP. Using DP, the anterior and posterior edges of the spinal canal and the vertebral column are detected. The vertebral bodies and the intervertebral disks are then segmented using region growing. Then, the anterior and posterior edges of the spinal cord are detected using median filtering followed by DP. We applied this method to 79 noncontrast MRI studies over a 3-month period. The spinal cords were detected in all cases, and the vertebral bodies were successfully labeled in 67 (85% of them. Our algorithm had very good performance. Compared to manual segmentation results, the Jaccard indices ranged from 0.937 to 1, with a mean of 0.980 ± 0.014. The Hausdorff distances between the automatically detected and manually delineated anterior and posterior spinal cord edges were both 1.0 ± 0.5 mm. Used alone or in combination, our method lays a foundation for computer-aided diagnosis of spinal diseases, particularly cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  6. Hemosiderin detected by T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms: indication of previous bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shihomi; Inoue, Takashi; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-01-01

    Previous bleeding from a cerebral aneurysm indicates a higher risk of rupture. Hemosiderin may be detected during aneurysm surgery or by preoperative imaging sensitive to hemosiderin. The detection of hemosiderin deposits by T(2)*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated in 49 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms who underwent open surgery. MR imaging was performed using 3.0 tesla MR scanner. Two sequences of T(2)*-weighted imaging, and proton density images were obtained. Preliminary study in patients with old subarachnoid hemorrhage provided the definitions of likely pathological findings during surgery and on T(2)*-weighted imaging due to previous hemorrhage. Hemosiderin deposits in the subarachnoid space were observed during surgery in 9 of the 49 patients, although no obvious rupture site was detected around the aneurysm wall. Size, presence of bleb, location, and number of aneurysms showed no significant difference between patients with and without hemosiderin deposition. Hypointense areas on T(2)*-weighted imaging were recognized in four patients. The mean size of the aneurysms in these patients was 9.8 mm, significantly larger than those in other patients (p = 0.029). Hemosiderin deposits were observed during surgery in sites close to the lesions on T(2)*-weighted imaging in two of these four patients. Hemosiderin deposits are not rare in patients with unruptured aneurysms, and preoperative T(2)*-weighted imaging can detect such deposits.

  7. Image quality and cancer visibility of T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the prostate at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, E.K.; Lagemaat, M.W.; Barentsz, J.O.; Futterer, J.J.; Zamecnik, P.; Roozen, H.; Orzada, S.; Bitz, A.K.; Maas, M.C.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the image quality of T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and the visibility of prostate cancer at 7 Tesla (T).Seventeen prostate cancer patients underwent T2w imaging at 7T with only an external transmit/receive array coil. Three radiologists independently scored

  8. The reliability of identifying the Omega sign using axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

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    Zakaria, Hesham Mostafa; Massa, Peter Joseph; Smith, Richard L; Moharram, Tarek Hazem; Corrigan, John; Lee, Ian; Schultz, Lonni; Hu, Jianhui; Patel, Suresh; Griffith, Brent

    2018-01-01

    Preoperative identification of the eloquent brain is important for neurosurgical planning. One common method of finding the motor cortex is by localizing "the Omega sign." No studies have tested the reliability of imaging to identify the Omega sign. We identified 40 recent and consecutive patients who had undergone preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging for identification of the hand motor area prior to tumor resection. We recruited 11 neurosurgical residents of various levels of training and one board-certified neurosurgeon to identify the hand motor cortex Omega. Testees were given axial images of T2-weighted MRI and placed marks where they expected to find the Omega. Two board-certified radiologists graded and quantified the localization attempts. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using the kappa statistic, and Rao-Scott chi-square tests were used to examine the relationship between clinical factors and testees' experience with correct identification of the Omega sign. The overall correct identification rate was 69.9% (95% CI = 63.4-75.7), ranging from 36.6% to 92.7% among all raters for the tumor side and from 46.2% to 97.4% for the non-tumor side. Anatomic distortion greatly affected correct identification ( p Omega than junior residents ( p Omega sign is poor, with a Fleiss kappa of 0.23. We concluded that correct identification of the Omega sign is affected by tumor distortion and experience but overall is not reliable. This underscores the limitations of anatomic landmarks and the importance of utilizing multiple scanning planes and preoperative fMRI for appropriate localization.

  9. Texture features on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: new potential biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, A.; Mazzetti, S.; Giannini, V.; Russo, F.; Bollito, E.; Porpiglia, F.; Stasi, M.; Regge, D.

    2015-04-01

    To explore contrast (C) and homogeneity (H) gray-level co-occurrence matrix texture features on T2-weighted (T2w) Magnetic Resonance (MR) images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for predicting prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness, and to compare them with traditional ADC metrics for differentiating low- from intermediate/high-grade PCas. The local Ethics Committee approved this prospective study of 93 patients (median age, 65 years), who underwent 1.5 T multiparametric endorectal MR imaging before prostatectomy. Clinically significant (volume ≥0.5 ml) peripheral tumours were outlined on histological sections, contoured on T2w and ADC images, and their pathological Gleason Score (pGS) was recorded. C, H, and traditional ADC metrics (mean, median, 10th and 25th percentile) were calculated on the largest lesion slice, and correlated with the pGS through the Spearman correlation coefficient. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) assessed how parameters differentiate pGS = 6 from pGS ≥ 7. The dataset included 49 clinically significant PCas with a balanced distribution of pGS. The Spearman ρ and AUC values on ADC were: -0.489, 0.823 (mean) -0.522, 0.821 (median) -0.569, 0.854 (10th percentile) -0.556, 0.854 (25th percentile) -0.386, 0.871 (C); 0.533, 0.923 (H); while on T2w they were: -0.654, 0.945 (C); 0.645, 0.962 (H). AUC of H on ADC and T2w, and C on T2w were significantly higher than that of the mean ADC (p = 0.05). H and C calculated on T2w images outperform ADC parameters in correlating with pGS and differentiating low- from intermediate/high-risk PCas, supporting the role of T2w MR imaging in assessing PCa biological aggressiveness.

  10. Cortical pathology in multiple sclerosis detected by the T1/T2-weighted ratio from routine magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righart, Ruthger; Biberacher, Viola; Jonkman, Laura E; Klaver, Roel; Schmidt, Paul; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Kirschke, Jan S; Zimmer, Claus; Hemmer, Bernhard; Geurts, Jeroen J G; Mühlau, Mark

    2017-10-01

    In multiple sclerosis, neuropathological studies have shown widespread changes in the cerebral cortex. In vivo imaging is critical, because the histopathological substrate of most measurements is unknown. Using a novel magnetic resonance imaging analysis technique, based on the ratio of T1- and T2-weighted signal intensities, we studied the cerebral cortex of a large cohort of patients in early stages of multiple sclerosis. A total of 168 patients with clinically isolated syndrome or relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (Expanded Disability Status Scale: median = 1, range = 0-3.5) and 80 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were investigated. We also searched for the histopathological substrate of the T1/T2-weighted ratio by combining postmortem imaging and histopathology in 9 multiple sclerosis brain donors. Patients showed lower T1/T2-weighted ratio values in parietal and occipital areas. The 4 most significant clusters appeared in the medial occipital and posterior cingulate cortex (each left and right). The decrease of the T1/T2-weighted ratio in the posterior cingulate was related to performance in attention. Analysis of the T1/T2-weighted ratio values of postmortem imaging yielded a strong correlation with dendrite density but none of the other parameters including myelin. The T1/T2-weighted ratio decreases in early stages of multiple sclerosis in a widespread manner, with a preponderance of posterior areas and with a contribution to attentional performance; it seems to reflect dendrite pathology. As the method is broadly available and applicable to available clinical scans, we believe that it is a promising candidate for studying and monitoring cortical pathology or therapeutic effects in multiple sclerosis. Ann Neurol 2017;82:519-529. © 2017 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  11. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  12. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

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    Antonio C. Westphalen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher’s exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25 and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34. Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. RESULTS: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58% had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59 for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59. For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2. CONCLUSION: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy.

  13. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

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    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology. Abdominal Imaging Section], e-mail: antonio.westphalen@radiology.ucsf.edu

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  14. SU-E-J-157: Improving the Quality of T2-Weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Clinical Evaluation

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    Du, D; Mutic, S; Hu, Y [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States); Caruthers, S [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH (United States); Glide-Hurst, C [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Low, D [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an imaging technique that enables us to acquire T2- weighted 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging (4DMRI) with sufficient spatial coverage, temporal resolution and spatial resolution for clinical evaluation. Methods: T2-weighed 4DMRI images were acquired from a healthy volunteer using a respiratory amplitude triggered T2-weighted Turbo Spin Echo sequence. 10 respiratory states were used to equally sample the respiratory range based on amplitude (0%, 20%i, 40%i, 60%i, 80%i, 100%, 80%e, 60%e, 40%e and 20%e). To avoid frequent scanning halts, a methodology was devised that split 10 respiratory states into two packages in an interleaved manner and packages were acquired separately. Sixty 3mm sagittal slices at 1.5mm in-plane spatial resolution were acquired to offer good spatial coverage and reasonable spatial resolution. The in-plane field of view was 375mm × 260mm with nominal scan time of 3 minutes 42 seconds. Acquired 2D images at the same respiratory state were combined to form the 3D image set corresponding to that respiratory state and reconstructed in the coronal view to evaluate whether all slices were at the same respiratory state. 3D image sets of 10 respiratory states represented a complete 4D MRI image set. Results: T2-weighted 4DMRI image were acquired in 10 minutes which was within clinical acceptable range. Qualitatively, the acquired MRI images had good image quality for delineation purposes. There were no abrupt position changes in reconstructed coronal images which confirmed that all sagittal slices were in the same respiratory state. Conclusion: We demonstrated it was feasible to acquire T2-weighted 4DMRI image set within a practical amount of time (10 minutes) that had good temporal resolution (10 respiratory states), spatial resolution (1.5mm × 1.5mm × 3.0mm) and spatial coverage (60 slices) for future clinical evaluation.

  15. High-Resolution T2-Weighted Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Respiratory Triggering: Impact of Butylscopolamine on Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, M.; Klessen, C.; Rief, M.; Elgeti, T.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Asbach, P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Respiratory triggering allows the acquisition of high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the upper abdomen. However, the depiction of organs close to the gastrointestinal tract can be considerably impaired by ghosting artifacts and blurring caused by bowel peristalsis. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of gastrointestinal motion suppression by intramuscular butylscopolamine administration on the image quality of a respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (T2w TSE) sequence of the upper abdomen. Material and Methods: Images of 46 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-four patients had received intramuscular injection of 40 mg butylscopolamine immediately before MR imaging. Fourteen of the 24 patients in the butylscopolamine group underwent repeat imaging after a mean of 29 min. Quantitative analysis of the ghosting artifacts was done by measuring signal intensities in regions of interest placed in air anterior to the patient. In addition, image quality was assessed qualitatively by two radiologists by consensus. Results: Spasmolytic medication with butylscopolamine reduced ghosting artifacts and significantly improved image quality of the respiratory-triggered T2w TSE sequence. The most pronounced effect of butylscopolamine administration on image quality was found for the pancreas and the left hepatic lobe. The rate of examinations with excellent or good depiction of the pancreas and the left hepatic lobe in the group without premedication and in the butylscopolamine group was 55% vs. 96% (pancreatic head), 35% vs. 88% (pancreatic body), 43% vs. 96% (pancreatic tail), and 45% vs. 83% (left hepatic lobe), respectively. Regarding the duration of the effect of intramuscular butylscopolamine, repeat imaging after a mean of 29 min did not result in a significant deterioration of image quality. Conclusion: Intramuscular butylscopolamine administration significantly improves image quality of respiratory-triggered T2-weighted abdominal

  16. High-Resolution T2-Weighted Abdominal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Respiratory Triggering: Impact of Butylscopolamine on Image Quality

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    Wagner, M.; Klessen, C.; Rief, M.; Elgeti, T.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B.; Asbach, P. (Dept. of Radiology, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (DE))

    2008-05-15

    Background: Respiratory triggering allows the acquisition of high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images of the upper abdomen. However, the depiction of organs close to the gastrointestinal tract can be considerably impaired by ghosting artifacts and blurring caused by bowel peristalsis. Purpose: To evaluate the effect of gastrointestinal motion suppression by intramuscular butylscopolamine administration on the image quality of a respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (T2w TSE) sequence of the upper abdomen. Material and Methods: Images of 46 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-four patients had received intramuscular injection of 40 mg butylscopolamine immediately before MR imaging. Fourteen of the 24 patients in the butylscopolamine group underwent repeat imaging after a mean of 29 min. Quantitative analysis of the ghosting artifacts was done by measuring signal intensities in regions of interest placed in air anterior to the patient. In addition, image quality was assessed qualitatively by two radiologists by consensus. Results: Spasmolytic medication with butylscopolamine reduced ghosting artifacts and significantly improved image quality of the respiratory-triggered T2w TSE sequence. The most pronounced effect of butylscopolamine administration on image quality was found for the pancreas and the left hepatic lobe. The rate of examinations with excellent or good depiction of the pancreas and the left hepatic lobe in the group without premedication and in the butylscopolamine group was 55% vs. 96% (pancreatic head), 35% vs. 88% (pancreatic body), 43% vs. 96% (pancreatic tail), and 45% vs. 83% (left hepatic lobe), respectively. Regarding the duration of the effect of intramuscular butylscopolamine, repeat imaging after a mean of 29 min did not result in a significant deterioration of image quality. Conclusion: Intramuscular butylscopolamine administration significantly improves image quality of respiratory-triggered T2-weighted abdominal

  17. Multifocal hemosiderin depositions on T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with pathology-proven systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

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    Yang, Xun-zhe; Ni, Jun; Cui, Li-ying

    2014-09-25

    Intracranial hemorrhage in central nervous system lymphoma is extremely rare. T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging is of particularly use in detecting silent hemorrhage as hypointense signals due to the deposition of paramagnetic hemosiderin or mineralization. Multifocal hemosiderin depositions caused by chronic silent hemorrhage have not yet been identified in patients with central nervous system involvement of systemic lymphoma. We present an unexpected radiographic feature on T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging in a patient with central nervous system involvement of pathologically confirmed systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A 56-year-old woman presented with lower extremities weakness and progressive cognitive decline for four months. Conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated multiple lesions with hypointensities on T1-weighted images and hyperintensities on T2-weighted images and fluid attenuated inversion recovery in both hemispheres. She was then transferred to our hospital. This is the first report of pathologically confirmed case of CNS involvement of systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with multifocal silent hemosiderin depositions detected by T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging. Even though uncommon, our report offers an insight that CNS lymphoma could present with multifocal silent hemosiderin depositions on T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging. Further studies were expected for exploring the association between this radiologic feature and systemic lymphoma and their underlying mechanisms.

  18. Significance of T2 weighted image on magnetic resonance. Imaging in diagnosis of acute cervical cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Isao; Kitahara, Takao; Endo, Masataka; Ohwada, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with acute cervical cord injury with neurological deficit were examined within 72 hours of injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study evaluated early MRI as a neurological status and prognostic indicator of the eventual neurological outcome. The neurological status was determined using Frankel classification at admission and follow-up examination. Three different patterns of T2 weighted image (T2WI) on MRI were observed in these patients: 7 patients (Frankel A in all) had coexistence of low and high signal (mixed type); 9 (A in 3, B in 5, C in one) had high signal over more than one spinal segment (diffuse high type); 14 (A in 5, B in 3, C in 6) had high signal within one spinal segment (local high type); 8 (C in 6, D in 2) had no abnormality (normal type). At follow-up examination, the improvement rate was 14.3% for mixed type, 33.3% for diffuse high type, 78.6% for local high type and 100% for normal type. These studies suggest that the early MRI is very useful in the diagnosis of acute cervical cord injury and in predicting neurological recovery. (author)

  19. Low intensity areas observed T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the cerebral cortex in various neurological diseases

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    Imon, Yukari [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    We retrospectively studied magnetic resonance images of the brain in 158 patients (8 cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 16 cases of Alzheimer`s disease, 8 cases of Parkinson`s disease, 53 cases of multiple cerebral infarct, 20 cases of other central nervous system (CNS) diseases, and 53 cases without any CNS disease) to examine the appearance of T2-weighted low signal intensity areas (LIA) in the cerebral cortex. The age of subjects ranged from 36 to 85 years with the mean 65.0 and SD 9.9 years. LIA in the motor and sensory cortices, and brain atrophy were evaluated visually on axial images of the spin-echo sequence obtained with a 1.5 tesla system. The incidence of LIA in the motor cortex was significantly higher in all CNS diseases than in cases without any CNS disease, but not significantly different among CNS diseases. LIA in the motor cortex showed a correlation with age, temporal and parietal atrophy. The appearance of LIA in the sensory cortex correlated with that of LIA in the motor cortex, and parietal atrophy. These results suggest that LIA may appear according to age and be associated with the accumulation of nonheme iron in the cortex, especially in patients with CNS diseases. (author)

  20. Dotlike hemosiderin spots on T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging as a predictor of stroke recurrence: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Toshio; Horita, Yoshifumi; Hashimoto, Yuji; Niwa, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Microangiopathy associated with hypertension is a notable cause of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), including deep intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and lacunar infarct. Dotlike low-intensity spots (dotlike hemosiderin spots: dotHSs) on T2*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images have been histologically diagnosed as old cerebral microbleeds associated with lipohyalinosis, amyloid angiopathy, or other microangiopathies and located in deep or subcortical regions. The aim of this study was to determine whether dotHSs indicate the severity of microangiopathy, and if so, whether large numbers of deep dotHSs are associated with SVD recurrence. The authors prospectively analyzed the number of dotHSs in 337 patients-191 men and 146 women with a mean age of 66 +/- 10.4 years (range 37-94 years)-with SVD (199 ICHs and 138 lacunar infarcts) who had been consecutively admitted to Hakodate Municipal Hospital. The follow-up period was 3.5 to 42 months (22.5 +/- 13.1 months). Patients were divided into two groups based on the recurrence. The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence was estimated based on the Cox proportional hazard model by using the number of deep and subcortical dotHSs as well as other factors. Of 337 patients, 20 were readmitted with recurrence. Results of a multivariate analysis revealed an elevated rate of recurrence in patients with many subcortical dotHSs (> or = 5, HR 4.36, p = 0.0019) or a history of ICH (HR 3.82, p = 0.014). A trend toward a positive correlation (Pearson correlation coefficient 0.548, p < 0.0001) was found between the number of deep and subcortical dotHSs. Although a small sample size limited the power of analyses, the findings indicate that a large number of subcortical dotHSs may predict SVD recurrence.

  1. Clinical utility of optimized three-dimensional T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted sequences in spinal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanitame, Nobuko; Tanitame, Keizo; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    This article reviews the clinical utility of 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences optimized for the evaluation of various intraspinal lesions. First, intraspinal tumors with hypervascular components and arteriovenous malformations (AVM) are clearly shown on contrast-enhanced (CE)-3D T1-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences with high spatial resolution. Second, dynamic CE-3D time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) shows delineated feeding arteries of intraspinal AVM or arteriovenous fistula (AVF), greatly aiding subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Third, 3D multiecho T2*-weighted GE sequences are used to visualize intraspinal structures and spinal cord lesions and are sensitive to the magnetic susceptibility of intraspinal hemorrhages. Three-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) and multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP sequences produce contiguous thin images with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in short scanning times. Intraspinal cystic lesions and small nerve-root tumors in subarachnoid space can be viewed using 3D balanced SSFP. Spinal cord myelomalacia and cord compression can be evaluated on fat-suppressed multishot 3D balanced non-SSFP. Finally, a 3D T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with variable flip angle (FA) refocusing pulse improves through-plane spatial resolution over conventional 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences while matching image contrast.

  2. Usefulness of magnetic resonance cholangiography and additional T2-weighted axial image in evaluating focaI intrahepatic ductal dilatation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yeong Mi; Cha, Sung Sook; Lee, Jong Yuk

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the value of MR cholangiography (MRC) and MRC with additional T2-weighted axial imaging for evaluating the cause and determining the therapeutic plan in patients with a focal dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts(IHBD). Forty nine patients (male, 27; female, 22; age range, 12-72 (mean, 51) years) with a focal intrahepatic ductal dilatation confirmed surgically and pathologically (lobectomy, 34; biopsy, 7; surgical finding and T-tube cholangiography, 7; percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with bile cytology, 1) underwent MRC and T2-weighted axial imaging. The MRC were obtained in one of two ways (a single slab or multislice acquisition under chemical fat saturation) using RARE (31 patients, source images and single slice images), or TSE (18 patients, source images and MIP reconstruction images). Two radiologists reviewed the MRC images alone, and the MRC images with the T2-weighted axial images. A diagnosis was determined by consensus. In 37 out of 49 patients, the causes of a bile duct dilation were benign diseases (IHBD stones in 33 cases, liver abscesses with IHBD stones in three cases, one inflammatory pseudotumor). Twelve patients had cholangiocarcinomas (mass-forming type in seven cases, intraductal type in three cases, and periductaI infiltrating type in two cases). A correct diagnosis was confirmed in 47 out of 49 cases(96.0%), i.e. all the 37 benign lesions and 10 out of 12 malignant lesions. The addition of the T2-weighted axial image to the MRC did not alter the diagnosis of the causes of the focal intrahepatic ductal dilatation, but was helpful in 10 cases (20.4%). Nine cases (7 cholangiocarcinomas and 2 abscesses), in which MRC showed masses, were visualized more definitely on the additional T2-weighted axial images to the MRC than on the MRC alone. The remaining cases were hepatolithiasis, where stones could be easily differentiated from air by the air-fluid level on the axial images. MRC is a good diagnostic modality for

  3. Myometrial invasion and overall staging of endometrial carcinoma: assessment using fusion of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yu Guo,1,2 Ping Wang,2 Penghui Wang,2 Wei Gao,1 Fenge Li,3 Xueling Yang,1 Hongyan Ni,2 Wen Shen,2 Zhi Guo1 1Department of Interventional Therapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, Tianjin’s Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin, 2Department of Radiology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, The First Central Clinical College of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 3Department of Gynecology, Tianjin First Center Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Background: The age of onset of endometrial carcinoma has been decreasing in recent years. In endometrial carcinoma, it is important to accurately assess invasion depth and preoperative staging. Fusion of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2WI and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI may contribute to the improvement of anatomical localization of lesions.Materials and methods: In our study, a total of 58 endometrial carcinoma cases were included. Based on the revised 2009 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system, a fusion of T2WI and DWI was utilized for the evaluation of invasion depth and determination of the overall stage. Postoperative pathologic assessment was considered as the reference standard. The consistency of T2WI image staging and pathologic staging, and the consistency of fused T2WI and DWI and pathologic staging were all analyzed using Kappa statistics.Results: Compared with the T2WI group, a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy was observed for myometrial invasion with fusion of T2WI and DWI (77.6% for T2WI; 94.8% for T2WI-DWI. For the identification of deep invasion, we calculated values for diagnostic sensitivity (69.2% for T2WI; 92.3% for T2WI-DWI, specificity (80% for T2WI; 95.6% for T2WI-DWI, positive predictive value (50% for T2WI; 85.7% for T2WI-DWI, and negative predictive value (90% for

  4. Utility of single shot fast spin echo technique in evaluating pancreaticobiliary diseases: T2-weighted image and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Jae Bok; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Dong Joon; Kim, Joo Hee; Chung, Jae Joon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of T2-weighted imaging an MR cholangiopancreatography using the single shot fast spin-echo technique for evaluating pancreaticobiliary disease. Between March and July 1997, axial and coronal T2-weighted images(TE: 80-200 msec) and MR cholangiopancreatograms (TE: 800-1200 msec) were obtained in two ways [single slab (thickness: 30-50 mm) and multislice acquisition under chemical fat saturation] using SSFSE pulse sequencing in 131 cases of suspected pancreati-cobiliary disease. The accuracy of SSFSE MR imaging was assessed in 89 lesions of 74 patients [male, 48; female, 26; age range, 30-86 (mean, 59) years] confirmed surgicopathologically (50 lesions in 39 patients) and clinically (39 lesions in 35 patients). Two radiologists reviewed the MR images and diagnosis was determined by consensus. Correct diagnosis was confirmed in 84 of 89 lesions (94%). Seven lesions were falsely interpreted, false positive and false negative results accounting for two and five cases, respectively. Two pancreatic cancers were misdiagnosed as pancreatitis and a cancer of the proximal common bile duct(CBD) was interpreted as a distal CBD cancer. The sensitivity of SSFSE MR imaging for malignancy was 93 %. One CBD stone revealed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was not detected on MR images. In contrast, a stone in the CBD seen on MR images was not apparent on subsequent ERCP. Sensitivity and specificity for calculous disease were 96% and 99.7%, respectively. A benign stricture of the ampulla of Vater was falsely interpreted as normal, and correct diagnosis was possible in two falsely diagnosed cases when MR images were reviewed retrospectively. The combination of T2-weighted and cholangiographic images using SSFSE is an accurate method for diagnosing pancreatcobiliary diseases

  5. Hippocampal Microbleed on a Post-Mortem T2*-Weighted Gradient-Echo 7.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. De Reuck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present post-mortem study of a brain from an Alzheimer patient showed on a T2*-weighted gradient-echo 7.0-T MRI of a coronal brain section a hyposignal in the hippocampus, suggesting a microbleed. On the corresponding histological examination, only iron deposits around the granular cellular layer and in blood vessel walls of the hippocampus were observed without evidence of a bleeding. This case report illustrates that the detection of microbleeds on MRI has to be interpreted with caution.

  6. Assessment of Myocardial Fibrosis in Mice Using a T2*-Weighted 3D Radial Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan J van Nierop

    Full Text Available Myocardial fibrosis is a common hallmark of many diseases of the heart. Late gadolinium enhanced MRI is a powerful tool to image replacement fibrosis after myocardial infarction (MI. Interstitial fibrosis can be assessed indirectly from an extracellular volume fraction measurement using contrast-enhanced T1 mapping. Detection of short T2* species resulting from fibrotic tissue may provide an attractive non-contrast-enhanced alternative to directly visualize the presence of both replacement and interstitial fibrosis.To goal of this paper was to explore the use of a T2*-weighted radial sequence for the visualization of fibrosis in mouse heart.C57BL/6 mice were studied with MI (n = 20, replacement fibrosis, transverse aortic constriction (TAC (n = 18, diffuse fibrosis, and as control (n = 10. 3D center-out radial T2*-weighted images with varying TE were acquired in vivo and ex vivo (TE = 21 μs-4 ms. Ex vivo T2*-weighted signal decay with TE was analyzed using a 3-component model. Subtraction of short- and long-TE images was used to highlight fibrotic tissue with short T2*. The presence of fibrosis was validated using histology and correlated to MRI findings.Detailed ex vivo T2*-weighted signal analysis revealed a fast (T2*fast, slow (T2*slow and lipid (T2*lipid pool. T2*fast remained essentially constant. Infarct T2*slow decreased significantly, while a moderate decrease was observed in remote tissue in post-MI hearts and in TAC hearts. T2*slow correlated with the presence of diffuse fibrosis in TAC hearts (r = 0.82, P = 0.01. Ex vivo and in vivo subtraction images depicted a positive contrast in the infarct co-localizing with the scar. Infarct volumes from histology and subtraction images linearly correlated (r = 0.94, P<0.001. Region-of-interest analysis in the in vivo post-MI and TAC hearts revealed significant T2* shortening due to fibrosis, in agreement with the ex vivo results. However, in vivo contrast on subtraction images was rather poor

  7. Diagnostic workup of primary sclerosing cholangitis: The benefit of adding gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography to conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolz, R.; Asenbaum, U.; Schoder, M.; Wibmer, A.; Einspieler, H.; Prusa, A.M.; Peck-Radosavljevic, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the value of gadoxetic acid-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) versus conventional T2-weighted (T2W) MRC compared to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Materials and methods: Based on T1W MRC, PSC patients were classified into a regular (RG) and a delayed (DG) excreting group, with an absence of gadoxetic acid in the common bile duct at 20 min. Beading, pruning, and gradation of central bile duct stenosis, evaluated by T1W and T2W MRC, were compared to ERCP. Liver parenchymal enhancement was measured in both study groups and compared to a reference group (n = 20) without a history of liver disease. Two readers performed all measurements. Results: Based on beading and pruning of the peripheral bile ducts, sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies for reader 1 were 0.17/0.43, 0/0.17, and 0.15/0.31 for T1W MRC, and 0.83/0.86, 1/0.83, and 0.85/0.85 for T2W MRC (p = 0.004). For reader 2 sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies were 0.25/0.57, 0/0.33, and 0.23/0.46 for T1W MRC, and 0.92/1, 1/0.83, and 0.92/0.92 for T2W MRC (p = 0.012). Compared to ERCP, central bile duct stenoses were significantly overestimated (p < 0.001) by T2W MRC. A significantly lower parenchymal enhancement was found in the DG (n = 7) compared to the RG (n = 13), and compared to the reference group (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The combined performance of T2W and T1W MRC may provide a comprehensive imaging workup of PSC, including morphological and functional information resulting in optimal management

  8. Mucocele-like lesions of the sphenoid sinus with hypointense foci on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Social Insurance Central General Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kikuchi, S. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Univ. Branch Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    Lesions limited to the sphenoid sinus are relatively rare, and are obscure with respect to symptoms and physical findings. The differential diagnosis of isolated sphenoid sinus disease includes bacterial sinusitis, fungal infection, granulomatous inflammation, mucocele, and tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide information that closely reflects the composition of the tissues, sometimes permitting differentiation between pathologically distinct lesions showing similar density by computed tomography. We describe two cases involving mucocele-like lesions of the sphenoid sinus where preoperative MRI revealed a focus of hypointensity within the lesions. In both patients the sphenoid sinus was opened by a transnasal endoscopic approach, and diseased tissue corresponding to the hypointense area was removed under direct endoscopic vision. Histopathological diagnosis revealed colonies of Aspergillus in one case and necrotic granulation tissue without fungus in the other. We concluded that MRI is a crucial part of preoperative evaluation and that the transnasal endoscopic approach represents a safe and effective method for treating nonmalignant isolated sphenoid sinus disease. (orig.)

  9. Optimizing T2-weighted magnetic resonance sequences for surface coil microimaging of the eye with regard to lid, eyeball and head moving artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Takayuki; Uemura, Koji; Nonaka, Hiroi; Tamura, Mitsuru; Tanada, Shuji; Ikehira, Hiroo

    2006-01-01

    To acquire high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images, we developed a new blinking artifact reduced pulse (BARP) sequence with a surface coil specialized for microscopic imaging (47 mm in diameter). To reduce eye movement, we ascertained that the subjects' eyes were kept open and fixated to the target in the 1.5-T MR gantry. To reduce motion artifacts from blinking, we inserted rest periods for blinking (1.5 s within every 5 s) during MR scanning (T2-weighted fast spin echo; repetition time, 5 s; echo time, 100 ms; echo train, 11; matrix, 256 x 128; field of view, 5 cm; 1-mm thickness x 30 slices). Three scans (100 s x 3) were performed for each normal subject, and they were added together after automatic adjustment for location to reduce quality loss caused by head motion. T2-weighted MR images were acquired with a high resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Motion artifacts were reduced with BARP, as compared with those with random blinking. Intraocular structures such as the iris and ciliary muscles were clearly visualized. Because the whole eye can be covered with a 1-mm thickness by this method, three-dimensional maps can easily be generated from the obtained images. The application of BARP with a surface coil of the human eye might become a useful and widely adopted procedure for MR microimaging.

  10. High Signal Intensity on T2-Weighted Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Life-Threatening Arrhythmic Events in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Yasuki; Takara, Ayako; Iguchi, Nobuo; Utanohara, Yuko; Teraoka, Kunihiko; Takada, Kaori; Machida, Haruhiko; Takamisawa, Itaru; Takayama, Morimasa; Yoshikawa, Tsutomu

    2018-02-21

    The prognostic value of high signal intensity on T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (T2 high signal) in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients in a single-center cohort was investigated.Methods and Results:A total of 237 HCM patients (median age, 62 years; 143 male) underwent T2-weighted, cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging, and were followed (median duration, 3.4 years) for life-threatening arrhythmic events. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics were extracted, and predictors of life-threatening arrhythmic events were assessed on multivariate analysis. LGE was present in 180 patients (75.9%). Median LGE score was 3 in a left ventricle 17-segment model. T2 high signal was present in 49 patients (20.7%). The annual events rate was significantly higher in patients with extensive LGE (score ≥4) than in those without (3.0%/year vs. 0.5%/year, P=0.011). On multivariate analysis, extensive LGE (hazard ratio, 5.650; 95% CI: 1.263-25.000, P=0.024) as an independent predictor for life-threatening arrhythmic events. In patients with extensive LGE, the annual events rate was significantly higher in patients with T2 high signal than in those without (5.8%/year vs. 0.9%/year, P=0.008). Extensive LGE was an independent predictor of life-threatening arrhythmic events in HCM patients. Furthermore, T2 high signal is useful for the risk stratification of serious arrhythmic events in patients with extensive LGE.

  11. High-resolution 3-dimensional T2*-weighted angiography (HR 3-D SWAN): an optimized 3-T magnetic resonance imaging sequence for targeting the subthalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefranc, Michel; Derrey, Stéphane; Merle, Philippe; Tir, Mélissa; Constans, Jean-Marc; Montpellier, Dominique; Macron, Jean Michel; Le Gars, Daniel; Peltier, Johan; Baledentt, Olivier; Krystkowiak, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease. To characterize an optimized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence (high-resolution 3-dimensional T2*-weighted angiography [HR 3-D SWAN]) for direct STN targeting. Sequence distortions were measured using the Leksell stereotactic phantom. Eight consecutive candidates for STN-DBS underwent HR 3-D SWAN MRI for direct identification of the 16 STN. Two senior neurosurgeons independently determined the boundaries of STN on a semiquantitative scale (ranging from 1 [identification very easy] to 4 [identification very difficult]) and the anatomic target within the nucleus. The anatomic data were compared with electrophysiological recordings (48 microrecordings). We examined the anatomic location of the active contacts on MRI. The mean distortion error over the phantom was 0.16 mm. For the 16 STNs, identification of the upper, internal, anterior, and external edges was considered to be easy (scores of 1 or 2). The distinction between the substantia nigra and the STN was rated 1 or 2 for all but 6 nuclei. In the mediolateral axis, electrophysiological recordings covered perfectly anatomic data. In the craniocaudal axis, the mean differences between the electrophysiological data and the anatomic data were 0.8 mm and 0.19 mm for the "entry" and "exit" of the STN, respectively. All active contacts were located within the STN on MRI. HR 3-D SWAN allows easy visualization of the STN. Adapted to stereotactic requirement, the sequence simplifies direct targeting in STN-DBS surgery.

  12. Is the Susceptibility Vessel Sign on 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance T2*-Weighted Imaging a Useful Tool to Predict Recanalization in Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Satomi, J; Harada, M; Izumi, Y; Nagahiro, S; Kaji, R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization approximately 24 h after intravenous administration of tissue-type plasminogen activator (IV TPA). The previous studies have been conducted using 1.5-Tesla (T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied whether the characteristics of 3-T MRI findings were useful to predict outcome and recanalization after IV tPA. Patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) (horizontal portion, M1; Sylvian portion, M2) occlusion and treated by IV tPA were enrolled. We studied whether the presence of susceptibility vessel sign (SVS) at M1 and low clot burden score on T2*-weighted imaging (T2*-CBS) on 3-T MRI were associated with the absence of recanalization. A total of 49 patients were enrolled (27 men; mean age, 73.9 years). MR angiography obtained approximately 24 h after IV tPA revealed recanalization in 21 (42.9 %) patients. Independent factors associated with the absence of recanalization included ICA or proximal M1 occlusion (odds ratio, 69.6; 95 % confidence interval, 5.05-958.8, p = 0.002). In this study, an independent factor associated with the absence of recanalization may be proximal occlusion of the cerebral arteries rather than SVS in the MCA or low T2*-CBS on 3-T MRI.

  13. Detection of the index tumour and tumour volume in prostate cancer using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rud, Erik; Klotz, Dagmar; Rennesund, Kristin; Baco, Eduard; Berge, Viktor; Lien, Diep; Svindland, Aud; Lundeby, Eskild; Berg, Rolf E; Eri, Lars M; Eggesbø, Heidi B

    2014-12-01

    To examine the performance of T2-weighted (T2W) and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting the index tumour in patients with prostate cancer and to examine the agreement between MRI and histology when assessing tumour volume (TV) and overall tumour burden. The study included 199 consecutive patients with biopsy confirmed prostate cancer randomised to MRI before radical prostatectomy from December 2009 to July 2012. MRI-detected tumours (MRTs) were ranked from 1 to 3 according to decreasing volume and were compared with histologically detected tumours (HTs) ranked from 1 to 3, with HT 1 = index tumour. Whole-mount section histology was used as a reference standard. The TVs of true-positive MRTs (MRTVs 1-3) were compared with the TVs found by histology (HTVs 1-3). All tumours were registered on a 30-sector map and by classifying each sector as positive/negative, the rate of true-positive and -negative sectors was calculated. The detection rate for the HT 1 (index tumour) was 92%; HT 2, 45%; and HT 3, 37%. The MRTV 1-3 vs the HTV 1-3 were 2.8 mL vs 4.0 mL (index tumour, P MRI detects the index tumour in 92% of cases, although MRI underestimates both TV and tumour burden compared with histology. © 2014 The Authors. BJU International © 2014 BJU International.

  14. Targeting Accuracy of the Subthalamic Nucleus in Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery: Comparison Between 3 T T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Microelectrode Recording Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andreas; Debove, Ines; Fiechter, Michael; Rossi, Frédéric; Oertel, Markus Florian; Wiest, Roland; Schüpbach, Michael; Pollo, Claudio

    2017-08-02

    Targeting accuracy in deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery can be defined as the level of accordance between selected and anatomic real target reflected by characteristic electrophysiological results of microelectrode recording (MER). To determine the correspondence between the preoperative predicted target based on modern 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and intraoperative MER results separately on the initial and consecutive second side of surgery. Retrospective cohort study of 86 trajectories of DBS electrodes implanted into the subthalamic nucleus (STN) of patients with Parkinson's disease. The entrance point of the electrode into the STN and the length of the electrode trajectory crossing the STN were determined by intraoperative MER findings and 3 T T2-weighted magnetic resonance images with 1-mm slice thickness. Average difference between MRI- and MER-based trajectory lengths crossing the STN was 0.28 ± 1.02 mm (95% CI: -0.51 to -0.05 mm). There was a statistically significant difference between the MRI- and MER-based entry points on the initial and second side of surgery ( P = .04). Forty-three percent of the patients had a difference of more than ±1 mm of the MRI-based-predicted and the MER-based-determined entry points into the STN with values ranging from -3.0 to + 4.5 mm. STN MRI-based targeting is accurate in the majority of cases on the first and second side of surgery. In 43% of implanted electrodes, we found a relevant deviation of more than 1 mm, supporting the concept of MER as an important tool to guide and optimize targeting and electrode placement. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  15. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of adenomyosis: The relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging on T2 weighted images and the therapeutic efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chunmei; Setzen, Raymond; Liu, Zhongqiong; Liu, Yunchang; Xie, Bin; Aili, Aixingzi; Zhang, Lian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on T2 weighted images (T2WI) and the therapeutic efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on adenomyosis. Materials and methods: From January 2011 to November 2015, four hundred and twenty-eight patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with HIFU. Based on the signal intensity and the number of hyperintense foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI, the patients were classified into groups. The day after HIFU ablation patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and a comparison was made of non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF), treatment time, sonication time, and adverse effects. Results: No significant difference in terms of HIFU treatment settings and results was observed between the group of patients with hypointense adenomyotic lesions and the group with isointense adenomyotic lesions (P > 0.05). However, the sonication time and EEF were significantly higher in the group with multiple hyperintense foci compared to the group with few hyperintense foci. The NPV ratio achieved in the lesions with multiple hyperintenese foci was significantly lower than that in the lesions with few hyperintense foci (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the rate of adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Based on our results, the response of the adenomyotic lesions to HIFU treatment is not related to the signal intensity of adenomyotic lesions on T2WI. However, the number of the high signal intensity foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI can be considered as a predictive factor to help select patients for HIFU treatment.

  16. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon; Shin, Su-Jin; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  17. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Deuk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  18. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of adenomyosis: The relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging on T2 weighted images and the therapeutic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Chunmei [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Setzen, Raymond [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Johannesburg (South Africa); Liu, Zhongqiong; Liu, Yunchang [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xie, Bin [Department of Ultrasound, Huanggang Central Hospital, Huanggang City, Hubei 438000 (China); Aili, Aixingzi, E-mail: 1819483078@qq.com [Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Health Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Lian, E-mail: lianwzhang@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on T2 weighted images (T2WI) and the therapeutic efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on adenomyosis. Materials and methods: From January 2011 to November 2015, four hundred and twenty-eight patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with HIFU. Based on the signal intensity and the number of hyperintense foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI, the patients were classified into groups. The day after HIFU ablation patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and a comparison was made of non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF), treatment time, sonication time, and adverse effects. Results: No significant difference in terms of HIFU treatment settings and results was observed between the group of patients with hypointense adenomyotic lesions and the group with isointense adenomyotic lesions (P > 0.05). However, the sonication time and EEF were significantly higher in the group with multiple hyperintense foci compared to the group with few hyperintense foci. The NPV ratio achieved in the lesions with multiple hyperintenese foci was significantly lower than that in the lesions with few hyperintense foci (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the rate of adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Based on our results, the response of the adenomyotic lesions to HIFU treatment is not related to the signal intensity of adenomyotic lesions on T2WI. However, the number of the high signal intensity foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI can be considered as a predictive factor to help select patients for HIFU treatment.

  19. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the myocardium at risk in acute reperfused myocardial infarction: comparison of T2-weighted imaging versus the circumferential endocardial extent of late gadolinium enhancement with transmural projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubachs, Joey F A; Engblom, Henrik; Erlinge, David; Jovinge, Stefan; Hedström, Erik; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2010-03-29

    In the situation of acute coronary occlusion, the myocardium supplied by the occluded vessel is subject to ischemia and is referred to as the myocardium at risk (MaR). Single photon emission computed tomography has previously been used for quantitative assessment of the MaR. It is, however, associated with considerable logistic challenges for employment in clinical routine. Recently, T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been introduced as a new method for assessing MaR several days after the acute event. Furthermore, it has been suggested that the endocardial extent of infarction as assessed by late gadolinium enhanced (LGE) CMR can also be used to quantify the MaR. Hence, we sought to assess the ability of endocardial extent of infarction by LGE CMR to predict MaR as compared to T2-weighted imaging. Thirty-seven patients with early reperfused first-time ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction underwent CMR imaging within the first week after percutaneous coronary intervention. The ability of endocardial extent of infarction by LGE CMR to assess MaR was evaluated using T2-weighted imaging as the reference method. MaR determined with T2-weighted imaging (34 +/- 10%) was significantly higher (p infarction (23 +/- 12%). There was a weak correlation between the two methods (r2 = 0.17, p = 0.002) with a bias of -11 +/- 12%. Myocardial salvage determined with T2-weighted imaging (58 +/- 22%) was significantly higher (p myocardial salvage determined with endocardial extent of infarction (45 +/- 23%). No MaR could be determined by endocardial extent of infarction in two patients with aborted myocardial infarction. This study demonstrated that the endocardial extent of infarction as assessed by LGE CMR underestimates MaR in comparison to T2-weighted imaging, especially in patients with early reperfusion and aborted myocardial infarction.

  20. Comparative study of fast T 2-weighted images using respiratory triggered, breath-hold, fat suppression and phased array multi coil for liver evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbehusen, Cristiane L.; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Palacio, Glaucia A.S.; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare both qualitatively and quantitatively six T 2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences varying the respiratory compensation technique, associating or not fat tissue suppression and using different types of coils. We performed a prospective study of 71 consecutive patients that were submitted to MRI of the liver using a 1.5 T magnet. The six following pulse sequences were used: fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; non-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold non fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with phased-array multi coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with phased-array multi coil. Images were analyzed quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratios and qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of hepatic contours, visibility of intrahepatic vessels and other segmental landmarks, and the presence of artifacts. Results: the qualitative analysis showed that the mean values obtained with the six sequences were 7.8, 4.6, 7.9, 5.2, 6.7 and 4.6 respectively. The respiratory-triggered sequences were better than the breath-hold sequences in both qualitative and quantitative analysis (p < 0.001). No significant differences in the values of signal-to-noise ratios and in overall image quality were found between the sequences with and without fat suppression (p . 0.05). The sequences using the body coil were similar in terms of image quality (p . 0.05) and better regarding signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained with the phased=array multi coil (p ,0.001). Our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that the best MRI sequences for the valuation of the liver are the sequences with respiratory triggering using a conventional body coil, with or without fat suppression. (author)

  1. High-resolution heavily T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of the pituitary stalk in children with ectopic neurohypophysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanharawi, Imane El; Tzarouchi, Loukia [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Cardoen, Liesbeth [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Martinerie, Laetitia; Leger, Juliane; Carel, Jean-Claude [Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, Paris (France); Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service d' Endocrinologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Elmaleh-Berges, Monique [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, Paris (France); Alison, Marianne [Hopital Robert Debre, APHP, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Paris (France); Inserm U1141, DHU PROTECT, Paris (France)

    2017-05-15

    In anterior pituitary deficiency, patients with non visible pituitary stalk have more often multiple deficiencies and persistent deficiency than patients with visible pituitary stalk. To compare the diagnostic value of a high-resolution heavily T2-weighted sequence to 1.5-mm-thick unenhanced and contrast-enhanced sagittal T1-weighted sequences to assess the presence of the pituitary stalk in children with ectopic posterior pituitary gland. We retrospectively evaluated the MRI data of 14 children diagnosed with ectopic posterior pituitary gland between 2010 and 2014. We evaluated the presence of a pituitary stalk using a sagittal high-resolution heavily T2-weighted sequence and a 1.5-mm sagittal T1-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence before and after contrast medium administration. A pituitary stalk was present on at least one of the sequences in 10 of the 14 children (71%). T2-weighted sequence depicted the pituitary stalk in all 10 children, whereas the 1.5-mm-thick T1-weighted sequence depicted 2/10 (20%) before contrast injection and 8/10 (80%) after contrast injection (P=0.007). Compared with 1.5-mm-thick contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences, high-resolution heavily T2-weighted sequence demonstrates better sensitivity in detecting the pituitary stalk in children with ectopic posterior pituitary gland, suggesting that contrast injection is unnecessary to assess the presence of a pituitary stalk in this setting. (orig.)

  2. Extent of myocardium at risk for left anterior descending artery, right coronary artery, and left circumflex artery occlusion depicted by contrast-enhanced steady state free precession and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, David; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced steady state free precession (CE-SSFP) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) have been clinically validated to estimate myocardium at risk (MaR) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance while using myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed...... tomography as reference standard. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography has been used to describe the coronary perfusion territories during myocardial ischemia. Compared with myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance offers...... superior image quality and practical advantages. Therefore, the aim was to describe the main coronary perfusion territories using CE-SSFP and T2-STIR cardiovascular magnetic resonance data in patients after acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Methods and Results - CE-SSFP and T2-STIR data...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cranial nerves in the posterior fossa: a comparative study of t2-weighted spin-echo sequences at 1.5 and 3.0 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, F; Müller, M; Bruhn, H

    2008-04-01

    High-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3.0 Tesla (T) is rapidly gaining clinical acceptance. Whether doubling of the field strength of 1.5T and the subsequent increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) leads to a significant improvement of image quality is not automatically given. To evaluate the depiction of fine anatomic detail in the posterior fossa, focusing on brain nerves, on T2-weighted imaging, and to define the potential advantage of imaging at 3.0T versus 1.5T. In total, 10 brainstem nerve pairs of 12 volunteers were identified on T2-weighted MR images of 2- and 5-mm section thickness acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T. The MR images were compared for each subject at both field strengths by three independent readers who rated image quality according to depiction of anatomic detail and contrast by using a rating scale. In general, MR images at 3.0T were considered more conspicuous and less noisy than images at 1.5T. The SNR value measured was almost doubled. With respect to structural identification and contrast according to the rating scale, observer scores were significantly improved both for standard imaging with 5-mm sections and high-resolution imaging with 2-mm sections at 3.0T. Direct comparison revealed a significant increase for evaluated image quality criteria and the number of nerves detected. The comparison revealed a clear advantage in favor of T2-weighted MRI at 3.0T vs. 1.5T in depicting the roots and course of brain nerves in the posterior fossa.

  4. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  5. Scaled signal intensity of uterine fibroids based on T2-weighted MR images: a potential objective method to determine the suitability for magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery of uterine fibroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun [CHA University, Comprehensive Gynecologic Cancer Center, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang-Wook [CHA University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, Sungnam-si, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Sokolov, Amit [InSightec Ltd., Haifa (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    Magnetic Resonance-guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery (MRgFUS) is a non-invasive method to treat uterine fibroids. To help determine the patient suitability for MRgFUS, we propose a new objective measure: the scaled signal intensity (SSI) of uterine fibroids in T2 weighted MR images (T2WI). Forty three uterine fibroids in 40 premenopausal women were included in this retrospective study. SSI of each fibroid was measured from the screening T2WI by standardizing its mean signal intensity to a 0-100 scale, using reference intensities of rectus abdominis muscle (0) and subcutaneous fat (100). Correlation between the SSI and the non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio (a measure for treatment success) was calculated. Pre-treatment SSI showed a significant inverse-correlation with post treatment NPV ratio (p < 0.05). When dichotomizing NPV ratio at 45 %, the optimal cut off value of the SSI was found to be 16.0. A fibroid with SSI value 16.0 or less can be expected to have optimal responses. The SSI of uterine fibroids in T2WI can be suggested as an objective parameter to help in patient selection for MRgFUS. (orig.)

  6. Changes in susceptibility signs on serial T2*-weighted single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo images in acute embolic infarction: comparison with recanalization status on 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Yuki; Kinoshita, Toshibumi; Kinoshita, Fumiko

    2012-01-01

    The present study compares changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up single-shot echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted images (GRE-EPI) with vascular status on follow-up magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in acute embolic infarction. Twenty consecutive patients with acute embolic infarction repeatedly underwent MR imaging including GRE-EPI and MRA using a 1.5-T MR superconducting system. All patients underwent initial MR examination within 24 h of onset and follow-up MR imaging within 1 month after onset. Changes in susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI were compatible with vascular status on follow-up MRA in 19 of the 20 patients. Susceptibility signs disappeared with complete recanalization in 13 patients, migrated with partial recanalization in 3, did not change together with the absence of recanalization in 2, and became extended together with the absence of recanalization in 1. Cerebral hemorrhage obscured susceptibility signs in the one remaining patient. Susceptibility signs on follow-up GRE-EPI can reflect changes in an acute embolus, such as recanalization or migration, in this study. Serial GRE-EPI in acute embolism complements the diagnostic certainty of MRA by directly detecting an embolus as a susceptibility sign. (orig.)

  7. Subjective and objective image qualities: a comparison of sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo and turbo-spin-eco sequences in magnetic resonance imaging of the spine by use of a subjective ranking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, G. [Institut fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Departement Radiologie, Universitaetskliniken, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Mader, I. [Radiologische Gemeinschaftspraxis Dres. Siems, Grossmann, Bayreuth (Germany); Proske, M. [Klinikum Rosenheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    1998-12-31

    We evaluated the subjective image impression of two different magnetic resonance (MR) sequences by using a subjective ranking system. This ranking system was based on 20 criteria describing several tissue characteristics such as the signal intensity of normal anatomical structures and the changes of signal intensities and shape of lesions as well as artefacts. MR of the vertebral spine was performed in 48 female and 52 male patients (mean age 44.8 years) referred consecutively for investigation of a back problem. Ninety-six pathologies were found in 82 patients. Sagittal and axial T1 weighted spin-echo before and after administration of Gadolinium (Gd-DOTA), and sagittal T2 weighted spin-echo (T2wSE) and Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequences were performed by means of surface coils. Using the subjective ranking system the sagittal T2wSE and sagittal TSE were compared. Both sequences were suitable for identification of normal anatomy and pathologic changes and there was no trend for increased detection of disease by one imaging sequence over the other. We found that sagittal TSE sequences can replace sagittal T2wSE sequences in spinal MR and that artefacts at the cervical and lumbar spine are less frequent using TSE, thus confirming previous studies. In this study, our ranking system reveiled, that there are differences between the subjective judgement of image qualities and objective measurement of SNR. However, this approach may not be helpful to compare two different MR sequences as it is limited to the anatomical area investigated and is time consuming. The subjective image impression, i.e. the quality of images, may not always be represented by physical parameters such as a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), radiologists should try to define influences of image quality also by subjective parameters. (orig.)

  8. A novel five-category multimodal T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging-based stratification system for the selection of spinal arachnoid cyst treatment: a 15-year experience of 81 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi J

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ji Qi, Jun Yang, Guihuai Wang Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: Idiopathic spinal arachnoid cysts are rare cystic masses of the spinal canal generally classified as intra- or extradural, based on anatomical presentation. However, this system may not effectively indicate treatment. Objective: To investigate the incidence, resection modality, and prognosis of spinal arachnoid cyst in a 15-year case series. Patients and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 81 spinal arachnoid cyst patients (male:female 34:47, mean age 36.5 years, age range 6–66 years classified using a novel five-category T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI classification system (intramedullary, subdural extramedullary, subdural/epidural, intraspinal epidural, or intraspinal/extraspinal. Conservative treatment failed in all patients. They underwent spinal surgery between January 1995 and December 2010 and were followed up for 69 (range 3–187 months. Performance outcomes were assessed using the Fugl-Meyer (FM scale 90 days after operation. Recurrences and deaths were recorded. Results: Subdural/epidural and intraspinal epidural cysts accounted for 66.7% (54 of 81 of patients, but exhibited relatively lower rates of postsurgical improvement using FM, with only 66.7% (36 of 54 of patients showing improvements. Excellent outcomes using the FM scale were reached in 100% (eight of eight of intramedullary, intraspinal/extraspinal, and subdural extramedullary cyst patients, 86.7% (13 of 15 of subdural extramedullary cyst patients, and 66.7% (36 of 54 of epidural intraspinal cyst patients. Conclusion: The proposed five-category multimodal MRI-based stratification system for spinal arachnoid cyst patients may more effectively allow clinicians to select the appropriate surgical intervention, and may help to predict outcomes. Keywords: spinal arachnoid cyst

  9. O valor da ressonância magnética na detecção de nódulos hepáticos utilizando-se diversas técnicas ponderadas em T2: existe consenso? The value of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of focal liver lesions using different T-2 weighted techniques: is there a consensus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Andrade e Silva Palácio

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Desde o início da década de 80 a ressonância magnética vem sendo utilizada para o estudo do abdome e principalmente na detecção de nódulos hepáticos. As imagens ponderadas em T2 são as que trouxeram maior benefício quando comparadas à tomografia computadorizada com contraste. Inúmeras técnicas e seqüências de ressonância magnética ponderadas em T2 surgiram desde então, na tentativa de aumentar a eficácia diagnóstica, com menores tempos de exame. Neste sentido, foram publicados inúmeros trabalhos demonstrando a utilidade de seqüências rápidas e ultra-rápidas, com e sem supressão de gordura, em apnéia, com sincronizador respiratório e com bobinas de sinergia, entre outros avanços tecnológicos. No entanto, não há um consenso sobre qual a técnica mais apropriada e sensível para a detecção de lesões hepáticas focais. Neste artigo fazemos uma revisão bibliográfica e análise crítica das diversas técnicas de imagens ponderadas em T2, no que diz respeito às suas sensibilidades na detecção de nódulos hepáticos.Since the early 1980's several magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences have been developed in order to determine the optimum imaging technique for the detection and characterization of hepatic lesions. T2-weighted images play an important role in the evaluation of the liver and present equal or greater sensitivity than enhanced computed tomography for the detection of liver lesions. New techniques for obtaining T-2 weighted images have been developed in the attempt to optimize the method. These techniques have improved the image quality by shortening examination time, reducing motion artifacts, and improving contrast-to-noise ratio. The effectiveness of the different techniques (fat suppression, breath-hold, respiratory-triggered and phased-array coils has been tested in many comparative studies, although the results are controversial. In this article we review the literature and discuss the several

  10. Comparative study of fast T 2-weighted images using respiratory triggered, breath-hold, fat suppression and phased array multi coil for liver evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging; Estudo comparativo das sequencias rapidas ponderadas em T2, utilizando-se sincronizacao respiratoria, apneia, supressao de gordura, bobina de corpo e bobina de sinergia para a avaliacao do figado pela ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbehusen, Cristiane L.; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe; Palacio, Glaucia A.S.; Szejnfeld, Jacob [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina (EPM). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: cabbehusen@hotmail.com

    2003-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare both qualitatively and quantitatively six T 2-weighted turbo spin-echo sequences varying the respiratory compensation technique, associating or not fat tissue suppression and using different types of coils. We performed a prospective study of 71 consecutive patients that were submitted to MRI of the liver using a 1.5 T magnet. The six following pulse sequences were used: fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; non-suppressed respiratory triggered with conventional body coil; breath-hold non fat-suppressed with conventional body coil; fat-suppressed respiratory triggered with phased-array multi coil; breath-hold fat-suppressed with phased-array multi coil. Images were analyzed quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratios and qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of hepatic contours, visibility of intrahepatic vessels and other segmental landmarks, and the presence of artifacts. Results: the qualitative analysis showed that the mean values obtained with the six sequences were 7.8, 4.6, 7.9, 5.2, 6.7 and 4.6 respectively. The respiratory-triggered sequences were better than the breath-hold sequences in both qualitative and quantitative analysis (p < 0.001). No significant differences in the values of signal-to-noise ratios and in overall image quality were found between the sequences with and without fat suppression (p . 0.05). The sequences using the body coil were similar in terms of image quality (p . 0.05) and better regarding signal-to-noise ratios than those obtained with the phased=array multi coil (p ,0.001). Our qualitative and quantitative results suggest that the best MRI sequences for the valuation of the liver are the sequences with respiratory triggering using a conventional body coil, with or without fat suppression. (author)

  11. Automatic Brain Tumor Detection in T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Kropatsch, W.G.; Bartušek, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2013), s. 223-230 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brain tumor * Brain tumor detection * Symmetry analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2013

  12. T2*-weighted image/T2-weighted image fusion in postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Norihisa; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Yoshio, Kotaro

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fusion is considered to be the best method for postimplant dosimetry of permanent prostate brachytherapy; however, it is inconvenient and costly. In T2 * -weighted image (T2 * -WI), seeds can be easily detected without the use of an intravenous contrast material. We present a novel method for postimplant dosimetry using T2 * -WI/T2-weighted image (T2-WI) fusion. We compared the outcomes of T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based and CT/T2-WI fusion-based postimplant dosimetry. Between April 2008 and July 2009, 50 consecutive prostate cancer patients underwent brachytherapy. All the patients were treated with 144 Gy of brachytherapy alone. Dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters (prostate D90, prostate V100, prostate V150, urethral D10, and rectal D2cc) were prospectively compared between T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based and CT/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry. All the DVH parameters estimated by T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry strongly correlated to those estimated by CT/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry (0.77≤ R ≤0.91). No significant difference was observed in these parameters between the two methods, except for prostate V150 (p=0.04). These results show that T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion-based dosimetry is comparable or superior to MRI-based dosimetry as previously reported, because no intravenous contrast material is required. For some patients, rather large differences were observed in the value between the 2 methods. We thought these large differences were a result of seed miscounts in T2 * -WI and shifts in fusion. Improving the image quality of T2 * -WI and the image acquisition speed of T2 * -WI and T2-WI may decrease seed miscounts and fusion shifts. Therefore, in the future, T2 * -WI/T2-WI fusion may be more useful for postimplant dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy. (author)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao; Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of intervertebral disc degeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Masao (Kitakyushu City Yahata Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan)); Kira, Hideaki; Fujiki, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Isao; Hinoue, Kaichi

    1993-02-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the degree of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration with findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Seventeen autopsied (from 7 patients) and 21 surgical (from 20 patients) intervertebral discs were used as specimens for histopathological examination. In addition, 21 intervertebral discs were examined on T2-weighted images. Histopathological findings from both autopsied and surgical specimens were well correlated with MRI findings. In particular, T2-weighted images reflected increased collagen fibers and rupture within the fibrous ring accurately. However, when severely degenerated intervertebral discs and hernia protruding the posterior longitudinal ligament existed, histological findings were not concordant well with T2-weighted images. Morphological appearances of autopsy specimens, divided into four on T2-weighted images, were well consistent with histological degeneration. This morphological classification, as shown on T2-weighted images, could also be used in the evaluation of intervertebral disc degeneration. (N.K.).

  15. 3D Fast Spin Echo T2-weighted Contrast for Imaging the Female Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Sanchez, Andrea Fernanda

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted contrast is the preferred modality for treatment planning and monitoring of cervical cancer. Current clinical protocols image the volume of interest multiple times with two dimensional (2D) T2-weighted MRI techniques. It is of interest to replace these multiple 2D acquisitions with a single three dimensional (3D) MRI acquisition to save time. However, at present the image contrast of standard 3D MRI does not distinguish cervical healthy tissue from cancerous tissue. The purpose of this thesis is to better understand the underlying factors that govern the contrast of 3D MRI and exploit this understanding via sequence modifications to improve the contrast. Numerical simulations are developed to predict observed contrast alterations and to propose an improvement. Improvements of image contrast are shown in simulation and with healthy volunteers. Reported results are only preliminary but a promising start to establish definitively 3D MRI for cervical cancer applications.

  16. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Tyrosinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N. [Ege Univ. Hospital, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-10-01

    A 3.5-year-old girl with tyrosinemia is reported. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatic nodules. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral high-signal changes confined to the globus pallidus on T2-weighted images. Globus pallidus lesions likely represented neuropathologic changes such as astocytosis, delayed myelination, and status spongiosus (myelin splitting and vacuolation)

  17. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Tyrosinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sener, R.N.

    2005-01-01

    A 3.5-year-old girl with tyrosinemia is reported. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen revealed multiple hepatic nodules. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral high-signal changes confined to the globus pallidus on T2-weighted images. Globus pallidus lesions likely represented neuropathologic changes such as astocytosis, delayed myelination, and status spongiosus (myelin splitting and vacuolation)

  18. T2-weighted imaging of the heart—A pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirakhur, Anirudh, E-mail: ani.mirakhur@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Foothills Medical Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Anca, Nicoleta, E-mail: nicoletanca@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Foothills Medical Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Mikami, Yoko, E-mail: yokomikami@gmail.com [Stephenson Cardiovascular MR Centre, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Merchant, Naeem, E-mail: n.merchant22@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Foothills Medical Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada); Stephenson Cardiovascular MR Centre, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Spin-Echo techniques in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have been used for decades, primarily to image cardiac anatomy. More recently, T2-weighted (T2W) imaging has seen an increased role in CMR protocols, especially in tissue characterization in acute myocardial processes. This article will review current methodologies of cardiac T2W acquisition and their limitations, as well as approach to both semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses. The appearance and utility of T2W imaging in a myriad of pathologic myocardial processes such as acute myocardial infarction, acute viral myocarditis, reversible stress-related cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and cardiac sarcoidosis, will also be discussed.

  19. T2-weighted imaging of the heart—A pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirakhur, Anirudh; Anca, Nicoleta; Mikami, Yoko; Merchant, Naeem

    2013-01-01

    Spin-Echo techniques in cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) have been used for decades, primarily to image cardiac anatomy. More recently, T2-weighted (T2W) imaging has seen an increased role in CMR protocols, especially in tissue characterization in acute myocardial processes. This article will review current methodologies of cardiac T2W acquisition and their limitations, as well as approach to both semi-quantitative and quantitative analyses. The appearance and utility of T2W imaging in a myriad of pathologic myocardial processes such as acute myocardial infarction, acute viral myocarditis, reversible stress-related cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and cardiac sarcoidosis, will also be discussed

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of myoedema in neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedel, H.; Vogel, T.; Lissner, J.; Reimers, C.C.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was done in 100 patients suffering from various generalized neuromuscular diseases. 30 (30%) showed higher signal intensities on T2-weighted images compared to T1-weighted images without contrast medium, indicating muscle edema. In inflammatory myopathies diffuse and severe muscle edema were found, whereas local and slight or moderate muscle edema were unspecific findings. In 10 patients also contrast enhanced T1-weighted images were done, showing no more sensitivity than T2-weighted images. In conclusion, we think that magnetic resonance imaging may contribute to differential diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. (orig.) [de

  1. Unusual Presentation of Popliteal Cyst on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Popliteal cyst commonly presents as an ellipsoid mass with uniform low signal intensity on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Here, we describe a popliteal cyst with unusual appearance on magnetic resonance imaging, including heterogeneous intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Arthroscopic cyst decompression revealed that the cyst was filled with necrotic synovial villi, indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. Arthroscopic enlargement of unidirectional valvular slits with synovectomy was useful for the final diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Dynamic characteristics of T2*-weighted signal in calf muscles of peripheral artery disease during low-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijun; Muller, Matthew D; Wang, Jianli; Sica, Christopher T; Karunanayaka, Prasanna; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Yang, Qing X

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the dynamic characteristics of T2* -weighted signal change in exercising skeletal muscle of healthy subjects and peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients under a low-intensity exercise paradigm. Nine PAD patients and nine age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers underwent a low-intensity exercise paradigm while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (3.0T) was obtained. T2*-weighted signal time-courses in lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior were acquired and analyzed. Correlations were performed between dynamic T2*-weighted signal and changes in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, leg pain, and perceived exertion. A significant signal decrease was observed during exercise in soleus and tibialis anterior of healthy participants (P = 0.0007-0.04 and 0.001-0.009, respectively). In PAD, negative signals were observed (P = 0.008-0.02 and 0.003-0.01, respectively) in soleus and lateral gastrocnemius during the early exercise stage. Then the signal gradually increased above the baseline in the lateral gastrocnemius during and after exercise in six of the eight patients who completed the study. This signal increase in patients' lateral gastrocnemius was significantly greater than in healthy subjects' during the later exercise stage (two-sample t-tests, P = 0.001-0.03). Heart rate and mean arterial pressure responses to exercise were significantly higher in PAD than healthy subjects (P = 0.036 and 0.008, respectively) and the patients experienced greater leg pain and exertion (P = 0.006 and P = 0.0014, respectively). During low-intensity exercise, there were different dynamic T2*-weighted signal behavior in the healthy and PAD exercising muscles. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:40-48. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  4. Efficacy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography compared with T2-weighted magnetic resonance cholangiography in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Pei Wu

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: CE-MRC is not superior to conventional T2W-MRC with respect to biliary visualization in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, a combination of T2W-MRC and CE-MRC provides significantly better visualization of biliary structures than T2W-MRC alone.

  5. Texture-based quantification of lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration from conventional T2-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michopoulou, Sofia; Speller, Robert; Todd-Pokropek, Andrew (Dept. of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London (United Kingdom)), e-mail: s.michopoulou@ucl.ac.uk; Costaridou, Lena (Dept. of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, Univ. of Patras (Greece)); Vlychou, Marianna (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital of Larissa, Univ. of Thessaly (Greece))

    2011-02-15

    Background: Disc degeneration quantification is important for monitoring the effects of new therapeutic methods, such as cell and growth factor therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) image texture reflects biochemical and structural tissue properties and has been used for differentiating between normal and pathological status in a variety of medical applications. Purpose: To investigate the suitability of textural descriptors for the quantification of intervertebral disc degeneration using conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance images of the lumbar spine. Material and Methods:: A 3 Tesla scanner was used, and conventional T2- weighted MR images were obtained, and a total of 255 lumbar discs were analyzed. An atlas-based method was used for segmenting the disc regions from the images. A set of first and second order statistics describing texture of each region were calculated. The validity and reliability of these descriptors for disc degeneration severity quantification was tested through their correlation with patient age and qualitative clinical grading of degeneration severity. Texture quantification results were compared to a widely accepted method for disc degeneration quantification based on the measurement of disc's mean signal intensity. Results: Out of the set of texture descriptors tested, two descriptors quantifying image intensity inhomogeneity, i.e. the grey level standard deviation and co-occurrence derived sum of squares displayed the strongest association to patient age and clinical grading of disc degeneration severity (P < 0.001). This is attributed to these inhomogeneity descriptors' capability to capture the progressive loss of nucleus-annulus distinction in the degenerative progress. Statistical analysis indicates that these descriptors can effectively separate between early stages of degeneration. Quantitative measurements are highly repeatable (intraclass correlation >0.98). Conclusion: Inhomogeneity descriptors could be a valuable

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in neurologic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Man Chung; Wan, Chu Wan; Myung, Ho Jin; Choi, Kil Soo; Ahn, Chang Beom; Oh, Chang Hyun; Cho, Zang Hee

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with 0.15 Tesla resistive magnet developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science were performed in 27 patients with various neurologic diseases and compared with x-ray computed tomography (CT). The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the image quality, the diagnostic value and limitation, and the optimal pulse sequence of MR imagings with a resistive magnet. The MR images were obtained by using a variety of pulse sequence with spin echo technique including saturation recovery. T2-weighted spin echo, and/or inversion recovery with various pulse repetition (TR) and echo delay (TE) times. The MR imaging demonstrated the capability of detecting the lesions shown on CT in al cases and also detected an additional finding in one case (multiple sclerosis) which was not seen on CT. The MR imaging appeared to be more useful than CT in the evaluation of syringomyelia of spinal cord and white matter disease, while it failed to demonstrated small calcific lesion or inflammatory nodule (less than 1 cm) shown on CT and has shown somewhat poor contrast resolution in the case of meingloma. The spatial resolution of saturation recovery images was similar or superior to CT, whereas the contrast resolution of saturation recovery was inferior to CT. While the saturation recovery images have shown false negative findings in 5 patients (19%), the inversion recovery and T2-weighted spin echo have shown consistently positive findings. The inversive recovery and T2-weighted spin echo images demonstrated better contrast discrimination between normal and pathologic conditions than the saturation recovery images, but somewhat poorer spatial resolution. Authors suggest that the MR images of both the saturation recovery with 300/30 and T2-weighted spin echo with 1000/90 be used as a routine procedure and additional inversion recovery of 1300/300/30 sequence as a option if white matter disease is suspected

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research. PMID:25659942

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  11. A method for quantifying intervertebral disc signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, Masaki [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitasato Univ. Kitasato Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Abe, Hitoshi [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kitasato Univ. Kitasato Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: hit-abe@insti.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Amaya, Kenji [Graduate School of Information Science and Engineering, Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Matsumoto, Hideo [Inst. for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yanaihara, Hisashi [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kitasato Univ. Kitasato Inst. Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nishiwaki, Yuji [Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health, Toho Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Background Quantification of intervertebral disc degeneration based on intensity of the nucleus pulposus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often uses the mean intensity of the region of interest (ROI) within the nucleus pulposus. However, the location and size of ROI have varied in different reports, and none of the reported methods can be considered fully objective. Purpose To develop a more objective method of establishing ROIs for quantitative evaluation of signal intensity in the nucleus pulposus using T2-weighted MRI. Material and Methods A 1.5-T scanner was used to obtain T2-weighted mid-sagittal images. A total of 288 intervertebral discs from 48 patients (25 men, 23 women) were analyzed. Mean age was 47.4 years (range, 17-69 years). All discs were classified into five grades according to Pfirrmann et al. Discs in grades I and II were defined as bright discs, and discs in grades IV and V were defined as dark discs. Eight candidate methods of ROI determination were devised. The method offering the highest degree of discrimination between bright and dark discs was investigated among these eight methods. Results The method with the greatest degree of discrimination was as follows. The quadrangle formed by anterior and posterior edges of the upper and lower end plates in contact with the intervertebral disc to be measured was defined as the intervertebral area. A shape similar to the intervertebral area but with one-quarter the area was drawn. The geometrical center of the shape was matched to the center of intensity, and this shape was then used as the ROI. Satisfactory validity and reproducibility were obtained using this method. Conclusion The present method offers adequate discrimination and could be useful for longitudinal tracking of intervertebral disc degeneration with sufficient reproducibility.

  12. Focal liver lesions segmentation and classification in nonenhanced T2-weighted MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos, Ilias; Tsantis, Stavros; Karamesini, Maria; Spiliopoulos, Stavros; Karnabatidis, Dimitris; Hazle, John D; Kagadis, George C

    2017-07-01

    To automatically segment and classify focal liver lesions (FLLs) on nonenhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) algorithm. 71 FLLs (30 benign lesions, 19 hepatocellular carcinomas, and 22 metastases) on T2-weighted MRI scans were delineated by the proposed CAD scheme. The FLL segmentation procedure involved wavelet multiscale analysis to extract accurate edge information and mean intensity values for consecutive edges computed using horizontal and vertical analysis that were fed into the subsequent fuzzy C-means algorithm for final FLL border extraction. Texture information for each extracted lesion was derived using 42 first- and second-order textural features from grayscale value histogram, co-occurrence, and run-length matrices. Twelve morphological features were also extracted to capture any shape differentiation between classes. Feature selection was performed with stepwise multilinear regression analysis that led to a reduced feature subset. A multiclass Probabilistic Neural Network (PNN) classifier was then designed and used for lesion classification. PNN model evaluation was performed using the leave-one-out (LOO) method and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The mean overlap between the automatically segmented FLLs and the manual segmentations performed by radiologists was 0.91 ± 0.12. The highest classification accuracies in the PNN model for the benign, hepatocellular carcinoma, and metastatic FLLs were 94.1%, 91.4%, and 94.1%, respectively, with sensitivity/specificity values of 90%/97.3%, 89.5%/92.2%, and 90.9%/95.6% respectively. The overall classification accuracy for the proposed system was 90.1%. Our diagnostic system using sophisticated FLL segmentation and classification algorithms is a powerful tool for routine clinical MRI-based liver evaluation and can be a supplement to contrast-enhanced MRI to prevent unnecessary invasive procedures. © 2017 American

  13. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  14. Are T2-weighted images necessary in renal mass characterization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dann, Phoebe; Thakur, Ravi; Chin, Deanne; Krinsky, Glenn; Israel, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine what role T2-weighted images play in characterizing renal masses. Methods: Forty-four pathologically proven renal masses (34 renal cell carcinomas, 8 oncocytomas, 1 metanephric adenoma, 1 angiomyolipoma without macroscopic fat) and 38 simple renal cysts were evaluated with T1- and T2-weighted images at 1.5 T. Two independent and blinded readers initially characterized all masses using only the T1-weighed images (in- and opposed-phase chemical shift, unenhanced frequency-selective fat-suppressed, gadolinium-enhanced frequency-selective fat-suppressed and subtraction images) and placed each mass into one of three categories: nonsurgical, in need of follow-up, or surgical. The masses were then re-evaluated with the addition of the T2-weighted images. It was determined if the T2-weighted images changed the initial classification. Results: Forty-three of the 44 (98%) pathologically proven renal masses were characterized as a surgical mass using only the T1-weighted images. The remaining renal mass (a renal cell carcinoma) was characterized as a mass in which follow-up exams would be suggested. Thirty-eight of 38 (100%) simple renal cysts were correctly characterized using only the T1-weighted images. The T2-weighted images did not change the initial interpretation of the T1-weighted images in any of the cases. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that T2-weighted images are not necessary in the evaluation of all renal masses and are specifically not necessary in the differentiation of solid and cystic renal neoplasms from simple renal cysts

  15. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  16. Cerebral fat embolism: magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedea, A.; Barrena, R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Tejada, A.

    1998-01-01

    We report the case of 26-year-old man who presented clinical evidence of fat embolism following a traffic accident. Although computed tomography (CT) of the brain showed no abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed several scattered points of high intensity on T2-weighted and proton density (PD) images, with complete resolution of the lesions on follow-up scan. MRI is considered more sensitive than computed tomography in detecting these lesions, and may be useful for their diagnosis, correlating well with the clinical course. (Author) 10 refs

  17. Automated image quality evaluation of T2-weighted liver MRI utilizing deep learning architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esses, Steven J; Lu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Tiejun; Shanbhogue, Krishna; Dane, Bari; Bruno, Mary; Chandarana, Hersh

    2018-03-01

    To develop and test a deep learning approach named Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) for automated screening of T 2 -weighted (T 2 WI) liver acquisitions for nondiagnostic images, and compare this automated approach to evaluation by two radiologists. We evaluated 522 liver magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams performed at 1.5T and 3T at our institution between November 2014 and May 2016 for CNN training and validation. The CNN consisted of an input layer, convolutional layer, fully connected layer, and output layer. 351 T 2 WI were anonymized for training. Each case was annotated with a label of being diagnostic or nondiagnostic for detecting lesions and assessing liver morphology. Another independently collected 171 cases were sequestered for a blind test. These 171 T 2 WI were assessed independently by two radiologists and annotated as being diagnostic or nondiagnostic. These 171 T 2 WI were presented to the CNN algorithm and image quality (IQ) output of the algorithm was compared to that of two radiologists. There was concordance in IQ label between Reader 1 and CNN in 79% of cases and between Reader 2 and CNN in 73%. The sensitivity and the specificity of the CNN algorithm in identifying nondiagnostic IQ was 67% and 81% with respect to Reader 1 and 47% and 80% with respect to Reader 2. The negative predictive value of the algorithm for identifying nondiagnostic IQ was 94% and 86% (relative to Readers 1 and 2). We demonstrate a CNN algorithm that yields a high negative predictive value when screening for nondiagnostic T 2 WI of the liver. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:723-728. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound ablating uterine fibroids with hyperintense on T2-weighted MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Wen-Peng; Chen, Jin-Yun; Zhang, Lian; Li, Quan; Qin, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate whether uterine fibroids with hyperintense on pretreatment T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be treated with ultrasound-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (USgHIFU). Materials and methods: 282 patients with 282 symptomatic uterine fibroids who underwent USgHIFU treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI, uterine fibroids were classified as hypointense, isointense and hyperintense. Hyperintense fibroids were subjectively further subdivided into heterogeneous hyperintense, slightly homogeneous hyperintense and markedly homogeneous hyperintense based on the signal intensity of fibroid relative to myometrium and endometrium on T2-weighted MRI. Enhanced MRI was performed within one month after HIFU treatment. Non-perfused volume (NPV, indicative of successful ablation) ratio, treatment time, treatment efficiency, energy effect ratio and adverse events were recorded. Results: The median volume of uterine fibroids was 70.3 cm 3 (interquartile range, 41.1–132.5 cm 3 ). The average NPV ratio, defined as non-perfused volume divided by the fibroid volume after HIFU treatment, was 76.8 ± 19.0% (range, 0–100%) in the 282 patients. It was 86.3 ± 11.9% (range, 40.9–100.0%) in the group with hypointense fibroids, 77.1 ± 16.5% (range, 32.2–100.0%) in isointense fibroids, and 67.6 ± 23.9% (range, 0–100.0%) in hyperintense fibroids. The lowest NPV ratio, lowest treatment efficiency, more treatment time, more sonication energy and pain scores were observed in the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids, and the NPV ratio was 55.8 ± 26.7% (range, 0–83.9%) in this subgroup. Conclusion: Based on our results, the heterogeneous and markedly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids were suitable for USgHIFU, and only the slightly homogeneous hyperintense fibroids should be excluded

  19. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis : effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duckers, H.J.; Muller, H J; Verhaagen, J; Nicolay, K; Gispen, Willem Hendrik

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a

  20. The value of magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of focal liver lesions using different T-2 weighted techniques: is there a consensus?

    OpenAIRE

    Palácio, Glaucia Andrade e Silva; Abbehusen, Cristiane Lima; Tiferes, Dario Ariel; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Szejnfeld, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    Desde o início da década de 80 a ressonância magnética vem sendo utilizada para o estudo do abdome e principalmente na detecção de nódulos hepáticos. As imagens ponderadas em T2 são as que trouxeram maior benefício quando comparadas à tomografia computadorizada com contraste. Inúmeras técnicas e seqüências de ressonância magnética ponderadas em T2 surgiram desde então, na tentativa de aumentar a eficácia diagnóstica, com menores tempos de exame. Neste sentido, foram publicados inúmeros trabal...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute ''wiiitis'' of the upper extremity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nett, Michael P.; Sperling, John W.; Collins, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    We present the first reported case of acute ''wiiitis'', documented clinically and by imaging, of the upper extremity, caused by prolonged participation in a physically interactive virtual video-game. Unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated marked T2-weighted signal abnormality within several muscles of the shoulder and upper arm, without evidence of macroscopic partial- or full-thickness tearing of the muscle or of intramuscular hematoma. (orig.)

  2. Elastofibroma dorsi: magnetic resonance imaging findings in two cases

    OpenAIRE

    KARAGÜLLE, A. Tuba; ERDEN, M.İlhan; ERDEN, Ayşe; KARADAĞ, Demet

    2002-01-01

    Elastofibroma dorsi is a pseudotumoral mass of unknown pathogenesis that is usually seen in elderly patients. We report two cases of histologically proven elastofibroma dorsi, each presenting with painful periscapular masses. Magnetic resonance imagingshowed periscapular tumoral mass with low to intermediate signal intensity with interspersed areas of high signal intensity on both T1 and T2 weighted images. After I.V. administration of gadopentate dimeglumine, these lesions demonstrated mild ...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoya, S.; Nakamura, T.; Kobayashi, S.; Yamamoto, I.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal cord injury is described. The traumatized cord segment was clearly shown as a hyperintensity in a T2-weighted image whereas it appeared as an isointensity in a moderately T1-weighted image. This different sensitivity may result from parenchymal hemorrhagic tissue and edematous changes due to direct trauma. Hyperintense tissue was also seen in the retro-pharyngeal and -tracheal spaces. (orig.)

  4. Intramedullary high intensity lesion on T2-weighted MR images in compressive cervical myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kameyama, Takashi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirose, Yoshikiyo (Nagoya Daini Red Hospital (Japan))

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 147 patients with compressive lesion of the cervical spinal canal. Intramedullary high intensity lesions were observed on T2-weighted or proton density spin-echo images in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (20.0%) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine (25.7%), while such signal abnormality was not found in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Frequency of this finding was proportional to clinical severity of myelopathy and degree of spinal cord compression. The pathophysiological basis of such signal abnormality was presumed to vary from acute edema to chronic myelomalacia. In most cases showing intramedullary high intensity lesion, the spinal cord was compressed at multiple levels, but the high intensity was usually found at a signal level where the compression was maximum. There was a good correlation between the neurological level and the high intensity level on MR images. Thus, the intramedullary lesion on MR images is considered to be the main site of lesion responsible for the neurological symptoms. (author).

  5. Intramedullary high intensity lesion on T2-weighted MR images in compressive cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Takashi; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Yanagi, Tsutomu; Yasuda, Takeshi; Hirose, Yoshikiyo

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 147 patients with compressive lesion of the cervical spinal canal. Intramedullary high intensity lesions were observed on T2-weighted or proton density spin-echo images in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (20.0%) and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine (25.7%), while such signal abnormality was not found in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. Frequency of this finding was proportional to clinical severity of myelopathy and degree of spinal cord compression. The pathophysiological basis of such signal abnormality was presumed to vary from acute edema to chronic myelomalacia. In most cases showing intramedullary high intensity lesion, the spinal cord was compressed at multiple levels, but the high intensity was usually found at a signal level where the compression was maximum. There was a good correlation between the neurological level and the high intensity level on MR images. Thus, the intramedullary lesion on MR images is considered to be the main site of lesion responsible for the neurological symptoms. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  7. Detection of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury with 3D-enhanced T2* weighted angiography (ESWAN) imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, QiangQiang, E-mail: rousikang@163.com; Zhang, Jianing, E-mail: 1325916060@qq.com; Hao, Peng, E-mail: 1043600590@qq.com; Xu, Yikai, E-mail: yikaivip@163.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the use of 3D-enhanced T2* weighted angiography (ESWAN) imaging for the observation and quantification of the evolution of brain injury induced by a recently developed model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI/R) in neonatal piglets. Methods: For these experiments, newborn piglets were subjected to HI/R injury, during which ESWAN scanning was performed, followed by H and E staining and immunohistochemistry of AQP-4 expression. Results: In the striatum, values from T2* weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) increased and reached their highest level at 3 days post injury, whereas T2* values increased and peaked at 24 h in the subcortical region. The change in T2* values was concordant with brain edema. Phase values in the subcortical border region were not dependent on time post-injury. Magnitude values were significantly different from the control group, and increased gradually over time in the subcortical border region. Susceptibility-weighted images (SWI) indicated small petechial hemorrhages in the striatum and thalamus, as well as dilated intramedullary veins. Conclusion: SWI images can be used to detect white and gray matter microhemorrhages and dilated intramedullary veins. The T2*, phase, and magnitude map can also reflect the development of brain injury. Our data illustrate that ESWAN imaging can increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MRI in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  8. Detection of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury with 3D-enhanced T2* weighted angiography (ESWAN) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, QiangQiang; Zhang, Jianing; Hao, Peng; Xu, Yikai

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the use of 3D-enhanced T2* weighted angiography (ESWAN) imaging for the observation and quantification of the evolution of brain injury induced by a recently developed model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI/R) in neonatal piglets. Methods: For these experiments, newborn piglets were subjected to HI/R injury, during which ESWAN scanning was performed, followed by H and E staining and immunohistochemistry of AQP-4 expression. Results: In the striatum, values from T2* weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) increased and reached their highest level at 3 days post injury, whereas T2* values increased and peaked at 24 h in the subcortical region. The change in T2* values was concordant with brain edema. Phase values in the subcortical border region were not dependent on time post-injury. Magnitude values were significantly different from the control group, and increased gradually over time in the subcortical border region. Susceptibility-weighted images (SWI) indicated small petechial hemorrhages in the striatum and thalamus, as well as dilated intramedullary veins. Conclusion: SWI images can be used to detect white and gray matter microhemorrhages and dilated intramedullary veins. The T2*, phase, and magnitude map can also reflect the development of brain injury. Our data illustrate that ESWAN imaging can increase the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MRI in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

  9. Hexachlorophene-induced brain edema in rat observed by proton magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Y; Matsumura, H; Igisu, H; Yokota, A

    2000-08-04

    Rat brain was examined with 4.7 T proton magnetic resonance (MR). On administering hexachlorophene (HCP) 30 mg/kg/day for 5 days, myelin-rich structures stood out in T2-weighted images. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was markedly suppressed in all regions examined except for cerebral cortex. Seven days after terminating the exposure to HCP, without enhancement in T2-weighted images, ADC was still decreased in corpus callosum, optic nerve and trigeminal nerve. Rat administered with HCP and followed with high magnetic field proton MR seems to provide a good model for cytotoxic brain edema, and it may also be useful to visualize heavily myelinated structures.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings of Ovarian Stromal Hyperthecosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, S.; Tahara, T.; Kaminou, T.; Ogawa, T. (Div. of Radiology, Dept. of Pathophysiological and Therapeutic Science, Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Kiyokawa, T. (Dept. of Pathology, Jikei Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)); Tsukihara, S. (Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan)); Senda, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Pref. Kousei Hospital, Kurayoshi (Japan))

    2009-10-15

    Ovarian stromal hyperthecosis is characterized by diffuse distribution of luteinized stromal cells accompanied by varying degrees of stromal hyperplasia. We report a case of ovarian stromal hyperthecosis with particular regard to magnetic resonance (MR)-pathologic correlation. At initial MR imaging, the central areas of the bilateral ovarian masses showed hypointensity on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images, while the peripheries of the bilateral masses showed isointensity to myometrium on T1-weighted images and heterogeneous signal intensities on T2-weighted images. At 15 days after the initial MR imaging examination, a second MR imaging demonstrated shrinkage of the bilateral ovarian masses. Change in the peripheries to predominantly isointensity to myometrium on the T2-weighted images was also observed. The patient underwent bilateral oophorectomy. Microscopic examination revealed scattered nests of lutein cells on a background of densely proliferated ovarian stroma with minimal collagen production in both ovaries. Edema was occasionally seen in the outer portion but was marked in the central zone of the ovaries, particularly on the left. The final pathologic diagnosis was stromal hyperthecosis. With regard to MR-pathologic correlation, the MR findings in the peripheries of the bilateral masses (isointensity relative to myometrium on both T1- and T2-weighted imaging) showed the characteristics of stromal hyperthecosis.

  11. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging driven growth modeling for radiotherapy target definition in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten B; Guldberg, Trine L; Harbøll, Anja

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy is routinely based on gadolinium contrast enhanced T1 weighted (T1w + Gd) and T2 weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (T2w FLAIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences which have been shown to over- or underestimate...

  12. High-resolution T2-weighted cervical cancer imaging : a feasibility study on ultra-high-field 7.0-T MRI with an endorectal monopole antenna

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogendam, Jaap; van Kalleveen, Irene; Arteaga de Castro, Catalina; Raaijmakers, AJE; Verheijen, René H M; van Den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Klomp, DWJ; Zweemer, RP; Veldhuis, Wouter B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We studied the feasibility of high-resolution T2-weighted cervical cancer imaging on an ultra-high-field 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system using an endorectal antenna of 4.7-mm thickness. Methods A feasibility study on 20 stage IB1?IIB cervical cancer patients was conducted. All underwent pre-treatment 1.5-T MRI. At 7.0-T MRI, an external transmit/receive array with seven dipole antennae and a single endorectal monopole receive antenna were used. Discomfort levels were ...

  13. Signal void dots on T2-weighted brain MR images in patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage : Its nature and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Joon; Yoo, Dong Soo; Kim, Seung Chul; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Jae Seung; Kim, Jae Il

    1997-01-01

    To describe the signal void dots found on T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain in hypertensive patients. Conventional T2-weighted MR images of 11 patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), 14 with lacunar infarction and 11 comprising a normal control group aged over 60 were analyzed with regard to the presence, location, number and size of signal void dots. We also evaluated their relationship to hypertension. We performed time-of-flight or phase contrast MR angiography, gradient echo pulse sequences, or conventional cerebral angiography in some hypertensive ICH patients and compared them with corresponding T2-weighted images. Signal void dots were found in all patients with hypertensive ICH. Six of 14 patients with lacunar infarction showed these dots;all six suffered from hypertension. The dots were located in the thalami, pons and basal ganglia, and were measured as 1 to 4mm in diameter, mostly 2mm;they looked larger on gradient echo images. In the normal control group there were no signal void dots, and on MR or conventional angiography, no vascular ectasia was noted at the site corresponding to the signal void dots. Signal void dots were not considered to be part of the normal aging process, but appeared to be closely related to hypertension and ICH. The dots were thought to be due to the susceptibility effect of blood degradation product rather than to flow artifact or enlarged vessels. The thrombosed microaneurysm with or without surrounding microleakage of blood may explain the nature of signal void dots on T2-weighted images of hypertensive brain

  14. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U. (Dept. of Radiodiagnosis and Dept. of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India))

    2008-06-15

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  15. Magnetic Resonance Features of Cerebral Malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, P.; Sharma, R.; Kumar, S.; Kumar, U.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cerebral malaria is a major health hazard, with a high incidence of mortality. The disease is endemic in many developing countries, but with a greater increase in tourism, occasional cases may be detected in countries where the disease in not prevalent. Early diagnosis and evaluation of cerebral involvement in malaria utilizing modern imaging modalities have an impact on the treatment and clinical outcome. Purpose: To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) features of patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. Material and Methods: We present the findings in three patients with cerebral malaria presenting with altered sensorium. MR imaging using a 1.5-Tesla unit was carried out. The sequences performed were 5-mm-thick T1-weighted, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR), and T2-weighted gradient-echo axial sequences, and sagittal and coronal FLAIR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with b values of 0 and 1000 s/mm 2 , and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were obtained. Results: Focal hyperintensities in the bilateral periventricular white matter, corpus callosum, occipital subcortex, and bilateral thalami were noticed on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The lesions were more marked in the splenium of the corpus callosum. No enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted MR images was observed. There was no evidence of restricted diffusion on the diffusion-weighted sequence and ADC map. Conclusion: MR is a sensitive imaging modality, with a role in the assessment of cerebral lesions in malaria. Focal white matter and corpus callosal lesions without any restricted diffusion were the key findings in our patients

  16. IMPROVING MAGNETIC RESONANCE RESOLUTION WITH SUPERVISED LEARNING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Amod; Carass, Aaron; Prince, Jerry L

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing improvements in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI), considerable clinical and, to a lesser extent, research data is acquired at lower resolutions. For example 1 mm isotropic acquisition of T 1 -weighted ( T 1 -w) Magnetization Prepared Rapid Gradient Echo (MPRAGE) is standard practice, however T 2 -weighted ( T 2 -w)-because of its longer relaxation times (and thus longer scan time)-is still routinely acquired with slice thicknesses of 2-5 mm and in-plane resolution of 2-3 mm. This creates obvious fundamental problems when trying to process T 1 -w and T 2 -w data in concert. We present an automated supervised learning algorithm to generate high resolution data. The framework is similar to the brain hallucination work of Rousseau, taking advantage of new developments in regression based image reconstruction. We present validation on phantom and real data, demonstrating the improvement over state-of-the-art super-resolution techniques.

  17. Image quality at synthetic brain magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Mi; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Won Hwa; Kim, Hye Jung [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung-Eun; Kim, In-One [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyun-Hae [Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Sun-Kyoung [Chungnam National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sook-Hyun [Kyungpook National University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Moon Jung [GE Healthcare, MR Applications and Workflow, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    The clinical application of the multi-echo, multi-delay technique of synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) generates multiple sequences in a single acquisition but has mainly been used in adults. To evaluate the image quality of synthetic brain MR in children compared with that of conventional images. Twenty-nine children (median age: 6 years, range: 0-16 years) underwent synthetic and conventional imaging. Synthetic (T2-weighted, T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR]) images with settings matching those of the conventional images were generated. The overall image quality, gray/white matter differentiation, lesion conspicuity and image degradations were rated on a 5-point scale. The relative contrasts were assessed quantitatively and acquisition times for the two imaging techniques were compared. Synthetic images were inferior due to more pronounced image degradations; however, there were no significant differences for T1- and T2-weighted images in children <2 years old. The quality of T1- and T2-weighted images were within the diagnostically acceptable range. FLAIR images showed greatly reduced quality. Gray/white matter differentiation was comparable or better in synthetic T1- and T2-weighted images, but poorer in FLAIR images. There was no effect on lesion conspicuity. Synthetic images had equal or greater relative contrast. Acquisition time was approximately two-thirds of that for conventional sequences. Synthetic T1- and T2-weighted images were diagnostically acceptable, but synthetic FLAIR images were not. Lesion conspicuity and gray/white matter differentiation were comparable to conventional MRI. (orig.)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  19. MRI of the anterior talofibular ligament, talar cartilage and os subfibulare: Comparison of isotropic resolution 3D and conventional 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jisook; Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Koo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Bo Ra [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Biomedical Statistics, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Chan Hong [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Wonmi-gu, Bucheon-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    To determine the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence compared with two-dimensional (2D) sequence for diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tears, chondral lesion of the talus (CLT) and os subfibulare/avulsion fracture of the distal fibula (OSF). Thirty-five patients were included, who had undergone ankle MRI with 3D T2-weighted FSE and 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences, as well as subsequent ankle arthroscopy, between November 2013 and July 2014. Each MR imaging sequence was independently scored by two readers retrospectively for the presence of ATFL tears, CLT and OSF. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was compared to determine the discriminatory power of the two image sequences. Interobserver agreement was expressed as unweighted kappa value. Arthroscopic findings confirmed 21 complete tears of the ATFL, 14 partial tears of the ATFL, 17 CLTs and 7 OSFs. There were no significant differences in the diagnoses of ATFL tears (p = 0.074-0.501), CLT (p = 0.090-0.450) and OSF (p = 0.317) obtained from the 2D and 3D sequences by either reader. The interobserver agreement rates between two readers using the 3D T2-weighted FSE sequence versus those obtained with the 2D sequence were substantial (κ = 0.659) versus moderate (κ = 0.553) for ATFL tears, moderate (κ = 0.499) versus substantial (κ = 0.676) for CLT and substantial (κ = 0.621) versus substantial (κ = 0.689) for OSF. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted FSE MRI of the ankle resulted in no statistically significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to two-dimensional T2-weighted FSE MRI in the evaluation of ATFL tears, CLTs and OSFs. (orig.)

  20. MRI of the anterior talofibular ligament, talar cartilage and os subfibulare: Comparison of isotropic resolution 3D and conventional 2D T2-weighted fast spin-echo sequences at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Jisook; Cha, Jang Gyu; Lee, Young Koo; Lee, Bo Ra; Jeon, Chan Hong

    2016-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of a three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence compared with two-dimensional (2D) sequence for diagnosing anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) tears, chondral lesion of the talus (CLT) and os subfibulare/avulsion fracture of the distal fibula (OSF). Thirty-five patients were included, who had undergone ankle MRI with 3D T2-weighted FSE and 2D T2-weighted FSE sequences, as well as subsequent ankle arthroscopy, between November 2013 and July 2014. Each MR imaging sequence was independently scored by two readers retrospectively for the presence of ATFL tears, CLT and OSF. The area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) was compared to determine the discriminatory power of the two image sequences. Interobserver agreement was expressed as unweighted kappa value. Arthroscopic findings confirmed 21 complete tears of the ATFL, 14 partial tears of the ATFL, 17 CLTs and 7 OSFs. There were no significant differences in the diagnoses of ATFL tears (p = 0.074-0.501), CLT (p = 0.090-0.450) and OSF (p = 0.317) obtained from the 2D and 3D sequences by either reader. The interobserver agreement rates between two readers using the 3D T2-weighted FSE sequence versus those obtained with the 2D sequence were substantial (κ = 0.659) versus moderate (κ = 0.553) for ATFL tears, moderate (κ = 0.499) versus substantial (κ = 0.676) for CLT and substantial (κ = 0.621) versus substantial (κ = 0.689) for OSF. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted FSE MRI of the ankle resulted in no statistically significant difference in diagnostic performance compared to two-dimensional T2-weighted FSE MRI in the evaluation of ATFL tears, CLTs and OSFs. (orig.)

  1. Dynamics of dot-like hemosiderin spots on T2*-weighted MRIs associated with stroke recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Toshio; Honma, Toshimi; Horita, Yoshifumi; Chiba, Masahiko; Kawamura, Maiko; Miyata, Kei; Kohama, Ikuhide; Niwa, Jun

    2007-07-01

    Dot-like low-intensity spots (dot-like hemosiderin spots: dotHSs) on gradient echo T2*-weighted (-w) brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) are frequently associated with cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), including deep intracerebral hemorrhages and lacunar infarctions. This study investigated how numbers of newly appeared dotHSs contribute to recurrent SVD. We prospectively analyzed numbers of newly appeared dotHSs in 12 patients with prior SVD (8 males, 4 females; mean 67.6 +/- 10.7 years old) readmitted with recurring SVD between October 2001 and March 2003. Numbers of appeared dotHSs per year were counted on T2*-w MRI scans after SVD recurrence and compared to previous MRIs. Seventy-one outpatients (35 males, 36 females; mean 64.3 +/- 9.6 years old) with histories of intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) that came to the hospital during the study period served as controls. The hazard ratio (HR) for recurrence was estimated from a multivariate logistic regression model, using the number of appeared dotHSs (per year) and other risk factors. Multivariate analyses revealed that an elevated rate of recurrence was found in patients with substantial numbers of appeared dotHSs (>or=5/year) (HR, 7.34; P= 0.0008). We also analyzed factors associated with the numbers of appeared dotHSs. A number of appeared dotHSs (>or=5/year) was significantly and independently associated with the initial number of dotHSs (>or=10) on T2*-w MRIs following the first SVD (HR, 18.6; P= 0.0001). Though a small sample size limited the power of our analyses, our findings suggest that a number of newly appeared dotHSs may be associated with SVD recurrence.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the knee: Current status, new directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munk, P.L.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.; Holt, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    A number of techniques for magnetic resonance imaging of the knee are reviewed. Spin-echo imaging sequences are at present the most widely used and are capable of demonstrating a wide range of pathology including cruciate and collateral ligament tears, meniscal abnormalities, and synovial disease. Fast scan imaging provides effective T2-weighting without the time penalty of T2-weighted spin-echo imaging. These fast scan techniques have also permitted the development of novel sequences including radial techniques and three-dimensional Fourier transform/volume acquisition (which may potentially become the imaging technique of choice in the knee). Inversion recovery may play an important role in evaluating cartilage disorders in the future. The strengths of each technique are discussed together with possible clinical applications. (orig.)

  3. Central nervous system lymphoma: magnetic resonance imaging features at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schwingel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This paper aimed at studying presentations of the central nervous system (CNS lymphoma using structural images obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODS: The MRI features at presentation of 15 patients diagnosed with CNS lymphoma in a university hospital, between January 1999 and March 2011, were analyzed by frequency and cross tabulation. RESULTS: All patients had supratentorial lesions; and four had infra- and supratentorial lesions. The signal intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images was predominantly hypo- or isointense. In the T2 weighted images, single lesions were associated with a hypointense signal component. Six patients presented necrosis, all of them showed perilesional abnormal white matter, nine had meningeal involvement, and five had subependymal spread. Subependymal spread and meningeal involvement tended to occur in younger patients. CONCLUSION: Presentations of lymphoma are very pleomorphic, but some of them should point to this diagnostic possibility.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furune, Sunao; Negoro, Tamiko; Maehara, Mitsuo; Nomura, Kazushi; Miura, Kiyokuni; Takahashi, Izumi; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) were performed on 45 patients with intractable complex partial seizures. MRI was performed with a superconducting whole-body scanner operating at 0.5 tesla (T) and 1.5 T. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, 8 of 24 patients had abnormal CT, but 16 or 24 patients showed abnormal MRI. 1.5 T MRI detected more abnormality than 0.5 T MRI when CT was normal. In patients with frontal lobe epilepsy, 5 of 7 patients had normal CT and MRI. In 2 other patients, MRI demonstrated an arachnoid cyst and increased signal intensity area on the T2-weighted images which were not detected by CT. In patients with occipital lobe epilepsy, 5 of 6 patients show abnormal CT and MRI. In patients with tuberous sclerosis, MRI revealed some increased signal intensity areas on the T2-weighted images in the occipital and temporal lobe, which were not detected by CT. Most surface EEG foci corresponded with the side of MRI abnormality. These data indicate that MRI is more informative than CT in complex partial seizures. MRI is the imaging technique of choice in the diagnosis of complex partial seizures. (author)

  5. MR signal of the solid portion of pilocytic astrocytoma on T2-weighted images: is it useful for differentiation from medulloblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kiyokazu; Yagi, Akiko; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Morita, Hideo; Koyama, Yoshinori; Endo, Keigo; Sato, Noriko; Aoki, Jun; Oba, Hiroshi; Ishiuchi, Shogo; Saito, Nobuhito

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Although imaging features of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma and medulloblastoma have been described in many texts, original comparisons of magnetic resonance intensity between these two tumours are limited. In the present study the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were reviewed, focusing especially on the signal intensity of the solid portion of these neoplasms. Methods: MR images of ten cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas and ten medulloblastomas were reviewed. The signal intensities of the solid components were graded on a scale of 1 to 5, with higher scores indicating a signal intensity closer to that of water. The degree of enhancement, tumour cysts and peripheral oedema were evaluated on MR images. When the solid portion was heterogeneous (i.e. mixed signal intensity or degree of enhancement), the dominant area was selected for evaluation. On T2-weighted images, the signal intensity of the solid portion was equal to that of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in 50% of pilocytic astrocytomas. No medulloblastomas showed such hyperintensity. Most medulloblastomas (80%) were isointense to grey matter. On T1-weighted images, the signal intensity varied widely in pilocytic astrocytomas; however, all medulloblastomas were iso- or hypointense to grey matter. The MR enhancement pattern, cystic component and peripheral oedema all varied in both tumour types and no specific features were identified. A signal intensity of the solid portion isointense to CSF on T2-weighted images was characteristic of cerebellar pilocytic astrocytomas; this was not observed in medulloblastomas. Attention to T2-weighted imaging of the solid portions of a tumour is easy and helpful in differentiating between cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma and medulloblastoma. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of knee trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, L.W.; Grover, J.S.; Seeger, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of normal knee anatomy and the role of MRI in the evaluation of knee trauma. Images acquired in the sagittal plane are the most useful. A combination of T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo pulse sequences is most commonly employed. A meniscal tear is identified by an intrameniscal signal which extends to the joint surface. MR and arthroscopic findings agree in more than 90% of patients. It is important to be familiar with the MRI appearance of normal anatomic variants that may be confused with meniscal tears: the transverse geniculate ligament, the hiatus of the popliteal tendon sheath, and the meniscofemoral ligaments. Tears in the anterior cruciate, posterior, cruciate, and collateral ligaments are also depicted. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of intraorbital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tooru; Fukui, Masashi; Matsushima, Toshio; Fujii, Kiyotaka; Hasuo, Kanehiro

    1991-01-01

    Ten cases of histologically confirmed intraorbital tumors were studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Two meningiomas were nearly isointense on the T 1 -weighted image (T 1 WI) and the T 2 -weighted image (T 2 WI) relative on the cerebral cortex. The hemangiopericytoma, lacrimal gland tumor, optic glioma, and encephalocele were hypointense on the T 1 WI. The pseudotumor was hypoisointense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. The metastatic tumor (prostatic carcinoma) was hyperintense on both the T 1 WI and the T 2 WI. Gd-DTPA MRI was performed in five cases. The anatomical relationships between the tumor and the orbital tissue could be discriminated well by means of the coronal and sagittal views. MRI is thus found to be useful for the preoperative diagnosis of the intraorbital tumor and the selection of the surgical approach. (author)

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Cesar Higa; Lima, Eduardo Carneiro; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Rosemberg, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome. We evaluated eight patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome using magnetic resonance imaging. The protocol included at least sagittal and axial T1-weighted images and axial and coronal T2-weighted images. Intravenous gadolinium was administered in a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Post-enhanced images were obtained at least in the axial and coronal planes. The results were: all patients presented a bilateral and symmetrical 'tiger-eye signal' on T2-weighted images, corresponding to central hyperintensity and peripheral hypointensity in the globi pallidus. FLAIR and diffusion images showed similar abnormalities. There was no gadolinium enhancement in any of the cases. We concluded that magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome are very typical and allow the diagnosis of the disease. (author)

  9. MR fetography using heavily T2-weighted sequences: Comparison of thin- and thick-slab acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Division Pediatric Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore (United States)], E-mail: thuisma1@jhmi.edu; Solopova, Alina [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of MR-fetography sequences in identifying the major fetal structures and to compare thick- and thin-slab acquisitions for their diagnostic value. Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive, pregnant women with suspected fetal pathology underwent fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 1.5 T MRI unit. Heavily T2-weighted, single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequences with a long echo train (MR-fetography) were acquired in a thick- and thin-slab modus. Thick- and thin-slab acquisitions were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with regard to the overall image quality and landmark anatomical structures (spinal canal, spinal cord, posterior fossa, cerebellum, brainstem, basal cisterns, stomach, urinary bladder and umbilical cord according to a three-scale grading system (good, moderate and poor). Visibility scores were calculated and compared between both sequences. Results: Overall image quality was graded good in 76.2%, moderate in 19.0% and poor in 4.8% for thick-slab images and good in 81%, moderate in 14.3% and poor in 4.8% for thin-slab images. The visibility scores of the thick/thin-slab images for evaluation of the main fetal structures were as follows: for the spinal canal 2.8 {+-} 0.4/2.9 {+-} 0.54 (p > 0.05), spinal cord 2.4 {+-} 0.75/2.7 {+-} 0.66 (p > 0.05), posterior fossa components (cerebellum, brainstem and basal cisterns) 2.4 {+-} 0.68/2.8 {+-} 0.54; 2.4 {+-} 0.67/2.7 {+-} 0.66; 2.5 {+-} 0.51/2.7 {+-} 0.56 (p < 0.05), stomach 2.8 {+-} 0.44/2.9 {+-} 0.48 (p > 0.05), urinary bladder 2.8 {+-} 0.51/2.8 {+-} 0.54 (p > 0.05) and umbilical cord 2.9 {+-} 0.30/2.6 {+-} 0.60 (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Heavily T2-weighted MR-fetography renders a quick overview of fetal contours, fetal position, amount of amniotic fluid and integrity and presence of several major fluid containing structures. Thick- and thin-slab acquisitions render complementary information. Thick-slab images display the entire fetus in one projection while

  10. Role of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Diffuse Axonal Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezaki, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Morikawa, M.; Nagata, I. [Nagasaki Univ., Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). Depts. of Neurosurgery and Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the signal changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), including fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), T2*-weighted gradient echo (GE) imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) patients correlate with the clinical outcome. Material and Methods: We diagnosed patients with DAI based on the following criteria: 1) a loss of consciousness from the time of injury that persisted beyond 6 h; 2) no apparent hemorrhagic contusion on computed tomography (CT); 3) the presence of white matter injury on MRI. Twenty-one DAI patients were analyzed (19 M, 2 F, mean age 34 years) with MRI (FLAIR, T2*-weighted GE imaging, and DWI). Results: 325 abnormalities were detected by MRI within a week after injury. The T2*-weighted GE imaging was significantly more sensitive than FLAIR and DWI in diagnosing DAI. DWI detected only 32% of all lesions, but could depict additional shearing injuries not visible on either T2*-weighted GE imaging or FLAIR. The mean number of lesions in brainstem detected by DWI in the favorable group (good recovery/moderately disabled) was significantly smaller than in the unfavorable group (severely disabled/vegetative survival/death). This trend was not observed on the T2*-weighted GE imaging and FLAIR findings. Conclusion: DWI cannot detect all DAI-related lesions, but is a potentially useful imaging modality for both diagnosing and assessing patients with DAI.

  11. Sub-Millimeter T2 Weighted fMRI at 7 T: Comparison of 3D-GRASE and 2D SE-EPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin G. Kemper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI allows studying human brain function non-invasively up to the spatial resolution of cortical columns and layers. Most fMRI acquisitions rely on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast employing T2* weighted 2D multi-slice echo-planar imaging (EPI. At ultra-high magnetic field (i.e. 7 T and above, it has been shown experimentally and by simulation, that T2 weighted acquisitions yield a signal that is spatially more specific to the site of neuronal activity at the cost of functional sensitivity. This study compared two T2 weighted imaging sequences, inner-volume 3D Gradient-and-Spin-Echo (3D-GRASE and 2D Spin-Echo EPI (SE-EPI, with evaluation of their imaging point-spread function, functional specificity, and functional sensitivity at sub-millimeter resolution. Simulations and measurements of the imaging point-spread function revealed that the strongest anisotropic blurring in 3D-GRASE (along the second phase-encoding direction was about 60 % higher than the strongest anisotropic blurring in 2D SE-EPI (along the phase-encoding direction In a visual paradigm, the BOLD sensitivity of 3D-GRASE was found to be superior due to its higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio. High resolution cortical depth profiles suggested that the contrast mechanisms are similar between the two sequences, however, 2D SE-EPI had a higher surface bias owing to the higher T2* contribution of the longer in-plane EPI echo-train for full field of view compared to the reduced field of view of zoomed 3D-GRASE.

  12. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  13. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance T2-STIR Imaging is Unable to Discriminate Between Intramyocardial Haemorrhage and Microvascular Obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Pedersen, Steen Fjord; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have used cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) imaging to detect intramyocardial haemorrhage (IMH) as a measure of ischemic/reperfusion injury. We investigated the ability of T2-STIR to differentiate between microvascular...

  14. Magnetic resonance reflects the pathological evolution of Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S H; Kim, M; Na, D L; Jeon, B S

    2001-10-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is an acute phase of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Pathologic findings change between acute and chronic phases. Only a few magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have been done to date. To correlate the MRI findings in acute and chronic stages of WE with the known pathologic information, 15 consecutive patients with WE were examined with MRI: 3 before thiamine treatment, 7 within 24 hours of thiamine treatment, 4 between the second and sixth day after thiamine treatment, and 1 fifty-five days after thiamine treatment. Nine of the patients had follow-up MRI between 2 days and 33 months. T1-weighted, proton, and T2-weighted axial images were obtained with additional 5-mm-thick T1-weighted sagittal and coronal images to better visualize the mammillary bodies. In the acute WE, MRI showed high signal intensityon T2-weighted images in periaqueduct and medial thalamic regions. In a few patients with alcoholism, vermian and mammillary body atrophies and third ventricular enlargements were noted. In the chronic phase of WE, T2 hyperintensity disappeared but mammillary bodies and cerebellar vermis became atrophic and third ventricular enlargements were evident. High signal intensity on T2-weighted images disappeared as early as 2 days, and atrophic changes appeared as early as 1 week. MRI is useful for in vivo monitoring and reflects the pathological evolution in acute and chronic phases of WE.

  15. Brain magnetic resonance findings in infective endocarditis with neurological complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Asako; O'uchi, Toshihiro; Toyoda, Keiko

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosing infective endocarditis and its complications can be difficult because of the nonspecific symptoms. We reviewed findings of intracranial abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 14 patients with neurological complications and herein discuss the overall intracranial MRI findings. We retrospectively reviewed patients with infective endocarditis from August 2004 to August 2006. Brain MRI, the causative bacteria, and abnormal neurological symptoms were reviewed for 14 patients with neurological complications. Of the 14 patients, 13 showed intracranial abnormalities on MRI. Embolization was seen in 10 patients, hemorrhage in 3, abscess formation in 3, and encephalitis in 2. Hyperintense lesions with a central hypointense area on T2-weighted and/or T2*-weighted imaging (Bull's-eye-like lesion) were seen in four patients. A combination of these intracranial abnormalities was observed in 6 patients. The MRI findings associated with infective endocarditis are wide-ranging: embolization, hemorrhage, meningitis, cerebritis, abscess, the bull's-eye-like lesion. Clinicians should consider the possibility of infective endocarditis in patients with unknown fever and neurological abnormality. Brain MRI should be promptly performed for those patients, and T2*-weighted imaging is recommended for an early diagnosis of infective endocarditis. (author)

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses ... of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  17. Monitoring of abdominal Staphylococcus aureus infection using magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromrey, M L; Göhler, A; Friedrich, N

    2017-01-01

    To establish a routine workflow for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of mice infected with bacterial biosafety level 2 pathogens and to generate a mouse model for systemic infection with Staphylococcus aureus suitable for monitoring by MRI. A self-contained acrylic glass animal bed...... visualized using a standard T2-weighted scan. Infection monitoring was performed for each animal by measurements at 1, 3, and 7 days after infection. Intravenous pathogen application led to a dose-dependent decrease in survival probability (p = 0.03). In the group with the highest infectious dose the 7-day...

  18. Reversible Myelopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Due to Cobalamin Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ju Lee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Subacute combined degeneration (SCD is known as myelopathy due to vitamin B12 deficiency. SCD always involves the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord, with the neuropathologic change showing vacuolation of the white matter. We describe 2 patients who presented with ataxic gait, impaired proprioception over limbs, and even mental change due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the cervical spine showed increased signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging, and laboratory data showed low serum vitamin B12 level. The 2 patients were treated with vitamin B12 injection intramuscularly. There was clinical improvement after treatment along with normalization of the MRI.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in obstetrics. II. Fetal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, M C; Worthington, B S; Buckley, J M; Symonds, E M

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 36 patients at between 10 and 38 weeks gestation to determine the fetal anatomy that could be identified at different gestations. Fetal motion significantly degraded the image quality in the first and second trimesters, but in the final trimester fetal anatomy was clearly demonstrated. T2 weighted sequences showed the fetal brain and lungs to have a high signal intensity. Shorter TR leading to a T1 weighting gave better resolution of the overall anatomy. MRI has revealed the potential for assessment of lung maturity and the growth-retarded fetus.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance in condensed matter was discov- ered simultaneously by Edward Purcell at Harvard and Felix. Bloch at Stanford in 1946 using different instrumentation and techniques. Both groups observed the response of magnetic nuclei, placed in a uniform magnetic field, to a continuous radio frequency ...

  1. Myocardium at risk in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction comparison of T2-weighted edema imaging with the MR-assessed endocardial surface area and validation against angiographic scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuernau, Georg; Eitel, Ingo; Franke, Vinzenz; Hildebrandt, Lysann; Meissner, Josefine; de Waha, Suzanne; Lurz, Philipp; Gutberlet, Matthias; Desch, Steffen; Schuler, Gerhard; Thiele, Holger

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the area at risk (AAR) in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction with 2 different cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging methods and to compare them with the validated angiographic Alberta Provincial Project for Outcome Assessment in Coronary Heart Disease Score (APPROACH-score) in a large consecutive patient cohort. Edema imaging with T(2)-weighted CMR and the endocardial surface area (ESA) assessed by late gadolinium enhancement have been introduced as relatively new methods for AAR assessment in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. However, data on the utility and validation of these techniques are limited. A total of 197 patients undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention in acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction were included. AAR (assessed with T(2)-weighted edema imaging and the ESA method), infarct size, and myocardial salvage (AAR minus infarct size) were determined by CMR 2 to 4 days after primary angioplasty. Angiographic AAR scoring was performed by use of the APPROACH-score. All measurements were done offline by blinded observers. The AAR assessed by T(2)-weighted imaging showed good correlation with the angiographic AAR (r = 0.87; p myocardial salvage index. In contrast, no dependence of T(2)-weighted edema imaging or the APPROACH-score on myocardial salvage index was seen. The AAR can be reliably assessed by T(2)-weighted CMR, whereas assessment of the AAR by ESA seems to be dependent on the degree of myocardial salvage, thereby underestimating the AAR in patients with high myocardial salvage such as aborted infarction. Thus, assessment of the AAR with the ESA method cannot be recommended. (Myocardial Salvage and Contrast Dye Induced Nephropathy Reduction by N-Acetylcystein [LIPSIA-N-ACC]; NCT00463749). Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MR fetography using heavily T2-weighted sequences: comparison of thin- and thick-slab acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Solopova, Alina

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the use of MR-fetography sequences in identifying the major fetal structures and to compare thick- and thin-slab acquisitions for their diagnostic value. Twenty-one consecutive, pregnant women with suspected fetal pathology underwent fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 1.5 T MRI unit. Heavily T2-weighted, single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequences with a long echo train (MR-fetography) were acquired in a thick- and thin-slab modus. Thick- and thin-slab acquisitions were reviewed by two experienced radiologists with regard to the overall image quality and landmark anatomical structures (spinal canal, spinal cord, posterior fossa, cerebellum, brainstem, basal cisterns, stomach, urinary bladder and umbilical cord according to a three-scale grading system (good, moderate and poor). Visibility scores were calculated and compared between both sequences. Overall image quality was graded good in 76.2%, moderate in 19.0% and poor in 4.8% for thick-slab images and good in 81%, moderate in 14.3% and poor in 4.8% for thin-slab images. The visibility scores of the thick/thin-slab images for evaluation of the main fetal structures were as follows: for the spinal canal 2.8+/-0.4/2.9+/-0.54 (p>0.05), spinal cord 2.4+/-0.75/2.7+/-0.66 (p>0.05), posterior fossa components (cerebellum, brainstem and basal cisterns) 2.4+/-0.68/2.8+/-0.54; 2.4+/-0.67/2.7+/-0.66; 2.5+/-0.51/2.7+/-0.56 (p0.05), urinary bladder 2.8+/-0.51/2.8+/-0.54 (p>0.05) and umbilical cord 2.9+/-0.30/2.6+/-0.60 (pslab acquisitions render complementary information. Thick-slab images display the entire fetus in one projection while thin-slab images provide more detailed anatomical information. The short imaging time usually allows measuring both thick- and thin-slab images. MR-fetography is as a helpful addition to conventional fetal MRI. MR-fetography should not be viewed as a single, stand alone sequence but as a supporting fast MR sequence in a well-designed multisequence fetal MRI protocol

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). ERCP is a diagnostic procedure that combines endoscopy , which uses an illuminated optical instrument to ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Biliary ...

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  10. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  11. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  12. Utility of echo-planar gradient-echo T2*-weighted MR images in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoe, Toshio; Yoshida, Tazuka; Kobayashi, Nozomu; Nakamura, Yukihiro; Kubota, Kazuyuki

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to reveal residues of intracerabral hemorrhage (ICH) throughout life because of the high sensitivity for iron-containing compounds. Gradient-echo T2 * -weighted MR imaging (T2 * MRI) requiring short times for complete acquisition is known to detect small areas of signal loss without surrounding edema representing microbleeds (MBs). MBs in the basal ganglia including the thalami are suggested to be closely related to intracerebral atherosclerotic microangiopathy. We looked for more than 3 MBs in basal ganglia or thalamus of patients with and without episodes of previous ICH. Twelve patients with previous hemorrhagic stroke and 82 without were studied. Multiple MBs in those regions were significantly more frequent in patients with recurrent ICH. In addition, a 76-year-old woman with a history of hypertension was transferred to our hospital for treatment of head injury. She had multiple incidental old basal ganglionic and thalamic MBs. The patient had an asymptomatic primary ICH on computed tomography (CT) 3 months later. In conclusion, MR evidence of multiple MBs in the basal ganglia and thalamus might identify patients at a risk for new and recurrent ICH. Therefore, patients with multiple MBs in those regions should be treated for cerebrovascular risk factors, especially hypertension. Our results appear to confirm the utility of T2 * MRI in hemorrhagic stroke. (author)

  13. Optimisation of T2*-weighted MRI for the detection of small veins in multiple sclerosis at 3 T and 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Jennifer Elizabeth; Simpson, Ashley; Mistry, Niraj; Evangelou, Nikos; Morris, Peter Gordon

    2013-01-01

    T 2 * -weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 7 T has recently been shown to allow differentiation between white-matter multiple sclerosis lesions and asymptomatic white-matter lesions, by the presence or absence of a detectable central blood vessel. The aim of the present work is to improve the technique by increasing the sensitivity to veins at both 3 T and 7 T, and to assess the benefit of ultra-high-field imaging. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurements and simulations are used to compare the sensitivity of magnitude T 2 * -weighted and susceptibility-weighted images for the detection of small veins (<1 pixel in diameter), both with and without the use of gadolinium. The simulations are used to predict the optimal scanning parameters in order to increase the sensitivity to these veins at both field strengths, and to reduce the inherent dependence on vessel orientation. The sensitivities of the sequences at both field strengths are compared, theoretically and experimentally, in order to quantify the benefit of imaging at ultra-high-field. Subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS) are scanned at both field strengths, using the optimised sequence parameters, as well as those used in previously published work, and the optimisation is shown to improve the detection of veins within lesions

  14. Comparison of 3D and 2D FSE T2-weighted MRI in the diagnosis of deep pelvic endometriosis: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazot, M.; Stivalet, A.; Daraï, E.; Coudray, C.; Thomassin-Naggara, I.; Poncelet, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy of two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Materials and methods: One hundred and ten consecutive patients with suspicion of endometriosis were recruited at two institutions over a 5-month period. Twenty-three women underwent surgery, 18 had DIE at histology. Two readers independently evaluated 3D and 2D MRI for image quality and diagnosis of DIE. Descriptive analysis, chi-square test for categorical or nominal variables, McNemar test for comparison between 3D and 2D T2-weighted MRI, and weighted “statistics” for intra- and interobserver agreement were used for statistical analysis. Results: Both readers found that 3D yielded significantly lower image quality than 2D MRI (p < 0.0001). Acquisition time for 3D was significantly shorter than 2D MRI (p < 0.01). 3D offered similar accuracy to diagnose DIE compared to 2D MRI. For all locations of endometriosis, a high or variable intra-observer agreement was observed for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusions: Despite a lower overall image quality, 3D provides significant time saving and similar accuracy than multiplanar 2D MRI in the diagnosis of specific DIE locations.

  15. Three-dimensional isotropic T2-weighted fast spin-echo (VISTA) ankle MRI versus two-dimensional fast spin-echo T2-weighted sequences for the evaluation of anterior talofibular ligament injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H J; Lee, S Y; Park, N H; Rho, M H; Chung, E C; Park, J H; Park, S J

    2016-04-01

    To compare the performance of axial images of the ankle joint on three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) with that of two-dimensional (2D) fast spin echo (FSE) T2-weighted images for the diagnosis of anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) injury. This retrospective study included 101 patients who underwent both 2D FSE T2-weighted and 3D VISTA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the ankle. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of both sequences were measured. The anatomical identification score and diagnostic performances of both sequences were evaluated by two radiologists. The diagnostic performances of 3D VISTA and 2D FSE images were analysed in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosing ATFL injury. Surgically or clinically confirmed diagnoses were used as reference standards. The margin sharpness scores on 3D VISTA were significantly inferior to those of 2D FSE (p<0.001). Other scores (entire length, entire width) were not significantly different between the two imaging methods. The SNRs and CNRs of 3D VISTA were significantly higher than those of 2D FSE (p<0.001). When diagnoses were classified as normal and abnormal, the specificity of the 3D VISTA images for the diagnosis of ATFL injury was 95.7%, significantly superior to 2D FSE (84.3-85.7%). There were no significant differences between 3D VISTA and 2D FSE images in sensitivity or accuracy for diagnosis (p=0.227-1.000), with the exception of accuracy by reader 1 (p=0.039). 3D VISTA imaging has a diagnostic performance comparable to that of 2D FSE for the diagnosis of ATFL injury, although 3D VISTA is inferior to 2D FSE for the evaluation of margin sharpness. Replacing axial and coronal images with 3D VISTA can save imaging time without negatively impacting the diagnostic ability for ATFL injury. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Detecting Acute Myocardial Infarction by Diffusion-Weighted versus T2-Weighted Imaging and Myocardial Necrosis Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jiyang; Chen, Min; Li, Yongjun; Wang, YaLing; Zhang, Shijun; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Lin; Ju, Shenghong

    2016-10-01

    We used a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction to study the signal evolution of ischemic myocardium on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (DWI). Eight Chinese miniature pigs underwent percutaneous left anterior descending or left circumflex coronary artery occlusion for 90 minutes followed by reperfusion, which induced acute myocardial infarction. We used DWI preprocedurally and hourly for 4 hours postprocedurally. We acquired turbo inversion recovery magnitude T2-weighted images (TIRM T2WI) and late gadolinium enhancement images from the DWI slices. We measured the serum myocardial necrosis markers myoglobin, creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, and cardiac troponin I at the same time points as the magnetic resonance scanning. We used histochemical staining to confirm injury. All images were analyzed qualitatively. Contrast-to-noise ratio (the contrast between infarcted and healthy myocardium) and relative signal index were used in quantitative image analysis. We found that DWI identified myocardial signal abnormity early (acute myocardial infarction and identified the infarct-related high signal more often than did TIRM T2WI: 7 of 8 pigs (87.5%) versus 3 of 8 (37.5%) ( P =0.046). Quantitative image analysis yielded a significant difference in contrast-to-noise ratio and relative signal index between infarcted and normal myocardium on DWI. However, within 4 hours after infarction, the serologic myocardial injury markers were not significantly positive. We conclude that DWI can be used to detect myocardial signal abnormalities early after acute myocardial infarction-identifying the infarction earlier than TIRM T2WI and widely used clinical serologic biomarkers.

  17. Entropy of T2-weighted imaging combined with apparent diffusion coefficient in prediction of uterine leiomyoma volume response after uterine artery embolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Meng-Qiu; Suo, Shi-Teng; Zhang, Xue-Bin; Zhong, Yi-Cun; Zhuang, Zhi-Guo; Cheng, Jie-Jun; Chi, Jia-Chang; Xu, Jian-Rong

    2014-04-01

    To determine the potential value of entropy of T2-weighted imaging combined with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) before uterine artery embolization (UAE) for prediction of uterine leiomyoma volume reduction (VR) after UAE. In this prospective study, 11 patients with uterine leiomyomas who underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging before and 6 months after UAE were included. A total number of 16 leiomyomas larger than 2 cm in diameter were evaluated. The volume of each leiomyoma before and after UAE was determined, and the percentage change in volume was calculated. Entropy of T2-weighted imaging and ADC before UAE were assessed. Pearson correction coefficients were calculated between leiomyoma VR after UAE and age, leiomyoma volume, ADC, and entropy, respectively. Multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the parameters that determine the VR after UAE. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of ADC, entropy and the combination of ADC and entropy for predicting volume response. The mean leiomyoma VR was 58.9% (range 25.8%-95.0%) in the 6-month follow-up. The mean ADC of leiomyomas was 1.37 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s (range 1.05 × 10(-3)-2.32 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s) and the mean entropy of T2-weighted imaging was 5.36 (range 4.62-5.91) before UAE. ADC and entropy were significantly correlated with leiomyoma VR, respectively (r = 0.61, P = .012; r = 0.73, P = .001). On multiple regression analysis, a combination of ADC and entropy constituted the best model for determining leiomyoma VR using Akaike information criterion. For predicting ≥50% VR, the optimal cutoff value of ADC was 1.39 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s (sensitivity 45.5%, specificity 80.0%) and the optimal cutoff value of entropy was 5.15 (sensitivity 90.9%, specificity 60.0%). The combination of ADC and entropy (area under the curve [AUC] 0.86) provided better classification accuracy than ADC or entropy

  18. Cognitive Function and 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tractography of White Matter Hyperintensities in Elderly Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C.; Tam, Angela; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Reginold, Jennifer; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study used 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography to determine if there was an association between tracts crossing white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and cognitive function in elderly persons. Methods: Brain T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion tensor MRI scans were acquired in participants above the age of 60 years. Twenty-six persons had WMH identified on T2 FLAIR scans. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tes...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce ...

  1. White Matter Hyperintensities on T2-Weighted MRI Images among DNA-Verified Older Familial Hypercholesterolemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyttinen, L.; Autti, T.; Soljanlahti, S.; Rauma, S.; Vuorio, A.F.; Strandberg, T.E.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, causing an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) if untreated. Silent brain infarctions and white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) observed on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) are associated with increased risk for stroke and myocardial infarction. Age is a strong predictor of WMHIs. Purpose: To use MRI to assess the presence of clinically silent brain lesions in older FH patients, and to compare the occurrence and size of these lesions in older FH patients with middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls. Material and Methods: A total of 43 older (age = 65 years) FH patients with the same FH North Karelia mutation, living in Finland, were identified. In this comprehensive cohort, 1.5T brain MRI was available for 33 individuals (age 65-84 years, M/F 9/24, mean duration of statin treatment 15.3 years). This group was divided into two age categories: 65-74 years (FHe1 group, n=23) and 75-84 years (FHe2 group, n=10). Infarcts, including lacunas, and WMHIs on T2-weighted images were recorded. Data from brain MRI were compared to those of a group of middle-aged FH patients with CHD (n=19, age 48-64 years) and with middle-aged healthy controls (n=29, age 49-63 years). Results: Only two (6%) of the older FH patients had clinically silent brain infarcts detected by MRI. The amount of large WMHIs (>5 mm in diameter) was similar in the FHe1 group compared with the groups of middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls, even though the FHe1 group was 13 years older. The total amount of WMHIs and the amount of large WMHIs were greatest in the FHe2 group. Conclusion: FH patients aged 65 to 74 years receiving long-term statin treatment (15 years) did not have more WMHIs on brain MRI compared to middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls

  2. White Matter Hyperintensities on T2-Weighted MRI Images among DNA-Verified Older Familial Hypercholesterolemia Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyttinen, L. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, North Karelia Central Hospital, Joensuu (Finland)); Autti, T.; Soljanlahti, S. (Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Rauma, S. (Dept. of Radiology, North Karelia Central Hospital, Joensuu (Finland)); Vuorio, A.F. (Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland)); Strandberg, T.E. (Dept. of Health Sciences/Geriatrics, Univ. of Oulu, Oulu (Finland))

    2009-04-15

    Background: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder, causing an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) if untreated. Silent brain infarctions and white matter hyperintensities (WMHIs) observed on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI) are associated with increased risk for stroke and myocardial infarction. Age is a strong predictor of WMHIs. Purpose: To use MRI to assess the presence of clinically silent brain lesions in older FH patients, and to compare the occurrence and size of these lesions in older FH patients with middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls. Material and Methods: A total of 43 older (age = 65 years) FH patients with the same FH North Karelia mutation, living in Finland, were identified. In this comprehensive cohort, 1.5T brain MRI was available for 33 individuals (age 65-84 years, M/F 9/24, mean duration of statin treatment 15.3 years). This group was divided into two age categories: 65-74 years (FHe1 group, n=23) and 75-84 years (FHe2 group, n=10). Infarcts, including lacunas, and WMHIs on T2-weighted images were recorded. Data from brain MRI were compared to those of a group of middle-aged FH patients with CHD (n=19, age 48-64 years) and with middle-aged healthy controls (n=29, age 49-63 years). Results: Only two (6%) of the older FH patients had clinically silent brain infarcts detected by MRI. The amount of large WMHIs (>5 mm in diameter) was similar in the FHe1 group compared with the groups of middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls, even though the FHe1 group was 13 years older. The total amount of WMHIs and the amount of large WMHIs were greatest in the FHe2 group. Conclusion: FH patients aged 65 to 74 years receiving long-term statin treatment (15 years) did not have more WMHIs on brain MRI compared to middle-aged FH patients and healthy controls.

  3. Subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition after subarachnoid hemorrhage on T2*-weighted MRI correlates with the location of disturbed cerebrospinal fluid flow on computed tomography cisternography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Yoshifumi; Imaizumi, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yuji; Niwa, Jun

    2008-01-01

    A 72-year-old male was admitted with subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. The aneurysm was treated with clipping soon after radiological examination. Eight weeks after the treatment, the patient suffered from secondary hydrocephalus resulting from blockage of the subarachnoid space due to subarachnoid granulation. Previous pathological examination revealed the granulation was associated with hemosiderin deposition. We investigated subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition in this patient using T2*-weighted (T2*-w) magnetic resonance image (MRI), a sensitive method for hemosiderin detection. computed tomography (CT) cisternography demonstrated that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was disturbed adjacent to sites of subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition on T2*-w MRI. Placement of a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt contributed to neurological improvement. In this case, T2*-w MRI was an effective means of diagnosing the location of disturbed CSF flow associated with subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition.

  4. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T. [Radiologian Klinikka, Oulu (Finland)

    2006-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord.

  5. Increasing Benefit of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Multiple Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyhtinen, J.; Karttunen, A.; Tikkakoski, T.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as an essential tool of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and has opened up completely new prospects in MS research and treatment trials. It is a sensitive method that gives direct evidence of tissue pathology and has greatly increased our knowledge of MS. In clinical work, MRI is used to confirm and exclude the diagnosis of MS. The international recommendation is that every suspected MS patient should undergo at least one brain MRI. T2-weighted images are the standard tool in clinical work, and functional imaging methods are mainly used in MS research. The subtypes and the course of the disease cause variation in MRI findings. Here, we present a general overview of MR findings in MS. Brain, magnetic resonance imaging, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord

  6. A study of spinal cord tumors by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gushiken, Isao; Nishihira, Takeshi; Nakasone, Tomohiro; Takara, Hiroaki; Oshiro, Yutaka; Oshiro, Takashi; Isa, Makoto; Kinjo, Yukio; Ibaraki, Kunio.

    1989-01-01

    We studied 17 cases of spinal cord tumors using magnetic resonance imaging. According to the intensity of image and histological feature of spinal cord tumors, we identified two groups in T2 weighted imaging. One was a hypointensity group showing cystic or vascular tumors, and the other was hyperintensity group of solid tumors. Preoperative images of swelling, narrowing, deviation of the spinal cord were remained after the operations. Grafted free fatty tissue for the prevention of adhesion was recognized well also after the operation. Postoperative imagings sometime showed pseudo-deviation of the spinal cord which was easy to be mistaken as the remains of tumors and narrowing of the spinal cord. In conclusion, the magnetic resonance imaging makes very early detection of spinal cord tumors possible, and it is valuable for a diagnosis of the spinal cord tumor associated with brain tumor. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of central nervous system haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; Hennessy, O.

    1993-01-01

    The variable magnetic resonance imaging appearances of central nervous system haemorrhage, both intra- and extra-axial, are described. These will vary with the type of image contrast (T1 or T2 weighting), the nature of the imaging sequence (spin-echo or gradient-echo) and the time from onset of haemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful technique for imaging haemorrhage in the central nervous system as it yields temporal information about haematoma development, and it is the only non-invasive means of imaging intraspinal haemorrhage. However, in the imaging of haematomas within 24 h of onset and in subarachnoid haemorrhage computed tomography is the investigation of choice. 13 refs., 6 figs

  8. Application of fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging for examination of the neurocranium. Comparison with the conventional T2-weighted spin-echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewert, C.; Hosten, N.; Felix, R.

    1994-01-01

    T 2 -weighted spin-echo imaging is the standard screening procedure in MR imaging of the neutrocranium. We evaluated fast spin-echo T 2 -weighted imaging (TT 2 ) of the neurocranium in comparison to conventional spin-echo T 2 -weighted imaging (T 2 ). Signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio of normal brain tissues (basal ganglia, grey and white matter, CSF fluid) and different pathologies were calculated. Signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher than TT 2 than in T 2 (with the exception of grey-to-white matter contrast). Tissues with increased content of water protons (mobile protons) showed the highest contrast to surrounding tissues. The increased signal intensity of fat must be given due attention in fatty lesions. Because the contrast-to-noise ratio between white matter and basal ganglia is less in TT 2 , Parkinson patients have to be examined by conventional T 2 . If these limitations are taken into account, fast spin-echo T 2 -weighted imaging is well appropriate for MR imaging of the neurocranium, resulting in heavy T 2 -weighting achieved in a short acquisition time. (orig.) [de

  9. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  10. Floating dural sac sign is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging finding of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Sato, Shinya; Kanoto, Masafumi; Kayama, Takamasa; Hatazawa, Jun; Fukao, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We would like to propose floating dural sac sign, which is observed as a hyperintense band or rim around the spinal dural sac on axial T 2 -weighted images, as a sensitive sign to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. One hundred patients with orthostatic headache were prospectively registered in 11 hospitals. These patients were examined by brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n=89), radioisotope cisternography (n=89), MR myelography (n=86), axial T 2 -weighted imaging of the spine (n=70), and computed tomography myelography (n=2). In this study, we separately evaluated the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension and spinal CSF leakage. Among 100 patients, 16 patients were diagnosed as having spinal CSF leaks. Of 70 patients examined with axial T 2 -weighted imaging, 14 patients were diagnosed with spinal CSF leaks, and floating dural sac sign was observed in 17 patients, 13 patients with spinal CSF leaks and 4 without CSF leaks (sensitivity 92.9%, specificity 92.9%). Of 86 patients examined by MR myelography, extradural fluid was observed in only 3 patients (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). The floating dural sac sign was a sensitive sign that can be used to identify CSF leakage. Spinal axial T 2 -weighted imaging might be a good screening method for spinal CSF leakage that can help to avoid the need for lumbar puncture. (author)

  11. The suprapineal recess of the third ventricle: an anatomic study with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Ono, Hideo; Yasumoto, Yukimasa

    2017-07-01

    The suprapineal recess (SPR) is a small, backward extension of the third ventricle. Few radiological studies have investigated the morphology of the SPR. Here, we explore the SPR with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. A total of 124 patients underwent thin-slice MR imaging examinations with T2-weighted imaging and the constructive interference steady-state (CISS) sequence. Imaging data were transferred to a workstation for analysis. The pineal gland (P) was delineated in 99% of the patients on T2-weighted imaging and 100% of the patients on the CISS sequence. In contrast, the SPR was identified in 27% of the patients on T2-weighted imaging and 82% of the patients on the CISS sequence. The location of the P relative to the lowest point of the splenium was roughly classified into two types. Of them, the anterior P location was the more frequent type and observed in 73% of the patients. The angle formed by the roof and floor of the SPR showed remarkable interindividual diversity. A membranous posterior extension with variable length, spanning between the posterosuperior margin of the P and Galenic complex was found in 55% of the identified SPRs on T2-weighted imaging and 45% on the CISS sequence. The SPR is a distinct structure with diversity in appearance among individuals but commonly extends posterior to the P. High-resolution MR imaging is useful for delineating the SPR in vivo.

  12. Development and Evaluation of a Semi-automated Segmentation Tool and a Modified Ellipsoid Formula for Volumetric Analysis of the Kidney in Non-contrast T2-Weighted MR Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuss, Hannes; Janka, Rolf; Prümmer, Marcus; Cavallaro, Alexander; Hammon, Rebecca; Theis, Ragnar; Sandmair, Martin; Amann, Kerstin; Bäuerle, Tobias; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Volumetric analysis of the kidney parenchyma provides additional information for the detection and monitoring of various renal diseases. Therefore the purposes of the study were to develop and evaluate a semi-automated segmentation tool and a modified ellipsoid formula for volumetric analysis of the kidney in non-contrast T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR)-images. Three readers performed semi-automated segmentation of the total kidney volume (TKV) in axial, non-contrast-enhanced T2-weighted MR-images of 24 healthy volunteers (48 kidneys) twice. A semi-automated threshold-based segmentation tool was developed to segment the kidney parenchyma. Furthermore, the three readers measured renal dimensions (length, width, depth) and applied different formulas to calculate the TKV. Manual segmentation served as a reference volume. Volumes of the different methods were compared and time required was recorded. There was no significant difference between the semi-automatically and manually segmented TKV (p = 0.31). The difference in mean volumes was 0.3 ml (95% confidence interval (CI), -10.1 to 10.7 ml). Semi-automated segmentation was significantly faster than manual segmentation, with a mean difference = 188 s (220 vs. 408 s); p volumetric analysis of the kidney in native T2-weighted MR data delivers accurate and reproducible results and was significantly faster than manual segmentation. Applying a modified ellipsoid formula quickly provides an accurate kidney volume.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging appearance at 1. 5 tesla of cartilaginous tumors involving the epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fobben, E.S.; Dalinka, M.K.; Schiebler, M.L.; Burk, D.L.; Kressel, H.Y.; Fallon, M.D.; Schmidt, R.G.

    1987-11-01

    Three cases of lytic, calcified epiphyseal lesions with plain film and computed tomography features suggestive of chondroblastoma were imaged by magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathologic correlation was obtained in each case. Two cases of chondroblastoma showed low signal intensity on both short (TR600/TE20ms) and long (TR2500/TE80ms) spin echo (SE) images. The third case, a clear cell chondrosarcoma, demonstrated increased signal intensity on moderately T2 weighted (TR2500/TE40ms) images. These findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in distinguishing these lesions. (orig.)

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UltrasoundCT Head ScanElectrocardiogram (EKG or ECG)Pap Smear (Pap Test) Home Tests and Procedures Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ... SafetyRead Article >>Imaging and Medical Radiation SafetyPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ...

  16. Acute versus Chronic Myocardial Infarction: Diagnostic Accuracy of Quantitative Native T1 and T2 Mapping versus Assessment of Edema on Standard T2-weighted Cardiovascular MR Images for Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Enver; Sinn, Martin; Bohnen, Sebastian; Avanesov, Maxim; Säring, Dennis; Stehning, Christian; Schnackenburg, Bernhard; Eulenburg, Christine; Wien, Joshua; Radunski, Ulf K; Blankenberg, Stefan; Adam, Gerhard; Higgins, Charles B; Saeed, Maythem; Muellerleile, Kai; Lund, Gunnar K

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of native T1 and T2 mapping compared with visual and quantitative assessment of edema on T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images to differentiate between acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Materials and Methods This study had institutional ethics committee approval. Written informed consent was obtained from 67 consecutive patients (57 years ± 12; 78% men) with a first acute myocardial infarction, who were prospectively enrolled between April 2011 and June 2015. Four serial 1.5-T MR imaging examinations were performed at 8 days ± 5, 7 weeks ± 2, 3 months ± 0.5, and 6 months ± 1.4 after infarction and included T2-weighted, native T1/T2 mapping, and late gadolinium enhancement MR imaging. Complete follow-up data were obtained in 42 patients. Regional native T1/T2 relaxation time, T2-weighted ratio, and extracellular volume were serially measured in infarcted and remote myocardium. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the MR imaging parameters for discriminating between acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Results Native T1 of infarcted myocardium decreased from 1286 msec ± 99 at baseline to 1077 msec ± 50 at 6 months (P acute and chronic myocardial infarction. Visual analysis of the presence of edema at standard T2-weighted cardiac MR imaging resulted in an inferior AUC of 0.863 (P infarcted myocardium are excellent discriminators between acute and chronic myocardial infarction and are superior to all other MR imaging parameters. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children and Radiation Safety Videos related to Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators metal pins, screws, plates, stents or surgical ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  2. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  3. High signals in the uterine cervix on T2-weighted MRI sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graef, De M.; Karam, R.; Daclin, P.Y.; Rouanet, J.P.; Juhan, V.; Maubon, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this pictorial review was to illustrate the normal cervix appearance on T2-weighted images, and give a review of common or less common disorders of the uterine cervix that appear as high signal intensity lesions on T2-weighted sequences. Numerous aetiologies dominated by cervical cancer are reviewed and discussed. This gamut is obviously incomplete; however, radiologists who perform MR women's imaging should perform T2-weighted sequences in the sagittal plane regardless of the indication for pelvic MR. Those sequences will diagnose some previously unknown cervical cancers as well as many other unknown cervical or uterine lesions. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  10. The appearances of oesophageal carcinoma demonstrated on high-resolution, T2-weighted MRI, with histopathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riddell, A.M.; Allum, W.H.; Thompson, J.N.; Wotherspoon, A.C.; Richardson, C.; Brown, G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the spectrum of imaging features of oesophageal adenocarcinoma seen using high-resolution T2-weighted (T2W) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-nine patients with biopsy-proven oesophageal adenocarcinoma were scanned using an external surface coil. A sagittal T2W sequence was used to localise the tumour and to plan axial images perpendicular to the tumour. Fast spin-echo (FSE) T2W axial sequence parameters were: TR/TE, 3,300-5,000 ms/120-80 ms; field of view (FOV) 225 mm, matrix 176 x 512(reconstructed) mm to 256 x 224 mm, giving an in-plane resolution of between 1.28 x 0.44 mm and 0.88 x 1.00 mm, with 3-mm slice thickness. Thirty-three patients underwent resection and the MR images were compared with the histological whole-mount sections. There were four T1, 12 T2, and 17 T3 tumours. The T2W high-resolution MRI sequences produced detailed images of the oesophageal wall and surrounding structures. Analysis of the imaging appearances for different tumour T stages enabled the development of imaging criteria for local staging of oesophageal cancer using high-resolution MRI. Our study illustrates the spectrum of appearances of oesophageal cancer on T2W high-resolution MRI, and using the criteria established in this study, demonstrates the potential of this technique as an alternative non-invasive method for local staging for oesophageal cancer. (orig.)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of pyomyositis in 43 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Rafaela E-mail: r.soler@.teleline.es; Rodriguez, Esther; Aguilera, Cristina; Fernandez, Rosa

    2000-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in pyomyositis. Methods and materials: Forty-three patients with proven muscle infection (30 males, 13 females) ranging in age from 14 to 86 years (mean 42 years) were studied with MRI. The initial clinical diagnose were soft tissue infection (n=27), neoplasm (n=12), thrombophlebitis (n=3), and lymphedema (n=1). Spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained in all cases and STIR sequence in 6. Spin-echo T1-weighted images after Gd-DTPA injection were obtained in 16 cases. The signal intensity findings, the extent of the abnormalities in the soft tissue (muscle, fascial and subcutaneous involvement), the presence of fluid collections, and the involvement of neighbouring bone and joint were reviewed retrospectively. Results: A hyperintense signal on T2-weighted and STIR images were detected in all patients. Fluid collections were seen in 21 cases as localized areas of hypointensity on the T1-weighted images, and highly hyperintense areas on the T2-weighted images. In four patients a rim of high signal intensity was seen around the fluid collection on the T1-weighted images. On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images there was diffuse enhancement in the patients without fluid collections that was heterogeneous in seven and homogeneous in two. After Gd-DTPA all fluid collections showed a central area without enhancement and a well-defined enhancing peripheral rim. Involvement of adjacent structures included subcutaneous tissue (n=25), bone marrow (n=14), fascial planes (n=15) and joints (n=11). Conclusion: MRI is useful in the assessment of pyomyositis and in determining the location and extension. A hyperintense rim on unenhanced T1-weighted images and peripheral enhancement after Gd-DTPA are useful for identifying the number, size, and location of soft-tissue abscesses.

  12. The diabetic foot: Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, J.; Campanini, D.S.; Knight, C.; McCalla, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fourteen diabetic patients with suspected foot infection and/or neuropathic joint (Charcot Joint) were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an attempt to assess the extent of the infection and also to distinguish infection from the changes seen with neuroarthropathy. The majority of patients with infection had more than one site of involvement and the following diagnoses were made by MRI evaluation: Osteomyelitis (n=8), abscess (n=7), neuropathic joint (n=5), septic arthritis (n=4), and tenosynovitis (n=4). Clinical or surgical/pathological confirmation of the MRI diagnoses was obtained in all but nine sites of infection or cases of neuropathic joint. If the two diagnostic categories of septic arthritis and tenosynovitis are excluded, all but four of the MRI diagnoses were confirmed. A distinctive pattern for neuroarthropathy was identified in five cases, consisting of low signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images within the bone marrow space adjacent to the involved joint. We conclude that MRI is a valuable adjunct in the evaluation of the diabetic foot, and that it provides accurate information regarding the presence and extent of infection in this subset of patients. MRI has proven particularly helpful in differentiating neuroarthropathy from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging study in a normal Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) stifle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Alberto; Encinoso, Mario; Jáber, José R; Morales, Daniel; Blanco, Diego; Artiles, Alejandro; Vázquez, José M

    2015-08-11

    The purpose of this study was to describe the normal appearance of the bony and soft tissue structures of the stifle joint of a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) by low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the use of gross anatomical dissections performed as anatomical reference. A cadaver of a mature female was imaged by MRI using specific sequences as the Spin-echo (SE) T1-weighting and Gradient-echo (GE) STIR T2-weighting sequences in sagittal, dorsal and transverse planes, with a magnet of 0.2 Tesla. The bony and articular structures were identified and labelled on anatomical dissections, as well as on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. MR images showed the bone, articular cartilage, menisci and ligaments of the normal tiger stifle. SE T1-weighted sequence provided excellent resolution of the subchondral bones of the femur, tibia and patella compared with the GE STIR T2-weighted MR images. Articular cartilage and synovial fluid were visualised with high signal intensity in GE STIR T2-weighted sequence, compared with SE T1-weighted sequence where they appeared with intermediate intensity signal. Menisci and ligaments of the stifle joint were visible with low signal intensity in both sequences. The infrapatellar fat pad was hyperintense on SE T1-weighted images and showed low signal intensity on GE STIR T2-weighted images. MRI provided adequate information of the bony and soft tissues structures of Bengal tiger stifle joints. This information can be used as initial anatomic reference for interpretation of MR stifle images and to assist in the diagnosis of diseases of this region.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  17. Diagnosis of vertebral artery dissection with basiparallel anatomical scanning magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuno, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2011-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding the optimal method for diagnosing the dissection of intracranial arteries. We have developed a rapid and accurate examination method to diagnose vertebral artery dissection in the acute stage of cerebral infarction. Twenty-two patients with severe headache and neck pain and/or symptoms of brain stem or cerebellar ischemia underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a 1.5-T scanner. Our protocol generated 3 contrast-weighted scans (T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and basi-parallel anatomical scanning [BPAS]-MRI) and conventional angiographs within 3 hours of the onset of symptoms. Then, we retrospectively analyzed the findings to identify the most reliable imaging method for diagnosing vertebral artery dissection in the acute stage of cerebral infarction. Based on the symptoms and the findings of T2-weighted imaging and conventional angiography, the initial diagnosis was dissection in 17 patients, lacunar infarction in 3 patients, and atherothrombosis in 2 patients. After follow-up studies the diagnosis was changed in 7 patients. The diagnosis based on symptoms and the findings of T2-weighted MRI and BPAS-MRI was dissection in 13 patients, atherothrombosis in 6 patients, and lacunar infarction in 3 patients. In 3 patients the diagnosis was changed during the follow-up phase. The diagnostic accuracy rate was higher with T2-weighted MRI and BPAS-MRI than with T2-weighted MRI and conventional angiography. We suggest that when intracranial vascular dissection is suspected, both the inner and outer contours of vessels must be inspected and that BPAS-MRI should be performed instead of conventional angiography to establish the definite diagnosis. (author)

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of intramuscular metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surov, Alexey; Spielmann, Rolf-Peter; Behrmann, Curd [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiology, Halle (Germany); Fiedler, Eckhard [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Halle (Germany); Voigt, Wieland [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Oncology, Halle (Germany); Wienke, Andreas [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Biometry, Halle (Germany); Holzhausen, Hans-Juergen [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Pathology, Halle (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The aim of the present study was to analyse magnetic resonance findings of intramuscular metastases (IM) in a relatively large series. From January 2000 to January 2010, 28 patients (207 metastases) were retrospectively identified in the radiological database of the Martin-Luther-University. Several different scanning protocols were used depending on the localisation of IM. In 12 patients diffusion-weighted (DW) images were obtained with a multi-shot SE-EPI sequence. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were also calculated. Furthermore, fusion images were manually generated between the DW and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo (HASTE) images. On T2-weighted images, 97% of the recognised IM were hyperintense in comparison to unaffected musculature, and 3% were mixed iso- to hyperintense. On T1-weighted images most IM (91%) were homogeneously isointense in comparison to muscle tissue, whereas 4% were hypointense, and 5% lightly hyperintense. ADC maps were calculated for 91 metastases ranging from 0.99 to 4.00 mm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (mean value 1.99 {+-} 0.66). ADC values of low (<1.5) signal intensity (SI) were identified in 26%, moderate SI (from 1.5 to 3.0) in 68%, and high SI (>3.0) in 6%. Of the IM that were investigated with contrast medium, 88.5% showed marked enhancement. It was homogeneous in 88% and heterogenous in 6%. Rim enhancement with central low attenuation was seen in 6%. There was no difference in enhancement characteristics with respect to ADC values or fusion patterns. Peritumoral enhancement was identified in 2.4%. Magnetic resonance features of muscle metastases are relatively typical and consist of round or oval intramuscular masses with well-defined margins, marked enhancement, low or moderate ADC values, and moderate to high signal intensity on fusion images. (orig.)

  19. The Impact of Gd-Eob-Dtpa-Enhanced MR Cholangiography in Biliary Diseases: Comparison with T2-Weighted MR Cholangiopancreatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özmen, Evrim; Algın, Oktay; Evrimler, Şehnaz; Arslan, Halil

    2016-05-01

    Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography is a novel technique and promising method in demonstrating biliary tree anatomy and evaluating biliary disorders. However, to date, there are a limited number of studies that have focused on the impact of this technique. We aimed to evaluate the additional role of contrast enhanced MR cholangiography (MRC) and compare contrast enhanced MRC with T2-weighted (w) magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) in the diagnosis of biliary disorders. Diagnostic accuracy study. The T2w-MRCP and contrast enhanced MRC sequences of 31 patients whose gold standard test results were available were scored visually for the existence of pathological findings with regard to any of the biliary diseases. Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) was used as the contrast agent. The correlation values were determined according to the statistical analysis made from those scores and the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values of each sequence were detected as well. We detected that the correlation values with gold standard methods of contrast enhanced MRC sequences were significantly higher than the ones of T2w-MRCP sequences. The correlation ratios of T2w-MRCP sequences were between 26 and 34%, while those for contrast enhanced MRC sequences were between 81 and 83% for the first reader and the correlation ratios of T2w-MRCP sequences were between 10 and 61%, whereas those of contrast enhanced MRC were between 79 and 81% for the second reader The mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values of T2w-MRCP sequences were 14.3-42.5%, 85-89.2% and 59.3-72.5%, respectively, while the mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy values of contrast enhanced MRC sequences were 100%, 86.7% and 93.2-93.3%, respectively. We suggest that obtaining of contrast enhanced MRC sequences in addition to the T2w-MRCP can be useful in the diagnosis of many diseases in relation with biliary tree.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute trauma of the cervical spine: spectrum of findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, B.B.; Koopmans, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrum of acute injury to the cervical spine was illustrated in this pictorial essay. The appearance of the traumatized cord was discussed, including intramedullary hemorrhage, and the causes of spinal cord compression, such as disk herniation, epidural hematoma, fracture, dislocation and underlying spinal stenosis. The ability of MRI to directly reveal the severity of cord injury and simultaneously indicate the cause of cord compression proved particularly useful in the management of incomplete injury, for which surgical intervention may prevent further deterioration. The protocol for MRI of cervical spinal trauma included sagittal T1-weighted and T2-weighted conventional spin-echo sequences. In addition, transverse T2-weighted gradient-echo images were obtained. MRI`s ability to directly reveal the extent of cord injury was said to be a powerful tool in the management of incomplete injuries where further deterioration could be prevented by timely surgical intervention. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital dislocation of the hip with avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Ikeda, Takeshi; Wada, Ikuo

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 22 patients (24 joints) with congenital dislocation of the hip (CDH) with avascular necrosis. T1 and T2 weighted images were obtained using spin echo techniques. Since positive images of the articular cartilage were obtained, it was possible to clearly image flattening or thickening of the articular cartilage of the femoral head and acetabulum in the coronal and in the axial plane of the T1 weighted image. There was a high intensity region in the femoral head with avascular necrosis in the coronal T2 weighted image. The wideness of the region increased with severity. Much information can be obtained with MRI and it is a useful technique in evaluating the pathology of CDH with avascular necrosis. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging analysis of hip joint development in patients with diastrophic dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes, Ville; Tervahartiala, Pekka; Helenius, Ilkka; Peltonen, Jari

    2002-01-01

    The authors used magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the hip joint in patients with diastrophic dysplasia. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained from 35 patients (25 female patients, 10 male patients) of different ages (1-39 years). The status of the joint and paraarticular soft tissues was evaluated. Hip joint congruity was good, although the joint was usually deformed. The thickness of the joint cartilage was diminished and signs of early osteoarthritis, including bone cysts and local edema, were common. The ligamentum teres was visible in only 24% of patients, suggesting abnormality of the ligamentous structures. Epiphyses were flattened or absent in all young patients. Of the 17 visible epiphyses, 7 showed avascular necrosis, indicated as a decrease in signal intensity in both T1- and T2-weighted images. It seems that proximal femoral epiphysis fails to bear normal weight pressure.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazawa, Hitoshi; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Yoshikawa, Koki; Mannen, Toru

    1986-01-01

    We were able to detect spinal lesions by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) in three cases of multiple sclerosis with suspected cervical spinal lesions. In two cases MRI was examined during relapse. MRI revealed marked swelling of the spinal cord. The lesions had low MRI-signal intensity in inversion-recovery images and high signal intensity in T 2 -weighted spin-echo images. As symptoms improved, a later MRI revealed that the spinal cord became thinner and signal intensity normalized. Prolongation of T 1 relaxation time is said to be useful in evaluating lesion activity, but from our observations, T 2 -weighted images were more effective in detecting the earliest lesions of multiple sclerosis. We thought the MRI changes were due to edema because the time course of proton relaxation time resembled that in the experimental studies of brain edema reported previously and because in one case the swelling of the spinal cord and high signal areas on spin-echo image disappeared so rapidly in response to anti-edema therapy. In the last case MRI was examined in the remission phase. Although the spinal cord was almost normal in size, skip lesions of low signal intensity on the inversion-recovery image were detected, and we were still able to find high signal areas on spin-echo image. We supposed these might be lesions full of foamy cells, but further investigation is necessary to clarify the meaning of MRI in remission phase. (author)

  4. Ferritin reporter used for gene expression imaging by magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Kenji; Fuma, Kazuya; Tabata, Kaori [Department of Brain Functions, Division of Stress Adaptation and Protection, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Sawada, Makoto, E-mail: msawada@riem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Brain Functions, Division of Stress Adaptation and Protection, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan)

    2009-10-23

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a minimally invasive way to provide high spatial resolution tomograms. However, MRI has been considered to be useless for gene expression imaging compared to optical imaging. In this study, we used a ferritin reporter, binding with biogenic iron, to make it a powerful tool for gene expression imaging in MRI studies. GL261 mouse glioma cells were over-expressed with dual-reporter ferritin-DsRed under {beta}-actin promoter, then gene expression was observed by optical imaging and MRI in a brain tumor model. GL261 cells expressing ferritin-DsRed fusion protein showed enhanced visualizing effect by reducing T2-weighted signal intensity for in vitro and in vivo MRI studies, as well as DsRed fluorescence for optical imaging. Furthermore, a higher contrast was achieved on T2-weighted images when permeating the plasma membrane of ferritin-DsRed-expressing GL261. Thus, a ferritin expression vector can be used as an MRI reporter to monitor in vivo gene expression.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord injury in chronic stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobimatsu, Haruki; Nihei, Ryuichi; Kimura, Tetsuhiko; Yano, Hideo; Touyama, Tetsuo; Tobimatsu, Yoshiko; Suyama, Naoto; Yoshino, Yasumasa

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of a total of 195 patients with cervical (125) or thoracic (70) spinal cord injury were reviewed. The imaging studies of the spinal cord lesions were correlated with clinical manifestations. Sequential MR imaging revealed hypointensity on T1-weighted images (T1WI) and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) in all patients, except for five patients showing no signal changes and two showing isointensity, suggesting gliosis, myelomalacia, and syringomyelia. Spinal cord lesions were classified into four types: small lesions, large lesions, complete transverse, and longitudinal rupture. These lesions were well correlated with the severity of injury and paralysis. Complete paralysis was frequently associated with enlarged, complete transverse for cervical spinal cord injury, and longitudinal ruptured or thinned complete transverse for thoracic spinal cord injury. The height of paralysis was well in agreement with that of lesions. For incomplete paralysis, localized lesions were seen within the spinal cord, coinciding with the paralysis or severity. Traumatic syringomyelia was seen in 17 patients (8.7%)-- for the cervical site (10 patients, 8%) and the thoracic site (7 patients, 10%). When homogeneous and marginally clear hypointensity is shown on T1-weighted images and vacuolated hyperintensity is shown on T2-weighted images, in addition to lesions spreading two or more cords or 1.5 or more cords above the nervous root level of paralysis, traumatic syringomyelia is strongly suspected, requiring the follow up observation. (N.K.)

  7. Atlantoaxial subluxation. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging correlated to myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, R.

    Twenty-nine patients with atlantoaxial subluxation (18 with rheumatoid arthritis, 2 due to trauma, 4 with os odontoideum, and one each with polyarteritis nodosa, rheumatic fever, Klippel-Feil syndrome, achondroplasia, and cause unknown) were evaluated using a 0.22 tesla resistive MRI unit. Cord compression was classified into four grades according to the degree on magnetic resonance imaging. There were 7 patients with no thecal sac compression (grade 0), 10 with a minimal degree of subarachnoid space compression without cord compression (grade 1), 7 with mild cord compression (grade 2), and 5 with severe cord compression or cord atrophy (grade 3). Although the severity of myelopathy showed poor correlation with the atlantodental interval on conventional radiography, high correlation was observed between MR grading and the degree of myelopathy. The high signal intensity foci were observed in 7 or 12 patients with cord compression (grades 2 and 3) on T2 weighted images. Other frequently observed findings in rheumatoid arthritis included soft tissue masses of low to intermediate signal intensity in the paraodontoid space, erosions of the odontoid processes, and atlanto-axial impaction on T1 and T2 weighted images.

  8. Pituitary disease in childhood: utility of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela, A. C.; Oleaga, L.; Ibanez, A. M.; Campo, M.; Grande, D.

    2000-01-01

    To assess the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the study of pediatric patients with clinical suspicion of pituitary disease. We studied 18 patients aged 7 to 18 years.Fifteen had hormonal disturbances, two presented amenorrhea and 1 complained of headache, fever and symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia. All the patients were examined using a Siemens SP 42 1-Tesla MRI scanner. Sagittal and coronal T1-weighted spin-echo images were obtained; in addition T2-weighted spin-echo or fast spin-echo imaging was performed in ten cases and intravenous gadolinium was administered in nine. We found 9 patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesis, 2 with germinoma, 2 cases of pituitary hemosiderosis in patients with thalassemia, 2 cases of microadenoma, one abscess, one case of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus and one of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. MR enabled us to assess pituitary structural alterations in children with hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies. In our series of patients, hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesiss was the most frequent cause of adenohypophyseal deficiencies, and most cases of central diabetes insipidus were secondary to masses in the sellar and suprasellar region. In patients with thalassemia, T2-weighted MR images showed the amount of iron deposited in adenophypophysis. Gadolinium-enhanced studies were useful in the study of masses and when the presence of microadenoma was suspected. (Author) 26 refs

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging for the internal derangement of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Noboru; Yamauchi, Kazunori; Ohyama, Naoki; Kura, Hideharu; Tokita, Fumio; Sasaki, Tetsuhito

    1990-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative diagnosis of internal derangement of the knee, MRI findings of 44 knees were reviewed. Definitive diagnoses were made by arthroscopy or arthrotomy: posterior cruciate ligament failure (8 knees), anterior cruciate ligament failure (21), inner meniscus injury (16), and outer meniscus injury (13). T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained by using a 1.5-T superconducting Signa MRI unit. The diagnostic accuracy was 100% for posterior cruciate ligament failure and anterior cruciate ligament failure, 89% for inner meniscus injury, and 93% for outer meniscus injury, suggesting the great potential of MRI in the preoperative diagnosis. For anterior cruciate ligament failure, the diagnostic accuracy was even more increased by combined use of T1-weighted sagittal imaging and T2-weighted coronal imaging. False positive findings for meniscus disorder included rupture of the posterior segment of meniscus, especially in the cnemis end. Longitudinal fissure of the posterior segment of the outer meniscus was misdiagnosed as lacuna of the popliteal muscle tendon. (N.K.)

  10. NON-CONTRAST MAGNETIC RESONANCE UROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita C

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Magnetic Resonance (MR urography with its optimal contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation provides a comprehensive examination of the entire urinary tract noninvasively. MR urography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected urinary tract obstruction, haematuria, congenital anomalies, and surgically altered anatomy. It is particularly useful in cases of where there is contraindication of ionizing radiation and in paediatric and pregnant patients. The common MR urographic techniques are: Static-fluid MR urography and excretory MR urography. Static-fluid MR urography uses of heavily T2-weighted sequences to image the urinary tract as a static collection of fluid, can be repeated sequentially (Cine MR urography to better demonstrate the ureters in their entirety and to confirm the presence of fixed stenoses. Excretory MR urography is performed during the excretory phase of enhancement after the intravenous administration of gadolinium-based contrast material; thus, the patient must have sufficient renal function to allow the excretion. Static-fluid and excretory MR urography can be combined with conventional MR imaging for comprehensive evaluation of the urinary tract. The limitations are limited availability, high cost, relatively long examination time, low spatial resolution compared to IVU (Intravenous Urogram and CT Urography; sensitivity to motion (breathing and ureteral peristalsis inherent contraindications like patients with pacemakers, claustrophobia, and relative insensitivity for calcification and ureteric calculi. In this article, an attempt has been made to demonstrate the potential of static-fluid MRU to demonstrate a spectrum of urologic pathology involving the kidneys, ureters, and bladder while discussing the limitations. METHODS Thirty patients with urinary tract abnormalities were evaluated with MR urography performed between May 2014 to April 2016 using routine MR sequences and

  11. Agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging including phase-contrast magnetic resonance venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.; Oddo, F.; Diaine, B.; Padovani, B.; Baldini, E.; Peten, E.P.

    2000-01-01

    Two cases of agenesis of the horizontal segment of the left portal vein are reported. This very rare vascular anomaly probably corresponds to an embryological variation rather than to an obstruction of the left portal vein. In almost all cases liver ultrasonography is sufficient for identifying such vascular abnormalities. It shows a large aberrant vessel emerging from a right anterior segmental portal branch and running transversely in the quadrate lobe towards the teres ligamentum from which the portal supply to the left lobe arises. It is important to be able to recognize the magnetic resonance imaging features of this vascular variation, as magnetic resonance imaging may be the initial imaging study, and ultrasound may be technically challenging. To our knowledge, we present the first description of these features, including an enhanced gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence, a turbo spin-echo T2-weighted sequence with fat saturation, and a three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance portography. (orig.)

  12. Comparative study of image quality between axial T2-weighted BLADE and turbo spin-echo MRI of the upper abdomen on 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Tian, ChunMei; Wang, PeiYuan; Chen, Liang; Mao, XiJin; Wang, ShanShan; Wang, Xu; Dong, JingMin; Wang, Bin

    2015-09-01

    To compare image quality of turbo spin-echo (TSE) with BLADE [which is also named periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER)] on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for upper abdomen. This study involved the retrospective evaluation of 103 patients (63 males, 40 females; age range 19-76 years; median age 53.8 years) who underwent 3.0 T MRI with both conventional TSE T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and BLADE TSE T2WI. Two radiologists assessed respiratory motion, gastrointestinal peristalsis, and vascular pulsation artifacts, as well as the sharpness of the liver and pancreas edges. Scores for all magnetic resonance (MR) images were recorded. Wilcoxon's rank test was used to compare hierarchical data. Cohen's kappa coefficient was adopted to analyze interobserver consistency. Compared to TSE T2WI, BLADE TSE T2WI reduced all of the examined motion artifacts and increased the sharpness of the liver and pancreas edges (all P image quality.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  15. MR-guided sclerotherapy of low-flow vascular malformations using T2 -weighted interrupted bSSFP (T2 W-iSSFP): comparison of pulse sequences for visualization and needle guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Herzka, Daniel A; Gilson, Wesley D; McVeigh, Elliot R; Lewin, Jonathan S; Weiss, Clifford R

    2015-02-01

    Image-guided treatment of low-flow vascular (venous or lymphatic) malformations presents a challenging visualization problem, regardless of the imaging modality being used for guidance. The purpose of this study was to employ a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence, T2 -weighted interrupted balanced steady-state free precession (T2 W-iSSFP), for real-time image guidance of needle insertion. T2 W-iSSFP uses variable flip angle balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP, a.k.a. SSFP) to establish T2 -weighting and fat suppression. Swine (n = 3) and patients (n = 4, three female, all with venous malformations) were enrolled in the assessment. T2 -weighted turbo spin echo (T2 -TSE) with spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), SPAIR-T2 -TSE or T2 -TSE for short, was used as the reference. T2 -weighted half Fourier acquired single shot turbo spin echo (T2 -HASTE) with SPAIR (SPAIR-T2 -HASTE, T2 -HASTE for short), fat saturated bSSFP (FS-SSFP), and T2 W-iSSFP were imaged. Numeric metrics, namely, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) efficiency (CNR divided by the square root of acquisition time) and local sharpness (the reciprocal of edge width), were used to assess image quality. MR-guided sclerotherapy was performed on the same patients using real-time T2 W-iSSFP to guide needle insertion. Comparing the visualization of needles in the images of swine, the local sharpness (mm(-1) ) was: 0.21 ± 0.06 (T2 -HASTE), 0.48 ± 0.02 (FS-SSFP), and 0.49 ± 0.03 (T2 W-iSSFP). T2 W-iSSFP is higher than T2 -HASTE (P W-iSSFP). T2 W-iSSFP is higher than FS-SSFP (P W-iSSFP was 2.5-3.5 frames per second. All MR-guided sclerotherapy procedures were successful, with all needles (six punctures) placed in the targets. T2 W-iSSFP provides effective lesion identification and needle visualization. This new pulse sequence can be used for MR-guided sclerotherapy of low-flow vascular malformations. It may have potential use in other MR-guided procedures where heavily T2 -weighted real

  16. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  17. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities in multiple sclerosis: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saharian, M. A.; Shakaouri Rad, A.; Motamedi, M.; Pakdaman, H.; Radue, E. W.

    2007-01-01

    :During the last two decades, magnetic resonance imaging has been widely used In the diagnosis and treatment monitoring of multiple sclerosis. MRI, both conventional and non conventional methods, has transformed all aspects of M S research and clinical practice in recent years. Although advanced imaging methods have added much more to our knowledge about pathogenesis and natural history of the disease but their cost, availability, complexity and lack of validation have limited their use in routine clinical practice. Conventional MR techniques including proton density, T1/T2-Weighted images and fluid- attenuated inversion recovery sequences are now accepted in standard protocols for diagnosis and treatment outcome measures in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis. This review will focus on the type, morphology and evolution of M S lesions regarding conventional MRI and their use for treatment monitoring in daily clinical practice

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  1. Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas, magnetic resonance studies in four patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, M.R.; Guelbenzu, S.; Garcia, S.; Bertrol, V.

    1998-01-01

    Intramedullary cavernous hemangiomas are vascular malformations that can be located throughout the entire central nervous system. They are more frequently found in brain than in spinal cord, where it is only possible to diagnose them by magnetic resonance (RM): We present four cases of intramedullary spinal cord cavernoma, three of which were located in the thoracic spine and one in cervical spine. Computed tomography was ineffective in their diagnosis. However, MR disclosed there presence of well-defined tumors producing a thickening of the spinal cord. The signal was heterogeneous in both T1 and T2-weighted images. There were low signal areas due to the presence of calcium and hemosiderin and high intensity signals provoked by methemoglobin within the lesions, which were scarcely enhanced by intravenous gadolinium administration. One of the lesions presented in the form of a large intramedullary hematoma. (Author) 8 refs

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in inflammatory lesions of the middle ear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tono, Tetsuya; Saku, Kazuaki; Miyanaga, Satoshi; Kano, Kiyo; Morimitsu, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Yukiko.

    1988-05-01

    Eighteen patients with chronic otitis media, middle ear cholesteatoma, and postoperative inflammatory diseases of the middle ear underwent high resolution computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgical exploration of the middle ear. Results showed that CT provides higher detail resolution in middle ear structures, but provides limited density resolution in displaying inflammatory soft tissue lesions. By contrast, MRI differentiates among soft tissue lesions such as fluid-filled spaces, granulation tissues, and cholesteatomatous debris. Cholesterin granulomas show a particularly characteristic signal pattern with a very high intensity area in both T1 and T2 weighted images. It is concluded that MRI is useful in differentiating soft tissue density masses when used in conjunction with CT in middle ear inflammatory diseases.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of intracranial lesions of tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoizumi, Hideo; Miyao, Masutomo; Kobayashi, Shigeichi; Nakamigawa, Terutoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Osamu; Yanagisawa, Masayoshi (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan))

    1989-07-01

    Six patients with tuberous sclerosis were evaluated with computed cranial tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results were assessed in comparison with the clinical severity of the disease. The brain lesions were shown by MRI as low-signal areas on IR images (T1 weighted sequences) and high-signal areas on SE images (T2 weighted sequences). Three patients, who had severe psychomotor retardation (DQ<70) and intractable epileptic seizures following infantile spasms, had many cortical and subcortical lesions. In the other three patients, intelligence was normal or slightly retarded (DQ or IQ>70) and epileptic seizures were well controlled, and small subependymal lesions were observed. Cortical lesions were rare. These results indicate that MRI can detect more precisely intracranial lesions in tuberous sclerosis. (author).

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  5. Differential diagnosis and staging of urological tumors by magnetic resonance imaging compared with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazuo; Okada, Yusaku; Takeuchi, Hideo; Miyakawa, Mieko; Okada, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Nishimura, Kazumasa

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on 49 urological tumors (11 renal cell carcinomas, 3 renal pelvic cancers, 2 renal angiomyolipomas, 1 renal leiomyosarcoma, 1 large renal cvst, 4 adrenal tumors, 11 bladder cancers, 2 bone metastasis from bladder cancer, 10 prostatic cancers, 1 prostatic sarcoma, 1 urethral cancer, 1 penile cancer and 1 perivesical granuloma) since October 1985 to September 1986. MRI was performed using a Signa (G.E.) with a 1.5 T superconductive magnet and 3 images, including T1 weighted image, T2 weighted image, and proton density image, were obtained. In conclusion MRI is a noninvasive examination and gives more information than computed tomography despite its high cost. In renal cell carcinoma, the chemical shift in MRI and clear visualization of tumor thrombus enable accurate staging. Differential diagnosis from other renal mass lesions may be possible by the T2 weighted image. In adrenal disease, most of the adrenal masses can be differentiated, but in some cases it is impossible. In bladder cancer, wall invasion of tumor may be evaluated in T2 weighted image, and MRI is suitable for staging of locally advanced tumor. In prostatic cancer, visualization of periprostatic plexus and differentiation between internal and external gland may enable local staging and identification of low stage tumors. (author)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome; Achados de ressonancia magnetica na sindrome de Hallervorden-Spatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Cesar Higa; Lima, Eduardo Carneiro; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia

    2003-12-01

    The objective of this study was to review the magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome. We evaluated eight patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome using magnetic resonance imaging. The protocol included at least sagittal and axial T1-weighted images and axial and coronal T2-weighted images. Intravenous gadolinium was administered in a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg. Post-enhanced images were obtained at least in the axial and coronal planes. The results were: all patients presented a bilateral and symmetrical 'tiger-eye signal' on T2-weighted images, corresponding to central hyperintensity and peripheral hypointensity in the globi pallidus. FLAIR and diffusion images showed similar abnormalities. There was no gadolinium enhancement in any of the cases. We concluded that magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome are very typical and allow the diagnosis of the disease. (author)

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test ... Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... images and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician, who will share the ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... let the radiologist know about them. Parents or family members who accompany patients into the scanning room ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  14. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... You may resume your usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. On very rare occasions, ... Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  19. Differentiating benign and malignant breast lesions with T2*-weighted first pass perfusion imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvistad, K.A.; Smenes, E.; Haraldseth, O.; Lundgren, S.; Fjoesne, H.E.; Smethurst, H.B.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Invasive breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas are often difficult to differentiate in dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR imaging of the breast, because both tumors can enhance strongly after contrast injection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of T2*-weighted first pass perfusion imaging can increase the differentiation of malignant from benign lesions. Material and Methods: Nine patients with invasive carcinomas and 10 patients with contrast enhancing fibroadenomas were examined by a dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D sequence immediately followed by a single slice T2*-weighted first pass perfusion sequence positioned in the contrast-enhancing lesion. Results: The carcinomas and the fibroadenomas were impossible to differentiate based on the contrast enhancement characteristics in the T1-weighted sequence. The signal loss in the T2*-weighted perfusion sequence was significantly stronger in the carcinomas than in the fibroadenomas (p=0.0004). Conclusion: Addition of a T2*-weighted first pass perfusion sequence with a high temporal resolution can probably increase the differentiation of fibroadenomas from invasive carcinomas in contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the breast. (orig.)

  20. Detection of hemosiderin deposition by T2*-weighted MRI after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Toshio; Chiba, Masahiko; Honma, Toshimi; Niwa, Jun

    2003-07-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is very difficult to diagnose several months after its onset. We thus investigated subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition well after SAH by T2*-weighted MRI, a sensitive method for hemosiderin detection. To investigate how hemosiderin deposition as confirmed by T2*-weighted MRI contributes to the determination of prior SAH and how the extent of hemosiderin deposition is associated with a number of clinical factors, we retrospectively analyzed 58 patients >3 months after SAH associated with ruptured aneurysms. We also investigated 209 healthy volunteers as controls. T2*-weighted MRI demonstrated subarachnoid hemosiderin deposition in 72.4% of the SAH patients, whereas no deposition was seen in the healthy volunteer group. The hemosiderin was preferentially deposited in the subarachnoid space near a ruptured aneurysm. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from logistic regression analyses correlating hemosiderin deposition with other factors. Age (>or=54 years) (OR, 5.1; 95% CI, 1.03 to 25.0; P=0.046), Fisher grade 3 on initial CT (OR, 8.0; 95% CI, 1.26 to 50.4; P=0.027), and Karnofsky Scale score hemosiderin deposition levels. T2*-weighted MRI is an effective means of diagnosing prior SAH and may also reveal the location of a ruptured aneurysm. The extent of hemosiderin deposition was significantly associated with several factors, including age, CT findings, and poor prognosis.

  1. Assessment of predictive indices for glioblastomas radiation therapy: comparison of perfusion MRI and spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, J.M.; Laprie, A.; Moyal Cohen-Jonathan, E.; Ken, S.; Lemoine, J.M.; Laprie, A.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Celsis, P.; Lubrano, V.; Berry, I.; Ken, S.; Lemoine, J.M.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Berry, I.; Lubrano, V.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the comparison of several imagery modalities: anatomic imagery (T1-weighted MRI after gadolinium injection and T2-weighted MRI), metabolic imagery (spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance) and functional imagery (perfusion MRI). This comparison has been performed within the frame of a prospective clinic test associating a radiosensitizer concomitant with a radiation therapy of glioblastomas. It appears that the integration of data of spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance and of perfusion MRI is a promising method to overcome the resistance of glioblastomas. Short communication

  2. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michael; Bulatowicz, Michael; Clark, Philip; Griffith, Robert; Mirijanian, James; Pavell, James

    2015-05-01

    The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Gyroscope (NMRG) is being developed by the Northrop Grumman Corporation (NGC). Cold and hot atom interferometer based gyroscopes have suffered from Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP) challenges and limits in bandwidth, scale factor stability, dead time, high rotation rate, vibration, and acceleration. NMRG utilizes the fixed precession rate of a nuclear spin in a constant magnetic field as a reference for determining rotation, providing continuous measurement, high bandwidth, stable scale factor, high rotation rate measurement, and low sensitivity to vibration and acceleration in a low SWaP package. The sensitivity to vibration has been partially tested and demonstrates no measured sensitivity within error bars. Real time closed loop implementation of the sensor significantly decreases environmental and systematic sensitivities and supports a compact and low power digital signal processing and control system. Therefore, the NMRG technology holds great promise for navigation grade performance in a low cost SWaP package. The poster will describe the history, operation, and design of the NMRG. General performance results will also be presented along with recent vibration test results.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaka, Fumio; Tashiro, Kunio; Itoh, Kazunori; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Hamada, Takeshi.

    1992-01-01

    The width of substantia nigra (SN) in 59 cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease as well as 21 normal controls was analyzed by T2 weighted image (T2WI) of 1.5 Tesla high-field magnetic resonance image (MRI). All patients and controls underwent MRI with the spin-echo sequences used TR/TE: 3000/30 (short TE), and TR/TE: 3000/80 (long TE), in 5-mm-thick volumes. The width between the red nucleus and the cerebral peduncle showing low signal intensity areas was measured as that of SN and its ratio to the distance from the aqueduct to the midline of the cerebral peduncle was also measured. The calculated values of the width of SN and its ratio were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. The significant reduction in the width of SN and its ratio in Parkinson's disease were disclosed below: the mean calculated values of the width of SN were 2.95±0.51 mm in controls, 2.68±0.99 mm in Parkinson's disase on long TE images (P<0.01), and the mean ratio of the width of SN were 13.58±4.21% in controls, 10.52±3.07% in Parkinson's disease on long TE images (P=0.0002). The narrowing of SN in Parkinson's disease was more prominent in men, and advanced cases with Yahr stage III and IV. Considering that the pars reticulata, which is normally containing iron, shows low signal intensity on long TE images, the width of pars compacta could be measured more precisely on this sequences. The evaluation of the ratio of SN in midbrain on long TE images seemed to be more sensitive than the calculated values in detecting the narrowing of SN and pars compacta in Parkinson's disease. (author)

  5. Liver Lobe Based Multi-Echo Gradient Recalled Echo T2*-Weighted Imaging in Chronic Hepatitis B-Related Cirrhosis: Association with the Presence and Child-Pugh Class of Cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available To investigate whether liver lobe based T2* values measured on gradient recalled echo T2*-weighted imaging are associated with the presence and Child-Pugh class of hepatitis B-related cirrhosis.Fifty-six patients with hepatitis B-related cirrhosis and 23 healthy control individuals were enrolled in this study and underwent upper abdominal T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. T2* values of the left lateral lobe (LLL, left medial lobe (LML, right lobe (RL and caudate lobe (CL were measured on T2*-weighted imaging. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the association between liver lobe based T2* values and the presence and Child-Pugh class of cirrhosis.The T2* values of the LLL, LML and RL decreased with the progression of cirrhosis from Child-Pugh class A to C (r = -0.231, -0.223, and -0.395, respectively; all P 0.05. To a certain extent, Mann-Whitney U tests with Bonferroni correction for multigroup comparisons showed that the T2* values of the LLL, LML and RL could distinguish cirrhotic liver from healthy liver (all P 0.05. Receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the T2* value of the RL could best distinguish cirrhosis from healthy liver, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.713 among T2* values of the liver lobes, and that only the T2* value of the RL could distinguish Child-Pugh class C from A-B, with an AUC of 0.697 (all P < 0.05.The T2* value of the RL can be associated with the presence and Child-Pugh class of hepatitis B-related cirrhosis.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital rubella virus and cytomegalovirus infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, K.; Ando, M.; Makino, M.; Takanashi, J.; Fujimoto, N.; Niimi, H. (Chiba Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1991-06-01

    Two children with congenital rubella virus and six with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, were examined by magnetic resonance (MR) and CT. Cranial MR imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and inversion recovery (IR) sequences demonstrated the following: Periventricular hyperintensity (4), subcortical hyperintensity (5), delayed myelination (4), oligo/pachygyria (2), cerebellar hypoplasia (2). This study showed that the more-disabled children had more marked abnormal MRI findings. MRI was more effective in the detection of parenchymal lesion than was CT, although intraventricular calcification was better visualized with CT. (orig.).

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in congenital rubella virus and cytomegalovirus infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, K.; Ando, M.; Makino, M.; Takanashi, J.; Fujimoto, N.; Niimi, H.

    1991-01-01

    Two children with congenital rubella virus and six with cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, were examined by magnetic resonance (MR) and CT. Cranial MR imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and inversion recovery (IR) sequences demonstrated the following: Periventricular hyperintensity (4), subcortical hyperintensity (5), delayed myelination (4), oligo/pachygyria (2), cerebellar hypoplasia (2). This study showed that the more-disabled children had more marked abnormal MRI findings. MRI was more effective in the detection of parenchymal lesion than was CT, although intraventricular calcification was better visualized with CT. (orig.)

  8. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic chordoma in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseri, Toshie; Shimizu, Junichiro; Akiyoshi, Hideo; Kusuda, Kayo; Hayashi, Akiyoshi; Mie, Keiichiro; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji; Fujimoto, Yuka; Ohashi, Fumihito

    2015-07-01

    A Bengal tiger was presented for evaluation of weakness, ataxia and inappetance. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a mass extending from the T7-8 vertebral body to the left rib and compressing the spinal cord. On CT, the bone destruction and sequestrum were shown. On MRI, the multilobulated mass appeared hypo- to isointense in T1-weighted and hyperintense in T2-weighted images. The tiger died after imaging, most likely from renal failure. Chordoma without metastasis was diagnosed on necropsy. The imaging characteristics were similar to those found in chordoma in humans. This report describes the use of CT and MRI in an exotic species.

  9. Soft tissue pseudotumor following intramuscular injection of 'DPT': A pitfall in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, D.J.; Sumers, E.; Klein, M.; State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook

    1987-01-01

    We report the time-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes that resulted from an intramuscular injection of a commonly-used pediatric sedation regiment ('DPT'). These changes at the site of injection consist of a focal abnormality characterized by a slight increase in signal intensity on T1 weighted images and markedly increased signal intensity on T2 weighted images. Alterations in signal are detectable almost immediately after the injection and progress over the first 31 hours. This abnormality, which could be mistaken for real disease, persists up to 36 days following injection. (orig.)

  10. Retears of postoperative knee meniscus: findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) by using low and high field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardello, Paolo; Pofi, Enrico; Gigli, Carlo; Voglino, Nicola; Ricci, Alessandra; Chiatti, Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) obtained with intra-articular contrast medium in the evaluation of recurrent meniscal tears using low-field extremity-only and high-field whole-body magnets. Postoperative standard MR examinations and MR arthrographies of 95 knees were reviewed. Patients experiencing pain and disability after meniscal repair underwent standard MR and MR arthrography (Gadoterate meglumine 0.0025 mmol/ml) on both a 0.2-T and 1.5-T magnet. In 52 of 95 patients, second-look arthroscopy was performed; in the remaining 43 of 95 patients, clinical follow-up was used as the standard of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as accuracy of MRI/MR arthrographic signs as meniscal morphologic changes and the presence of contrast medium tracking into the tear at T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the detection of recurrent meniscal tears were determined. All MR and MR arthrograpic signs were sensitive in the detection of recurrent tears (range 80-91%). Abnormal meniscal morphology had low specificity [26% (13/50)] for both the 0.2-T and 1.5-T scanner, whereas accuracy was 55% (52/95) and 57% (54/95), respectively. The presence of contrast medium within the meniscus substance on T2-weighted images had higher value of specificity [84% (42/50)] and accuracy [84% (80/95)] by using low field strength magnet than by using high field strength magnet [74% (37/50) and 81% (77/95), respectively]. Whereas, the increased intrameniscal signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface at T1-weighted sequences after intra-articular contrast medium administration had lower specificity and accuracy on 0.2-T images [84% (42/50) and 82% (78/95), respectively] than on 1.5-T images [90% (45/50) and 88% (84/95), respectively]. A diagnosis of recurrent meniscal tear in a previously arthroscopically repaired meniscus can be made both on 0.2-T and 1.5-T magnets on the basis of

  11. Retears of postoperative knee meniscus: findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) by using low and high field magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardello, Paolo; Pofi, Enrico [Belcolle Hospital, Department of Radiodiagnostic, Viterbo (Italy); Gigli, Carlo; Voglino, Nicola [Belcolle Hospital, Division of Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Viterbo (Italy); Ricci, Alessandra; Chiatti, Leonardo [Belcolle Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Viterbo (Italy)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MR) obtained with intra-articular contrast medium in the evaluation of recurrent meniscal tears using low-field extremity-only and high-field whole-body magnets. Postoperative standard MR examinations and MR arthrographies of 95 knees were reviewed. Patients experiencing pain and disability after meniscal repair underwent standard MR and MR arthrography (Gadoterate meglumine 0.0025 mmol/ml) on both a 0.2-T and 1.5-T magnet. In 52 of 95 patients, second-look arthroscopy was performed; in the remaining 43 of 95 patients, clinical follow-up was used as the standard of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values as well as accuracy of MRI/MR arthrographic signs as meniscal morphologic changes and the presence of contrast medium tracking into the tear at T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the detection of recurrent meniscal tears were determined. All MR and MR arthrograpic signs were sensitive in the detection of recurrent tears (range 80-91%). Abnormal meniscal morphology had low specificity [26% (13/50)] for both the 0.2-T and 1.5-T scanner, whereas accuracy was 55% (52/95) and 57% (54/95), respectively. The presence of contrast medium within the meniscus substance on T2-weighted images had higher value of specificity [84% (42/50)] and accuracy [84% (80/95)] by using low field strength magnet than by using high field strength magnet [74% (37/50) and 81% (77/95), respectively]. Whereas, the increased intrameniscal signal intensity extending to the meniscal surface at T1-weighted sequences after intra-articular contrast medium administration had lower specificity and accuracy on 0.2-T images [84% (42/50) and 82% (78/95), respectively] than on 1.5-T images [90% (45/50) and 88% (84/95), respectively]. A diagnosis of recurrent meniscal tear in a previously arthroscopically repaired meniscus can be made both on 0.2-T and 1.5-T magnets on the basis of

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... health problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  13. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  14. Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Kimiya; Sekimoto, Yoichi; Koike, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Serial changes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of spinal cord lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) were demonstrated. Two inpatients of MS were followed-up for 8 and 5 months respectively. The first case was a 38-year-old housewife with lesions in upper cervical cord, medulla oblongata and visual nerve. The second case was a 45-year-old man with middle thracic spinal cord and brain stem lesions. Both cases were successfully induced into the remission by peroral prednisolone therapy. In the first case, in early stage of the disease, low signal (in IR method) and high signal (in T 2 -weighted SE method) intensities with enlarged lower dorsal medulla were demonstrated. The second MRI in this case specially in horizontal sections revealed round high intensity lesions (in T 2 -weighted SE) with clear margins, which appeared to push away the normal spinal cord tissue. In the third MRI, T 2 weighted SE revealed localized narrowing in C 2 and C 3 cervical cord, and even no signal lesions in IR method were shown in the central of the spinal cord. The forth and fifth MRI, however, showed almost normally recovered spinal cord and medulla oblongata. In the second case, the first MRI revealed high intensity lesions in the middle thracic spinal cord in T 2 weight SE, and moreover, the spinal cord looked very enlarged. In IR method, localized patchy low intensity lesions were seen in the enlarged spinal cord, but in this case, the MRI demonstrated that localized patchy high intensity lesions without cord swelling in SE remained long after the clinically complete recovery of the disease. (author)

  15. A concept for magnetic resonance visualization of surgical textile implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, Nils A; Donker, Hank C W; Otto, Jens; Hodenius, Michael; Sénégas, Julien; Slabu, Ioana; Klinge, Uwe; Baumann, Martin; Müllen, Andreas; Obolenski, Boris; Günther, Rolf W; Krombach, Gabriele A

    2010-08-01

    To develop a method for visualizing surgical textile implant (STI) with superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO), using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Therefore, positive-contrast inversion-recovery with on-resonant water suppression (IRON) was applied and its properties were evaluated in vitro. STI with different concentrations of SPIO integrated into the base material were produced. Imaging was performed on a clinical 1.5 Tesla scanner, using conventional balanced gradient echo sequences (SSFP), T2*-weighted sequences, and IRON-imaging. In vitro experiments were conducted in an agarose phantom. On MR-images, contrast-to-noise-ratios, and the dimensions of the implant were assessed. Conventional MRI exhibited SPIO-loaded STI as signal voids. Using IRON, the mesh was clearly exhibited hyperintensely with suppression of on-resonant background signals with a distinct differentiation to other sources of off-resonances. Concentrations of approximately 9 mg/g led to best positive contrast and highest contrast-to-noise-ratios using IRON. Depending on B0-orientation, phase encoding direction and the STI's SPIO-load, the IRON-signal showed a characteristic pattern and an overestimation of STI size up to 4.6 mm. The integration of SPIOs into the base material combined with IRON is a feasible approach to visualize STI with MRI. This method could help to identify mesh-related problems in time and to reduce the need for surgical revision.

  16. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  17. Nuclear magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P.H.; Brainard, J.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Ryan, R.R.

    1997-12-30

    A family of contrast agents for use in magnetic resonance imaging and a method of enhancing the contrast of magnetic resonance images of an object by incorporating a contrast agent of this invention into the object prior to forming the images or during formation of the images. A contrast agent of this invention is a paramagnetic lanthanide hexaazamacrocyclic molecule, where a basic example has the formula LnC{sub 16}H{sub 14}N{sub 6}. Important applications of the invention are in medical diagnosis, treatment, and research, where images of portions of a human body are formed by means of magnetic resonance techniques. 10 figs.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  19. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system or “scanner”. The powerful, constant magnetic field aligns a tiny fraction of subatomic particles called protons ... or bullet wounds Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets ...

  1. MRI of the normal brain from early childhood to middle age. Pt. 2. Age dependence of signal intensity changes on T2-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autti, T.; Raininko, R.; Vanhanen, S.L.; Kallio, M.; Santavuori, P.

    1994-01-01

    We examined 66 healthy volunteers aged 4 to 50 years by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the signal intensity was measured on T2-weighted images in numerous sites and correlated with age and sex. Using distilled water and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as references on each slice, we calculated the signal intensities of the brain structures. Calculated ratios between structures did not change with age, except for those of the globus pallidus and thalamus, in which the signal intensities decreased more rapidly. The signal intensities of other brain structures changed equally but this could not be discerned visually and quantitative measurements were required. The signal intensities in the white and deep grey matter decreased rapidly in the first decade and then gradually to reach a plateau after the age of 18 years. Maturation of the brain thus seems to continue until near the end of the second decade of life. No sex differences were found. Quantitative analysis requires intensity references. The CSF in the tips of the frontal horns seems to be as reliable as an external fluid reference for intensity, and can be used in routine examinations provided the frontal horns are large enough to avoid partial volume effect. (orig.)

  2. Simple and Inexpensive Classroom Demonstrations of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Joel A.; Nordell, Karen J.; Chesnik, Marla A.; Landis, Clark R.; Ellis, Arthur B.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Condren, S. Michael; Lisensky, George C.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a set of simple, inexpensive, classical demonstrations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) principles that illustrate the resonance condition associated with magnetic dipoles and the dependence of the resonance frequency on environment. (WRM)

  3. Hepatic lesions: improved image quality and detection with the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction technique--evaluation of SPIO-enhanced T2-weighted MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Yuusuke; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Maetani, Yoji S; Arizono, Shigeki; Shimada, Kotaro; Okada, Tomohisa; Shibata, Toshiya; Togashi, Kaori

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction (PROPELLER) technique for superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with respiratory compensation with the prospective acquisition correction (PACE) technique in the detection of hepatic lesions. The institutional human research committee approved this prospective study, and all patients provided written informed consent. Eighty-one patients (mean age, 58 years) underwent hepatic 1.5-T MR imaging. Fat-saturated T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images were acquired with the PACE technique and with and without the PROPELLER method after administration of SPIO. Images were qualitatively evaluated for image artifacts, depiction of liver edge and intrahepatic vessels, overall image quality, and presence of lesions. Three radiologists independently assessed these characteristics with a five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performance was assessed with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Quantitative analysis was conducted by measuring the liver signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The Wilcoxon signed rank test and two-tailed Student t test were used, and P techniques resulted in significantly improved image quality, higher sensitivity, and greater area under the ROC curve for hepatic lesion detection than did MR imaging with the PACE technique alone (P technique than without it (P technique and SPIO enhancement is a promising method with which to improve the detection of hepatic lesions. (c) RSNA, 2009.

  4. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Takuaki; Motomura, Goro; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Kubo, Yusuke; Iwamoto, Yukihide [Kyushu University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Our aims were to investigate the imaging appearance of subchondral insufficiency fracture (SIF) of the femoral head based on fat-suppressed T2-weighted MRI, and evaluate its correlation with the clinical outcomes following conservative treatment. We retrospectively evaluated 40 hips in 37 patients with SIF of the femoral head (12 males and 25 females; mean age 55.8 years, range 22-78 years). MRI examinations were performed within 3 months after the onset of hip pain. Using fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging, we evaluated the hips for the intensity of the subchondral bone (corresponding to the area superior to the low intensity band on T1-weighted images) as well as bone marrow edema, joint effusion, and presence of the band lesion. We then correlated the intensity of the subchondral bone with clinical outcomes. The hips were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted images: type 1 (21 hips) showed high intensity, type 2 (eight hips) showed heterogeneous intensity, and type 3 (11 hips) showed low intensity. The mean period between pain onset and MRI examination was significantly longer for type 2 hips than for type 1. Healing rates were 86 % for type 1, 75 % for type 2, and 18 % for type 3. SIF cases were classified into three types based on subchondral intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging performed within 3 months after pain onset. Type 3 SIF tended to be intractable to conservative treatment compared to type 1 and type 2. (orig.)

  5. Difference between T1 and T2 weighted MR images in avascular necrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubo, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Koki; Itai, Yuzo; Iio, Masahiro; Takatori, Yoshio; Kamogawa, Morihide; Ninomiya, Setsuo

    1990-01-01

    T 1 and T 2 weighted MR images were compared in 32 hips with avascular necrosis, and the difference between them was discussed. In 27 of 32 hips, abnormal low intensity area in the affected femoral head is smaller in T 2 weighted images than in T 1 weighted images. The area of low intensity on T 1 weighted image and high on T 2 weighted image might be granuloma in reactive tissue and surrounding hyperemia. The difference between T 1 and T 2 weighted images must be taken into consideration especially in determination of the border of affected bone. (author)

  6. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi [Hyogo Coll. of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  7. A neurotological study of patients with pontine hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Toru; Tominaga, Satoru; Yukimasa, Akiko; Oku, Masaya; Sakagami, Masafumi

    2002-01-01

    Pontine hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted MRI were thought to be related to disequilibrium. Some of these lesions have a low signal on T1-weighted imaging, while others have an iso-signal. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between neurological findings and pontine lesions detected by MRI. The subjects were 11 patients (6 males, 5 females; age range: 30 to 83 years [mean: 64.1 years]) with pontine hyperintense lesions identified on T2-weighted MRI. We compared the clinical signs and the MRI findings. Six of the patients had low-intensity areas on T1-weighted images, and the other 5 had iso-intensity areas. Six patients complained of vertigo, and 5 complained of dizziness. Eight complained of positionaly evoked disequilibrium. Positional nystagmus was seen in 4 patients. In 9 patients, abnormalities were found on the ENG test, including the saccadic eye movement test, ETT, and OKP. Numbness on the lips occurred in 2 patients, and cerebellar signs were present in 4. None of the patients had facial paralysis. Disequilibrium originating in the central nervous system was suggested in 10 patients. Clinical examinations revealed similar findings in patients with a low signal on T1-weighted MRI and those with an iso-signal. Our results indicate that pontine lesions identified by T2-weighted MRI cause vertigo or dizziness, and, in most cases, these lesions cause abnormal neurological or neurological abnormalities. (author)

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures of ... of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by the coils. ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine complex fractures top of page How should I prepare my child for the MRI? Your child ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... scanner. top of page How does the procedure work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography ( ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR imaging of the head is performed ...

  1. Approximate fuzzy C-means (AFCM) cluster analysis of medical magnetic resonance image (MRI) data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DelaPaz, R.L.; Chang, P.J.; Bernstein, R.; Dave, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe the application of an approximate fuzzy C-means (AFCM) clustering algorithm as a data dimension reduction approach to medical magnetic resonance images (MRI). Image data consisted of one T1-weighted, two T2-weighted, and one T2*-weighted (magnetic susceptibility) image for each cranial study and a matrix of 10 images generated from 10 combinations of TE and TR for each body lymphoma study. All images were obtained with a 1.5 Tesla imaging system (GE Signa). Analyses were performed on over 100 MR image sets with a variety of pathologies. The cluster analysis was operated in an unsupervised mode and computational overhead was minimized by utilizing a table look-up approach without adversely affecting accuracy. Image data were first segmented into 2 coarse clusters, each of which was then subdivided into 16 fine clusters. The final tissue classifications were presented as color-coded anatomically-mapped images and as two and three dimensional displays of cluster center data in selected feature space (minimum spanning tree). Fuzzy cluster analysis appears to be a clinically useful dimension reduction technique which results in improved diagnostic specificity of medical magnetic resonance images

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging as predictor of functional outcome in craniopharyngiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortini, Pietro; Gagliardi, Filippo; Bailo, Michele; Spina, Alfio; Parlangeli, Andrea; Falini, Andrea; Losa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life of craniopharyngioma patients can be severely impaired by derangement of hypothalamic function. A classification, taking into account preoperative hypothalamic damage, evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlating it with postoperative weight change is still missing in the literature. The aim of our study is to identify objective radiological criteria as preoperative prognostic factors for hypothalamic damage. Pre- and post-operative MRI and clinical data of 47 patients, treated at our Institution for craniopharyngioma, were retrospectively analyzed, based on radiological variables, identified as prognostic factor for hypothalamic involvement. Main factors associated with postoperative obesity were hypothalamic hyperintensity in T2-weighted/FLAIR imaging (p < 0.033), mammillary body involvement according to Müller classification (p < 0.020), unidentifiable pituitary stalk (p < 0.001), dislocated chiasm (p < 0.038), either not visible infundibular recess (p < 0.019) or unrecognizable supra-optic recess (p < 0.004), and retrochiasmatic tumor extension (p < 0.019). Accordingly, postoperative hypothalamic syndrome was associated with peritumoral edema in T2-weighted/FLAIR images (p < 0.003), unidentifiable hypothalamus (p < 0.024), hypothalamic compression (p < 0.006), fornix displacement (p < 0.032), and unrecognizable supra-optic recess (p < 0.031). Ultimately, variables identified as predictive factors of postoperative hypothalamic syndrome were the degree of hypothalamic involvement according to the classification described by Sainte-Rose and Puget (p < 0.002; grade 0 vs 2 p < 0.001), Van Gompel (p < 0.002; grade 0 vs 1, p < 0.027; and grade 0 vs 2, p < 0.002), and Muller (p < 0.006; grade 0 vs 1, p < 0.05; and grade 0 vs 2, p < 0.004). The identification of these predictive factors will help to define and score the preoperative hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma patients.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in phenylketonuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Mina; Yamazaki, Hirotaka; Nakabayashi, Hiroki; Owada, Misao

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between the abnormalities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and blood phenylalanine (Phe) levels in phenylketonuria (PKU) and hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA), we reviewed MRIs from 16 patients with early treated PKU and HPA. Their ages ranged from 4-24 years and were found by mass screening and treated from early infancy, and 5 patients with late detected PKU who were aged 24-33 years. The former patients had no remarkable neurological signs or symptoms. One patient of the latter had severe mental retardation and 3 patients had mild to border mental retardation. Axial T 1 -weighted and T 2 -weighted spin echo sequences, fluid attenuated inversion recovery MR sequences (FLAIR) through the brain were performed. The scans were graded according to the extent of increased signal intensity of white matter on T 2 -weighted and FLAIR sequences. To investigate the influence of plasma Phe levels, three approaches were used. Firstly an average of all yearly serial blood Phe concentration was calculated for each patient, then Phe was determined for a period of 6 months and 12 months prior to MRI, and also for their lifetime up to their age at the time this study began. These average blood Phe levels were classified into four categories: group A: Phe level below 5 mg/dl, group B: 5-8 mg/dl, group C: 9-12 mg/dl, group D: above 12 mg/dl. MRI findings were not significant in group A. Remarkable high signals of white matter were obtained in group C and D, except for one patient in group D whose MRI finding was normal. MRI findings correlated to long-term dietary control stronger than those of 6 months prior to MRI. The clinical significance of MRI abnormalities is still unclear, and further study is required to clarify the relationship of the MRI findings and clinical conditions. (author)

  4. Infantile fibrosarcoma: Magnetic resonance imaging findings in six cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canale, Sandra [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)], E-mail: canalesandra@yahoo.com; Vanel, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Istituti Ortopedici Rizzoli, 1/10 via di Barbiano, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Couanet, Dominique [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Patte, Catherine [Department of Pediatrics, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Caramella, Caroline; Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features in a series of six infantile fibrosarcomas to find out if MR can suggest this unusual diagnosis and to highlight the value of MR during and following treatment. Materials and methods: The records of six cases of histologically proven infantile fibrosarcoma were retrieved from the files of our cancer center. All imaging data available were consensually reviewed by two radiologists. Results: There were five females and one male (age range at diagnosis, 0-12 months; mean, 6 months). The most common finding was a well-circumscribed single mass in five patients (83%). All tumors had arisen on limbs; at their proximal or distal extremity or at the root of the limb. The masses were 9 cm large in mean diameter. The initial tumor signal was isointense to muscle on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted sequences. All masses were well circumscribed and half of them contained internal fibrous septa. The internal signal was homogeneous in three patients and heterogeneous in the three others. An intense enhancement was seen in all three contrast-enhanced exams available; heterogeneous in two cases and homogeneous in one. Osseous erosion was observed in only one patient who was the only one with distant metastasis. After treatment (chemotherapy and very limited surgery), tumors had totally disappeared, leaving muscle fat infiltration in two patients and subcutaneous fat hypertrophy in one patient. Conclusion: Although imaging findings are not specific of infantile fibrosarcoma, this diagnosis could be suggested when MR imaging depicts a large well-circumscribed mass arising in a limb at birth or during the neonatal period. This mass is sometimes heterogeneous and septate and exhibits an isointense T1- and hyperintense T2-weighted signals and strong enhancement. MR is also the technique of choice for follow-up during treatment which consists nowadays almost exclusively in chemotherapy.

  5. Significance of high-intensity signals on cranial MRI T2 weighted image in diagnosis of age-associated dementia. From a viewpoint of reversibility of brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishiro, Masaki

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether changes of EEG band profile in patients showing high-intensity signal (HIS) on cranial magnetic resonance images (MRI), who had however no vascular lesions on cranial CT, were similar to those in multi-infarct dementia (MID) or senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) patients and to determine the significance of HIS in the diagnosis of SDAT. Forty-two patients with dementia diagnosed according to DSM-III-R were divided into HIS (n=21), MID (n=13), and SDAT (n=8) based on CT and MRI findings. Multi-infarcted lesions were seen on cranial CT and HIS was seen on cranial MRI in MID patients. There were no abnormal lesions except brain atrophy on cranial CT and MRI in SDAT patients. Appearance rates (%) of the 2-18 c/s frequency bands using computerized quantitative EEG before and after administration of protirelin tartrate (TRH-T) were analyzed in the frontal, central, parietal and occipital areas of the brain. There were no significant differences in appearance rates of EEG frequency bands before administration of TRH-T in HIS, MID, and SDAT patients. A significant decrease in appearance rates of slow waves and a significant increase in appearance rates of α waves were observed after administration of TRH-T in the four areas in MID patients compared with those before administration. No significant differences in appearance rates of EEG frequency bands were observed after administration of TRH-T in the four areas in HIS and SDAT patients compared with those before administration. Changes of the EEG band profile in HIS patients were similar to those in SDAT patients. In the presence of appearance of HSI on cranial MRI T 2 weighted images, the possibility of SDAT patients cannot be excluded. Therefore, SDAT should be diagnosed based on both clinical data and the absence of brain vascular lesions on cranial CT. Also, HIS on MRI T 2 -weighted images is considered to reflect non-vascular lesions. (J.N.P.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of inflamed myocardium using iron oxide nanoparticles in patients with acute myocardial infarction - preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Rösch, Sabine; Klingel, Karin; Kandolf, Reinhard; Helluy, Xavier; Hiller, Karl-Heinz; Jakob, Peter M; Sechtem, Udo

    2013-02-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO)-based molecular imaging agents targeting macrophages have been developed and successfully applied in animal models of myocardial infarction. The purpose of this clinical trial was to investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of macrophages using ferucarbotran (Resovist®) allows improved visualisation of the myocardial (peri-)infarct zone compared to conventional gadolinium-based necrosis/fibrosis imaging in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The clinical study NIMINI-1 was performed as a prospective, non-randomised, non-blinded, single agent phase III clinical trial (NCT0088644). Twenty patients who had experienced either an acute ST-elevation or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI/NSTEMI) were included to this study. Following coronary angiography, a first baseline cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) study (pre-SPIO) was performed within seven days after onset of cardiac symptoms. A second CMR study (post-SPIO) was performed either 10 min, 4h, 24h or 48h after ferucarbotran administration. The CMR studies comprised cine-CMR, T2-weighted "edema" imaging, T2-weighted cardiac imaging and T1-weighted late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging. The median extent of short-axis in-plane LGE was 28% (IQR 19-31%). Following Resovist® administration the median extent of short-axis in-plane T2-weighted hypoenhancement (suggestive of intramyocardial haemorrhage and/or SPIO accumulation) was 0% (IQR 0-9%; p=0.68 compared to pre-SPIO). A significant in-slice increase (>3%) in the extent of T2-weighted "hypoenhancement" (post-SPIO compared to pre-SPIO) was seen in 6/16 patients (38%). However, no patient demonstrated "hypoenhancement" in T2-weighted images following Resovist® administration that exceeded the area of LGE. T2/T2-weighted MRI aiming at non-invasive myocardial macrophage imaging using the approved dose of ferucarbotran does not allow improved visualisation of the myocardial (peri

  7. Folic acid-targeted magnetic Tb-doped CeF3 fluorescent nanoparticles as bimodal probes for cellular fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhi-Ya; Liu, Yu-Ping; Bai, Ling-Yu; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2015-10-07

    Magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential applications for diagnostics, imaging and therapy. We developed a facile polyol method to synthesize multifunctional Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3 NPs with small size (imaging agents for simultaneous in vitro targeted fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of HeLa cells with overexpressed folate receptors (FR). The results indicated that these NPs had strong luminescence and enhanced T2-weighted MR contrast and would be promising candidates as multimodal probes for both fluorescence and MRI imaging.

  8. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  9. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of spontaneous spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cusmano, F.; Calabrese, G.; Bassi, S.; Branislav, S.; Bassi, P.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose of this work is to report the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) features of acute and chronic spontaneous spondylodiscitis as well as any as well as any typical patterns which can be useful for the differential diagnosis between pyogenic and tuberculous forms. Eleven patients affected with spontaneous spondylodiscitis were selected for the study; they were 7 men and 4 women ranging in age 33-87 years (mean: 64). Patients with a superconductive magnet at 1.5, with the following sequences: sagittal PD and T2-weighted TSE, sagittal T1-weighted SE, axial PD and T2-weighted TSE for the lumbar spine, axial T2-weighted GRE for the cervical and dorsal spine and axial and sagittal T1-weighted SE after contrast agent (gadolinium DTPA) injection. MR images were reviewed by three experienced radiologists and morphological and signal intensity changes of vertebral body and disk were recorded on a standard form. In 9 patients it was possible to compare MR to CT findings. Three patients had infectious diseases in other organs and 2 were diabetics. Biopsy was performed in two cases only and demonstrated Staphylococcus aureus in one and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the other patient. MRI, allowed the correct diagnosis to be made in all cases, demonstrating the pathological involvement of the paravertebral structures and into the spinal canal earlier and more accurately than CT. A common finding in pyogenic and tuberculous spondylodiscitis was the low signal of the subcortical bone marrow on T1-weighted sagittal images, which enhanced after Gd-DTPA administration and became intermediate or high on T2-weighted images. Moreover, the steady high signal intensity of the disk on T2-weighted images and its contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images is typical for an acute inflammatory process. Based on our personal experience an literature data, it is believed that MRI is the most sensitive technique for the diagnosis of spondylodiscitis in the acute phase, whereas it is

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  11. Dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands in the reoperative neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenbach, R., E-mail: rene.aschenbach@helios-kliniken.de [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Tuda, S. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Lamster, E.; Meyer, A. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Endocrinology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Roediger, H.; Stier, A. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Visceral Surgery, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Conrad, E. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Basche, S.; Klisch, J. [HELIOS Hospital Erfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Nordhaeuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt (Germany); Vogl, T.J. [University Hospital Frankfurt/Main, Center of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: To evaluate the use of dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for localization of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands in the reoperative neck. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the head-neck MRIs of 30 patients with a history of hyperparathyroidism, prior head-neck surgery, and intraoperative proven adenomas. The protocol included conventional imaging with T2-weighted STIR sequences, T1w axial and coronal prior to and after contrast media administration, and dynamic magnetic resonance angiography. We compared the results from MRI, dynamic magnetic resonance angiography with 99m-Tc-Sestamibi with intraoperative findings as the gold standard. Results: In conventional MRI 19/30 true positives were detected with a sensitivity and specificity of 63.3% and 100%, respectively. However, by adding dynamic magnetic resonance angiography the detection rate increased to 28/30 true positives. Based on intraoperative findings, the sensitivity and specificity of dynamic magnetic resonance angiography were 93.3% and 100%, respectively. 99m-Tc-Sestamibi detected 24/30 true positives, sensitivity was 80%. Conclusion: The diagnostic value of MRI including dynamic magnetic resonance angiography is superior to MRI alone and superior to that of 99m-Tc-Sestamibi in the diagnostic workup of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands when compared against intraoperative findings.

  12. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C.; Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A.; Ozturk, E.; Karatoprak, O.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  13. Value of Perineural Edema/Inflammation Detected by Fat Saturation Sequences in Lumbar Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvanci, M.; Duran, C. (Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Bilim Univ., Istanbul (Turkey)); Kara, B.; Onat, L.; Ulusoy, O.L.; Mutlu, A. (Dept. of Radiology of Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Ozturk, E. (Dept. of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Teaching Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)); Karatoprak, O. (Dept. of Orthopeadic Surgery, Kadikoy Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey))

    2009-02-15

    Background: Routine lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may not show any evidence of the cause of sciatica in some cases. The relationship between nerve root compression detected on lumbar MRI and sciatica is also sometimes uncertain. Purpose: To ascertain whether axial (and, when necessary, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI findings can be used to study the level of sciatica in patients with a non-yielding routine MRI examination. Material and Methods: A total of 215 patients with unilateral sciatica underwent MRI. All patients were asked to complete pain drawing forms describing their pain dermatomal distributions. Perineural edema/inflammation corresponding to the pain location indicated by the pain drawings was sought on short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted images. Results: Routine MRI findings revealed that 110 of the 215 patients had nerve root compromise related to the patients' symptoms. Routine MRI could not ascertain the cause of these symptoms in the remaining 105 patients. In 31 (29.5%) of these 105 patients, short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images revealed perineural edema/inflammation surrounding the nerve roots related to the pain locations indicated in the pain drawings. Conclusion: Axial (and, when required, sagittal and coronal) short-tau inversion recovery or fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images may be helpful for revealing additional findings in cases of unexplained sciatica in standard magnetic resonance imaging. However, the value of this imaging may be not great enough to justify routine use of these additional sequences to study the level of sciatica

  14. Influence of partial k-space filling on the quality of magnetic resonance images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago da Silva Jornada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To study the influence that the scan percentage tool used in partial k-space acquisition has on the quality of images obtained with magnetic resonance imaging equipment. Materials and Methods: A Philips 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner was used in order to obtain phantom images for quality control tests and images of the knee of an adult male. Results: There were no significant variations in the uniformity and signal-to-noise ratios with the phantom images. However, analysis of the high-contrast spatial resolution revealed significant degradation when scan percentages of 70% and 85% were used in the acquisition of T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. There was significant degradation when a scan percentage of 25% was used in T1- and T2-weighted in vivo images (p ≤ 0.01 for both. Conclusion: The use of tools that limit the k-space is not recommended without knowledge of their effect on image quality.

  15. Evaluation of different magnetic resonance imaging contrast materials to be used as dummy markers in image-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Pessoa Sales

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify a contrast material that could be used as a dummy marker for magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and Methods: Magnetic resonance images were acquired with six different catheter-filling materials-water, glucose 50%, saline, olive oil, glycerin, and copper sulfate (CuSO4 water solution (2.08 g/L-inserted into compatible computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging ring applicators placed in a phantom made of gelatin and CuSO4. The best contrast media were tested in four patients with the applicators in place. Results: In T2-weighted sequences, the best contrast was achieved with the CuSO4-filled catheters, followed by saline- and glycerin-filled catheters, which presented poor visualization. In addition (also in T2-weighted sequences, CuSO4 presented better contrast when tested in the phantom than when tested in the patients, in which it provided some contrast but with poor identification of the first dwell position, mainly in the ring. Conclusion: We found CuSO4 to be the best solution for visualization of the applicator channels, mainly in T2-weighted images in vitro, although the materials tested presented low signal intensity in the images obtained in vivo, as well as poor precision in determining the first dwell position.

  16. Evaluation of different magnetic resonance imaging contrast materials to be used as dummy markers in image-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, Camila Pessoa; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Rubo, Rodrigo Augusto; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Rodrigues, Laura Natal, E-mail: camyps@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InRad/HC/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Instituto de Radiologia; Taverna, Khallil Chaim; Pastorello, Bruno Fraccini [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Lab. de Ressonancia Magnetica em Neurorradiologia; Borgonovi, Arthur Felipe [Royal Philips Electronics, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Objective: to identify a contrast material that could be used as a dummy marker for magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods: magnetic resonance images were acquired with six different catheter-filling materials - water, glucose 50%, saline, olive oil, glycerin, and copper sulfate (CuSO{sub 4}) water solution (2.08 g/L) - inserted into compatible computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging ring applicators placed in a phantom made of gelatin and CuSO{sub 4}. The best contrast media were tested in four patients with the applicators in place. Results: in T2-weighted sequences, the best contrast was achieved with the CuSO{sub 4}-filled catheters, followed by saline- and glycerin-filled catheters, which presented poor visualization. In addition (also in T2-weighted sequences), CuSO{sub 4} presented better contrast when tested in the phantom than when tested in the patients, in which it provided some contrast but with poor identification of the first dwell position, mainly in the ring. Conclusion: we found CuSO{sub 4} to be the best solution for visualization of the applicator channels, mainly in T2-weighted images in vitro, although the materials tested presented low signal intensity in the images obtained in vivo, as well as poor precision in determining the first dwell position. (author)

  17. An intracranial aspergilloma with low signal on T2-weighted images corresponding to iron accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore MD (United States); Zoarski, G.H.; Rothman, M.I.; Zagardo, M.T. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore MD (United States); Nishimura, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Sun, C.C.J. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore MD (United States)

    2001-07-01

    We present a case of cerebral aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient. The MRI signal characteristics were compared with the histologic findings. Irregular low-signal zones were demonstrated between the wall of the abscess and the central necrosis on T2-weighted images; the pathology specimen revealed concentrated iron in these transitional zones but no hemosiderin. Iron is an essential element for the growth of fungal hyphae. The low-signal zones may represent the areas where there was active proliferation of aspergillus, and the unique location of the low signal may be a helpful imaging characteristic for the diagnosis of an aspergillus abscess. (orig.)

  18. 3D T2-weighted imaging to shorten multiparametric prostate MRI protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanec, Stephan H; Lazar, Mathias; Wengert, Georg J; Bickel, Hubert; Spick, Claudio; Susani, Martin; Shariat, Shahrokh; Clauser, Paola; Baltzer, Pascal A T

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether 3D acquisitions provide equivalent image quality, lesion delineation quality and PI-RADS v2 performance compared to 2D acquisitions in T2-weighted imaging of the prostate at 3 T. This IRB-approved, prospective study included 150 consecutive patients (mean age 63.7 years, 35-84 years; mean PSA 7.2 ng/ml, 0.4-31.1 ng/ml). Two uroradiologists (R1, R2) independently rated image quality and lesion delineation quality using a five-point ordinal scale and assigned a PI-RADS score for 2D and 3D T2-weighted image data sets. Data were compared using visual grading characteristics (VGC) and receiver operating characteristics (ROC)/area under the curve (AUC) analysis. Image quality was similarly good to excellent for 2D T2w (mean score R1, 4.3 ± 0.81; R2, 4.7 ± 0.83) and 3D T2w (mean score R1, 4.3 ± 0.82; R2, 4.7 ± 0.69), p = 0.269. Lesion delineation was rated good to excellent for 2D (mean score R1, 4.16 ± 0.81; R2, 4.19 ± 0.92) and 3D T2w (R1, 4.19 ± 0.94; R2, 4.27 ± 0.94) without significant differences (p = 0.785). ROC analysis showed an equivalent performance for 2D (AUC 0.580-0.623) and 3D (AUC 0.576-0.629) T2w (p > 0.05, respectively). Three-dimensional acquisitions demonstrated equivalent image and lesion delineation quality, and PI-RADS v2 performance, compared to 2D in T2-weighted imaging of the prostate. Three-dimensional T2-weighted imaging could be used to considerably shorten prostate MRI protocols in clinical practice. • 3D shows equivalent image quality and lesion delineation compared to 2D T2w. • 3D T2w and 2D T2w image acquisition demonstrated comparable diagnostic performance. • Using a single 3D T2w acquisition may shorten the protocol by 40%. • Combined with short DCE, multiparametric protocols of 10 min are feasible.

  19. Boosting the SNR by adding a receive-only endorectal monopole to an external antenna array for high-resolution, T2-weighted imaging of early-stage cervical cancer with 7-T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kalleveen, I M L; Hoogendam, J P; Raaijmakers, A J E; Visser, F; Arteaga de Castro, C S; Verheijen, R H M; Luijten, P R; Zweemer, R P; Veldhuis, W B; Klomp, D W J

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain in early-stage cervical cancer at ultrahigh-field MRI (e.g. 7 T) using a combination of multiple external antennas and a single endorectal antenna. In particular, we used an endorectal monopole antenna to increase the SNR in cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This should allow high-resolution, T 2 -weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) for metabolic staging, which could facilitate the local tumor status assessment. In a prospective feasibility study, five healthy female volunteers and six patients with histologically proven stage IB1-IIB cervical cancer were scanned at 7 T. We used seven external fractionated dipole antennas for transmit-receive (transceive) and an endorectally placed monopole antenna for reception only. A region of interest, containing both normal cervix and tumor tissue, was selected for the SNR measurement. Separated signal and noise measurements were obtained in the region of the cervix for each element and in the near field of the monopole antenna (radius antenna in each patient. We obtained high-resolution, T 2 -weighted images with a voxel size of 0.7 × 0.8 × 3.0 mm 3 . In four cases with optimal placement of the endorectal antenna (verified on the T 2 -weighted images), a mean gain of 2.2 in SNR was obtained at the overall cervix and tumor tissue area. Within a radius of 30 mm from the monopole antenna, a mean SNR gain of 3.7 was achieved in the four optimal cases. Overlap between the two different regions of the SNR calculations was around 24%. We have demonstrated that the use of an endorectal monopole antenna substantially increases the SNR of 7-T MRI at the cervical anatomy. Combined with the intrinsically high SNR of ultrahigh-field MRI, this gain may be employed to obtain metabolic information using MRS and to enhance spatial resolutions to assess tumor invasion. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  1. T2-weighted liver MRI using the multiVane technique at 3T: Comparison with conventional T2-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyung A [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dong Il; Lee, Won Jae [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Ju [Philips Healthcare Korea, Philips, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Sin Ho; Baek, Sun Young [Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To assess the value of applying MultiVane to liver T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) compared with conventional T2WIs with emphasis on detection of focal liver lesions. Seventy-eight patients (43 men and 35 women) with 86 hepatic lesions and 20 pancreatico-biliary diseases underwent MRI including T2WIs acquired using breath-hold (BH), respiratory-triggered (RT), and MultiVane technique at 3T. Two reviewers evaluated each T2WI with respect to artefacts, organ sharpness, and conspicuity of intrahepatic vessels, hilar duct, and main lesion using five-point scales, and made pairwise comparisons between T2WI sequences for these categories. Diagnostic accuracy (Az) and sensitivity for hepatic lesion detection were evaluated using alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. MultiVane T2WI was significantly better than BH-T2WI or RT-T2WI for organ sharpness and conspicuity of intrahepatic vessels and main lesion in both separate reviews and pairwise comparisons (p < 0.001). With regard to motion artefacts, MultiVane T2WI or BH-T2WI was better than RT-T2WI (p < 0.001). Conspicuity of hilar duct was better with BH-T2WI than with MultiVane T2WI (p = 0.030) or RT-T2WI (p < 0.001). For detection of 86 hepatic lesions, sensitivity (mean, 97.7%) of MultiVane T2WI was significantly higher than that of BH-T2WI (mean, 89.5%) (p = 0.008) or RT-T2WI (mean, 84.9%) (p = 0.001). Applying the MultiVane technique to T2WI of the liver is a promising approach to improving image quality that results in increased detection of focal liver lesions compared with conventional T2WI.

  2. Magnetic resonance enteroclysis: state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourtsoyiannis, N.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) possess several virtues including superb soft-tissue contrast, absence of radiation exposure, cross-sectional and projectional imaging capabilities in all three dimensions and multiple contrast sources, that may favour a comprehensive morphologic and functional evaluation of the small bowel (SB). Ultrafast pulse sequences should be utilized to reduce motion related artifacts arising from physiological motion (respiration and peristalsis). the spatial resolution of these sequences should be high enough to permit demonstration of small lesions i.e. ulcers, that are usually present in small bowel diseases. MRI examination protocols of the small bowel usually comprise T1- and T2- weighted sequences on axial and coronal planes. Both T1- and T2- weighted sequences should be fast enough to allow comfortable breath-hold acquisition times and reduce the motion related artifacts. For T1- weighted images, most authors are using gradient echo sequences in 2D and 3D acquisition modes with or without fat saturation prepulses, while for T2-weighted images, TCE and HASTE sequences are commonly employed. True FISP sequence has been successfully applied in SB imaging, providing high resolution images of the bowel wall and additional information from the mesenteries. Fat suppressed TSE or STIR sequences have been also applied to access Crohn disease activity. True FISP sequence was introduced for MR examination of the small bowel after duodenal intubation. the contrast in true FISP images is somewhat more complex and invoke both T1 and T2 contributions in the form of the T2/T1 ratio. True FISP sequence is excellent in demonstrating the mesenteries, due to high contrast resolution between the bright peritoneal fat and the dark vessels and lymph nodes. Motion related artifacts are minimal on true FISP images due to short acquisition time. As opposed to HASTE sequences, true FISP is insensitive to intraluminal flow voids, due to its balanced

  3. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  4. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Underestimation of Prostate Cancer Geometry: Use of Patient Specific Molds to Correlate Images with Whole Mount Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priester, Alan; Natarajan, Shyam; Khoshnoodi, Pooria; Margolis, Daniel J; Raman, Steven S; Reiter, Robert E; Huang, Jiaoti; Grundfest, Warren; Marks, Leonard S

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in determining the size and shape of localized prostate cancer. The subjects were 114 men who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging before radical prostatectomy with patient specific mold processing of the specimen from 2013 to 2015. T2-weighted images were used to contour the prostate capsule and cancer suspicious regions of interest. The contours were used to design and print 3-dimensional custom molds, which permitted alignment of excised prostates with magnetic resonance imaging scans. Tumors were reconstructed in 3 dimensions from digitized whole mount sections. Tumors were then matched with regions of interest and the relative geometries were compared. Of the 222 tumors evident on whole mount sections 118 had been identified on magnetic resonance imaging. For the 118 regions of interest mean volume was 0.8 cc and the longest 3-dimensional diameter was 17 mm. However, for matched pathological tumors, of which most were Gleason score 3 + 4 or greater, mean volume was 2.5 cc and the longest 3-dimensional diameter was 28 mm. The median tumor had a 13.5 mm maximal extent beyond the magnetic resonance imaging contour and 80% of cancer volume from matched tumors was outside region of interest boundaries. Size estimation was most accurate in the axial plane and least accurate along the base-apex axis. Magnetic resonance imaging consistently underestimates the size and extent of prostate tumors. Prostate cancer foci had an average diameter 11 mm longer and a volume 3 times greater than T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging segmentations. These results may have important implications for the assessment and treatment of prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Signal void dots on T2-weighted brain MR imaging: correlation with hypertensive brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo; Jeong, Chun Keun; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Jae Il; Kwon, Ho Jang

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship of signal void dots seen on T2-weighted images with hypertension, hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage and infarction. MR images of 73 consecutive patients with signal void dots on T2-weighted images were reviewed. Seventy-three randomly selected age-matched patients without signal void dot lesion were also reviewed. We evaluated 1) the location and number of signal void dots;2) the frequency of hypertension among patients and controls; 3) the frequency of associated brain parenchymal abnormalities (hypertensive intracerebra hemorrhage, microangiopathy and infarction) in both groups; 4) the relationship between the number of signal void dots and associated brain lesions in the patient group. Signal void dots numbered 1-50(average, 12), and were found mostly in the thalamus, basal ganglis, and the pons. Hypertension(97.1%), hypertensive ICH(43.8%) and microangiopathy(96%) were frequent in patients with signal void dots, the number of which correlated with the severity of microangiopathy. Infarction(13.7%), however, did not correlate with dots. Signal void dots correlate closely with hypertension, hypertensive ICH, and microangiopathy. They may indicate hypertensive brain change.=20

  7. Computer-aided detection of prostate cancer in T2-weighted MRI within the peripheral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampun, Andrik; Zheng, Ling; Malcolm, Paul; Tiddeman, Bernie; Zwiggelaar, Reyer

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we propose a prostate cancer computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system and suggest a set of discriminant texture descriptors extracted from T2-weighted MRI data which can be used as a good basis for a multimodality system. For this purpose, 215 texture descriptors were extracted and eleven different classifiers were employed to achieve the best possible results. The proposed method was tested based on 418 T2-weighted MR images taken from 45 patients and evaluated using 9-fold cross validation with five patients in each fold. The results demonstrated comparable results to existing CAD systems using multimodality MRI. We achieved an area under the receiver operating curve (A z ) values equal to 90.0%+/- 7.6% , 89.5%+/- 8.9% , 87.9%+/- 9.3% and 87.4%+/- 9.2% for Bayesian networks, ADTree, random forest and multilayer perceptron classifiers, respectively, while a meta-voting classifier using average probability as a combination rule achieved 92.7%+/- 7.4% .

  8. MR imaging finding of synovial sarcoma: emphasis on signal characteristics on T2-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hye Weon; Cho, So Yeon; Han, Moon Hee; Im, Jung Gi; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-01-01

    To determine the MR imaging findings of synovial sarcoma, with emphasis on the signal characteristics of pathologically correlated T2-weighted images. Necrosis, cystic change or hemorrhage was suggested in 11 cases, ten of which showed triple signal intensity, and in all cases, was pathologically confirmed. Fluid-fluid levels were found in three cases and internal septa in ten. In four cases, maximum diameter was less than 5 cm, and in nine, was greater than this. No mass was detected in one case. The tumor was located in the low extremity(n=9), pelvic girdle and hip joint area(n=2), scapular (n=1), shoulder joint area(n=1), and scalp(n=1). Eleven cases showed a relatively well-defined margin and nine showed lobulation. Except in the area of necrosis and cystic change, the pattern of contrast enhancement was diffuse and inhomogeneous. Bony invasion was detected in two cases, neurovascular encasement in four, calcification in four, and joint capsule invasion in four. On T2-weighted images, synovial sarcoma frequently showed triple signal intensity and internal septa with fluid-fluid levels: this was induced by cystic changes due to necrosis and hemorrhage. (author). 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging features of allografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kattapuram, S.V.; Rosol, M.S.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Palmer, W.E.; Mankin, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of allografts at various time intervals after surgery in patients with osteoarticular allografts.Design and patients. Sixteen patients who were treated with osteoarticular allografts and who were followed over time with MRI studies as part of their long-term follow-up were retrospectively selected for this study. T1-weighted images were obtained both before and after gadolinium administration along with T2-weighted images. All images were reviewed by an experienced musculoseletal radiologist, with two other experienced radiologists used for consultation. Imaging studies were organized into three groups for ease of discussion: early postoperative period (2 days to 2 months), intermediate postoperative period (3 months to 2 years), and late postoperative period (greater than 2 years).Results. In the early postoperative period, no gadolinium enhancement of the allograft was visible in any of the MR images. A linear, thin layer of periosteal and endosteal tissue enhancement along the margin of the allograft was visible in images obtained at 3-4 months. This enhancement apeared gradually to increase in images from later periods, and appears to have stabilized in the images obtained approximately 2-3 years after allograft placement. The endosteal enhancement diminished after several years, with examinations conducted between 6 and 8 years following surgery showing minimal endosteal enhancement. However, focal enhancement was noted adjacent to areas of pressure erosion or degenerative cysts. All the cases showed inhomogeneity in the marrow signal (scattered low signal foci on T1 with corresponding bright signal on T2), and a diffuse, inhomogeneous marrow enhancement later on.Conclusion. We have characterized the basic MRI features of osteoarticular allografts in 16 patients who underwent imaging studies at various time points as part of routine follow-up. We believe that the endosteal and periosteal

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    The method- ology went through vigorous growth and development during this time, laying the theoretical basis for understanding a wide array of applications. The stage was set for ... nance (NMR) is the experimental observation of the resonant absorption of ..... siveness, ranging from qualitative to quantitative. More signifi-.

  11. Pituitary disease in childhood: utility of magnetic resonance; Patologia hipofisaria en la edad pediatrica: unidad de la resonance magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela, A. C.; Oleaga, L.; Ibanez, A. M.; Campo, M.; Grande, D. [Hospital de Basurto. Bilbao (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    To assess the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the study of pediatric patients with clinical suspicion of pituitary disease. We studied 18 patients aged 7 to 18 years.Fifteen had hormonal disturbances, two presented amenorrhea and 1 complained of headache, fever and symptoms of polyuria and polydipsia. All the patients were examined using a Siemens SP 42 1-Tesla MRI scanner. Sagittal and coronal T1-weighted spin-echo images were obtained; in addition T2-weighted spin-echo or fast spin-echo imaging was performed in ten cases and intravenous gadolinium was administered in nine. We found 9 patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesis, 2 with germinoma, 2 cases of pituitary hemosiderosis in patients with thalassemia, 2 cases of microadenoma, one abscess, one case of idiopathic central diabetes insipidus and one of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. MR enabled us to assess pituitary structural alterations in children with hypothalamic-pituitary hormone deficiencies. In our series of patients, hypothalamic-pituitary dysgenesiss was the most frequent cause of adenohypophyseal deficiencies, and most cases of central diabetes insipidus were secondary to masses in the sellar and suprasellar region. In patients with thalassemia, T2-weighted MR images showed the amount of iron deposited in adenophypophysis. Gadolinium-enhanced studies were useful in the study of masses and when the presence of microadenoma was suspected. (Author) 26 refs.

  12. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  13. Interventional Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikus, Christina E.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) combines excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar views, and dynamic imaging of cardiac function without ionizing radiation exposure. Interventional cardiovascular magnetic resonance (iCMR) leverages these features to enhance conventional interventional procedures or to enable novel ones. Although still awaiting clinical deployment, this young field has tremendous potential. We survey promising clinical applications for iCMR. Next, we discuss the technologies that allow CMR-guided interventions and, finally, what still needs to be done to bring them to the clinic. PMID:19909937

  14. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of T2*-weighted MR imaging for identifying hepatocellular carcinoma with liver explant correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardie, Andrew D.; Nance, John W.; Boulter, Daniel J.; Kizziah, Michael K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: T2*-weighted MRI may represent a novel method for identifying hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The goal of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of T2*-weighted MRI for HCC with liver explant correlation. Materials and methods: A retrospective review identified 25 patients who had undergone liver transplantation with pre-operative T2*-weighted MRI. All patients had Child's-Pugh A (9), B (9), or C (7) liver disease with 13 transplanted for liver dysfunction and 12 for HCC. The T2*-weighted images were interpreted by 2 blinded, independent observers and the results compared with the explanted specimens. Sensitivity and specificity of T2*-weighted MRI for the identification of HCC was assessed. Results: By pathology, 16 HCC (mean largest diameter 2.1 cm; range 0.9–3.6 cm) were identified in 14 patients. Reader 1 had a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval 41–88%) and a specificity of 100% (68–100%). Reader 2 had a sensitivity of 56% (31–79%) and a specificity of 100% (68–100%). There was a very good inter-observer agreement (kappa = 0.84). Conclusion: T2*-weighted MRI had a moderate sensitivity for identifying HCC but had an excellent specificity. A T2*-weighted MR sequence may be a useful component of a liver MRI protocol due to its high specificity for HCC, and may be particularly useful in patients unable to undergo gadolinium enhanced MRI.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of menisci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Yasushi; Hachiya, Yudo; Murano, Hiromichi; Sakai, Takashi; Banno, Tatsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty six patients with 37 menisci suspicious of meniscal injury of the knee joint have been examined by MRI since Septemper 1989. All the menisci were also evaluated by arthroscopy. Gradient echo technique for T 2 * weighted image showed better tissue contrast of deranged menisci compared with usual spin echo sequence. Grading and classification of meniscal tears were also reviewed. As a result, MRI was able to depict 92% of meniscal injuries which were revealed on arthroscopy. (author)

  16. Optimal MR pulse sequences for hepatic hemangiomas : comparison of T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo, T2-weighted breath-hold turbo-spin-echo, and T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wen Chao; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cho, Soon Gu

    1997-01-01

    To optimize MR imaging pulse sequences in the imaging of hepatic hemangioma and to evaluate on dynamic MR imaging the enhancing characteristics of the lesions. Twenty patients with 35 hemangiomas were studied by using Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence (T2-weighted, T2- and heavily T2-weighted breath-hold) and T1-weighted FLASH imaging acquired before, immediately on, and 1, 3 and 5 minutes after injection of a bolus of Gd-DTPA (0.1mmol/kg). Phased-array multicoil was employed. Images were quantitatively analyzed for lesion-to-liver signal difference to noise ratios (SD/Ns), and lesion-to-liver signal ratios (H/Ls), and qualitatively analyzed for lesion conspicuity. The enhancing characteristics of the hemangiomas were described by measuring the change of signal intensity as a curve in T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging. For T2-weighted images, breath-hold T2-weighted TSE had a slightly higher SD/N than other pulse sequences, but there was no statistical difference in three fast pulse sequences (p=0.211). For lesion conspicuity, heavily T2-weighted breath-hold TSE images was superior to T2-weighted breath-hold or non-breath-hold TSE (H/L, 5.75, 3.81, 2.87, respectively, p<0.05). T2-weighted breath-hold TSE imaging was more effective than T2-weighted TSE imaging in removing lesion blurring or lack of sharpness, and there was a 12-fold decrease in acquisition time (20sec versus 245 sec). T1-weighted FLASH dynamic images of normal liver showed peak enhancement at less than 1 minute, and of hemangioma at more than 3 minutes;the degree of enhancement for hemangioma decreased after a 3 minute delay. T2-weighed breath-hold TSE imaging and Gd-DTPA enhanced FLASH dynamic imaging with 5 minutes delay are sufficient for imaging hepatic hemangiomas

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child may resume their usual activities and normal diet immediately after the exam. A few patients experience ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, and muscular and bone ... (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s ... determine the presence of certain diseases. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor, transmitted ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a digital cloud server. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MRI ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... at a very early stage by mapping the motion of water molecules in the tissue. This water motion, known as diffusion, is impaired by most strokes, ... that magnetic resonance imaging harms the fetus, pregnant women usually are advised not to have an MRI ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  8. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  9. Significance of periventricular hyperintensity in T2 weighted MRI on memory dysfunction and depression after stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokura, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Yamashita, Kazuya; Koide, Hiromi

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effect of periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) in T2 weighted MRI on memory function and post-stroke depression in 159 patients with cerebrovacular disease. Memory function was assessed with Hasegawa's scale, and depressive state was estimated with Zung's self-rating depression scale. Patients showing diffusely distributed PVH had significantly low scores in memory function tests. Localized PVH around the anterior horns of the laterals ventricle was also associated with impaired memory function when the area of PVH was large. The incidence of post-stroke depression was high in patients with large PVH around the anterior horn in comparison with patients with PVH around the posterior horn. The severity of PVH around the posterior horn did not affect memory function and post-stroke depression. These findings suggest that memory dysfunction and post-stroke depression were accelerated by the diffusely or anteriorly distributed PVH. (author)

  10. Predictive value of T2-weighted imaging and contrast-enhanced MR imaging in assessing myometrial invasion in endometrial cancer: a pooled analysis of prospective studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lian-Ming [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Wayne State University, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States); Xu, Jian-Rong; Gu, Hai-Yan; Hua, Jia [Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Haacke, E.M.; Hu, Jiani [Wayne State University, Department of Radiology, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2013-02-15

    To obtain diagnostic performance values of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) in the prediction of myometrial invasion in patients with endometrial cancer. Databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for relevant original articles published from January1995 to March 2012. Pooled estimation data were obtained by statistical analysis. Eleven articles (548 patients) were included. For assessing any myometrial involvement, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for CE-MRI were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.72, 0.88), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.64, 0.79), 0.65 (95% CI, 0.56, 0.73) and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78, 0.91); for T2WI, they were 0.87 (95% CI, 0.78, 0.94), 0.58 (95% CI, 0.47, 0.69), 0.64 (95% CI, 0.54, 0.73), 0.84 (95% CI, 0.73, 0.92) respectively. The pooled specificity of CE-MRI (0.72) was significantly higher than T2WI (0.58) (P < 0.05). For assessing deep myometrial involvement, there was no statistically significant difference between CE-MRI and T2WI, (P > 0.05). CE-MRI has a good diagnostic performance in the prediction of any myometrial invasion and is superior to T2WI. But its PPV is somewhat suboptimal. For assessing deep myometrial involvement, its NPV appears relative high and negative findings strongly suggest an absence of deep myometrial involvement, which can guide therapeutic decision-making. (orig.)

  11. Non-invasive detection of biliary leaks using Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR cholangiography: comparison with T2-weighted MR cholangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantarci, Mecit; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Ogul, Hayri; Kizrak, Yesim; Eren, Suat; Karabulut, Nevzat; Ozturk, Gurkan; Aydinli, Bulent; Yilmaz, Sinan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the added role of T1-weighted (T1w) gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) compared with T2-weighted MRC (T2w-MRC) in the detection of biliary leaks. Ninety-nine patients with suspected biliary complications underwent routine T2w-MRC and T1w contrast-enhanced (CE) MRC using Gd-EOB-DTPA to identify biliary leaks. Two observers reviewed the image sets separately and together. MRC findings were compared with those of surgery and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiopancreatography. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the techniques in identifying biliary leaks were calculated. Accuracy of locating biliary leaks was superior with the combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC and T2w-MRC (P < 0.05).The mean sensitivities were 79 % vs 59 %, and the mean accuracy rates were 84 % vs 58 % for combined CE-MRC and T2w-MRC vs sole T2w-MRC. Nineteen out of 21 patients with biliary-cyst communication, 90.4 %, and 12/15 patients with post-traumatic biliary extravasations, 80 %, were detected by the combination of Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC and T2w-MRC images, P < 0.05. Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC yields information that complements T2w-MRC findings and improves the identification and localisation of the bile extravasations (84 % accuracy, 100 % specificity, P < 0.05). We recommend Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRC in addition to T2w-MRC to increase the preoperative accuracy of identifying and locating extravasations of bile. (orig.)

  12. Delta Relaxation Enhanced Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Jamu K.

    Generally speaking, targeted molecular imaging has always been difficult to perform with magnetic resonance. The difficulty does not arise with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique or equipment itself, but rather with the targeted contrast agents, which the method requires. Also referred to as activatable contrast agents, or MRI probes, targeted contrast agents are pharmaceuticals that will selectively bind to a particular biological (target) molecule. They are used to highlight a certain tissue or the difference between healthy and diseased tissue. Unfortunately, nearly all MRI probes are non-specific, causing localized increases in MR image intensity in both the unbound and target-bound states. Therefore, brightening in a conventional MRI image, following probe injection, does not positively indicate the presence of the target molecule. Herein, a novel method known as delta relaxation enhanced magnetic resonance (dreMR, pronounced "dreamer") is presented that utilizes variable magnetic field technology to produce image contrast related to the dependence of the sample's longitudinal relaxation rates upon the strength of the main magnetic field of the MRI scanner. Since only bound contrast agent shows significant magnetic field dependence, it is an indicator of the bound probe, which is in turn a marker for the target molecule. This work details the development of the dreMR method, focusing on the specialized hardware necessary to provide a clinical, static-field MRI the ability to modulate its main magnetic field throughout an MRI sequence. All modifications were performed in such a manner that the host MRI system was not degraded or permanently modified in any way. The three parts of this technology are: the insertable electromagnet, the power supply system and the control system. The insertable electromagnet modifies the magnetic field, the power system drives the electromagnet, and the control system generates the magnetic field waveform envelope and

  13. Relationship between levels of serum creatinine and perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted MR images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erden, Ayse, E-mail: ayse.erden@medicine.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Sahin, Burcu Savran, E-mail: bsavrans@hotmail.com [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Orgodol, Horolsuren, E-mail: hoogii99@yahoo.com [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Erden, Ilhan, E-mail: erden@medicine.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Biyikli, Zeynep, E-mail: zeynep.biyikli@gmail.com [Ankara University, School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Talatpasa Bulvari, Sihhiye, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency of perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted images and to evaluate its relationship with serum creatinine levels. Subjects and methods: Axial and coronal single-shot fast spin-echo images which have been originally obtained for MR cholangiopancreatography in 150 subjects were examined by two observers individually for the presence of perirenal hyperintensity. The morphologic properties of perirenal hyperintensity (peripheral rim-like, discontinuous, polar) were recorded. Chi square test was used to test whether the frequencies of bilateral perirenal hyperintensity differ significantly in subjects with high serum creatinine levels and those with normal creatinine levels. This test was also used to compare the frequencies of perirenal hyperintensity in patients with and without renal cysts and in patients with and without corticomedullary differentiation. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The perirenal hyperintensity was identified in 40 of 150 cases (26.6%) on heavily T2-weighted image. Serum creatinine levels were high in 18 of 150 cases (12%). The perirenal hyperintensity was present in 11 of 18 subjects (61%) with high serum creatinine levels and 26 of 132 subjects (19.7%) with normal creatinine levels. The difference of rates in two groups was statistically significant. Odds ratio was 6407 (95% confidence interval 2264-18,129). The frequency of perirenal hyperintensity was also significantly higher in subjects with renal cyst or cysts in whom serum creatinine levels were normal (p < 0.05) (37.5% vs. 11.8%). Conclusion: Perirenal hyperintensities are more frequent in patients with high serum creatinine levels. They are also more common in patients with simple renal cysts.

  14. Relationship between levels of serum creatinine and perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erden, Ayse; Sahin, Burcu Savran; Orgodol, Horolsuren; Erden, Ilhan; Biyikli, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of perirenal hyperintensity on heavily T2-weighted images and to evaluate its relationship with serum creatinine levels. Subjects and methods: Axial and coronal single-shot fast spin-echo images which have been originally obtained for MR cholangiopancreatography in 150 subjects were examined by two observers individually for the presence of perirenal hyperintensity. The morphologic properties of perirenal hyperintensity (peripheral rim-like, discontinuous, polar) were recorded. Chi square test was used to test whether the frequencies of bilateral perirenal hyperintensity differ significantly in subjects with high serum creatinine levels and those with normal creatinine levels. This test was also used to compare the frequencies of perirenal hyperintensity in patients with and without renal cysts and in patients with and without corticomedullary differentiation. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: The perirenal hyperintensity was identified in 40 of 150 cases (26.6%) on heavily T2-weighted image. Serum creatinine levels were high in 18 of 150 cases (12%). The perirenal hyperintensity was present in 11 of 18 subjects (61%) with high serum creatinine levels and 26 of 132 subjects (19.7%) with normal creatinine levels. The difference of rates in two groups was statistically significant. Odds ratio was 6407 (95% confidence interval 2264-18,129). The frequency of perirenal hyperintensity was also significantly higher in subjects with renal cyst or cysts in whom serum creatinine levels were normal (p < 0.05) (37.5% vs. 11.8%). Conclusion: Perirenal hyperintensities are more frequent in patients with high serum creatinine levels. They are also more common in patients with simple renal cysts.

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  16. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  17. Improve Image Quality of Transversal Relaxation Time PROPELLER and FLAIR on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, N.; Alam, D. Y.; Jamaluddin, M.; Samad, B. A.

    2018-03-01

    The Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging technique that uses the interaction between the magnetic field and the nuclear spins. MRI can be used to show disparity of pathology by transversal relaxation time (T2) weighted images. Some techniques for producing T2-weighted images are Periodically Rotated Overlapping Parallel Lines with Enhanced Reconstruction (PROPELLER) and Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR). A comparison of T2 PROPELLER and T2 FLAIR parameters in MRI image has been conducted. And improve Image Quality the image by using RadiAnt DICOM Viewer and ENVI software with method of image segmentation and Region of Interest (ROI). Brain images were randomly selected. The result of research showed that Time Repetition (TR) and Time Echo (TE) values in all types of images were not influenced by age. T2 FLAIR images had longer TR value (9000 ms), meanwhile T2 PROPELLER images had longer TE value (100.75 - 102.1 ms). Furthermore, areas with low and medium signal intensity appeared clearer by using T2 PROPELLER images (average coefficients of variation for low and medium signal intensity were 0.0431 and 0.0705, respectively). As for areas with high signal intensity appeared clearer by using T2 FLAIR images (average coefficient of variation was 0.0637).

  18. High dynamic range processing for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy H Hung

    Full Text Available To minimize feature loss in T1- and T2-weighted MRI by merging multiple MR images acquired at different TR and TE to generate an image with increased dynamic range.High Dynamic Range (HDR processing techniques from the field of photography were applied to a series of acquired MR images. Specifically, a method to parameterize the algorithm for MRI data was developed and tested. T1- and T2-weighted images of a number of contrast agent phantoms and a live mouse were acquired with varying TR and TE parameters. The images were computationally merged to produce HDR-MR images. All acquisitions were performed on a 7.05 T Bruker PharmaScan with a multi-echo spin echo pulse sequence.HDR-MRI delineated bright and dark features that were either saturated or indistinguishable from background in standard T1- and T2-weighted MRI. The increased dynamic range preserved intensity gradation over a larger range of T1 and T2 in phantoms and revealed more anatomical features in vivo.We have developed and tested a method to apply HDR processing to MR images. The increased dynamic range of HDR-MR images as compared to standard T1- and T2-weighted images minimizes feature loss caused by magnetization recovery or low SNR.

  19. Transient Splenial Lesion of Corpus Callosum Associated with Antiepileptic Drug: Conventional and Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakyemez, B.; Erdogan, C.; Yildirim, N.; Gokalp, G.; Parlak, M.

    2005-01-01

    Transient focal lesions of splenium of corpus callosum can be seen as a component of many central nervous system diseases, including antiepileptic drug toxicity. The conventional magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the disease are characteristic and include ovoid lesions with high signal intensity at T2-weighted MRI. Limited information exists about the diffusion-weighted MRI characteristics of these lesions vanishing completely after a period of time. We examined the conventional, FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted MR images of a patient complaining of depressive mood and anxiety disorder after 1 year receiving antiepileptic medication

  20. Transient Splenial Lesion of Corpus Callosum Associated with Antiepileptic Drug: Conventional and Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, B.; Erdogan, C.; Yildirim, N.; Gokalp, G.; Parlak, M. [Uludag Univ. Medical School, Bursa (Turkey). Dept. of Radiology

    2005-11-01

    Transient focal lesions of splenium of corpus callosum can be seen as a component of many central nervous system diseases, including antiepileptic drug toxicity. The conventional magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the disease are characteristic and include ovoid lesions with high signal intensity at T2-weighted MRI. Limited information exists about the diffusion-weighted MRI characteristics of these lesions vanishing completely after a period of time. We examined the conventional, FLAIR, and diffusion-weighted MR images of a patient complaining of depressive mood and anxiety disorder after 1 year receiving antiepileptic medication.

  1. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Byrnes, Christian T; Jain, Rajeev Kumar; Urban, Federico R

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of ${\\cal O}(10^{-15}\\, \\Gauss)$ today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.

  2. Idiopathic and diabetic skeletal muscle necrosis: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattapuram, Taj M.; Suri, Rajeev; Kattapuram, Susan V. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Bone and Joint Radiology, Boston (United States); Rosol, Michael S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Bone and Joint Radiology, Boston (United States); Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States); Rosenberg, Andrew E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, James Homer Wright Laboratories, Department of Pathology, Boston (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Idiopathic and diabetic-associated muscle necrosis are similar, uncommon clinical entities requiring conservative management and minimal intervention to avoid complications and prolonged hospitalization. An early noninvasive diagnosis is therefore essential. We evaluated the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of muscle necrosis in 14 patients, in eight of whom the diagnoses were confirmed histologically. Two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists performed retrospective evaluations of the MRI studies of 14 patients with the diagnoses of skeletal muscle infarction. In 10 cases gadolinium-enhanced (T1-weighted fat-suppressed) sequences were available along with T1-weighted, T2-weighted images and STIR sequences, while in four cases contrast-enhanced images were not available. Eight patients had underlying diabetes and in six patients the cause of the myonecrosis was considered idiopathic. T1-weighted images demonstrated isointense swelling of the involved muscle, with mildly displaced fascial planes. There was effacement of the fat signal intensity within the muscle. Fat-suppressed T2-weighted images showed diffuse heterogeneous high signal intensity in the muscles suggestive of edema. Perifascial fluid collection was seen in eight cases. Subcutaneous edema was present in seven patients. Following intravenous gadolinium administration, MRI demonstrated a focal area of heterogeneously enhancing mass with peripheral enhancement. Within this focal lesion, linear dark areas were seen with serpentine enhancing streaks separating them in eight cases. In two cases, a central relatively nonenhancing mass with irregular margins and peripheral enhancement was noted. The peripheral enhancement involved a significant part of the muscle. No focal fluid collection was noted. We believe that the constellation of imaging findings on T1- and T2-weighted images and post-gadolinium sequences is highly suggestive of muscle necrosis. We consider certain specific findings

  3. Comparison of computer tomography and magnetic resonance tomography in the diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, S.; Elste, V.; Sartor, K.; Reith, W.; Ertl-Wagner, B.; Muenchen Univ.

    1999-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Stroke symptoms are caused in 10 to 15% by intracerebral hemorrhage. From the clinical examination it is often impossible to differentiate intracerebralhemorrhage from cerebral ischemia. To exclude intracerebral hemorrhage as the cause of clinical symptoms a CT is usually performed. The aim of our study was a direct comparison of the sensitivity of Computed Tomography and MRI using different MR sequences for the detection of acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Methods: In 8 male Wistar rats intracerebral hemorrhage was induced by infusion of collagenase into the caudate nucleus. After 1 hour the brains were subsequently imaged with CT and MRI using T2- and T1-weighted Spin Echo sequences, diffusion-weighted sequences, T2*-weighted gradient echo sequences and FLAIR-sequences. Visibility of the intracerebral hemorrhage was examined using a scoring system for 1=not visible to 5=excellent visible. Finally, the intracerebral hemorrhage was verified by histological staining. Results: In all animals, intracerebral hemorrhage was visible in T2*-weighted gradient echo and diffusion weighted MR images 1 h after infusion of collagenase. T2- and PD-weighted SE images were positive in 7/8 rats. T1-weighted images revealed signal changes in 5/8 rats, and FLAIR sequence was positive in 8/8 rats. In CT intracerebral hemorrhage was only visible in 3/8 rats. When measuring the increase of Hounsfield units within the suspected hemisphere we saw a mean increase of 7% compared to the normal hemisphere in 3/8 rats. Conclusions: In this animal model, T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging proved to be the most sensitive imaging modality in the detection of acute intracerebral hemorrhage and is by far more sensitive than CT. (orig.) [de

  4. Acute swelling of the limbs: magnetic resonance pictorial review of fascial and muscle signal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revelon, Geraldine [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Jazaerli, Nedal [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Godeau, Bertrand [Department of Internal Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Chosidow, Olivier [Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Authier, Jerome [Department of Pathology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Mathieu, Didier [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Roujeau, Jean-Claude [Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Vasile, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: This pictorial review analyzes the magnetic resonance (MR) fascial/muscular changes in 69 patients referred as emergencies with acute swelling of the limbs (ASL) from various causes. Methods and material: A prospective MR imaging (MRI) study of 69 patients referred as emergencies for ASL was performed. Our population consisted of 45 patients with skin and soft-tissue infections (cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis, and pyomyositis), six patients with soft-tissue inflammatory diseases (dermatomyositis, graft-versus-host disease), 11 patients with acute deep venous thrombosis, three patients with rhabdomyolysis, one patient with acute denervation and three other patients with rare diseases. Hematomas, tumorous or infectious bone involvement and soft-tissue tumors were excluded. All studies included spin echo T1-weighted images and spin echo T2-weighted images. Gadolinium-enhanced spin echo T1-weighted images were obtained when an abscess was suspected on T2-weighted images. Selective fat-saturated T1- and T2-weighted sequences were also used. MRI analysis was performed to obtain a compartmentalized anatomical approach according to the location of signal abnormalities in subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fascia and muscle. Results: In all patients with ASL, MRI demonstrated soft-tissue abnormalities involving subcutaneous fat, superficial fascia, deep fascia, or muscle. Although MR findings were non-specific, MRI appears sensitive for detecting subtle fascial and muscle signal changes. Conclusions: In skin and soft-tissue infections, MRI can be helpful for therapeutic management by determining the depth of soft-tissue involvement, particularly within fasciae and muscles, which is partly related to the severity of cellulitis with severe systemic manifestations. MRI can also aid the surgeon in diagnosing abscesses. In inflammatory diseases, MRI can determine the best site for biopsy and also monitor therapeutic response.

  5. Acute swelling of the limbs: magnetic resonance pictorial review of fascial and muscle signal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelon, Geraldine; Rahmouni, Alain; Jazaerli, Nedal; Godeau, Bertrand; Chosidow, Olivier; Authier, Jerome; Mathieu, Didier; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Vasile, Norbert

    1999-01-01

    Objective: This pictorial review analyzes the magnetic resonance (MR) fascial/muscular changes in 69 patients referred as emergencies with acute swelling of the limbs (ASL) from various causes. Methods and material: A prospective MR imaging (MRI) study of 69 patients referred as emergencies for ASL was performed. Our population consisted of 45 patients with skin and soft-tissue infections (cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis, and pyomyositis), six patients with soft-tissue inflammatory diseases (dermatomyositis, graft-versus-host disease), 11 patients with acute deep venous thrombosis, three patients with rhabdomyolysis, one patient with acute denervation and three other patients with rare diseases. Hematomas, tumorous or infectious bone involvement and soft-tissue tumors were excluded. All studies included spin echo T1-weighted images and spin echo T2-weighted images. Gadolinium-enhanced spin echo T1-weighted images were obtained when an abscess was suspected on T2-weighted images. Selective fat-saturated T1- and T2-weighted sequences were also used. MRI analysis was performed to obtain a compartmentalized anatomical approach according to the location of signal abnormalities in subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fascia and muscle. Results: In all patients with ASL, MRI demonstrated soft-tissue abnormalities involving subcutaneous fat, superficial fascia, deep fascia, or muscle. Although MR findings were non-specific, MRI appears sensitive for detecting subtle fascial and muscle signal changes. Conclusions: In skin and soft-tissue infections, MRI can be helpful for therapeutic management by determining the depth of soft-tissue involvement, particularly within fasciae and muscles, which is partly related to the severity of cellulitis with severe systemic manifestations. MRI can also aid the surgeon in diagnosing abscesses. In inflammatory diseases, MRI can determine the best site for biopsy and also monitor therapeutic response

  6. Study of skin markers for magnetic resonance imaging examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Umezaki, Yoshie; Miyati, Tosiaki; Yamamura, Kenichirou

    2013-01-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), skin markers are used as a landmark in order to make plans for examinations. However, there isn't a lot of research about the material and shape of skin markers. The skin marker's essential elements are safety, good cost performance, high signal intensity for T 1 weighted image (T 1 WI) and T 2 weighted image (T 2 WI), and durable. In order to get a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of T 1 WI and T 2 WI, baby oil, salad oil and olive oil were chosen, because these materials were easy to obtain and safe for the skin. The SNR of baby oil was the best. Baby oil was injected into the infusion tube, and the tube was solvent welded and cut by a heat sealer. In order to make ring shaped skin markers, both ends of the tube were stuck with adhesive tape. Three different diameters of markers were made (3, 5, 10 cmφ). Ring shaped skin markers were put on to surround the examination area, therefore, the edge of the examination area could be seen at every cross section. Using baby oil in the ring shaped infusion tube is simple, easy, and a highly useful skin marker. (author)

  7. Value of magnetic resonance imaging in brucellar spondylodiscitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qin; Guo, Xinghua

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with brucellar spondylodiscitis. Sixty-three patients with spondylodiscitis were diagnosed based on positive clinical findings, ≥1/160 titres of brucella agglutination tests and/or positive blood cultures. MR imaging was performed in all of the patients with spondylodiscitis. Signal changes and enhancement of vertebral bodies, involvement of paravertebral soft tissues and epidural spaces, nerve root and cord compression and abscess formation were assessed. Of 63 patients with spinal brucellosis, eight had thoracic, 35 had lumbar, ten had cervical vertebral, seven had both thoracic and lumbar, and three had both lumbar and sacral vertebral involvement. Thirteen patients had cord compression and six had root compression. Four patients had facet-joint involvement, and one had erector spinae muscle involvement. Twenty-four had intervertebral disc narrowing. Seventeen patients were in the acute stage, 32 in the subacute stage and 14 in the chronic stage. Vertebral bodies, vertebral end plates and intervertebral disc spaces were hypointense and hyperintense in the acute stage, whereas they were hypointense and heterogeneous in the subacute and chronic stages on T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. Brucella is still a public health problem in endemic areas. MR imaging is a highly sensitive and noninvasive imaging technique which should be first choice of imaging in the early diagnosis of spondylodiscitis.

  8. Vertebroplasty: Magnetic Resonance Findings Related to Cement Leakage Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Y.H.; Han, D.; Cha, J.H.; Seong, C.K.; Kim, J.; Choi, Y.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Municipal Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: To find magnetic resonance (MR) findings predicting cement leakage in patients receiving percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) due to osteoporotic compression fractures. Material and Methods: MR was done in 43 patients (age 52-89 years) before PVP (56 vertebrae), which was done via a bipedicular approach with fluoroscopic monitoring. Shortly after the procedure, a non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan was done at the vertebroplasty sites for evaluation of bone cement leakage. The following MR findings of fractured vertebral bodies were retrospectively reviewed for correlation with leakage risk: severity of bone-marrow edema, presence of a T2-weighted low-signal-intensity line, percentage residual vertebral body height, presence of either a vacuum or cystic change within the vertebral body, and presence of a cortical disruption. Results: After PVP, cement leakage was detected in 35 vertebrae (62.5%). Leakage was most frequently observed in the anterior external vertebral venous plexus (46%). Cement leakage rate increased when there was a cortical disruption (P = 0.037), especially at the endplates, while it decreased when there was a vacuum or a cystic change within the fractured vertebra (P 0.019). Other MR findings were not related to the risk of cement leakage. Conclusion: The risk of cement leakage in PVP increases when MR shows cortical disruption in a fractured vertebral body, especially at the endplates. It decreases when MR shows a vacuum or cystic change within the body. Keywords Cement leakage, MR imaging, spine, vertebroplasty.

  9. DYNAMIC MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING: PRELIMINARY PRESENTATION OF A TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRUNO DA COSTA ANCHESCHI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate morphometric variations of the cervical spine in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in neutral, flexion and extension positions. Methods: This is a prospective study of patients with CSM secondary to degenerative disease of the cervical spine. The morphometric parameters were evaluated using T2-weighted MRI sequences in the sagittal plane in neutral, flexion and extension position of the neck. The parameters studied were the anterior length of the spinal cord (ALSC, the posterior length of the spinal cord (PLSC, the diameter of the vertebral canal (DVC and the diameter of the spinal cord (DSC. Results: The ALSC and PLSC were longer in flexion than in extension and neutral position, with statistically significant difference between the flexion and extension position. The DVC and the DSC were greater in flexion than in extension and neutral position, however, there was no statistically significant difference when they were compared in the neutral, flexion and extension positions. Conclusion: Dynamic MRI allows to evaluate morphometric variations in the cervical spinal canal in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

  10. Assessment of the sinus lift operation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senel, Figen Cizmeci; Duran, Serpil; Icten, Onur; Izbudak, Izlem; Cizmeci, Fulya

    2006-12-01

    Vertical bone loss in edentulous maxillary alveolar processes may necessitate a sinus lift before the placement of dental implants. We have measured and assessed maxillary sinuses meticulously before the operation and evaluated the postoperative results of the operation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirteen edentulous maxillary regions in eight patients were included in the study. The patients were examined 1 week before and 3 months after the sinus lift operations using a 1.5 T superconductive MR imager that gave oblique sagittal T2-weighted images with slices 2 mm thick without a gap. The images that were obtained 3 months after the sinus lift operations confirmed that vertical height had increased. We obtained high quality images without any artefacts during a short examination period with a high-resolution scanner. The results showed that it is possible to assess the maxillary sinus before the sinus lift and to evaluate the postoperative results using MRI accurately in three dimensions without the risk of radiation. This makes MRI a suitable alternative to computed tomography (CT).

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of medulloblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokimura, Hiroshi; Uetsuhara, Koichi; Komasaku, Ryuichiro; Kasamo, Shizuya; Asakura, Tetsuhiko

    1989-01-01

    Five patients with medulloblastomas were evaluated with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and the results were compared with those of X-ray computed tomography (CT). On CT, medulloblastomas generally appeared as isodense or hyperdense masses and were enhanced uniformly with a contrast agent. On MRI, medulloblastomas appeared as low-intensity masses in T 1 -weighted images and as high-intensity masses in T 2 -weighted images. Moreover, the tumors were clearly differentiated from the surrounding tissue. In sagittal images, we could easily recognize the relation between the brainstem or the fourth ventiricle and the tumors. In spite of these merits, though, on MRI we could not detect the boundary between the tumors and the perifocal edema. In this point, we had to be dependent on CT. In one case, we could measure the T 1 value and the T 2 value both before and after irradiation. The T 2 value was markedly decreased after irradiation. Henceforth, the T 1 and T 2 values can be used to evaluate the effects of irradiation. Medulloblastomas are often disseminated through cerebrospinal fluid. We could detect this type of metastasis by means of the sagittal image on MRI. As has been mentioned above, MRI is very useful in diagnosing medulloblastomas and for the post-operative follow-up those tumors. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, H.; Sakai, F.; Kan, S.; Okada, J.; Tazaki, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was studied in 91 patients with migraine and in 98 controls. Risk factors known to cause MRI lesions were carefully examined. In 36 patients with migraine (39.6%), small foci of high intensity on T 2 -weighted and proton-density-weighted images were seen in the white matter. Of patients with migraine who were less than 40 years old and without any risk factor, 29.4% showed lesions on MRI; this was singificantly higher than the 11.2% for the group of age-matched controls (n=98). The lesions were distributed predominantly in the centrum semiovale and frontal white matter in young patients, but extended to the deeper white matter at the level of basal ganglia in the older age group. The side of the MRI lesions did not always correspond to the side of usual aura or headache. Migraine-related variables such as type of migraine, frequency, duration or intensity of headache or consumption of ergotamine showed no significant correlation with the incidence om MRI abnormalities. The data indicated that migraine may be associated with early pathologic changes in the brain. 26 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of prostate tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yue; Huang, Lixiang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ji, Qian; Shen, Wen [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2015-08-15

    To describe the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of prostate tuberculosis. Six patients with prostate tuberculosis were analyzed retrospectively. The mean age of the patients was 60.5 years (range, 48-67 years). The mean prostate specific antigen concentration was 6.62 ng/mL (range, 0.54-14.57 ng/mL). All patients underwent a multiparametric MRI examination. The histopathological results were obtained from biopsies in four men and from transurethral resection of the prostate in two men after the MRI examination. Nodular (33%, 2/6 patients) and diffuse lesions (67%, 4/6 patients) were seen on MRI. The nodular lesions were featured by extremely low signal intensity (similar to that of muscle) on T2-weighted imaging (T2WI). The T2WI signal intensity of the diffuse lesions was low but higher than that of muscle, which showed high signal intensity on diffusion weighted imaging and low signal intensity on an apparent diffusion coefficient map. MR spectroscopic imaging of this type showed a normal-like spectrum. Abscesses were found in one patient with the nodular type and in one with the diffuse type. The appearance of prostate tuberculosis on MRI can be separated into multiple nodular and diffuse types. Multiparametric MRI may offer useful information for diagnosing prostate tuberculosis.

  14. Endometrial cancer: preoperative staging using three-dimensional T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and diffusion-weighted MR imaging at 3.0 T: a prospective comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Kim, Tonsok; Onishi, Hiromitsu; Nakamoto, Atsushi; Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Imaoka, Izumi; Kagawa, Yuki; Murakami, Takamichi [Kinki University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Ueguchi, Takashi; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki [Osaka University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Osaka (Japan); Enomoto, Takayuki [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka (Japan); Niigata University School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Niigata (Japan); Kimura, Tadashi [Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    To prospectively assess the efficacy of 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using the three-dimensional turbo spin-echo T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted technique (3D-TSE/DW) compared with that of conventional imaging using the two-dimensional turbo spin-echo T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced technique (2D-TSE/DCE) for the preoperative staging of endometrial cancer, with pathological analysis as the reference standard. Seventy-one women with endometrial cancer underwent MR imaging using 3D-TSE/DW (b = 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) and 2D-TSE/DCE. Two radiologists independently assessed the two imaging sets. Accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for staging were analysed with the McNemar test; the areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) were compared with a univariate z-score test. The results for assessing deep myometrial invasion, accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and Az, respectively, were as follows: 3D-TSE/DW - observer 1, 87 %, 95 %, 85 % and 0.96; observer 2, 92 %, 84 %, 94 % and 0.95; 2D-TSE/DCE - observer 1, 80 %, 79 %, 81 % and 0.89; observer 2, 86 %, 84 %, 87 % and 0.86. Most of the values were higher with 3D-TSE/DW without significant differences (P > 0.12). For assessing cervical stromal invasion, there were no significant differences in those values for both observers (P > 0.6). Accuracy of 3D-TSE/DW was at least equivalent to that of the conventional technique for the preoperative assessment of endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging in hemosiderosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kessing, P.H.L.; Falke, T.H.M.; Steiner, R.M.; Bloem, H.; Peters, A. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis)

    1985-01-15

    The case of a patient with iron deposition disease is presented to illustrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of this entity. The image characteristics of MRI are discussed and the results are compared with those of computer tomography (CT). The importance of a decrease in T2 relaxation time as the determinant parameter for signal intensity in MRI of the liver in such patients is emphasized.

  16. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  17. Fast T1- and T2-weighted pulmonary MR-imaging in patients with bronchial carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both, M.; Schultze, J.; Reuter, M.; Bewig, B.; Hubner, R.; Bobis, I.; Noth, R.; Heller, M.; Biederer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: A prospective study to evaluate the diagnostic potential and limitations of three fast MRI sequences in patients with bronchial carcinoma based on the comparison with spiral CT. Material and methods: Three fast chest MRI sequences from 20 patients with central or peripheral bronchial carcinoma were evaluated by two observers for relation of tumour to adjacent structures, lymph node enlargement, additional pulmonary lesions and artefacts. The information from MR-imaging was compared with the results from spiral CT. MRI comprised a T1-3D-GRE breath-hold examination ('VIBE', TR/TE 4.5/1.9 ms, flip-angle 12 deg., matrix 502 x 512, 2.5 mm coronal slices), a breath-hold, T2-HASTE sequence (TR/TE 2000/43 ms, matrix 192 x 256, 10 mm coronal slices) and a respiration-triggered T2-TSE sequence (TR/TE 3000-6000/120 ms, matrix 270 x 512, 6 mm transverse slices). The FOV was adapted individually (380-480 mm). Results: The presence of the primary bronchial carcinoma and infiltration of thoracic structures by tumour tissue could be demonstrated by all sequences. VIBE sequence was more suitable for detecting small pulmonary nodules than the other MRI examinations, but compared to CT still 20% of these lesions were missed. Contrary to VIBE and T2-weighted TSE scans, HASTE sequence was limited in imaging mediastinal lymph nodes due to missing relevant findings in 2/20 patients. HASTE images significantly provided the lowest rate of artefacts in imaging lung parenchyma (P < 0.001 in peripheral parenchyma), but spatial resolution was limited in this sequence. Concerning the differentiation between tumour and adjacent atelectasis (n = 8), T2-weighted TSE imaging was superior to CT and VIBE in all cases and to HASTE sequence in 4/8 patients. Conclusion: The combination of VIBE and HASTE sequence allows for an adequate imaging of thoracic processes in patients with bronchial carcinoma, limited only in visualizing small pulmonary nodules. To obtain more detail resolution and to

  18. Proximal Bright Vessel Sign on Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Acute Cardioembolic Cerebral Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ayumi; Shinohara, Yuki; Kuya, Keita; Sakamoto, Makoto; Kowa, Hisanori; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2017-07-01

    The congestion of spin-labeled blood at large-vessel occlusion can present as hyperintense signals on perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (proximal bright vessel sign). The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference between proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign in acute cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Forty-two patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction in the anterior circulation territory underwent magnetic resonance imaging including diffusion-weighted imaging, 3-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, T2*-weighted imaging, and 3-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography using a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner. Visual assessments of proximal bright vessel sign and the susceptibility vessel sign were performed by consensus of 2 experienced neuroradiologists. The relationship between these signs and the occlusion site of magnetic resonance angiography was also investigated. Among 42 patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction, 24 patients showed proximal bright vessel sign (57.1%) and 25 showed susceptibility vessel sign (59.5%). There were 19 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-clear, 12 cases of proximal bright vessel sign and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear, and 11 mismatched cases. Four out of 6 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-unclear and susceptibility vessel sign-clear showed distal middle cerebral artery occlusion, and 2 out of 5 patients with proximal bright vessel sign-clear and susceptibility vessel sign-unclear showed no occlusion on magnetic resonance angiography. Proximal bright vessel sign is almost compatible with susceptibility vessel sign in patients with cardioembolic cerebral infarction. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. MR imaging with fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequence of childhood adrenoleukodystrophy : comparison with T2 weighted spin echo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Asiry; Seo, Jeong-Jin; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Chung, Tae Woong; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kook, Hoon; Woo, Young Jong; Hwang, Tai Joo [Chonnam Univ. Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of FLAIR(Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) MR imaging in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy by comparing with those of T2-weighted FSE imaging, and to correlate MRI findings with clinical manifestations. Axial FLAIR images(TR/TE/TI=10004/123/2200) and T2-weighted FSE images(TR/TE=4000/104) of brain in six male patients(age range : 6-17 years, mean age : 10.2 years) with biochemically confirmed adrenoleukodystrophy were compared visually by two radiologists for detection, conspicuity, and the extent of lesion. Quantitatively, we compared lesion/CSF contrast, lesion/CSF contrast to noise ratio(CNR), lesion/white matter(WM) contrast, and lesion/WM CNR between FLAIR and T2 weighted image. We correlated MR findings with clinical manifestations of neurologic symptoms and evaluated whether MRI could detect white matter lesions in neurologically asymptomatic patients. Visual detection of lesions was better with FLAIR images in 2 of the 6 cases and it was equal in the remainders. Visual conspicuity and detection of the extent of lesion were superior on FLAIR images than T2-weighted images in all 6 cases. In the quantitative assessment of lesions, FLAIR was superior to T2-weighted image for lesion/CSF contrast and lesion/CSF CNR, but was inferior to T2 weighted image for lesion/WM contrast and lesion/WM CNR. In one case, FLAIR images distinguished the portion of encephalomalacic change from lesions. MR findings of adrenoleukodystrophy were correlated with clinical manifestations in symptomatic 4 cases, and also detected white matter lesions in asymptomatic 2 cases. MR imaging with FLAIR sequence provided images that were equal or superior to T2-weighted images in the evaluation of childhood adrenoleukodystrophy. MRI findings were well correlated with clinical manifestations and could detect white matter lesions in neurologically asymptomatic adrenoleukodystrophy patients.

  20. Intracellular labeling and quantification process by magnetic resonance imaging using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles in rat C6 glioma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Amaro Junior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess intracellular labeling and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging using iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles coated with biocompatible materials in rat C6 glioma cells in vitro. These methods will provide direction for future trials of tumor induction in vivo as well as possible magnetic hyperthermia applications. Methods: Aminosilane, dextran, polyvinyl alcohol, and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles were used in the qualitative assessment of C6 cell labeling via light microscopy. The influence of the transfection agent poly-L-lysine on cellular uptake was examined. The quantification process was performed by relaxometry analysis in T1 and T2weighted phantom images. Results: Light microscopy revealed that the aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles alone or complexed with poly-L-lysine showed higher cellular uptake than did the uncoated magnetic particles. The relaxivities of the aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter of 50nm to a 3-T field were r1=(6.1±0.3×10-5 ms-1mL/μg, r2=(5.3±0.1× 10-4 ms-1mL/μg, with a ratio of r2 / r1 ≅ 9. The iron uptake in the cells was calculated by analyzing the relaxation rates (R1 and R2 using a mathematical relationship. Conclusions: C6 glioma cells have a high uptake efficiency for aminosilane-coated magnetic nanoparticles complexed with the transfection agent poly-L-lysine. The large ratio r2 / r1 ≅ 9 indicates that these magnetic nanoparticles are ideal for quantification by magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted imaging techniques.

  1. Evaluation of renal function with dynamic MRI-T2-weighted gradient echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Katsuya

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of dynamic MRI of kidneys in healthy volunteers and patients with different 24-hour creatinine clearance (Ccr) levels, a dynamic study that employed the T2 weighted gradient echo technique (FLASH: TR/TE=34/25 msec, flip angle= 20 degrees) with single images during breathhold was performed on 10 healthy volunteers and 35 patients, all examined for the Ccr and suspected of having renal parenchymal disease after a phantom study. T1-weighted and dynamic MR imagings were obtained with a 1.5T imager. I analyzed the time-intensity curve of renal cortex and medulla, and defined a cortex decreased ratio (CDR) and medulla decreased ratio (MDR) in comparison with the Ccr. The cortico-medullary difference ratio (CMDR) of T1WI was also compared with the Ccr. The parameters of the T2 dynamic MRI study (CDR, MDR) better correlated with the Ccr than CMDR. Renal function can be quantitatively evaluated with the T2 dynamic MRI and there is a possibility that we can qualitatively evaluate the renal dysfunction and estimate its cause. (author)

  2. T2-weighted MRI-derived textural features reflect prostate cancer aggressiveness: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nketiah, Gabriel; Elschot, Mattijs; Kim, Eugene; Teruel, Jose R. [NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Scheenen, Tom W. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bathen, Tone F.; Selnaes, Kirsten M. [NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway)

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic relevance of T2-weighted (T2W) MRI-derived textural features relative to quantitative physiological parameters derived from diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI in Gleason score (GS) 3+4 and 4+3 prostate cancers. 3T multiparametric-MRI was performed on 23 prostate cancer patients prior to prostatectomy. Textural features [angular second moment (ASM), contrast, correlation, entropy], apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and DCE pharmacokinetic parameters (K{sup trans} and V{sub e}) were calculated from index tumours delineated on the T2W, DW, and DCE images, respectively. The association between the textural features and prostatectomy GS and the MRI-derived parameters, and the utility of the parameters in differentiating between GS 3+4 and 4+3 prostate cancers were assessed statistically. ASM and entropy correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with both GS and median ADC. Contrast correlated moderately with median ADC. The textural features correlated insignificantly with K{sup trans} and V{sub e}. GS 4+3 cancers had significantly lower ASM and higher entropy than 3+4 cancers, but insignificant differences in median ADC, K{sup trans}, and V{sub e}. The combined texture-MRI parameters yielded higher classification accuracy (91%) than the individual parameter sets. T2W MRI-derived textural features could serve as potential diagnostic markers, sensitive to the pathological differences in prostate cancers. (orig.)

  3. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gispen, W.H.; Nicolay, K.; Verhaagen, J.; Muller, H.J.; Duckers, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short τ inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a neurotrophic adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9 analogue [H-Met(O 2 )-Glu-His-Phe-d-Lys-Phe-OH] on the volume of lesions in the brains of rats suffering from chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis. Lesion volume was monitored during a five-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated that treatment with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9 analogue significantly reduced the lesion volume by 84 and 85% 10 and 20 weeks after lesion induction, respectively. Furthermore, peptide treatment significantly reduced chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis-related neurological symptoms during the chronic phase of the disease (week 3 until week 20 after lesion induction). Both functional and morphological recovery were considerably advanced by peptide treatment. Twenty weeks after lesion induction rats with chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis were killed for histological analysis, to correlate magnetic resonance imaging findings with morphological changes. The regions of abnormally high signal intensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images coincided with areas of demyelination and concomitant widespread inflammatory infiltration, oedema formation and enlarged ventricles.The improved neurological status and the 84% reduction in the lesion volume in the cerebrum of rats chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis point to the potential value of trophic peptides in the development of strategies for limiting the damage caused by central demyelinating lesions in syndromes such as multiple sclerosis. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gispen, W.H. [Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Nicolay, K. [Department of in vivo NMR, Bijvoet Center, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaagen, J. [Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Muller, H.J. [Department of in vivo NMR, Bijvoet Center, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Duckers, H.J. [Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-02-14

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short {tau} inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a neurotrophic adrenocorticotrophic hormone{sub 4-9} analogue [H-Met(O{sub 2})-Glu-His-Phe-d-Lys-Phe-OH] on the volume of lesions in the brains of rats suffering from chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis. Lesion volume was monitored during a five-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated that treatment with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone{sub 4-9} analogue significantly reduced the lesion volume by 84 and 85% 10 and 20 weeks after lesion induction, respectively. Furthermore, peptide treatment significantly reduced chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis-related neurological symptoms during the chronic phase of the disease (week 3 until week 20 after lesion induction). Both functional and morphological recovery were considerably advanced by peptide treatment. Twenty weeks after lesion induction rats with chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis were killed for histological analysis, to correlate magnetic resonance imaging findings with morphological changes. The regions of abnormally high signal intensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images coincided with areas of demyelination and concomitant widespread inflammatory infiltration, oedema formation and enlarged ventricles.The improved neurological status and the 84% reduction in the lesion volume in the cerebrum of rats chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis point to the potential value of trophic peptides in the development of strategies for limiting the damage caused by central demyelinating lesions in syndromes such as multiple sclerosis. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Visualization of cranial nerves I-XII: value of 3D CISS and T2-weighted FSE sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousry, I.; Camelio, S.; Wiesmann, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Yousry, T.A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Marchioninistrasse 15, D-81377 Munich (Germany); Schmid, U.D. [Neurosurgical Unit, Klinik im Park, 8000 Zurich (Switzerland); Horsfield, M.A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 5WW (United Kingdom)

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of the three-dimensional constructive interference of steady state (3D CISS) sequence (slice thickness 0.7 mm) and that of the T2-weighted fast spin echo (T2-weighted FSE) sequence (slice thickness 3 mm) for the visualization of all cranial nerves in their cisternal course. Twenty healthy volunteers were examined using the T2-weighted FSE and the 3D CISS sequences. Three observers evaluated independently the cranial nerves NI-NXII in their cisternal course. The rates for successful visualization of each nerve for 3D CISS (and for T2-weighted FSE in parentheses) were as follows: NI, NII, NV, NVII, NVIII 40 of 40 (40 of 40), NIII 40 of 40 (18 of 40), NIV 19 of 40 (3 of 40), NVI 39 of 40 (5 of 40), NIX, X, XI 40 of 40 (29 of 40), and NXII 40 of 40 (4 of 40). Most of the cranial nerves can be reliably assessed when using the 3D CISS and the T2-weighted FSE sequences. Increasing the spatial resolution when using the 3D CISS sequence increases the reliability of the identification of the cranial nerves NIII-NXII. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to study striatal iron accumulation in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Virel

    Full Text Available Abnormal accumulation of iron is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. In Parkinson's disease, an excess of iron has been demonstrated in different structures of the basal ganglia and is suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson's disease, the edematous effect of 6-OHDA and its relation with striatal iron accumulation was examined utilizing in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The results revealed that in comparison with control animals, injection of 6-OHDA into the rat striatum provoked an edematous process, visible in T2-weighted images that was accompanied by an accumulation of iron clearly detectable in T2*-weighted images. Furthermore, Prussian blue staining to detect iron in sectioned brains confirmed the existence of accumulated iron in the areas of T2* hypointensities. The presence of ED1-positive microglia in the lesioned striatum overlapped with this accumulation of iron, indicating areas of toxicity and loss of dopamine nerve fibers. Correlation analyses demonstrated a direct relation between the hyperintensities caused by the edema and the hypointensities caused by the accumulation of iron.

  7. Multi-contrast brain magnetic resonance image super-resolution using the local weight similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Qu, Xiaobo; Bai, Zhengjian; Liu, Yunsong; Guo, Di; Dong, Jiyang; Peng, Xi; Chen, Zhong

    2017-01-17

    Low-resolution images may be acquired in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) due to limited data acquisition time or other physical constraints, and their resolutions can be improved with super-resolution methods. Since MRI can offer images of an object with different contrasts, e.g., T1-weighted or T2-weighted, the shared information between inter-contrast images can be used to benefit super-resolution. In this study, an MRI image super-resolution approach to enhance in-plane resolution is proposed by exploring the statistical information estimated from another contrast MRI image that shares similar anatomical structures. We assume some edge structures are shown both in T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI brain images acquired of the same subject, and the proposed approach aims to recover such kind of structures to generate a high-resolution image from its low-resolution counterpart. The statistical information produces a local weight of image that are found to be nearly invariant to the image contrast and thus this weight can be used to transfer the shared information from one contrast to another. We analyze this property with comprehensive mathematics as well as numerical experiments. Experimental results demonstrate that the image quality of low-resolution images can be remarkably improved with the proposed method if this weight is borrowed from a high resolution image with another contrast. Multi-contrast MRI Image Super-resolution with Contrast-invariant Regression Weights.

  8. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the chi2 test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p 0.05). Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain.

  9. Clinical observation of metal artifacts on magnetic resonance images of oral and maxillofacial regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Shimahara, Masashi; Takeishi, Hiroshi; Uesugi, Yasuo; Narabayashi, Isamu

    2002-01-01

    We assessed the effect of metal materials used in prosthodontics on the clarity of clinical magnetic resonance (MR) images of the oral and maxillofacial regions in 37 patients. Excluded were patients who had undergone surgery in either region, patients with deciduous teeth, patients with a space-occupying lesion, i.e., an inflammatory change or a malignant process, and patients for whom images were affected by motion artifacts. The patients had all undergone orthopantomography, though none received dental treatment in the period between the MR imaging and orthopantomography study. T1- and T2- weighted axial images were used. There were no apparent differences between T1- and T2- weighted images in artifacts caused by metal prosthodontics, whereas artifacts caused by metal crowns were severe in comparison to those caused by metal inlays. In the lateral and apex portions of the tongue, when more than four crowns were present, artifacts had a marked influence on the image, and diagnosis could not be made. Moreover, in the upper and lower alveolus, the presence of two crowns had a similar effect, precluding diagnosis. However, in the antrum, mandibular body, and mental regions, metal artifacts had less of an effect on the images compared to that of metal artifacts in the alveolus region. (author)

  10. Experimental study on early detection of alloxan-induced pulmonary injury by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awai, Kazuo; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Susumu; Fujikawa, Koichi; Utsumi, Toshio; Kajima, Toshio; Azuma, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Katsuhide.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the early detection of alloxan-induced pulmonary injury by magnetic resonance imaging in vivo. Permeability edema was induced in ten rats by intravenous injection of alloxan at 100 mg/Kg. T1-and T2-weighted images were acquired in five rats every 30 min for 120 min after alloxan injection. Five rats served as controls. The rats were sacrificed immediately after imaging and examined microscopically. CT images were also acquired in five rats every 30 min for 120 min after alloxan injection. Five rats served as controls. The rats were sacrificed immediately after imaging, and the wet-to-dry ratio of the lung was measured. In T1-weighted images, relative signal intensity from the lung with permeability edema rose from 30 min to 120 min, and was greater than that from normal lung every time. In T2-weighted images, there was no statistically significant difference in relative signal intensity of the lung between permeability edema and the control during 120 min. In CT images, there was also no statistically significant difference in lung density between permeability edema and the control during 120 min. There was no statistically significant difference in the wet-to-dry lung ratio between edematous lung and normal lung. In histological study, mild congestion and interstitial edema were observed in edematous lung. These results suggest the potential capability of MR imaging in detecting the early phase of permeability pulmonary edema. (author)

  11. Assessment of acute myocarditis by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging: Comparison of qualitative and quantitative analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriaco, Massimo; Nappi, Carmela; Puglia, Marta; De Giorgi, Marco; Dell'Aversana, Serena; Cuocolo, Renato; Ponsiglione, Andrea; De Giorgi, Igino; Polito, Maria Vincenza; Klain, Michele; Piscione, Federico; Pace, Leonardo; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2017-10-26

    To compare cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) qualitative and quantitative analysis methods for the noninvasive assessment of myocardial inflammation in patients with suspected acute myocarditis (AM). A total of 61 patients with suspected AM underwent coronary angiography and CMR. Qualitative analysis was performed applying Lake-Louise Criteria (LLC), followed by quantitative analysis based on the evaluation of edema ratio (ER) and global relative enhancement (RE). Diagnostic performance was assessed for each method by measuring the area under the curves (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic analyses. The final diagnosis of AM was based on symptoms and signs suggestive of cardiac disease, evidence of myocardial injury as defined by electrocardiogram changes, elevated troponin I, exclusion of coronary artery disease by coronary angiography, and clinical and echocardiographic follow-up at 3 months after admission to the chest pain unit. In all patients, coronary angiography did not show significant coronary artery stenosis. Troponin I levels and creatine kinase were higher in patients with AM compared to those without (both P qualitative (T2-weighted STIR 0.92, EGE 0.87 and LGE 0.88) and quantitative (ER 0.89 and global RE 0.80) analyses were also similar. Qualitative and quantitative CMR analysis methods show similar diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of AM. These findings suggest that a simplified approach using a shortened CMR protocol including only T2-weighted STIR sequences might be useful to rule out AM in patients with acute coronary syndrome and normal coronary angiography.

  12. Gadolinium-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging with endorectal coil for local staging of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamakawa, Mitsuharu; Kawaai, Yuriko; Shirase, Ryuji

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dynamic gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with endorectal coil for assessing tumor invasion based on simple classification criteria. A total of 58 patients with operable primary rectal cancer underwent preoperative MRI. An enhancement pattern in Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI with regard to tumor penetration was clarified. Retrospectively, two observers independently scored T2-weighted MRI and T2-weighted MRI combined with Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI for tumor penetration using the following criteria: With Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI, T1 tumors showed an early enhanced line around the tumor as rim enhancement; T2 tumors appeared as black lines or double layers, as the muscularis propria kept its integrity; T3 tumors showed partial discontinuity of the muscularis propria as a dotted line and a perforated area as an interrupted line. A confidence level scoring system was used, and receiver operating characteristic curves were generated. There were no significant differences at the T1 stage. There were significant differences for observer 1 (P=0.001 for observer 1) at the T2 stage. There were significant differences for both observers (P=0.001 for observer 1 and P=0.005 for observer 2) at the T3 stage. Our criteria for Gd-enhanced dynamic MRI were effective for T3 stage tumors. (author)

  13. Granular cell tumor of the extremity: magnetic resonance imaging characteristics with pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacksin, Marcia F.; White, Lawrence M.; Hameed, Meera; Kandel, Rita; Patterson, Francis R.; Benevenia, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to delineate the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of a granular cell tumor (GrCT) of the extremity and to correlate the imaging appearance with the microscopic findings. A retrospective review of five patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of GrCT and pre-operative MR imaging of the neoplasm was done. The images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists in a consensus fashion. Lesion location, size, shape, margination, and signal intensity characteristics were assessed. MR findings were correlated with histopathological examination. The benign subtype of GrCT is usually isointense or brighter than muscle on T1-weighted sequences, round or oval in shape, superficial in location, and 4 cm or less in size. On T2-weighted sequences, benign lesions may demonstrate a high peripheral signal, as well as a central signal intensity that is isointense to muscle or suppressed fat. A significant stromal component in the tumor and, hypothetically, a ribbon-like arrangement of tumor cells may influence the signal intensity demonstrated on the T1 and T2-weighted sequences. The malignant subtype may demonstrate signal intensity characteristics and invasion of adjacent structures often seen with other aggressive neoplasms; sizes larger than 4 cm and association with major nerve trunks can be seen. (orig.)

  14. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ha-Na; Kim, Kyoung-A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the χ2 test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p0.05). Conclusion Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain. PMID:25473637

  15. Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography: Practical Tips and Clinical Indications for Biliary Disease Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Palmucci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction, MRCP has been improved over the years due to the introduction of several technical advances and innovations. It consists of a noninvasive method for biliary tree representation, based on heavily T2-weighted images. Conventionally, its protocol includes two-dimensional single-shot fast spin-echo images, acquired with thin sections or with multiple thick slabs. In recent years, three-dimensional T2-weighted fast-recovery fast spin-echo images have been added to the conventional protocol, increasing the possibility of biliary anatomy demonstration and leading to a significant benefit over conventional 2D imaging. A significant innovation has been reached with the introduction of hepatobiliary contrasts, represented by gadoxetic acid and gadobenate dimeglumine: they are excreted into the bile canaliculi, allowing the opacification of the biliary tree. Recently, 3D interpolated T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo images have been proposed for the evaluation of the biliary tree, obtaining images after hepatobiliary contrast agent administration. Thus, the acquisition of these excretory phases improves the diagnostic capability of conventional MRCP—based on T2 acquisitions. In this paper, technical features of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography are briefly discussed; main diagnostic tips of hepatobiliary phase are showed, emphasizing the benefit of enhanced cholangiography in comparison with conventional MRCP.

  16. Carcinoma of the cervix. Value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in assessing early stromal invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yumi; Aoki, Yoichi; Kase, Hiroaki; Kodama, Shoji; Tanaka, Kenichi

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (dynamic MR imaging) in the evaluation of preinvasive and early invasive cancer of the cervix. Twenty-nine women with untreated squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix with either no stromal invasion or early stromal invasion underwent pretreatment MR imaging and dynamic MR imaging within 4 weeks of surgical evaluation. The images were evaluated for tumor detection and compared with results of histologic examination of the surgical specimens. The lesions in 17 cases with histologically proven stromal invasion of 4 mm or greater were detected with dynamic MR imaging, whereas lesions in only 8 of these cases were detected with T2 imaging. In 9 cases with stromal invasion between 4.0 mm and 5.0 mm, lesions were represented as early phase focal enhancement on dynamic MR images, but not detected on T2-weighted images. In the 12 cases with less than 4 mm stromal invasion, no lesions were visualized on either T2-weighted images or dynamic MR images, except in 1 case of glandular involvement without stromal invasion that appeared as enhancement on early-phase dynamic MR imaging. Dynamic MR imaging detected more lesions of early stromal invasion in pretreatment imaging for cervical cancer than nonenhanced MR imaging. (author)

  17. Optimising magnetic resonance image quality of the ear in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Davina; Lüpke, Matthias; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Klopmann, Thilo; Nolte, Ingo; Seifert, Hermann

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an examination protocol for magnetic resonance imaging, in order to display diagnostically important information of the canine middle and inner ear. To ensure that this protocol could also be used as a basis for determining pathological changes, the anatomical structures of the ear were presented in detail. To minimise stress through anaesthesia in live animals, preliminary examinations were carried out on four dog cadavers. During these initial examinations, three-dimensional (3D) sequences proved to be superior to two-dimensional ones. Therefore, only 3D sequences were applied for the main examinations performed on six clinically healthy Beagles. The anonymised MR images were rated by three experienced reviewers using a five-point scale. The most valuable sequence was a T2-weighted CISS sequence (TR = 16.7 ms, TE = 8.08 ms). This sequence proved to be most suitable for illustrating the inner ear structures and enabled good tissue contrasts. The sequence ranked second best was also a T2-weighted DESS sequence (TR = 19 ms, TE = 6 ms), allowing the imaging of the tympanic cavity and enabling 3D reconstruction due to its isotropic voxels. Due to low contrast and strong noise, the other sequences (TSE, FISP, MP RAGE) were not suitable for anatomical illustration of the middle and inner ear.

  18. Endometrium evaluation with high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging in patients submitted to uterine leiomyoma embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Monica Amadio Piazza; Nasser, Felipe; Zlotnik, Eduardo; Messina, Marcos de Lorenzo; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the endometrial alterations related to embolization of uterine arteries for the treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis (pelvic pain and/or uterine bleeding) by means of high-field (3-Tesla) magnetic resonance. This is a longitudinal and prospective study that included 94 patients with a clinical and imaging diagnosis of symptomatic uterine leiomyomatosis, all of them treated by embolization of the uterine arteries. The patients were submitted to evaluations by high-field magnetic resonance of the pelvis before and 6 months after the procedure. Specific evaluations were made of the endometrium on the T2-weighted sequences, and on the T1-weighted sequences before and after the intravenous dynamic infusion of the paramagnetic contrast. In face of these measures, statistical analyses were performed using Student's t test for comparison of the results obtained before and after the procedure. An average increase of 20.9% was noted in the endometrial signal on T2-weighted images obtained after the uterine artery embolization procedure when compared to the pre-procedure evaluation (p=0.0004). In the images obtained with the intravenous infusion of paramagnetic contrast, an average increase of 18.7% was noted in the post-embolization intensity of the endometrial signal, compared to the pre-embolization measure (p<0.035). After embolization of the uterine arteries, there was a significant increase of the endometrial signal on the T2-weighted images and on the post-contrast images, inferring possible edema and increased endometrial flow. Future studies are needed to assess the clinical impact of these findings

  19. Texture analysis of torn rotator cuff on preoperative magnetic resonance arthrography as a predictor of postoperative tendon status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Ah; Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kim, Boh Young; Kim, Su Jin; Ahn, Joong Mo; Kang, Heung Sik [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate texture data of the torn supraspinatus tendon (SST) on preoperative T2-weighted magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) for prediction of post-operative tendon state. Fifty patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears of the SST were included in this retrospective study. Based on 1-year follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging showed that 30 patients had intact SSTs, and 20 had rotator cuff retears. Using GLCM, two radiologists measured independently the highest signal intensity area of the distal end of the torn SST on preoperative T2-weighted MRA, which were compared between two groups.The relationships with other well-known prognostic factors, including age, tear size (anteroposterior dimension), retraction size (mediolateral tear length), grade of fatty degeneration of the SST and infraspinatus tendon, and arthroscopic fixation technique (single or double row), also were evaluated. Of all the GLCM features, the retear group showed significantly higher entropy (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001), variance (p = 0.030 and 0.011), and contrast (p = 0.033 and 0.012), but lower angular second moment (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002) and inverse difference moment (p = 0.027 and 0.027), as well as larger tear size (p = 0.001) and retraction size (p = 0.002) than the intact group. Retraction size (odds ratio [OR] = 3.053) and entropy (OR = 17.095) were significant predictors. Texture analysis of torn SSTs on preoperative T2-weighted MRA using the GLCM may be helpful to predict postoperative tendon state after rotator cuff repair.

  20. The value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging in predicting postoperative recovery in patients with cervical spondylosis myelopathy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Pan, Jun; Nisar, Majid; Zeng, Huan Bei; Dai, Li Fang; Lou, Chao; Zhu, Si Pin; Dai, Bing; Xiang, Guang Heng

    2016-03-01

    This meta-analysis was designed to elucidate whether preoperative signal intensity changes could predict the surgical outcomes of patients with cervical spondylosis myelopathy on the basis of T1-weighted and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging images. We searched the Medline database and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for this purpose and 10 studies meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. In total, 650 cervical spondylosis myelopathy patients with (+) or without (-) intramedullary signal changes on their T2-weighted images were examined. Weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were used to summarize the data. Patients with focal and faint border changes in the intramedullary signal on T2 magnetic resonance imaging had similar Japanese Orthopaedic Association recovery ratios as those with no signal changes on the magnetic resonance imaging images of the spinal cord did. The surgical outcomes were poorer in the patients with both T2 intramedullary signal changes, especially when the signal changes were multisegmental and had a well-defined border and T1 intramedullary signal changes compared with those without intramedullary signal changes. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging including T1 and T2 imaging can thus be used to predict postoperative recovery in cervical spondylosis myelopathy patients.

  1. Diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma : significance of T2-weighted MR image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ra, Won Kyun; Lee, Yul; Ko, Eun Young; Lee, Kyung Won; Yang, Ik; Chung, Soo Young; Shim, Jeong Won [Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    To evaluate the significance of T2-weighted MR imaging(T2WI) in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma. We retrospectively evaluated the MR imaging findings of 30 cases of pituitary microadenoma. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgery, serum hormonal level, and the presence of mass lesion on MR (T1WI and T2WI), and conventional as well as dynamic contrast enhanced T1WI images were obtained. In each MR sequence, signal intensity and detectability of the tumor were evaluated. We also determined whether diagnosis was possible on both T1WI and T2WI. In eight cases, histopathologic findings (cellularity, fibrosis, and cystic change) were correlated with T2 signal intensity of the tumor. T2WI, T1WI, and dynamic and conventional enhanced T1WI detected the tumor in 21 cases (70%), 21 cases (70%), 28 cases (93.3%), and 22 cases (73.3%), respectively. On T2WI, pituitary microadenomas showed a high signal in 18 cases (60%), an iso-signal in nine (30%), and a low signal in three (10%) compared with normal pituitary gland. In 20 cases (66.7%), diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma was possible on both T1WI and T2WI, but in one case, the tumor was detected only on T2WI. Three cases with fibrosis, as seen on histopathologic examination showed an iso or low signal on T2WI. T2WI is useful in the diagnosis of pituitary microadenoma Decreased signal intensity on T2WI may suggest fibrosis.

  2. Diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy with MRI. Efficacy of T2*-weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshigi, Jun; Kitagaki, Hajime; Yashiro, Naobumi; Kinoshita, Takahiro; O'uchi, Toshihiro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess MRI in diagnosing ectopic pregnancy (EP), emphasizing T 2 * -weighted imaging (WI) efficacy. This is a prospective study of 24 female patients (16 to 41 years, average 29.9) clinically suspected of EP from April 1999 to June 2001. Eighteen had minimal vaginal bleeding and slight abdominal pain. All had positive pregnancy tests, and sonography showed no intrauterine pregnancy despite estimated gestational age of embryos and/or high concentrations of human chorionic gonadotrophin. MRI was performed with a 1.5T imager (Siemens, Vision VB33A) with a body-array coil. T 2 -WI (HASTE), T 1 -WI (2D FLASH), and T 2 * -WI (2D FLASH) were obtained without contrast. T 2 -WI was routinely obtained in 3 directions. T 2 * -WI orientation was determined based on the T 2 -WI. One of 4 radiologists with experience interpreting abdominal MR images interpreted images based on transvaginal ultrasonography (TVUS) and laboratory results. Abnormal adnexal mass with remarkable low signal area on T 2 * -WI was diagnosed as EP. We diagnosed 19 cases as EP. Tubectomy in eighteen and abdominal total hysterectomy in one confirmed diagnosis. In one undergoing diagnostic laparoscopy, EP was denied. In 5 cases diagnosed negative based on the above criterion, no mass was detected in three, and no area of low signal was recognized on T 2 * -WI in the masses in two. EP was denied in four of five, and in one of the five, who underwent tubectomy, EP without bleeding was diagnosed. All EP were tubal pregnancies at final diagnosis, 19 were ampullar pregnancies and one, interstitial. Using MRI to diagnose EP, with T 2 * -WI as a key diagnostic factor, sensitivity was 95%, specificity 100%, and accuracy 96%. MRI using T 2 * -WI is a sensitive, specific, and accurate method to evaluate EP. T 2 * -WI is highly accurate for detecting and diagnosing EP because of its sensitivity to fresh hematoma. (author)

  3. Dot-like hemosiderin deposition on T2*-weighted MR imaging associated with nonhypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Toshio; Horita, Yoshifumi; Chiba, Masahiko; Miyata, Kei; Toyama, Kentaro; Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Hashimoto, Yuji; Niwa, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Microangiopathy, a disorder often related to hypertension, is an important cause of deep intracerebral hematoma (ICH). The microangiopathy is associated with dot-like low-intensity spots (a dot-like hemosiderin spot: dotHS) on gradient-echo T2*-weighted MR images that have been histologically diagnosed as old microbleeds. The locations of dotHS are consistent with deep ICH. To investigate how dotHS or other risk factors contribute to nonhypertensive deep ICH, the number and location of dotHSs, as well as other risk factors were examined in 213 deep ICH patients (106 males, 107 females, age: 37-94 (65.8 +/- 11.2) years) consecutively admitted to Hakodate Municipal Hospital. Patients were divided into two subgroups according to the presence or absence of hypertension. DotHSs were also divided into deep and subcortical dotHS and investigated independently. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from logistic regression analyses. Furthermore, nonhypertensive ICH patients were compared with nonhypertensive healthy volunteers matched for age and sex. No risk factors were identified in the 31 nonhypertensive deep ICH patients that differed from those found in the 182 hypertensive deep ICH patients. Deep dotHS > or = 1 (OR: 25.5; 95% CI: 4.76-137; P = .0002), subcortical dotHS > or = 1 (OR: 9.0; 95% CI: 1.79-44.9; P = .046), diabetes mellitus (OR: 9.0; 95% CI: 1.53-52.3; P = .015), and smoking (OR, 9.6; 95% CI; 1.8-49.8, P = .007) significantly elevated the risk of nonhypertensive ICH, compared to the healthy volunteers. Our findings suggest that deep and subcortical dotHSs may be risk factors for the development of non-hypertensive deep ICH.

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance: myocardial perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, E.; Al-Saadi, N.; Fleck, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, German Heart Inst. Berlin and Charite, Campus Virchow, Humboldt Univ. (Germany)

    2000-06-01

    There is growing evidence that the noninvasive assessment of myocardial perfusion with cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a valid and accurate tool for the assessment of ischemic heart disease and its introduction into routine clinical evaluation of patients is rapidly expected. Magnetic resonance measurements allow the evaluation of reversible and irreversible myocardial ischemia, the assessment of acute myocardial infarction, as well as the recognition and detection of viable myocardium. Magnetic resonance perfusion measurements are mainly performed with T1-shortening contrast agents such as gadolinium-DTPA either by visual analysis or based on the analyses of signal intensity time curves. For the detection of myocardial ischemia the first pass kinetics of a gadolinium-DTPA bolus and for the detection of myocardial necrosis and the definition of viable myocardium steady state distribution kinetics are assessed. Quantitative analysis of myocardial perfusion can be performed but requires complex modeling due to the characteristics of gadolinium-DTPA. Thus, semi-quantitative parameters are preferred. There is accumulating evidence in the literature that magnetic resonance imaging can be used for the detection of coronary artery stenosis with high diagnostic accuracy both with semi-quantitative or visual analysis. Myocardial infarction can be reliably detected and the infarcted area determined. Non-reperfused infarcted myocardium can be differentiated from reperfused myocardium by different enhancement patterns that correlates with viability. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MR) erlangt bei der nichtinvasiven Diagnostik der koronaren Herzerkrankung eine zunehmende Bedeutung. Mit dieser Technik koennen sowohl die globale und regionale Myokardfunktion als auch die myokardiale Perfusion exakt beurteilt werden. Bisher liegen die meisten Daten fuer die Analyse von Wandbewegungsstoerun-gen unter Belastung vor, wobei sich eine deutliche diagnostische

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  7. Evaluation of the SLAP lesion using a low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Back, Chang Hee; Lee, Kyung Rae; Shin, Yun Hack

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic capabilities of the low-field (0.2T) magnetic resonance (MR) system in the detection of the superior labrum anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesion. One hundred fifty patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder over a 7-month period. Forty-six patients underwent arthroscopic surgery, and the surgical results were correlated with the findings of the MR imaging. Arthroscopic procedures were performed within a mean of 8 days after MR imaging. MR imaging of the shoulder was conducted as follows: shoulder coil; T1-weighted spin echo, coronal-oblique images; T2-weighted gradient echo, coronal-oblique and axial images; and T2-weighted spin echo, coronal oblique and sagittal-oblique images. Prospectively, one radiologist interpreted the MR images. The results of surgery were as follow: SLAP II in 26 shoulders, SLAP III in 1 shoulder, SLAP IV in 1 shoulder, normal labrum in 6 shoulder. For SLAP lesions with a higher grade than type 2, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of the low-field MRI were 85.7%, 55.5%. 75%, 71%, and 74%, respectively. There was relatively good agreement for the comparison of the MR results obtained using a low-field MR system with the surgical findings for identifying SLAP lesions

  8. Unidentified Bright Objects on Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging Affect Vestibular Neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Ji Chan; Chang, Dong Sik; Cho, Chin Saeng

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in clinical manifestations of in two groups of vestibular neuritis (VN) patients with or without unidentified bright objects (UBOs). A prospective, observational study with 46 patients diagnosed with VN between May 2013 and November 2013 was executed. A caloric test, a cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs) test, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), spontaneous nystagmus test, head impulse test, and head-shaking nystagmus test were performed. Of the patients, 56.5% (n=26) were classified as UBO-positive by MRI. These showed lower caloric weakness and more prominent cVEMP asymmetry compared with the UBO-negative group (P0.05). UBOs on T2-weighted or fluid attenuated inversion recovery MRI may affect the patterns of the vestibular nerve in patients with VN.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in schizophrenia: a morphometric study; Ressonancia magnetica na esquizofrenia: um estudo morfometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Claudio Campi de [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Instituto do Coracao (InCor). Secao de Ressonancia Magnetica]. E-mail: campi@uol.com.br

    2001-06-01

    Thirty-three patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 normal subjects were submitted to magnetic resonance imaging studies using a 1.5 T scanner. Axial and coronal T 2-weighted images were obtained. The volumes of the brain, intracranial, supratentorial, infratentorial and the total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes were measured using semi-automated morphometric methods. The volumes of the amygdala-hippocampus complex, para hippocampal gyrus cortex, putamen, globus pallidus, temporal lobe, gray and white matter of temporal lobe were also measured. These volumes were normalized using the intracranial volume as reference. The most relevant findings observed were reduced brain volume and increased total, ventricular and subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid volumes in patients with schizophrenia when compared to the controls. Patients with schizophrenia had also smaller amygdala-hippocampus complexes, temporal lobes and temporal lobe white matter than the controls, as well as increased putamen volumes. (author)

  10. Cerebral microbleeds: a magnetic resonance imaging review of common and less common causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, D

    2018-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are small foci of (acute, subacute or chronic) blood products, best seen using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques sensitive to iron deposits (i.e. gradient-echo T2*-weighted and susceptibility-weighted imaging), frequently encountered in small vessel disease (SVD) (with hypertensive vasculopathy and cerebral amyloid angiopathy as the most frequent conditions) and also in other disorders. In this review, the MRI characteristics of CMBs and the associated MRI abnormalities encountered in common and less common SVD and non-SVD conditions are the main focus. Identification of the origin of CMBs depends on their localization, the presence of other associated MRI abnormalities, and the patient's history and clinical state. © 2017 EAN.

  11. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Wakoh; Tsukamoto, Yuuko; Takizawa, Shunya; Kawada, Shiaki; Takagi, Shigeharu

    2012-01-01

    Renal dysfunction may be related to cerebral small-vessel disease. This study aimed to assess the relationship between mild renal dysfunction and various white matter hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 2106 subjects (1368 men and 738 women; mean age, 56 ± 10 years) without a history of stroke were enrolled in the study. Kidney function was evaluated in terms of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the relationship 194Cr(-1.094) × age(-0.287) × 0.739 (if female), where Cr is serum creatinine concentration. White matter hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI was classified as deep and/or subcortical white matter hyperintensity (DSWMH), periventricular hyperintensity (PVH), or asymptomatic cerebral infarction (ACI). The prevalence of ACI, DSWMH, and PVH was significantly correlated with degree of eGFR reduction; in the subgroups with eGFR ≥ 90, 60∼89, and Stroke Association.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of the skeletal muscle of a patient with nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, M; Mochizuki, Y

    1998-09-01

    This is the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) report of nemaline myopathy in which muscle atrophy was not apparent clinically in the lower extremities because of subcutaneous fat. The patient is a 38-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital because of muscle weakness of the four extremities. Until the age of 17 years, she was asymptomatic except that her running speed was slow. The T1-weighted image of muscle MRI at the mid-thigh level showed hyperintensity of the quadriceps femoris muscle and relatively spared hamstring muscle. The T2-weighted image of muscle MRI at the maximum diameter of the lower leg showed hyperintensity of the tibialis anterior muscle and a relatively spared triceps surae muscle. The biopsy specimen of the right deltoid muscle showed nemaline bodies and type II fiber deficiency.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando

    2000-01-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  14. HLA typing in acute optic neuritis. Relation to multiple sclerosis and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J.L.; Madsen, H.O.; Ryder, L.P.

    1997-01-01

    with idiopathic ON, 66 with ON + CDMS), ethnically matched with 192 healthy volunteers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relation between the HLA-DR15, -DR17, -DQA-1B, and -DQB-1B polymorphisms as defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and presence of plaques on T2-weighted brain MRI. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients......-DQB-1B (49% in ON + CDMS, 59% in ON) were significantly increased compared with control subjects (41%, HLA-DQA-1B; 37%, HLA-DQB-1B). Brain MRI was abnormal in 48 of 56 examined patients with ON + CDMS and in 64 of 120 examined patients with ON (P

  15. Solitary synovial chondromatosis arising in the gluteus maximus bursa: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Noriko; Nambu, Atsushi; Tago, Masao; Shibuya, Isao; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2016-03-01

    Chondral tumors in soft tissue are referred to as soft-tissue chondromas or extraskeletal chondromas, or as synovial chondromatosis if they arise in synovial tissue. We report the case of a 29-year-old man with synovial chondromatosis, also called synovial osteochondromatosis, which appeared in a solitary and extra-articular form. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, the central portion of the tumor showed similar characteristics to bone marrow, despite the absence of any connection to adjacent bone. T2-weighted imaging displayed marked peripheral hyperintensity consistent with a cartilaginous area. These findings suggested the presence of enchondral ossification and were similar to those of skeletal osteochondroma, with the exception of the absence of attachment to bone. MRI is useful for distinguishing solitary synovial chondromatosis from other lesions, such as myositis ossificans, extraskeletal chondrosarcoma, and parosteal osteosarcoma.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appenzeller, Simone; Kobayashi, Eliane; Costallat, Lilian T.L.; Zanardi, Veronica de Araujo; Ribeiro Neto, Jose Menezes; Damasceno, Benito Pereira; Cendes, Fernando [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2000-03-01

    To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis. Method: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. Results: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weight images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behcet's disease or systemic lupus erythematosus). After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. Conclusion: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. (author)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis and connective tissue disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    APPENZELLER SIMONE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the evaluation of patients with chronic and recurrent aseptic meningitis.METHOD: A retrospective study of five patients with aseptic meningoencefalitis diagnosed by clinical and CSF findings. CT scans showed without no relevant findings. RESULTS: MRI showed small multifocal lesions hyperintense on T2 weighted images and FLAIR, with mild or no gadolinium enhancement, mainly in periventricular and subcortical regions. Meningoencephalitis preceded the diagnosis of the underlying disease in four patients (Behçet´s disease or systemic lupus erythematosus. After the introduction of adequate treatment for the rheumatic disease, they did not present further symptoms of aseptic meningoencephalitis. CONCLUSION: Aseptic meningoencephalitis can be an early presentation of an autoimmune disease. It is important to emphasize the role of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients.

  18. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis with bilateral inferior collicular hyperintensity on magnetic resonance imaging brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE is chronic encephalitis occurring after infection with measles virus. An 8-year-old boy presented with progressive behavioral changes, cognitive decline and myoclonic jerks, progressing to a bed bound state over 2 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI brain showed T2-weighted hyperintensities in the subcortical areas of the left occipital lobe and brachium of the inferior colliculus on both sides. EEG showed bilateral, synchronous periodic discharges. Serum/cerebrospinal fluid measles IgG titer was significantly positive. The overall features were suggestive of SSPE. MRI finding of bilateral inferior colliculus changes on MRI without significant involvement of other commonly involved areas suggests an uncommon/rare imaging pattern of SSPE.

  19. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging in acute stage of cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Sen; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Ihara, Ikuo

    1986-01-01

    The value of the nuclear magnetic resonance image (MRI) was investigated in the acute stage of experimental cerebral ischemia. The MRI system employed was designed for clinical use, and the superconducting magnet was operated at a field strength of 1.5 tesla. Ischemic insult was made by transorbital occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) permanently in 4 cats and temporarily in 2 cats. After MCA occlusion the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured on the affected cortex, and 5 cats with rCBF below 10 ml/100 g/min and one with rCBF over 15 ml/100 g/min were studied. In the permanent occlusion group, MRI was performed every 2 hours from 4 to 12 hours after MCA occlusion and another MRI was carried out 20 min after gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) intravenous administration. The earliest changes were found 6 to 8 hours after MCA occlusion on the spin echo image (repetition time = 1.4 sec, echo time = 70 msec) in 3 cats with severe ischemia. It was postulated that the ischemic lesion could be depicted less than 6 hours on more T 2 -weighted images. The increased intensity area was markedly enhanced with Gd-DTPA 12 hours after occlusion. In the recirculation group, the increased intensity area was observed on enhanced MRI in a cat with recirculation as early as one hour after MCA occlusion, although it was not found on the plain MRI. In the other cat with recirculation after 2 hours' occlusion, definite lesion was found in all parameter images without enhancement. The results suggest that changes in cerebral ischemia can be obtained on the MRI earlier than X-ray computed tomography, and that it may be possible to determine the severity of the ischemic brain injury by the MRI findings. (author)

  1. Basic studies on the human uterus by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuzawa, Michio

    1990-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze characteristic features of the human uterus by using a 0.5 Tesla super-conducting magnet. Relative square ratios of the endometrium and the junctional zone to the uterine body were measured during menstrual cycle with a computed image analyser. Nine healthy volunteers aged 21 to 30 years underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proliferative, secretory, and menstrual phases. Relaxation times of the endometrium, junctional zone, and myometrium were determined. The relative ratio of the endometrium to the uterine body was 13.8% in the proliferative phase, 17.9% in the secretory phase, and 8.0% in the menstrual phase. The ratio of the junctional zone decreased from 26.6% in the proliferative phase to 23.4% in the secretory phase, and increased to 35.0% in the menstrual phase. Relaxation times of the endometrium and junctional zone were the shortest in the menstrual phase. For the myometrium, T 1 values showed the same tendency. T 2 values were the shortest in the proliferative phase. MRI was also performed in 39 patients with hydatidiform (one), myoma uteri (11), adenomyosis uteri (one), carcinoma of the uterine body (3), and carcinoma of the uterine cervix (23). Myoma nodule without degeneration appeared at low intensity, and had the shortest T 1 and T 2 values. Myoma uteri with degeneration had an increased intensity and larger T 1 and T 2 values. Adenomyosis uteri showed a diffuse low intensity with high intensity spots. Malignant lesions of both the uterine body and cervix showed a high intensity on T 2 -weighted image and similar T 1 and T 2 values. These T 1 and T 2 values were, however, shorter than tissue of unmarried normal women. MRI was considered useful for the observation of menstrual cyclic and quantitative change in the human physiologic uterus, as well as for the differentiation of malignant from benign uterine diseases. (N.K.)

  2. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  3. Follow-up of regional myocardial T2 relaxation times in patients with myocardial infarction evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, X.H.; Wall, E. van der; Laarse, A. van der; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Doornbos, J.; Roos, A. de; Voorthuisen, A.E. van

    1990-01-01

    Multi-echo spin-echo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging studies (echo times 30, 60, 90 and 120 ms) were performed in 19 patients with a 7-14-day (mean 10) old myocardial infarction and were repeated in 13 patients 4-7 months (mean 6) later. Also, 10 normal subjects were studied with magnetic resonance imaging. T2 relaxation times of certain left ventricular segments were calculated from the signal intensities at echo times of 30 and 90 ms. Compared to normal individuals, the mean T2 values on the early magnetic resonance images of the patients with inferior infarction showed significantly prolonged T2 times in the inferiorly localized segments, while on the follow-up magnetic resonance images the T2 times had almost returned to the normal range. Also the patients with anterior infarction showed significantly prolonged T2 times in the anteriorly localized segments on the early nuclear magnetic resonance images, but the T2 times remained prolonged at the follow-up magnetic resonance images. For every patient a myocardial damage score was determined, which was defined as the sum of the segmental T2 values in the patients minus the upper limit of normal T2 values obtained from the normal volunteers (= mean normal+2SD). The damage score on both the early and late magnetic resonance imaging study correlated well with the infarction size determined by myocardial enzyme release. Only the patients with an inferior infarction showed a significant decrease in damage score at follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that the regional T2 relaxation times are increased in infarcted myocardial regions and may remain prolonged for at least up to 7 months after the acute event, particularly in patients with an anterior infarction. These findings demonstrate the clinical potential of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies for detecting myocardial infarction, and estimating infarct size for an extended period after acute myocardial infarction. (author). 29 refs

  4. Is There an Additional Value of 11C-Choline PET-CT to T2-weighted MRI Images in the Localization of Intraprostatic Tumor Nodules?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, Laura; Koole, Michel; Isebaert, Sofie; Joniau, Steven; Deroose, Christophe M.; Oyen, Raymond; Lerut, Evelyne; Budiharto, Tom; Mottaghy, Felix; Bormans, Guy; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Haustermans, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the additional value of 11 C-choline positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) to T2-weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for localization of intraprostatic tumor nodules. Methods and Materials: Forty-nine prostate cancer patients underwent T2w MRI and 11 C-choline PET-CT before radical prostatectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Tumor regions were outlined on the whole-mount histopathology sections and on the T2w MR images. Tumor localization was recorded in the basal, middle, and apical part of the prostate by means of an octant grid. To analyze 11 C-choline PET-CT images, the same grid was used to calculate the standardized uptake values (SUV) per octant, after rigid registration with the T2w MR images for anatomic reference. Results: In total, 1,176 octants were analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of T2w MRI were 33.5%, 94.6%, and 70.2%, respectively. For 11 C-choline PET-CT, the mean SUV max of malignant octants was significantly higher than the mean SUV max of benign octants (3.69 ± 1.29 vs. 3.06 ± 0.97, p mean values (2.39 ± 0.77 vs. 1.94 ± 0.61, p mean and absolute tumor volume (Spearman r = 0.3003, p = 0.0362). No correlation was found between SUVs and prostate-specific antigen, T-stage or Gleason score. The highest accuracy (61.1%) was obtained with a SUV max cutoff of 2.70, resulting in a sensitivity of 77.4% and a specificity of 44.9%. When both modalities were combined (PET-CT or MRI positive), sensitivity levels increased as a function of SUV max but at the cost of specificity. When only considering suspect octants on 11 C-choline PET-CT (SUV max ≥ 2.70) and T2w MRI, 84.7% of these segments were in agreement with the gold standard, compared with 80.5% for T2w MRI alone. Conclusions: The additional value of 11 C-choline PET-CT next to T2w MRI in detecting tumor nodules within the prostate is limited.

  5. Confidence in Assessment of Lumbar Spondylolysis Using Three-Dimensional Volumetric T2-Weighted MRI Compared With Limited Field of View, Decreased-Dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavan, Joshua Adam; Stence, Nicholas V; Mirsky, David M; Gralla, Jane; Fadell, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    spondylolysis, 2D MRI is still very good at detecting spondylolysis while remaining sensitive for detection of alternative diagnoses such as disc abnormalities and pars stress reaction. The data suggest that standard 2D MRI sequences should not be entirely replaced by a volumetric T2-weighted 3D sequence (despite promising features of rapid acquisition time, increased spatial resolution, and reconstruction capability). © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging findings in paraplegic dogs with recovery of motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, Johannes S; Wang-Leandro, Adriano; Amendt, Hanna-Luise; Rohn, Karl; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M

    2018-03-22

    Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (TMMEP) are associated with severity of clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with spinal cord disease. That in initially paraplegic dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH), MRI findings before surgery and TMMEPs obtained after decompressive surgery are associated with long-term neurological status and correlate with each other. Seventeen client-owned paraplegic dogs with acute thoracolumbar IVDH. Prospective observational study. TMMEPs were obtained from pelvic limbs and MRI (3T) of the spinal cord was performed at initial clinical presentation. Follow-up studies were performed ≤ 2 days after reappearance of motor function and 3 months later. Ratios of compression length, intramedullary hyperintensities' length (T2-weighted hyperintensity length ratio [T2WLR]), and lesion extension (T2-weighted-lesion extension ratio) in relation to the length of the 2nd lumbar vertebral body were calculated. TMMEPs could be elicited in 10/17 (59%) dogs at 1st and in 16/17 (94%) dogs at 2nd follow-up. Comparison of TMMEPs of 1st and 2nd follow-up showed significantly increased amplitudes (median from 0.19 to 0.45 mV) and decreased latencies (from 69.38 to 40.26 ms; P = .01 and .001, respectively). At 2nd follow-up latencies were significantly associated with ambulatory status (P = .024). T2WLR obtained before surgery correlated with latencies at 2nd follow-up (P = .04). TMMEP reflect motor function recovery after severe spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. [Middle field and low field magnetic resonance tomography in wrist injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happel, Brigitte; Breitenseher, M; Trattnig, S; Gäbler, Ch; Kukla, Ch; Rand, Th; Imhof, H; Lechner, G

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of magnet resonance imaging in comparison of a dedicated 0.2-T unit and a 1.0-T unit in patients with clinically suspected scaphoid fractures and other wrist fractures. In 20 patients (14 m/6 f) with clinically suspected scaphoid fractures and a normal six view radiographic exam, magnet resonance imaging was performed first with the dedicated 1.0-T unit and afterwards with the 0.2-T unit within 7 days after trauma. T1 weighted spin-echo, STIR and T2-weighted 3D GRE sequences were performed. The 0.2 Tesla dedicated system is inferior to the 1.0 Tesla unit concerning the outcome of the 3 examiners. Especially the areas of bone bruise showed different results: each examiner detected at least two more cases of bone bruise with the 1.0 Telsa unit, which could not be defined with the 0.2 Tesla unit. This study shows, how utmost sensitive magnet resonance imaging is referring to unremoved fractures of the scaphoid and to other wrist abnormalities. Results with the 0.2 Tesla dedicated system was inferior compared to the 1.0 Tesla unit.

  8. Clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of gastrocnemius musculotendinopathy in various dog breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Susanne M; Harms, Oliver; Konar, Martin; Staudacher, Anne; Langer, Anna; Thiel, Cetina; Kramer, Martin; Schaub, Sebastian; von Pückler, Kerstin H

    2016-11-23

    To describe clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in 16 dogs diagnosed with gastrocnemius musculotendinopathy. Retrospective evaluation of medical records, radiographs, and MRI results, as well as follow-up completed by telephone questionnaire. Most dogs had chronic hindlimb lameness with no history of trauma or athletic activities. Clinical examination revealed signs of pain on palpation without stifle joint instability. Seven dogs had radiographic signs of osteophyte formation on the lateral fabella. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed T2 hyperintensity and uptake of contrast agent in the region of the origin of the gastrocnemius muscle. Changes were found in the lateral and medial heads of the gastrocnemius. Conservative treatment resulted in return to full function in 11 dogs. Two dogs showed partial restoration of normal function, one dog showed no improvement. Two dogs were lost to follow-up. Gastrocnemius musculotendinopathy is a potential cause of chronic hindlimb lameness in medium to large breed dogs. A history of athletic activity must not necessarily be present. Magnetic resonance imaging shows signal changes and uptake of contrast agent in the region of the origin of the gastrocnemius muscle. A combination of T1 pre- and post-contrast administration and T2 weighted sequences completed by a fat-suppressed sequence in the sagittal plane are well-suited for diagnosis. Conservative treatment generally results in return to normal function.

  9. Single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Assess diagnostic utility of combined magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University ...

  10. Magnetic resonance: discovery, investigations, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessenikh, Aleksandr V

    2009-01-01

    The history of the development of the theoretical ideas and experimental methods of magnetic resonance, as well as the applications of these methods in modern natural science, technology, and medicine, are outlined, with allowance for the contribution of Russian researchers. An assessment of some promising trends of studies and applications of magnetic resonance is given. (from the history of physics)

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  13. Hemifacial spasm. Study by magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittar, Miriam Salvadori; Staut, Claudio Cesar Vilela; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bacheschi, Luiz Alberto; Magalhaes, Alvaro Cebrian de Almeida

    1995-01-01

    Nine patients with idiopathic hemifacial spasm were evaluated with cranial magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Alterations of the posterior fossa vasculature, possibly related to the facial nerve irritation, were found in 8 patients (88%). Magnetic resonance angiography is a noninvasive procedure and appears to be a sensitive method to evaluate hemifacial spasm etiology. (author)

  14. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  15. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. ...

  16. A Bright Future for Magnetic Resonance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Does magnetic resonance have a bright future? Ever since magnetic resonance in condensed phase started in 1945, questions about its future prospects (or its imminent doom) have been asked time and again. Some, like Nicolaas Bloembergen, left the field at an early stage because they felt there was no hope to gather ...

  17. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and meningioma surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine if intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging improves surgical resection and postoperative outcome of intracranial meningioma. Study design: Prospective, non-randomized, cohort study. Method: Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (iMRI) was used to evaluate patients with meningioma ...

  18. Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appropriateness of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans in the Eden and Central Karoo districts of the Western Cape Province, South Africa. ... South African Medical Journal ... Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are an essential part of modern healthcare. Marked ...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging textural evaluation of posterior cranial fossa tumors in childhood; Avaliacao textural por ressonancia magnetica dos tumores da fossa posterior em criancas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joelson Alves dos; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lacerda, Maria Teresa Carvalho de; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia]. E-mail: joelson_alves@ig.com.br; Matsushita, Hamilton [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia

    2004-08-01

    Objective: To distinguish healthy from pathological tissues in pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using calculated textural parameters from magnetic resonance images. Materials And Methods: We evaluated 14 pediatric patients with posterior cranial fossa tumors using the software MaZda to define the texture parameters in selected regions of interest representing healthy and pathological tissues based on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between normal and tumoral tissues as well as between supposedly normal tissues adjacent and distant from the tumoral lesion. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance textural evaluation is an useful tool for determining differences among various tissues, including tissues that appear apparently normal on visual analysis. (author)

  20. Feasibility of similarity coefficient map for improving morphological evaluation of T2* weighted MRI for renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hao-Yu; Bao Shang-Lian; Jiani Hu; Meng Li; Haacke, E. M.; Xie Yao-Qin; Chen Jie; Amy Yu; Wei Xin-Hua; Dai Yong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of using a similarity coefficient map (SCM) in improving the morphological evaluation of T 2 * weighted (T 2 *W) magnatic resonance imaging (MRI) for renal cancer. Simulation studies and in vivo 12-echo T 2 *W experiments for renal cancers were performed for this purpose. The results of the first simulation study suggest that an SCM can reveal small structures which are hard to distinguish from the background tissue in T 2 *W images and the corresponding T 2 * map. The capability of improving the morphological evaluation is likely due to the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) by using the SCM technique. Compared with T 2 *W images, an SCM can improve the SNR by a factor ranging from 1.87 to 2.47. Compared with T 2 * maps, an SCM can improve the SNR by a factor ranging from 3.85 to 33.31. Compared with T 2 *W images, an SCM can improve the CNR by a factor ranging from 2.09 to 2.43. Compared with T 2 * maps, an SCM can improve the CNR by a factor ranging from 1.94 to 8.14. For a given noise level, the improvements of the SNR and the CNR depend mainly on the original SNRs and CNRs in T 2 *W images, respectively. In vivo experiments confirmed the results of the first simulation study. The results of the second simulation study suggest that more echoes are used to generate the SCM, and higher SNRs and CNRs can be achieved in SCMs. In conclusion, an SCM can provide improved morphological evaluation of T 2 *W MR images for renal cancer by unveiling fine structures which are ambiguous or invisible in the corresponding T 2 *W MR images and T 2 * maps. Furthermore, in practical applications, for a fixed total sampling time, one should increase the number of echoes as much as possible to achieve SCMs with better SNRs and CNRs

  1. Multidimensionally encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fa-Hsuan

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically achieves spatial encoding by measuring the projection of a q-dimensional object over q-dimensional spatial bases created by linear spatial encoding magnetic fields (SEMs). Recently, imaging strategies using nonlinear SEMs have demonstrated potential advantages for reconstructing images with higher spatiotemporal resolution and reducing peripheral nerve stimulation. In practice, nonlinear SEMs and linear SEMs can be used jointly to further improve the image reconstruction performance. Here, we propose the multidimensionally encoded (MDE) MRI to map a q-dimensional object onto a p-dimensional encoding space where p > q. MDE MRI is a theoretical framework linking imaging strategies using linear and nonlinear SEMs. Using a system of eight surface SEM coils with an eight-channel radiofrequency coil array, we demonstrate the five-dimensional MDE MRI for a two-dimensional object as a further generalization of PatLoc imaging and O-space imaging. We also present a method of optimizing spatial bases in MDE MRI. Results show that MDE MRI with a higher dimensional encoding space can reconstruct images more efficiently and with a smaller reconstruction error when the k-space sampling distribution and the number of samples are controlled. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Magnetic Resonance of the Knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Romano, L.; Ragozzino, A.; Corrado, L.; Monteleone, V.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been applied to muscoloskeletal pathoanatomy and has proved to be useful in the detection and characterization of knees and 8 normal knees were examined. The images were obtained in the Diagnostic Centre RMRC of Naples on a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic system, using a surface coil and a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE 600/28 ms). The examined limb was immobilized and bent at 8-10 grade, extrarotated for the examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) only. Images were obtained on a 256x256 matrix and had a 2 or 4-mm thickness. MRI cleary showed all the anatomical structures. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PAL) and tha patellar ligament were shown by sagittal SE images through the intercondylar notch; the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments (TCL and FCL) were evaluated on coronal SE images; the articular capsula and menisci on axial transverse SE images. Objective criteria for ACL and PCL tears were: lack of continuity of the signal and change in signal intensity; in meniscal pathology, menisci with small linear regions of increased signal or with grossly truncated shape were interpreted as tears. Preliminary results of this study indicate that MRI together with clinical evaluation may be an useful non-invasive procedure in the assessment of acute injuries of the knee

  3. Glomus Tumors: Symptom Variations and Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Weon Ham

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe typical clinical symptoms of glomus tumors are pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change, and the presence of these clinical findings is helpful in diagnosis. However, the tumors often pose diagnostic difficulty because of variations in presentation and the nonspecific symptoms of glomus tumors. To the best of our knowledge, few studies have reported on the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in diagnosing glomus tumors in patients with unspecific symptoms.MethodsThe inclusion criteria of this study were: having undergone surgery for subungual glomus tumor of the hand, histopathologic confirmation of glomus tumor, and having undergone preoperative MRI. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. The characteristics of the tumors and the presenting symptoms including pain, tenderness, and sensitivity to temperature change were retrospectively reviewed.ResultsFive out of 21 patients (23% did not show the typical glomus tumor symptom triad because they did not complain of pain provoked by coldness. Nevertheless, preoperative MRI showed well-defined small soft-tissue lesions on T1- and T2-weighted images, which are typical findings of glomus tumors. The tumors were completely resected and confirmed as glomus tumor histopathologically.ConclusionsEarly occult lesions of glomus tumor in the hand may not be revealed by physical examination because of their barely detectable symptoms. Moreover, subungual lesions may be particularly difficult to evaluate on physical examination. Our cases showed that MRI offers excellent diagnostic information in clinically undiagnosed or misdiagnosed patients. Preoperative MRI can accurately define the character and extent of glomus tumor, even though it is impalpable and invisible.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Yoshitaka; Une, Humiho; Osame, Mitsuhiro

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was evaluated in 12 HAM (HTLV-I-associated myelopathy) patients (4 males and 8 females, mean age of 54 yrs) and compaired with 36 non-HAM controls (16 males and 20 females mean age of 52yrs). MRI of the brain was performed using a 0.5 Tesla superconducting unit. Imaging in all patients was done with the long spin echo (TR=2,000msec, TE=100msec) sequences, and 10mm contiguous axial slices of the entire brain were obtained in all cases. Except for two cases, MRI of the brain was abnormal in 10 (83%) HAM patients, while in controls, 18 (50%) cases were abnormal. The abnormalities were high intensity lesions through SE 2000/100 sequences (T 2 weighted image), and consisted of small isolated hemisphere lesions in 9 patients, periventricular changes in 9 patients, bilateral thalamic lesions in 2 patients and pontine lesions in 3 patients. We found that the factor of age was very important. In patients with ages below 59 yrs, 6 of 8 HAM patients (75%) had abnormalities, while in control cases, 6 of 23 (23%) had abnormalities in periventricular area. And in isolated hemisphere, 6 of 8 HAM patients (75%) had abnormalities, while in control cases, 3 of 23 (13%) had abnormalities. On the other hand, in patients with ages over 60 yrs, 3 of 4 (75%) HAM patients had abnormalities in periventricular area, while in controls, 10 of 13 cases (77%) had abnormalities, and in isolated hemisphere, 3 of 4 (75%) HAM patients had abnormalities, and in controls, 10 of 13 cases (77%) had abnormalities. Our data suggest that HAM patients with ages below 59 years will show a greater percentage of abnormalities than controls. (author)

  5. Pitfalls of magnetic resonance imaging of alar ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sumit; Hol, Per Kristian; Tillung, Terje [Interventional Centre, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Laerum, L. Thea [Anglo-European College of Chiropractic, Bournemouth (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    An observational study of variations in the appearance of the alar ligament on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the normal range of lateral flexion and rotation of the atlas was performed to validate some of the premises underlying the use of MRI for the detection of injuries to the alar ligament. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included. Three sets of coronal proton-density images, and axial T2-weighted images of the craniovertebral junction, were obtained at 0.5 T with the neck in neutral position and laterally flexed (coronal proton density) or rotated (axial T2). Five of the subjects also underwent imaging at 1.5 T. The scans were independently examined twice by two radiologists. The presence of alar ligaments was recorded and a three-point scale used to grade the extent of hyperintensity exhibited by the structures: the ligament were graded as 2 and 3 if, respectively, less or more of its cross-section was hyperintense, whereas grade 1 represented a hypointense ligament. The effect of lateral flexion on image quality was assessed. Concordance analysis of the data were performed before and after dichotomising the data on grading. The atlanto-axial angle and rotation of the atlas were measured. The magnitude of movement to right was normalised to that to the left to give, respectively, the flexion index and the rotation index. The alar ligaments were most reliably seen on coronal proton-density scans, with a Maxwell's RE of 0.96 as compared with 0.46 for sagittal images. Flexion of the neck improved definition of the ligaments in only rare instances. (orig.)

  6. Pitfalls of magnetic resonance imaging of alar ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sumit; Hol, Per Kristian; Tillung, Terje; Laerum, L. Thea

    2004-01-01

    An observational study of variations in the appearance of the alar ligament on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the normal range of lateral flexion and rotation of the atlas was performed to validate some of the premises underlying the use of MRI for the detection of injuries to the alar ligament. Fifteen healthy volunteers were included. Three sets of coronal proton-density images, and axial T2-weighted images of the craniovertebral junction, were obtained at 0.5 T with the neck in neutral position and laterally flexed (coronal proton density) or rotated (axial T2). Five of the subjects also underwent imaging at 1.5 T. The scans were independently examined twice by two radiologists. The presence of alar ligaments was recorded and a three-point scale used to grade the extent of hyperintensity exhibited by the structures: the ligament were graded as 2 and 3 if, respectively, less or more of its cross-section was hyperintense, whereas grade 1 represented a hypointense ligament. The effect of lateral flexion on image quality was assessed. Concordance analysis of the data were performed before and after dichotomising the data on grading. The atlanto-axial angle and rotation of the atlas were measured. The magnitude of movement to right was normalised to that to the left to give, respectively, the flexion index and the rotation index. The alar ligaments were most reliably seen on coronal proton-density scans, with a Maxwell's RE of 0.96 as compared with 0.46 for sagittal images. Flexion of the neck improved definition of the ligaments in only rare instances. (orig.)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of paracoccidioidomycosis in the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarese, Leonor G; Monsignore, Lucas M; de Andrade Hernandes, Mateus; Martinez, Roberto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2015-10-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in musculoskeletal paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Retrospective case series study after IRB approval. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed in consensus the MRI findings of 11 patients with microbiologically and/or pathologically proven osteoarticular PCM. The MRI evaluation included discrimination of abnormalities in joints, bones and soft tissues. Mean age of patients was 29 years (10-55 years), eight men and three women. Musculoskeletal involvement was the only or the primary presentation of the disease in seven patients (63%). Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, with seven cases (63%). Primary arthritis was found in one patient (9%). Isolated extra-articular soft tissue PCM was found in three patients: myositis (2) and subcutaneous infection (1). All cases showed regions with signal intensity higher than or similar to the signal of muscle on T1-weighted images. Penumbra sign was present in five cases (45%). T2-weighted images showed reactive soft tissue oedema in eight cases (72%). Post-gadolinium images showed peripheral (8/9) or heterogeneous (1/9) enhancement. Synovial enhancement was present in all cases of joint involvement (6/6). Lipomatosis arborescens was documented in one case of chronic knee involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first case series describing MRI findings of musculoskeletal PCM. Musculoskeletal involvement was the primary presentation of the disease in most cases, and therefore, neoplasms were initially in the differential diagnosis. Osteomyelitis was the most common presentation, often with secondary involvement of joint and or soft tissue. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Magnetic resonance cisternography for preoperative evaluation of arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awaji, M. [Niigata University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata (Japan); Okamoto, K. [Niigata University, Center for Integrated Human Brain Science, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan); Nishiyama, K. [Niigata University, Department of Neurosurgery, Brain Research Institute, Niigata (Japan)

    2007-09-15

    With a high likelihood of clinical improvement and low rates of complications, minimally invasive neuroendoscopic surgery is becoming the treatment of choice for symptomatic or growing arachnoid cysts. In neuroendoscopic surgery, visualization of anatomical landmarks is essential in achieving successful fenestration without complications. Because of the restricted visual field in neuroendoscopic surgery, preoperative anatomical assessment is very helpful. Magnetic resonance cisternography (MRC) with high spatial resolution and contrast, using for example 3-D Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady state (CISS) or fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences, is able to detect the arachnoid cyst wall and neighboring anatomical structures as the anatomical landmarks. We retrospectively reviewed T2-weighted (T2-W) fast spin-echo images, and the MRC and intraoperative findings. Axial and coronal T2-W images (6 and 3 mm thickness, respectively) and axial and coronal 0.8 mm thick MRC images with CISS or FIESTA were obtained from four patients with arachnoid cysts treated by neuroendoscopic surgery. Intraoperative findings were reviewed on videotape recorded during the procedures. At the brain surface, the arachnoid cyst wall could be detected clearly in any of the four patients on MRC images, and was only partly seen in the fourth patient T2-W images. Adjacent important anatomical structures including vessels and cranial nerves, and an enough space for cystocisternostomy were identified on MRC images, and the findings were consistent with the findings during neuroendoscopic surgery. Preoperative identification of the arachnoid cyst wall and surrounding anatomical structures by MRC may help avoid complications and allow safer neuroendoscopic surgery. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of predictive indices for glioblastomas radiation therapy: comparison of perfusion MRI and spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance; Evaluation d'indices predictifs pour la radiotherapie des glioblastomes: comparaison de l'IRM de perfusion et de l'imagerie de spectrometrie par resonance magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemoine, J.M.; Laprie, A.; Moyal Cohen-Jonathan, E.; Ken, S. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France); Lemoine, J.M.; Laprie, A.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Celsis, P.; Lubrano, V.; Berry, I.; Ken, S. [Inserm, UMR 825, imagerie cerebrale et handicaps neurologiques, 31 - Toulouse (France); Lemoine, J.M.; Franceries, X. [Universite Paul-Sabatier, 31 - Toulouse (France); Lotterie, J.A.; Berry, I. [Departement de biophysique, CHU Rangueil, 31 - Toulouse (France); Lubrano, V. [Departement de neurochirurgie, CHU Rangueil, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report the comparison of several imagery modalities: anatomic imagery (T1-weighted MRI after gadolinium injection and T2-weighted MRI), metabolic imagery (spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance) and functional imagery (perfusion MRI). This comparison has been performed within the frame of a prospective clinic test associating a radiosensitizer concomitant with a radiation therapy of glioblastomas. It appears that the integration of data of spectrometric imagery by magnetic resonance and of perfusion MRI is a promising method to overcome the resistance of glioblastomas. Short communication

  10. [Distinction between adrenal adenomas and metastases using 0.5 Telsa MR imaging: diagnosis with out-of-phase T2*-weighted gradient-field-echo image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, T; Fujimoto, H; Uchiyama, G; Murakami, K; Ohtomo, K

    1994-03-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of MR imaging with a 0.5-T apparatus to distinguish adrenal adenomas from adrenal metastases. The series included 23 adrenal adenomas (18 non-hyperfunctioning adenomas, 5 hyperfunctioning) and 23 adrenal metastases (14 from lung, 5 liver, 3 colon, and 1 stomach cancer). The signal intensity (SI) ratio (adrenal tumor/liver) on T1-, T2-, and T2*-weighted MR images was calculated for adrenal tissue characterization. Adrenal adenomas were more precisely distinguished from adrenal metastases on T2*-weighted images (21/23, 91%) than on T2-weighted images (15/23, 65%). In conclusion, T2*-weighted images were better than routine T2-weighted images in distinguishing adrenal adenomas from adrenal metastases. The reason could be that the total signal intensity of adrenal adenomas which contained some fat components decreased on T2*-weighted images due to an out-of-phase effect.

  11. High signal of the striatum in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: sequential change on T2-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, A.; O'uchi, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Yashiro, N.

    2002-01-01

    The object of this study is to describe the sequential change of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Three cases of autopsy-proven sporadic CJD and a total of 18 serial MR images are included in this study. The degree of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI was evaluated by two neuroradiologists and divided into four grades by mutual agreement. Initial MRI of all three cases showed a slightly high signal of the bilateral striatum, and the conspicuity of the high signal became more prominent as the disease progressed. In each case the pathological change of striatum and globus pallidus was compared with the high signal on the last MR image. (orig.)

  12. High signal of the striatum in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: sequential change on T2-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, A.; O' uchi, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Yashiro, N. [Department of Radiology, Kameda Medical Center, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The object of this study is to describe the sequential change of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Three cases of autopsy-proven sporadic CJD and a total of 18 serial MR images are included in this study. The degree of high signal of the striatum on T2-weighted MRI was evaluated by two neuroradiologists and divided into four grades by mutual agreement. Initial MRI of all three cases showed a slightly high signal of the bilateral striatum, and the conspicuity of the high signal became more prominent as the disease progressed. In each case the pathological change of striatum and globus pallidus was compared with the high signal on the last MR image. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  14. Sclerosing Pneumocytoma with a Wax-and-Wane Pattern of Growth: A Case Report on Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Lee, Sung Soo; Park, Heae Surng; Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Tae Hoon [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Sclerosing pneumocytoma (SP) of the lung is a rare benign neoplasm. Here, we describe an unusual presentation of SP with a wax-and-wane pattern of growth in a 47-year-old woman. Tumor diameter decreased over a 3-year follow-up period and then increased on serial follow-up computed tomography scans. The mass showed high signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and early enhancement with a plateau on dynamic MRI. We speculate that intratumoral bleeding and resorption processes accounted for the changes in tumor size.

  15. Stepwise algorithm using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosis of fat-poor angiomyolipoma in small renal masses: Development and external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hajime; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ishioka, Junichiro; Matsuoka, Yoh; Saito, Kazutaka; Uehara, Sho; Numao, Noboru; Yuasa, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Masuda, Hitoshi; Yonese, Junji; Kihara, Kazunori

    2017-07-01

    To develop a stepwise diagnostic algorithm for fat-poor angiomyolipoma in small renal masses. Two cohorts of small renal masses magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings were analyzed. Based on multivariate analysis, we developed two prediction models for fat-poor angiomyolipoma, the computed tomography model and the computed tomography + magnetic resonance imaging model, and a stepwise algorithm that proposes the sequential use of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The computed tomography model, which was composed of female aged magnetic resonance imaging model. The computed tomography + magnetic resonance imaging model, consisting of the first three factors of the computed tomography model, low signal intensity and absence of pseudocapsule on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, re-stratified the tumors into low, intermediate and high angiomyolipoma-probability groups. The incidence of fat-poor angiomyolipoma in each group was 0%, 26% and 93%, respectively (area under the curve 0.981). External validation by two readers showed a high area under the curve (0.912 and 0.924) for each. The interobserver agreement was good (kappa score 0.77). The present algorithm differentiates fat-poor angiomyolipoma in small renal masses with high accuracy by adding magnetic resonance imaging to computed tomography in selected patients. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Dynamic ASL and T2-weighted MRI in exercising calf muscle at 7 T: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewzow, Kiril; Fiedler, Georg Bernd; Meyerspeer, Martin; Goluch, Sigrun; Laistler, Elmar; Wolzt, Michael; Moser, Ewald; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a measurement protocol for noninvasive simultaneous perfusion quantification and T2 *-weighted MRI acquisition in the exercising calf muscle at 7 Tesla. Using a nonmagnetic ergometer and a dedicated in-house built calf coil array, dynamic pulsed arterial spin labeling (PASL) measurements with a temporal resolution of 12 s were performed before, during, and after plantar flexion exercise in 16 healthy volunteers. Postexercise peak perfusion in gastrocnemius muscle (GAS) was 27 ± 16 ml/100g/min, whereas in soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles it remained at baseline levels. T2 *-weighted and ASL time courses in GAS showed comparable times to peak of 161 ± 72 s and 167 ± 115 s, respectively. The T2 *-weighted signal in the GAS showed a minimum during exercise (88 ± 6 % of the baseline signal) and a peak during the recovery (122 ± 9%), whereas in all other muscles only a signal decrease was observed (minimum 91 ± 6% in SOL; 87 ± 8% in TA). We demonstrate the feasibility of dynamic perfusion quantification in skeletal muscle at 7 Tesla using PASL. This may help to better investigate the physiological processes in the skeletal muscle and also in diseases such as diabetes mellitus and peripheral arterial disease. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Fast spin-echo T2-weighted MR imaging of tongue cancer; the value of fat-suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Zu Byoung; Na, Dong Gyu; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Byun, Hong Sik; Baek, Chung Whan; Son, Yong Ik [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    To compare the diagnostic efficacy of fast spin-echo (FSE) T2-weighted MR imaging with and without fat suppression. Twelve patients (7 men and 5 women; mean age, 48 years) with pathologically proven cancer of the tongue were included in this study. In all of these, FSE T2-weighted MR images with and without fat suppression were obtained in the same imaging planes before surgery or biopsy. Two radiologists visually compared the images thus obtained in terms of detection, extent, and conspicuity of the tumor, and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each tumor was also calculated. In all patients, both imaging modalities were equal in terms of tumor detection. In 4 of 12(33%), the extent of the tumor was greater with fat suppression, while in eight (67%), it was almost the same both with and without. In ten patients (83%), the tumor was more conspicuous with fat suppression, and percentage CNRs were significantly higher with fat suppression than without (180{+-}70% and 113{+-}61%, respectively; p=0.02). For the evaluation of patients with tongue cancer, fat-suppressed FSE T2-weighted MR imaging is superior to its conventional equivalent.

  18. Magnetic resonance elastometry using a single-sided permanent magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Carl S; Marble, Andrew E; Ono, Yuu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a magnetic resonance method of measuring material elasticity using a single-sided magnet with a permanent static field gradient. This method encodes sample velocity in a reciprocal space using Hahn spin-echoes with variable timing. The experimental results show a strong correlation between magnetic resonance signal attenuation and elasticity when an oscillating force is applied on the sample. This relationship in turn provides us with information about the displacement velocity experienced by the sample, which is inversely proportional to Young's modulus. The proposed method shows promise in offering a portable and cost-effective magnetic resonance elastography system. (paper)

  19. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  20. Dextran-coated superparamagnetic amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy for magnetic resonance imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Lu; Yu, Yanrong; Li, Xuejian; Liu, Wei; Yang, Hong; Wu, Dongmei; Yang, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed serving as a sensitive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging applications. - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was prepared via wet chemical reduction approach. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is superparamagnetic. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy exhibits T 2 -weighted MR enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: For magnetic resonance imaging applications, a facile approach for water-soluble dextran coated amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed. The as-synthesized nanoalloy had a diameter of 9 nm with a narrow size distribution and showed superparamagnetic property with a saturated magnetization (Ms) of 25 emu/g. In vitro cytotoxicity test revealed that it was biocompatible at a concentration below 120 μg/mL. It can be uptaken by HeLa cells effectively and resulted in the obvious T 2 effect after internalization. Biodistribution studies in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) confirmed that Fe–Co nanoalloy was preferentially accumulated in lung and spleen after intravenous injection for 4 h. In vivo MRI, dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy can serve as a sensitive contrast agent for MR imaging, especially in the spleen, so we believe that it maybe hold great promise for diagnosis of splenic disease by appropriately functionalizing their surface

  1. Accuracy of deformable image registration on magnetic resonance images in digital and physical phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ger, Rachel B; Yang, Jinzhong; Ding, Yao; Jacobsen, Megan C; Fuller, Clifton D; Howell, Rebecca M; Li, Heng; Jason Stafford, R; Zhou, Shouhao; Court, Laurence E

    2017-10-01

    Accurate deformable image registration is necessary for longitudinal studies. The error associated with commercial systems has been evaluated using computed tomography (CT). Several in-house algorithms have been evaluated for use with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but there is still relatively little information about MRI deformable image registration. This work presents an evaluation of two deformable image registration systems, one commercial (Velocity) and one in-house (demons-based algorithm), with MRI using two different metrics to quantify the registration error. The registration error was analyzed with synthetic MR images. These images were generated from interpatient and intrapatient variation models trained on 28 patients. Four synthetic post-treatment images were generated for each of four synthetic pretreatment images, resulting in 16 image registrations for both the T1- and T2-weighted images. The synthetic post-treatment images were registered to their corresponding synthetic pretreatment image. The registration error was calculated between the known deformation vector field and the generated deformation vector field from the image registration system. The registration error was also analyzed using a porcine phantom with ten implanted 0.35-mm diameter gold markers. The markers were visible on CT but not MRI. CT, T1-weighted MR, and T2-weighted MR images were taken in four different positions. The markers were contoured on the CT images and rigidly registered to their corresponding MR images. The MR images were deformably registered and the distance between the projected marker location and true marker location was measured as the registration error. The synthetic images were evaluated only on Velocity. Root mean square errors (RMSEs) of 0.76 mm in the left-right (LR) direction, 0.76 mm in the anteroposterior (AP) direction, and 0.69 mm in the superior-inferior (SI) direction were observed for the T1-weighted MR images. RMSEs of 1.1 mm in the LR

  2. Risk Stratification of Equivocal Lesions on Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Tim; Quentin, Michael; Arsov, Christian; Schmaltz, Anna Katharina; Tschischka, Alexander; Laqua, Nina; Hiester, Andreas; Blondin, Dirk; Rabenalt, Robert; Albers, Peter; Antoch, Gerald; Schimmöller, Lars

    2017-09-20

    We systematically analyzed the records of patients with PI-RADS™ (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System) 3 lesions, which are called equivocal according to PI-RADS version 2, using prostate multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance imaging targeted biopsies. Systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies served as the reference standard. A total of 120 consecutive patients were retrospectively included in the study. In these patients the overall PI-RADS score was 3 after 3 Tesla T2-weighted imaging, diffusion weighted imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging as well as subsequent targeted magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound fusion guided biopsies plus systematic 12-core transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies. The study end points were the prostate cancer detection rate, the Gleason score distribution, the prostate cancer location and risk stratification by subgroup analyses. Prostate cancer was detected in 13 of 118 patients for a detection rate of 11%, including 5 patients (4.2%) with a Gleason score of 3 + 4 = 7 or greater. Three of the 212 lesions (1.4%) in the transition zone and 6 of the 64 (9.4%) in the peripheral zone were positive for prostate cancer. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging revealed patterns of peripheral prostatitis combined with diffuse stromal hyperplasia in 54% of the patients with prostate cancer. Prostate volume was significantly lower in patients with prostate cancer (p = 0.015) but differences in prostate specific antigen levels were not statistically significant (p = 0.87). Prostate specific antigen density was higher in patients with prostate cancer (0.19 vs 0.12 ng/ml/ml). Low grade prostate cancer (Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6) can develop in patients with an overall PI-RADS score of 3. Prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 3 + 4 = 7 or greater can be detected by multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging with a high degree of certainty. Gleason score 4

  3. Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography for Breast Target Volume Delineation in Prone and Supine Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, Elise M. [Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Ahern, Verity [Crown Princess Mary Cancer Care Centre, Westmead Hospital, Westmead (Australia); Boxer, Miriam M. [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Chan, Christine [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); David, Steven [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Dimigen, Marion [Department of Radiology, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer A. [School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston (Australia); Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba (Australia); Koh, Eng-Siew [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Lim, Karen [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Papadatos, George [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool (Australia); and others

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether T2-weighted MRI improves seroma cavity (SC) and whole breast (WB) interobserver conformity for radiation therapy purposes, compared with the gold standard of CT, both in the prone and supine positions. Methods and Materials: Eleven observers (2 radiologists and 9 radiation oncologists) delineated SC and WB clinical target volumes (CTVs) on T2-weighted MRI and CT supine and prone scans (4 scans per patient) for 33 patient datasets. Individual observer's volumes were compared using the Dice similarity coefficient, volume overlap index, center of mass shift, and Hausdorff distances. An average cavity visualization score was also determined. Results: Imaging modality did not affect interobserver variation for WB CTVs. Prone WB CTVs were larger in volume and more conformal than supine CTVs (on both MRI and CT). Seroma cavity volumes were larger on CT than on MRI. Seroma cavity volumes proved to be comparable in interobserver conformity in both modalities (volume overlap index of 0.57 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.54-0.60) for CT supine and 0.52 (95% CI 0.48-0.56) for MRI supine, 0.56 (95% CI 0.53-0.59) for CT prone and 0.55 (95% CI 0.51-0.59) for MRI prone); however, after registering modalities together the intermodality variation (Dice similarity coefficient of 0.41 (95% CI 0.36-0.46) for supine and 0.38 (0.34-0.42) for prone) was larger than the interobserver variability for SC, despite the location typically remaining constant. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging interobserver variation was comparable to CT for the WB CTV and SC delineation, in both prone and supine positions. Although the cavity visualization score and interobserver concordance was not significantly higher for MRI than for CT, the SCs were smaller on MRI, potentially owing to clearer SC definition, especially on T2-weighted MR images.

  4. NMR magnetic field controller for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheler, G.; Anacker, M.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance controller for magnetic fields, which can also be used for pulsed NMR investigations, is described. A longtime stability of 10 -7 is achieved. The control signal is generated by a modified time sharing circuit with resonance at the first side band of the 2 H signal. An exact calibration of the magnetic field is achieved by the variation of the H 1 - or of the time-sharing frequency. (author)

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and neurolupus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, A.M.; Colson, F.; Tebib, J.; Noel, E.; Bouvier, M.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was assessed in the management of neuropsychiatric manifestations occurring in 6 SLE patients. The MRI scans were normal in 3 cases and was associated with remission of the symptoms except for a patient who experienced a chorea at the time of the examination. Abnormal MRI scans always revealed more lesions than CT scan. 2 different patterns of abnormalities seem to correspond to 2 specific disorders. In 2 patients with clinical presentation suggesting a cortical ischemia by vascular thrombosis, both MRI scans showed areas of abnormal high signal intensities located in the subcortical white matter. In one last patient, MRI scan revealed multiple focal areas of high signal intensities (on T 1 weighter scans) disseminated not only in the deep white matter but also in the gray one. These lesions could be depend upon demyelinisation which may occur by a local vascular process. This serie confirms the interest of MRI in the management of SLE brain involvement as well as it points out some problem of interpretation. This suggest further comparative studies especially at the real onset and during the course of neuro-psychiatric manifestations. At last, the coronal sections may be more informative for the diagnosis and patholophysiology than the horizontal ones [fr

  7. Magnetic resonance in obstructive jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jena, A.; Khushu, S.; Kakar, A.K.; Mishra, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Twelve cases of obstructive jaundice in whom ultrasound failed to demonstrate the site and/or the cause of obstruction of the biliary tract were examined with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), correctly diagnosing the site and cause of obstruction in 10 of 12 surgically proven cases. In one case of cholangiocarcinoma, the site of obstruction was well shown on MR but a definite cause could not be ascertained. In another patient who developed intermittent jaundice following surgery for choledochal cyst, MR demonstrated a solitary stone in the common hepatic duct. Surgical confirmation could not be achieved as the patient was lost to follow up. There were 6 cases of choledocholithiasis, 3 cases of gall bladder carcinoma and one case each of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and cholangiocarcinoma. It is believed that MRI will provide obstructive jaundice and will be able to minimize the use of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in view of its ability to perform multiplanar imaging in multiple sequences. 11 refs., figs., 1 tab

  8. Blount's disease: magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducou le Pointe, H.; Mousselard, H.; Rudelli, A.; Montagne, J.P.; Filipe, G.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the information obtained by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the radiographic and MR investigations of nine patients treated for idiopathic tibia vara were reviewed in retrospect. There were six unilateral and three bilateral cases (12 tibiae). Initial radiographs of each patient were assigned a stage according to Catonne's classification. MR imaging was performed with a 0.5- or 1.5-T apparatus. Bony epiphyses were poorly developed in all cases. The cartilaginous component of the epiphyses compensated partially (6/12 cases) or completely (6/12 cases) for the collapse of the physes. In two cases an abnormal area was found between the medial meniscus and the cartilaginous portion of the epiphysis. An abnormally large medial meniscus was noted in four cases; an abnormal signal in the medial meniscus was seen in two cases. MR imaging has several advantages over plain film: it uses no ionizing radiation, it shows the shape of the ossified and cartilaginous epiphysis, and it demonstrates meniscal and physeal abnormalities. MR imaging may influence the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging safety guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, R.; Hurrell, M.; Tremewan, R.

    1996-01-01

    These guidelines are based on the findings and recommendations of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, the National Radiological Protection Board (UK), the National Health and Medical Research Council (Australia), the US Food and Drug Administration, the International Electrotechnical Commission and the Society for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. They indicate circumstances under which examinations may proceed with no special precautions, and those where a nmore careful evaluation may be necessary. They do not displace the need to maintain a current knowledge of the relevant medical literature. The guidelines have been endorsed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (NZ Branch), the NZ Institute of Medical Radiation Technologists and the Royal Australasian College of Radiologists (NZ Branch) as being supportive of good practice in MRI. They are based on information available at the time of publication. MRI imaging is an evolving technique, and it is recognised that future research and experience may require modifications to these recommendations. In recognition of this fact, they will ceaseto be valid on 31 December 2001. It is intended that they should be reviewed and modified where necessary before that date. (author). 9 refs., 2 tabs

  10. SU-F-R-35: Repeatability of Texture Features in T1- and T2-Weighted MR Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahon, R; Weiss, E; Karki, K; Hugo, G; Ford, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate repeatability of lung tumor texture features from inspiration/expiration MR image pairs for potential use in patient specific care models and applications. Repeatability is a desirable and necessary characteristic of features included in such models. Methods: T1-weighted Volumetric Interpolation Breath-Hold Examination (VIBE) and/or T2-weighted MRI scans were acquired for 15 patients with non-small cell lung cancer before and during radiotherapy for a total of 32 and 34 same session inspiration-expiration breath-hold image pairs respectively. Bias correction was applied to the VIBE (VIBE_BC) and T2-weighted (T2_BC) images. Fifty-nine texture features at five wavelet decomposition ratios were extracted from the delineated primary tumor including: histogram(HIST), gray level co-occurrence matrix(GLCM), gray level run length matrix(GLRLM), gray level size zone matrix(GLSZM), and neighborhood gray tone different matrix (NGTDM) based features. Repeatability of the texture features for VIBE, VIBE_BC, T2-weighted, and T2_BC image pairs was evaluated by the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) between corresponding image pairs, with a value greater than 0.90 indicating repeatability. Results: For the VIBE image pairs, the percentage of repeatable texture features by wavelet ratio was between 20% and 24% of the 59 extracted features; the T2-weighted image pairs exhibited repeatability in the range of 44–49%. The percentage dropped to 10–20% for the VIBE_BC images, and 12–14% for the T2_BC images. In addition, five texture features were found to be repeatable in all four image sets including two GLRLM, two GLZSM, and one NGTDN features. No single texture feature category was repeatable among all three image types; however, certain categories performed more consistently on a per image type basis. Conclusion: We identified repeatable texture features on T1- and T2-weighted MRI scans. These texture features should be further investigated for use

  11. SU-F-R-35: Repeatability of Texture Features in T1- and T2-Weighted MR Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, R; Weiss, E; Karki, K; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Ford, J [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate repeatability of lung tumor texture features from inspiration/expiration MR image pairs for potential use in patient specific care models and applications. Repeatability is a desirable and necessary characteristic of features included in such models. Methods: T1-weighted Volumetric Interpolation Breath-Hold Examination (VIBE) and/or T2-weighted MRI scans were acquired for 15 patients with non-small cell lung cancer before and during radiotherapy for a total of 32 and 34 same session inspiration-expiration breath-hold image pairs respectively. Bias correction was applied to the VIBE (VIBE-BC) and T2-weighted (T2-BC) images. Fifty-nine texture features at five wavelet decomposition ratios were extracted from the delineated primary tumor including: histogram(HIST), gray level co-occurrence matrix(GLCM), gray level run length matrix(GLRLM), gray level size zone matrix(GLSZM), and neighborhood gray tone different matrix (NGTDM) based features. Repeatability of the texture features for VIBE, VIBE-BC, T2-weighted, and T2-BC image pairs was evaluated by the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) between corresponding image pairs, with a value greater than 0.90 indicating repeatability. Results: For the VIBE image pairs, the percentage of repeatable texture features by wavelet ratio was between 20% and 24% of the 59 extracted features; the T2-weighted image pairs exhibited repeatability in the range of 44–49%. The percentage dropped to 10–20% for the VIBE-BC images, and 12–14% for the T2-BC images. In addition, five texture features were found to be repeatable in all four image sets including two GLRLM, two GLZSM, and one NGTDN features. No single texture feature category was repeatable among all three image types; however, certain categories performed more consistently on a per image type basis. Conclusion: We identified repeatable texture features on T1- and T2-weighted MRI scans. These texture features should be further investigated for use

  12. T2-weighted MR imaging of liver lesions: a prospective evaluation comparing turbo spin-echo, breath-hold turbo spin-echo and half-Fourier turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.; Villajos, M.; Oses, M. J.; Veintemillas, M.; Rue, M.; Puig, J.; Sentis, M.

    2000-01-01

    To compare turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE and half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequences quantitatively and qualitatively in T2-weighted images of liver lesions. The authors evaluated prospectively 89 liver lesions in 73 patients using a 1.0-T magnetic resonance system to compare TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences. The quantitative parameters were: lesion-to-liver contrast and lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio. The qualitative analysis was performed by two observers in consensus who examined four parameters: respiratory artifacts, lesion edge definition, intrahepatic vessel definition and image quality. Repeated measures analysis of variance was utilized to compare the quantitative variables and Friedman's nonparametric test for the qualitative parameters. In quantitative terms, the lesion-to-liver contrast was similar in TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (2.45±1.44 versus 2.60±1.66), both of which were significantly better than the HASTE sequence (1.12±0.72; p<0.001). The lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher in the TSE sequence (62.60±46.40 versus 40.22±25.35 versus 50.90±32.10 for TSE, breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, respectively; p<0.001). In the qualitative comparisons, the HASTE sequence was significantly better than the TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences (p<0.001) in terms of artifacts and definition of lesion edge and intrahepatic vessels. Image quality was also significantly greater in the HASTE sequence (p<0.001). In quantitative terms, the TSE sequence is better than the breath-hold TSE and HASTE sequences, but there are no movement artifacts in the HASTE sequence, which is also significantly superior to TSE and breath-hold TSE sequences in qualitative terms and, thus, can be employed for T2-weighted images in liver studies. (Author) 17 refs

  13. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  14. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.; Alonso, J.; Cucurella, G.; Nos, C.; Tintore, M.; Pedraza, S.; Rio, J.; Montalban, X.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs

  15. The progress in diagnostic imaging for staging of bladder and prostate cancer. Endorectal magnetic resonance imaging and magnetization transfer contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arima, Kiminobu; Hayashi, Norio; Yanagawa, Makoto; Kawamura, Juichi; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan [Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine; Sugimura, Yoshiki

    1999-08-01

    We retrospectively studied the staging accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in comparison with transrectal ultrasound examination (TRUS) for 71 localized bladder cancers and 19 localized prostate cancers (PC) radically resected. The accuracy of clinical staging for bladder cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 85.9% and 69.2%, respectively. The presence or absence of the continuity of submucosal enhancement on T2-weighted MRI images could be useful for the staging of bladder cancer. The accuracy of the seminal vesicular invasion for prostate cancer in endorectal MRI and TRUS was 95% and 63%, respectively. To determine whether magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) provides additional information in the diagnosis of prostate cancer, the magnetization transfer ratios (MTRs) were calculated in 22 patients with PC, 5 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and 4 controls. The mean MTR in the peripheral zone of the normal prostate (8.0%{+-}3.4 [standard deviation]) showed a statistically significant decrease relative to that in the inner zone of the normal prostate (27.4%{+-}3.4, p<0.01), BPH (25.5%{+-}3.7, p<0.01), pre-treatment PC (30.6%{+-}5.9, p<0.01), and PC after hormonal therapy (20.3%{+-}6.3, p<0.01). The mean MTR in pre-treatment PC was significantly higher than that in BPH, or in PC after hormonal therapy (p<0.01). MTC was considered to be useful for conspicuity of prostate cancer lesion. (author)

  16. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography ( ... pictures of the major blood vessels throughout your body. It may be performed with or without contrast ...

  17. The role of magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) is accepted as the gold standard, there is a place for magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in the diagnosis of obstructive biliary disorders. Aim: To compare the findings of MRCP with ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Breast Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ikeda, Debra

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a unique magnetic resonance imaging multi voxel pulse sequence producing spectroscopic images of key metabolites found in breast cancer, and validated our work with in vitro spectra and pathology...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Medical Imaging Costs Radiology and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/ ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Trackbed Moisture Sensor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    In this initial phase, conducted from March 2015 through December 2016, Vista Clara and its subcontractor Zetica Rail successfully developed and tested a man-portable, non-invasive spot-check nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) moisture sensor that dire...

  1. single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy in distinguishing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-03

    Mar 3, 2011 ... magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRI, MRS) in differentiating focal neoplastic lesions from focal non- neoplastic (infective or degenerative) brain lesions. Design: Descriptive, analytical - prospective study. Setting: The Aga Khan University MRI department. Subject: Seventy four consecutive patients.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & ... Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing that doctors use to see the body's organs ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and You Take our survey Sponsored by Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Test Medical Imaging Costs Video: Abdominal Ultrasound Video: Pelvic Ultrasound Radiology and You ...

  4. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mild sedative prior to the examination. For more information about Magnetic Resonance Angiography of MRA or any ... Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

  5. Usefulness of spinal magnetic resonance imaging in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska-Pamuła, Anna; Ziółko, Ewa; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Podwińska, Ewa; Adamczyk, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome is a rare, chronic hematological disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical presentations. Subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome are characterized by different survival times and ability to transform into acute myeloid leukemia. The objective of the study included the assessment of the relationship between the images obtained by magnetic resonance scans of lumbar spine and the clinical symptoms of the disease in patients diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, as well as the assessment of the correlation of the images with the phase of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. The study-related tests were carried out in Specialist Hospital No. 1 in Bytom between 2006 and 2011 and involved 53 patients aged 55÷77, divided into groups according to the diagnosed subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. The study also included the prognosis of overall survival and time to transformation into AML on the basis of valid classifications. The spinal magnetic resonance scans were obtained from medical documentation. The analysis included images obtained using T1- and T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, transverse and frontal planes in all patients, images obtained using the STIR sequence from 21 patients as well as 40 images obtained after contrast administration. The statistical analysis of the results was carried out using STATISTICA software. The obtained results demonstrated that the magnetic resonance scans revealed statistically significant changes in the images of bone marrow in vertebral body scans; with a decrease in the intensity of MRI signals correlated with the RAEB subtype, particularly with transformation into acute myeloid leukemia as well as with the high IPSS risk score with regard to the time of survival and transformation into acute myeloid leukemia. The research-related test results indicate the importance of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnostics and the assessment of the disease dynamics

  6. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  7. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murillo Viera, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis [es

  8. Magnetic resonance force microscopy using ferromagnetic resonance of a magnetic tip excited by microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yukinori; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-12-01

    The present work proposes magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) based on ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) modulation of a magnetic tip using microwave transmission via a coaxial resonator instead of using conventional microwave irradiation by an external antenna. In this MRFM, the coaxial resonator is electrically connected to the magnetic cantilever tip, which enables simple implementation of FMR excitation of a magnetic tip in conventional magnetic force microscopy. The FMR frequency of the tip can be easily extracted from the reflection spectrum of a transmission line connected to the magnetic tip. The excitation of tip FMR is confirmed from the microwave frequency dependence of the mechanical response of the tip oscillation. This MRFM is effective for extracting the magnetic interaction force near a sample surface without perturbation of its magnetic state. Nanometer-scale imaging of magnetic domain structures on a demagnetized thin-film permanent magnet is successfully demonstrated.

  9. Myocardial tissue characterization in Chagas' heart disease by cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreão, Jorge A; Ianni, Barbara M; Mady, Charles; Naia, Evandro; Rassi, Carlos H; Nomura, Cesar; Parga, José R; Avila, Luis F; Ramires, José A F; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Rochitte, Carlos E

    2015-11-18

    Chagas' heart disease is an important public health problem in South America. Several aspects of the pathogenesis are not fully understood, especially in its subclinical phases. On pathology Chagas' heart disease is characterized by chronic myocardial inflammation and extensive myocardial fibrosis. The latter has also been demonstrated by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). In three clinical phases of this disease, we sought to investigate the presence of LGE, myocardial increase in signal intensity in T2-weighted images (T2W) and in T1-weighted myocardial early gadolinium enhancement (MEGE), previously described CMR surrogates for myocardial fibrosis, myocardial edema and hyperemia, respectively. Fifty-four patients were analyzed. Sixteen patients with the indeterminate phase (IND), seventeen patients with the cardiac phase with no left ventricular systolic dysfunction (CPND), and twenty-one patients with the cardiac phase with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (CPD). All patients underwent 1.5 T CMR scan including LGE, T2W and MEGE image sequences to evaluate myocardial abnormalities. Late gadolinium enhancement was present in 72.2 % of all patients, in 12.5 % of IND, 94.1 % of the CPND and 100 % of the CPD patients (p < 0.0001). Myocardial increase in signal intensity in T2-weighted images (T2W) was present in 77.8 % of all patients, in 31.3 % of the IND, 94.1 % of the CPND and 100 % of the CPD patients (p < 0.0001). T1-weighted myocardial early gadolinium enhancement (MEGE) was present in 73.8 % of all patients, in 25.0 % of the IND, 92.3 % of the CPND and 94.1 % of the CPD (p < 0.0001). A good correlation between LGE and T2W was observed (r = 0.72, and p < 0.001). Increase in T2-weighted (T2W) myocardial signal intensity and T1-weighted myocardial early gadolinium enhancement (MEGE) can be detected by CMR in patients throughout all phases of Chagas' heart disease, including its

  10. Serial water changes in human skeletal muscles on exercise studied with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Toru; Ikehira, Hiroo; Arimizu, Noboru

    1994-01-01

    In vivo 1 H-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enabled us to study the distribution of water in living tissues and to document changes in human skeletal muscles during physical exercise. The purpose of the present study was to determine the total muscle water changes after exercise using water in 1 H-MR spectroscopy and to compare these changes to the signal intensity change on T 2 * -weighted images and/or to the T 2 value change. Seven young male volunteers were positioned in a 1.5 T Philips MR imaging system. They were then asked to dorsiflex their ankle joint against a 2 kg weight once every 2 seconds for 2 minutes. The peak height of water declined according to the clearance curve after exercise in all seven cases with the 1 H-MRS similar to the signal intensity. The increasing rate at peak height of total muscle water exceeded both the signal intensity and the T 2 value because the water peak height on the 1 H-MRS included the extracellular water. In addition, we measured the changes in signal intensity in both calf muscles after walking race exercise. The time intensity curves were used to draw a clearance curve for each muscle group after exercise. It was possible to discern which muscle was used most from the T 2 * -weighted image that was obtained once after exercise. (author)

  11. Cancer and diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. Differentiation with computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging - Preliminary experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oeistaemoe, Emma; Hjern, Fredrik; Abraham-Nordling, Mirna; Blomqvist, Lennart; Von Heijne, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both colon cancer and diverticular disease are common in the Western world. A challenge when patients present with clinical findings is that both diseases can present with symptoms that may mimic the other. Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be helpful to differentiate between diverticulitis and cancer of the sigmoid colon compared to the differentiation offered by evaluation of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a clinical situation. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were consecutively included. Fifteen patients were under work-up for a recently diagnosed sigmoid cancer and 15 patients had recently been treated in hospital due to first-time acute sigmoid diverticulitis. All patients underwent CT, T2- weighted MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI. Anonymized examinations were retrospectively presented in random order to one experienced radiologist. Results: With contrast-enhanced CT, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 66.7% (10/15) and 93.3% (14/15), respectively. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Conclusion: MRI provides information that may contribute to improve the differentiation between sigmoid cancer and diverticulitis that is offered by CT. These encouraging results need to be confirmed in a larger study

  12. Cancer and diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon. Differentiation with computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging - Preliminary experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeistaemoe, Emma; Hjern, Fredrik; Abraham-Nordling, Mirna [Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Div. of Surgery, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)], e-mail: mirna.abraham.nordling@ki.se; Blomqvist, Lennart [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Surgery Karolinska Univ. Hospital Solna and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Von Heijne, Anders [Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Div. of Radiology, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Both colon cancer and diverticular disease are common in the Western world. A challenge when patients present with clinical findings is that both diseases can present with symptoms that may mimic the other. Purpose: To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be helpful to differentiate between diverticulitis and cancer of the sigmoid colon compared to the differentiation offered by evaluation of multidetector computed tomography (CT) in a clinical situation. Material and Methods: Thirty patients were consecutively included. Fifteen patients were under work-up for a recently diagnosed sigmoid cancer and 15 patients had recently been treated in hospital due to first-time acute sigmoid diverticulitis. All patients underwent CT, T2- weighted MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI. Anonymized examinations were retrospectively presented in random order to one experienced radiologist. Results: With contrast-enhanced CT, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 66.7% (10/15) and 93.3% (14/15), respectively. Using T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted MR images, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of cancer and diverticulitis were 100% (14/14) and 100% (14/14), respectively. Conclusion: MRI provides information that may contribute to improve the differentiation between sigmoid cancer and diverticulitis that is offered by CT. These encouraging results need to be confirmed in a larger study.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous carcinoma in the breast according to echogenicity on ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Gyung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Yoon, JUng Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this study was to explore the clinical and pathological characteristics of pure mucinous breast carcinoma (PMBC) according to internal echogenicity on ultrasonography (US). Thirty-three patients with PMBC diagnosed at surgery were included in this study. Cases of PMBC were classified according to internal echogenicity on US. The imaging features on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were compared between the hypoechogenic and the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic groups. Eleven cases of PMBC (33.3%) exhibited hypoechogenicity on US, while 22 cases (66.7%) exhibited isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity. Of the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs, 95.5% showed a high signal on T2-weighted images, which was a significantly greater percentage than was observed for the hypoechogenic group (54.5%) (P=0.010). Of the hypoechogenic PMBCs, 63.6% showed a washout pattern in the delayed phase, which was substantially more than the result of 23.8% observed for the isoechogenic to hyperechogenic PMBCs (P=0.053). PMBCs with isoechogenicity or hyperechogenicity were more likely to show a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images than hypoechogenic PMBCs. However, other MR imaging and clinicohistopathological characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups.

  14. Spectrum of findings on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in patients with neurological manifestations of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejeshwar Singh Jugpal

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe the spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in patients with neurological manifestations of dengue. Materials and Methods: We included nine patients with dengue fever (three females and six males; age range, 9–30 years, all of whom presented with neurological manifestations. The MRI examinations, performed in 1.5 T or 3 T scanners, included T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient mapping was also employed. Fast low-angle shot and susceptibility-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequences, as well as contrast-enhanced T1-weighted scans, were also obtained in order to assess parenchymal enhancement. MRI scans were analyzed for lesion distribution and imaging features. Results: All patients showed areas of altered signal intensity that appeared as hyperintensity on T2-weighted and FLAIR sequences. The most commonly affected site was the basal ganglia-thalamus complex. Other affected sites were the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, white matter, and brainstem. In all cases, we observed patchy areas of restricted diffusion and focal areas of hemorrhage. Conclusion: Dengue encephalitis commonly affects the basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and white matter. Therefore, MRI should be an indispensable part of the evaluation of patients with neurological complications of dengue fever.

  15. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Kyoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow.

  16. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung Do; Lee, Kang Kyoo; Koh, Kwang Joon

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow.

  17. Frequency of common bile duct motion artifacts caused by inferior vena cava pulsation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Satoru; Ueno, Eiko; Saito, Naoko

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the frequency of common bile duct (CBD) motion artifacts caused by inferior vena cava (IVC) pulsation on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). We retrospectively evaluated CBD motion artifacts in 4 MRCP sequences from each of 115 consecutive patients. We observed 37 (32.2%) ghost artifacts at the ventral and dorsal aspects of the CBD on transaxial, half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE-ax) images; no such artifacts were observed on transaxial T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo images. In 10 patients, we observed 9 (7.8%) pseudo-defects of the CBD on 3-dimensional T 2 -weighted turbo spin-echo with navigator-triggered prospective acquisition correction technique MRCP and 6 (5.2%) pseudo-defects on single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement MRCP. Pseudo-defects were significantly more frequent in patients with ghost artifacts than without (9 of 37 [24.3%] versus one of 78 [1.3%]; P<0.01, McNemar test). Although uncommon, pseudo-defects of the CBD caused by IVC pulsation are observed on MRCP. MRCP interpretation that includes comparison with HASTE-ax images can diminish the potential misinterpretation of such CBD motion artifact as bile duct tumor or biliary stone. (author)

  18. Evaluation of sclerosis in Modic changes of the spine using susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Böker, Sarah M., E-mail: Sarah-maria.boeker@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Bender, Yvonne Y., E-mail: Yi-na.bender@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Adams, Lisa C., E-mail: Lisa.adams@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Fallenberg, Eva M., E-mail: Eva.fallenberg@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Wagner, Moritz, E-mail: Moritz.wagner@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R., E-mail: Marcus.makowski@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité, Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes. • SWI has a better accuracy for detection of sclerosis in Modic changes than T1/T2w MR. • By applying SWMR the use of additional CT/radiography can be minimized. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (SWMR) for the differentiation of sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes (MC) of the spine compared to computed tomography (CT) and radiographs. Materials and methods: The Institutional Ethics-Review-Board approved this prospective study in advance. Written consent was obtained from all subjects. SWMR and standard T1/T2 MR of the cervical (n = 21) and/or lumbar spine (n = 34) were performed in 54 patients. 21 patients served as control. 18 patients were evaluated with CT; in all other patients radiographs were available. 67 Modic changes were identified on T1/T2 MR. On SWMR changes were classified as sclerotic and non-sclerotic based on signal intensity measurements. The sensitivity and specificity of SWMR and T1/T2 MR for differentiating between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes were determined with CT and radiographs as reference standard. Results: On SWMR, signal measurements between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes differed significantly (p < 0.01). On T1- and T2-weighted MR no significant difference (p > 0.05) was measured. On SWMR, a reliable differentiation between sclerotic and non-sclerotic Modic changes could be achieved, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 95%. In contrast, the combination of T1-/T2-weighted MR yielded a significantly lower sensitivity to detect sclerosis (20%). Conclusion: SWMR allows a reliable detection of sclerosis in Modic changes with a higher accuracy compared to standard spine MR sequences, using radiographs and CT as reference standard.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound ablation of uterine fibroids. Early clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Koji; Osuga, Keigo; Tomoda, Kaname; Nakamura, Hironobu; Murakami, Takamichi; Okada, Atsuya

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound (MRIgFUS) ablation for uterine fibroids and to identify the candidates for this treatment. A total of 48 patients with a symptomatic uterine fibroid underwent MRIgFUS. The percent ablation volume was calculated, and the patients' characteristics and the MR imaging features of the fibroids that might predict the effect of this treatment were assessed. Changes in the symptoms related to the uterine fibroid were assessed at 6 and 12 months. The planned target zone were successfully treated in 32 patients with bulk-related and menstrual symptoms but unsuccessfully treated in the remaining 16 patients. These 16 patients were obese or their uterine fibroid showed heterogeneous high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. The 32 successfully treated patients were followed up for 6 months. At the 6-month follow-up, bulk-related and menstrual symptoms were diminished in 60% and 51% of patients, respectively. Among them, 17 patients were followed up for 12 months, and 9 of them who showed alleviation of bulk-related symptoms at 6 months had further improvement. The mean percent ablation volume of those nine patients was 51%. In 5 (33%) of the 15 patients with alleviation of menstrual symptoms at 6 months, the symptoms became worse at 12 months. There was a significant difference in the mean percent ablation volume between patients with alleviation of menstrual symptoms and those without (54% vs. 37%; P=0.03). MRIgFUS ablation is a safe, effective treatment for nonobese patients with symptomatic fibroids that show low signal intensity on T2-weighted images. Ablation of more than 50% of the fibroid volume may be needed with a short-term follow-up. (author)

  20. Marchiafava-Bignami disease: a case studied with brain magnetic resonance and SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardozo Oliver, J.; Casas Parera, Ignacio; Libere, G.; Malagold, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To show the correlation between brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) and single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) in a patient with Marchiafava-Bignami (MB) disease. Background: MB disease is a rare disorder associated with chronic alcoholism. It is characterized by symmetric demyelination of corpus callosum (CC) and adjacent white matter. These lesions can be demonstrated both by computed tomography or/and MRI. Scarce information is available about MRI and SPECT according to the research done. Design/methods: A 79-year-old white man with a history of excessive alcohol consumption (predominantly wine) was admitted to our Institute. A decrease in his physical activity was evidenced in the two years prior to admission and in the last twelve months progressive dementia with hallucinations and severe apathy developed. On admission neurologic examination showed papillae pale in both eyes, left hearing loss, action tremor of upper limbs and proximal hyporeflexia with distal arreflexia of all four limbs was observed. Affectation of higher cortical functions was evident. Cerebrospinal fluid was normal and serology for syphilis and HIV were negative. Both renal and hepatic functions were normal. Brain MRI and SPECT were performed. The patient died 70 days after diagnosis of MB disease. Results: MRI scans of the brain showed multiple hyperintense T2-weighted lesions in white matter and basal ganglia. Cortical atrophy, especially in the fronto-temporal areas, and a CC thickness reduction were also observed. Sagittal view showed an irregular cavitation in the genu of the CC, hypointense and hyperintense on T1 and T2-weighted images respectively. The SPECT showed an abnormal low perfusion on both frontal lobes, left temporo-parietal lobes and right basal ganglia. Conclusion: The clinical features and MRI were consistent with the diagnosis of MB disease. MRI and SPECT studies showed the connection between the lesion in the CC and bilateral cortical

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of third molars: developing a protocol suitable for forensic age estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tobel, Jannick; Hillewig, Elke; Bogaert, Stephanie; Deblaere, Karel; Verstraete, Koenraad

    2017-03-01

    Established dental age estimation methods in sub-adults study the development of third molar root apices on radiographs. In living individuals, however, avoiding ionising radiation is expedient. Studying dental development with magnetic resonance imaging complies with this requirement, adding the advantage of imaging in three dimensions. To elaborate the development of an MRI protocol to visualise all third molars for forensic age estimation, with particular attention to the development of the root apex. Ex vivo scans of porcine jaws and in vivo scans of 10 volunteers aged 17-25 years were performed to select adequate sequences. Studied parameters were T1 vs T2 weighting, ultrashort echo time (UTE), fat suppression, in plane resolution, slice thickness, 3D imaging, signal-to-noise ratio, and acquisition time. A bilateral four-channel flexible surface coil was used. Two observers evaluated the suitability of the images. T2-weighted images were preferred to T1-weighted images. To clearly distinguish root apices in (almost) fully developed third molars an in plane resolution of 0.33 × 0.33 mm 2 was deemed necessary. Taking acquisition time limits into account, only a T2 FSE sequence with slice thickness of 2 mm generated images with sufficient resolution and contrast. UTE, thinner slice T2 FSE and T2 3D FSE sequences could not generate the desired resolution within 6.5 minutes. Three Tesla MRI of the third molars is a feasible technique for forensic age estimation, in which a T2 FSE sequence can provide the desired in plane resolution within a clinically acceptable acquisition time.

  2. Enterovirus 71-related encephalomyelitis: usual and unusual magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seonah; Suh, Sang-il; Ha, Su Min; Byeon, Jung Hye; Eun, Baik-Lin; Lee, Young Hen; Seo, Hyung Suk; Eun, So-Hee; Seol, Hae-Young

    2012-03-01

    Most enterovirus (EV) 71 infections manifest as mild cases of hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD)/herpangina with seasonal variations, having peak incidence during the summer. Meanwhile, EV 71 may involve the central nervous system (CNS), causing severe neurologic disease. In many cases, enteroviral encephalomyelitis involves the central midbrain, posterior portion of the medulla oblongata and pons, bilateral dentate nuclei of the cerebellum, and the ventral roots of the cervical spinal cord, and the lesions show hyperintensity on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Our goal was to review usual and unusual magnetic resonance (MR) findings in CNS involvement of enteroviral infection. Among consecutive patients who had HFMD and clinically suspected encephalitis or myelitis and who underwent brain or spinal MR imaging, five patients revealed abnormal MR findings. Diffusion-weighted and conventional MR and follow-up MR images were obtained. From cerebrospinal fluid, stool, or nasopharyngeal swabs, EV 71 was confirmed in all patients. MR imaging studies of two patients showed hyperintensity in the posterior portion of the brainstem on T2-weighted and FLAIR images, which is the well-known MR finding of EV 71 encephalitis. The remaining three cases revealed unusual manifestations: leptomeningeal enhancement, abnormal enhancement along the ventral roots at the conus medullaris level without brain involvement, and hyperintensity in the left hippocampus on T2/FLAIR images. EV 71 encephalomyelitis shows relatively characteristic MR findings; therefore, imaging can be helpful in radiologic diagnosis. However, physicians should also be aware of unusual radiologic manifestations of EV 71.

  3. Limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Silvia D; Cooperberg, Peter L; Wong, Anthony D; Llewellyn, Patrick A; Bilbey, James H

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elucidation of ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. This study focused only on pelvic masses in which the origin of the mass (uterine v. extrauterine) could not be determined by ultrasonography (US). The origin of a pelvic mass has clinical implications. A mass arising from the uterus is most likely to be a leiomyoma, which is a benign lesion, whereas an extrauterine mass will have a higher likelihood of malignancy and usually requires surgery. Eighty-one female patients whose pelvic mass was of indeterminate origin on US also underwent limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis. Most of the MRI examinations were performed on the same day as the US. Limited-sequence MRI sequences included a quick gradient-echo T1-weighted localizer and a fast spin-echo T2-weighted sequence. Final diagnoses were established by surgical pathology or by clinical and imaging follow-up. Limited-sequence MRI was helpful in 79 of the 81 cases (98%). Fifty-two of the 81 masses (64%) were leiomyomas. One was a leiomyosarcoma. The extrauterine masses (26/81 [32%]) were identified as 14 ovarian malignancies, 4 endometriomas, 3 dermoids, an ovarian fibroma, an infarcted fibrothecoma, an infarcted hemorrhagic cyst, a sigmoid diverticular abscess and a gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the ileum. In the other 2 cases (2/81 [2%]), the origin of the pelvic mass remained indeterminate. Both of these indeterminate masses showed low signal on T2-weighted images and were interpreted as probable leiomyomas. They were not surgically removed but were followed clinically and had a stable course. Limited-sequence MRI is a quick and efficient way to further evaluate ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. Limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis can suffice, in these cases, without requiring a full MRI examination.

  4. Small Hypervascular Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Limited Value of Portal and Delayed Phases on Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.S.; Lee, J.H.; Chung, J.J.; Kim, J.H.; Kim, K.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Characterization of small nodules in the cirrhotic liver is always challenging in clinical practice. In the differential diagnosis of small hypervascular lesions, it has been reported that portal venous or delayed hypointensity is a useful sign to characterize hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) during dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. However, few studies have assessed the diagnostic value of this sign. Purpose: To determine the diagnostic value of portal-phase (PP) and delayed-phase (DP) images for the diagnosis of small hypervascular HCCs during intravenous (IV) contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging of cirrhotic liver. Material and Methods: A total of 69 small (6-20 mm) hypervascular HCCs in 53 cirrhotic patients were subjected to a retrospective analysis of the signal intensities (hypo-, iso-, or hyperintense) and rim enhancement on PP and 5-min DP images from three-phased dynamic MR imaging according to the pre-contrast T1- and T2-weighted imaging features. After exclusion of 33 subcapsular wedge-shaped pseudolesions and three hemangiomas by typical imaging features, 74 centrally located small hypervascular benign or pseudolesions were used as a control group for comparative analyses. Results: The sensitivities of PP hypointensity, DP hypointensity, and rim enhancement in the diagnosis were 11%, 29%, and 18%, respectively, for 6-10-mm hypervascular HCCs, and 42%, 63%, and 58%, respectively, for 16-20-mm lesions. After exclusion of the 48 lesions showing T2-weighted hyperintensity (HCCs, n=39; benign lesions, n=9), the overall sensitivity for diagnosis of small hypervascular HCCs decreased (8.3%, 25.0%, and 8.3%, respectively). Conclusion: Although DP provides a better sensitivity than PP, both PP and DP have very limited diagnostic value for diagnosis of small hypervascular HCCs during dynamic MR imaging of the cirrhotic liver

  5. Relationship between pain and effusion on magnetic resonance imaging in temporomandibular disorder patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ha Na; Kim, Kyoung A; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Bioscience, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study was performed to find the relationship between pain and joint effusion using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. The study subjects included 232 TMD patients. The inclusion criteria in this study were the presence of spontaneous pain or provoked pain on one or both temporomandibular joints (TMJs). The provoked pain was divided into three groups: pain on palpation (G1), pain on mouth opening (G2), and pain on mastication (G3). MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. T1- and T2-weighted images with para-sagittal and para-coronal images were obtained. According to the T2-weighted image findings, the cases of effusions were divided into four groups: normal, mild (E1), moderate (E2), and marked effusion (E3). A statistical analysis was carried out using the chi2 test with SPSS (version 12.0, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Spontaneous pain, provoked pain, and both spontaneous and provoked pain were significantly related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p<0.05). However, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ (G1) was not related to joint effusion in TMD patients (p>0.05). Spontaneous pain was related to the MRI findings of joint effusion; however, among the various types of provoked pain, pain on palpation of the masticatory muscles and TMJ was not related to the MRI findings of joint effusion. These results suggest that joint effusion has a significant influence on the prediction of TMJ pain.

  6. Limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of the ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.D.; Cooperberg, P.L.; Wong, A.D.; Llewellyn, P.A.; Bilbey, J.H.

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of limited-sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the elucidation of ultrasonographically indeterminate pelvic masses. This study focused only on pelvic masses in which the origin of the mass (uterine v. extrauterine) could not be determined by ultrasonography (US). The origin of a pelvic mass has clinical implications. A mass arising from the uterus is most likely to be a leiomyoma, which is a benign lesion, whereas an extrauterine mass will have a higher likelihood of malignancy and usually requires surgery. Eighty-one female patients whose pelvic mass was of indeterminate origin on US also underwent limited-sequence MRI of the pelvis. Most of the MRI examinations were performed on the same day as the US. Limited-sequence MRI sequences included a quick gradient-echoT 1 -weighted localizer and a fast spin-echoT 2 -weighted sequence. Final diagnoses were established by surgical pathology or by clinical and imaging follow-up. Limited-sequence MRI was helpfu