WorldWideScience

Sample records for systems aerosol characteristics

  1. Atmospheric aerosol system: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospero, J.M.; Charlson, R.J.; Mohnen, V.; Jaenicke, R.; Delany, A.C.; Moyers, J.; Zoller, W.; Rahn, K.

    1983-01-01

    Aerosols could play a critical role in many processes which impact on our lives either indirectly (e.g., climate) or directly (e.g., health). However, our ability to assess these possible impacts is constrained by our limited knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of aerosols, both anthropogenic and natural. This deficiency is attributable in part to the fact that aerosols are the end product of a vast array of chemical and physical processes. Consequently, the properties of the aerosol can exhibit a great deal of variability in both time and space. Furthermore, most aerosol studies have focused on measurements of a single aerosol characteristic such as composition or size distribution. Such information is generally not useful for the assessment of impacts because the degree of impact may depend on the integral properties of the aerosol, for example, the aerosol composition as a function of particle size. In this overview we discuss recent work on atmospheric aerosols that illustrates the complex nature of the aerosol chemical and physical system, and we suggest strategies for future research. A major conclusion is that man has had a great impact on the global budgets of certain species, especially sulfur and nitrogen, that play a dominant role in the atmospheric aerosol system. These changes could conceivably affect climate. Large-scale impacts are implied because it has recently been demonstrated that natural and pollutant aerosol episodes can be propagated over great distances. However, at present there is no evidence linking anthropogenic activities with a persistent increase in aerosol concentrations on a global scale. A major problem in assessing man's impact on the atmospheric aerosol system and on global budgets is the absence of aerosol measurements in remote marine and continental areas

  2. The response of a simulated mesoscale convective system to increased aerosol pollution: Part II: Derecho characteristics and intensity in response to increased pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, Michal; Grasso, Lewis D.; Cotton, William R.; van den Heever, Susan C.

    2018-01-01

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) are important contributors to rainfall as well as producers of severe weather such as hail, tornados, and straight-line wind events known as derechos. In this study, different aerosol concentrations and their effects on a derecho event are examined by simulating a case study, the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho", using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a cloud-resolving model with sophisticated aerosol and cloud microphysics. Three simulations were conducted that differed in the initial aerosol concentrations, spatial distribution and chemical composition as derived from output of GEOS-Chem, a 3D chemical transport model. In order to understand the impact of changes in aerosol concentrations on the derecho characteristics, the dynamical processes that produced the strong surface wind were determined by performing back-trajectory analysis during two periods of the simulated storm: the development and the onset of dissipation. A time dependent and non-monotonic trend was found between the intensity of the derecho and the increased aerosol concentrations that served as cloud condensation nuclei. During the formation period of the MCS, the non-monotonic trend was attributed to the microphysical impact of aerosol loading on the intensity of the cold pool; that is, the impact of aerosols on both the melting and evaporation rates of hydrometeors. The subsequent intensity changes within the cold pool modified the balance between the horizontal vorticity generated by the cold pool and that of the environment, thereby impacting the orientation of the convective updraft at the leading line. This, in turn, altered the primary flow that contributed to the formation of the derecho-strength surface winds. The simulation with no anthropogenic aerosols exhibited the strongest cold pool and the primary flow was associated with a descending rear inflow jet that produced the derecho winds over a larger region. The simulation with the highest

  3. Revised Land Use Characteristic Dataset for Asia and Southwest Asia for the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A. L.; Richardson, K.; Westphal, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Presently, the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) uses the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) land use characteristic dataset to determine global dust emission areas. The USGS dataset was developed from Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer 1-km data from April 1992 to March 1993. In the past decade drastic changes in land and water use in Asia and Southwest Asia have quickly outdated this dataset. In China and Mongolia, age-old practices of farming and animal husbandry have been abandoned. Herders have too many animals in one location allowing the grassland to be eaten away and leaving vast areas of topsoil exposed and primed for removal by the wind. In the case of Southwest Asia, a four-year drought is in progress. Many of the wetlands and marshes in the river deltas are drying up from the lack of water runoff. To compound the problem several new dams were and are being built along the major watersheds. In particular, Iraq's dam building in the 1990's and politically driven draining of the Mesopotamian marshes between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers has lead to the near disappearance of this historical marshland. To incorporate these changes we are updating the USGS land use characteristic dataset using GIS-like software named ENVI (Environment for Visualizing Images), 1 km National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global topographical data, satellite imagery, and recently released governmental maps and reports. (For example, within the last two years the Chinese and Mongolian governments have released land degradation and desertification maps to satisfy the requirements set forth by United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification.) The steps taken to create the new land use characteristic database will be described in detail. Before (non-dust producing areas) and after (dust producing areas) examples will be shown.

  4. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  5. A UV multifunctional Raman lidar system for the observation and analysis of atmospheric temperature, humidity, aerosols and their conveying characteristics over Xi'an

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yufeng, Wang; Qiang, Fu; Meina, Zhao; Fei, Gao; Huige, Di; Yuehui, Song; Dengxin, Hua

    2018-01-01

    To monitor the variability and the correlation of multiple atmospheric parameters in the whole troposphere and the lower stratosphere, a ground-based ultraviolet multifunctional Raman lidar system was established to simultaneously measure the atmospheric parameters in Xi'an (34.233°N, 108.911°E). A set of dichroic mirrors (DMs) and narrow-band interference filters (IFs) with narrow angles of incidence were utilized to construct a high-efficiency 5-channel polychromator. A series of high-quality data obtained from October 2013 to December 2015 under different weather conditions were used to investigate the functionality of the Raman lidar system and to study the variability of multiple atmospheric parameters in the whole stratosphere. Their conveying characteristics are also investigated using back trajectories with a hybrid single-particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory model (HYSPLIT). The lidar system can be operated efficiently under weather conditions with a cloud backscattering ratio of less than 18 and an atmospheric visibility of 3 km. We observed an obvious temperature inversion phenomenon at the tropopause height of 17-18 km and occasional temperature inversion layers below the boundary layer. The rapidly changing atmospheric water vapor is mostly concentrated at the lower troposphere, below ∼4-5 km, accounting for ∼90% of the total water vapor content at 0.5-10 km. The back trajectory analysis shows that the air flow from the northwest and the west mainly contributes to the transport of aerosols and water vapor over Xi'an. The simultaneous continuous observational results demonstrate the variability and correlation among the multiple atmospheric parameters, and the accumulated water vapor density in the bottom layer causes an increase in the aerosol extinction coefficient and enhances the relative humidity in the early morning. The long-term observations provide a large amount of reliable atmospheric data below the lower stratosphere, and can be

  6. Temporal characteristics of aerosol physical properties at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Realizing the importance of aerosol physical properties at the adjoining continental and coastal locations in the airmass pathways onto the oceanic region, extensive measurements of aerosol physical properties were made at Visakhapatnam (17.7°N, 83.3°E), an eastern coastal location in peninsular India during the ICARB ...

  7. Aerosol vertical distribution characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Z Q; Han, Y X; Zhao, Q; Li, J

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) aerosol products are widely used in climatic characteristic studies and stratospheric aerosol pattern research. Some SAGE II products, e.g., temperature, aerosol surface area density, 1020 nm aerosol extinction coefficient and dust storm frequency, from ground-based observations were analysed from 1984 to 2005. This analysis explored the time and spatial variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols on the Tibet Plateau. The stratospheric aerosol extinction coefficient increased more than two orders of magnitude because of a large volcanic eruption. However, the tropospheric aerosol extinction coefficient decreased over the same period. Removing the volcanic eruption effect, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) and tropospheric AOD was 0.197. Moreover, the correlation coefficient for stratospheric AOD and dust storm frequency was 0.315. The maximum stratospheric AOD was attained in January, the same month as the tropospheric AOD, when the Qaidam Basin was the centre of low tropospheric AOD and the large mountains coincided with high stratospheric AOD. The vertical structure generated by westerly jet adjustment and the high altitude of the underlying surface of the Tibetan Plateau were important factors affecting winter stratospheric aerosols

  8. Role of anthropogenic aerosols in UV and shortwave absorption and their consequences over natural aerosol characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, K. D.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosols are extremely fine particles those affect Earth's climate by altering the Earth's "radiation budget". The aim of present work is to study the absorption in UV and shortwave regions due to aerosols over various atmospheric environments. In the first part of the work, we have performed a new technique to enumerate the absorption due to organic carbon as optical depth. This method is applied for ground based observations but it can also be useful for satellite observed spectral optical depths. Our study exhibits large "anomalous" absorption in UV wavelengths over different locations worldwide. Here we divulge that a major portion of anomalous absorption is contributed by organic carbon aerosols (nominated as Organic Carbon Aerosol Optical Depth 'OCAOD') and part of it also due to dust aerosols. Using this method, we are capable to assess the contribution of each aerosol species in UV absorption quantitatively. Second part of the work is a classic example of how the anthropogenic absorbing aerosols can modify the absorption properties of natural aerosols. Regions closest to desert locations are unique in terms of aerosol characteristics due to the co-existence of both natural and anthropogenic aerosols. Shortwave absorption over such regions is significantly affected by biomass burning activities, and hence providing an opportunity to study the interaction between natural and anthropogenic aerosols. Ground based observations from AERosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET) are used to examine the relationship between shortwave absorption and size characteristics of aerosols using single scattering albedo (ω) at 441 nm wavelength and angstrom wavelength exponent (α) in the spectral range 440-870nm respectively. For α(440-870)dust over land), ω(441) was found reasonably low (as low as 0.87) compared to those stated for pure dust in earlier studies. Our simple and cogent analysis using simple key aerosols parameters from ground based observation suggests that these

  9. Aerosol sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  10. Removal characteristics of sulfuric acid aerosols from coal-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Danping; Yang, Linjun; Wu, Hao; Huang, Rongting

    2017-03-01

    With increasing attention on sulfuric acid emission, investigations on the removal characteristics of sulfuric acid aerosols by the limestone gypsum wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) system and the wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) were carried out in two coal-fired power plants, and the effects of the WFGD scrubber type and the flue gas characteristics were discussed. The results showed that it was necessary to install the WESP device after desulfurization, as the WFGD system was inefficient to remove sulfuric acid aerosols from the flue gas. The removal efficiency of sulfuric acid aerosols in the WFGD system with double scrubbers ranged from 50% to 65%, which was higher than that with a single scrubber, ranging from 30% to 40%. Furthermore, the removal efficiency of WESP on the sulfuric acid aerosols was from 47.9% to 52.4%. With increased concentrations of SO 3 and particles in the flue gas, the removal efficiencies of the WFGD and the WESP on the sulfuric acid aerosols were increased. Investigations on removal of sulfuric acid aerosols by the WFGD and the WESP in the power plants were aimed at the control of sulfuric acid emission. The results showed that the improvement of the WFGD system was beneficial for the reduction of sulfuric acid emission, while the WESP system was essential to control the final sulfuric acid aerosol concentration.

  11. Atmospheric aerosol characteristics retrieved using ground based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    toring the air for aerosol parameters – AODs and. Ångstrom coefficients and finding their correlation with meteorological parameters at Mohal (Kullu) in the northwestern Indian Himalaya. This would help in unfolding the current status of air quality in this part of the Himalaya during clear sky days from April 2006 to March ...

  12. Experiences using the latest generation of satellite aerosol products in a global aerosol data assimilation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, E. J.; Zhang, J.; McHardy, T. M.; Shi, Y.; Lynch, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) produces short-term forecasts of aerosol mass concentration and optical properties. These forecasts are initialized by the Navy Variational Data Assimilation System for Aerosol (NAVDAS-AOD). This system requires observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) which are unbiased, and free from outliers to the extent possible. With a new generation of AOD data products from MODIS Collection 6 (including Dark Target and Deep Blue algorithms) as well as from NPP VIIRS, the applicability of these products for use in NAVDAS-AOD and their impact on analysis and forecast of aerosols in NAAPS has been evaluated in detail. This talk describes the evaluation of these products, the pre-processing used for quality assurance and quality control of these products for use in NAVDAS-AOD, and the impacts of assimilation of these products on the NAAPS model. Discussion of product characteristics that impact the data assimilation application is also included, as well as prospects for future aerosol products that could lead to improved utilization in atmospheric forecast models.

  13. Multi-Sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, M.; Ichoku, C.; Leptoukh, G.

    2011-01-01

    Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS), which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient) of aerosol products from multiple spacebome sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua), MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  14. Aerosol size characteristics in selected working areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.

    1984-05-01

    This report presents the work done to study the aerosol activity size distributions and their respirable fractions in some selected areas of the Juelich Nuclear Research Center. Anderson cascade impactors were used to find the aerodynamic size ranges of the airborne particles for subsequent analysis of activity associated with each size group. The aerosols were found to follow in general log-normal distributions in the hot cells with values of AMAD between 5 and 10 μm. Measurements in the AVR containment and decontamination laboratory in Uranit GmbH showed deviations from log-normal distribution. In the waste press area the distribution is sometimes log-normal and sometimes not, depending upon the origin of waste. The values of AMAD are in the range of 2 to 4 μm in these areas. The respirable fractions were calculated using ACGIH definition for respirable dust to be < 25% in hot cells and < 60% in other areas. Pulmonary depositions according to ICRP model were < 10% and < 15% respectively. (orig./HP)

  15. Three-Dimensional Physical and Optical Characteristics of Aerosols over Central China from Long-Term CALIPSO and HYSPLIT Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols greatly influence global and regional atmospheric systems, and human life. However, a comprehensive understanding of the source regions and three-dimensional (3D characteristics of aerosol transport over central China is yet to be achieved. Thus, we investigate the 3D macroscopic, optical, physical, and transport properties of the aerosols over central China based on the March 2007 to February 2016 data obtained from the Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO mission and the hybrid single-particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory (HYSPLIT model. Our results showed that approximately 60% of the aerosols distributed over central China originated from local areas, whereas non-locally produced aerosols constituted approximately 40%. Anthropogenic aerosols constituted the majority of the aerosol pollutants (69% that mainly distributed less than 2.0 km above mean sea level. Natural aerosols, which are mainly composed of dust, accounted for 31% of the total aerosols, and usually existed at an altitude higher than that of anthropogenic aerosols. Aerosol particles distributed in the near surface were smaller and more spherical than those distributed above 2.0 km. Aerosol optical depth (AOD and the particulate depolarization ratio displayed decreasing trends, with a total decrease of 0.11 and 0.016 from March 2007 to February 2016, respectively. These phenomena indicate that during the study period, the extinction properties of aerosols decreased, and the degree of sphericity in aerosol particles increased. Moreover, the annual anthropogenic and natural AOD demonstrated decreasing trends, with a total decrease of 0.07 and 0.04, respectively. This study may benefit the evaluation of the effects of the 3D properties of aerosols on regional climates.

  16. Measurement of particle size characteristics of metered dose inhaler (MDI) aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolovich, M

    1991-01-01

    Measurement of the aerodynamic size of an aerosol allows a prediction of its deposition efficiency and behaviour in the lung. The dynamics of volatile or pressurized (MDI) aerosols presents problems not encountered in the characterization of solid or liquid particles alone. For example, the data obtained in real-time sampling as opposed to measuring an aged aerosol provide a truer representation of circumstances during actual clinical use, yet this may be difficult to achieve due to propellent evaporation. A number of particle sizing systems have been developed based upon light scattering techniques and aerodynamic principles. Each method has its limitations; in general, they successfully measure the aerodynamic size distributions of MDI aerosols. Cascade impactors, the "gold standard" of the industry have the advantage that they allow analysis of drug mass as well as other tracers within the aerosol, but the process as a whole is labour intensive, with limited resolution. Highly automated laser-based systems developed over the past 10 years measure the surface characteristics of the aerosol rather than the direct measurement of mass. Because of different values obtained from various sizing systems, it is suggested that all MDI drugs be sized using cascade impactors but that parallel data be obtained using an alternative sizing system.

  17. Portable diffusion battery. It's application to measuring aerosol size characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, D.

    1972-01-01

    A miniature portable cluster-tube diffusion battery for measurement of the size and size distribution of submicron aerosols (1-100 nm) is described. A series of commercially available Collimated Holes Structures are mounted in sleeves with O-rings so that aerosol penetration can be measured at a number of outlets along the series. The CHS are stainless-steel discs of several different diameters and thicknesses, containing a large number of nearly circular holes. The actual length of the apparatus is about 2 ft but the equivalent length is 3.25 mi. Calculated curves of penetration versus particle size are used to evaluate size distribution and show that the equivalent size frequently reported from one measurement with a rectangular diffusion battery is practically meaningless. The value depends as much on the characteristics and mode of the operation of the diffusion battery as on the aerosol; the longer the battery and the lower the air flow, the greater the equivalent size will appear to be. Graphical plots of the cumulative size distribution of room aerosol and silver aerosol are illustrated for large battery and miniature battery measurements and appear to be in close agreement. Measurements on radon daughters in uranium mines with the miniature batteries show activity median diameters from 0.1 to 0.17 micron, with standard deviations from 2 to 4. Two similar measurements made in the laboratory on room air tagged with about 50 pCi/l radon daughters show activity median diameters of 0.15 and 0.17 micron, with geometric standard deviations of 2.2 and 2.6, respectively

  18. Radiological/biological/aerosol removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Jeffery J

    2015-03-17

    An air filter replacement system for existing buildings, vehicles, arenas, and other enclosed airspaces includes a replacement air filter for replacing a standard air filter. The replacement air filter has dimensions and air flow specifications that allow it to replace the standard air filter. The replacement air filter includes a filter material that removes radiological or biological or aerosol particles.

  19. Modeling analysis of secondary inorganic aerosols over China: pollution characteristics, and meteorological and dust impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xiao; Wang, Shuxiao; Chang, Xing; Cai, Siyi; Xing, Jia; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) are the predominant components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and have significant impacts on air quality, human health, and climate change. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) was modified to incorporate SO2 heterogeneous reactions on the surface of dust particles. The revised model was then used to simulate the spatiotemporal characteristics of SIA over China and analyze the impacts of meteorological factors and d...

  20. Lead exposures and biological responses in military weapons systems: Aerosol characteristics and acute lead effects among US Army artillerymen: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, M.H.; Stebbings, J.H.; Peterson, D.P.; Johnson, S.A.; Kumar, R.; Goun, B.D.; Janssen, I.; Trier, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    This study was to determine the concentration and chemical nature of lead (Pb) aerosols produced during the firing of artillery and to determine the exposures and biological responses of crew members exposed to lead aerosols during such firing. The concentrations of lead-containing aerosols at crew positions depended on wind conditions, with higher concentrations when firing into a head wind. Aerosol concentrations were highest in the muzzle blast zone. Concentrations of lead in the blood of crew members rose during the first 12 days of exposure to elevated airborne lead concentrations and then leveled off. There was no rapid decrease in blood lead concentrations after completion of firing. Small decreases in hematocrit and small increases in free erythrocyte porphyrin were correlated with increasing exposure to airborne lead. These changes were reversed by seven weeks after firing. Changes in nerve conduction velocity had borderline statistical significance to airborne lead exposure. In measuring nerve conduction velocity, differences in skin temperature must be taken into account.

  1. Evaluation of a radioactive aerosol surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Stafford, R.G.; Beckman, R.J.; Tillery, M.I.; Romero, P.O.

    Measurements of the dilution of air contaminants between worker breathing zone and area air samplers were made by releasing a test aerosol in a workroom equipped with an aerosol surveillance system. The data were used to evaluate performance, and suggest improvements in design of the workroom's alarming air monitor system. It was found that a breathing zone concentration of 960 times the maximum permissible concentration in air (MPC/sub a/) for a half-hour was required to trigger alarms of the existing monitoring system under some release conditions. Alternative air monitor placement, suggested from dilution measurements, would reduce this average triggering concentration to 354 MPC/sub a/. Deployment of additional air monitors could further reduce the average triggering concentration to 241 MPC/sub a/. The relation between number of monitors and triggering concentration was studied. No significant decrease in average triggering concentration was noted for arrays containing greater than five monitors

  2. Aerosol characteristics and sources in Yangzhou, China resolved by offline aerosol mass spectrometry and other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xinlei; Li, Ling; Chen, Yanfang; Chen, Hui; Wang, Junfeng; Ye, Zhaolian; Xu, Jianzhong; Chen, Mindong

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of fine aerosol characteristics and sources is essential in reducing the air pollution in the densely populated areas, such as the Yangtze River Delta region in China. This study performed a half-year long PM2.5 sample collection in Yangzhou and analyzed the chemical components using various techniques, in particular, an Aerodyne soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SP-AMS). The measured species were able to reconstruct the majority of PM2.5 mass (on average, 91.2%). Source analyses of inorganic species found that secondary nitrate, sulfate and chloride were the major species, and also qualitatively inferred primary sources including biomass burning, coal combustion, traffic, industry and re-suspended dust due to nearby demolition activities. EC-tracer method derived that the organic matter (OM) was composed of 65.4% secondary OM (SOM) and 34.6% of primary OM (POM). SP-AMS determined that the water-soluble OM (WSOM) occupied 60.3% of OM, close to the fraction of SOM to OM, and correlation analyses showed that WSOM might enrich SOM, while water-insoluble OM (WIOM) was likely abundant in POM. Further positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses on WSOM identified three primary sources including traffic, cooking and biomass burning, and two secondary factors. Indeed, we found the secondary factors dominated WSOM mass (68.1%), and their contributions increased with the increase of WSOM concentrations. The relatively small contribution of primary sources in WSOM was likely due to the low water solubility of these primary OM factors. This study improves understanding of the complex aerosol sources and chemistry in this region.

  3. Seasonal variability in aerosol optical and physical characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sion, etc.), but at regional level the contribution of anthropogenic sources of aerosol is significant. (Ramanathan et al 2001). The long-range trans- port of desert dust also contributes to the aerosol. Keywords. Aerosol optical depth; Ångström exponent; second order polynomial fit; multi-wavelength radiometer. J. Earth Syst.

  4. Characteristics of spectral aerosol optical depths over India during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Regional Remote Sensing Service Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Campus, Kharagpur 721 302, India. 8 ... transport of aerosols, particularly from the west Asia and northwest coastal India, contributed ... Keywords. Atmospheric aerosols; aerosol optical depth; Ångström parameters; ICARB; long-range transport; multi-.

  5. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber. 8 claims, 7 figures

  6. Calculation of color difference and measurement of the spectrum of aerosol based on human visual system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mengyan; Liu, Jianghai; Cui, Jianlin; Chen, Chunsheng; Jia, Peng

    2017-10-01

    In order to solve the problem of the quantitative test of spectrum and color of aerosol, the measurement method of spectrum of aerosol based on human visual system was proposed. The spectrum characteristics and color parameters of three different aerosols were tested, and the color differences were calculated according to the CIE1976-L*a*b* color difference formula. Three tested powders (No 1# No 2# and No 3# ) were dispersed in a plexglass box and turned into aerosol. The powder sample was released by an injector with different dosages in each experiment. The spectrum and color of aerosol were measured by the PRO 6500 Fiber Optic Spectrometer. The experimental results showed that the extinction performance of aerosol became stronger and stronger with the increase of concentration of aerosol. While the chromaticity value differences of aerosols in the experiment were so small, luminance was verified to be the main influence factor of human eye visual perception and contributed most in the three factors of the color difference calculation. The extinction effect of No 3# aerosol was the strongest of all and caused the biggest change of luminance and color difference which would arouse the strongest human visual perception. According to the sensation level of chromatic color by Chinese, recognition color difference would be produced when the dosage of No 1# powder was more than 0.10 gram, the dosage of No 2# powder was more than 0.15 gram, and the dosage of No 3# powder was more than 0.05 gram.

  7. [Distribution characteristics of particulate mercury in aerosol in coastal city].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fu-Wang; Zhao, Jin-Ping; Chen, Jin-Sheng; Xu, Ya

    2010-10-01

    Particulate mercury, which is bound with aerosol in atmosphere, has a negative impact on human health and the environment, also plays an important role in the biogeochemical process of mercury. In this paper, taking southeast coastal city of Xiamen as research object, the PM2.5, PM10 and TSP were collected in residential, tourism, industrial area and background, respectively, during four seasons (October 2008-September 2009). RA-915 + mercury analyzer was employed to determinate mercury concentration in different size particle matters based on zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry. The results showed that the contents of particulate mercury in different size of aerosol during Winter, Spring were obviously higher than that of Summer, Autumn; the concentrations of particulate mercury in fine particle during Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter were (51.46 +/- 19.28), (42.41 +/- 12.74), (38.38 +/- 6.08) and (127.23 +/- 33.70) pg/m3, respectively. The experimental data showed that the particulate mercury were mainly distributed in fine particles (PM2.5), which covered 42.48%-67.87%, and it can be concluded that the rate of particulate mercury enrichment in coarse particle was much lower than that of fine particle. The sequence of atmospheric particulate mercury concentration in different functional areas was: background tourism < industrial area < suburban; which showed characteristics of spatial distribution of particulate mercury was affected by the sampling location. On the whole, Xiamen had a low level of atmospheric particulate mercury; the enrichment of PM2.5 to particulate mercury was significantly higher than that of PM10 and TSP, and showed that fine particle pollution should be tightly controlled to reduce particulate mercury.

  8. Regional characteristics of spring Asian dust and its impact on aerosol chemistry over northern China

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhuang, G. S.; Wang, Z. F.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, W. J.; Tang, A. H.; Zhao, X. J.; Jia, L.

    2006-01-01

    TSP and PM2.5 aerosol samples were synchronously collected at six sites along the transport pathway of dust storm from desert regions to coastal areas in the spring of 2004. The aerosol concentration and composition were measured to investigate the regional characteristics of spring Asian dust and its impact on aerosol chemistry over northern China. Based on the daily PM10 concentrations in 13 cities, the northern China could be divided into five ...

  9. In vitro aerodynamic characteristics of aerosol delivered from different inhalation methods in mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElHansy, Muhammad H E; Boules, Marina E; Farid, Heba; Chrystyn, Henry; El-Maraghi, Sameh Kamal; Al-Kholy, Mohamed Bakry; El-Essawy, Assem Fouad Mohamed; Abdelrahman, Maha M; Said, Amira S A; Hussein, Raghda R S; Rabea, Hoda; Abdelrahim, Mohamed E A

    2017-09-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of aerosol delivery during invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) are mostly determined by inserting cascade impactor in the circuit. Impactor might have some effect on airflow within IMV. Hence, the aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate new in vitro aerodynamic characterization methodology without affecting airflow in IMV. Breathing simulator was set in standard adult IMV circuit with inspiratory and expiratory pressures of 20 and 5 cm H 2 O, 1:3 inspiratory-expiratory ratio, 15 breaths min -1 , and tidal volume of 500 ml. Two ml of salbutamol solution containing 10,000 μg was nebulized using three different vibrating mesh nebulizers (VMNs) and Sidestream jet nebulizer (JET). Sixteen-metered doses, containing 100 μg salbutamol each, were delivered using three different spacers. Each device was placed in inspiration limb of Y-piece of ventilator tubing. Aerodynamic characteristics of aerosol delivered were measured using cooled Andersen cascade impactor, with mixing inlet connected to it. VMNs used had significantly more total mass in the impactor (p < .001) and fine particle dose (p < .001) compared to JET. Spacers used had higher total mass in the impactor percent (p < .001) and fine particle fraction compared to nebulizers. The in vitro IMV methodology setting suggested here showed encouraging results in comparison of different aerosol delivery systems in intubated patient.

  10. Aerosol characteristics at a remote island: Minicoy in southern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Minicoy in southern Arabian Sea for the period (February 2006–March 2007) are used to char- acterize their ... with the exception of soil dust, sea-salt forms one ..... level.) mass of super micron aerosols than the winter. (DJF) but, the rainfall associated with the mon- soon perhaps brings down the sea-salt aerosols by.

  11. Physical and optical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols during ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Collocated measurements of the optical and physical properties of columnar and near-surface aerosols were carried out from Manora Peak, Nainital (a sparsely inhabited, high altitude location, ∼2km above mean sea level, in the Himalayas), during the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget ...

  12. Characteristics and sources of carbonaceous aerosols from Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An intensive investigation of carbonaceous PM2.5 and TSP (total suspended particles from Pudong (China was conducted as part of the MIRAGE-Shanghai (Megacities Impact on Regional and Global Environment experiment in 2009. Data for organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC, organic species, including C17 to C40 n-alkanes and 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes OC (δ13COC and EC (δ13CEC were used to evaluate the aerosols' temporal variations and identify presumptive sources. High OC/EC ratios indicated a large fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA; high char/soot ratios indicated stronger contributions to EC from motor vehicles and coal combustion than biomass burning. Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated that much of the SOA was produced via coal combustion. Isotope abundances (δ13COC = −24.5 ± 0.8‰ and δ13CEC = −25.1 ± 0.6‰ indicated that fossil fuels were the most important source for carbonaceous PM2.5 (particulate matter less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter, with lesser impacts from biomass burning and natural sources. An EC tracer system and isotope mass balance calculations showed that the relative contributions to total carbon from coal combustion, motor vehicle exhaust, and SOA were 41%, 21%, and 31%; other primary sources such as marine, soil and biogenic emissions contributed 7%. Combined analyses of OC and EC, n-alkanes and PAHs, and stable carbon isotopes provide a new way to apportion the sources of carbonaceous particles.

  13. Effect of operation conditions of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator on aerosol characteristics: Pseudo-cinematographic and plasma mass spectrometric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlandini von Niessen, Jan O.; Krone, Karin M.; Bings, Nicolas H., E-mail: bings@uni-mainz.de

    2014-02-01

    The recently presented drop-on-demand (DOD) aerosol generator overcomes some of the drawbacks of pneumatic nebulization, as its aerosol is no longer generated by gas–liquid interaction. In the current study, an advanced imaging technique is presented, based on a CCD camera equipped with magnifying telecentric optics to allow for fast, automated and precise aerosol characterization as well as fundamental studies on the droplet generation processes by means of pseudo-cinematography. The DOD aerosol generator is thoroughly characterized regarding its droplet size distribution, which shows few distinct populations rather than a continuous distribution. Other important figures, such as the Sauter diameter (D{sub 3,2}) of 22 μm and the span of 0.4 were also determined. Additionally, the influence of the electrical operation conditions of the dosing device on the aerosol generation process is described. The number and volume of the generated droplets were found to be very reproducible and user-variable, e.g. from 17 to 27 μm (D{sub 3,2}), within a span of 0.07–0.89. The performances of different setups of the DOD as liquid sample introduction system in ICP-MS are correlated to the respective achievable aerosol characteristics and are also compared to the performance of a state-of-the-art μ-flow nebulizer (EnyaMist). The DOD system allowed for improved sensitivity, but slightly elevated signal noise and overall comparable limits of detection. The results are critically discussed and future directions are outlined. - Graphical abstract: Further characterization of the drop-on-demand aerosol generator for sample introduction in atomic spectrometry. - Highlights: • Significantly improved ICP-MS sensitivity using the DOD vs. EnyaMist. • Comparable detection limits but slightly worse short-term precision. • Superior flexibility compared with conventional/miniaturized pneumatic nebulizers. • Electrical operation conditions of the DOD influence aerosol

  14. Remote continental aerosol characteristics in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Ezra J. T.

    The Rocky Mountains of Colorado and Wyoming enjoy some of the cleanest air in the United States, with few local sources of particulate matter or its precursors apart from fire emissions, windblown dust, and biogenic emissions. However, anthropogenic influences are also present with sources as diverse as the populated Front Range, large isolated power plants, agricultural emissions, and more recently emissions from increased oil and gas exploration and production. While long-term data exist on the bulk composition of background fine particulate matter at remote sites in the region, few long-term observations exist of aerosol size distributions, number concentrations and size resolved composition, although these characteristics are closely tied to important water resource issues through the potential aerosol impacts on clouds and precipitation. Recent modeling work suggests sensitivity of precipitation-producing systems to the availability of aerosols capable of serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN); however, model inputs for these aerosols are not well constrained due to the scarcity of data. In this work I present aerosol number and volume concentrations, size distributions, chemical composition and hygroscopicity measurements from long-term field campaigns. I also explore the volatility of organic material from biomass burning and the potential impacts on aerosol loading. Relevant aerosol observations were obtained in several long-term field studies: the Rocky Mountain Atmospheric Nitrogen and Sulfur study (RoMANS, Colorado), the Grand Tetons Reactive Nitrogen Deposition Study (GrandTReNDS, Wyoming) and as part of the Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen project (BEACHON, Colorado). Average number concentrations (0.04 low values of aerosol hygroscopicity, described using the kappa parameter. Over the entire year-long BEACHON study, kappa had an average value of 0.16 +/- 0.08, similar to values determined

  15. Aerosol mass spectrometry systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergenson, David P.; Gard, Eric E.

    2013-08-20

    A system according to one embodiment includes a particle accelerator that directs a succession of polydisperse aerosol particles along a predetermined particle path; multiple tracking lasers for generating beams of light across the particle path; an optical detector positioned adjacent the particle path for detecting impingement of the beams of light on individual particles; a desorption laser for generating a beam of desorbing light across the particle path about coaxial with a beam of light produced by one of the tracking lasers; and a controller, responsive to detection of a signal produced by the optical detector, that controls the desorption laser to generate the beam of desorbing light. Additional systems and methods are also disclosed.

  16. A numerical study on the characteristics of gaseous pollutant absorbed by a moving liquid aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, J.J.; Du, Y.G.; Yu, Y.; Ding, J.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution involving aerosols is becoming increasingly problematic. Since aerosols are small in size and have large specific surface areas, they can enhance some chemical reactions. Liquid aerosols in the air can absorb gaseous pollutants to adversely affect air quality and human health. This paper studied the characteristics of liquid aerosols and the absorption process of gaseous pollutants. Specifically, the paper presented a model to depict the characteristic of the absorption process of gaseous pollutant by a liquid aerosol with internal circulation and chemical reaction. The model assumed that liquid aerosols retain a spherical shape while moving freely in air. The finite volume method was used to develop an algorithm used to numerically simulate the experimental work of Walcek. The paper also discussed the numerical evaluation of the transient momentum and mass transfer characteristics of sulphur dioxide into a droplet. It was concluded that the chemical reaction increased the rate of mass transfer and the quasi-saturation time of aerosols, which provided a theoretical basis for the heterogeneous reaction of liquid aerosols. 3 refs., 6 figs

  17. Characteristics of aerosol pollution during heavy haze events in Suzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, M.; Wang, H. B.; Chen, Y.; Yang, F. M.; Zhang, X. H.; Zou, Q.; Zhang, R. Q.; Ma, Y. L.; He, K. B.

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive measurement was carried out to analyze the heavy haze events in Suzhou in January 2013 when extremely severe haze pollution occurred in many cities in China especially in the East. Hourly concentrations of PM2.5, chemical composition (including water-soluble inorganic ions, OC, and EC), and gas-phase precursors were obtained via on-line monitoring system. Based on these data, detailed aerosol composition, light extinction and gas-phase precursors were analyzed to understand the characteristics of the haze events, moreover, the formation mechanism of nitrate and sulfate in PM2.5 and the regional sources deduced from trajectory and PSCF were discussed to explore the origin of the heavy aerosol pollution. The results showed that frequent haze events were occurred on January 2013 and the concentrations of PM2.5 often exceeded 150 μg m-3 during the haze occurrence, with a maximum concentration of 324 μg m-3 on 14 January 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions (high RH, and low rainfall, wind speed and atmospheric pressure), high concentration of secondary aerosol species (including SO42-, NO3-, NH4+, and SOC) and precursors were observed during the haze events. Additionally, OM, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3 were demonstrated to be the major contributors to the visibility impairment but the share differed from haze events. This study also found that the high concentration of sulfate might be explained by the heterogeneous reactions in the aqueous surface layer of pre-existing particles or in cloud processes while nitrate might be mainly formed through homogeneous gas-phase reactions. The results of trajectory clustering and the PSCF method manifested that aerosol pollutions in the studied areas were mainly affected by local activities and surrounding sources transported from nearby cities.

  18. Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrenko

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Global and local properties of atmospheric aerosols have been extensively observed and measured using both spaceborne and ground-based instruments, especially during the last decade. Unique properties retrieved by the different instruments contribute to an unprecedented availability of the most complete set of complimentary aerosol measurements ever acquired. However, some of these measurements remain underutilized, largely due to the complexities involved in analyzing them synergistically. To characterize the inconsistencies and bridge the gap that exists between the sensors, we have established a Multi-sensor Aerosol Products Sampling System (MAPSS, which consistently samples and generates the spatial statistics (mean, standard deviation, direction and rate of spatial variation, and spatial correlation coefficient of aerosol products from multiple spaceborne sensors, including MODIS (on Terra and Aqua, MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIOP, and SeaWiFS. Samples of satellite aerosol products are extracted over Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET locations as well as over other locations of interest such as those with available ground-based aerosol observations. In this way, MAPSS enables a direct cross-characterization and data integration between Level-2 aerosol observations from multiple sensors. In addition, the available well-characterized co-located ground-based data provides the basis for the integrated validation of these products. This paper explains the sampling methodology and concepts used in MAPSS, and demonstrates specific examples of using MAPSS for an integrated analysis of multiple aerosol products.

  19. Seasonal variability in aerosol optical and physical characteristics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B. Pant Institute of Himalayan Environment and Development, Himachal Unit, Mohal-Kullu 175 126, India. 2G.B. Pant Institute of Himalayan ... ing and transport which result in a large variability in their size distribution (Meszaros 1981; ... dust aerosol due to its transport from the western deserts. The understanding of the ...

  20. Clouds and Aerosols in the Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Remote sensing of cloud and aerosol properties from space is reviewed for present and planned international satellite sensors. Techniques that are being used to enhance our ability to characterize the global distribution of cloud and aerosol properties include well-calibrated multispectral radiometers that rely on visible, near-infrared, and thermal infrared channels, sometimes including polarization as well. The availability of thermal channels to aid in cloud screening for aerosol properties is an important additional piece of information that has not always been incorporated into sensor designs. In this paper, we describe the radiative properties of clouds as currently determined from satellites (cloud fraction, optical thickness, cloud top pressure, and cloud effective radius), and highlight the global and regional cloud microphysical properties currently available for assessing climate variability and forcing. In addition, we will frustrate the radiative and microphysical properties of aerosol particles that are currently available from space-based observations, as well as enhancements to aerosol remote sensing over bright-reflecting surfaces that is anticipated in the next couple of years. Finally, we will describe the aerosol optical and radiative properties available from the globally distributed AERONET network of ground-based sun-sky radiometers.

  1. Capstone Required System Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    roll roll Interactive Media Element This interactive illustration provides information about the characteristics of satellite communication systems, and the characteristics associated with each of the four categories of space segment (constellation of communication satellites). The four categories are: Narrowband (UHF) , Wideband (SHF), Protected (EHF), CommercialSimple mouseover interactions are used to reveal individual pieces of information. SS3613 Military Satellite Communi...

  2. Earth System Research Laboratory Long-Term Surface Aerosol Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerosol measurements began at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) baseline observatories in the mid-1970's with the...

  3. Enhancing the Capabilities of the Global Aerosol Monitoring Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Global Aerosol Measurement System (GAMS) project is developing a new, low cost satellite capability for measuring the properties and distributions of particles...

  4. Characteristics and sources of aerosol pollution at a polluted rural site southwest in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yang; Wang, Shuxiao; Jiang, Jingkun; Zhou, Wei; Xu, Qingcheng; Li, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Baoxian; Zhang, Dawei; Zheng, Mei

    2018-06-01

    Annual average PM 2.5 concentration in south Beijing was 30% and 40% higher than the whole Beijing city in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Few studies have been conducted to investigate what leads to the characteristics and sources of heavy pollution in the south rural area of Beijing. This study conducted an observation with Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at a southwest rural site (Liulihe) in Beijing during 2014-2016, to investigate the seasonal aerosol characteristics and their sources. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) algorithm was used to distinguish different components of organic aerosol measured by ACSM. Biomass burning is an important pollution source, mainly due to the open burning after harvest season in autumn, regional transport in spring, and local residential biofuel use in winter. Coal consumption is the largest primary organic aerosol source in winter. Heavy duty diesel trucks contributed significantly to organic aerosol at night-time in the rural area. Results of this study show residential solid fuel burning is the most important source of aerosol pollution in the rural area of Beijing and the results focusing on urban Beijing might have underestimate the contribution from residential emissions in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerosol Observing System Surface Meteorology (AOSMET) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrouac, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerosol Observing System (AOS) surface meteorology instrument is an ancillary sensor that provides temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed and direction, and precipitation data relevant to the AOS. It consists of a Vaisala WXT520 Weather Transmitter mounted on top of the AOS aerosol inlet, at a height of approximately 10 meters.

  6. Physicochemical characteristics of chlorofluorohydrocarbon-based inhalation aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashurst, I.C.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the physicochemical factors which affect the formulation of suspension inhalation aerosols. The adsorption of six nonionic and cationic surfactants onto Spherisorb has been investigated. The results were analyzed by calculating the area occupied by one adsorbed molecule at the surface and by comparing these values for each surfactant. The amount of each surfactant adsorbed was correlated with the number of sites on that surfactant molecule which could interact with the surface. The stability of suspensions, produced by both the model colloid Spherisorb, and by the drug isoprenaline sulfate, after adsorption of the surfactants, has been assessed by measuring settling times and rising times. The most stable suspension were found to be those which had the greatest amounts of long chain fatty acid surfactant adsorbed on their surface. A comparison was made between the effective stabilizing properties of Span 85 and oleic acid on various drug suspension. It was found that Span 85 gave the most stable suspension. Inhalation aerosol suspensions of isoprenaline sulfate were manufactured using the same surfactants used in the adsorption and suspension stability studies and were analyzed by measuring the particle size distributions of the suspension and the emitted doses. The results were found to correlate with the adsorption and suspension stability studies and it was concluded that a deflocculated suspension was preferable to a flocculated suspension in inhalation aerosols provided that the drug density was less than the propellant density. The application of this work to preformulation studies was also discussed.

  7. Preliminary study on the characteristics of aerosols over the western pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Zhaohui; Liu Pingsheng; Liu Shijie; Yao Ying; Feng Guohua

    1996-01-01

    Marine aerosol from the western Pacific were collected by two types of samplers during a cruise from Nanhai of China through the west of Philippines to the equatorial and to the north-eastern of Solomon Archipelago. Collected samples were analyzed by PIXE. The data gave aerosol characteristics over the western Pacific, including concentrations, enrichments and mass size distributions of detected elements, and possible sources of these elements were specially researched. The result indicates that Al, Si and Fe were associated with soil particles; Cl, Br, K, Ca and S showed characteristics of the sea-salt origin; and Cu, Zn, and Pb were due to pollution from long-range transport of continental aerosol. We have also made comparison with data obtained in earlier studies over other regions of the Pacific. (author)

  8. Characteristics and Composition of Atmospheric Aerosols in Phimai, Central Thailand During BASE-ASIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Kim, Jin Young; Howell, Steven G.; Huebert, Barry J.; Ji, Qiang; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Hansell, Richard A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Popular summary: Atmospheric aerosols play an important role in the Earth's climate system, and can also have adverse effects on air quality and human health. The environmental impacts of aerosols, on the other hand, are highly regional, since their temporal/spatial distribution is inhomogeneous and highly depends on the regional emission sources. To better understand the effects of aerosols, intensive field experiments are necessary to characterize the chemical and physical properties on a region-by-region basis. From late February to early May in 2006, NASA/GSFC's SMARTLabs facility was deployed at a rural site in central Thailand, Southeast Asia, to conduct a field experiment dubbed BASE-ASIA (Biomass-burning Aerosols in South East-Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment). The group was joined by scientists from the University of Hawaii and other regional institutes. Comprehensive measurements were made during the experiment, including aerosol chemical composition, optical and microphysical properties, as well as surface energetics and local . meteorology. This study analyzes part of the data from the BASE-ASIA experiment. It was found that, even for the relatively remote rural site, the aerosol loading was still substantial. Besides agricultural burning in the area, industrial pollution near the Bangkok metropolitan area, about 200 km southeast of the site, and even long-range transport from China, also contribute to the area's aerosol loading. The results indicate that aerosol pollution has developed into a regional problem for northern Indochina, and may become more severe as the region's population and economy continue to grow. Abstract: Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols were made in Phimai, central Thailand (15.l83 N, 102.565 E, elevation: 206 m) during the BASE-ASIA field experiment from late February to early May in 2006. The observed aerosol loading was sizable for this rural site (mean aerosol scattering: 108 +/- 64 Mm(exp -1); absorption: 15

  9. Application of the characteristics-based sectional method to spatially varying aerosol formation and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederix, E.M.A.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Nordlund, M.; Veldman, A.E.P.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    The characteristics-based ssolution. It is easy to verify thatectional method (CBSM) offers an Eulerian description of an internally mixed aerosol. It was shown to be robust and capable of exact preservation of lower order moments, allowing for highly skewed sectional droplet size distributions. In

  10. Chemical characteristics of aerosols in MABL of Bay of Bengal and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transport from arid and semi- arid regions of Oman coast to southern Arabian. Sea, and airmasses originating within the marine environment affecting the aerosol characteristic in northern Arabian Sea are also supported by AMBT analysis. 3.3 Water-soluble ions. Water-soluble inorganic species ranged from 30 to.

  11. Physical metrology of aerosols; Metrologie physique des aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulaud, D.; Vendel, J. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    The various detection and measuring methods for aerosols are presented, and their selection is related to aerosol characteristics (size range, concentration or mass range), thermo-hydraulic conditions (carrier fluid temperature, pressure and flow rate) and to the measuring system conditions (measuring frequency, data collection speed, cost...). Methods based on aerosol dynamic properties (inertial, diffusional and electrical methods) and aerosol optical properties (localized and integral methods) are described and their performances and applications are compared

  12. Aerosol characteristics and particle production in the upper troposphere over the Amazon Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Andreae

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Airborne observations over the Amazon Basin showed high aerosol particle concentrations in the upper troposphere (UT between 8 and 15 km altitude, with number densities (normalized to standard temperature and pressure often exceeding those in the planetary boundary layer (PBL by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. The measurements were made during the German–Brazilian cooperative aircraft campaign ACRIDICON–CHUVA, where ACRIDICON stands for Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems and CHUVA is the acronym for Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation Systems in Brazil: A Contribution to Cloud Resolving Modeling and to the GPM (global precipitation measurement, on the German High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO. The campaign took place in September–October 2014, with the objective of studying tropical deep convective clouds over the Amazon rainforest and their interactions with atmospheric trace gases, aerosol particles, and atmospheric radiation. Aerosol enhancements were observed consistently on all flights during which the UT was probed, using several aerosol metrics, including condensation nuclei (CN and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN number concentrations and chemical species mass concentrations. The UT particles differed sharply in their chemical composition and size distribution from those in the PBL, ruling out convective transport of combustion-derived particles from the boundary layer (BL as a source. The air in the immediate outflow of deep convective clouds was depleted of aerosol particles, whereas strongly enhanced number concentrations of small particles (< 90 nm diameter were found in UT regions that had experienced outflow from deep convection in the preceding 5–72 h. We also found elevated concentrations of larger (> 90 nm particles in the UT, which consisted mostly of organic matter and nitrate and were very effective CCN. Our

  13. Aerosol characteristics and particle production in the upper troposphere over the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreae, Meinrat O.; Afchine, Armin; Albrecht, Rachel; Amorim Holanda, Bruna; Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Borrmann, Stephan; Cecchini, Micael A.; Costa, Anja; Dollner, Maximilian; Fütterer, Daniel; Järvinen, Emma; Jurkat, Tina; Klimach, Thomas; Konemann, Tobias; Knote, Christoph; Krämer, Martina; Krisna, Trismono; Machado, Luiz A. T.; Mertes, Stephan; Minikin, Andreas; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Sauer, Daniel; Schlager, Hans; Schnaiter, Martin; Schneider, Johannes; Schulz, Christiane; Spanu, Antonio; Sperling, Vinicius B.; Voigt, Christiane; Walser, Adrian; Wang, Jian; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Wendisch, Manfred; Ziereis, Helmut

    2018-01-01

    Airborne observations over the Amazon Basin showed high aerosol particle concentrations in the upper troposphere (UT) between 8 and 15 km altitude, with number densities (normalized to standard temperature and pressure) often exceeding those in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. The measurements were made during the German-Brazilian cooperative aircraft campaign ACRIDICON-CHUVA, where ACRIDICON stands for Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation, and Radiation Interactions and Dynamics of Convective Cloud Systems and CHUVA is the acronym for Cloud Processes of the Main Precipitation Systems in Brazil: A Contribution to Cloud Resolving Modeling and to the GPM (global precipitation measurement), on the German High Altitude and Long Range Research Aircraft (HALO). The campaign took place in September-October 2014, with the objective of studying tropical deep convective clouds over the Amazon rainforest and their interactions with atmospheric trace gases, aerosol particles, and atmospheric radiation. Aerosol enhancements were observed consistently on all flights during which the UT was probed, using several aerosol metrics, including condensation nuclei (CN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations and chemical species mass concentrations. The UT particles differed sharply in their chemical composition and size distribution from those in the PBL, ruling out convective transport of combustion-derived particles from the boundary layer (BL) as a source. The air in the immediate outflow of deep convective clouds was depleted of aerosol particles, whereas strongly enhanced number concentrations of small particles ( 90 nm) particles in the UT, which consisted mostly of organic matter and nitrate and were very effective CCN. Our findings suggest a conceptual model, where production of new aerosol particles takes place in the continental UT from biogenic volatile organic material brought up by deep convection and converted to condensable

  14. Vegetation fires, absorbing aerosols and smoke plume characteristics in diverse biomass burning regions of Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vadrevu, Krishna Prasad; Lasko, Kristofer; Giglio, Louis; Justice, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explored the relationships between the satellite-retrieved fire counts (FC), fire radiative power (FRP) and aerosol indices using multi-satellite datasets at a daily time-step covering ten different biomass burning regions in Asia. We first assessed the variations in MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical depths (AOD’s) in agriculture, forests, plantation and peat land burning regions and then used MODIS FC and FRP (hereafter FC/FRP) to explain the variations in AOD characteristics. Results suggest that tropical broadleaf forests in Laos burn more intensively than the other vegetation fires. FC/FRP-AOD correlations in different agricultural residue burning regions did not exceed 20% whereas in forest regions they reached 40%. To specifically account for absorbing aerosols, we used Ozone Monitoring Instrument-derived aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) and UV aerosol index (UVAI). Results suggest relatively high AAOD and UVAI values in forest fires compared with peat and agriculture fires. Further, FC/FRP could explain a maximum of 29% and 53% of AAOD variations, whereas FC/FRP could explain at most 33% and 51% of the variation in agricultural and forest biomass burning regions, respectively. Relatively, UVAI was found to be a better indicator than AOD and AAOD in both agriculture and forest biomass burning plumes. Cloud–Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations data showed vertically elevated aerosol profiles greater than 3.2–5.3 km altitude in the forest fire plumes compared to 2.2–3.9 km and less than 1 km in agriculture and peat-land fires, respectively. We infer the need to assimilate smoke plume height information for effective characterization of pollutants from different sources. (letter)

  15. Atmospheric aerosol monitoring by an elastic Scheimpflug lidar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Liang; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2015-11-30

    This work demonstrates a new approach - Scheimpflug lidar - for atmospheric aerosol monitoring. The atmospheric backscattering echo of a high-power continuous-wave laser diode is received by a Newtonian telescope and recorded by a tilted imaging sensor satisfying the Scheimpflug condition. The principles as well as the lidar equation are discussed in details. A Scheimpflug lidar system operating at around 808 nm is developed and employed for continuous atmospheric aerosol monitoring at daytime. Localized emission, atmospheric variation, as well as the changes of cloud height are observed from the recorded lidar signals. The extinction coefficient is retrieved according to the slope method for a homogeneous atmosphere. This work opens up new possibilities of using a compact and robust Scheimpflug lidar system for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing.

  16. Optical properties of the crustal aerosol: Relation to chemical and physical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    We have measured crustal absorption, expressed as a wavelength dependent imaginary index of refraction (n/sub IM/) at both visible and infrared wavelengths. Measurements at visible wavelengths show values of n/sub IM/ that range from approx.0.02 at 300 nm to approx.0.004 to 700 nm. Infrared measurements show an absorption that is dominated by a silicate absorption with a maximum value of n/sub IM/approx.1 near 10 μm. Comparisons of our measurements with other reported measurements of well-documented crustal aerosols show a great deal of similarity among the measured values. We have shown that these measured optical properties, and the similarities and differences in the measured values, can be understood in terms of mineralogical characteristics of the aerosol and fractionation processes that occur in the generation and transport of these aerosols

  17. Seasonal variability of aerosols and their characteristics in urban and rural locations of Delhi-NCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Purnima; Pandey, Alok Kumar; Kumar, Krishan; Jain, V. K.

    2017-10-01

    Present study shows the seasonal variation of the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and aerosols characteristics in an urban and rural environment over Delhi-NCR. Aerosol sampling was carried out using a Mini-Volume sampler at an urban and rural location in Delhi-NCR. A relatively higher PM2.5 (particulate matter of size agglomerate (soot) in urban area whereas the rural area was relatively clean. The winter season SEM results showed the presence of aggregates of smaller particles at urban site whereas flaky, round and irregular shaped particles were observed at the rural site. EDX analysis showed the presence of elements such as C, Cu, Zn, Ga and Fe (representative elements) in varying concentrations at both the urban and rural sampling locations. NASA's Aqua satellite MODIS sensor AOD data for summer and winter seasons have been used to study the spatial distributions of aerosols over the study region. AOD was found to be relatively higher in urban area as compared to the rural area in both the summer and winter seasons indicating the contribution of high amount of anthropogenic aerosols in the urban atmosphere.

  18. Formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high-temperature environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Du, Shan-Wen; Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Wu, Jheng-Syun

    2008-05-01

    The formation characteristics of aerosol particles from pulverized coal pyrolysis in high temperatures are studied experimentally. By conducting a drop-tube furnace, fuel pyrolysis processes in industrial furnaces are simulated in which three different reaction temperatures of 1000, 1200, and 1400 degrees C are considered. Experimental observations indicate that when the reaction temperature is 1000 degrees C, submicron particles are produced, whereas the particle size is dominated by nanoscale for the temperature of 1400 degrees C. Thermogravimetric analysis of the aerosol particles stemming from the pyrolysis temperature of 1000 degrees C reveals that the thermal behavior of the aerosol is characterized by a three-stage reaction with increasing heating temperature: (1) a volatile-reaction stage, (2) a weak-reaction stage, and (3) a soot-reaction stage. However, with the pyrolysis temperature of 1400 degrees C, the volatile- and weak-reaction stages almost merge together and evolve into a chemical-frozen stage. The submicron particles (i.e., 1000 degrees C) are mainly composed of volatiles, tar, and soot, with the main component of the nanoscale particles (i.e., 1400 degrees C) being soot. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in the aerosols are also analyzed. It is found that the PAH content in generated aerosols decreases dramatically as the pyrolysis temperature increases.

  19. The Aerosol-Monsoon Climate System of Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kyu-Myong, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In Asian monsoon countries such as China and India, human health and safety problems caused by air-pollution are worsening due to the increased loading of atmospheric pollutants stemming from rising energy demand associated with the rapid pace of industrialization and modernization. Meanwhile, uneven distribution of monsoon rain associated with flash flood or prolonged drought, has caused major loss of human lives, and damages in crop and properties with devastating societal impacts on Asian countries. Historically, air-pollution and monsoon research are treated as separate problems. However a growing number of recent studies have suggested that the two problems may be intrinsically intertwined and need to be studied jointly. Because of complexity of the dynamics of the monsoon systems, aerosol impacts on monsoons and vice versa must be studied and understood in the context of aerosol forcing in relationship to changes in fundamental driving forces of the monsoon climate system (e.g. sea surface temperature, land-sea contrast etc.) on time scales from intraseasonal variability (weeks) to climate change ( multi-decades). Indeed, because of the large contributions of aerosols to the global and regional energy balance of the atmosphere and earth surface, and possible effects of the microphysics of clouds and precipitation, a better understanding of the response to climate change in Asian monsoon regions requires that aerosols be considered as an integral component of a fully coupled aerosol-monsoon system on all time scales. In this paper, using observations and results from climate modeling, we will discuss the coherent variability of the coupled aerosol-monsoon climate system in South Asia and East Asia, including aerosol distribution and types, with respect to rainfall, moisture, winds, land-sea thermal contrast, heat sources and sink distributions in the atmosphere in seasonal, interannual to climate change time scales. We will show examples of how elevated

  20. Development and validation of a CCD-laser aerosol detective system for measuring the ambient aerosol phase function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yuxuan; Zhao, Chunsheng; Xu, Wanyun; Zhao, Gang; Tao, Jiangchuan; Kuang, Ye

    2017-06-01

    Aerosol phase function represents the angular scattering property of aerosols, which is crucial for understanding the climate effects of aerosols that have been identified as one of the largest uncertainties in the evaluation of radiative forcing. So far, there is a lack of instruments with which to measure the aerosol phase function directly and accurately in laboratory studies and in situ measurements. A portable instrument with high angular range and resolution has been developed for the measurement of the phase function of ambient aerosols in this study. The charge-coupled device-laser aerosol detective system (CCD-LADS) measures the aerosol phase function both across a relatively wide angular range of 10-170° and at a high resolution of 0.1°. The system includes a continuous laser, two charge-coupled device cameras and the corresponding fisheye lenses. The CCD-LADS was validated by both a laboratory study and a field measurement. The comparison between the aerosol phase function retrieved from CCD-LADS and Mie-scattering model shows good agreement. Compared with the TSI polar nephelometer, CCD-LADS has the advantages of wider detection range and better stability.

  1. Determination of tropospheric aerosol characteristics by spectral measurements of solar radiation using a compact, stand-alone spectroradiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manago, Naohiro; Kuze, Hiroaki

    2010-03-10

    We developed a method for characterizing atmospheric properties from ground-based, spectral measurements of direct and scattered solar radiation under clear sky conditions. A compact spectroradiometer is employed for radiation measurement in the wavelength range between 350 and 1050 nm with a resolution of 10 nm. Spectral matching of measured and simulated spectra yields a set of optical parameters that describe optical characteristics of tropospheric aerosols. We utilize the radiative transfer code MODTRAN4 for constructing realistic atmospheric models. Details of the system calibration, analysis procedure, and the results of its performance test are described.

  2. The response of a simulated Mesoscale Convective System to increased aerosol pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, Michal

    This work focuses on the impacts of aerosols on the total precipitation amount, rates and spatial distribution of precipitation produced by a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS), as well as the characteristics of a derecho event. Past studies have shown that the impacts on MCS-produced precipitation to changes in aerosol concentration are strongly dependent on environmental conditions, primarily humidity and environmental wind shear. Changes in aerosol concentrations were found to alter MCS-precipitation production directly by modifying precipitation processes and indirectly by affecting the efficiency of the storm's self-propagation. Observational and numerical studies have been conducted that have examined the dynamics responsible for the generation of widespread convectively-induced windstorms, primarily focusing on environmental conditions and the MCS features that generate a derecho event. While the sensitivity of the formation of bow-echoes, the radar signature associated with derecho events, to changes in microphysics has been examined, a study on a derecho-producing MCS characteristics to aerosol concentrations has not. In this study different aerosol concentrations and their effects on precipitation and a derecho produced by an MCS are examined by simulating the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho" MCS. The MCS was simulated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with sophisticated aerosol and microphysical parameterizations. Three simulations were conducted that varied in their initial aerosol concentration, distribution and hygroscopicity as determined by their emission sources. The first simulation contained aerosols from only natural sources and the second with aerosols sourced from both natural and anthropogenic emissions The third simulation contained the same aerosol distribution as in the second simulation, however multiplied by a factor of 5 in order to represent a highly polluted scenario. In all three of the

  3. Characteristics of welding fume aerosol investigated in three Swedish workshops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaxon, C; Pagels, J; Gudmundsson, A; Bohgard, M; Asbach, C; John, A C; Kuhlbusch, T A J; Karlsson, J E; Kammer, R; Tinnerberg, H; Nielsen, J

    2009-01-01

    Potentially high human exposures to nanometer sized airborne particles occur due to welding and other thermal processes in industrial environments. Detailed field measurements of physical and chemical particle characteristics were performed in three work-shops in Sweden. Measurements were performed both in the plume 5-20 cm above the welding point and in the background air (more than 5 m away from the nearest known particle source). Particle number and mass concentrations were measured on-line. A low pressure impactor was used for size-resolved chemical particle composition. The in-plume measurements generated the chemical signatures for different welding processes. These signatures were then used to identify contributions from various processes to the particle concentrations in different size classes. The background number and mass concentrations increased by more than an order of magnitude during intense activities in the work-shops compared to low activities during breaks.

  4. Microphysical and chemical characteristics of near-water aerosol over White and Kara Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpugova, S. A.; Polkin, V. V.; Panchenko, M. V.; Golobokova, L. P.; Kozlov, V. S.; Shmargunov, V. P.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Lisitzin, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    The results are presented of five-year-long (2003-2007) study of the spatial - temporal variability of the near-water aerosol in the water area of White and Kara Seas (55, 64, 71 and 80-th cruises of RV "Professor Shtockman"; 53 and 54-th cruises of RV "Akademik Mstislav Keldysh"). Measurements of aerosol microphysical characteristics were carried out by means of the automated mobile aerosol complex consisting of nephelometer, photoelectric counter and aethalometer. The aerosol disperse composition was studied with photoelectric counter in 256 size intervals from 0.4 to 10 m. About 1500 series of measurements were carried out in White Sea, and about 1400 series in Kara Sea. Chemical characteristics of aerosol were determined from samples collected on aerosol filters (92 samples were collected in White Sea and 48 in Kara Sea). The ion composition was determined under laboratory conditions. The H+, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, NH4+, Cl-, NO3-, HCO3-, SO42- ions were under examination. Comparing aerosol characteristics of two seas, one can note that the mean values of the aerosol content parameters in Kara Sea are less than in White Sea. The ratio of the aerosol mass concentration are from 2 (Yamal Peninsula, northern part of Novaya Zemlya) to 9 times (Blagopoluchia Bay, Ob' Gulf). The differences in the concentration of black carbon vary from 3 (Yamal Peninsula) to 17 times (Blagopoluchia Bay). The differences in the aerosol number concentration NA are not so big. The values NA near Kara Gate, Yamal Peninsula and northern part of Novaya Zemlya are practically the same as in White Sea. The concentration NA at Ob' gulf is one order of magnitude less than in White sea. The obtained aerosol volume size distributions were approximated by the sums of two fractions, submicron and coarse, with lognormal size distributions. The mean volume size distribution of submicron fraction in White Sea is approximated by the distribution with the variance of the radius logarithm s=0.6 and modal

  5. Modeling analysis of secondary inorganic aerosols over China: pollution characteristics, and meteorological and dust impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao; Wang, Shuxiao; Chang, Xing; Cai, Siyi; Xing, Jia; Hao, Jiming

    2016-10-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA) are the predominant components of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and have significant impacts on air quality, human health, and climate change. In this study, the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system (CMAQ) was modified to incorporate SO2 heterogeneous reactions on the surface of dust particles. The revised model was then used to simulate the spatiotemporal characteristics of SIA over China and analyze the impacts of meteorological factors and dust on SIA formation. Including the effects of dust improved model performance for the simulation of SIA concentrations, particularly for sulfate. The simulated annual SIA concentration in China was approximately 10.1 μg/m3 on domain average, with strong seasonal variation: highest in winter and lowest in summer. High SIA concentrations were concentrated in developed regions with high precursor emissions, such as the North China Plain, Yangtze River Delta, Sichuan Basin, and Pearl River Delta. Strong correlations between meteorological factors and SIA pollution levels suggested that heterogeneous reactions under high humidity played an important role on SIA formation, particularly during severe haze pollution periods. Acting as surfaces for heterogeneous reactions, dust particles significantly affected sulfate formation, suggesting the importance of reducing dust emissions for controlling SIA and PM2.5 pollution.

  6. Calculation Of Aerosol Transport Efficiency For The Airborne Radioiodine Monitoring System - ''RIS125''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchik, T.; Levinson, L.; Mazor, Y.; Dolev, E.; German, U.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive iodine is a typical fission product in nuclear power reactors. Of the many iodine isotopes that can be generated in nuclear reactors only four are considered as radiobiological significant. These are: 125 1 (T 1/2 =60 days), '1 31 I (T 1/2 =8d), 133 I (T 1/2 =21h) and I35 I (T 1/2 7h). The chemical forms that have been identified in heavy water reactors are I 2 (elemental), organic iodides (CH 3 I), Inorganic iodides (HOI, HI) and LiI. Radioiodine is, generally, released as a gas but can be adsorbed on air particulates to form radioiodine contained aerosols. Therefore. its monitoring has to include both gas and aerosol sampling. A new monitoring system, RIS (Radioactive iodine Sampler), has been developed at the NRCN to monitor radioactive iodine (gas and aerosol) on-line in workplaces. This system samples radioiodine at a 60 L/min rate through a transport line connected to a filter holder. The filter consists of a cartridge containing activated charcoal with TEDA for iodine gas adsorption with a membrane for aerosols' retention in from of it. The radioiodine filter cartridge (F and J product code: TE2C) has a diameter of 2 1/4 inch and height of 1 inch . The gas adsorbent is coconut shell carbon type activated charcoal with 5% (by weight) TEDA impregnation and has 30x50 mesh size. This paper presents the aerosols' sampling characteristics of the RIS system including their transport in the sampling line and filter holder. The adsorption of iodine gas on the transport system components is negligible

  7. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. (Royal Free Hospital, London (England))

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  8. The response of a simulated mesoscale convective system to increased aerosol pollution: Part I: Precipitation intensity, distribution, and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, Michal; Cotton, William R.; van den Heever, Susan C.; Saleeby, Stephen M.; Pierce, Jeffery R.

    2018-01-01

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are important contributors to rainfall in the High Plains of the United States and elsewhere in the world. It is therefore of interest to understand how different aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) may impact the total amount, rates and spatial distribution of precipitation produced by MCSs. In this study, different aerosol concentrations and their effects on precipitation produced by an MCS are examined by simulating the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho" MCS using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), a cloud-resolving model (CRM) with sophisticated aerosol and microphysical parameterizations. Three simulations were conducted that differed only in the initial concentration, spatial distribution, and chemical composition of aerosols. Aerosol fields were derived from the output of GEOS-Chem, a 3D chemical transport numerical model. Results from the RAMS simulations show that the total domain precipitation was not significantly affected by variations in aerosol concentrations, however, the pollution aerosols altered the precipitation characteristics. The more polluted simulations exhibited higher precipitation rates, higher bulk precipitation efficiency, a larger area with heavier precipitation, and a smaller area with lighter precipitation. These differences arose as a result of aerosols enhancing precipitation in the convective region of the MCS while suppressing precipitation from the MCS's stratiform-anvil. In the convective region, several processes likely contributed to an increase of precipitation. First, owing to the very humid environment of this storm, the enhanced amount of cloud water available to be collected overwhelmed the reduction in precipitation efficiency associated with the aerosol-induced production of smaller droplets which led to a net increase in the conversion of cloud droplets to precipitation. Second, higher aerosol concentrations led to invigoration of convective updrafts which

  9. Changing circulation structure and precipitation characteristics in Asian monsoon regions: greenhouse warming vs. aerosol effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong; Ruby Leung, L.

    2017-12-01

    Using model outputs from CMIP5 historical integrations, we have investigated the relative roles of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) and aerosols in changing the characteristics of the large-scale circulation and rainfall in Asian summer monsoon (ASM) regions. Under GHG warming, a strong positive trend in low-level moist static energy (MSE) is found over ASM regions, associated with increasing large-scale land-sea thermal contrast from 1870s to present. During the same period, a mid-tropospheric convective barrier (MCB) due to widespread reduction in relative humidity in the mid- and lower troposphere is strengthening over the ASM regions, in conjunction with expanding areas of anomalous subsidence associated with the Deep Tropical Squeeze (Lau and Kim in Proc Natl Acad Sci 12:3630-3635, 2015). The opposing effects of MSE and MCB lead to enhanced total ASM rainfall, but only a partial strengthening of the southern portion of the monsoon meridional circulation, coupled to anomalous multi-cellular overturning motions over ASM land. Including anthropogenic aerosol emissions strongly masks MSE but enhances MCB via increased stability in the lower troposphere, resulting in an overall weakened ASM circulation with suppressed rainfall. Analyses of rainfall characteristics indicate that under GHG, overall precipitation efficiency over the ASM region is reduced, manifesting in less moderate but more extreme heavy rain events. Under combined effects of GHG and aerosols, precipitation efficiency is unchanged, with more moderate, but less extreme rainfall.

  10. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  11. Traffic aerosol lobar doses deposited in the human respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigrasso, Maurizio; Vernale, Claudio; Avino, Pasquale

    2017-06-01

    Aerosol pollution in urban environments has been recognized to be responsible for important pathologies of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. In this perspective, great attention has been addressed to Ultra Fine Particles (UFPs respiratory system and are capable of translocating from the airways into the blood circulation. This paper describes the aerosol regional doses deposited in the human respiratory system in a high-traffic urban area. The aerosol measurements were carried out on a curbside in downtown Rome, on a street characterized by a high density of autovehicular traffic. Aerosol number-size distributions were measured by means of a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer in the range from 5.6 to 560 nm with a 1 s time resolution. Dosimetry estimates were performed with the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model by means of the stochastic lung model. The exposure scenario close to traffic is represented by a sequence of short-term peak exposures: about 6.6 × 10 10 particles are deposited hourly into the respiratory system. After 1 h of exposure in proximity of traffic, 1.29 × 10 10 , 1.88 × 10 10 , and 3.45 × 10 10 particles are deposited in the head, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions. More than 95 % of such doses are represented by UFPs. Finally, according to the greater dose estimated, the right lung lobes are expected to be more susceptible to respiratory pathologies than the left lobes.

  12. Online high sensitivity measurement system for transuranic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordas, J.F.; Phelps, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    A measurement system for transuranic aerosols has been designed that will be able to withstand the corrosive nature of stack effluents and yet have extremely high sensitivity. It will be capable of measuring 1 maximum permissible concentration (MPC) of plutonium or americium in 30 minutes with a fractional standard deviation of less than 0.33. Background resulting from 218 Po is eliminated by alpha energy discrimination and a decay scheme analysis. A microprocessor controls all data acquisition, data reduction, and instrument calibration

  13. Partitioning of Viruses in Wastewater Systems and Potential for Aerosolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titcombe Lee, Mari; Pruden, Amy; Marr, Linsey C

    2016-05-10

    To gain insight into the potential for aerosolization of viruses in wastewater systems, we investigated the partitioning of MS2 and Phi6 bacteriophages in synthetic sludge and anaerobically digested sludge from a wastewater treatment plant. We evaluated partitioning among the liquid, solids, and material surfaces of porcelain, concrete, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polypropylene. In all cases, at least 94% of the virions partitioned into the liquid fraction. In real sludge, no more than 0.8% of virions partitioned to the solids and no more than 6% to the material surface. Both MS2 and Phi6 partitioned more to the surface of concrete and polypropylene than to the surface of porcelain or PVC. Partitioning of viruses in wastewater among the liquid, biosolids, and material surface does not appear to mitigate the potential for aerosolization of virus, as most of the virus remains in the liquid phase.

  14. Characteristics of atmospheric aerosols observed by lidar at five TCCON sites extending from 43°N to 45°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, O.; Sakai, T.; Nagai, T.; Izumi, T.; Shibata, T.; Morino, I.; Yoshida, Y.; Hiroshi, O.; Arai, K.; Bagtasa, G.; Pollard, D.; Liley, B.

    2017-12-01

    We have been observing the vertical distributions of atmospheric aerosols with two wavelength polarization lidar systems at five Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) sites of Rikubetsu (43.46°N, 143.77°E), Tsukuba (36.05°N, 140.12°E), Saga (33.24°N, 130.29°E) in Japan, Burgos (18.53°N, 120.65°E) in the Philippines and Lauder (45.04°S, 169.68°E) in New Zealand. The main purpose of these lidar observations is to investigate the influence of atmospheric aerosols and thin cirrus clouds on the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) data with simultaneous TCCON Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observations during the GOSAT overpass time. Also, these lidar data provide indispensable information on characteristics of space and time variations of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols in the northern low and middle latitudes and the southern middle latitude. Aerosols originating from fires in Siberia were observed at Rikubetsu on 18-20 May and were also observed at Tsukuba on 19 May in 2016. The aerosols covered the northern part of Japan, and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio of the aerosols was about 60 sr and the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 532 nm was larger than 1.0. The column amount of CO measured by Rikubetsu TCCON FTS increased simultaneously. Aerosols from the polluted area in the North China Plain and dust particles from the Gobi Desert were observed in spring time at Saga, and large AOD could impact on GOSAT data. On the other hand, tropospheric AOD is usually very low at Lauder. Lidar observation at Burgos just started in March 2017, and using the Raman scattering technique, water vapor profiles were obtained up to 5 km in nighttime. These lidar systems detected some increases in stratospheric aerosols by the volcanic eruptions of Sarychev Peak, Puyehue-Cordon Caulle, Nabro and Calbuco from the launch of GOSAT in 2009 to 2016. Increased stratospheric aerosols after the Calbuco eruption might significantly impact GOSAT data

  15. Carbonaceous aerosol in jet engine exhaust: emission characteristics and implications for heterogeneous chemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, A.; Schroeder, F.P.; Kaercher, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Wessling (Germany). Institut fuer Physik der Atmosphaere; Stroem, J. [Stockholm University (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1999-08-01

    Characteristic parameters of black carbon aerosol (BC) emitted from jet engine were measured during ground tests and in-flight behind the same aircraft. Size distribution features were a primary BC mode at a model diameter D {approx} 0.045 {mu}m, and a BC agglomeration mode at D < 0.2 {mu}m. The total BC number concentration at the engine exit was 2.9 x 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3} with good agreement between model results and in-flight measured number concentrations of non-volatile particles with D {>=} 0.014 {mu}m. A comparison between total number concentration of BC particles and the non-volatile fraction of the total aerosol at the exit plane suggests that the non-volatile fraction of jet engine exhaust aerosol consists almost completely of BC. In-flight BC mass emission indices ranged from 0.11 to 0.15 g BC (kg fuel){sup -1}. The measured in-flight particle emission value was 1.75 {+-} 0.15 x 10{sup 15} kg{sup -1} with corresponding ground test values of 1.0-8.7 x 10{sup 14} kg{sup -1}. Both size distribution properties and mass emission indices can be scaled from ground test to in-flight conditions. Implications for atmosphere BC loading, BC and cirrus interaction and the potential of BC for perturbation of atmospheric chemistry are briefly outlined. (author)

  16. Investigation of methods for physical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and ground dust fractions on radioactive contaminated areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artem'ev, O.I.; Osintsev, A.Yu.; Gaziev, Ya.I.; Gordeev, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents data about current situation and trends to develop investigation methods for physical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols and ground dust fractions that are observed on the former Semipalatinsk Test Site area and adjacent regions. It was considered one of the options for comprehensive collection of radioactive aerosols as fallout within control area of atmospheric contamination and underlying surface with aerosol products of the man-caused dusting on the former STS area to determine rates of 'dry' deposition and ground-based activity concentration contained in these products of radionuclides at different distances from place of dusting. (author)

  17. Calibration of a PIXE system for analysis of environmental aerosols; Calibracion de un sistema PIXE para analisis de aerosoles ambientales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldape, F.; Diaz, R.V.; Anguiano, G.; Flores M, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    1991-04-15

    The results of the calibration of the PIXE system for analysis of environmental aerosols in the CNM is presented. The system was calibrated in order to lead to the project study of environmental aerosols using PIXE from the qualitative dimension to the quantitative one. Part of this work it was carried out in collaboration with the expert of the IAEA Dr. D. Crumpton. The calibration of the system it was achieved bombarding thin targets of well-known composition with protons of 2.5 MeV. Using this technique it was determined the absolute elementary concentration in samples of atmospheric aerosols. As an example the calculation of the lead concentration in one of them whose result was of 662 {+-} 49 ng m{sup -3} is presented. This value agrees with the measurements made in the Crocker Nuclear Lab of the UCD. Its are also discussed the reproducibility and precision of the used technique. (Author)

  18. Aerosol characteristics in the entrainment interface layer in relation to the marine boundary layer and free troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadashazar, Hossein; Braun, Rachel A.; Crosbie, Ewan; Chuang, Patrick Y.; Woods, Roy K.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Sorooshian, Armin

    2018-02-01

    This study uses airborne data from two field campaigns off the California coast to characterize aerosol size distribution characteristics in the entrainment interface layer (EIL), a thin and turbulent layer above marine stratocumulus cloud tops, which separates the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer (STBL) from the free troposphere (FT). The vertical bounds of the EIL are defined in this work based on considerations of buoyancy and turbulence using thermodynamic and dynamic data. Aerosol number concentrations are examined from three different probes with varying particle diameter (Dp) ranges: > 3 nm, > 10 nm, and 0.11-3.4 µm. Relative to the EIL and FT layers, the sub-cloud (SUB) layer exhibited lower aerosol number concentrations and higher surface area concentrations. High particle number concentrations between 3 and 10 nm in the EIL are indicative of enhanced nucleation, assisted by high actinic fluxes, cool and moist air, and much lower surface area concentrations than the STBL. Slopes of number concentration versus altitude in the EIL were correlated with the particle number concentration difference between the SUB and lower FT layers. The EIL aerosol size distribution was influenced by varying degrees from STBL aerosol versus subsiding FT aerosol depending on the case examined. These results emphasize the important role of the EIL in influencing nucleation and aerosol-cloud-climate interactions.

  19. Providing the Efficiency and Dispersion Characteristics of Aerosols in Ultrasonic Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelev, V. N.; Shalunov, A. V.; Golykh, R. N.; Nesterov, V. A.; Dorovskikh, R. S.; Shalunova, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    This article is devoted to the investigation of the process of atomization of liquids under the action of ultrasonic vibrations. It has been shown that the ultrasonic atomization parameters are determined by the regimes of action (vibration frequency and amplitude of the atomization surface), the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension), and the thickness of the liquid layer covering the atomization surface. To reveal the dependences of the efficiency of the process at various dispersion characteristics of produced liquid droplets, we propose a model based on the cavitation-wave theory of droplet formation. The obtained results can be used in designing and using ultrasonic atomizers producing an aerosol with characteristics complying with the requirements on efficiency and dispersivity for the process being realized.

  20. An empirical model of optical and radiative characteristics of the tropospheric aerosol over West Siberia in summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Panchenko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An empirical model of the vertical profiles of aerosol optical characteristics is described. This model was developed based on data acquired from multi-year airborne sensing of optical and microphysical characteristics of the tropospheric aerosol over West Siberia. The main initial characteristics for the creation of the model were measurement data of the vertical profiles of the aerosol angular scattering coefficients in the visible wavelength range, particle size distribution functions and mass concentrations of black carbon (BC. The proposed model allows us to retrieve the aerosol optical and radiative characteristics in the visible and near-IR wavelength range, using the season, air mass type and time of day as input parameters. The columnar single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor of the aerosol scattering phase function, calculated using the average vertical profiles, are in good agreement with data from the AERONET station located in Tomsk.

    For solar radiative flux calculations, this empirical model has been tested for typical summer conditions. The available experimental database obtained for the regional features of West Siberia and the model developed on this basis are shown to be sufficient for performing these calculations.

  1. Impact of Two Intense Dust Storms on Aerosol Characteristics and Radiative Forcing over Patiala, Northwestern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of dust storms on the aerosol characteristics and radiative forcing over Patiala, northwestern India has been studied during April-June of 2010 using satellite observations and ground-based measurements. Six dust events (DE have been identified during the study period with average values of Aqua-MODIS AOD550 and Microtops-II AOD500 over Patiala as 1.00±0.51 and 0.84±0.41, respectively while Aura-OMI AI exhibits high values ranging from 2.01 to 6.74. The Ångström coefficients α380–870 and β range from 0.12 to 0.31 and 0.95 to 1.40, respectively. The measured spectral AODs, the OPAC-derived aerosol properties and the surface albedo obtained from MODIS were used as main inputs in SBDART model for the calculation of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF over Patiala. The ARF at surface (SRF and top of atmosphere (TOA ranges from ∼−50 to −100 Wm−2 and from ∼−10 to −25 Wm−2, respectively during the maximum of dust storms. The radiative forcing efficiency was found to be −66 Wm−2AOD−1 at SRF and −14 Wm−2AOD−1 at TOA. High values of ARF in the atmosphere (ATM, ranging between ∼+40 Wm−2 and +80.0 Wm−2 during the DE days, might have significant effect on the warming of the lower and middle atmosphere and, hence, on climate over northwestern India.

  2. Characteristics of bacterial and fungal aerosols during the autumn haze days in Xi'an, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Fu, Honglei; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jun; Meng, Qinglong; Wang, Wenke

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, haze pollution has become one of the most critical environmental issues in Xi'an, China, with particular matter (PM) being one of the top pollutants. As an important fraction of PM, bioaerosols may have adverse effects on air quality and human health. In this study, to better understand the characteristics of such biological aerosols, airborne microbial samples were collected by using an Andersen six-stage sampler in Xi'an from October 8th to 22nd, 2014. The concentration, size distribution and genera of airborne viable bacteria and fungi were comparably investigated during the haze days and non-haze days. Correlations of bioaerosol levels with meteorological parameters and PM concentrations were also examined. The results showed that the daily average concentrations of airborne viable bacteria and fungi during the haze days, 1102.4-1736.5 and 1466.2-1703.9 CFU/m3, respectively, were not only much higher than those during the non-haze days, but also exceeded the recommended permissible limit values. Comparing to size distributions during the non-haze days, slightly different patterns for bacterial aerosols and similar single-peak distribution pattern for fungal aerosols were observed during the haze days. Moreover, more allergic and infectious genera (e.g. Neisseria, Aspergillus, and Paecilomyces) in bioaerosols were identified during the haze days than during non-haze days. The present results reveal that bioaerosols may have more significant effects on public health and urban air quality during the haze days than during non-haze days.

  3. Sub 2 nm Particle Characterization in Systems with Aerosol Formation and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang

    size distributions were discrete, suggesting the formation of stable clusters that may be intermediate phases between initial chemical reactions and downstream particle growth. The evolution of incipient cluster size distributions further provided information on the gaseous precursor reaction kinetics, which matched well with the data obtained through other techniques. Part 2. The size distributions and their evolution measured by the DMAs help explain the physical pathways of aerosol formation. The chemical analysis of the incipient particles is an important counterpart to the existing characterization method. The chemical compositions of charged species were measured online with an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight mass spectrometer (APi-TOF). The tandem arrangement of the high-resolution DMA and the APi-TOF realized the simultaneous measurement of the mobility and the mass of combustion-generated natively charged particles, which enabled their chemical and physical formation pathways to be derived. The results showed that the initial stages of particle formation were strongly influenced by chemically ionized species during combustion, and that incipient particles composed of pure oxides did not exist. The effective densities of the incipient particles were much lower than those of bulk materials, due to their amorphous structures and different chemical compositions. Measuring incipient particles with high-resolution DMAs is limited because a DMA classifies charged particles only, while the charging characteristics of sub 2 nm particles are not well understood. The charge fraction of combustion-generated incipient particles was measured by coupling a charged particle remover and a condensation particle counter. A high charge fraction was observed, confirming the strong interaction among chemically ionized species and formed particles. The combustion system was modeled by using a unimodal aerosol dynamics model combined with Fuchs' charging theory, and

  4. Evaluation of IASI-derived dust aerosol characteristics over the tropical belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelle, V.; Chédin, A.; Siméon, M.; Tsamalis, C.; Pierangelo, C.; Pondrom, M.; Crevoisier, C.; Crepeau, L.; Scott, N. A.

    2014-09-01

    within the boundary layer (particularly for sites close to active sources) to which IASI, as any thermal infrared sounder, is poorly sensitive, unlike AERONET. Site by site, disparities appear that are principally due to either the insufficient number of AERONET observations throughout the period considered, to the complexity of the location leading to the mixing of several aerosol types (in the case of the Persian Gulf, for example), to surface heterogeneities (elevation, emissivity, etc.), or to the use of a single aerosol model (called "MITR"). Results using another aerosol model, with a different refractive index, are presented and discussed. Concerning altitude over oceanic regions, correlation is 0.70 for 853 items and the normalized standard deviation is 0.92. A systematic bias of -0.4 km (IASI-CALIOP) is observed, with a standard deviation of 0.48 km. This result is satisfactory, considering the important differences between the two instruments (space-time coverage, definition of the altitude). Altitude results over land, essentially over deserts, are not satisfactory for a majority of sites. The smaller sensitivity of IASI to altitude compared to its sensitivity to AOD, added to the difficulties met for the determination of the AOD over land (surface heterogeneities), explain this result. Work is in progress to solve this difficulty. We conclude that the present results demonstrate the usefulness of IASI data, which are planned to cover a long period of time, as an additional constraint to a better knowledge of the impact of aerosols on the climate system.

  5. Effects of Aerosols on Solar Radiation in the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP System

    OpenAIRE

    Gleeson, E.; Toll, V.; Nielsen, K.P.; Rontu, L.; Mašek, J.

    2015-01-01

    The direct shortwave radiative effect of aerosols in the ALADIN-HIRLAM numerical weather prediction system was investigated using three different shortwave radiation schemes in diagnostic single-column experiments. The aim was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the model in this regard and to prepare the model for eventual use of real-time aerosol information. Experiments were run using observed, climatologically-averaged and zero aerosols, with particular focus on ...

  6. The MERRA-2 Aerosol Reanalysis, 1980 Onward. Part I: System Description and Data Assimilation Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randles, C. A. [Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; da Silva, A. M. [Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Buchard, V. [Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Goddard Earth Sciences Technology and Research/Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, Maryland; Colarco, P. R. [Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Darmenov, A. [Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Govindaraju, R. [Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, Maryland; Smirnov, A. [Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, Maryland; NASA Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, Greenbelt, Maryland; Holben, B. [NASA Biospheric Sciences Laboratory, Greenbelt, Maryland; Ferrare, R. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia; Hair, J. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia; Shinozuka, Y. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, Petaluma, California; NASA Ames Research Center Cooperative for Research in Earth Science and Technology, Moffett Field, California; Flynn, C. J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

    2017-09-01

    The Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications, Version 2 (MERRA-2) updates NASA’s previous satellite era (1980 – onward) reanalysis system to include additional observations and improvements to the Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model. As a major step towards a full Integrated Earth Systems Analysis (IESA), in addition to meteorological observations, MERRA-2 now includes assimila-tion of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from various ground- and space-based remote sensing platforms. Here, in the first of a pair of studies, we document the MERRA-2 aerosol assimilation, including a description of the prognostic model (GEOS-5 coupled to the GOCART aerosol module), aerosol emissions, and the quality control of ingested observations. We provide initial validation and evaluation of the analyzed AOD fields using independent observations rom ground, aircraft, and shipborne instruments. We demonstrate the pos-itive impact of the AOD assimilation on simulated aerosols by comparing MERRA-2 aerosol fields to an identical control simulation that does not in-clude AOD assimilation. Having shown the AOD evaluation, we take a first look at aerosol-climate interactions by examining the shortwave, clear-sky aerosol direct radiative effect. In our companion paper, we evaluate and validate available MERRA-2 aerosol properties not directly impacted by the AOD assimilation (e.g. aerosol vertical distribution and absorption). Importantly, while highlighting the skill of the MERRA-2 aerosol assimilation products, both studies point out caveats that must be considered when using this new reanalysis product for future studies of aerosols and their interactions with weather and climate.

  7. INTEGRATED PROTECTIVE FABRIC SYSTEM (IPFS) PHASE III PROGRAM: AEROSOL PROTECTION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-16

    TECHNICAL REPORT AD ________________ NATICK/TR-17/021 INTEGRATED PROTECTIVE...September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE INTEGRATED PROTECTIVE FABRIC SYSTEM (IPFS) PHASE III PROGRAM: AEROSOL PROTECTION REPORT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...materials and configurations investigated in this study. 1 INTEGRATED PROTECTIVE FABRIC SYSTEM (IPFS) PHASE III PROGRAM: AEROSOL PROTECTION REPORT 1

  8. Aerosol characteristics in the entrainment interface layer in relation to the marine boundary layer and free troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Dadashazar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study uses airborne data from two field campaigns off the California coast to characterize aerosol size distribution characteristics in the entrainment interface layer (EIL, a thin and turbulent layer above marine stratocumulus cloud tops, which separates the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer (STBL from the free troposphere (FT. The vertical bounds of the EIL are defined in this work based on considerations of buoyancy and turbulence using thermodynamic and dynamic data. Aerosol number concentrations are examined from three different probes with varying particle diameter (Dp ranges: > 3 nm, > 10 nm, and 0.11–3.4 µm. Relative to the EIL and FT layers, the sub-cloud (SUB layer exhibited lower aerosol number concentrations and higher surface area concentrations. High particle number concentrations between 3 and 10 nm in the EIL are indicative of enhanced nucleation, assisted by high actinic fluxes, cool and moist air, and much lower surface area concentrations than the STBL. Slopes of number concentration versus altitude in the EIL were correlated with the particle number concentration difference between the SUB and lower FT layers. The EIL aerosol size distribution was influenced by varying degrees from STBL aerosol versus subsiding FT aerosol depending on the case examined. These results emphasize the important role of the EIL in influencing nucleation and aerosol–cloud–climate interactions.

  9. Simulation of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aerosol index using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System aerosol reanalysis products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Colarco

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We provide an analysis of the commonly used Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI aerosol index (AI product for qualitative detection of the presence and loading of absorbing aerosols. In our analysis, simulated top-of-atmosphere (TOA radiances are produced at the OMI footprints from a model atmosphere and aerosol profile provided by the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5 Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero. Having established the credibility of the MERRAero simulation of the OMI AI in a previous paper we describe updates in the approach and aerosol optical property assumptions. The OMI TOA radiances are computed in cloud-free conditions from the MERRAero atmospheric state, and the AI is calculated. The simulated TOA radiances are fed to the OMI near-UV aerosol retrieval algorithms (known as OMAERUV is compared to the MERRAero calculated AI. Two main sources of discrepancy are discussed: one pertaining to the OMI algorithm assumptions of the surface pressure, which are generally different from what the actual surface pressure of an observation is, and the other related to simplifying assumptions in the molecular atmosphere radiative transfer used in the OMI algorithms. Surface pressure assumptions lead to systematic biases in the OMAERUV AI, particularly over the oceans. Simplifications in the molecular radiative transfer lead to biases particularly in regions of topography intermediate to surface pressures of 600 and 1013.25 hPa. Generally, the errors in the OMI AI due to these considerations are less than 0.2 in magnitude, though larger errors are possible, particularly over land. We recommend that future versions of the OMI algorithms use surface pressures from readily available atmospheric analyses combined with high-spatial-resolution topographic maps and include more surface pressure nodal points in their radiative transfer lookup tables.

  10. Simulation of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aerosol index using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System aerosol reanalysis products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter R.; Gassó, Santiago; Ahn, Changwoo; Buchard, Virginie; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Torres, Omar

    2017-11-01

    We provide an analysis of the commonly used Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aerosol index (AI) product for qualitative detection of the presence and loading of absorbing aerosols. In our analysis, simulated top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances are produced at the OMI footprints from a model atmosphere and aerosol profile provided by the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications aerosol reanalysis (MERRAero). Having established the credibility of the MERRAero simulation of the OMI AI in a previous paper we describe updates in the approach and aerosol optical property assumptions. The OMI TOA radiances are computed in cloud-free conditions from the MERRAero atmospheric state, and the AI is calculated. The simulated TOA radiances are fed to the OMI near-UV aerosol retrieval algorithms (known as OMAERUV) is compared to the MERRAero calculated AI. Two main sources of discrepancy are discussed: one pertaining to the OMI algorithm assumptions of the surface pressure, which are generally different from what the actual surface pressure of an observation is, and the other related to simplifying assumptions in the molecular atmosphere radiative transfer used in the OMI algorithms. Surface pressure assumptions lead to systematic biases in the OMAERUV AI, particularly over the oceans. Simplifications in the molecular radiative transfer lead to biases particularly in regions of topography intermediate to surface pressures of 600 and 1013.25 hPa. Generally, the errors in the OMI AI due to these considerations are less than 0.2 in magnitude, though larger errors are possible, particularly over land. We recommend that future versions of the OMI algorithms use surface pressures from readily available atmospheric analyses combined with high-spatial-resolution topographic maps and include more surface pressure nodal points in their radiative transfer lookup tables.

  11. Retrieval of the vertical distribution of aerosol microphysical characteristics from lidar measurements in Tomsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilova, S. V.; Penner, I. E.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Balin, Yu. S.

    2017-11-01

    Regular lidar measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol optical parameters are carried out in Tomsk (560N, 850E) since April, 2011. We present the results of retrieval of microphysical characteristics from the data of measurements by means of Raman lidar in 2013. Section 2 is devoted to the theoretical aspects of retrieving the particle size distribution function U(r) (SDF) assuming a known complex refractive index m (CRI). It is shown that the coarse fraction cannot be retrieved unambiguously. When estimating U(r) and m together (section 3), the retrieved refractive index is non-linearly related to the optical coefficients and the distribution function, which leads to appearance of different, including false values of m . The corresponding U(r) differs only slightly, so the inaccuracy in m does not essentially affect the retrieval of the distribution function.

  12. On the correlation of output rate and aerodynamic characteristics in vibrating-mesh-based aqueous aerosol delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Oesterheld, Nina; Knuedeler, Marie-Christine; Seeger, Werner; Schmehl, Thomas

    2014-01-30

    Aerosolization of aqueous formulations is of special interest for inhalative drug delivery, where an adequate nebulizer performance represents a prerequisite for improving pulmonary therapy. The present study investigated the interplay of output rate and aerodynamic characteristics of different excipient-based formulations and its impact on the atomization process by vibrating-mesh technology (i.e. eFlow(®)rapid). Output rate and aerodynamic characteristics were manipulated by both dynamic viscosity and conductivity of the applied formulation. Supplementation with sucrose and sodium chloride caused a decline (down to ∼0.2 g/min) and elevation (up to ∼1.0 g/min) of the nebulizer output rate, respectively. However, both excipients were capable of decreasing the aerodynamic diameter of produced aerosol droplets from >7.0 μm to values of ≤5.0 μm. Thus, the correlation of output rate and aerodynamic characteristics resulted in linear fits of opposite slopes (R(2)>0.85). Finally, the overall number of delivered aerosol droplets per time was almost constant for sucrose (≤1×10(8) droplets/s), while for sodium chloride a concentration-dependent increase was observed (up to ∼3×10(8) droplets/s). Overall, the current findings illustrated the influence of formulation parameters on the aerosolization process performed by vibrating-mesh technology. Moreover, concentration and charge distribution of aerosol populations supposedly modify the final characteristics of the delivered aerosols. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optical, physical and chemical characteristics of Australian continental aerosols: results from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Radhi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust is one of the major components of the world's aerosol mix, having a number of impacts within the Earth system. However, the climate forcing impact of mineral dust is currently poorly constrained, with even its sign uncertain. As Australian deserts are more reddish than those in the Northern Hemisphere, it is important to better understand the physical, chemical and optical properties of this important aerosol. We have investigated the properties of Australian desert dust at a site in SW Queensland, which is strongly influenced by both dust and biomass burning aerosol.

    Three years of ground-based monitoring of spectral optical thickness has provided a statistical picture of gross aerosol properties. The aerosol optical depth data showed a clear though moderate seasonal cycle with an annual mean of 0.06 ± 0.03. The Angstrom coefficient showed a stronger cycle, indicating the influence of the winter-spring burning season in Australia's north. AERONET size distributions showed a generally bimodal character, with the coarse mode assumed to be mineral dust, and the fine mode a mixture of fine dust, biomass burning and marine biogenic material.

    In November 2006 we undertook a field campaign which collected 4 sets of size-resolved aerosol samples for laboratory analysis – ion beam analysis and ion chromatography. Ion beam analysis was used to determine the elemental composition of all filter samples, although elemental ratios were considered the most reliable output. Scatter plots showed that Fe, Al and Ti were well correlated with Si, and Co reasonably well correlated with Si, with the Fe/Al ratio somewhat higher than values reported from Northern Hemisphere sites (as expected. Scatter plots for Ca, Mn and K against Si showed clear evidence of a second population, which in some cases could be identified with a particular sample day or size fraction. These data may be used to attempt to build a signature of soil in this

  14. Effects of aerosols on clear-sky solar radiation in the ALADIN-HIRLAM NWP system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gleeson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The direct shortwave radiative effect of aerosols under clear-sky conditions in the Aire Limitee Adaptation dynamique Developpement InterNational – High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN-HIRLAM numerical weather prediction system was investigated using three shortwave radiation schemes in diagnostic single-column experiments: the Integrated Forecast System (IFS, acraneb2 and the hlradia radiation schemes. The multi-band IFS scheme was formerly used operationally by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF whereas hlradia and acraneb2 are broadband schemes. The former is a new version of the HIRLAM radiation scheme while acraneb2 is the radiation scheme in the ALARO-1 physics package. The aim was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the numerical weather prediction (NWP system regarding aerosols and to prepare it for use of real-time aerosol information. The experiments were run with particular focus on the August 2010 Russian wildfire case. Each of the three radiation schemes accurately (within ±4 % at midday simulates the direct shortwave aerosol effect when observed aerosol optical properties are used. When the aerosols were excluded from the simulations, errors of more than +15 % in global shortwave irradiance were found at midday, with the error reduced to +10 % when standard climatological aerosols were used. An error of −11 % was seen at midday if only observed aerosol optical depths at 550 nm, and not observation-based spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedos and asymmetry factors, were included in the simulations. This demonstrates the importance of using the correct aerosol optical properties. The dependency of the direct radiative effect of aerosols on relative humidity was tested and shown to be within ±6 % in this case. By modifying the assumptions about the shape of the IFS climatological vertical aerosol profile, the inherent uncertainties associated

  15. A system for the production and delivery of monodisperse salbutamol aerosols to the lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddiscombe, Martyn F; Usmani, Omar S; Barnes, Peter J

    2003-03-26

    An aerosol system is described for the generation and delivery of measured doses of monodisperse therapeutic drug particles to the human lungs. The system comprises a spinning top aerosol generator (STAG), aerosol chamber and inhalation control unit. Monodisperse aerosols allow drug particle size effects to be studied as the dose is within a narrow size distribution and when combined with controlled inhalation may lead to more precise targeting of therapeutic drug to the airways. Using the STAG, particles in the size range 1.5-12 microm were generated and their mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and concentration measured using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). The application and validation of the system with the bronchodilator drug salbutamol sulphate is described, and its potential use in the study of aerosol particle size effects is discussed. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.

  16. Aerosol characteristics in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region during successive and contrasting Indian summer monsoon season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A. K.; Kumar, D.; Misra, A.; Kanawade, V. P.; Pathak, V.; Tiwari, S.; Devara, P. C. S.

    2018-01-01

    Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO)-derived aerosol vertical profiles were studied in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) over the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) region during two successive and contrasting monsoon years (2008-2009). An enhanced aerosol layer was observed in the UTLS between 15 and 19 km altitude, in the vicinity of tropopause during both years. However, the optical characteristics of aerosol layers were found to be dissimilar during the two contrasting consecutive summer monsoon seasons. While the depolarization ratio of enhanced aerosol layer (exceeding 0.2) during both years suggested anisotropic nature of particles, the aerosol backscatter coefficient was observed to be more intensified with a sharp peak during the active monsoon year (2008) whereas it was relatively broader with lower magnitude during a drought year (2009). The enhanced backscatter coefficient in the UTLS was found to be closely associated with the variability in tropopause height and convection during both years, which is more pronounced during the active monsoon year as compared to a drought year. Deep convection over the ISM region may inject boundary layer aerosols into the upper troposphere as evidenced from the analysis of the outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR). Our results also showed an enhanced integrated backscatter coefficient (IBC) of about 30%, which is associated with a decrease in OLR of about 7% during the active monsoon year as compared to drought year. These findings were further corroborated using NCEP-NCAR vertical velocity and HYSPLIT air-mass backward trajectory analyses.

  17. Characteristics of aerosol particles and trace gases in ship exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnick, F.; Diesch, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Gaseous and particulate matter from marine vessels gain increasing attention due to their significant contribution to the anthropogenic burden of the atmosphere, implying the change of the atmospheric composition and the impact on local and regional air quality and climate (Eyring et al., 2010). As ship emissions significantly affect air quality of onshore regions, this study deals with various aspects of gas and particulate plumes from marine traffic measured near the Elbe river mouth in northern Germany. In addition to a detailed investigation of the chemical and physical particle properties from different types of commercial marine vessels, we will focus on the chemistry of ship plumes and their changes while undergoing atmospheric processing. Measurements of the ambient aerosol, various trace gases and meteorological parameters using a mobile laboratory (MoLa) were performed on the banks of the Lower Elbe which is passed on average, daily by 30 ocean-going vessels reaching the port of Hamburg, the second largest freight port of Europe. During 5 days of sampling from April 25-30, 2011 170 commercial marine vessels were probed at a distance of about 1.5-2 km with high temporal resolution. Mass concentrations in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 and number as well as PAH and black carbon (BC) concentrations in PM1 were measured; size distribution instruments covered the size range from 6 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory aerosol in the submicron range was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase species analyzers monitored various trace gas concentrations in the air and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Additionally, a wide spectrum of ship information for each vessel including speed, size, vessel type, fuel type, gross tonnage and engine power was recorded via Automatic Identification System (AIS) broadcasts. Although commercial marine vessels powered by diesel engines consume high

  18. Characteristics of the surface source of radioactive atmospheric aerosols in the 30km Chernobyl zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garger, E.; Gurgula, B.; Kashpur, V.; Kostezh, A.

    1993-01-01

    Territory contaminated by radionuclides around Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant is the surface source of radioactive atmospheric aerosols due to the natural wind resuspension and ''technogenic'' activity. The present work is devoted to characterizing this source. Measurements of the spacial distribution of soil contamination, atmospheric dry deposition, volume concentration of radioactive aerosols and their variability in space and time, distribution of the radioactivity according to the size of aerosol particles, and size distribution of ''hot'' particles in the surface layer of the atmosphere were taken and the power of the surface source of the radioactivity aerosol was estimated. (author)

  19. Characteristics of size-resolved atmospheric inorganic and carbonaceous aerosols in urban Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X. X.; Kong, L. D.; Du, C. T.; Zhanzakova, A.; Fu, H. B.; Tang, X. F.; Wang, L.; Yang, X.; Chen, J. M.; Cheng, T. T.

    2017-10-01

    Size-segregated aerosol particles were collected with a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at an urban site in Shanghai, China for four non-consecutive months representing four seasons from 2015 to 2016. Chemical composition, including water-soluble ions as well as organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and secondary organic carbon (SOC) of size-resolved (0.056-18 μm) atmospheric aerosols in four seasons and in different polluted cases were studied. The size distributions of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium (SNA) and carbonaceous aerosol (OC, EC and SOC) were discussed and the potential sources of PM1.8-associated secondary species (SO42-, NO3-, SNA and SOC) in different seasons were identified by potential source contribution function (PSCF) model. Results showed that atmospheric ultrafine and fine particle pollution in Shanghai were very serious during the study period. Most of the water-soluble ions tended to be enriched in fine particles, especially being abundant in the droplet mode in polluted cases. Compared with sulfate, size distributions of nitrate and ammonium presented more significant seasonal variations and showed distinctive characteristics in polluted days. Abundant nitrate was concentrated in fine particles in cold seasons (spring and winter), whereas it was enriched in coarse mode during summer and autumn. The droplet mode sulfate with high concentration did not result in the aggravation of air pollution, while the nucleation mode sulfate may have made a great contribution to the air pollution in urban Shanghai. It was also found that the formation of air pollution in urban Shanghai had a significant link with nitrate and ammonium, especially with nitrate and ammonium in condensation mode and droplet mode, and the contribution of sulfate to the pollution formation in Shanghai would somehow be surpassed by the increasing nitrate and ammonium. OC and EC concentrations from spring to winter were found to be 11.10, 7.10, 12

  20. A radioactive aerosols in air monitoring system - 'ASIA'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belaish, I.; Levinson, S.; Pelled, O.; German, U.; Laichter, Y.; Gonen, E.; Wengrowicz, U.; Tirosh, D.; Barak, D.

    1997-01-01

    A continuous air monitoring system called 'ASIA' (Aerosols Sampler In Air) was developed at the NRCN for monitoring and measuring the concentration of airborne alpha emitting radionuclides such as Radon or natural Uranium. The 'ASIA' is a stationary multi-channel analyzer based system. The air passes through a 2.5 cm diameter filter and the radioactivity accumulated on it is monitored by a Silicon solid state detector. The sampling unit can be separated from the display and control unit to enable environment sampling close to the workers. The ASIA uses modern hardware and software in order to improve noise and background reduction and to allow friendly and flexible use. Remote communication is also available. The spectrum and additional data are displayed on line. The system was checked according to ANSI N42.17B -1989. The linearity and efficiency were evaluated by using various alpha sources. The Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) and Decision Limit (Lc) were calculated according to ANSI N13.30. Long time stability measurements were performed using a natural Uranium source. (authors)

  1. Prednisolone multicomponent nanoparticle preparation by aerosol solvent extraction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moribe, Kunikazu; Fukino, Mika; Tozuka, Yuichi; Higashi, Kenjirou; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2009-10-01

    Prednisolone nanoparticles were prepared in the presence of a hydrophilic polymer and a surfactant by the aerosol solvent extraction system (ASES). A ternary mixture of prednisolone, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) dissolved in methanol was sprayed through a nozzle into the reaction vessel filled with supercritical carbon dioxide. After the ASES process was repeated, precipitates of the ternary components were obtained by depressurizing the reaction vessel. When a methanolic solution of prednisolone/PEG 4000/SDS at a weight ratio of 1:6:2 was sprayed under the optimized ASES conditions, the mean particle size of prednisolone obtained after dispersing the precipitates in water was observed to be ca. 230 nm. Prednisolone nanoparticles were not obtained by the binary ASES process for prednisolone, in the presence of either PEG or SDS. Furthermore, ternary cryogenic cogrinding, as well as solvent evaporation, was not effective for the preparation of prednisolone nanoparticles. As the ASES process can be conducted under moderate temperature conditions, the ASES process that was applied to the ternary system appeared to be one of the most promising methods for the preparation of drug nanoparticles using the multicomponent system.

  2. Aerosol size distribution characteristics of organosulfates in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Bin Yu; Lin, Peng; Hu, Min; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Organosulfates (OSs) have been detected in various atmospheric environments, but their particle size distribution characteristics are unknown. In this work, we examined their size distributions in ambient aerosols to gain insights into the formation processes. Size-segregated aerosol samples in the range of 0.056-18 μm were collected using a ten-stage impactor at a receptor site in Hong Kong in both summer and winter and in Nansha in the Pearl River Delta in winter. The humic-like substances fraction in the size-segregated samples was isolated and analyzed using electrospray ionization coupled with an Orbitrap Ultra High Resolution Mass Spectrometer. Through accurate mass measurements, ∼190 CHOS and ∼90 CHONS formulas were tentatively identified to be OS compounds. Among them, OS compounds derived from isoprene, α-/β-pinene, and limonene and alkyl OSs having low double bond equivalents (DBE = 0,1) and 0-2 extra O beyond those in -OSO3 were found with high intensity. The biogenic volatile organic compounds-derived OS formulas share a common characteristic with sulfate in that the droplet mode dominated, peaking in either 0.56-1.0 or 1.0-1.8 μm size bin, reflecting sulfate as their common precursor. Most of these OSs have a minor coarse mode, accounting for 0-45%. The presence of OSs on the coarse particles is hypothesized to be a result of OSs on small particle (vs. m/z 249 C10H17O5S- from α/β-pinene, differing by (+H2O-HNO3)), the CHONS compounds had an enhanced coarse mode presence. This could be interpreted as a result of slower hydrolysis of the CHONS compounds on the alkali coarse particles. The low DBE alkyl OS compounds have a dominant droplet mode at the Hong Kong site, but a more significant coarse mode presence was observed for CnH2n+1O4S-, CnH2n-1O4S-, and CnH2n-1O5S- formulas in the Nansha site, possibly suggesting site-specific mixed secondary and primary sources for these formulas.

  3. Mesoscale and synoptic scale transport of aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of mesoscale and synoptic-scale (macroscale) aerosol transport as observed in recent air pollution field studies. Examples of mesoscale transport systems are discussed, including urban plumes, sea breezes, the mountain-valley wind cycle, and the urban-heat-island circulation. The synoptic-scale systems considered are migrating high- and low-pressure systems. Documented cases are reviewed of aerosol transport in the various mesoscale systems, aerosol accumulation and transport in high-pressure systems, and acid precipitation in low-pressure systems. The characteristics of the transported aerosols are identified, along with the chemical species that occur primarily in aerosols in the accumulation mode (particle diameters of 0.1-3 microns). It is shown that aerosol particles in the accumulation mode are the most important in terms of synoptic-scale and mesoscale transport and that such particles are primarily responsible for visible haze

  4. A miniature system for separating aerosol particles and measuring mass concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dao; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Dai, Chi-An

    2010-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hydrogel, which was found to be a reliable adhesive for capturing aerosol particles. The QCM sensor coated with hydrogel was used to measure the mass loading of particles by utilizing its characteristic of resonant frequency shift. An integrated system has been demonstrated.

  5. A Miniature System for Separating Aerosol Particles and Measuring Mass Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Liang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d < 2.28 μm, 2.28 μm ≤ d ≤ 3.20 μm, d > 3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hydrogel, which was found to be a reliable adhesive for capturing aerosol particles. The QCM sensor coated with hydrogel was used to measure the mass loading of particles by utilizing its characteristic of resonant frequency shift. An integrated system has been demonstrated.

  6. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  7. Development of the Ensemble Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS) and its application of the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) in support of aerosol forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, J. I.; Reid, J. S.; Hansen, J. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Collins, N.; Hoar, T. J.; Hogan, T.; Lynch, P.; McLay, J.; Reynolds, C. A.; Sessions, W. R.; Westphal, D. L.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-01

    An ensemble-based forecast and data assimilation system has been developed for use in Navy aerosol forecasting. The system makes use of an ensemble of the Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS) at 1° × 1°, combined with an Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter from NCAR's Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). The base ENAAPS-DART system discussed in this work utilizes the Navy Operational Global Analysis Prediction System (NOGAPS) meteorological ensemble to drive offline NAAPS simulations coupled with the DART Ensemble Kalman Filter architecture to assimilate bias-corrected MODIS Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrievals. This work outlines the optimization of the 20-member ensemble system, including consideration of meteorology and source-perturbed ensemble members as well as covariance inflation. Additional tests with 80 meteorological and source members were also performed. An important finding of this work is that an adaptive covariance inflation method, which has not been previously tested for aerosol applications, was found to perform better than a temporally and spatially constant covariance inflation. Problems were identified with the constant inflation in regions with limited observational coverage. The second major finding of this work is that combined meteorology and aerosol source ensembles are superior to either in isolation and that both are necessary to produce a robust system with sufficient spread in the ensemble members as well as realistic correlation fields for spreading observational information. The inclusion of aerosol source ensembles improves correlation fields for large aerosol source regions such as smoke and dust in Africa, by statistically separating freshly emitted from transported aerosol species. However, the source ensembles have limited efficacy during long range transport. Conversely, the meteorological ensemble produces sufficient spread at the synoptic scale to enable observational impact through the ensemble data

  8. Development of the Ensemble Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS and its application of the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART in support of aerosol forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Rubin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An ensemble-based forecast and data assimilation system has been developed for use in Navy aerosol forecasting. The system makes use of an ensemble of the Navy Aerosol Analysis Prediction System (ENAAPS at 1 × 1°, combined with an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter from NCAR's Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART. The base ENAAPS-DART system discussed in this work utilizes the Navy Operational Global Analysis Prediction System (NOGAPS meteorological ensemble to drive offline NAAPS simulations coupled with the DART ensemble Kalman filter architecture to assimilate bias-corrected MODIS aerosol optical thickness (AOT retrievals. This work outlines the optimization of the 20-member ensemble system, including consideration of meteorology and source-perturbed ensemble members as well as covariance inflation. Additional tests with 80 meteorological and source members were also performed. An important finding of this work is that an adaptive covariance inflation method, which has not been previously tested for aerosol applications, was found to perform better than a temporally and spatially constant covariance inflation. Problems were identified with the constant inflation in regions with limited observational coverage. The second major finding of this work is that combined meteorology and aerosol source ensembles are superior to either in isolation and that both are necessary to produce a robust system with sufficient spread in the ensemble members as well as realistic correlation fields for spreading observational information. The inclusion of aerosol source ensembles improves correlation fields for large aerosol source regions, such as smoke and dust in Africa, by statistically separating freshly emitted from transported aerosol species. However, the source ensembles have limited efficacy during long-range transport. Conversely, the meteorological ensemble generates sufficient spread at the synoptic scale to enable observational impact

  9. Spatial characteristics of aerosol physical properties over the northeastern parts of peninsular India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements on aerosol spectral optical depths and near surface mass-size distributions made at several locations in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Orissa and Chattisgarh, constituting the northeastern part of the peninsular India during the ISRO-GBP land campaign-I show significant regional variations in aerosol physical properties. Higher spectral optical depths were observed in the coastal regions and over southern latitudes compared to interior continental regions and northern latitudes. The optical depths, size index "α" and the near surface aerosol mass concentrations indicate a relative abundance of nucleation mode aerosols in the northern latitudes, in contrast to the dominance of the accumulation mode aerosols at the eastern coastal and southern latitudes. The airmass pathways derived from the back trajectory analysis indicate that the higher aerosol population in the accumulation mode, and consequently the higher optical depths in the southern locations, could be due to the transport of aerosol from the polluted north Indian regions via the oceanic region over the Bay of Bengal, where significant particle growth is expected, increasing the population of accumulation mode aerosols over these regions.

  10. Characteristics of aerosol pollution during heavy haze events in Suzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Extremely severe haze weather events occurred in many cities in China, especially in the east part of the country, in January 2013. Comprehensive measurements including hourly concentrations of PM2.5 and its major chemical components (water-soluble inorganic ions, organic carbon (OC, and elemental carbon (EC and related gas-phase precursors were conducted via an online monitoring system in Suzhou, a medium-sized city in Jiangsu province, just east of Shanghai. PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 µm or less frequently exceeded 150 µg m−3 on hazy days, with the maximum reaching 324 µg m−3 on 14 January 2013. Unfavorable weather conditions (high relative humidity (RH, and low rainfall, wind speed, and atmospheric pressure were conducive to haze formation. High concentrations of secondary aerosol species (including SO42−, NO3−, NH4+, and SOC and gaseous precursors were observed during the first two haze events, while elevated primary carbonaceous species emissions were found during the third haze period, pointing to different haze formation mechanisms. Organic matter (OM, (NH42SO4, and NH4NO3 were found to be the major contributors to visibility impairment. High concentrations of sulfate and nitrate might be explained by homogeneous gas-phase reactions under low RH conditions and by heterogeneous processes under relatively high RH conditions. Analysis of air mass trajectory clustering and potential source contribution function showed that aerosol pollution in the studied areas was mainly caused by local activities and surrounding sources transported from nearby cities.

  11. Near Real Time Vertical Profiles of Clouds and Aerosols from the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorks, J. E.; McGill, M. J.; Nowottnick, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    Plumes from hazardous events, such as ash from volcanic eruptions and smoke from wildfires, can have a profound impact on the climate system, human health and the economy. Global aerosol transport models are very useful for tracking hazardous plumes and predicting the transport of these plumes. However aerosol vertical distributions and optical properties are a major weakness of global aerosol transport models, yet a key component of tracking and forecasting smoke and ash. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is an elastic backscatter lidar designed to provide vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols while also demonstrating new in-space technologies for future Earth Science missions. CATS has been operating on the Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS) since early February 2015. The ISS orbit provides more comprehensive coverage of the tropics and mid-latitudes than sun-synchronous orbiting sensors, with nearly a three-day repeat cycle. The ISS orbit also provides CATS with excellent coverage over the primary aerosol transport tracks, mid-latitude storm tracks, and tropical convection. Data from CATS is used to derive properties of clouds and aerosols including: layer height, layer thickness, backscatter, optical depth, extinction, and depolarization-based discrimination of particle type. The measurements of atmospheric clouds and aerosols provided by the CATS payload have demonstrated several science benefits. CATS provides near-real-time observations of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions that can be used as inputs to global models. The infrastructure of the ISS allows CATS data to be captured, transmitted, and received at the CATS ground station within several minutes of data collection. The CATS backscatter and vertical feature mask are part of a customized near real time (NRT) product that the CATS processing team produces within 6 hours of collection. The continuous near real time CATS data

  12. Aerosol light absorption in the North Atlantic: trends and seasonal characteristics during the period 1989 to 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Junker

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol light attenuation on quartz fibre filters has been measured since February 1989 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research station near Carna, Co. Galway, Ireland, using an Aethalometer. The frequency of occurrence of the hourly averaged aerosol absorption data is found to be bimodally distributed. The two modes result from clean marine air and anthropogenically polluted continental air both being advected to the station dependent on the prevailing wind direction. The hourly averages of the marine portion of the aerosol light absorption are found to follow closely a lognormal distribution with a geometric mean of 0.310 Mm-1. The hourly averages of continental sector aerosol absorption are neither normally nor lognormally distributed and have an arithmetic mean of 6.36 Mm-1, indicating the presence of anthropogenic sources for BC east of the Mace Head station. The time series of the monthly averaged attenuation coefficient σatt of both marine and continental sector aerosol shows an increase from 1989 to 1997 and a levelling off thereafter. The monthly maximum of marine sector σatt is found in May. Trend and seasonal characteristics of the clean marine aerosol attenuation coefficients observed at Mace Head appear to be driven by meteorological factors, as indicated by rainfall data and by trends in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO indices. The observed increasing trends of the continental sector σatt from 1989 up to 1997 are possibly related to changes in BC emissions over Ireland, calculated from UNSTAT (2002 fuel consumption data.

  13. A global modeling study on carbonaceous aerosol microphysical characteristics and radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bauer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects.

    Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is −0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between −0.32 to −0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  14. A Global Modeling Study on Carbonaceous Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics and Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. E.; Menon, S.; Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Tsigaridis, K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, indirect and semi-direct aerosol effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and the way that mixed, aged aerosols interact with clouds and radiation. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the GISS climate model is used in this study to present a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative effects. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative flux change between 1750 and 2000 is -0.56 W/m2. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are quite sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative flux change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m2 depending on these carbonaceous particle properties at emission. Taking into account internally mixed black carbon particles let us simulate correct aerosol absorption. Absorption of black carbon aerosols is amplified by sulfate and nitrate coatings and, even more strongly, by organic coatings. Black carbon mitigation scenarios generally showed reduced radiative fluxeswhen sources with a large proportion of black carbon, such as diesel, are reduced; however reducing sources with a larger organic carbon component as well, such as bio-fuels, does not necessarily lead to a reduction in positive radiative flux.

  15. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS): A New Lidar for Aerosol and Cloud Profiling from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; McGill, Mathew J.; Yorks. John E.; Hlavka, Dennis L.; Hart, William D.; Palm, Stephen P.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Spaceborne lidar profiling of aerosol and cloud layers has been successfully implemented during a number of prior missions, including LITE, ICESat, and CALIPSO. Each successive mission has added increased capability and further expanded the role of these unique measurements in wide variety of applications ranging from climate, to air quality, to special event monitoring (ie, volcanic plumes). Many researchers have come to rely on the availability of profile data from CALIPSO, especially data coincident with measurements from other A-Train sensors. The CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO continues to operate well as it enters its fifth year of operations. However, active instruments have more limited lifetimes than their passive counterparts, and we are faced with a potential gap in lidar profiling from space if the CALIOP lidar fails before a new mission is operational. The ATLID lidar on EarthCARE is not expected to launch until 2015 or later, and the lidar component of NASA's proposed Aerosols, Clouds, and Ecosystems (ACE) mission would not be until after 2020. Here we present a new aerosol and cloud lidar that was recently selected to provide profiling data from the International Space Station (ISS) starting in 2013. The Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is a three wavelength (1064,532,355 nm) elastic backscatter lidar with HSRL capability at 532 nm. Depolarization measurements will be made at all wavelengths. The primary objective of CATS is to continue the CALIPSO aerosol and cloud profile data record, ideally with overlap between both missions and EarthCARE. In addition, the near real time (NRT) data capability ofthe ISS will enable CATS to support operational applications such as aerosol and air quality forecasting and special event monitoring. The HSRL channel will provide a demonstration of technology and a data testbed for direct extinction retrievals in support of ACE mission development. An overview of the instrument and mission will be provided, along with a

  16. Characteristics of Aerosol Types in Beijing and the Associations with Air Pollution from 2004 to 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development of the economy and expansion, a large number of people have concentrated in Beijing over the past few decades, leading to the result that Beijing has become home to one of the most complex mixtures of aerosol types in the world. The various aerosol types play different roles in the determination of global climate change, visibility, and human health. However, to the best of our knowledge, research has rarely analyzed the correlation between aerosol types and air quality index (AQI in Beijing (urban and suburban over a long-term series of observations. Therefore, in this study, we aim to identify and discuss the different aerosol types and AQI in Beijing from 2004 to 2015. The aerosol types are classified into six categories: dust, mixed, highly-absorbing, moderately-absorbing, slightly-absorbing, and scattering by a multiple clustering method with the fine mode fraction (FMF and single scattering albedo (SSA data of retrievals from the global Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET sun photometer sites. The AQI levels: are good (0–50; moderate (51–100; unhealthy for sensitive groups (101–150; unhealthy (151–200; very unhealthy (201–300; and hazardous (>300. The results show that a significant FMF variability occurred among different seasons in Beijing, with maximum values present in spring and minimum values in winter. The SSA values exhibit variation, with small fluctuations from season to season. In the case of BJ station, the scattering aerosols are more frequent in summer (39% and less in winter (1%, while the coarse particles (dust are more frequent in spring (18% and less in autumn (6%. In contrast, the absorbing aerosols (especially slightly-absorbing are more frequent in summer (35% and winter (15%. However, the mixed aerosol types are more frequent in spring (38% and less in summer (8%. There is a similar seasonal variation in XH. In the past 12 years, the slightly-absorbing aerosol type in Beijing has

  17. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Over the Land from the Earth Observing System MODIS Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Yoram; Tanre, Didier; Remer, Lorraine; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    On Dec 18, 1999, NASA launched the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra mission, in a spectacular launch. The mission will provide morning (10:30 AM) global observations of aerosol and other related parameters. It will be followed a year later by a MODIS instrument on EOS Aqua for afternoon observations (1:30 PM). MODIS will measure aerosol over land and ocean with its eight 500 m and 250 m channels in the solar spectrum (0-41 to 2.2 micrometers). Over the land MODIS will measure the total column aerosol loading, and distinguish between submicron pollution particles and large soil particles. Standard daily products of resolution of ten kilometers and global mapped eight day and monthly products on a 1x1 degree global scale will be produced routinely and make available for no or small reproduction charge to the international community. Though the aerosol products will not be available everywhere over the land, it is expected that they will be useful for assessments of the presence, sources and transport of urban pollution, biomass burning aerosol, and desert dust. Other measurements from MODIS will supplement the aerosol information, e.g., land use change, urbanization, presence and magnitude of biomass burning fires, and effect of aerosol on cloud microphysics. Other instruments on Terra, e.g. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES), will also measure aerosol, its properties and radiative forcing in tandem with the MODIS measurements. During the Aqua period, there are plans to launch in 2003 the Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO) mission for global measurements of the aerosol vertical structure, and the PARASOL mission for aerosol characterization. Aqua-MODIS, PICASSO and PARASOL will fly in formation for detailed simultaneous characterization of the aerosol three-dimensional field, which

  18. Study of Radiative Forcing of Dust Aerosols and its impact on Climate Characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Fawwad H

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of following project is to study the effect of dust aerosols on the radiative forcing which is directly related to the surface temperature. A single column radiative convective model is used for simulation purpose. A series of simulations have been performed by varying the amount of dust aerosols present in the atmosphere to study the trends in ground temperature, heating rate and radiative forcing for both its longwave and shortwave components. A case study for dust storm is also performed as dust storms are common in Arabian Peninsula. A sensitivity analyses is also performed to study the relationship of surface temperature minimum and maximum against aerosol concentration, single scattering albedo and asymmetry factor. These analyses are performed to get more insight into the role of dust aerosols on radiative forcing.

  19. Characteristics of natural - and brush fire atmospheric aerosols of the Amazon basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaxo Netto, P.E.; Orsini, C.M.Q.; Tabacniks, M.H.; Boueres, L.C.S.; Leslie, A.

    1981-08-01

    The experiments described concern the air particulate matter component of the 'Projeto Queimadas'. (Brushfire Project) Samplings have been done in the North (natural aerosols) and southwest (brushfire aerosols) of the city of Manaus. Collected samples have been analyzed by the PIXE and PESA methods. The principal results are: in general, the C, N and O constitute virtually the substract container of the air particulates, both for the natural and brushfire aerosols, since they participate with about 80% and 99%, respectively, of their total masses, in a way that are always highly correlated to all the other trace-elements of the particulates; the total concentration of the natural aerosol of the Amazon Basin was found to be under 10 μg/m 3 ; the mass-size distributions curves which were found fit quite well the picture of the biophysical processes involved in the life of the tropical rain forest of the Amazon Basin, and particularly significant is the close correlation abserved between the fine modes of the distribution curves of S and K for both remote and burning aerosols. Statistical and enrichment factor analysis have also been done, aiming to reach conclusion about the relations between the sources and aerosols investigated. (Author) [pt

  20. Compact and portable system for evaluation of individual exposure at aerosol particle in urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Zaiacomo, T.

    1995-01-01

    A compact and portable system for real-time acquisition of aerosol concentration data in urban and extra-urban area is presented. It is based on two optical type aerosol monitors integrated by aerosol particle separating and collecting devices, assembled into a carrying case together with temperature and relative humidity sensors and a programmable analog data logger; data output is addressed to a dedicated printer or personal computer. Further data about particle size, morphological aspect and particle mass concentration are obtainable by weighing supports used to concurrently collect aerosol particles and/or by means of microanalytical techniques. System performances are evaluated from the point of view of portability, possibility of use as stationary sampler for long-term monitoring purposes and coherence between optical response and ponderal mass. Some tests are finally carried out, to investigate the effect of relative humidity on the optical response of this type of instruments

  1. Stratospheric Aerosol Effects from Soufriere Volcano as Measured by the SAGE Satellite System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M P; Kent, G S; Yue, G K; Cunnold, D M

    1982-06-04

    During its April 1979 eruption series, Soufriere Volcano produced two major stratospheric plumes that the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) satellite system tracked to West Africa and the North Atlantic Ocean. The total mass of these plumes, whose movement and dispersion are in agreement with those deduced from meteorological data and dispersion theory, was less than 0.5 percent of the global stratospheric aerosol burden; no significant temperature or climate perturbation is therefore expected.

  2. Stratospheric aerosol effects from Soufriere Volcano as measured by the SAGE satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccormick, M. P.; Kent, G. S.; Yue, G. K.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    During its April 1979 eruption series, Soufriere Volcano produced two major stratospheric plumes that the SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment) satellite system tracked to West Africa and the North Atlantic Ocean. The total mass of these plumes, whose movement and dispersion are in agreement with those deduced from meteorological data and dispersion theory, was less than 0.5 percent of the global stratospheric aerosol burden; no significant temperature or climate perturbation is therefore expected.

  3. Characteristics and composition of atmospheric aerosols in Phimai, central Thailand during BASE-ASIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Can; Tsay, Si-Chee; Hsu, N. Christina; Kim, Jin Young; Howell, Steven G.; Huebert, Barry J.; Ji, Qiang; Jeong, Myeong-Jae; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Hansell, Richard A.; Bell, Shaun W.

    2013-10-01

    Comprehensive measurements of atmospheric aerosols were made in Phimai, central Thailand (15.183°N, 102.565°E, elevation: 206 m) during the BASE-ASIA field experiment from late February to early May in 2006. The observed aerosol loading was sizable for this rural site (mean aerosol scattering: 108 ± 64 Mm-1; absorption: 15 ± 8 Mm-1; PM10 concentration: 33 ± 17 μg m-3), and dominated by submicron particles. Major aerosol compounds included carbonaceous (OC: 9.5 ± 3.6 μg m-3; EC: 2.0 ± 2.3 μg m-3) and secondary species (SO42-: 6.4 ± 3.7 μg m-3, NH4+: 2.2 ± 1.3 μg m-3). While the site was seldom under the direct influence of large forest fires to its north, agricultural fires were ubiquitous during the experiment, as suggested by the substantial concentration of K+ (0.56 ± 0.33 μg m-3). Besides biomass burning, aerosols in Phimai during the experiment were also strongly influenced by industrial and vehicular emissions from the Bangkok metropolitan region and long-range transport from southern China. High humidity played an important role in determining the aerosol composition and properties in the region. Sulfate was primarily formed via aqueous phase reactions, and hygroscopic growth could enhance the aerosol light scattering by up to 60%, at the typical morning RH level of 85%. The aerosol single scattering albedo demonstrated distinct diurnal variation, ranging from 0.86 ± 0.04 in the evening to 0.92 ± 0.02 in the morning. This experiment marks the first time such comprehensive characterization of aerosols was made for rural central Thailand. Our results indicate that aerosol pollution has developed into a regional problem for northern Indochina, and may become more severe as the region's population and economy continue to grow.

  4. Characteristics of aerosol light scattering and absorption properties observed at Gosan, Korea, during GOPOEX 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C.; Kim, S. W.; Sheridan, P. J.; Gustafsson, O.; Lee, M.; Yoon, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropogenic fine pollution and wind-blown mineral dust aerosols have a significant effect on the regional radiation budget by scattering or absorbing the solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. We investigate the optical and physical properties of dust and pollution aerosols at Gosan Climate Observatory (GCO), Korea during Gosan Pollution Experiment 2014 (GOPOEX 2014; January 2014).Mean values of aerosol scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient during GOPOEX 2014 were 72 ± 86 Mm-1 and 6 ± 5 Mm-1 at 550 nm, respectively. Aerosol scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient during dust episodes were 245 ± 171 Mm-1 and 22 ± 13 Mm-1 at 550 nm, which were approximately 3.5 times greater than mean values during GOPOEX 2014. Values for scattering and absorption coefficient of pollution episodes were recorded as 153 ± 95 Mm-1 and 12 ± 7 Mm-1 at 550 nm. Therefore, single scattering albedo of pollution episodes (0.92 ± 0.02) was slightly higher than those of dust episodes (0.90 ± 0.03). This is because that pollutant aerosols include more scattering fraction such as SO42-, and NO3- in fine particulate matter emitted from industrial areas in the eastern coastal region of China while dust aerosols are transported from North China to Gosan.Aerosol optical properties are influenced by where the air mass is transported from, either South China or North China. The mean values of aerosol scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient when air mass was transported from South China were 136 ± 132 Mm-1 and 15 ± 14 Mm-1 at 550 nm whereas those from North China were 108 ± 112 Mm-1 and 8 ± 7 Mm-1 at 550 nm. Single scattering albedo are almost identical as 0.9 ± 0.03 for both air masses.Carbonaceous composition of aerosols, which occupy a considerable fraction of fine particulate matter, also depends on the origin of the air mass. Radiocarbon (14C) is a good indicator for distinguishing between fossil combustion and biomass combustion. Detailed source

  5. Chemical characteristics of submicron particles at the central Tibetan Plateau: insights from aerosol mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed a significant influx of anthropogenic aerosol from South Asia to the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (TP during pre-monsoon period. In order to characterize the chemical composition, sources, and transport processes of aerosol in this area, we carried out a field study during June 2015 by deploying a suite of online instruments including an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP at Nam Co station (90°57′ E, 30°46′ N; 4730 m a.s.l. at the central of the TP. The measurements were made at a period when the transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon occurred. The average ambient mass concentration of submicron particulate matter (PM1 over the whole campaign was  ∼  2.0 µg m−3, with organics accounting for 68 %, followed by sulfate (15 %, black carbon (8 %, ammonium (7 %, and nitrate (2 %. Relatively higher aerosol mass concentration episodes were observed during the pre-monsoon period, whereas persistently low aerosol concentrations were observed during the monsoon period. However, the chemical composition of aerosol during the higher aerosol concentration episodes in the pre-monsoon season was on a case-by-case basis, depending on the prevailing meteorological conditions and air mass transport routes. Most of the chemical species exhibited significant diurnal variations with higher values occurring during afternoon and lower values during early morning, whereas nitrate peaked during early morning in association with higher relative humidity and lower air temperature. Organic aerosol (OA, with an oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O ∕ C of 0.94, was more oxidized during the pre-monsoon period than during monsoon (average O ∕ C ratio of 0.72, and an average O ∕ C was 0.88 over the entire campaign period, suggesting overall highly oxygenated aerosol in the central TP. Positive matrix factorization of the

  6. Chemical characteristics of submicron particles at the central Tibetan Plateau: insights from aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qi; Shi, Jinsen; Ge, Xinlei; Xie, Conghui; Wang, Junfeng; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Ruixiong; Wang, Yuhang

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a significant influx of anthropogenic aerosol from South Asia to the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (TP) during pre-monsoon period. In order to characterize the chemical composition, sources, and transport processes of aerosol in this area, we carried out a field study during June 2015 by deploying a suite of online instruments including an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) and a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) at Nam Co station (90°57' E, 30°46' N; 4730 m a.s.l.) at the central of the TP. The measurements were made at a period when the transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon occurred. The average ambient mass concentration of submicron particulate matter (PM1) over the whole campaign was ˜ 2.0 µg m-3, with organics accounting for 68 %, followed by sulfate (15 %), black carbon (8 %), ammonium (7 %), and nitrate (2 %). Relatively higher aerosol mass concentration episodes were observed during the pre-monsoon period, whereas persistently low aerosol concentrations were observed during the monsoon period. However, the chemical composition of aerosol during the higher aerosol concentration episodes in the pre-monsoon season was on a case-by-case basis, depending on the prevailing meteorological conditions and air mass transport routes. Most of the chemical species exhibited significant diurnal variations with higher values occurring during afternoon and lower values during early morning, whereas nitrate peaked during early morning in association with higher relative humidity and lower air temperature. Organic aerosol (OA), with an oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O / C) of 0.94, was more oxidized during the pre-monsoon period than during monsoon (average O / C ratio of 0.72), and an average O / C was 0.88 over the entire campaign period, suggesting overall highly oxygenated aerosol in the central TP. Positive matrix factorization of the high-resolution mass spectra of OA identified two oxygenated

  7. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevzorov Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E. The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  8. Measuring the characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer and total ozone concentration at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5 °N, 85.0 °E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of TOMS satellite data for the period 1979- 1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk after a series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, researchers record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  9. Certain Results of Measurements of Characteristics of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer and Total Ozone Content at Siberian Lidar Station in Tomsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevzorov, Aleksey; Bazhenov, Oleg; Burlakov, Vladimir; Dolgii, Sergey

    2016-06-01

    We consider the results of long-term remote optical monitoring, obtained at the Siberian Lidar Station of Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences in Tomsk (56.5°N, 85.0°E). The scattering characteristics of stratospheric aerosol layer, obtained according to data of lidar measurements since 1986, are presented. We analyze the trends of changes in the total ozone (TO) content over Tomsk for the period 1996-2013 according to data of spectrophotometric measurements with employment of Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data for the period 1979-1994. We determined the periods of elevated content of stratospheric aerosol over Tomsk aftera series of explosive eruptions of volcanoes of Pacific Ring of Fire and Iceland in 2006-2011. Since the second half of 1990s, we record an increasing TO trend, equaling 0.65 DU/yr for the period 1996-2013.

  10. Chemical and physical characteristics of aerosol particles at a remote coastal location, Mace Head, Ireland, during NAMBLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Coe

    2006-01-01

    characteristics to western Europe. During NAMBLEX the submicron aerosol was predominately acidified sulphate and organic material, which was most likely internally mixed. The remaining accumulation mode aerosol was sea salt. The organic and sulphate fractions were approximately equally important, though the mass ratio varies considerably between air masses. Mass spectral fingerprints of the organic fraction in polluted conditions are similar to those observed at other locations that are characterised by aged continental aerosol. In marine conditions, the background input of both sulphate and organic aerosol into Europe was observed to be between 0.5 and 1 µg m−3. Key differences in the mass spectra were observed during the few clean periods but were insufficient to ascertain whether these changes reflect differences in the source fingerprint of the organic aerosol. The coarse mode was composed of sea salt and showed significant displacement of chloride by nitrate and to a lesser extent sulphate in polluted conditions.

  11. A combined DMPS/LAS system for the characterisation of environmental aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebhart, J.; Brand, P.

    1993-01-01

    A mobile measuring station is described. It is based on the principle of particle counting and serves to determine the concentration count and the size distribution count of aerosol particles in the range between 10 nm and 3 μm. Several commercial measuring instruments are combined: a differential electrical mobility particle spectrometer (DMPS) consisting of a differential electric mobility analyser (DMA) and a condensation nucleus counter (CNC) which records particle sizes between 10 nm and about 0.2 μm; a laser-aerosol spectrometer (LAS-X) which measures particles with diameters between 0.09 μm and 3 μm. The use of the measuring system is demonstrated with poly dispersed aerosols from nozzle atomizers and with field tests of urban and maritime aerosols. (orig.) [de

  12. Chemical characteristics of organic aerosols in Algiers city area: influence of a fat manufacture plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Meklati, Brahim Youcef; Cecinato, Angelo

    Total concentrations and homologue distributions of organic fraction constituents have been determined in particulate matter emitted from different units of a fat manufacturer (i.e. oils refining and conditioning plants, and production and conditioning units of a soap industry) located in Algiers area, as well as in atmospheric aerosols. In particular n-alkanes, n-alkanoic and n-alkenoic acids, n-alkan-2-ones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated. Organic aerosol contents varied broadly among the plant units, depending upon nature of the manufactured products. The percent composition of all classes of compounds investigated in ambient atmosphere was similar to those observed indoor at industrial plant units. Organic acids, n-alkanoic as well as n-alkenoic, appeared by far the most abundant organic constituents of aerosols, both indoor and outdoor, ranging from 7.7 to 19.8 and from 12.7 to 17.1 μg m -3, respectively. The huge occurrence of acids and n-alkanes in ambient aerosols was consistent with their high levels present in oil and fat materials. Among minor components of aerosols, n-alkan-2-ones and PAH, seemed to be related to thermally induced ageing and direct combustion of raw organic material used for oil and soap production.

  13. Improving our fundamental understanding of the role of aerosol-cloud interactions in the climate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinfeld, John H; Bretherton, Christopher; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Coe, Hugh; DeMott, Paul J; Dunlea, Edward J; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Guenther, Alex B; Kahn, Ralph; Kraucunas, Ian; Kreidenweis, Sonia M; Molina, Mario J; Nenes, Athanasios; Penner, Joyce E; Prather, Kimberly A; Ramanathan, V; Ramaswamy, Venkatachalam; Rasch, Philip J; Ravishankara, A R; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Stephens, Graeme; Wood, Robert

    2016-05-24

    The effect of an increase in atmospheric aerosol concentrations on the distribution and radiative properties of Earth's clouds is the most uncertain component of the overall global radiative forcing from preindustrial time. General circulation models (GCMs) are the tool for predicting future climate, but the treatment of aerosols, clouds, and aerosol-cloud radiative effects carries large uncertainties that directly affect GCM predictions, such as climate sensitivity. Predictions are hampered by the large range of scales of interaction between various components that need to be captured. Observation systems (remote sensing, in situ) are increasingly being used to constrain predictions, but significant challenges exist, to some extent because of the large range of scales and the fact that the various measuring systems tend to address different scales. Fine-scale models represent clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interactions with high fidelity but do not include interactions with the larger scale and are therefore limited from a climatic point of view. We suggest strategies for improving estimates of aerosol-cloud relationships in climate models, for new remote sensing and in situ measurements, and for quantifying and reducing model uncertainty.

  14. Improving Our Fundamental Understanding of the Role of Aerosol Cloud Interactions in the Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seinfeld, John H.; Bretherton, Christopher; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Coe, Hugh; DeMott, Paul J.; Dunlea, Edward J.; Feingold, Graham; Ghan, Steven; Guenther, Alex B.; Kahn, Ralph; hide

    2016-01-01

    The effect of an increase in atmospheric aerosol concentrations on the distribution and radiative properties of Earth's clouds is the most uncertain component of the overall global radiative forcing from preindustrial time. General circulation models (GCMs) are the tool for predicting future climate, but the treatment of aerosols, clouds, and aerosol-cloud radiative effects carries large uncertainties that directly affect GCM predictions, such as climate sensitivity. Predictions are hampered by the large range of scales of interaction between various components that need to be captured. Observation systems (remote sensing, in situ) are increasingly being used to constrain predictions, but significant challenges exist, to some extent because of the large range of scales and the fact that the various measuring systems tend to address different scales. Fine-scale models represent clouds, aerosols, and aerosol-cloud interactions with high fidelity but do not include interactions with the larger scale and are therefore limited from a climatic point of view. We suggest strategies for improving estimates of aerosol-cloud relationships in climate models, for new remote sensing and in situ measurements, and for quantifying and reducing model uncertainty.

  15. Sampling port for real time analysis of bioaerosol in whole body exposure system for animal aerosol model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W.; Chen, Ching-ju; Seay, Sarah A.; Click, Eva M.; Lee, Sunhee; Hartings, Justin M.; Frothingham, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Multiple factors influence the viability of aerosolized bacteria. The delivery of aerosols is affected by chamber conditions (humidity, temperature, and pressure) and bioaerosol characteristics (particle number, particle size distribution, and viable aerosol concentration). Measurement of viable aerosol concentration and particle size is essential to optimize viability and lung delivery. The Madison chamber is widely used to expose small animals to infectious aerosols. Methods A multiplex sampling port was added to the Madison chamber to measure the chamber conditions and bioaerosol characteristics. Aerosols of three pathogens (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) were generated under constant conditions and their bioaerosol characteristics were analyzed. Airborne microbes were captured using an impinger or BioSampler. The particle size distribution of airborne microbes was determined using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Viable aerosol concentration, spray factor (viable aerosol concentration/inoculum concentration), and dose presented to the mouse were calculated. Dose retention efficiency and viable aerosol retention rate were calculated from the sampler titers to determine the efficiency of microbe retention in lungs of mice. Results B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and M. tuberculosis aerosols were sampled through the port. The count mean aerodynamic sizes were 0.98, 0.77, and 0.78 μm with geometric standard deviations of 1.60, 1.90, and 2.37, and viable aerosol concentrations in the chamber were 211, 57, and 1 colony-forming unit (CFU)/mL, respectively. Based on the aerosol concentrations, the doses presented to mice for the three pathogens were 2.5e5, 2.2e4 and 464 CFU. Discussion Using the multiplex sampling port we determined whether the animals were challenged with an optimum bioaerosol based on dose presented and respirable particle size. PMID:20849964

  16. Sampling port for real-time analysis of bioaerosol in whole body exposure system for animal aerosol model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Divey; Hopkins, Gregory W; Chen, Ching-Ju; Seay, Sarah A; Click, Eva M; Lee, Sunhee; Hartings, Justin M; Frothingham, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Multiple factors influence the viability of aerosolized bacteria. The delivery of aerosols is affected by chamber conditions (humidity, temperature, and pressure) and bioaerosol characteristics (particle number, particle size distribution, and viable aerosol concentration). Measurement of viable aerosol concentration and particle size is essential to optimize viability and lung delivery. The Madison chamber is widely used to expose small animals to infectious aerosols. A multiplex sampling port was added to the Madison chamber to measure the chamber conditions and bioaerosol characteristics. Aerosols of three pathogens (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis) were generated under constant conditions and their bioaerosol characteristics were analyzed. Airborne microbes were captured using an impinger or BioSampler. The particle size distribution of airborne microbes was determined using an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS). Viable aerosol concentration, spray factor (viable aerosol concentration/inoculum concentration), and dose presented to the mouse were calculated. Dose retention efficiency and viable aerosol retention rate were calculated from the sampler titers to determine the efficiency of microbe retention in lungs of mice. B. anthracis, Y. pestis, and M. tuberculosis aerosols were sampled through the port. The count mean aerodynamic sizes were 0.98, 0.77, and 0.78 μm with geometric standard deviations of 1.60, 1.90, and 2.37, and viable aerosol concentrations in the chamber were 211, 57, and 1 colony-forming unit (CFU)/mL, respectively. Based on the aerosol concentrations, the doses presented to mice for the three pathogens were 2.5e5, 2.2e4 and 464 CFU. Using the multiplex sampling port we determined whether the animals were challenged with an optimum bioaerosol based on dose presented and respirable particle size. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a 10 Hz measurement system for atmospheric aerosol concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouarouri, Assia

    2014-01-01

    The goal is to develop an aerosol charger based on a corona discharge for atmospheric concentration measurements (10 3 -10 5 cm -3 ) within a response time of 100 ms. Two ion sources, point-to-hole and wire-to-slit have been characterized. The increase of the ion flow in the post-discharge by EHD ion confinement in both the discharge gap and the hole has been shown. At first, using an experimental survey driven in two mixing configurations, concentric and face-to-face, we have confirmed the aerosol diffusion charging law which depends on aerosol diameter and N i .t product, with N i , the ions concentration and t, the charging time. Thus, the originality of this charger relies on the very high heterogeneity of unipolar ion densities (N i 0 ≥10 9 cm -3 ) required to compensate the charging time of 50 ms. In these conditions, we have shown that aerosol diameter and the charging dynamic (which depends also on the diameter) control the aerosol trajectory. The chargers have, next, been compared in different operating conditions, mainly in terms of the maximal charging and the minimal losses. In the chosen charger (point-to-hole ion source and concentric mixing), the relations charge/mobility and losses according to diameter have been characterized. We have also shown the linearity of the charged particles current with the aerosol concentration which allows the current-concentration data inversion. The preliminary measurement system composed by the charger, the separator and the particle current measurements, satisfies the objectives of the study in terms of the concentration detection limit (10 3 cm -3 ) and the response time (100 ms). We have thus shown the feasibility of an atmospheric aerosol concentration measurement system at 10 Hz using a corona discharge charger provided that the separation power is improved. Furthermore, knowing that aerosol losses are negligible and the lower limit of the partial charging, the developed charger is adaptable with other

  18. Characteristics of solid aerosols produced by optical catapulting studied by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Optical catapulting (OC) constitutes an effective method to transport small amounts of different materials in the form of a solid aerosol. In this report, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for the analysis of those aerosols produced by OC. For this purpose, materials were catapulted using a Q-switch Nd:YAG laser. A second Q-switch Nd:YAG laser was used for LIBS analysis of the ejected particles. Data processing of aerosols was conducted using conditional data analysis. Also, the standard deviation method was used for the qualitative identification of the ejected particles. Two modes of interaction in OC (OC with focused or defocused pulses) have been evaluated and discussed. LIBS demonstrates that the distribution (spreading) of the ejected particles along the propagation axis increased as a function of the interpulse delay time. The mass density and the thickness of the target also play an important role in OC-LIBS.

  19. Sources and characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol in two largest cities in Pearl River Delta Region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jingchun; Tan, Jihua; Cheng, Dingxi; Bi, Xinhui; Deng, Wenjing; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo; Wong, M. H.

    PM 2.5 samples were collected at five sites in Guangzhou and Hong Kong, Pearl River Delta Region (PRDR), China in both summer and winter during 2004-2005. Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) in these samples were measured. The OC and EC concentrations ranked in the order of urban Guangzhou > urban Hong Kong > background Hong Kong. Total carbonaceous aerosol (TCA) contributed less to PM 2.5 in urban Guangzhou (32-35%) than that in urban Hong Kong (43-57%). The reason may be that, as an major industrial city in South China, Guangzhou would receive large amount of inorganic aerosol from all kinds of industries, however, as a trade center and seaport, urban Hong Kong would mainly receive organic aerosol and EC from container vessels and heavy-duty diesel trucks. At Hong Kong background site Hok Tsui, relatively lower contribution of TCA to PM 2.5 may result from contributions of marine inorganic aerosol and inland China pollutant. Strong correlation ( R2=0.76-0.83) between OC and EC indicates minor fluctuation of emission and the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in urban Guangzhou. Weak correlation between OC and EC in Hong Kong can be related to the impact of the long-range transported aerosol from inland China. Averagely, secondary OC (SOC) concentrations were 3.8-5.9 and 10.2-12.8 μg m -3, respectively, accounting for 21-32% and 36-42% of OC in summer and winter in Guangzhou. The average values of 4.2-6.8% for SOA/ PM 2.5 indicate that SOA was minor component in PM 2.5 in Guangzhou.

  20. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol–cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500, lower-tropospheric stability (LTS and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs, with a focus on liquid water path (LWP response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascent (ω500  <  −25 hPa day−1 and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is close to that in subsidence regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascent are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm day−1 contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %. Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes compared to the uncertainty in its global mean values, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.

  1. Culture-independent analysis of aerosol microbiology in a metropolitan subway system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles E; Baumgartner, Laura K; Harris, J Kirk; Peterson, Kristen L; Stevens, Mark J; Frank, Daniel N; Pace, Norman R

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the composition and diversity of microorganisms associated with bioaerosols in a heavily trafficked metropolitan subway environment. We collected bioaerosols by fluid impingement on several New York City subway platforms and associated sites in three sampling sessions over a 1.5-year period. The types and quantities of aerosolized microorganisms were determined by culture-independent phylogenetic analysis of small-subunit rRNA gene sequences by using both Sanger (universal) and pyrosequencing (bacterial) technologies. Overall, the subway bacterial composition was relatively simple; only 26 taxonomic families made up ~75% of the sequences determined. The microbiology was more or less similar throughout the system and with time and was most similar to outdoor air, consistent with highly efficient air mixing in the system. Identifiable bacterial sequences indicated that the subway aerosol assemblage was composed of a mixture of genera and species characteristic of soil, environmental water, and human skin commensal bacteria. Eukaryotic diversity was mainly fungal, dominated by organisms of types associated with wood rot. Human skin bacterial species (at 99% rRNA sequence identity) included the Staphylococcus spp. Staphylococcus epidermidis (the most abundant and prevalent commensal of the human integument), S. hominis, S. cohnii, S. caprae, and S. haemolyticus, all well-documented human commensal bacteria. We encountered no organisms of public health concern. This study is the most extensive culture-independent survey of subway microbiota so far and puts in place pre-event information required for any bioterrorism surveillance activities or monitoring of the microbiological impact of recent subway flooding events.

  2. Physicochemical Characteristics of Individual Aerosol Particles during the 2015 China Victory Day Parade in Beijing

    OpenAIRE

    Wenhua Wang; Longyi Shao; Jiaoping Xing; Jie Li; Lingli Chang; Wenjun Li

    2018-01-01

    During the 2015 China Victory Day parade control periods, the air quality in Beijing hit the best record, leading to 15 continuous good days with an average PM2.5 mass concentration 18 μg/m3, which provided a unique opportunity to study the ambient aerosols in megacity Beijing. The morphology and elemental composition of aerosol particles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (TEM-EDX). Five types of individual particles were i...

  3. Global indirect aerosol effects: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lohmann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the climate system by changing cloud characteristics in many ways. They act as cloud condensation and ice nuclei, they may inhibit freezing and they could have an influence on the hydrological cycle. While the cloud albedo enhancement (Twomey effect of warm clouds received most attention so far and traditionally is the only indirect aerosol forcing considered in transient climate simulations, here we discuss the multitude of effects. Different approaches how the climatic implications of these aerosol effects can be estimated globally as well as improvements that are needed in global climate models in order to better represent indirect aerosol effects are discussed in this paper.

  4. Air mass characteristics, aerosol particle number concentrations, and number size distributions at Macquarie Island during the First Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechtel, Fred J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Swan, Hilton B.

    1998-01-01

    and accumulation mode number concentrations were depleted. Evidence for possible cloud processing of aerosol was found during two Antarctic influenced periods. Variability in observed aerosol characteristics was found to coincide with changes in air mass source region as indicated by back trajectories and frontal passages.

  5. Clinical assessment of a commercial delivery system for aerosol ventilation scanning by comparison with Krypton-81m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.; Eriksson, L.; Andersson, A.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial aerosol delivery system for ventilation scanning was evaluated in 23 patients with lung disease involving regional disturbances of ventilation. Ventilation scans obtained after inhalation of an aerosol labeled with In-113m were compared with Kr-81m ventilation scans. An indirect comparison was also made with a settling bag technique. There was close agreement between the aerosol and the Kr-81m ventilation scans in all of the patients. The aerosol outlined the ventilated parts of the lung adequately, and central deposition of particles was minimal. The penetration of the aerosol into the lung was higher with the delivery system that with a settling bag system. The aerosol delivery system appears suitable for clinical pulmonary ventilation scintigraphy

  6. Aerosol characteristics in Phimai, Thailand determined by continuous observation with a polarization sensitive Mie–Raman lidar and a sky radiometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Nobuo; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nishizawa, Tomoaki; Matsui, Ichiro; Jin, Yoshitaka; Khatri, Pradeep; Irie, Hitoshi; Takamura, Tamio; Aoki, Kazuma; Thana, Boossarasiri

    2015-01-01

    Distributions and optical characteristics of aerosols were continuously observed with a polarization-sensitive (532 nm), Mie-scattering (532 and 1064 nm) and Raman-scattering (607 nm) lidar and a sky radiometer in Phimai, Thailand. Polarization lidar measurements indicated that high concentration plumes of spherical aerosols considered as biomass burning smoke were often observed in the dry season. Plumes of non-spherical aerosols considered as long-range transported soil dust from Africa, the Middle East, or Northeast Asia were occasionally observed. Furthermore, low-concentration non-spherical aerosols were almost always observed in the atmospheric mixing layer. Extinction coefficient profiles of spherical aerosols and non-spherical dust exhibited different diurnal variations, and spherical aerosols including smoke were distributed in higher altitudes in the mixing layer and residual layer. The difference can be explained by hygroscopic growth of smoke particles and buoyancy of the smoke. Analysis of seasonal variations of optical properties derived from the Raman lidar and the sky radiometer confirmed that the lidar ratio, aerosol optical depth, and Angstrom exponent were higher in the dry season (October–May) and lower in the wet season (June–September). The single scattering albedo was lower in the dry season. These seasonal variations are explained by frequent biomass burning in the dry season consistent with previous studies in Southeast Asian region. At the same time, the present work confirmed that soil dust was a major aerosol component in Phimai, Thailand. (letter)

  7. Characteristics of PM2.5 Carbonaceous Aerosol in Urban New York State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, H. A.; Dutkiewicz, V.; Briggs, R.; Siddique, A.; Regan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In order to investigate the characteristics of carbonaceous fine aerosols, PM2.5 and size-segregated particulate samples (Botanical Garden (BTG), New York City and Empire State Plaza (ESP), Albany. Gas phase organic compounds were sampled with polyurethane foam (PUF) plugs. Particulate samples were acquired on quartz fiber filters using a high-volume air sampler (Hi-Vol) attached with a slotted impactor. Filters were sonicated in dichloromethane:methanol (9:1); extracts concentrated. A suite of more than 200 individual organic compounds was identified in the PM2.5 samples. Molecular markers, homologous compound series, and non-polar and polar organic compounds were detected at ng/m3 ambient concentrations using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Measurements of the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) were also made. Organic compounds detected in the size-segregated samples were grouped into different classes including phthalates and adipates, n-alkanes, alkanoic acids, cyclic siloxanes, waxes, benzoates, polyethylene glycols, squalene, and 4-nitro-butylated phenol. Results indicated that these organic species were predominantly associated in the fine particle mode (extractable and elutable organic carbon was found to correspond to a complex mixture of phthalates and adipates, benzoate esters, n-alkanes, methyl silicates, phosphate esters, aldehydes and ketones, alcohols, alkyl amines, nitrosamines, formamides, amides, morpholines, carboxylic acids, methyl and isopropyl esters, dicarboxylic acids, waxes, lactones, hopanes, ionol 2, and PAHs. The most abundant classes of compounds are carboxylic acids, followed by phthalates and adipates, n-alkanes, and alkyl amines. At the BTG, OC and EC concentrations were measured to be 4.7 and 0.31 μg/m3, respectively, whereas at the ESP their concentrations were 4.4 and 0.43 μg/m3, respectively. Source-receptor relationships of fine carbonaceous particles were investigated by air mass back

  8. Characteristic pathological changes of main organs of rates after inhalation of depleted uranium aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Zhenshan; Zhu Maoxiang; Yang Zhihua; Pan Xiujie; Li Yuanmin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the pathological and morphometric alteration of main organs of rat after inhalation of depleted uranium (DU) aerosole in order to provide information for medical protection against DU weapons. Methods: Routine pathological technique and morphometric measurements were used to observe histopathological and morphological changes in lung, kidney, spleen, liver, brain of rats 1-14 months after inhalation of DU aerosol. Results: After inhalation of DU aerosol, lymphocytic infiltration in the pulmonary parenchyma, serious bronchitis, pulmonary hemorrhage and abscess formation were seen in some of the rats; distinct dilatation of tubules in renal cortex and papillae, casts in some tubules of the cortex, medulla and papillae, and interstitial hemorrhage were found in some other rats; diminution of the area of splenic white pulp, reduction of megakaryocytic mitosis were also observed, the incidence and severity of above changes in the lung and kidney, but not in the liver and brain, showed dependance on the length of time after inhalation or the dose of DU inhaled. Conclusion There are evident injurious effects on rat lung, kidney and spleen by inhalation of DU aerosol. (authors)

  9. Spatial-temporal characteristics of haze and vertical distribution of aerosols over the Yangtze River Delta of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yueqian; Zhang, Wu; Wang, Wenjing

    2018-04-01

    Variation of haze events occurred in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of China, the characteristics of meteorological elements and the vertical distribution of aerosols during haze episodes were analyzed by utilizing data of ground observation, radiosonde and CALIPSO. The results illustrate that the frequency of haze events between 1981 and 2010 peaked in winter but bottomed out in summer and decreased from north to south in the YRD region, reaching at the lowest point in "low frequency center" - Shanghai. When haze happened, the most seriously affected area was 2-4km above the ground and the concentrated range of total backscattering coefficient (TBC) that decreased with altitude was 0.8×10 -3 -2.5×10 -3 km -1 ·sr -1 . Particulate depolarization ratio (PDR) was less than 40% in a large part and 93% aerosols over the YRD area were regular particles, while the irregular ones concentrated on 2km above the surface and the irregularity rose up but the diversity diminished when altitude increased. Color ratio (CR) was lower than 1.2 mostly at all altitudes and distributed asymmetrically above the ground. Nearly 80% aerosols under 10km were fine particles (CR1.0) clustered at 2-4km. Large particles (CR>1.2) aggregated in lower troposphere massively yet relatively smaller ones gathered in middle and upper troposphere. In the YRD region, aerosols with more powerful capabilities were wider and less regular than the ones of Northwestern China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamiya, Koichi; Tanaka, Toru; Nitta, Shinnosuke; Itosu, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Shun; Oki, Yuichi; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Various characteristics such as size distribution, chemical component and radioactivity have been analyzed for radioactive aerosols released from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Measured results for radioactive aerosols suggest that the potential transport medium for radioactive cesium was non-sea-salt sulfate. This result indicates that cesium isotopes would preferentially attach with sulfate compounds. In the present work the attachment behavior of fission products to aqueous solution aerosols of sodium salts has been studied using a generation system of solution aerosols and spontaneous fission source of {sup 248}Cm. Attachment ratios of fission products to the solution aerosols were compared among the aerosols generated by different solutions of sodium salt. A significant difference according as a solute of solution aerosols was found in the attachment behavior. The present results suggest the existence of chemical effects in the attachment behavior of fission products to solution aerosols.

  11. Hygroscopic properties of levoglucosan and related organic compounds characteristic to biomass burning aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2004-11-01

    Biomass burning, which is characterized by pyrolysis as well as vaporization and condensation of biomass constituents, is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosols. In this study, hygroscopic properties of five organic compounds (levoglucosan, D-glucose, and vanillic, syringic, and 4-hydroxybenozoic acids), which are major pyrolysis products of wood, were measured using a tandem differential mobility analyzer. Levoglucosan, which is typically the most abundant species in wood burning aerosols, showed a significant hygroscopic growth for particles with a diameter of 100 nm. No efflorescence was observed under the measured relative humidity, and a supersaturated condition of levoglucosan-water particles was observed. The growth factors of levoglucosan are 1.08, 1.18, 1.23, and 1.38 at relative humidity (RH) of 60, 80, 85, and 90%, respectively. The measured hygroscopic curves are in general consistent with those estimated from ideal solution theory and Uniquac Functional-Group Activity Coefficient (UNIFAC) and Conductor-Like Screening Model for Real Solvent (COSMO-RS) methods. Significant hygroscopic growth was also observed for D-glucose, whose growth factor is quite similar to that of levoglucosan. However, three model pyrolysis products of lignin (i.e., vanillic-, syringic-, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids) did not show any hygroscopic growth under the RH conditions up to 95%. On the basis of the organic composition of wood burning aerosols, the water absorption attributed to levoglucosan in wood burning aerosols is calculated to be up to 30% of the organic mass at 90% RH. This study demonstrates that oxygenated organics emitted from biomass burning could significantly enhance the hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  12. Characterization of Aerosols of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Following Three Generation Methods Using an Optimized Aerosolization System Designed for Experimental Inhalation Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Pujalté

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs can be released in the air in work settings, but various factors influence the exposure of workers. Controlled inhalation experiments can thus be conducted in an attempt to reproduce real-life exposure conditions and assess inhalation toxicology. Methods exist to generate aerosols, but it remains difficult to obtain nano-sized and stable aerosols suitable for inhalation experiments. The goal of this work was to characterize aerosols of titanium dioxide (TiO2 NPs, generated using a novel inhalation system equipped with three types of generators—a wet collision jet nebulizer, a dry dust jet and an electrospray aerosolizer—with the aim of producing stable aerosols with a nano-diameter average (<100 nm and monodispersed distribution for future rodent exposures and toxicological studies. Results showed the ability of the three generation systems to provide good and stable dispersions of NPs, applicable for acute (continuous up to 8 h and repeated (21-day exposures. In all cases, the generated aerosols were composed mainly of small aggregates/agglomerates (average diameter <100 nm with the electrospray producing the finest (average diameter of 70–75 mm and least concentrated aerosols (between 0.150 and 2.5 mg/m3. The dust jet was able to produce concentrations varying from 1.5 to 150 mg/m3, and hence, the most highly concentrated aerosols. The nebulizer collision jet aerosolizer was the most versatile generator, producing both low (0.5 mg/m3 and relatively high concentrations (30 mg/m3. The three optimized generators appeared suited for possible toxicological studies of inhaled NPs.

  13. Aerosolization as novel sanitizer delivery system to reduce food-borne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S-W; Gray, P M; Dougherty, R H; Kang, D-H

    2005-01-01

    As a preliminary experiment on new sanitizer delivery tools, the efficacy of aerosolized sanitizer on food-borne pathogens was investigated in larger model chamber system. Peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide were aerosolized in a model system against artificially inoculated target micro-organisms on laboratory media. Cultures of four different food-borne pathogens were inoculated and affixed onto three different heights (bottom, wall and ceiling), and three different orientations (face-down, vertical and face-down) inside a commercial semi-trailer cabinet (14.6 x 2.6 x 2.8 m). Sanitizer was aerosolized into 2 microm droplet size fog and treated for 1 h at ambient temperature. Populations of Bacillus cereus, Listeria innocua, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhimurium were reduced by an average of 3.09, 7.69, 6.93 and 8.18 log units per plate respectively. Interestingly, L. innocua, Staph. aureus, and Salm. typhimurium showed statistically not different (P >/= 0.05) reduction patterns relative to height and orientation that were never expected in a spraying system. Aerosolized sanitizers diffuse like gaseous sanitizers. Aerosolization has great potential for use in commercial applications.

  14. Powder aerosol delivery through nasal high-flow system: In vitro feasibility and influence of process conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tang, Patricia; Yu, Jiaqi; Finlay, Warren H; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-11-25

    We aimed to obtain fundamental information for potential pulmonary delivery of powder aerosols using a clinically-approved nasal high-flow system (AIRVO), with spray-dried mannitol (SD-Man) being a model powder. Compressed air exiting the AIRVO at set 'dispersion' air flow rates dispersed SD-Man loaded in an Osmohaler ® into a human nasal airway replica (NAR) coupled downstream to a Next Generation Impactor (NGI) running at specific 'inspiratory' flow rates. Increasing the dispersion flow rate from 30 to 60L/min increased powder deposition in the NAR from 50 to 70% of the emitted dose, while decreased the NGI deposition from 50 to 30% of the emitted dose. The inspiratory flow rate did not affect powder deposition in the NAR and NGI. In contrast, as the inspiratory flow rate was increased from 15 to 40L/min, powder recovery, emitted fraction, and fine particle fraction below 5μm (as aerosol performance indices) were increased from 90, 30 and 5% to 97, 45 and 8% of the loaded dose, respectively. The dispersion flow rate did not change the performance indices. Importantly, heating and humidification of dispersion airflow, loaded doses, and nasal cannula sizes did not greatly affect the aerosol characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of continental advection on aerosol characteristics over Bay of Bengal (BoB in winter: results from W-ICARB cruise experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kharol

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The transport of aerosols and pollutants from continental India to the adjoining oceanic areas is a major topic of concern and several experimental campaigns have been conducted over the region focusing on aerosol characteristics and their climate implications. The present study analyzes the spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD variations over Bay of Bengal (BoB during Winter-Integrated Campaign for Aerosols, gases and Radiation Budget (W-ICARB from 27 December 2008 to 30 January 2009 and investigates the influence of the adjoining landmass to the marine aerosol field. High AOD500 values (>0.7 occurred over northern BoB due to outflow of aerosols and pollutants from the densely populated Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP; low AOD500 (0.1–0.2 was observed in central and southern BoB, far away from the mainland. The Angstrom exponent "α" was observed to be high (>1.2 near coastal waters, indicating relative abundance of accumulation-mode continental aerosols. On the other hand, over southern BoB its values dropped below ~0.7. National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP reanalysis data on winds at 850 and 700 hPa, along with air-mass trajectories calculated using Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model, suggested transport of continental aerosols from central and northern India over the BoB. On the other hand, when the ship was crossing the eastern BoB, the aerosol loading was strongly affected by air-masses originating from Southeast Asia, causing an increase in AOD and α. Biomass-burning episodes over the region played an important role in the observed aerosol properties. Terra/Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS AOD550 and cruise measured AOD550 showed good agreement (R2 = 0.86 and 0.77, respectively over BoB, exhibiting similar AOD and α spatio-temporal variation.

  16. Calibration of aerosol radiometers. Special aerosol sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Fertman, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Problems of calibration of artificial aerosol radiometry and information-measurement systems of radiometer radiation control, in particular, are considered. Special aerosol source is suggested, which permits to perform certification and testing of aerosol channels of the systems in situ without the dismantling

  17. Formation and characteristics of ions and charged aerosol particles in a native Australian Eucalypt forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Suni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic aerosol formation is likely to contribute significantly to the global aerosol load. In recent years, new-particle formation has been observed in various ecosystems around the world but hardly any measurements have taken place in the terrestrial Southern Hemisphere. Here, we report the first results of atmospheric ion and charged particle concentrations as well as of new-particle formation in a Eucalypt forest in Tumbarumba, South-East Australia, from July 2005 to October 2006. The measurements were carried out with an Air Ion Spectrometer (AIS with a size range from 0.34 to 40 nm. The Eucalypt forest was a very strong source of new aerosol particles. Daytime aerosol formation took place on 52% of days with acceptable data, which is 2–3 times as often as in the Nordic boreal zone. Average growth rates for negative/positive 1.5–3 nm particles during these formation events were 2.89/2.68 nmh−1, respectively; for 3-7 nm particles 4.26/4.03, and for 7–20 nm particles 8.90/7.58 nmh−1, respectively. The growth rates for large ions were highest when the air was coming from the native forest which suggests that the Eucalypts were a strong source of condensable vapours. Average concentrations of cluster ions (0.34–1.8 nm were 2400/1700 cm−3 for negative/positive ions, very high compared to most other measurements around the world. One reason behind these high concentrations could be the strong radon efflux from the soils around the Tumbarumba field site. Furthermore, comparison between night-time and daytime concentrations supported the view that cluster ions are produced close to the surface within the boundary layer also at night but that large ions are mostly produced in daytime. Finally, a previously unreported phenomenon, nocturnal aerosol formation, appeared in 32% of the analysed nights but was clustered almost entirely within six months from summer to autumn in 2006. From January to May

  18. Quantification and risks associated with bacterial aerosols near domestic greywater-treatment systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benami, Maya; Busgang, Allison; Gillor, Osnat; Gross, Amit, E-mail: amgross@exchange.bgu.ac.il

    2016-08-15

    Greywater (GW) reuse can alleviate water stress by lowering freshwater consumption. However, GW contains pathogens that may compromise public health. During the GW-treatment process, bioaerosols can be produced and may be hazardous to human health if inhaled, ingested, or come in contact with skin. Using air-particle monitoring, BioSampler®, and settle plates we sampled bioaerosols emitted from recirculating vertical flow constructed wetlands (RVFCW) – a domestic GW-treatment system. An array of pathogens and indicators were monitored using settle plates and by culturing the BioSampler® liquid. Further enumeration of viable pathogens in the BioSampler® liquid utilized a newer method combining the benefits of enrichment with molecular detection (MPN-qPCR). Additionally, quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) was applied to assess risks of infection from a representative skin pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. According to the settle-plate technique, low amounts (0–9.7 × 10{sup 4} CFU m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) of heterotrophic bacteria, Staphylococcus spp., Pseudomonas spp., Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia coli were found to aerosolize up to 1 m away from the GW systems. At the 5 m distance amounts of these bacteria were not statistically different (p > 0.05) from background concentrations tested over 50 m away from the systems. Using the BioSampler®, no bacteria were detected before enrichment of the GW-aerosols. However, after enrichment, using an MPN-qPCR technique, viable indicators and pathogens were occasionally detected. Consequently, the QMRA results were below the critical disability-adjusted life year (DALY) safety limits, a measure of overall disease burden, for S. aureus under the tested exposure scenarios. Our study suggests that health risks from aerosolizing pathogens near RVFCW GW-treatment systems are likely low. This study also emphasizes the growing need for standardization of bioaerosol-evaluation techniques

  19. A review of natural aerosol interactions and feedbacks within the Earth system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Carslaw

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The natural environment is a major source of atmospheric aerosols, including dust, secondary organic material from terrestrial biogenic emissions, carbonaceous particles from wildfires, and sulphate from marine phytoplankton dimethyl sulphide emissions. These aerosols also have a significant effect on many components of the Earth system such as the atmospheric radiative balance and photosynthetically available radiation entering the biosphere, the supply of nutrients to the ocean, and the albedo of snow and ice. The physical and biological systems that produce these aerosols can be highly susceptible to modification due to climate change so there is the potential for important climate feedbacks. We review the impact of these natural systems on atmospheric aerosol based on observations and models, including the potential for long term changes in emissions and the feedbacks on climate. The number of drivers of change is very large and the various systems are strongly coupled. There have therefore been very few studies that integrate the various effects to estimate climate feedback factors. Nevertheless, available observations and model studies suggest that the regional radiative perturbations are potentially several Watts per square metre due to changes in these natural aerosol emissions in a future climate. Taking into account only the direct radiative effect of changes in the atmospheric burden of natural aerosols, and neglecting potentially large effects on other parts of the Earth system, a global mean radiative perturbation approaching 1 W m−2 is possible by the end of the century. The level of scientific understanding of the climate drivers, interactions and impacts is very low.

  20. Characteristics of mineral aerosol deposited on the glaciers of Mt. Elbrus, Caucasus, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutuzov, Stanislav; Shahgedanova, Maria; Mikhalenko, Vladimir; Ginot, Patrick; Lavrentiev, Ivan; Popov, Gregory

    2014-05-01

    Records of mineral aerosol (desert dust) stored in glaciers provide data on frequency and intensity of deposition events, source regions and atmospheric pathways of mineral dust. We present and discuss a chronology of dust deposition events recorded in the shallow firn and ice cores extracted on the Western Plateau, Mt. Elbrus (5150 m a.s.l.), Caucasus Mountains, Russia and covering the period of 2009-2013. Particle size distribution and chemical analysis (major ions, trace elements) were peformed using Coulter Counter Multisizer III, Abacus particle counter, IC and ICPMS analysis. Sampling was performed using continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. Annual average dust flux (264 μg/cm2 a-1) and average mass concentration (1.7 mg/kg) over the period 2007-2013 were calculated for the first time for this region. A combination of satellite imagery (MSG SEVIRI), trajectory models (FLEXTA, HYSPLIT) and meteorological data were used to accurately date each of the dust layers observed in shallow cores and investigate provenance of the dust and its pathways. Desert dust originating from the Middle East and Sahara was deposited on the Caucasus glaciers 3-6 times a year. Although less frequent, Saharan events are characterized by considerably higher dust loads than the more frequent Middle Eastern events. The mass median diameter of dust particles ranged between 2 and 9 μm. The deposition of dust resulted in elevated concentrations of most ions, especially Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and sulphates. Dust originated from or passing over the Middle East was characterised by the elevated concentrations of nitrates and ammonia. This may be related to dust emissions from agricultural fields which, if abandoned due to droughts, become important sources of dust. By contrast, samples of the Saharan dust originated from natural sources showed lower concentrations of ammonium. The mean values of crustal enrichment factors for the measured trace elements including metals were calculated. Overall

  1. Hygroscopic properties of levoglucosan and related organic compounds characteristic to biomass burning aerosol particles

    OpenAIRE

    Mochida, Michihiro; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2004-01-01

    Biomass burning, which is characterized by pyrolysis as well as vaporization and condensation of biomass constituents, is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosols. In this study, hygroscopic properties of five organic compounds (levoglucosan, D-glucose, and vanillic, syringic, and 4-hydroxybenozoic acids), which are major pyrolysis products of wood, were measured using a tandem differential mobility analyzer. Levoglucosan, which is typically the most abundant species in wood burni...

  2. Carbonaceous aerosol characteristics over Delhi in Northern India: Seasonal variability and possible sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul Kumar; Bisht, Ds; Tiwari, S.

    Carbonaceous aerosols have been the focus of extensive studies during the last decade due to its significant impacts on human health, visibility and climate change. As per Asian regions are concerned, aerosols in south-Asia are gaining considerable importance because of their potential impacts on regional climate, yet their possible sources are poorly understood. Semi-continuous measurements of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) and continuous measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosols were conducted simultaneously at Delhi during the period from January 2011 to May 2012. Delhi is the capital city of India and one of the densely populated and industrialized urban megacities in Asia, located at the Ganga basin in the northern part of India. Being highly polluted region, mass concentrations of OC, EC and BC over Delhi were found to vary from about 6-92 mug m (-3) (mean: 23±16 mug m (-3) ), 3-38 mug m (-3) (mean: 11±7 mug m (-3) ) and 1-24 mug m (-3) (mean: 7±5 mug m (-3) ), respectively during the entire measurement period, with about two times higher concentration during winter as compared to summer. A significant correlation between OC and EC (R=0.95, n=232) and relatively lower OC/EC ratio (range: 1.0-3.6; mean: 2.2±0.5) suggest fossil fuel emission as a dominant source of carbonaceous aerosols over the station. The average mass concentration of EC was found about 38% higher than BC during the study period, which is interestingly different as reported at other locations over Ganga basin. We also determined the associated optical properties of carbonaceous species (e.g. absorption coefficient and mass absorption efficiency) over the station. Significant loading of carbonaceous species over such regions emphasize an urgent need to focus on air quality management and proper impact assessment on health perspective.

  3. Physicochemical Characteristics of Individual Aerosol Particles during the 2015 China Victory Day Parade in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available During the 2015 China Victory Day parade control periods, the air quality in Beijing hit the best record, leading to 15 continuous good days with an average PM2.5 mass concentration 18 μg/m3, which provided a unique opportunity to study the ambient aerosols in megacity Beijing. The morphology and elemental composition of aerosol particles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (TEM-EDX. Five types of individual particles were identified, including homogeneous mixed S-rich particles (HS; 44.9%, organic coated S-rich particles (CS; 34.3%, mineral particles (10.5%, soot aggregates (7.21% and organic particles (3.2%. The number percentage of secondary particles (including HS and CS accounted for a large proportion with 79.2% during the control periods. The average diameter of secondary particles increased with relative humidity (RH, being 323 nm, 358 nm and 397 nm at the RH 34%, 43% and 53%, respectively, suggesting that the high RH might favor the growth of secondary particles. The higher proportion of CS particles may show great atmospheric implications and the CS particles may be formed by the condensation of secondary organic aerosols on pre-existing S-rich particles.

  4. Aerosol black carbon characteristics over a high-altitude Western Ghats location in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Udayasoorian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol black carbon (BC mass concentrations were continuously monitored over a period of 2 years (April 2010 to May 2012 from a high-altitude location Ooty in the Nilgiris Mountain range in southern India to characterize the distinct nature of absorbing aerosols and their seasonality. Despite being remote and sparsely inhabited, BC concentrations showed significant seasonality with higher values (~ 0.96 ± 0.35 μg m−3 in summer (March to May, attributed to increased vertical transport of effluents in the upwind valley regions, which might have been confined to the surrounding valley regions within the very shallow winter boundary layer. The local atmospheric boundary layer (ABL influence in summer was further modulated by the long-range transported aerosols from the eastern locations of Ooty. During monsoon (June–August, the concentrations were far reduced (~ 0.23 ± 0.06 μg m−3 due to intense precipitation. Diurnal variations were found conspicuous mainly during summer season associated with local ABL. The spectral absorption coefficients (αabs depicted, in general, flatter distribution (mostly abs in summer.

  5. Aerosol sampling system for collection of Capstone depleted uranium particles in a high-energy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Thomas D; Guilmette, Raymond A; Cheng, Yung Sung; Parkhurst, Mary Ann; Hoover, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    The Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study was undertaken to obtain aerosol samples resulting from a large-caliber DU penetrator striking an Abrams or Bradley test vehicle. The sampling strategy was designed to (1) optimize the performance of the samplers and maintain their integrity in the extreme environment created during perforation of an armored vehicle by a DU penetrator, (2) collect aerosols as a function of time post perforation, and (3) obtain size-classified samples for analysis of chemical composition, particle morphology, and solubility in lung fluid. This paper describes the experimental setup and sampling methodologies used to achieve these objectives. Custom-designed arrays of sampling heads were secured to the inside of the target in locations approximating the breathing zones of the crew locations in the test vehicles. Each array was designed to support nine filter cassettes and nine cascade impactors mounted with quick-disconnect fittings. Shielding and sampler placement strategies were used to minimize sampler loss caused by the penetrator impact and the resulting fragments of eroded penetrator and perforated armor. A cyclone train was used to collect larger quantities of DU aerosol for measurement of chemical composition and solubility. A moving filter sample was used to obtain semicontinuous samples for DU concentration determination. Control for the air samplers was provided by five remotely located valve control and pressure monitoring units located inside and around the test vehicle. These units were connected to a computer interface chassis and controlled using a customized LabVIEW engineering computer control program. The aerosol sampling arrays and control systems for the Capstone study provided the needed aerosol samples for physicochemical analysis, and the resultant data were used for risk assessment of exposure to DU aerosol.

  6. Stratospheric aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, J.; Ivanov, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol measurements can provide both spatial and temporal data of sufficient resolution to be of use in climate models. Relatively recent results from a wide range of instrument techniques for measuring stratospheric aerosol parameters are described. Such techniques include impactor sampling, lidar system sensing, filter sampling, photoelectric particle counting, satellite extinction-sensing using the sun as a source, and optical depth probing, at sites mainly removed from tropospheric aerosol sources. Some of these techniques have also had correlative and intercomparison studies. The main methods for determining the vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosols are outlined: lidar extinction measurements from satellites; impactor measurements from balloons and aircraft; and photoelectric particle counter measurements from balloons, aircraft, and rockets. The conversion of the lidar backscatter to stratospheric aerosol mass loading is referred to. Absolute measurements of total solar extinction from satellite orbits can be used to extract the aerosol extinction, and several examples of vertical profiles of extinction obtained with the SAGE satellite are given. Stratospheric mass loading can be inferred from extinction using approximate linear relationships but under restrictive conditions. Impactor sampling is essentially the only method in which the physical nature of the stratospheric aerosol is observed visually. Vertical profiles of stratospheric aerosol number concentration using impactor data are presented. Typical profiles using a dual-size-range photoelectric dustsonde particle counter are given for volcanically disturbed and inactive periods. Some measurements of the global distribution of stratospheric aerosols are also presented. Volatility measurements are described, indicating that stratospheric aerosols are composed primarily of about 75% sulfuric acid and 25% water

  7. Overview of atmospheric aerosol studies in Malaysia: Known and unknown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; San Lim, Hwee; Latif, Mohd Talib; Kamarul Zaman, Nurul Amalin Fatihah; Liew, Juneng

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols particularly those originated from anthropogenic sources can affect human health, air quality and the regional climate system of Southeast Asia (SEA). Population growth, and rapid urbanization associated with economic development in the SEA countries including Malaysia have resulted in high aerosol concentrations. Moreover, transboundary smoke plumes add more aerosols to the atmosphere in Malaysia. Nevertheless, the aerosol monitoring networks and/or field studies and research campaigns investigating the various aerosol properties are not so widespread over Malaysia. In the present work, we summarize and discuss the results of previous studies that investigated the aerosol properties over Malaysia by means of various instrumentation and techniques, focusing on the use of remote sensing data to examine atmospheric aerosols. Furthermore, we identify gaps in this research field and recommend further studies to bridge these knowledge gaps. More specifically gaps are identified in (i) monitoring aerosol loading and composition over urban areas, (ii) examining the influence of dust, (iii) assessing radiative effects of aerosols, (iv) measuring and modelling fine particles and (v) quantifying the contribution of long range transport of aerosols. Such studies are crucial for understanding the optical, physical and chemical properties of aerosols and their spatio-temporal characteristics over the region, which are useful for modelling and prediction of aerosols' effects on air quality and climate system.

  8. Assessing a system to capture stray aerosol during inhalation of nebulized liposomal cisplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittgen, Bart P. H.; Kunst, Peter W. A.; Perkins, Walter R.; Lee, Jin K.; Postmus, Pieter E.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of using a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter air cleaning system, a demistifier, to reduce the potential risk of fugitive aerosol contact in health care personnel working with patients inhaling nebulized liposomal encapsulated SLIT

  9. The characteristics of Beijing aerosol during two distinct episodes: Impacts of biomass burning and fireworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Yuan; Engling, Guenter; He, Ke-bin; Duan, Feng-kui; Du, Zhen-yu; Ma, Yong-liang; Liang, Lin-lin; Lu, Zi-feng; Liu, Jiu-meng; Zheng, Mei; Weber, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of Beijing aerosol was measured during summer and winter. Two distinct episodes were identified. Water-soluble potassium (K + ) increased significantly during the firework episode in winter with an episode to non-episode ratio of 4.97, whereas the biomass burning (BB) episode in summer was characterized by high episode to non-episode ratios of levoglucosan (6.38) and K + (6.90). The BB and firework episodes had only a minor influence on the water-soluble OC (organic carbon) to OC ratio. Based on separate investigations of episode and non-episode periods, it was found that: (i) sulfate correlated strongly with both relative humidity and nitrate during the typical winter period presumably indicating the importance of the aqueous-phase oxidation of sulfur dioxide by nitrogen dioxide, (ii) oxalate and WSOC during both winter and summer in Beijing were mainly due to secondary formation, and (iii) high humidity can significantly enhance the formation potential of WSOC in winter. -- Highlights: • Two episodes were identified based on the chemical composition of Beijing aerosol. • Levoglucosan and K + increased significantly during the biomass burning episode. • The firework episode was characterized by high concentrations of K + . • WSOC and oxalate exhibited secondary nature during both summer and winter. • High humidity can significantly enhance the formation of WSOC in winter. -- This study suggests the benefits of investigating aerosol composition separately during episode and non-episode periods, and introducing organic tracers to the speciation measurements of PM 2.5

  10. Combustion characteristics of water-insoluble elemental and organic carbon in size selected ambient aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Wittmaack

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Combustion of elemental carbon (EC and organic carbon (OC contained in ambient aerosol matter was explored using scanning electron microscopy (SEM in combination with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. To ease identification of the particles of interest and to avoid or at least reduce interaction with simultaneously sampled inorganic oxides and salts, the approach used in this work differed in two ways from commonly applied procedures. First, rather than using a mixture of particles of vastly different sizes, as in PM10 or PM2.5, aerosol matter was collected in a 5-stage impactor. Second, the water soluble fraction of the collected matter was removed prior to analysis. Diesel soot particles, which appeared in the well-known form of chain-type aggregates, constituted the major fraction of EC. In contrast, OC containing particles were observed in a variety of shapes, including a sizable amount of bioaerosol matter appearing mostly in the size range above about 1 µm. During heating in ambient air for 1h, diesel soot particles were found to be stable up to 470°C, but complete combustion occurred in a narrow temperature interval between about 480 and 510°C. After diesel soot combustion, minute quantities of 'ash' were observed in the form of aggregated tiny particles with sizes less than 10 nm. These particles could be due to elemental or oxidic contaminants of diesel soot. Combustion of OC was observed over a wide range of temperatures, from well below 200°C to at least 500°C. Incompletely burnt bioaerosol matter was still found after heating to 600°C. The results imply that the EC fraction in aerosol matter can be overestimated significantly if the contribution of OC to a thermogram is not well separated.

  11. Functional state of the bronchopulmonary system in Mayak nuclear workers inhaled plutonium-239 aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaeva, Z.; Grigoryeva, E.; Khokhryakov, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The current system of the individual and collective protection facilities for nuclear personnel permits decreasing the radiation dose from internal emitters at the most. At the same time, specific production conditions do not exclude possible inhalation of plutonium-239 aerosols. As the lung is the critical organ for this isotope, the study of respiratory function is aimed at detecting of pre-clinical lung pathology. Early detection of internal exposure effects on functional state of respiratory apparatus is difficult due to a number of confounding actors of non-radiation nature, one of which is smoking. Functional state of bronchopulmonary system was studied in 386 males, workers of the first Russian nuclear facility. 1198 examinations were carried out during medical inspection as well as hospitalization for routine preventive inspection. Most of males (39.4%) started working at the age of 21-26 years and 27.2% at the age of 20 years. The main factors of occupational exposure were exposure to plutonium-239 aerosols and the external gamma -rays. The absorbed dose to lungs from incorporated plutonium-239 was 0-435.8 c Gy. Whole-body external gamma dose varied from 0 to 382 c Gy at the examination. Individual dosimetry data were provided by the Mayak Radiation Safety Department and Internal Dosimetry Laboratory of the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute. While studying respiratory function, the most informative indices characterizing the state of lung tissue and tracheobronchial system such as vital capacity inspiration, forced expiratory volume, forced inspiratory volume, test Tiffno, diffusion capacity, characteristics of the flow vs. volume of the forced vital capacity inspiration curve, and resistance were used. Analysis was done separately for smokers and nonsmokers. Smoking index, i.e. product of number of smoked cigarettes per day and number of years of smoking was considered an integral value. The study did not reveal the

  12. Characteristics of fine and coarse particles of natural and urban aerosols of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsini, C.M.Q.; Tabacniks, M.H.; Artaxo Netto, P.E.; Andrade, M.F.; Kerr, A.

    1986-02-01

    Fine and coarse particles have been sampled from 1982 to 1985 in one natural forest seacoast site (Jureia) and five urban-industrial cities (Vitoria, Salvador, Porto Alegre, Sao Paulo, and Belo Horizonte). The time variations of concentrations in air and the relative elemental compositions of fine and coarse particle fractions, sampled by Nuclepore stacked filter units (SFU), have been determined gravimetrically and by PIXE analysis, respectively. Enrichment factors and correlation coefficients of the trace elements measured lead to unambiguous characterization of soil dust and sea salt, both major aerosol sources that emit coarse particles, and soil dust is also a significant source of fine particles. (Author) [pt

  13. Aerosol Abundances and Optical Characteristics in the Pacific Basin Free Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Livingston, J. M.; Ferry, G. V.; deFelice, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    During NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) mission flights in November 1989 and May 1990, a DC-8 research aircraft probed the Pacific Basin free troposphere for about 90 flight hours in each month between +72 and -62 degrees latitude, +130 and -120 degrees longitude, and up to 39,000 feet pressure altitudes. Aerosols were sampled continuously in situ by optical particle counters to measure concentration and particle size, and during 48 10-min intervals during each mission by wire impactors for concentration, size, composition, phase and shape analyses. The optical particle counters cover a particle diameter range between 0.3 and 20 microns; wire impactors extend the range down to 0.03 microns. Results of particle number, size, shape, together with the assumption of a refractive index corresponding to (NH4)2SO4 to account for the prevalence of aerosol sulfur, were utilized in a Mie algorithm to calculate aerosol extinction and backscatter for a range of wavelengths (0.385 less than lambda less than 10.64 microns). Computations for 22 randomly selected size distributions yield coefficients of extinction E(0.525) = (2.03 +/- 1.20) x 10(exp -4) km(exp -1) and backscatter beta(0.525) = (6.45 +/- 3.49) x 10(exp -6) km(exp -1) sr(exp -1) in the visible, and E(10.64) = (8.13 +/- 6.47) x 10(exp -6) km(exp -1) and beta(10.64) = (9.98 +/- 10.69) x 10(exp -8) km(exp -1) sr(exp -1) in the infrared, respectively. Large particles (D greater than 0.3 microns) contribute two-thirds to the total extinction in the visible (lambda = 0.525 microns), and almost 100% in the infrared (lambda = 10.64 microns). These results have been used to define an IR optical aerosol climatology of the Pacific Basin free troposphere, from which it follows that the infrared backscatter coefficient at lambda = 9.25 microns wavelength fluctuates between 5.0 x 10(exp -10) and 2.0 x 10(exp -7) km(exp -1) sr(exp -1) with a modal value 2.0 x 10(exp -8) km(exp -1) sr(exp -1).

  14. Towards routine measurements of meteorological and aerosol parameters using small unmanned aerial and tethered balloon systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, F.; Dexheimer, D.; Hubbe, J. M.; deBoer, G.; Schmid, B.; Ivey, M.; Longbottom, C.; Carroll, P.

    2017-12-01

    The Inaugural Campaigns for ARM Research using Unmanned Systems (ICARUS) had been launched in 2016 and then the effort has been continued in 2017. ICARUS centered on Oliktok Point, Alaska focusses on developing routine operations of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and Tethered Balloon Systems (TBS). The operation routine practiced during ICARUS 2016 provided valuable guidance for the ICARUS 2017 deployment. During two intensive operation periods in 2017, a small DataHawk II UAS has been deployed to collect data for two weeks each in May and August. Coordinated with DataHawk flights, the TBS has been launched with meteorology sensors such as iMet and Tethersondes, therefore vertical profiles of the basic atmospheric state (temperature, humidity, and horizontal wind) were observed simultaneously by UAS and TBS. In addition, an aerosol payload was attached and launched with 2 TBS flights in April and 7 TBS flights in May, which include a condensation particle counter (CPC, TSI 3007) and two printed optical particle spectrometers (POPS, Handix TBS version). The two POPS were operated at different inlet temperatures. This approach provided potential measurements for aerosol optical closure in future. Measured aerosol properties include total particle number concentrations, particle size distribution, at different ambient temperature and relative humidity. Vertical profiles of atmospheric state and aerosol properties will be discussed based on the coordinated flights. Monthly variation will be assessed with data from the upcoming August flights.

  15. Development towards a global operational aerosol consensus: basic climatological characteristics of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessions, W. R.; Reid, J. S.; Benedetti, A.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.; Lu, S.; Sekiyama, T.; Tanaka, T. Y.; Baldasano, J. M.; Basart, S.; Brooks, M. E.; Eck, T. F.; Iredell, M.; Hansen, J. A.; Jorba, O. C.; Juang, H.-M. H.; Lynch, P.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Moorthi, S.; Mulcahy, J.; Pradhan, Y.; Razinger, M.; Sampson, C. B.; Wang, J.; Westphal, D. L.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the first steps in developing a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble intended for eventual operational and basic research use. Drawing from members of the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, 5-day aerosol optical thickness (AOT) forecasts are analyzed for December 2011 through November 2012 from four institutions: European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and Naval Research Lab/Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (NRL/FNMOC). For dust, we also include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-National Geospatial Advisory Committee (NOAA NGAC) product in our analysis. The Barcelona Supercomputing Centre and UK Met Office dust products have also recently become members of ICAP, but have insufficient data to be included in this analysis period. A simple consensus ensemble of member and mean AOT fields for modal species (e.g., fine and coarse mode, and a separate dust ensemble) is used to create the ICAP Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME). The ICAP-MME is run daily at 00:00 UTC for 6-hourly forecasts out to 120 h. Basing metrics on comparisons to 21 regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites, all models generally captured the basic aerosol features of the globe. However, there is an overall AOT low bias among models, particularly for high AOT events. Biomass burning regions have the most diversity in seasonal average AOT. The Southern Ocean, though low in AOT, nevertheless also has high diversity. With regard to root mean square error (RMSE), as expected the ICAP-MME placed first over all models worldwide, and was typically first or second in ranking against all models at individual sites. These results are encouraging; furthermore, as more global operational aerosol models come online, we expect their inclusion in a robust

  16. Structure, electrical characteristics, and high-temperature stability of aerosol jet printed silver nanoparticle films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Md Taibur; McCloy, John; Panat, Rahul, E-mail: rahul.panat@wsu.edu, E-mail: rvchintalapalle@utep.edu [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99163 (United States); Ramana, C. V., E-mail: rahul.panat@wsu.edu, E-mail: rvchintalapalle@utep.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2016-08-21

    Printed electronics has emerged as a versatile eco-friendly fabrication technique to create sintered nanoparticle (NP) films on arbitrary surfaces with an excellent control over the film microstructure. While applicability of such films for high-temperature applications is not explored previously, herein we report the high-temperature electrical stability of silver (Ag) metal NP films fabricated using an Aerosol Jet based printing technique and demonstrate that this behavior is dictated by changes in the film microstructure. In-situ high temperature (24–500 °C) impedance spectroscopy measurements show that the real part of the impedance increases with increasing temperature up to 150 °C, at which point a decreasing trend prevails until 300 °C, followed again by an increase in impedance. The electrical behavior is correlated with the in-situ grain growth of the Ag NP films, as observed afterwards by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and could be tailored by controlling the initial microstructure through sintering conditions. Using combined diffraction and spectroscopic analytical methods, it is demonstrated the Aerosol Jet printed Ag NP films exhibit enhanced thermal stability and oxidation resistance. In addition to establishing the conditions for stability of Ag NP films, the results provide a fundamental understanding of the effect of grain growth and reduction in grain boundary area on the electrical stability of sintered NP films.

  17. [Study on pollution characteristics of carbonaceous aerosols in Xi'an City during the spring festival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bian-Hong; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Wang, Ge-Hui

    2013-02-01

    The samples of PM2.5 with 8 times periods were collected using Automated Cartridge Collection Unit (ACCU) of Rupprecht& Patashnick (R&P)Corporation, and monitored by R&P1400a instrument of TEOM series online during 2011 Spring Festival in Xi'an city. The organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and water-insoluble organic carbon (WIOC) contents of 3 h integrated PM2.5 were analyzed to evaluate the influence of firework display on the carbonaceous components in urban air. The mass concentration of PM2.5 was found increased significantly from 00:00 A. M. to 02:59 A. M. at the Chinese Lunar New Year's Eve than the non-firework periods, reaching 1514.8 microg.m-3 at 01:00 A. M. The mass concentrations of OC, EC, WSOC, and WIOC during the same time period were 123.3 microg.m-3, 18.6 microg.m-3, 66.7 microg.m-3, and 56.6 microg.m-3, about 1.7, 1.2, 1.4, and 2.2 times higher than the average in normal days, respectively. Correlation analysis among WSOC, OC, and EC contents in PM25 showed that firework emission was an obvious source of carbonaceous aerosol in the Spring Festival vacation. However, it only contributes to 9. 4% for aerosol in fireworks emission.

  18. Characteristics of Black Carbon Aerosol during the Chinese Lunar Year and Weekdays in Xi’an, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiyuan Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC aerosol plays an important role in climate forcing. The net radiative effect is strongly dependent on the physical properties of BC particles. A single particle soot photometer and a carbon monoxide analyser were deployed during the Chinese Lunar Year (CLY and on weekdays at Xi’an, China, to investigate the characteristics of refractory black carbon aerosol (rBC. The rBC mass on weekdays (8.4 μg·m−3 exceeds that during the CLY (1.9 μg·m−3, presumably due to the lower anthropogenic emissions during the latter. The mass size distribution of rBC shows a primary mode peak at ~205 nm and a small secondary mode peak at ~102-nm volume-equivalent diameter assuming 2 g·cm−3 in void-free density in both sets of samples. More than half of the rBC cores are thickly coated during the CLY (fBC = 57.5%; the percentage is slightly lower (fBC = 48.3% on weekdays. Diurnal patterns in rBC mass and mixing state differ for the two sampling periods, which are attributed to the distinct anthropogenic activities. The rBC mass and CO mixing ratios are strongly correlated with slopes of 0.0070 and 0.0016 μg·m−3·ppbv−1 for weekdays and the CLY, respectively.

  19. Aerosolization characteristics of dry powder inhaler formulations for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application: effect of spray drying process conditions on aerosol performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael

    2013-02-25

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxamer 188 were selected as a model drug, hygroscopic excipient, dispersibility enhancer and surfactant, respectively. Formulations were assessed by scanning electron microscopy and aerosol performance following aerosolization using an Aerolizer dry powder inhaler (DPI). In vitro drug deposition was studied using a realistic mouth-throat (MT) model. Based on the in vitro aerosolization results, the best performing submicrometer powder formulation consisted of albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine and poloxamer 188 in a ratio of 30:48:20:2, containing 0.5% solids in a water:ethanol (80:20%, v/v) solution which was spray dried at 70 °C. The submicrometer particle fraction (FPF(1 μm/ED)) of this final formulation was 28.3% with more than 80% of the capsule contents being emitted during aerosolization. This formulation also showed 4.1% MT deposition. The developed combination formulation delivered a powder aerosol developed for the EEG application with high dispersion efficiency and low MT deposition from a convenient DPI device platform. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Sterilization efficacy of ultraviolet irradiation on microbial aerosols under dynamic airflow by experimental air conditioning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    In order to know the sterilization efficacy of ultraviolet irradiation on microbial aerosols, the size and the weight of the aerosol particles were evaluated, and these were irradiated under dynamic air flow created by an experimental air conditioning system. The experimental apparatus consisted of a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter, an aerosol generator, spiral UV lamps placed around a quart glass tube, an Andersen air sampler and a vacuum pump. They were connected serially by stainless steel ducts (85 mm in diameter, 8 m in length). Six types of microbial aerosols generated from an ultrasonic nebulizer were irradiated by UV rays (wavelength 254 nm, mean density 9400 μW/cm 2 ). Their irradiation time ranged from 1.0 to 0.0625 seconds. The microbial aerosols were collected onto the trypticase soy agar (TSA) medium in the Andersen air sampler. After incubation, the number of colony forming units (CFU) were counted, and converted to particle counts. The diameter of microbial aerosol particles calculated by their log normal distribution were found to match the diameter of a single bacteria cell measured by a microscope. The sterilization efficacy of UV in standard airflow conditions (0.5 sec. irradiation) were found to be over 99.5 % in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Serratia marcescens, Bacillus subtilis (vegetative cell) and Bacillus subtilis (spore) and 67 % in Aspergillus niger (conidium). In A. niger, which was the most resistant microbe to UV irradiation, the efficacy rose up to 79 % when irradiated for 1.0 sec., and it was observed that the growth speed of the colonies was slower than that of the controls. It was thought that UV rays caused some damage to the proliferation of A. niger cells. (author)

  1. An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) Investigating the OMI Aerosol Products Using Simulated Aerosol and Atmospheric Fields from the NASA GEOS-5 Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, P. R.; Gasso, S.; Jethva, H. T.; Buchard, V.; Ahn, C.; Torres, O.; daSilva, A.

    2016-12-01

    Output from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model is used to simulate the top-of-atmosphere 354 and 388 nm radiances observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the Aura spacecraft. The principle purpose of developing this simulator tool is to compute from the modeled fields the so-called OMI Aerosol Index (AI), which is a more fundamental retrieval product than higher level products such as the aerosol optical depth (AOD) or absorbing aerosol optical depth (AAOD). This lays the groundwork for eventually developing a capability to assimilate either the OMI AI or its radiances, which would provide further constraint on aerosol loading and absorption properties for global models. We extend the use of the simulator capability to understand the nature of the OMI aerosol retrieval algorithms themselves in an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE). The simulated radiances are used to calculate the AI from the modeled fields. These radiances are also provided to the OMI aerosol algorithms, which return their own retrievals of the AI, AOD, and AAOD. Our assessment reveals that the OMI-retrieved AI can be mostly harmonized with the model-derived AI given the same radiances provided a common surface pressure field is assumed. This is important because the operational OMI algorithms presently assume a fixed pressure field, while the contribution of molecular scattering to the actual OMI signal in fact responds to the actual atmospheric pressure profile, which is accounted for in our OSSE by using GEOS-5 produced atmospheric reanalyses. Other differences between the model and OMI AI are discussed, and we present a preliminary assessment of the OMI AOD and AAOD products with respect to the known inputs from the GEOS-5 simulation.

  2. Chemical, optical and radiative characteristics of aerosols during haze episodes of winter in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Zhang, Yufen; Han, Suqin; Xiao, Zhimei; Wang, Jiao; Feng, Yinchang

    2018-05-01

    Aerosol and water vapor radiative forcings, shortwave atmospheric heating rates and longwave atmospheric cooling rates were determined based on in situ physical and chemical measurements of aerosol, associated with the Mie theory and a radiative transfer model, LOWTRAN7, during the two haze episodes in the winter of 2013 in Tianjin, China. The aerosol types considered in LOWTRAN7 included rural, urban, marine, desert and custom aerosols. The default ratio of the absorption coefficient to the extinction coefficient for urban aerosol in LOWTRAN7 was approximately double of those found in this work, implying the weaker absorption ability of aerosols in the North China Plain (NCP). Moreover, the aerosol is assumed to be evenly distributed below 1 km of planetary boundary layer (PBL) on hazy days in LOWTRAN7. If the default urban aerosol optical properties and extinction profile in LOWTRAN7 is employed directly, a larger energy imbalance between the atmosphere and surface is generated and the warming effect of the aerosol is magnified. Hence, modified urban aerosol optical properties were established to replace the corresponding parameters' database in LOWTRAN7. The aerosol extinction profiles were obtained based on a 255-m meteorological tower and observed results from the studies about Tianjin. In the NCP, the aerosol had little impact on atmospheric counter radiation. The water vapor is the crucial factor that affects atmospheric counter radiation. Both modified high shortwave heating rates and longwave cooling rates occur near the surface due to the abundance of aerosol and water vapor. The modified net atmospheric heating rate near the surface is 1.2 K d-1 on hazy days and 0.3 K d-1 on non-hazy days. Compared with the default urban aerosol optical properties and its vertical distribution in LOWTRAN7, the feedback effect of the modified urban aerosol on the boundary layer may not necessarily result in a stable lower atmosphere, but depends on the aerosol light

  3. Characteristics, sources, and transport of aerosols measured in spring 2008 during the aerosol, radiation, and cloud processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Brock

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the background, scientific goals, and execution of the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC project of April 2008. We then summarize airborne measurements, made in the troposphere of the Alaskan Arctic, of aerosol particle size distributions, composition, and optical properties and discuss the sources and transport of the aerosols. The aerosol data were grouped into four categories based on gas-phase composition. First, the background troposphere contained a relatively diffuse, sulfate-rich aerosol extending from the top of the sea-ice inversion layer to 7.4 km altitude. Second, a region of depleted (relative to the background aerosol was present within the surface inversion layer over sea-ice. Third, layers of dense, organic-rich smoke from open biomass fires in southern Russia and southeastern Siberia were frequently encountered at all altitudes from the top of the inversion layer to 7.1 km. Finally, some aerosol layers were dominated by components originating from fossil fuel combustion.

    Of these four categories measured during ARCPAC, the diffuse background aerosol was most similar to the average springtime aerosol properties observed at a long-term monitoring site at Barrow, Alaska. The biomass burning (BB and fossil fuel layers were present above the sea-ice inversion layer and did not reach the sea-ice surface during the course of the ARCPAC measurements. The BB aerosol layers were highly scattering and were moderately hygroscopic. On average, the layers produced a noontime net heating of ~0.1 K day−1 between 3 and 7 km and a slight cooling at the surface. The ratios of particle mass to carbon monoxide (CO in the BB plumes, which had been transported over distances >5000 km, were comparable to the high end of literature values derived from previous measurements in wildfire smoke. These ratios suggest minimal precipitation scavenging and removal of the BB

  4. An overview of regional and local characteristics of aerosols in South Africa using satellite, ground, and modeling data

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hersey, SP

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of aerosols on human health, visibility, and cli- mate are well documented. There are a number of natural sources of dust, sea salt, sulfate, and organic aerosol, and anthropogenic aerosol primarily derives from fuel combus- tion. Combustion...

  5. A humidity controlled Nephelometer system to study the hygroscopic properties of aerosols in the marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishya, Aditya; O'Dowd, Colin; Jennings, S. Gerard

    2010-05-01

    A Humidograph system has been designed to study the hygroscopic properties of aerosols for different air-masses and for different seasons in the marine environment. Since ambient marine aerosols are likely to be found in a metastable state, and in accordance with recommendations of WMO/GAW to sample dry aerosol, a drying unit (Nafion based) is placed just after the inlet to dry the aerosols to a relative humidity (RH) Gore-Tex based humidifier followed by a single-wavelength TSI-3561 Integrating Nephelometer. The humidifier is used to vary the RH from 40% to 90%. While the TSI-3563 Integrating Nephelometer will operate at RH < 40%, the TSI-3561 Integrating Nephelometer will operate under varying RH conditions. Software developed in LabVIEW is used to control the hardware components and to log the data in a predefined format. Results of the performance of the Humidograph system in the laboratory and at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station are presented.

  6. Temporal characteristics of columnar aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing (2011-2015) measured at AERONET's Pretoria_CSIR_DPSS site in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Raghavendra; Kang, Na; Sivakumar, V.; Griffith, Derek

    2017-09-01

    Ground-based observations of the spectral aerosol optical depths (AODs) revealed that the northwest of South Africa (SA) possessed large aerosol loading and still remained unexplored as none of the authors have been extensively studied. The characteristics of aerosol optical, physical, and radiative properties, as well as their relationships presented in this paper, were derived from the direct sun and sky radiances measured at Pretoria during August 2011-December 2015 using the AERONET's (CE-318) automatic sun/sky radiometer. The annual mean AOD440, AE440-870, and SSA-T440 estimated at Pretoria during the study period were 0.23 ± 0.13, 1.50 ± 0.26, and 0.91 ± 0.04, respectively. The mean AOD440 (AE440-870) for the study period appeared higher during the spring and summer seasons (summer), suggest dominance of fine mode particles attributed to biomass burning activities and seasonal influence of meteorology. Analysis of frequency occurrences of AOD and AE also indicate that this region is richly populated with fine mode particles. Further, the AOD-AE relationship was studied at Pretoria and the result concluded that the mixed type aerosols contributed more among the others followed by the urban/industrial-biomass burning and clean continental (background) aerosols. The high summertime SSA-T440 and fine mode radius of AVSD could be associated with the hygroscopic growth of water-soluble aerosols under high water vapor (absorbing aerosols). The positive (negative) values of aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) were observed in all the months, an indication of significant heating (cooling) within the atmosphere (top of the atmosphere (TOA) and bottom of the atmosphere (BOA)) were due to strong absorption (scattering) of radiation. Further, the efficiency derived between ARF and AOD440 indicated that ARF is a strong function of AOD at the BOA noted with a high degree of correlation coefficient (r = 0.93).

  7. Aerosols and environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth's atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth's radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  8. Evaluation of systems for reducing the transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Dee, Scott A.; Batista, Laura; Deen, John; Pijoan, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 methods for the reduction of aerosol transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration, low-cost filtration, and ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. The HEPA-filtration system involved a pre-filter screen, a bag filter (EU8 rating), and a HEPA filter (EU13 rating). The low-cost-filtration system contained mosquito netting (pre-filter), a fiberglass furnace filter, and an ele...

  9. Update on the NASA GEOS-5 Aerosol Forecasting and Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, Peter; da Silva, Arlindo; Aquila, Valentina; Bian, Huisheng; Buchard, Virginie; Castellanos, Patricia; Darmenov, Anton; Follette-Cook, Melanie; Govindaraju, Ravi; Keller, Christoph; hide

    2017-01-01

    GEOS-5 is the Goddard Earth Observing System model. GEOS-5 is maintained by the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office. Core development is within GMAO,Goddard Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory, and with external partners. Primary GEOS-5 functions: Earth system model for studying climate variability and change, provide research quality reanalyses for supporting NASA instrument teams and scientific community, provide near-real time forecasts of meteorology,aerosols, and other atmospheric constituents to support NASA airborne campaigns.

  10. Monitoring O3 and Aerosols with the NASA LaRC Mobile Ozone Lidar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganoe, Rene; Gronoff, Guillaume; Berkoff, Timothy; DeYoung, Russell; Carrion, William

    2016-01-01

    The NASA's Langley Mobile Ozone Lidar (LMOL) system routinely measures tropospheric ozone and aerosol profiles, and is part of the Tropospheric Lidar Network (TOLNet). Recent upgrades to the system include a new pump laser that has tripled the transmission output power extending measurements up to 8 km in altitude during the day. In addition, software and algorithm developments have improved data output quality and enabled a real-time ozone display capability. In 2016, a number of ozone features were captured by LMOL, including the dynamics of an early-season ozone exceedance that impacted the Hampton Roads region. In this presentation, we will review current LMOL capabilities, recent air quality events observed by the system, and show a comparison of aerosol retrieval through the UV channel and the green line channel.

  11. Power System Oscillatory Behaviors: Sources, Characteristics, & Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follum, James D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tuffner, Francis K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dosiek, Luke A. [Union College, Schenectady, NY (United States); Pierre, John W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This document is intended to provide a broad overview of the sources, characteristics, and analyses of natural and forced oscillatory behaviors in power systems. These aspects are necessarily linked. Oscillations appear in measurements with distinguishing characteristics derived from the oscillation’s source. These characteristics determine which analysis methods can be appropriately applied, and the results from these analyses can only be interpreted correctly with an understanding of the oscillation’s origin. To describe oscillations both at their source within a physical power system and within measurements, a perspective from the boundary between power system and signal processing theory has been adopted.

  12. Temporal characteristics of inhalable mercury and arsenic aerosols in the urban atmosphere in southern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Kuo, Su-Ching; Lin, Yi-Hsuan

    Urban aerosol samples for PM 10 and PM 2.5 were collected during summer (August) and winter (December) 2000 in southern Taiwan (Tainan City) to demonstrate the temporal variations of Hg and As in particulate matter (PM). The mean mass concentrations with standard deviations were 80.0±26.8 μg m -3 for PM 10 and 50.6±16.6 μg m -3 for PM 2.5. The average PM 2.5/PM 10 mass ratio for the two periods combined was 63%, indicating that fine particles were a large portion of PM 10. Particulate samples of Hg and As were analyzed within 2 days following sampling and weighing, because of the highly volatile nature of PM Hg and As. The average Hg and As values in PM 10, PM 2.5 and PM 2.5-10 in summer were significantly lower than those in winter. PM 2.5 Hg constituted 0.34 to 5.8 ng m -3 and PM 2.5-10 Hg 0.05 to 3.1 ng m -3. PM 2.5 As constituted 1.09 to 9.51 ng m -3 and PM 2.5-10 As 0.18 to 4.14 ng m -3. In summer and winter PM 10, the Hg contents showed regular daily variation, with the higher values at daytime and lower values at nighttime, indicating conversion of gaseous Hg to the particulate phase by reaction with atmospheric oxidants under strong solar radiation during the daytime in both summer and winter. PM As behaved similar to Hg in the summer, but in the winter higher concentrations were observed during the nighttime than during the daytime, implying that the stable temperature inversion during winter nighttime caused the accumulation of PM As near the ground. In summer, SE-WSW winds carried As from an As-emitting fossil power plant to the sample area. In a similar vein, NE-WNW winter winds contributed to aerosol Hg, especially in PM 2.5, originating from a waste incinerator located NW of Tainan City.

  13. Preliminary Evaluation of Influence of Aerosols on the Simulation of Brightness Temperature in the NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Atmospheric Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong; Akella, Santha; da Silva, Arlindo M.; Todling, Ricardo; McCarty, William

    2018-01-01

    This document reports on preliminary results obtained when studying the impact of aerosols on the calculation of brightness temperature (BT) for satellite infrared (IR) instruments that are currently assimilated in a 3DVAR configuration of Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-atmospheric data assimilation system (ADAS). A set of fifteen aerosol species simulated by the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model is used to evaluate the influence of the aerosol fields on the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) calculations taking place in the observation operators of the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis system of GEOSADAS. Results indicate that taking aerosols into account in the BT calculation improves the fit to observations over regions with significant amounts of dust. The cooling effect obtained with the aerosol-affected BT leads to a slight warming of the analyzed surface temperature (by about 0:5oK) in the tropical Atlantic ocean (off northwest Africa), whereas the effect on the air temperature aloft is negligible. In addition, this study identifies a few technical issues to be addressed in future work if aerosol-affected BT are to be implemented in reanalysis and operational settings. The computational cost of applying CRTM aerosol absorption and scattering options is too high to justify their use, given the size of the benefits obtained. Furthermore, the differentiation between clouds and aerosols in GSI cloud detection procedures needs satisfactory revision.

  14. Human Characteristics and Measures in Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MEASURES IN SYSTEMS DESIGN 19.2.5 Physiological Factors Human physiology is based on the concept of homeostasis , the natural feedback system that...characteristics of the human components within our "man-made" systems engineering ecosystem . Understanding the strengths and limitations of the human

  15. Thermal characteristics and mass absorption efficiency of carbonaceous aerosol measured during a post-harvest burning period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmunkh, T.; Kim, Y. J.; Cayetano, M. G.; Lee, K.; Kim, K.; Park, K.

    2012-12-01

    In order to better understand the characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol time-resolved OC, EC, and BC were measured by a Sunset OC/EC analyzer and an Aethalometer, respectively, during a post-harvest burning period from November 22 to December 20, 2011 at a sub-urban site in Gwangju, Korea. OC and EC were analyzed by the thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) method with NIOSH temperature protocol. The spectral light absorption coefficient (babs) was determined based on the Aethalometer data. Overall average OC and EC concentrations were found to be 5.0±2.4 ugC/ m3 and 1.5±0.9 ugC/ m3, respectively for the sampling period. On average, babs at seven Aethalometer wavelengths was found to be 38.4±27.8 Mm-1, 24.3±17.8 Mm-1, 20.8±15.4 Mm-1, 17.9±13.3 Mm-1, 14.9±11.1 Mm-1, 9.9±7.4 Mm-1, and 8.8±6.6 Mm-1 at 370 nm, 470 nm, 520 nm, 590 nm, 660 nm, 880 nm, and 950 nm, respectively. Clear diurnal variations with morning (7:00 AM~9:00 AM) and evening (7:00 PM~11:00 PM) peaks were observed for OC, EC, and babs mostly due to local burning activities. Based on the 4-day back-trajectory analyses conducted using the HYSPLIT model. Event cases were classified into four categories, based on the 4-day air mass back trajectories, as Clean(C), Stagnant(ST), Continental(CC), and Local Burning(LB) events. In order to better investigate the characteristics of atmospheric carbonaceous aerosol, thermal evolution patterns of carbonaceous aerosol measured by the Sunset analyzer were characterized as OC1, OC2, and EC, which were detected in temperature steps of 600 C, 840 C in an non-oxidizing atmosphere, and 870 C in an oxidizing atmosphere, respectively. High ratio of OC2/OC1; 1.39~1.41 was observed in the evening 9:00~11:00 PM due to local burning event. Concentration of OC2 was higher up to 1.4 times than that of OC1 for the LB cases, showing that higher molecular weight fraction of organic aerosol was dominant for the time. As expected, higher correlation was found between EC and

  16. Aerosol Observing System Greenhouse Gas (AOS GhG) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reichl, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Greenhouse Gas (GhG) Measurement system is a combination of two systems in series: (1) the Tower Gas Processing (TGP) System, an instrument rack which pulls, pressurizes, and dries air streams from an atmospheric sampling tower through a series of control and monitoring components, and (2) the Picarro model G2301 cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS), which measures CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor; the primary measurements of the GhG system.

  17. Characteristic Time Scales of Characteristic Magmatic Processes and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2004-05-01

    Every specific magmatic process, regardless of spatial scale, has an associated characteristic time scale. Time scales associated with crystals alone are rates of growth, dissolution, settling, aggregation, annealing, and nucleation, among others. At the other extreme are the time scales associated with the dynamics of the entire magmatic system. These can be separated into two groups: those associated with system genetics (e.g., the production and transport of magma, establishment of the magmatic system) and those due to physical characteristics of the established system (e.g., wall rock failure, solidification front propagation and instability, porous flow). The detailed geometry of a specific magmatic system is particularly important to appreciate; although generic systems are useful, care must be taken to make model systems as absolutely realistic as possible. Fuzzy models produce fuzzy science. Knowledge of specific time scales is not necessarily useful or meaningful unless the hierarchical context of the time scales for a realistic magmatic system is appreciated. The age of a specific phenocryst or ensemble of phenocrysts, as determined from isotopic or CSD studies, is not meaningful unless something can be ascertained of the provenance of the crystals. For example, crystal size multiplied by growth rate gives a meaningful crystal age only if it is from a part of the system that has experienced semi-monotonic cooling prior to chilling; crystals entrained from a long-standing cumulate bed that were mechanically sorted in ascending magma may not reveal this history. Ragged old crystals rolling about in the system for untold numbers of flushing times record specious process times, telling more about the noise in the system than the life of typical, first generation crystallization processes. The most helpful process-related time scales are those that are known well and that bound or define the temporal style of the system. Perhaps the most valuable of these

  18. The characteristics of mechanical engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, R

    1977-01-01

    The Characteristics of Mechanical Engineering Systems focuses on the characteristics that must be considered when designing a mechanical engineering system. Mechanical systems are presented on the basis of component input-output relationships, paying particular attention to lumped-parameter problems and the interrelationships between lumped components or """"black-boxes"""" in an engineering system. Electric motors and generators are treated in an elementary manner, and the principles involved are explained as far as possible from physical and qualitative reasoning. This book is comprised of

  19. Development of a room air monitor system and workplace transuranic aerosol measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyree, W.H.; Balmer, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    A room air monitor under development at Rocky Flats will detect transuranic aerosols with improved sample collection and alpha particle counting efficiencies. The new instrument will be integrated into present building sampling systems replacing older commercial units now in service. The collection filter medium has been designed to simplify handling and identification procedures. Operating parameters for the system include a sampling rate of 50 liters per minute, with a counting geometry of at least twenty percent. Projected sensitivity is about 0.3 MPC-day. Estimated cost is $2,000.00 for a sampling head with a 1700mm 2 are ion-impacted detector, filter holder and package. This cost includes the electronics counting system with local alarms and battery backup. The sampling head will be produced in quantity as an aluminum casting. A front panel liquid crystal display scalar will indicate the net count obtained from long-lived emitters in the presence of radon interference. The unit includes the option of plug-in high-power audio and visual alarm outputs. A working prototype will be available for inspection and evaluation at the October Workshop. 6 figures, 1 table

  20. Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol in PM 2.5: Pearl Delta River Region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H.; Ho, K. F.; Lee, S. C.; Tsang, P. K.; Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Zou, C. W.; Zou, S. C.; Cao, J. J.; Xu, H. M.

    2012-02-01

    Simultaneous measurements of atmospheric organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) were made at four sampling sites, namely Guangzhou (GZ), Zhaoqing (ZQ), PolyU Campus (PU) and Hok Tsui (HT), in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region between 14 August 2006 and 28 August 2007. The highest concentrations of total carbon (TC) were found at the medium-scale roadside site (PU) and the lowest were found at the regional-scale site (HT). Among the four sampling sites, the average WSOC at ZQ showed the highest concentrations, while the lowest were seen at HT. OC and EC concentrations revealed spring/summer minima and autumn/winter maxima at all sites except PU, which had a consistently high EC concentration all over the year. The highest WSOC/OC ratio was found at ZQ with an average of 0.41, suggesting that the OC was more oxidized in the atmosphere of the semi-rural site. The lowest WSOC/OC was found at the roadside site of PU. Moreover, the WSOC/OC ratio increased in autumn, when the photochemical reactions are the most active in the PRD region. This can be attributed to aging and atmospheric processing of the organic compounds during their transportation, or to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Average annual secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentrations in PM2.5 were estimated to be 2.2 and 3.5 μg m- 3 for GZ and ZQ, comprising 33.5% and 42.8% of the corresponding OC concentrations, respectively. The results indicate that SOC is significant in the PRD region, and its formation mostly occurs within the region.

  1. Co-spray dried carbohydrate microparticles: crystallisation delay/inhibition and improved aerosolization characteristics through the incorporation of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin with amorphous raffinose or trehalose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Maria Inês; Tajber, Lidia; Corrigan, Owen I; Healy, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    To formulate and investigate the physicochemical properties, physical stability and aerosolization characteristics of nanoporous/nanoparticulate microparticles (NPMPs) prepared by co-spray drying the sugars raffinose pentahydrate (R) or trehalose dihydrate (T) with the cyclic oligosaccharide hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD). Production of powders was carried out using a laboratory scale spray dryer. The resulting powders were characterised by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser diffraction particle sizing, specific surface area analysis (SSA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic vapour sorption (DVS) and aerodynamic assessment using a Next Generation Impactor (NGI). Powders were amorphous and composed of spherical, porous microparticles with reduced particle size and high specific surface area (~100 m(2)/g). DSC scans showed a single glass transition temperature. FTIR was indicative of the existence of molecular interactions between the carbohydrates. DVS analysis showed an increase in the critical relative humidity (RH) of raffinose and trehalose and eventual crystallization inhibition with increasing concentration of HPβCD. The in vitro deposition showed powders formulated with HPβCD had higher recovered emitted dose and fine particle fraction (spray dried alone. The co-spray drying of raffinose or trehalose with HPβCD results in powders with improved physicochemical characteristics, physical stability and aerodynamic behaviour compared to spray-dried raffinose/trehalose particles, constituting improved potential drug-carrier systems for pulmonary delivery.

  2. Aerosol optical characteristics and their vertical distributions under enhanced haze pollution events: effect of the regional transport of different aerosol types over eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The climatological variation of aerosol properties and the planetary boundary layer (PBL during 2013–2015 over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD region were investigated by employing ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL and CE-318 sun-photometer observations. Combining Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO satellite products, enhanced haze pollution events affected by different types of aerosol over the YRD region were analyzed through vertical structures, spatial distributions, backward trajectories, and the potential source contribution function (PSCF model. The results show that aerosols in the YRD are dominated by fine-mode particles, except in March. The aerosol optical depth (AOD in June and September is higher due to high single scattering albedo (SSA from hygroscopic growth, but it is lower in July and August due to wet deposition from precipitation. The PBL height (PBLH is greater (means ranging from 1.23 to 1.84 km and more variable in the warmer months of March to August, due to the stronger diurnal cycle and exchange of heat. Northern fine-mode pollutants are brought to the YRD at a height of 1.5 km. The SSA increases, blocking the radiation to the surface, and cooling the surface, thereby weakening turbulence, lowering the PBL, and in turn accelerating the accumulation of pollutants, creating a feedback to the cooling effect. Originated from the deserts in Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia, long-range transported dust masses are seen at heights of about 2 km over the YRD region with an SSA440 nm below 0.84, which heat air and raise the PBL, accelerating the diffusion of dust particles. Regional transport from biomass-burning spots to the south of the YRD region bring mixed aerosol particles at a height below 1.5 km, resulting in an SSA440 nm below 0.89. During the winter, the accumulation of the local emission layer is facilitated by

  3. Aerosol optical characteristics and their vertical distributions under enhanced haze pollution events: effect of the regional transport of different aerosol types over eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianze; Che, Huizheng; Qi, Bing; Wang, Yaqiang; Dong, Yunsheng; Xia, Xiangao; Wang, Hong; Gui, Ke; Zheng, Yu; Zhao, Hujia; Ma, Qianli; Du, Rongguang; Zhang, Xiaoye

    2018-03-01

    The climatological variation of aerosol properties and the planetary boundary layer (PBL) during 2013-2015 over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region were investigated by employing ground-based Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and CE-318 sun-photometer observations. Combining Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite products, enhanced haze pollution events affected by different types of aerosol over the YRD region were analyzed through vertical structures, spatial distributions, backward trajectories, and the potential source contribution function (PSCF) model. The results show that aerosols in the YRD are dominated by fine-mode particles, except in March. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) in June and September is higher due to high single scattering albedo (SSA) from hygroscopic growth, but it is lower in July and August due to wet deposition from precipitation. The PBL height (PBLH) is greater (means ranging from 1.23 to 1.84 km) and more variable in the warmer months of March to August, due to the stronger diurnal cycle and exchange of heat. Northern fine-mode pollutants are brought to the YRD at a height of 1.5 km. The SSA increases, blocking the radiation to the surface, and cooling the surface, thereby weakening turbulence, lowering the PBL, and in turn accelerating the accumulation of pollutants, creating a feedback to the cooling effect. Originated from the deserts in Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia, long-range transported dust masses are seen at heights of about 2 km over the YRD region with an SSA440 nm below 0.84, which heat air and raise the PBL, accelerating the diffusion of dust particles. Regional transport from biomass-burning spots to the south of the YRD region bring mixed aerosol particles at a height below 1.5 km, resulting in an SSA440 nm below 0.89. During the winter, the accumulation of the local emission layer is facilitated by stable weather conditions

  4. Development of Raman-Mie lidar system for aerosol and water vapor profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qian; Wang, Zhenzhu; Xu, Jiwei; Tan, Min; Wu, Decheng; Xie, Chenbo; Liu, Dong; Wang, Yingjian

    2018-03-01

    Aerosol and water vapor are two important atmospheric parameters. The accurate quantification of diurnal variation of these parameters are very useful for environment assessment and climate change studies. A moveable, compact and unattended lidar system based on modular design is developed for aerosol extinction coefficients and water vapor mixing ratios measurements. In the southern suburbs of Beijing, the continuous observation was carried out by this lidar since the middle of the year of 2017. The lidar equipment is presented and the case study is also described in this paper. The observational results show that the lidar kept a very good status from the long-time continuous measurements which is suitable for networking especially in meteorological research field.

  5. Aerosols from metal cutting techniques typical of decommissioning nuclear facilities - experimental system for collection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Hoover, M.D.; Barr, E.B.; Wong, B.A.; Ritter, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    Decommissioning of radioactively contaminated sites has the potential for creating radioactive and other potentially toxic aerosols. We describe an experimental system to collect and characterize aerosols from metal cutting activities typical of those used in decommissioning of nuclear facilities. A special enclosure was designed for the experiment and consisted of a 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm stud frame with double walls of flame retardant polyethylene film. Large plexiglass windows allowed the cutting operations to be directed and filmed. Ventilation was 8500 liters/minute (300 CFM) exhausted through HEPA filters. Seven cutting techniques were evaluated: pipe cutter, reciprocating saw, band saw, chop saw, oxy-acetylene torch, electric arc cut rod and plasma torch. Two grinding tools were also evaluated. Materials cut were 5.1 cm, 7.6 cm and 10.2 cm diameter schedule 40, 80 and 180 type 304L stainless steel pipe

  6. Characteristics of the higher education system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, Benjamin W.A.; Sijgers, Irene; Hammer, Matthijs; ter Horst, Wolf; Nieuwenhuis, Paul; van der Sijde, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the main characteristics of the higher education system in the Netherlands. Section 2.1 presents some key facts about the system as a whole (types of institutions, number of students, degrees). Section 2.2 discusses the different types of higher education

  7. Characteristics and sources of the fine carbonaceous aerosols in Haikou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoshuang; Zhang, Jiaying; Wang, Lu; Liang, Danni; Cheng, Yuan; Wu, Jianhui; Bi, Xiaohui; Feng, Yinchang; Zhang, Yufen; Yang, Haihang

    2018-01-01

    Ambient PM2.5 samples were collected from January to September 2015 in Haikou. The carbonaceous fractions included OC, EC, OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, EC1, EC2, EC3, Char-EC (EC1 minus POC) and Soot-EC (EC2 plus EC3) were analysed in this study. The results indicate that the mean concentrations of OC and EC are 5.6 and 2.5 μg/m3 during the sampling period, respectively; and the concentrations of most of carbonaceous fractions are the highest in winter and the lowest in spring. The seasonal variations of Soot-EC and Char-EC concentrations show distinct differences. The concentrations of Char-EC are higher in winter and lower in spring; while those of Soot-EC are lower in winter and higher in summer. Compared to Char-EC, the concentrations of Soot-EC show smaller seasonal-variation in Haikou. The Char-EC has the higher correlations with OC and EC (r = 0.91 and 0.95, P 0.05). The average ratios of Char-EC/Soot-EC are in the order of winter (15.9) > autumn (4.9) > summer (4.0) > spring (3.6), with an average value of 7.1. According to error estimation (EE) diagnostics analysis, four factors are revealed in Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis during each season. The combined gasoline/diesel vehicle exhaust, coal combustion, biomass burning and specific diesel vehicle exhaust are identified as the major sources of carbonaceous aerosols, and their contributions during the whole year are up to 29.3%, 27.4%, 17.9% and 15.9%, respectively. The transport trajectories of the air masses illustrate distinct differences during different seasons, and the transport trajectories are mainly derived from the mainland China (i.e. Jiangxi, Fujian and Guangdong provinces) in winter, likely caused by higher contribution of coal combustion.

  8. Marine Aerosol Precursor Emissions for Earth System Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltrud, Mathew Einar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is generated by marine ecosystems and plays a major role in cloud formation over the ocean. Currently, Earth System Models use imposed flux of DMS from the ocean to the atmosphere that is independent of the climate state. We have added DMS as a prognostic variable to the Community Earth System Model (CESM) that depends on the distribution of phytoplankton species, and thus changes with climate.

  9. Interesting Scientific Questions Regarding Interactions in the Gas-aerosol-cloud System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabazadeh, Azadeh

    2002-01-01

    The growth of human population and their use of land, food and energy resources affect the Earth's atmosphere, biosphere and oceans in a complex manner. Many important questions in earth sciences today deal with issues regarding the impact of human activities on our immediate and future environment, ranging in scope from local (i.e. air pollution) to global (i.e. global warming) scale problems. Because the mass of the Earth's atmosphere is negligible compare to that found in the oceans and the biosphere, the atmosphere can respond quickly to natural and/or manmade perturbations. For example, seasonal 'ozone hole' formation in the Antarctic is a result of manmade CFC emissions in just the last 40 years. Also, the observed rise in global temperatures (known as global warming) is linked to a rapid increase in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas concentrations (emitted primarily by combustion processes) over the last century. The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a mixture of gases, aerosol and cloud particles. Natural and anthropogenic emissions of gases and aerosols affect the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. Changes in the chemical and physical makeup of the atmosphere can influence how the Earth will interact with the incoming solar radiation and the outgoing infrared radiation and vise versa. While, some perturbations are short-lived, others are long-lived and can affect the Earth's global climate and chemistry in many decades to come, In order to be able to separate the natural effects from anthropogenic ones, it is essential that we understand the basic physics and chemistry of interactions in the gas-aerosol-cloud system in the Earth's atmosphere. The important physics and chemistry that takes place in the coupled gas-aerosol-cloud system as it relates to aircraft observations are discussed.

  10. Tropospheric Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    m, PM10=1.1 μg m-3; estimated coefficient of light scattering by particulate matter, σep, at 570 nm=12 Mm-1). (b) High aerosol concentration (PM2.5=43.9 μg m-3; PM10=83.4 μg m-3; estimated σep at 570 nm=245 Mm-1) (reproduced by permission of National Park Service, 2002). Although comprising only a small fraction of the mass of Earth's atmosphere, aerosol particles are highly important constituents of the atmosphere. Special interest has focused on aerosols in the troposphere, the lowest part of the atmosphere, extending from the land or ocean surface typically to ˜8 km at high latitudes, ˜12 km in mid-latitudes, and ˜16 km at low latitudes. That interest arises in large part because of the importance of aerosol particles in geophysical processes, human health impairment through inhalation, environmental effects through deposition, visibility degradation, and influences on atmospheric radiation and climate.Anthropogenic aerosols are thought to exert a substantial influence on Earth's climate, and the need to quantify this influence has sparked much of the current interest in and research on tropospheric aerosols. The principal mechanisms by which aerosols influence the Earth radiation budget are scattering and absorbing solar radiation (the so-called "direct effects") and modifying clouds and precipitation, thereby affecting both radiation and hydrology (the so-called "indirect effects"). Light scattering by aerosols increases the brightness of the planet, producing a cooling influence. Light-absorbing aerosols such as black carbon exert a warming influence. Aerosols increase the reflectivity of clouds, another cooling influence. These radiative influences are quantified as forcings, where a forcing is a perturbation to the energy balance of the atmosphere-Earth system, expressed in units of watts per square meter, W m-2. A warming influence is denoted a positive forcing, and a cooling influence, negative. The radiative direct and indirect forcings by

  11. Aerosolization Characteristics of Dry Powder Inhaler Formulations for the Excipient Enhanced Growth (EEG) Application: Effect of Spray Drying Process Conditions on Aerosol Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Yoen-Ju; Longest, P. Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a spray dried submicrometer powder formulation suitable for the excipient enhanced growth (EEG) application. Combination particles were prepared using the Buchi Nano spray dryer B-90. A number of spray drying and formulation variables were investigated with the aims of producing dry powder formulations that were readily dispersed upon aerosolization and maximizing the fraction of submicrometer particles. Albuterol sulfate, mannitol, L-leucine, and poloxame...

  12. Characteristics, sources and evolution of fine aerosol (PM1) at urban, coastal and forest background sites in Lithuania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masalaite, A.; Holzinger, Rupert; Remeikis, V.; Rockmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    The chemical and isotopic composition of organic aerosol (OA) samples collected on PM1 filters was determined as a function of desorption temperature to investigate the main sources of organic carbon and the effects of photochemical processing on atmospheric aerosol. The filter samples were

  13. Air-cleaning systems for sodium-fire-aerosol control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1982-05-01

    A development program has been carried out at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) with the purpose of developing and proof testing air cleaning components and systems for use under severe sodium fire conditions, including those involving high levels of radioactivity. The air cleaning components tested can be classified as either dry filters or aqueous scrubbers. Test results are presented

  14. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  15. Chemical Characteristics of Organic Aerosols in Shanghai: A Study by Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography Coupled With Orbitrap Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinke; Hayeck, Nathalie; Brüggemann, Martin; Yao, Lei; Chen, Hangfei; Zhang, Ci; Emmelin, Corinne; Chen, Jianmin; George, Christian; Wang, Lin

    2017-11-01

    Particulate matter 2.5 (PM2.5) filter samples were collected in July and October 2014 and January and April 2015 in urban Shanghai and analyzed using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled to Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The measured chromatogram-mass spectra were processed by a nontarget screening approach to identify significant signals. In total, 810-1,510 chemical formulas of organic compounds in the negative polarity (negative electrospray ionization (ESI-)) and 860-1,790 in the positive polarity (ESI+), respectively, were determined. The chemical characteristics of organic aerosols (OAs) in Shanghai varied among different months and between daytime and nighttime. In the January samples, organics were generally richer in terms of both number and abundance, whereas those in the July samples were far lower. More CHO- (compounds containing only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen and detected in ESI-) and CHOS- (sulfur-containing organics) were found in the daytime samples, suggesting a photochemical source, whereas CHONS- (nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics) were more abundant in the nighttime samples, due to nocturnal nitrate radical chemistry. A significant number of monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic compounds, and nitrogen- and sulfur-containing heterocyclic compounds, were detected in all samples, indicating that biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion made important contributions to the OAs in urban Shanghai. Additionally, precursor-product pair analysis indicates that the epoxide pathway is an important formation route for organosulfates observed in Shanghai. Moreover, a similar analysis suggests that 35-57% of nitrogen-containing compounds detected in ESI+ could be formed through reactions between ammonia and carbonyls. Our study presents a comprehensive overview of OAs in urban Shanghai, which helps to understand their characteristics and sources.

  16. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with changes in air mass origin at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean, a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition, small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions, could be identified in the particle phase

  17. Characterisation of a uranium fire aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuscher, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium swarf, which can burn spontaneously in air, creates an aerosol which is chemically toxic and radiotoxic. The uptake of uranium oxide in the respiratory system is determined to a large extent by the characteristics of the aerosol. A study has been made of the methods by which aerosols can be characterised. The different measured and defined characteristics of particles are given. The normal and lognormal particle size distributions are discussed. Shape factors interrelating characteristics are explained. Experimental techniques for the characterisation of an aerosol are discussed, as well as the instruments that have been used in this study; namely the Andersen impactor, point-to-plane electrostatic precipitator and the Pollak counter. Uranium swarf was made to burn with a heated filament, and the resulting aerosol was measured. Optical and electron microscopy have been used for the determination of the projected area diameters, and the aerodynamic diameters have been determined with the impactor. The uranium fire aerosol can be represented by a bimodal, or monomodal, lognormal particle size distribution depending on the way in which the swarf burns. The determined activity median aerodynamic diameter of the two peaks were 0,49μm and 6,0μm respectively [af

  18. Improving aerosol interaction with clouds and precipitation in a regional chemical weather modeling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive aerosol–cloud–precipitation interaction (ACI scheme has been developed under a China Meteorological Administration (CMA chemical weather modeling system, GRAPES/CUACE (Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System, CMA Unified Atmospheric Chemistry Environment. Calculated by a sectional aerosol activation scheme based on the information of size and mass from CUACE and the thermal-dynamic and humid states from the weather model GRAPES at each time step, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN are interactively fed online into a two-moment cloud scheme (WRF Double-Moment 6-class scheme – WDM6 and a convective parameterization to drive cloud physics and precipitation formation processes. The modeling system has been applied to study the ACI for January 2013 when several persistent haze-fog events and eight precipitation events occurred.The results show that aerosols that interact with the WDM6 in GRAPES/CUACE obviously increase the total cloud water, liquid water content, and cloud droplet number concentrations, while decreasing the mean diameters of cloud droplets with varying magnitudes of the changes in each case and region. These interactive microphysical properties of clouds improve the calculation of their collection growth rates in some regions and hence the precipitation rate and distributions in the model, showing 24 to 48 % enhancements of threat score for 6 h precipitation in almost all regions. The aerosols that interact with the WDM6 also reduce the regional mean bias of temperature by 3 °C during certain precipitation events, but the monthly means bias is only reduced by about 0.3 °C.

  19. Current Status of Aerosol Generation and Measurement Facilities for the Verification Test of Containment Filtered Venting System in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the design of aerosol generation and measurement systems are explained and present circumstances are also described. In addition, the aerosol test plan is shown. Containment Filtered Venting System (FCVS) is one of the safety features to reduce the amount of released fission product into the environment by depressurizing the containment. Since Chernobyl accident, the regulatory agency in several countries in Europe such as France, Germany, Sweden, etc. have been demanded the installation of the CFVS. Moreover, the feasibility study on the CFVS was also performed in U.S. After the Fukushima accident, there is a need to improve a containment venting or installation of depressurizing facility in Korea. As a part of a Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) project, KAERI has been conducted the integrated performance verification test of CFVS. As a part of the test, aerosol generation system and measurement systems were designed to simulate the fission products behavior. To perform the integrated verification test of CFVS, aerosol generation and measurement system was designed and manufactured. The component operating condition is determined to consider the severe accident condition. The test will be performed in normal conditions at first, and will be conducted under severe condition, high pressure and high temperature. Undesirable difficulties which disturb the elaborate test are expected, such as thermophoresis on the pipe, vapor condensation on aerosol, etc.

  20. Geochemical, Sulfur Isotopic Characteristics and Source Contributions of Size-Aggregated Aerosols Collected in Baring Head, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Michalski, G. M.; Davy, P.; Harvey, M.; Wilkins, B. P.; Katzman, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Sulfate aerosols are critical to the climate, human health, and the hydrological cycle in the atmosphere, yet the sources of sulfate in aerosols are not completely understood. In this work, we evaluated the sources of sulfate in size-aggregated aerosols from the Southern Pacific Ocean and the land of New Zealand using geochemical and isotopic analyses. Aerosols were collected at Baring Head, New Zealand between 6/30/15 to 8/4/16 using two collectors, one only collects Southern Pacific Ocean derived aerosols (open-ocean collector), the other collects aerosols from both the ocean and the land (all-direction collector). Each collector is equipped with two filters to sample size-aggregated aerosols (fine aerosols: DMS flux. The sources of sulfur in NSS-SO42- could be further determined by their d34S values. DMS emission is likely the sole sulfur source in the open-ocean collector as it shows constant DMS-like d34S signatures (15-18‰) throughout the year. Meanwhile, the d34S of NSS-SO42- in the all-direction collector display a seasonal trend: summer time d34S values are higher and DMS-like (15-18‰), indicating DMS emission is the dominant sulfur source; winter time d34S values are lower ( 6-12‰), therefore the sulfur is likely sourced from both DMS emission and terrestrial S input with low d34S values, such as volcanic activities, fossil fuel and wood burning.

  1. Characteristics and source apportionment of fine haze aerosol in Beijing during the winter of 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xiaona; Zhang, Kai; Meng, Fan; Wang, Shihao; Lee, Meehye; Suh, Inseon; Kim, Daigon; Jeon, Kwonho; Park, Hyunju; Wang, Xuezhong; Zhao, Yuxi

    2018-02-01

    For PM2.5 filter samples collected daily at the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences (Beijing, China) from December of 2013 to February of 2014 (the winter period), chemical characteristics and sources were investigated with an emphasis on haze events in different alert levels. During the 3 months, the average PM2.5 concentration was 89 µg m-3, exceeding the Chinese national standard of 75 µg m-3 in 24  h. The maximum PM2.5 concentration was 307 µg m-3, which characterizes developed-type pollution (PM2.5 / PM10>0.5) in the World Health Organization criteria. PM2.5 was dominated by SO42-, NO3-, and pseudo-carbonaceous compounds with obvious differences in concentrations and proportions between non-haze and haze episodes. The non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) analysis provided reasonable PM2.5 source profiles, by which five sources were identified: soil dust, traffic emission, biomass combustion, industrial emission, and coal combustion accounting for 13, 22, 12, 28, and 25  % of the total, respectively. The dust impact increased with northwesterlies during non-haze periods and decreased under stagnant conditions during haze periods. A blue alert of heavy air pollution was characterized by the greatest contribution from industrial emissions (61  %). During the Chinese Lantern Festival, an orange alert was issued and biomass combustion was found to be the major source owing to firework explosions. Red-alert haze was almost equally contributed by local traffic and transported coal combustion emissions from the vicinity of Beijing (approximately 40  % each) that was distinguished by the highest levels of NO3- and SO42-, respectively. This study also reveals that the severity and source of haze are largely dependent on meteorological conditions.

  2. Characteristics and source apportionment of fine haze aerosol in Beijing during the winter of 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Shang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available For PM2.5 filter samples collected daily at the Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences (Beijing, China from December of 2013 to February of 2014 (the winter period, chemical characteristics and sources were investigated with an emphasis on haze events in different alert levels. During the 3 months, the average PM2.5 concentration was 89 µg m−3, exceeding the Chinese national standard of 75 µg m−3 in 24  h. The maximum PM2.5 concentration was 307 µg m−3, which characterizes developed-type pollution (PM2.5 / PM10>0.5 in the World Health Organization criteria. PM2.5 was dominated by SO42−, NO3−, and pseudo-carbonaceous compounds with obvious differences in concentrations and proportions between non-haze and haze episodes. The non-negative matrix factorization (NMF analysis provided reasonable PM2.5 source profiles, by which five sources were identified: soil dust, traffic emission, biomass combustion, industrial emission, and coal combustion accounting for 13, 22, 12, 28, and 25  % of the total, respectively. The dust impact increased with northwesterlies during non-haze periods and decreased under stagnant conditions during haze periods. A blue alert of heavy air pollution was characterized by the greatest contribution from industrial emissions (61  %. During the Chinese Lantern Festival, an orange alert was issued and biomass combustion was found to be the major source owing to firework explosions. Red-alert haze was almost equally contributed by local traffic and transported coal combustion emissions from the vicinity of Beijing (approximately 40  % each that was distinguished by the highest levels of NO3− and SO42−, respectively. This study also reveals that the severity and source of haze are largely dependent on meteorological conditions.

  3. In vitro evaluation of radio-labeled aerosol delivery via a variable-flow infant CPAP system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farney, Kimberly D; Kuehne, Brandon T; Gibson, Laurie A; Nelin, Leif D; Shepherd, Edward G

    2014-03-01

    Nasal CPAP is widely used in neonatal ICUs. Aerosolized medications such as inhaled steroids and β agonists are commonly administered in-line through nasal CPAP, especially to infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. We hypothesized that aerosol delivery to the lungs via variable-flow nasal CPAP in an in vitro model would be unreliable, and that the delivery would depend on the position of the aerosol generator within the nasal CPAP circuit. We used a system that employed a test lung placed in a plastic jar and subjected to negative pressure. Simulated inspiration effort was measured with a heated-wire anemometer. We used technetium-99m-labeled diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid as our aerosol. The nebulizer was placed either close to the humidifier or close to the nasal prongs in the circuit, and patient effort was simulated with a minute ventilation of 0.4 L/min. Relative aerosol delivery to the infant test lung with the nebulizer close to the humidifier was extremely low (0.3 ± 0.4%), whereas placing the nebulizer close to the nasal prongs resulted in significantly (P nasal prongs were: nebulizer (10 ± 4% vs 33 ± 13%, P nasal CPAP was negligible in this in vitro setup; however, such delivery was significantly improved by locating the aerosol generator closer to the nasal CPAP interface.

  4. Emission characteristics of refractory black carbon aerosols from fresh biomass burning: a perspective from laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaole; Kanaya, Yugo; Taketani, Fumikazu; Miyakawa, Takuma; Inomata, Satoshi; Komazaki, Yuichi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Wang, Zhe; Uno, Itsushi; Wang, Zifa

    2017-11-01

    The emission characteristics of refractory black carbon (rBC) from biomass burning are essential information for numerical simulations of regional pollution and climate effects. We conducted combustion experiments in the laboratory to investigate the emission ratio and mixing state of rBC from the burning of wheat straw and rapeseed plants, which are the main crops cultivated in the Yangtze River Delta region of China. A single particle soot photometer (SP2) was used to measure rBC-containing particles at high temporal resolution and with high accuracy. The combustion state of each burning case was indicated by the modified combustion efficiency (MCE), which is calculated using the integrated enhancement of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide concentrations relative to their background values. The mass size distribution of the rBC particles showed a lognormal shape with a mode mass equivalent diameter (MED) of 189 nm (ranging from 152 to 215 nm), assuming an rBC density of 1.8 g cm-3. rBC particles less than 80 nm in size (the lower detection limit of the SP2) accounted for ˜ 5 % of the total rBC mass, on average. The emission ratios, which are expressed as ΔrBC / ΔCO (Δ indicates the difference between the observed and background values), displayed a significant positive correlation with the MCE values and varied between 1.8 and 34 ng m-3 ppbv-1. Multi-peak fitting analysis of the delay time (Δt, or the time of occurrence of the scattering peak minus that of the incandescence peak) distribution showed that rBC-containing particles with rBC MED = 200 ± 10 nm displayed two peaks at Δt = 1.7 µs and Δt = 3.2 µs, which could be attributed to the contributions from both flaming and smoldering combustion in each burning case. Both the Δt values and the shell / core ratios of the rBC-containing particles clearly increased as the MCE decreased from 0.98 (smoldering-dominant combustion) to 0.86 (flaming-dominant combustion), implying the great importance of the

  5. Comparison of Aerosol optical depth (AOD) derived from AERONET sunphotometer and Lidar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khor, Wei Ying; Hee, Wan Shen; Tan, Fuyi; Lim, Hwee San; Jafri, Mohamad Zubir Mat; Holben, Brent

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is the measure of aerosols distributed within a column of air from the instrument or Earth's surface to the top of the atmosphere. In this paper, we compared the AOD measured by the Raymetrics Lidar system and AERONET sunphotometer. A total of 6 days data which was collected by both instruments were compiled and compared. Generally, AOD value calculated from Lidar data are higher than that calculated from AERONET data. Differences and similarities in the AOD data trend were observed and the corresponding explanations were done. Level 1.5 data of AERONET is estimated to have an accuracy of ±0.03, thus the Lidar data should follow the trend of the AERONET. But in this regards, this study was conducted less than one month and was very difficult to justify the differences and similarities between AOD measured by the Raymetrics Lidar system and AERONET sunphotometer. So further studies for an extended period will be needed and performed with more comprehensive LIDAR measurements. The slope of the best-fit straight line for the data points between the AOD values retrieved from LIDAR and the AERONET measurements is the closest to unity and the coefficient of determination is high (above 0. 6692). Factors which affect AOD data were discussed. As a conclusion, the trends of the AOD of both systems are similar. Yet due to some external factors, the trend will be slightly different

  6. Emission characteristics of refractory black carbon aerosols from fresh biomass burning: a perspective from laboratory experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Pan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The emission characteristics of refractory black carbon (rBC from biomass burning are essential information for numerical simulations of regional pollution and climate effects. We conducted combustion experiments in the laboratory to investigate the emission ratio and mixing state of rBC from the burning of wheat straw and rapeseed plants, which are the main crops cultivated in the Yangtze River Delta region of China. A single particle soot photometer (SP2 was used to measure rBC-containing particles at high temporal resolution and with high accuracy. The combustion state of each burning case was indicated by the modified combustion efficiency (MCE, which is calculated using the integrated enhancement of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide concentrations relative to their background values. The mass size distribution of the rBC particles showed a lognormal shape with a mode mass equivalent diameter (MED of 189 nm (ranging from 152 to 215 nm, assuming an rBC density of 1.8 g cm−3. rBC particles less than 80 nm in size (the lower detection limit of the SP2 accounted for ∼ 5 % of the total rBC mass, on average. The emission ratios, which are expressed as ΔrBC ∕ ΔCO (Δ indicates the difference between the observed and background values, displayed a significant positive correlation with the MCE values and varied between 1.8 and 34 ng m−3 ppbv−1. Multi-peak fitting analysis of the delay time (Δt, or the time of occurrence of the scattering peak minus that of the incandescence peak distribution showed that rBC-containing particles with rBC MED  =  200 ± 10 nm displayed two peaks at Δt  =  1.7 µs and Δt  =  3.2 µs, which could be attributed to the contributions from both flaming and smoldering combustion in each burning case. Both the Δt values and the shell / core ratios of the rBC-containing particles clearly increased as the MCE decreased from 0.98 (smoldering

  7. Profiling Systems Using the Defining Characteristics of Systems of Systems (SoS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    system exhaust and emissions system gas engine heating and air conditioning system fuel system regenerative braking system safety system...47 4.4 National Smart Grid 50 5 Two Other Sets of System Characteristics 54 5.1 Quality Characteristics 54 5.1.1 Definitions 54 ii | CMU/SEI...System Characteristics of a Military Aircraft Fleet 50 Figure 23: Meters for the System Characteristics of a National Smart Grid 53 Figure 24: The

  8. Hydraulic characteristics of oil sands hydrotransport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, J. M. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Research Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada)); McDonnell, B. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada))

    1999-01-01

    Operating characteristics of a large-scale hydrotransport system which was installed at Syncrude in 1997 to transport oil sands to the processing plant about 4.5 km away is described. While in transit, the bitumen also undergoes conditioning. Some unique characteristics associated with the presence of bitumen have been observed . For example, headlosses in the horizontal pipeline were close to the water line for normal oil sands, but considerably higher for high grade oil sands. Pump head ratios and efficiency ratios were observed to be affected negatively by the presence of high grade oil sands. Slurry density had the same negative effect. The overall result of lower pump efficiencies and larger headloss with higher grade ore is a general degradation of system performance. The lesson to be learned from this observation is that when handling slurries with higher oil sand grades, it is essential to increase pumping capacity . 9 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Hydraulic characteristics of oil sands hydrotransport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coward, J. M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Research Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada); McDonnell, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1999-10-01

    Operating characteristics of a large-scale hydrotransport system which was installed at Syncrude in 1997 to transport oil sands to the processing plant about 4.5 km away is described. While in transit, the bitumen also undergoes conditioning. Some unique characteristics associated with the presence of bitumen have been observed . For example, headlosses in the horizontal pipeline were close to the water line for normal oil sands, but considerably higher for high grade oil sands. Pump head ratios and efficiency ratios were observed to be affected negatively by the presence of high grade oil sands. Slurry density had the same negative effect. The overall result of lower pump efficiencies and larger headloss with higher grade ore is a general degradation of system performance. The lesson to be learned from this observation is that when handling slurries with higher oil sand grades, it is essential to increase pumping capacity . 9 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Four-wavelength lidar evaluation of particle characteristics and aerosol densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthe, E. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Delateur, S. A.; Nielsen, N. B.

    1985-06-01

    The SRI International four-wavelength (0.53, 1.06, 3.8, 10.6 micron) lidar systems was used during the SNOW-ONE-B and Smoke Week XI/SNOW-TWO field experiments to validate its capabilities in assessing obscurant optical and physical properties. The lidar viewed along a horizontal path terminated by a passive reflector. Data examples were analyzed in terms of time-dependent transmission, wavelength dependence of optical depth, and range-resolved extinction coefficients. Three methods were used to derive extinction data from the lidar signatures. These were target method, Klett method and experimental data method. The results of the field and analysis programs are reported in the journal and conference papers that are appended to this report, and include: comparison study of lidar extinction methods, submitted to applied optics, error analysis of lidar solution techniques for range-resolved extinction coefficients based on observational data, smoke/obscurants symposium 9, Four--Wavelength Lidar Measurements from smoke week 6/SNOW-TWO, smoke/obscurants symposium 8, SNOW-ONE-B multiple-wavelength lidar measurements. Snow symposium 3, and lidar applications for obscurant evaluations, smoke/obscurants Symposium 7. The report also provides a summary of background work leading to this project, and of project results.

  11. Microanalysis of indoor aerosols and the impact of a compact high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, M E

    1999-03-01

    Aerosol particles in municipal atmospheres are of increasing public health concern; however, since most of our time is spent indoors, indoor aerosols must be researched in counterpart. Compact High-Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter systems are commonly employed in residences to alleviate airborne dust concentrations. In this study, a detailed and original methodology was used to determine concentrations and types of submicrometer aerosols, as well as of large (> 4 microns) dust particles. Scanning electron microscopy was used to quantify and characterize ambient aerosols collected from filtered and non-filtered rooms. Particle concentrations were significantly lower in samples collected in the presence of the filter system (mean 23 to 8 coarse particles liter-1, 63% reduction; 13 to 3 inorganic submicron particles cm-3, 76% reduction; 85 to 33 total submicron particles cm-3, 62% reduction; all P filter systems are effective at reducing submicron aerosol concentrations, they may improve the health of individuals such as asthmatics, who experience health problems caused by anthropogenic fine particles.

  12. GUIDE TO CALCULATING TRANSPORT EFFICIENCY OF AEROSOLS IN OCCUPATIONAL AIR SAMPLING SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogue, M.; Hadlock, D.; Thompson, M.; Farfan, E.

    2013-11-12

    This report will present hand calculations for transport efficiency based on aspiration efficiency and particle deposition losses. Because the hand calculations become long and tedious, especially for lognormal distributions of aerosols, an R script (R 2011) will be provided for each element examined. Calculations are provided for the most common elements in a remote air sampling system, including a thin-walled probe in ambient air, straight tubing, bends and a sample housing. One popular alternative approach would be to put such calculations in a spreadsheet, a thorough version of which is shared by Paul Baron via the Aerocalc spreadsheet (Baron 2012). To provide greater transparency and to avoid common spreadsheet vulnerabilities to errors (Burns 2012), this report uses R. The particle size is based on the concept of activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD). The AMAD is a particle size in an aerosol where fifty percent of the activity in the aerosol is associated with particles of aerodynamic diameter greater than the AMAD. This concept allows for the simplification of transport efficiency calculations where all particles are treated as spheres with the density of water (1g cm-3). In reality, particle densities depend on the actual material involved. Particle geometries can be very complicated. Dynamic shape factors are provided by Hinds (Hinds 1999). Some example factors are: 1.00 for a sphere, 1.08 for a cube, 1.68 for a long cylinder (10 times as long as it is wide), 1.05 to 1.11 for bituminous coal, 1.57 for sand and 1.88 for talc. Revision 1 is made to correct an error in the original version of this report. The particle distributions are based on activity weighting of particles rather than based on the number of particles of each size. Therefore, the mass correction made in the original version is removed from the text and the calculations. Results affected by the change are updated.

  13. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) in a Novel Molten Salt Aerosol System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ammon N; Phongikaroon, Supathorn

    2017-04-01

    In the pyrochemical separation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), fission product, rare earth, and actinide chlorides accumulate in the molten salt electrolyte over time. Measuring this salt composition in near real-time is advantageous for operational efficiency, material accountability, and nuclear safeguards. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been proposed and demonstrated as a potential analytical approach for molten LiCl-KCl salts. However, all the studies conducted to date have used a static surface approach which can lead to issues with splashing, low repeatability, and poor sample homogeneity. In this initial study, a novel molten salt aerosol approach has been developed and explored to measure the composition of the salt via LIBS. The functionality of the system has been demonstrated as well as a basic optimization of the laser energy and nebulizer gas pressure used. Initial results have shown that this molten salt aerosol-LIBS system has a great potential as an analytical technique for measuring the molten salt electrolyte used in this UNF reprocessing technology.

  14. Characteristics, sources and evolution of fine aerosol (PM1) at urban, coastal and forest background sites in Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masalaite, A.; Holzinger, R.; Remeikis, V.; Röckmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    2017-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of organic aerosol (OA) samples collected on PM1 filters was determined as a function of desorption temperature to investigate the main sources of organic carbon and the effects of photochemical processing on atmospheric aerosol. The filter samples were collected at an urban (54°38‧ N, 25°18‧ E), coastal (55°55‧ N, 21°00‧ E) and forest (55°27‧ N, 26°00' E) site in Lithuania in March 2013. They can be interpreted as winter-time samples because the monthly averaged temperature was -4 °C. The detailed chemical composition of organic compounds was analysed with a thermal desorption PTR-MS. The mass concentration of organic aerosol at the forest site was roughly by a factor of 30 lower than at the urban and coastal site. This fact could be an indication that in this cold month the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation was very low. Moreover, the organic aerosol collected at the forest site was more refractory and contained a larger fraction of heavy molecules with m/z > 200. The isotopic composition of the aerosol was used to differentiate the two main sources of organic aerosol in winter, i.e. biomass burning (BB) and fossil fuel (FF) combustion. Organic aerosol from biomass burning is enriched in 13C compared to OA from fossil fuel emissions. δ13COC values of the OA samples showed a positive correlation with the mass fraction of several individual organic compounds. Most of these organic compounds contained nitrogen indicating that organic nitrogen compounds formed during the combustion of biomass may be indicative of BB. Other compounds that showed negative correlations with δ13COC were possibly indicative of FF. These compounds included heavy hydrocarbons and were on the average less oxidized than the bulk organic carbon. The correlation of δ13COC and the O/C ratio was positive at low but negative at high desorption temperatures at the forest site. We propose that this might be due to

  15. Understanding the influence of powder flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration characteristics on the aerosolization of pharmaceutical model powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Armstrong, Brian; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2010-08-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the intrinsic inter-particulate cohesion of model pharmaceutical powders on their aerosolization from a dry powder inhaler. Two cohesive poly-disperse lactose powders with median particle sizes of around 4 and 20 microm were examined. The results showed that after dry coating with magnesium stearate, their flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration behaviours could be substantially improved, as indicated by powder rheometry, shear testing and laser diffraction aerosol testing. This was achieved by reducing their cohesiveness via surface modification. In contrast to some previous reports, this study demonstrated how powder aerosolization may be improved more significantly and consistently (for widely varying air flow rates) by substantially reducing their inter-particulate cohesive forces. This study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between intrinsic cohesive nature and bulk properties such as flowability, fluidization and de-agglomeration and its impact on their aerosolization, which is fundamental and critical in the optimal design of dry powder inhaler formulations. The intensive mechanical dry coating technique also demonstrated a promising potential to improve aerosolization efficiency of fine cohesive model powders. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Optical absorption characteristics of brown carbon aerosols during the KORUS-AQ campaign at an urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungshik; Yu, Geun-Hye; Lee, Sangil

    2018-05-01

    This study investigates the absorption characteristics of brown carbon (BrC) obtained from water and methanol extracts of fine particulate matter measured at an urban site in Gwangju, Korea during the KOREA U.S. - Air Quality campaign (May 2-June 11, 2016). The measurement period was classified into two intervals: biomass burning (BB) and non-BB periods. During the non-BB period, water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and humic-like substances (HULIS) primarily resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and primary vehicle emissions. Water-soluble organic aerosols during the BB period, meanwhile, were closely related to SOA formation and regionally transported BB emissions. The light absorption coefficient measured at 365 nm (babs,365) by methanol extracts was 2.6 and 6.1 times higher than the coefficients from the water and HULIS extracts, respectively, indicating the importance of BrC absorption by water-insoluble organic carbon. This was demonstrated by a good correlation between the water-insoluble BrC absorption and the elemental carbon concentration. A comparison of babs,365 between the methanol- and water-extracted BrC indicated that water-insoluble BrC accounted for approximately 61% (33-86%) of the total BrC absorption. The contributions of SOA, primary BB emissions, and traffic emissions to the water extract babs,365 were estimated using a stepwise multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis and found to be 1.17 ± 0.55, 0.65 ± 0.62, and 0.25 ± 0.09 Mm- 1, respectively, accounting for 59.6, 26.1, and 14.3% of the absorption coefficient by the water-soluble BrC. Further, it was determined that the contribution of the BB emissions to the water-soluble BrC absorption was approximately two times higher in the BB period than in the non-BB period. The average absorption Ångstrӧm exponent was 4.8 ± 0.3, 5.3 ± 0.7, and 6.8 ± 0.8 for the methanol, water, and HULIS extracts, respectively. The average mass absorption efficiency (MAE365) of methanol

  17. Spectroscopic Determination of Aerosol pH from Acid-Base Equilibria in Inorganic, Organic, and Mixed Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Rebecca L; Nandy, Lucy; Axson, Jessica L; Dutcher, Cari S; Ault, Andrew P

    2017-08-03

    Atmospheric aerosol acidity impacts key multiphase processes, such as acid-catalyzed reactions leading to secondary organic aerosol formation, which impact climate and human health. However, traditional indirect methods of estimating aerosol pH often disagree with thermodynamic model predictions, resulting in aerosol acidity still being poorly understood in the atmosphere. Herein, a recently developed method coupling Raman microspectroscopy with extended Debye-Hückel activity calculations to directly determine the acidity of individual particles (1-15 μm projected area diameter, average 6 μm) was applied to a range of atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic acid-base equilibria systems (HNO 3 /NO 3 - , HC 2 O 4 - /C 2 O 4 2- , CH 3 COOH/CH 3 COO - , and HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- ) covering a broad pH range (-1 to 10), as well as an inorganic-organic mixture (sulfate-oxalate). Given the ionic strength of the inorganic solutions, the H + activity, γ(H + ), yielded lower values (0.68-0.75) than the organic and mixed systems (0.72-0.80). A consistent relationship between increasing peak broadness with decreasing pH was observed for acidic species, but not their conjugate bases. Greater insight into spectroscopic responses to acid-base equilibria for more complicated mixtures is still needed to understand the behavior of atmospheric aerosols.

  18. Design, assembly, and validation of a nose-only inhalation exposure system for studies of aerosolized viable influenza H5N1 virus in ferrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Sara B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The routes by which humans acquire influenza H5N1 infections have not been fully elucidated. Based on the known biology of influenza viruses, four modes of transmission are most likely in humans: aerosol transmission, ingestion of undercooked contaminated infected poultry, transmission by large droplets and self-inoculation of the nasal mucosa by contaminated hands. In preparation of a study to resolve whether H5N1 viruses are transmissible by aerosol in an animal model that is a surrogate for humans, an inhalation exposure system for studies of aerosolized H5N1 viruses in ferrets was designed, assembled, and validated. Particular attention was paid towards system safety, efficacy of dissemination, the viability of aerosolized virus, and sampling methodology. Results An aerosol generation and delivery system, referred to as a Nose-Only Bioaerosol Exposure System (NBIES, was assembled and function tested. The NBIES passed all safety tests, met expected engineering parameters, required relatively small quantities of material to obtain the desired aerosol concentrations of influenza virus, and delivered doses with high-efficacy. Ferrets withstood a mock exposure trial without signs of stress. Conclusions The NBIES delivers doses of aerosolized influenza viruses with high efficacy, and uses less starting material than other similar designs. Influenza H5N1 and H3N2 viruses remain stable under the conditions used for aerosol generation and sample collection. The NBIES is qualified for studies of aerosolized H5N1 virus.

  19. Design, assembly, and validation of a nose-only inhalation exposure system for studies of aerosolized viable influenza H5N1 virus in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Richard S; Sosna, William A; Daniels, Deirdre E; Hamilton, Sara B; Lednicky, John A

    2010-06-23

    The routes by which humans acquire influenza H5N1 infections have not been fully elucidated. Based on the known biology of influenza viruses, four modes of transmission are most likely in humans: aerosol transmission, ingestion of undercooked contaminated infected poultry, transmission by large droplets and self-inoculation of the nasal mucosa by contaminated hands. In preparation of a study to resolve whether H5N1 viruses are transmissible by aerosol in an animal model that is a surrogate for humans, an inhalation exposure system for studies of aerosolized H5N1 viruses in ferrets was designed, assembled, and validated. Particular attention was paid towards system safety, efficacy of dissemination, the viability of aerosolized virus, and sampling methodology. An aerosol generation and delivery system, referred to as a Nose-Only Bioaerosol Exposure System (NBIES), was assembled and function tested. The NBIES passed all safety tests, met expected engineering parameters, required relatively small quantities of material to obtain the desired aerosol concentrations of influenza virus, and delivered doses with high-efficacy. Ferrets withstood a mock exposure trial without signs of stress. The NBIES delivers doses of aerosolized influenza viruses with high efficacy, and uses less starting material than other similar designs. Influenza H5N1 and H3N2 viruses remain stable under the conditions used for aerosol generation and sample collection. The NBIES is qualified for studies of aerosolized H5N1 virus.

  20. Reduction of nanoparticle exposure to welding aerosols by modification of the ventilation system in a workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myong-Hwa; McClellan, William J.; Candela, Joe; Andrews, Dan; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer particle size distributions were measured in booths with two different ventilation patterns in an occupational environment with welding operations underway. The measurements were used to illustrate the impact of change of ventilation methods (existing - with ventilation ducts located at the top, modified - with ventilation ducts located below the weld bench) on the aerosol size distributions at different locations: close to the weld, in the vicinity of the welder's face, and in the exhaust duct. Particle number concentrations measured in the vicinity of the welder's face (mask) during a horizontal standard arc welding process in a booth with ventilation at the top was in the range of 7.78×105 particles cm-3 with a geometric mean size of 181 nm and geometric standard deviation of 1.8. This reduced to 1.48×104 particles cm-3 in the vicinity of the welder's face with the modified ventilation system. The clearance of the welding aerosol was also faster in the modified booth (6 min compared to 11 min in a conventional booth). Particles were collected in the booth for the various test conditions, and analyzed to determine their composition and morphology. The particles were composed of hazardous heavy metals such as manganese, chromium and nickel, and had varying morphologies.

  1. Reduction of nanoparticle exposure to welding aerosols by modification of the ventilation system in a workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myong-Hwa; McClellan, William J.; Candela, Joe; Andrews, Dan; Biswas, Pratim

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer particle size distributions were measured in booths with two different ventilation patterns in an occupational environment with welding operations underway. The measurements were used to illustrate the impact of change of ventilation methods (existing - with ventilation ducts located at the top, modified - with ventilation ducts located below the weld bench) on the aerosol size distributions at different locations: close to the weld, in the vicinity of the welder's face, and in the exhaust duct. Particle number concentrations measured in the vicinity of the welder's face (mask) during a horizontal standard arc welding process in a booth with ventilation at the top was in the range of 7.78x10 5 particles cm -3 with a geometric mean size of 181 nm and geometric standard deviation of 1.8. This reduced to 1.48x10 4 particles cm -3 in the vicinity of the welder's face with the modified ventilation system. The clearance of the welding aerosol was also faster in the modified booth (6 min compared to 11 min in a conventional booth). Particles were collected in the booth for the various test conditions, and analyzed to determine their composition and morphology. The particles were composed of hazardous heavy metals such as manganese, chromium and nickel, and had varying morphologies

  2. Operational characteristics of VEC vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanadham, C.; Bhavsar, S.T.; Bose, D.K.; Chintalapudi, S.N.; Das, S.K.; Tiwary, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The main vacuum system of the Variable Energy Cyclotron which has been built indigenously has fulfilled the requirements for the smooth operation of the machine. By running two 88.9 cm diffusion pumps with freon cooled baffles and backed by 600 l/m rotary pumps, a pressure of 5 x 10 -6 torr in absence of the beam and 1 x 10 -5 torr in presence of the beam is readily achieved in the 23 m 3 volume. Various means have been adopted to maintain the system in order and contamination-free, by maintaining a pressure level of 1 x 10 -4 torr throughout the working week by a 30 cm diffusion pump, which can run even on emergency power. Cryopanels have also been installed and tried out. Details of pump-down characteristics and system performance are discussed. (auth.)

  3. New satellite project Aerosol-UA: Remote sensing of aerosols in the terrestrial atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, M.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; Sosonkin, M.; Moskalov, S.; Bovchaliuk, V.; Lukenyuk, A.; Shymkiv, A.; Udodov, E.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earth's surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  4. New Satellite Project Aerosol-UA: Remote Sensing of Aerosols in the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinevsky, G.; Yatskiv, Ya.; Degtyaryov, O.; Syniavskyi, I.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, V.; Ivanov, Yu.; Makarov, A.; Bovchaliuk, A.; Danylevsky, V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the development of the Ukrainian space project Aerosol-UA which has the following three main objectives: (1) to monitor the spatial distribution of key characteristics of terrestrial tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols; (2) to provide a comprehensive observational database enabling accurate quantitative estimates of the aerosol contribution to the energy budget of the climate system; and (3) quantify the contribution of anthropogenic aerosols to climate and ecological processes. The remote sensing concept of the project is based on precise orbital measurements of the intensity and polarization of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere and the surface with a scanning polarimeter accompanied by a wide-angle multispectral imager-polarimeter. Preparations have already been made for the development of the instrument suite for the Aerosol-UA project, in particular, of the multi-channel scanning polarimeter (ScanPol) designed for remote sensing studies of the global distribution of aerosol and cloud properties (such as particle size, morphology, and composition) in the terrestrial atmosphere by polarimetric and spectrophotometric measurements of the scattered sunlight in a wide range of wavelengths and viewing directions from which a scene location is observed. ScanPol is accompanied by multispectral wide-angle imager-polarimeter (MSIP) that serves to collect information on cloud conditions and Earths surface image. Various components of the polarimeter ScanPol have been prototyped, including the opto-mechanical and electronic assemblies and the scanning mirror controller. Preliminary synthetic data simulations for the retrieval of aerosol parameters over land surfaces have been performed using the Generalized Retrieval of Aerosol and Surface Properties (GRASP) algorithm. Methods for the validation of satellite data using ground-based observations of aerosol properties are also discussed. We assume that designing, building, and launching into orbit a multi

  5. Characteristics of element composition of aerosols adsorbed on leaves by radioactivation analysis and their effects on plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, Takejiro; Koshikawa, Masami; Sase, Hiroyuki; Masuzawa, Toshiyuki; Kawashima, Munetsugu; Takada, Jitsuya; Matsushita, Rokuji

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol deposits on leaves of various trees, especially cedar in different regions of Japan were collected to characterize the elemental composition using neutron activation analysis, ICP-AES, etc. and also investigate the effects of deposit aerosols on plants and the efficacy as an indicator for air pollution. Compared with the elemental composition of the soil, Se, Cr, Au, Br, As, Sb, Ag, etc. were more abundant in aerosols on cedar leaves. Especially, Sb is thought to be mostly derived from combustion of fossil fuels (exhaust gas from cars, etc.). Since Sb was accumulated on leaves at high levels and the analytical precision for Sb by neutron radioactivation was very high, the element was thought useful as an indicator for air pollution. If the amounts of Sb on the leaves of cedar and pine trees, which are widely distributed in Japan are determined, the degrees of pollution in all regions of Japan would be determined. In cedar trees of Saitama Prefecture where the deposit amounts of aerosols were comparatively larger, 42% of stoma was covered with the deposits, resulting that the rate of cuticular transpiration was increased and the amounts of basic elements leached from the leave surface was also increased. Thus, it was suggested that these changes might be the cause of recent declining of cedars in Japanese urban regions. (M.N.)

  6. Investigation of molar volume and surfactant characteristics of water-soluble organic compounds in biomass burning aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Asa-Awuku

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we characterize the CCN activity of the water-soluble organics in biomass burning aerosol. The aerosol after collection upon filters is dissolved in water using sonication. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic components are fractionated from a portion of the original sample using solid phase extraction, and subsequently desalted. The surface tension and CCN activity of these different samples are measured with a KSV CAM 200 goniometer and a DMT Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Counter, respectively. The measurements show that the strongest surfactants are isolated in the hydrophobic fraction, while the hydrophilics exhibit negligible surface tension depression. The presence of salts (primarily (NH42SO4 in the hydrophobic fraction substantially enhances surface tension depression; their synergistic effects considerably enhance CCN activity, exceeding that of pure (NH42SO4. From our analysis, average thermodynamic properties (i.e, molar volume are determined for samples using our newly developed Köhler Theory Analysis (KTA method. The molar mass of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic aerosol components is estimated to be 87±26 g mol−1 and 780±231 g mol−1, respectively. KTA also suggests that the relative proportion (in moles of hydrophobic to hydrophilic compounds in the original sample to be 1:3. For the first time, KTA is applied to an aerosol with this level of complexity and displays its potential for providing physically-based constraints for GCM parameterizations of the aerosol indirect effect.

  7. [Seasonal Variation Characteristics and Potential Source Contribution of Sulfate, Nitrate and Ammonium in Beijing by Using Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lang; Zhang, Wen-jie; Du, Shi-yong; Hou, Lu-jian; Han, Bin; Yang, Wen; Chen, Min-dong; Bai, Zhi-peng

    2016-05-15

    Single particle aerosol mass spectrometry (SPAMS) was deployed to continuously observe the aerosol particles of Beijing urban area from 2013-12 to 2014-11, and the hourly average data of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium (SNA) were obtained using the characteristic ion tracer method. The mixing state and size distribution of SNA were analyzed. In addition, based on Hysplit 48 h back air mass trajectory results in combination with Concentration Weighted Trajectory method (CWT), we obtained the seasonal potential source contribution area of SNA. The results showed that the mixture of sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in spring and summer was more stable than that in autumn and winter. The size distribution of sulfate and nitrate was very similar. The size distribution characteristics of SNA followed the order of autumn > summer > spring > winter. The potential source region of SNA had similar spatial distribution characteristics, and the potential source region of SNA was mainly located in Beijing and south areas, especially at Tianjin, Langfang, Hengshui, Baoding and Shijiazhuang.

  8. WRF-CMAQ two-way coupled system with aerosol feedback: software development and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Wong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Air quality models such as the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ require meteorological data as part of the input to drive the chemistry and transport simulation. The Meteorology-Chemistry Interface Processor (MCIP is used to convert meteorological data into CMAQ-ready input. Key shortcoming of such one-way coupling include: excessive temporal interpolation of coarsely saved meteorological input and lack of feedback of atmospheric pollutant loading on simulated dynamics. We have developed a two-way coupled system to address these issues. A single source code principle was used to construct this two-way coupling system so that CMAQ can be consistently executed as a stand-alone model or part of the coupled system without any code changes; this approach eliminates maintenance of separate code versions for the coupled and uncoupled systems. The design also provides the flexibility to permit users: (1 to adjust the call frequency of WRF and CMAQ to balance the accuracy of the simulation versus computational intensity of the system, and (2 to execute the two-way coupling system with feedbacks to study the effect of gases and aerosols on short wave radiation and subsequent simulated dynamics. Details on the development and implementation of this two-way coupled system are provided. When the coupled system is executed without radiative feedback, computational time is virtually identical when using the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM radiation option and a slightly increased (~8.5% when using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for GCMs (RRTMG radiation option in the coupled system compared to the offline WRF-CMAQ system. Once the feedback mechanism is turned on, the execution time increases only slightly with CAM but increases about 60% with RRTMG due to the use of a more detailed Mie calculation in this implementation of feedback mechanism. This two-way model with radiative feedback shows noticeably reduced bias in simulated surface shortwave

  9. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with continental, urban and marine air masses at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesch, J.-M.; Drewnick, F.; Zorn, S. R.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Martinez, M.; Borrmann, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides) project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W). As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville) and the Atlantic Ocean a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS). Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2) and a weather station provided meteorological parameters. Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m-3 and 1000 cm-3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54%) was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition small concentrations of methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a product of biogenic dimethyl sulfate (DMS) emissions could be identified in the particle phase. In all

  10. Variability of aerosol, gaseous pollutants and meteorological characteristics associated with changes in air mass origin at the SW Atlantic coast of Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Diesch

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the ambient aerosol were performed at the Southern coast of Spain, within the framework of the DOMINO (Diel Oxidant Mechanisms In relation to Nitrogen Oxides project. The field campaign took place from 20 November until 9 December 2008 at the atmospheric research station "El Arenosillo" (37°5'47.76" N, 6°44'6.94" W. As the monitoring station is located at the interface between a natural park, industrial cities (Huelva, Seville and the Atlantic Ocean, a variety of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols and gas phase could be characterized in dependency on the origin of air masses. Backwards trajectories were examined and compared with local meteorology to classify characteristic air mass types for several source regions. Aerosol number and mass as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and black carbon concentrations were measured in PM1 and size distributions were registered covering a size range from 7 nm up to 32 μm. The chemical composition of the non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1 was measured by means of an Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS. Gas phase analyzers monitored various trace gases (O3, SO2, NO, NO2, CO2 and a weather station provided meteorological parameters.

    Lowest average submicron particle mass and number concentrations were found in air masses arriving from the Atlantic Ocean with values around 2 μg m−3 and 1000 cm−3. These mass concentrations were about two to four times lower than the values recorded in air masses of continental and urban origins. For some species PM1-fractions in marine air were significantly larger than in air masses originating from Huelva, a closely located city with extensive industrial activities. The largest fraction of sulfate (54% was detected in marine air masses and was to a high degree not neutralized. In addition, small concentrations of

  11. Aerosol scrubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The Submerged Gravel Scrubber is an air cleaning system developed by the Department of Energy's Liquid Metal Reactor Program. The Scrubber System has been patented by the Department of Energy. This technology is being transferred to industry by the DOE. Its basic principles can be adapted for individual applications and the commercialized version can be used to perform a variety of tasks. The gas to be cleaned is percolated through a continuously washed gravel bed. The passage of the gas through the gravel breaks the stream into many small bubbles rising in a turbulent body of water. These conditions allow very highly efficient removal of aerosols from the gas

  12. Design characteristics of the Sludge Mobilization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.L.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the West Valley Demonstration Project is being processed into low-level waste and solidified in cement. High-level waste also stored underground will be vitrified and solidified into canistered glass logs. To move the waste from where it resides at the Waste Tank Farm to the Vitrification Facility requires equipment to prepare the storage tanks for low-level and high-level waste processing, equipment to mobilize and mix the radioactive sludge into a homogeneous slurry, and equipment to transfer the slurry for vitrification. The design of the Sludge Mobilization System has incorporated the necessary components to effect the preparation and transfer of waste in five operational phases. The first phase of the Sludge Mobilization System, which began in 1987, prepared the waste tanks to process radioactive liquid for delivery to the Cement Solidification System and to support the mobilization equipment. The second phase, beginning in 1991, will wash the sludge that remains after the liquid supernatant is decanted to prepare it for mobilization operations. The third phase will combine the contents of various waste tanks into one tank. The fourth phase will resuspend and mix the contents of the high-level waste tank. The fifth and final phase of the Sludge Mobilization System will entail transferring the waste mixture to the Vitrification Facility for processing into glass logs. Provisions for recycling the waste streams or slurries within the tank farm or for returning process streams to the Waste Tank Farm from the Vitrification Facility are also included in the final phase. This document addresses the Sludge Mobilization System equipment design characteristics in terms of its use in each of the five operational phases listed above

  13. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; hide

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN RH -DENUDED MIE ACTIVE SAMPLING SYSTEM AND TARGETED AEROSOL CALIBRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The MIE pDR 1200 nephelometer provides time resolved aerosol concentrations during personal and fixed-site sampling. Active (pumped) operation allows defining an upper PM2.5 particle size, however, this dramatically increases the aerosol mass passing through the phot...

  15. Characteristics of Twenty-Nine Aerosol Samplers Tested at U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (2000-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    polycarbonate membrane type collection filter. The filter where particles are collected is contained on a reel, which automatically advances to the...wetted wall cyclone (or a contactor ) for aerosol collection. The sampler is packaged in a suitcase with a handle for easy carrying. This test was started...wall cyclone ( contactor ). Air enters the contactor through two narrow slits. The unit retains the water in the contactor and does not produce a

  16. At-Sea Evaluation of the Obscuration Characteristics of a Hygroscopic Aerosol Smoke Produced by the CY85A Pyrotechnic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    and IiWIU* by block nmber) Salty Dog Obscuration .2Hygroscopic aerosol Extinction ISmoke Pyrotechnically Generated ’For the past six years, Calapan, in...combustion. Such particles are especially advantageous due to their hygroscopicity. When exposed to a sufficient level of ambient humidity the...particles are especially advantageous due to their hygroscopicity. When exposed to a sufficient level of ambient humidity the particles deliquesce to form

  17. Aerosol spectral optical depths and size characteristics at a coastal industriallocation in India - effect of synoptic and mesoscale weather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The aerosol spectral optical depths at ten discrete channels in the visible and near IR bands, obtained from a ground-based passive multi-wavelength solar radiometer at a coastal industrial location, Visakhapatnam, on the east coast of India, are used to study the response of the aerosol optical properties and size distributions to the changes in atmospheric humidity, wind speed and direction. It is observed that during high humidity conditions, the spectral optical depths show about 30% higher growth factors, and the size distributions show the generation of a typical new mode around 0.4 microns. The surface wind speed and direction also indicate the formation of new particles when the humid marine air mass interacts with the industrial air mass. This is interpreted in terms of new particle formation and subsequent particle growth by condensation and self-coagulation. The results obtained on the surface-size segregated aerosol mass distribution from a co-located Quartz Crystal Microbalance during different humidity conditions also show a large mass increase in the sub-micron size range with an increase in atmospheric humidity, indicating new particle formation at the sub-micron size range.

  18. Monetary targeting and financial system characteristics : An empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samarina, A..

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how reforms and characteristics of the financial system affect the likelihood of countries to abandon their strategy of monetary targeting. Apart from financial system characteristics, we include macroeconomic, fiscal, and institutional factors potentially associated with

  19. Core design characteristics of the hyper system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonghee, Kim; Won-Seok, Park; Hill, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    In Korea, an accelerator-driven system (ADS) called HYPER (Hybrid Power Extraction Reactor) is being studied for the transmutation of the radioactive wastes. HYPER is a 1000 MWth lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE)-cooled ADS. In this paper, the neutronic design characteristics of HYPER are described and its transmutation performances are assessed for an equilibrium cycle. The core is loaded with a ductless fuel assembly containing transuranics (TRU) dispersion fuel pins. In HYPER, a relatively high core height, 160 cm, is adopted to maximize the multiplication efficiency of the external source. In the ductless fuel assembly, 13 non-fuel rods are used as tie rods to maintain the mechanical integrity of assembly. As the reflector material, pure lead is used to improve the neutron economy and to minimise the generation of radioactive materials. In HYPER, to minimise the burn-up reactivity swing, a B 4 C burnable absorber is employed. For efficient depletion of the B-10 absorber, the burnable absorber is loaded only in the axially-central part (92 cm long) of the 13 tie rods of each assembly. In the current design, the amount of the B 4 C absorber was determined such that the burn-up reactivity swing is about 3.0% Δk. The long-lived fission products (LLFPs) 99 Tc and 129 I are also transmuted in the HYPER core such that their supporting ratios are equal to that of the TRUs. A heterogeneous LLFP transmutation in the reflector zone has been analysed in this work. A unique feature of the HYPER system is that it has an auxiliary core shutdown system, independent of the accelerator shutdown system. It has been shown that a cylindrical B 4 C absorber between the target and fuel blanket can drastically reduce the fission power even without shutting off the accelerator power. (author)

  20. MISR Aerosol Climatology Product V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MISR Aerosol Climatology Product is 1) the microphysical and scattering characteristics of pure aerosol upon which routine retrievals are based; 2) mixtures of pure...

  1. Measurements of the Vertical Structure of Aerosols and Clouds Over the Ocean Using Micro-Pulse LIDAR Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, Ellsworth J.; Spinhirne, James D.; Campbell, James R.; Berkoff, Timothy A.; Bates, David; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The determination of the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds over the ocean is needed for accurate retrievals of ocean color from satellites observations. The presence of absorbing aerosol layers, especially at altitudes above the boundary layer, has been shown to influence the calculation of ocean color. Also, satellite data must be correctly screened for the presence of clouds, particularly cirrus, in order to measure ocean color. One instrument capable of providing this information is a lidar, which uses pulses of laser light to profile the vertical distribution of aerosol and cloud layers in the atmosphere. However, lidar systems prior to the 1990s were large, expensive, and not eye-safe which made them unsuitable for cruise deployments. During the 1990s the first small, autonomous, and eye-safe lidar system became available: the micro-pulse lidar, or MPL. The MPL is a compact and eye-safe lidar system capable of determining the range of aerosols and clouds by firing a short pulse of laser light (523 nm) and measuring the time-of-flight from pulse transmission to reception of a returned signal. The returned signal is a function of time, converted into range using the speed of light, and is proportional to the amount of light backscattered by atmospheric molecules (Rayleigh scattering), aerosols, and clouds. The MPL achieves ANSI eye-safe standards by sending laser pulses at low energy (micro-J) and expanding the beam to 20.32 cm in diameter. A fast pulse-repetition-frequency (2500 Hz) is used to achieve a good signal-to-noise, despite the low output energy. The MPL has a small field-of-view (< 100 micro-rad) and signals received with the instrument do not contain multiple scattering effects. The MPL has been used successfully at a number of long-term sites and also in several field experiments around the world.

  2. Deployable Plume and Aerosol Release Prediction and Tracking System. Nuclear Non-Proliferation Task 1. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleppe, John; Norris, William; Etezadi, Mehdi

    2006-07-19

    This contract was awarded in response to a proposal in which a deployable plume and aerosol release prediction and tracking system would be designed, fabricated, and tested. The system would gather real time atmospheric data and input it into a real time atmospheric model that could be used for plume predition and tracking. The system would be able to be quickly deployed by aircraft to points of interest or positioned for deployment by vehicles. The system would provide three dimensional (u, v, and w) wind vector data, inversion height measurements, surface wind information, classical weather station data, and solar radiation. The on-board real time computer model would provide the prediction of the behavior of plumes and released aerosols.

  3. Performance evaluation of the pilot-scale, double-shell tank ventilation system using simulated aerosol streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouns, T.M.; Peterson, M.E.

    1989-12-01

    Radioactive waste slurries are currently being stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. The slurries that are being stored in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) are various mixtures of radioactive solids, liquids, and aqueous wastes. The tanks must be maintained at a negative pressure relative to atmospheric pressure to safeguard against pressurization and the subsequent leakage of entrained radioactive aerosols to the environment. A ventilation system must be capable of withdrawing the total volume of off gas generated from the tanks while maintaining the tanks at a negative pressure. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has identified a need to improve the efficiency of the ventilation system being used on the tank farms to meet the more restrictive release limits for radioactive isotopes. Kaiser Engineers Hanford Company (KEH) has been contracted by WHC to design the new ventilation system for the existing tank farms. WHC contracted the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to fabricate and test the prototypic pilot-scale design prior to finalizing the design of the ventilation system. The PNL has conducted tests to determine (1) the effectiveness of the system for removal of vapors condensable at 35{degrees}F, (2) the effectiveness for removal of soluble and insoluble aerosols, and (3) the life span of the mist eliminators to be used in the new system. The results of extensive testing of the pilot-scale system with condensables and both soluble and insoluble aerosols are presented in this report. 7 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Satellite studies of the stratospheric aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, M.P.; Hamill, P.; Pepin, T.J.; Chu, W.P.; Swissler, T.J.; McMaster, L.R.

    1979-01-01

    The potential climatological and environmental importance of the stratospheric aerosol layer has prompted great interest in measuring the properties of this aerosol. In this paper we report on two recently deployed NASA satellite systems (SAM II and SAGE) that are monitoring the stratospheric aerosol. The satellite orbits are such that nearly global coverage is obtained. The instruments mounted in the spacecraft are sun photometers that measure solar intensity at specific wavelengths as it is moderated by atmospheric particulates and gases during each sunrise and sunset encountered by the satellites. The data obtained are ''inverted'' to yield vertical aerosol and gaseous (primarily ozone) extinction profiles with 1 km vertical resolution. Thus, latitudinal, longitudinal, and temporal variations in the aerosol layer can be evaluated. The satellite systems are being validated by a series of ground truth experiments using airborne and ground lidar, balloon-borne dustsondes, aircraft-mounted impactors, and other correlative sensors. We describe the SAM II and SAGE satellite systems, instrument characteristics, and mode of operation; outline the methodology of the experiments; and describe the ground truth experiments. We present preliminary results from these measurements

  5. Scanning Mobile Lidar for Aerosol Tracking and Biological Aerosol Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tingyao; Bergant, Klemen; Filipčič, Andrej; Forte, Biagio; Gao, Fei; Stanič, Samo; Veberič, Darko; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2010-05-01

    Optical properties of non-biological aerosols containing aromatic hydrocarbons, such as industrial chemicals and engine exhausts, have already been thoroughly studied using remote sensing techniques. However, because of their complex composition and characteristics, the identification of biological aerosols, such as fungi, pollen and bacteria that are present in the environment remains a rather difficult task. The collection of information on both non-biological and biological aerosols is of great importance for understanding their interrelation, physical and chemical properties and their influence on human health and the environment. Biological and non-biological aerosols can be simultaneously detected, tracked and identified by a scanning mobile Mie-fluorescence lidar. The device developed at the University of Nova Gorica can perform azimuth and zenith angle scans with an angular resolution of 0.1°, as well as operate in both day and night-time conditions. Aerosols of biological origin are identified through the detection of the fluorescence of the amino acid tryptophan which is present in almost all substances of biological origin. In our system, the transmitter is a solid state Nd:YAG laser which is capable of simultaneous emission of light at a base wavelength of 1064 nm (IR) and its quadrupled wavelength of 266 nm (UV) at a maximum repetition rate of 10 Hz. Tryptophan contained in biological aerosols is excited by the 266 nm laser pulses and the returning fluorescence signals are detected in the spectral band centered at 295 nm. The receiver is a Newtonian telescope which uses a 300 mm parabolic mirror to direct received light into three detection channels - two elastic backscatter channels (IR and UV) and a fluorescence channel. First experiments show that the detection range of the lidar reaches 10 km in the IR channel and 3 km in the UV channel. Based on the preliminary simulations of the signal-to-noise ratio, the detection range for biological

  6. Organic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN

  7. Carbonaceous and inorganic aerosols over a sub-urban site in peninsular India: Temporal variability and source characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswini, A. R.; Hegde, Prashant; Nair, Prabha R.

    2018-01-01

    PM10 aerosol samples collected from a sub-urban site in Coimbatore during pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter from 2014 to 2016 showed a large variability from 7.6 to 89 μg m- 3 with an annual average of 41 ± 21 μg m- 3 (N = 69). High abundance of PM10 and other components were recorded during winter and lowest during monsoon period. Total carbonaceous aerosols and water soluble ionic species contributed to 31% and 45% of PM10 mass respectively. SO42 - was the most abundant species (average 9.8 ± 4.8 μg m- 3) and constituted for 24% of total mass. Organic Carbon (OC) was the next most abundant species ranging from 1 to 16 μg m- 3 with an average of 7 ± 3.6 μg m- 3 accounting for 17% of PM10 mass concentration. POC (primary organic carbon) and SOC (secondary organic carbon) accounted for 56% and 44% of OC respectively. A major portion of OC ( 60%) was found to be water soluble. The correlation between OC and EC (elemental carbon) was found to be higher for night-time compared to daytime suggesting their origin from common sources during night-time. K+ was found to be strongly correlated with OC during night-time. WSOC showed good correlation with POC and K+ which was high especially during night-time. WSON (water soluble organic nitrogen) accounted for 34% of water soluble total nitrogen (WSTN). HCO3- exhibited significant positive correlation with Ca2 + during daytime indicating their crustal origin. The observations suggest that the region is influenced by biomass burning sources, however during day-time, secondary production and terrestrial sources (due to high temperature and wind) significantly influence the atmospheric aerosols over this region.

  8. Radioactive aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    Radon. Fission product aerosols. Radioiodine. Tritium. Plutonium. Mass transfer of radioactive vapours and aerosols. Studies with radioactive particles and human subjects. Index. This paper explores the environmental and health aspects of radioactive aerosols. Covers radioactive nuclides of potential concern to public health and applications to the study of boundary layer transport. Contains bibliographic references. Suitable for environmental chemistry collections in academic and research libraries

  9. Development of an aerosol-chemistry transport model coupled to non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM) through applying a stretched grid system to regional simulations around Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, D.; Nakajima, T.; Masaki, S.

    2014-12-01

    Air pollution has a great impact on both climate change and human health. One effective way to tackle with these issues is a use of atmospheric aerosol-chemistry models with high-resolution in a global scale. For this purpose, we have developed an aerosol-chemistry model based on a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM), Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM; Tomita and Satoh, Fluid. Dyn. Res. 2004; Satoh et al., J. Comput. Phys. 2008, PEPS, 2014) under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project. In the present study, we have simulated aerosols and tropospheric ozone over Japan by our aerosol-chemistry model "NICAM-Chem" with a stretched-grid system of approximately 10 km resolution, for saving the computer resources. The aerosol and chemistry modules are based on Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS; Takemura et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2005) and Chemical AGCM for Study of Atmospheric Environment and Radiative Forcing (CHASER; Sudo et al., J. Geophys. Res., 2002). We found that our model can generally reproduce both aerosols and ozone, in terms of temporal variations (daily variations of aerosols and diurnal variations of ozone). Under MEXT/RECCA/SALSA project, we also have used these results obtained by NICAM-Chem for the assessment of their impact on human health.

  10. The impacts of a plume-rise scheme on earth system modeling: climatological effects of biomass aerosols on the surface temperature and energy budget of South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Menezes Neto, Otacilio L.; Coutinho, Mariane M.; Marengo, José A.; Capistrano, Vinícius B.

    2017-08-01

    Seasonal forest fires in the Amazon are the largest source of pollutants in South America. The impacts of aerosols due to biomass burning on the temperature and energy balance in South America are investigated using climate simulations from 1979 to 2005 using HadGEM2-ES, which includes the hot plume-rise scheme (HPR) developed by Freitas et al. (Estudos Avançados 19:167-185, 2005, Atmos Chem Phys 7:3385-3398, 2007, Atmos Chem Phys 10:585-594, 2010). The HPR scheme is used to estimate the vertical heights of biomass-burning aerosols based on the thermodynamic characteristics of the underlying model. Three experiments are performed. The first experiment includes the HPR scheme, the second experiment turns off the HPR scheme and the effects of biomass aerosols (BIOMASS OFF), and the final experiment assumes that all biomass aerosols are released at the surface (HPR OFF). Relative to the BIOMASS OFF experiment, the temperature decreased in the HPR experiment as the net shortwave radiation at the surface decreased in a region with a large amount of biomass aerosols. When comparing the HPR and HPR OFF experiments, the release of biomass aerosols higher on the atmosphere impacts on temperature and the energy budget because the aerosols were transported by strong winds in the upper atmospheric levels.

  11. Impact of Aerosols and Atmospheric Thermodynamics on Cloud Properties within the Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Masunaga, Hirohiko; Pielke, Roger, Sr.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2003-01-01

    A combination of cloud-top and columnar droplet sizes derived from the multi Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) sensors reveals the sensitivity of the aerosols effect on cloud-precipitation process due to environmental vertical thermodynamic structure. First, the magnitude of aerosol indirect effect could be larger with the analysis of columnar droplet sizes than that derived from the cloud-top droplet sizes, since column-droplet size can account for the broader droplet spectra in the cloud layers. Second, a combination of cloud- top and columnar droplet sizes reveals that the warm rain process is prevented regardless of the aerosols concentration under a high static stability such as when a strong temperature inversion exists, while a high aerosol concentration suppresses the warm rain formulation under a low static stability.

  12. Lifting options for stratospheric aerosol geoengineering: advantages of tethered balloon systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Peter; Burgoyne, Chris; Hunt, Hugh; Causier, Matt

    2012-09-13

    The Royal Society report 'Geoengineering the Climate' identified solar radiation management using albedo-enhancing aerosols injected into the stratosphere as the most affordable and effective option for geoengineering, but did not consider in any detail the options for delivery. This paper provides outline engineering analyses of the options, both for batch-delivery processes, following up on previous work for artillery shells, missiles, aircraft and free-flying balloons, as well as a more lengthy analysis of continuous-delivery systems that require a pipe connected to the ground and supported at a height of 20 km, either by a tower or by a tethered balloon. Towers are shown not to be practical, but a tethered balloon delivery system, with high-pressure pumping, appears to have much lower operating and capital costs than all other delivery options. Instead of transporting sulphuric acid mist precursors, such a system could also be used to transport slurries of high refractive index particles such as coated titanium dioxide. The use of such particles would allow useful experiments on opacity, coagulation and atmospheric chemistry at modest rates so as not to perturb regional or global climatic conditions, thus reducing scale-up risks. Criteria for particle choice are discussed, including the need to minimize or prevent ozone destruction. The paper estimates the time scales and relatively modest costs required if a tethered balloon system were to be introduced in a measured way with testing and development work proceeding over three decades, rather than in an emergency. The manufacture of a tether capable of sustaining the high tensions and internal pressures needed, as well as strong winds, is a significant challenge, as is the development of the necessary pumping and dispersion technologies. The greatest challenge may be the manufacture and launch of very large balloons, but means have been identified to significantly reduce the size of such balloons or aerostats.

  13. Quantifying physical characteristics of wildland fuels using the fuel characteristic classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia L. Riccardi; Susan J. Prichard; David V. Sandberg; Roger D. Ottmar

    2007-01-01

    Wildland fuel characteristics are used in many applications of operational fire predictions and to understand fire effects and behaviour. Even so, there is a shortage of information on basic fuel properties and the physical characteristics of wildland fuels. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) builds and catalogues fuelbed descriptions based on...

  14. Characterization of biological aerosol exposure risks from automobile air conditioning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Mingzhen; Shen, Fangxia; Zou, Zhuanglei; Yao, Maosheng; Wu, Chang-yu

    2013-09-17

    Although use of automobile air conditioning (AC) was shown to reduce in-vehicle particle levels, the characterization of its microbial aerosol exposure risks is lacking. Here, both AC and engine filter dust samples were collected from 30 automobiles in four different geographical locations in China. Biological contents (bacteria, fungi, and endotoxin) were studied using culturing, high-throughput gene sequence, and Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) methods. In-vehicle viable bioaerosol concentrations were directly monitored using an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UVAPS) before and after use of AC for 5, 10, and 15 min. Regardless of locations, the vehicle AC filter dusts were found to be laden with high levels of bacteria (up to 26,150 CFU/mg), fungi (up to 1287 CFU/mg), and endotoxin (up to 5527 EU/mg). More than 400 unique bacterial species, including human opportunistic pathogens, were detected in the filter dusts. In addition, allergenic fungal species were also found abundant. Surprisingly, unexpected fluorescent peaks around 2.5 μm were observed during the first 5 min use of AC, which was attributed to the reaerosolization of those filter-borne microbial agents. The information obtained here can assist in minimizing or preventing the respiratory allergy or infection risk from the use of automobile AC system.

  15. Investigation of black carbon aerosols and their characteristics over tropical urban and semi-arid rural environments in peninsular India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeer Hussain, S.; Chakradhar Rao, T.; Balakrishnaiah, G.; Rama Gopal, K.; Raja Obul Reddy, K.; Siva Kumar Reddy, N.; Lokeswara Reddy, T.; Pavan Kumari, S.; Ramanjaneya Reddy, P.; Ramakrishna Reddy, R.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted the campaign studies on Black Carbon (BC) aerosol measured at two different locations such as semi-arid rural, Anantapur (ATP) and tropical wet and dry urban, Tirupati (TPTY) of Andhra Pradesh. The campaign took place from June 1 to June 30, 2015. We studied diurnal variations and weekdays/weekends differences of BC mass Concentration and its correlations with meteorological parameters for two sites. BC exhibits a strong weekly cycle in which weekend concentrations are significantly lower than weekday concentrations by ∼14 and 31% for ATP and TPTY due to the decrease in the local traffic volumes during weekends due to a well-known 'weekend effect'. An estimation of percentage of contribution of BC indicates the main sources of BC as fossil fuel combustion and which is dominantly observed at TPTY than at ATP. Finally, the influence of the transported air masses has also been discussed with the help of HYSPLIT air mass backward trajectories.

  16. Aerosol sampling and characterization for hazard evaluation. Progress report, July 1, 1975--September 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scripsick, R.C.; Gray, D.C.; Tillery, M.I.; Stafford, R.G.; Romero, P.O.

    1977-04-01

    A draft Manual of Recommended Practice for Aerosol Sampling and Evaluation was completed and sent to the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance (DSSC) for review. The results of the Survey of Sampling Techniques for Defining Respirable Concentration and/or Particle Size Characteristics of Aerosols were published as LA-6087. The need for greater standardization of ERDA aerosol sampling techniques was indicated. The Aerosol Training Course was presented in 11 sessions to 85 persons. General elements of good practice were emphasized, and recommendation of specific sampling devices or procedures was avoided. A system for estimating dissolution rates of plutonium aerosols was developed. Studies indicate that plutonium aerosols found in the field have a rapid initial dissolution phase followed by a slower secondary phase. Three methods of particle sizing air samples collected on membrane filters were investigated. The most promising was a scanning electron microscope electron microprobe (SEM-EMp) method. An operating plutonium handling facility was a model for development of techniques to evaluate aerosol surveillance systems performance. Airborne contamination records were studied. The physicochemical properties of a plutonium aerosol existing in the facility were investigated in relation to plutonium handling operations. The techniques developed have indicated some areas of the aerosol surveillance system that need improvement

  17. Comparison of laser ablation and dried solution aerosol as sampling systems in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coedo, A G; Padilla, I; Dorado, M T

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes a study designed to determine the possibility of using a dried aerosol solution for calibration in laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The relative sensitivities of tested materials mobilized by laser ablation and by aqueous nebulization were established, and the experimentally determined relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) were used in conjunction with aqueous calibration for the analysis of solid steel samples. To such a purpose a set of CRM carbon steel samples (SS-451/1 to SS-460/1) were sampled into an ICP-MS instrument by solution nebulization using a microconcentric nebulizer with membrane desolvating (D-MCN) and by laser ablation (LA). Both systems were applied with the same ICP-MS operating parameters and the analyte signals were compared. The RSF (desolvated aerosol response/ablated solid response) values were close to 1 for the analytes Cr, Ni, Co, V, and W, about 1.3 for Mo, and 1.7 for As, P, and Mn. Complementary tests were carried out using CRM SS-455/1 as a solid standard for one-point calibration, applying LAMTRACE software for data reduction and quantification. The analytical results are in good agreement with the certified values in all cases, showing that the applicability of dried aerosol solutions is a good alternative calibration system for laser ablation sampling.

  18. Aerosol from Tobacco Heating System 2.2 has reduced impact on mouse heart gene expression compared with cigarette smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Justyna; Boué, Stéphanie; Talikka, Marja; Guedj, Emmanuel; Martin, Florian; Phillips, Blaine; Ivanov, Nikolai V; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2017-03-01

    Experimental studies clearly demonstrate a causal effect of cigarette smoking on cardiovascular disease. To reduce the individual risk and population harm caused by smoking, alternative products to cigarettes are being developed. We recently reported on an apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe -/- ) mouse inhalation study that compared the effects of exposure to aerosol from a candidate modified risk tobacco product, Tobacco Heating System 2.2 (THS2.2), and smoke from the reference cigarette (3R4F) on pulmonary and vascular biology. Here, we applied a transcriptomics approach to evaluate the impact of the exposure to 3R4F smoke and THS2.2 aerosol on heart tissues from the same cohort of mice. The systems response profiles demonstrated that 3R4F smoke exposure led to time-dependent transcriptomics changes (False Discovery Rate (FDR) < 0.05; 44 differentially expressed genes at 3-months; 491 at 8-months). Analysis of differentially expressed genes in the heart tissue indicated that 3R4F exposure induced the downregulation of genes involved in cytoskeleton organization and the contractile function of the heart, notably genes that encode beta actin (Actb), actinin alpha 4 (Actn4), and filamin C (Flnc). This was accompanied by the downregulation of genes related to the inflammatory response. None of these effects were observed in the group exposed to THS2.2 aerosol. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Study of real time detection and size distribution measurement of ultrafine aerosol with a particle growth system (PGS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebours, A.

    1994-06-29

    First, the theoretical knowledge on condensation phenomena of a supersaturated vapor in a cylindrical duct where an ultrafine aerosol of nanometers size is flowing, is recalled. Then, a Particle Growth-System (PGS) of original design is developed: the aerosol is confined in a region with a uniform vapor supersaturation profile. When imperfectly filtered atmospheric air is used as source of condensation nuclei, the produced droplets are found to be monodisperse. Therefore, our PGS offers a simple method of calibrating Optical Particle Counters because the size distribution of theses droplets is controlled. After an experimental study validated by a theoretical model, we establish that, under certain supersaturation conditions, the droplet size in our PGS is a function of ultrafine particle size on which the vapor condenses. Furthermore, when the sampled aerosol is constituted of an ultrafine fraction and a fine fraction, we show that the size distribution of the droplets that come out from the PGS is bimodal too. Finally, a simple redesign of our fluids inlet system should reduce particles losses in the PGS due to brownian diffusion and, in that manner improve their detection. (author). 72 refs., 46 figs., 8 tabs., 4 appends.

  20. Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Building system characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This manual, the third in a series, focuses on residential building system characteristics and their effects on indoor air quality. The manual addresses: residential indoor air pollutants by source, indoor concentrations, health effects, source control and mitigation techniques, standards and guidelines; building system characteristics of air exchange, pollutant source strength, residence volume, site characteristics, structural design, construction, and operation, infiltration and ventilation system, building occupancy; and monitoring methods

  1. Coarse mode aerosols in the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; Saha, A.; Duck, T. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fine mode (submicron) aerosols in the Arctic have received a fair amount of scientific attention in terms of smoke intrusions during the polar summer and Arctic haze pollution during the polar winter. Relatively little is known about coarse mode (supermicron) aerosols, notably dust, volcanic ash and sea salt. Asian dust is a regular springtime event whose optical and radiative forcing effects have been fairly well documented at the lower latitudes over North America but rarely reported for the Arctic. Volcanic ash, whose socio-economic importance has grown dramatically since the fear of its effects on aircraft engines resulted in the virtual shutdown of European civil aviation in the spring of 2010 has rarely been reported in the Arctic in spite of the likely probability that ash from Iceland and the Aleutian Islands makes its way into the Arctic and possibly the high Arctic. Little is known about Arctic sea salt aerosols and we are not aware of any literature on the optical measurement of these aerosols. In this work we present preliminary results of the combined sunphotometry-lidar analysis at two High Arctic stations in North America: PEARL (80°N, 86°W) for 2007-2011 and Barrow (71°N,156°W) for 2011-2014. The multi-years datasets were analyzed to single out potential coarse mode incursions and study their optical characteristics. In particular, CIMEL sunphotometers provided coarse mode optical depths as well as information on particle size and refractive index. Lidar measurements from High Spectral Resolution lidars (AHSRL at PEARL and NSHSRL at Barrow) yielded vertically resolved aerosol profiles and gave an indication of particle shape and size from the depolarization ratio and color ratio profiles. Additionally, we employed supplementary analyses of HYSPLIT backtrajectories, OMI aerosol index, and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) outputs to study the spatial context of given events.

  2. Assessment of nicotine concentration in electronic nicotine delivery system (ENDS) liquids and precision of dosing to aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmider, Leon; Sobczak, Andrzej; Szołtysek-Bołdys, Izabela; Prokopowicz, Adam; Skórka, Agnieszka; Abdulafeez, Oluyadi; Koszowski, Bartosz

    2015-01-01

    Global use of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS; also called electronic cigarettes, e-cigarettes) has increased dramatically in recent years. However, due to the limited safety studies and growing concerns on the potential toxicity from long term use of ENDS, many national and international governments have employed regulatory measures to curtail its use. One of the most significant challenges regulators of ENDS encounter is the lack of quality standards to assess ENDS, e-liquid (solution used with ENDS which contain nicotine--a highly toxic and addictive substance), and amount of nicotine delivery to aerosol during ENDS use. Aims of the study were to (1) measure and compare nicotine concentration in e-liquids to values reported by manufacturers on packaging labels; (2) assess the precision of nicotine delivery from tank during aerosol formation. Methods: Nine popular Polish e-liquids (based on the market share data from October 2014) were purchased for the study. The labelled nicotine concentration for the selected e-liquids ranged between 11-25 mg/mL. All e-liquids were aerosolized in the laboratory using a smoking simulation machine (Palaczbot). Each e-liquid was aerosolized in a series of 6 consecutive bouts. A single bout consisted of 15 puffs with the following puff topography: 65 mL puff volume, 2.8 sec. puff duration, and 19 sec. interpuff interval. A total of 90 puffs were generated from each e-liquid. Nicotine content in the e-liquids and the aerosol generated were determined by gas chromatography with thermionic sensitive detection (GC-TSD). For seven of nine analyzed e-liquids, the difference between measured and manufacturer labeled nicotine concentration was less than 10%. Nicotine dose in aerosol per bout ranged between 0.77-1.49 mg (equivalent to one-half the nicotine a smoker inhales from a single combustible cigarette). Our analysis showed the high consistency between the labeled and measured nicotine concentration for popular on the

  3. Coupling of organic and inorganic aerosol systems and the effect on gas-particle partitioning in the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Havala O. T.; Zuend, Andreas; Fry, Juliane L.; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabriel; Capps, Shannon L.; Wyat Appel, K.; Foroutan, Hosein; Xu, Lu; Ng, Nga L.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2018-01-01

    Several models were used to describe the partitioning of ammonia, water, and organic compounds between the gas and particle phases for conditions in the southeastern US during summer 2013. Existing equilibrium models and frameworks were found to be sufficient, although additional improvements in terms of estimating pure-species vapor pressures are needed. Thermodynamic model predictions were consistent, to first order, with a molar ratio of ammonium to sulfate of approximately 1.6 to 1.8 (ratio of ammonium to 2 × sulfate, RN/2S ≈ 0.8 to 0.9) with approximately 70 % of total ammonia and ammonium (NHx) in the particle. Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization Network (SEARCH) gas and aerosol and Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) Monitor for AeRosols and Gases in Ambient air (MARGA) aerosol measurements were consistent with these conditions. CMAQv5.2 regional chemical transport model predictions did not reflect these conditions due to a factor of 3 overestimate of the nonvolatile cations. In addition, gas-phase ammonia was overestimated in the CMAQ model leading to an even lower fraction of total ammonia in the particle. Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements indicated less ammonium per sulfate than SEARCH and MARGA measurements and were inconsistent with thermodynamic model predictions. Organic compounds were predicted to be present to some extent in the same phase as inorganic constituents, modifying their activity and resulting in a decrease in [H+]air (H+ in µg m-3 air), increase in ammonia partitioning to the gas phase, and increase in pH compared to complete organic vs. inorganic liquid-liquid phase separation. In addition, accounting for nonideal mixing modified the pH such that a fully interactive inorganic-organic system had a pH roughly 0.7 units higher than predicted using traditional methods (pH = 1.5 vs. 0.7). Particle-phase interactions of organic and inorganic compounds were found to

  4. Dynamical systems of proper characteristic 0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, K.H.; Hamoui, A.

    1991-07-01

    Flows with orbits of proper characteristics 0 exhibit recurrent behaviour, a feature of basic importance in the description of their dynamics. Here, we analyze flows with such orbits relating them with recurrent flows and with flows that exhibit orbital, Poisson or Lagrange stability. (author). 11 refs

  5. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, CM; Berg, LK; Cziczo, DJ; Flynn, CJ; Kassianov, EI; Fast, JD; Rasch, PJ; Shilling, JE; Zaveri, RA; Zelenyuk, A; Ferrare, RA; Hostetler, CA; Cairns, B; Russell, PB; Ervens, B

    2011-07-27

    The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) field campaign will provide a detailed set of observations with which to (1) perform radiative and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) closure studies, (2) evaluate a new retrieval algorithm for aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the presence of clouds using passive remote sensing, (3) extend a previously developed technique to investigate aerosol indirect effects, and (4) evaluate the performance of a detailed regional-scale model and a more parameterized global-scale model in simulating particle activation and AOD associated with the aging of anthropogenic aerosols. To meet these science objectives, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility will deploy the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) and the Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS) on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for a 12-month period starting in the summer of 2012 in order to quantify aerosol properties, radiation, and cloud characteristics at a location subject to both clear and cloudy conditions, and clean and polluted conditions. These observations will be supplemented by two aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs), one in the summer and a second in the winter. Each IOP will deploy one, and possibly two, aircraft depending on available resources. The first aircraft will be equipped with a suite of in situ instrumentation to provide measurements of aerosol optical properties, particle composition and direct-beam irradiance. The second aircraft will fly directly over the first and use a multi-wavelength high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and scanning polarimeter to provide continuous optical and cloud properties in the column below.

  6. Lung deposition and systemic bioavailability of different aerosol devices with and without humidification in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Islam O F; Ali, Mohammed R A-A; Al Hallag, Moataz; Rabea, Hoda; Fink, James B; Dailey, Patricia; Abdelrahim, Mohamed E A

    During mechanical ventilation medical aerosol delivery has been reported to be upto two fold greater with dry inhaled gas than with heated humidity. Urine levels at 0.5 h post dose (URSAL0.5%) has been confirmed as an index of lung deposition and 24 h (URSAL24%) as index of systemic absorption. Our aim was to determine the effect of humidification and aerosol device type on drug delivery to ventilated patients using urine levels. In a randomized crossover design, 36 (18female) mechanically ventilated patients were assigned to one of three groups. Groups 1 and 2 received 5000 μg salbutamol using vibrating mesh (VM) and jet nebulizers (JN), respectively, while group 3 received 1600 μg (16 puffs) of salbutamol via metered dose inhaler with AeroChamber Vent (MDI-AV). All devices were placed in the inspiratory limb of ventilator downstream from the humidifier. Each subject received aerosol with and without humidity at >24 h intervals with >12 h washout periods between salbutamol doses. Patients voided urine 15 min before each study dose and urine samples were collected at 0.5 h post dosing and pooled for the next 24 h. The MDI-AV and VM resulted in a higher percentage of urinary salbutamol levels compared to the JN (p < 0.05). Urine levels were similar between humidity and dry conditions. Our findings suggest that in-vitro reports overestimate the impact of dry vs. heated humidified conditions on the delivery of aerosol during invasive mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. GEM-AQ/EC, an on-line global multi-scale chemical weather modelling system: model development and evaluation of global aerosol climatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Gong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A global air quality modeling system GEM-AQ/EC was developed by implementing tropospheric chemistry and aerosol processes on-line into the Global Environmental Multiscale weather prediction model – GEM. Due to the multi-scale features of the GEM, the integrated model, GEM-AQ/EC, is able to investigate chemical weather at scales from global to urban domains. The current chemical mechanism is comprised of 50 gas-phase species, 116 chemical and 19 photolysis reactions, and is complemented by a sectional aerosol module CAM (The Canadian Aerosol Module with 5 aerosols types: sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea-salt and soil dust. Monthly emission inventories of black carbon and organic carbon from boreal and temperate vegetation fires were assembled using the most reliable areas burned datasets by countries, from statistical databases and derived from remote sensing products of 1995–2004. The model was run for ten years from from 1995–2004 with re-analyzed meteorology on a global uniform 1° × 1° horizontal resolution domain and 28 hybrid levels extending up to 10 hPa. The simulating results were compared with various observations including surface network around the globe and satellite data. Regional features of global aerosols are reasonably captured including emission, surface concentrations and aerosol optical depth. For various types of aerosols, satisfactory correlations were achieved between modeled and observed with some degree of systematic bias possibly due to large uncertainties in the emissions used in this study. A global distribution of natural aerosol contributions to the total aerosols is obtained and compared with observations.

  8. The Nevada railroad system: Physical, operational, and accident characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-09-01

    This report provides a description of the operational and physical characteristics of the Nevada railroad system. To understand the dynamics of the rail system, one must consider the system`s physical characteristics, routing, uses, interactions with other systems, and unique operational characteristics, if any. This report is presented in two parts. The first part is a narrative description of all mainlines and major branchlines of the Nevada railroad system. Each Nevada rail route is described, including the route`s physical characteristics, traffic type and volume, track conditions, and history. The second part of this study provides a more detailed analysis of Nevada railroad accident characteristics than was presented in the Preliminary Nevada Transportation Accident Characterization Study (DOE, 1990).

  9. Size distribution characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol in Xishuangbanna, southwest China: a sign for biomass burning in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuhong

    2016-03-01

    In 2012, size-segregated aerosol samples were collected in Xishuangbanna, a forest station in southwest China. The concentrations of organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC for short) were quantified with thermal/optical carbon analyzer in the filter samples. OC and EC exhibited similar seasonal patterns, with the highest concentrations in spring, possibly due to the influence of biomass burning in south and southeast Asia. The mass size distributions of OC and EC were bimodal in all the sampling seasons, each with a dominant peak in the fine mode of 0.4-0.7 μm and a coarse peak in the size range of 2.1-4.7 μm. In fine mode, OC and EC showed smaller geometric mean diameters (GMDs) during winter. OC and EC were prone to be more concentrated in fine particles in spring and winter than in summer and autumn. Furthermore, EC was more abundant in fine particles than OC. Good correlations (R(2) = 0.75-0.82) between OC and EC indicated that they had common dominant sources of combustion such as biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion emissions. The daily average OC/EC ratios ranged from 2.1 to 9.1, more elevated OC/EC ratios being found in the winter.

  10. The Subject Analysis of Payment Systems Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Korobeynikova Olga Mikhaylovna

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the analysis of payment systems aimed at identifying the categorical terminological apparatus, proving their specific features and revealing the impact of payment systems on the state of money turnover. On the basis of the subject analysis, the author formulates the definitions of a payment system (characterized by increasing speed of effecting payments, by the reduction of costs, by high degree of payments convenience for subjects of transactions, by security of paymen...

  11. Discharge characteristics of a high speed fuel injection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robertson

    1925-01-01

    Discussed here are some discharge characteristics of a fuel injection system intended primarily for high speed service. The system consisted of a cam actuated fuel pump, a spring loaded automatic injection valve, and a connecting tube.

  12. Characteristics of Company Accounting Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tokić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information has always presented an important factor of human activity. As a resource that guided human activity, information was gathered, stored, analysed and distributed in different ways throughout the history. Today, information system is a necessity in the global business system. Globalisation processes have changed the traditional concept of doing business and brought about the need for information management as an integral part of overall company assets and rapid development of information and communication technology. Regardless of the benefits and advantages that may be offered by the systems, companies do business to earn profit. In this sense information systems should be considered as investment. Although investment costs can be determined relatively precisely, benefits offered by the systems are more difficult to measure and they require comprehensive consideration of all aspects of doing business to which the systems refer. Accounting is an information subsystem of the single information system of a company. Its purpose is to provide comprehensive, systematic and permanent presentation of data and information, based on documents that refer to all elements contained in business subsystems and the business system of the company as a whole. Information resulting from accounting and information system is contained in accounting reports, i.e. calculations, estimates and analyses within which it is presented to the management.

  13. The Subject Analysis of Payment Systems Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikova Olga Mikhaylovna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the analysis of payment systems aimed at identifying the categorical terminological apparatus, proving their specific features and revealing the impact of payment systems on the state of money turnover. On the basis of the subject analysis, the author formulates the definitions of a payment system (characterized by increasing speed of effecting payments, by the reduction of costs, by high degree of payments convenience for subjects of transactions, by security of payments, by acceptable level of risks and by social efficiency, a national payment system, and a local payment system (characterized by the growth of economic and social efficiency of systems participants, by the process of money turnover optimization on the basis of saving transaction costs and increasing speed of money flows within the local payment systems. According to the economic levels, the payment systems are divided to macrosystems (national payment systems, mezosystems (payment systems localized on the operational and territorial basis, microsystems (payments by individual economic subjects. The establishment of qualitative features of payment systems, which is a basis of the author’s terminological interpretation, gave a possibility to reveal the cause-effect relations of payment systems influence on the state of money turnover in the involved subjects, and on the economy as a whole. The result of the present research consists in revealing the payment systems influence on the state of money turnover which is significant: at the state and regional level – in the optimization of budget and inter-budgetary relations, in acceleration of the money turnover, in deceleration of the money supply and inflation rate, in reduced need in money emission; at the level of economic entities – in accelerating the money turnover and accounts receivable, in the reduction of debit and credit loans, in the growth of profit (turnover; at the household level – in

  14. Fuel Characteristic Classification System version 3.0: technical documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Prichard; David V. Sandberg; Roger D. Ottmar; Ellen Eberhardt; Anne Andreu; Paige Eagle; Kjell. Swedin

    2013-01-01

    The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) is a software module that records wildland fuel characteristics and calculates potential fire behavior and hazard potentials based on input environmental variables. The FCCS 3.0 is housed within the Integrated Fuels Treatment Decision Support System (Joint Fire Science Program 2012). It can also be run from command...

  15. Audit Characteristics for Information System Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main aspects regarding the development of the information security and assurance of their security. The information systems, standards and audit processes definitions are offered. There are presented the most important security standards used in information system security assessment

  16. Audit Characteristics for Information System Security

    OpenAIRE

    Marius POPA; Mihai DOINEA

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the main aspects regarding the development of the information security and assurance of their security. The information systems, standards and audit processes definitions are offered. There are presented the most important security standards used in information system security assessment

  17. A critical role for autoxidation in the alpha-pinene + OH aerosol system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of monoterpenes results in efficient formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and is included as an SOA source in most chemical transport models. However, current model parameterizations lack a mechanistic dependence of monoterpene SOA on NOx and oxidant identity (e...

  18. Aerosols in the convective boundary layer: Shortwave radiation effects on the coupled land-atmosphere system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde Barbaro, E.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ouwersloot, H.G.; Schroter, J.S.; Donovan, D.P.; Krol, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    By combining observations and numerical simulations, we investigated the responses of the surface energy budget and the convective boundary layer (CBL) dynamics to the presence of aerosols. A detailed data set containing (thermo)dynamic observations at CESAR (Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric

  19. Safety characteristics of potential waste transmutation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    For nuclear waste transmutation to alter significantly the need for geologic disposal of spent fuel from US Light-water reactors (LWRs), about 1.4% of the spent fuel (by mass) must be separated and transmuted. This includes the plutonium, the minor actinides, and four fission products: iodine. technetium, cesium and strontium. Regarding the actinides, fissioning of the plutonium, neptunium, americium, and curium generates a great deal of heat, so much so that most of the plutonium should be used to produce power. However, these actinides have some undesirable neutronic characteristics, and their utilization in reactors or subcritical (proton-accelerator) targets requires either a fast neutronic spectrum or a very high thermal-neutron flux. Transmutation of the fission products is generally by neutron capture, although this is difficult in the case of cesium and strontium. In this paper, various proposed means of transmuting the actinides and fission products are discussed, with the main focus being on the safety characteristics of each approach

  20. Performance characteristics for advanced control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisner, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    A growing collection of control techniques is becoming available to the design engineer. This make selection of the most appropriate technique for a given application a difficult task. A systematic approach to evaluating alternative control schemes is needed. The approach discussed in this paper expands the traditional concepts of quantitative performance analysis to include other relevant factors such as robustness of the technique, resource requirements, and effects on operators and other personnel. This collection of factors, termed measures of utility, may be used as qualitative and quantitative means of evaluating and comparing properties of alternative control system designs. This paper, although not an in-depth study, serves to outline several measures of utility and suggests a general structure for control system development. This method of comparing the usefulness of alternative control system will prove valuable to the ORNL Advanced Controls Program (ACTO) for optimizing compatibility with actual systems and equipment

  1. Fundamental Characteristics of Industrial Variant Specification Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer; Hvam, Lars

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the operational task of creating customised variants of industrial specifications (e.g. drawings, routings and bill-of-materials). Rooted in a lack of existing literature on the subject the paper describes the nature of variant specification systems. It introduces some...... fundamental concepts related to this task, which are relevant to understand for academia and practitioners working with the subject. This is done through a description of variant specification tasks and typical aspects of system solutions. To support the description of variant specification tasks and systems...... examples. In general the paper discusses an important focus area within mass customization and build-to-order production: the nature of industrial variant specification systems....

  2. Homegarden systems: agricultural characteristics and challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge, I.; Fresco, L.O.

    1993-01-01

    Many sources of informal, grey literature on agronomic aspects of homegardens are discussed with the aim to increase the understanding of current garden systems, of their evolution and of their potential for increasing food security

  3. Characteristics of Company Accounting Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Tokić; Marina Proklin

    2011-01-01

    Information has always presented an important factor of human activity. As a resource that guided human activity, information was gathered, stored, analysed and distributed in different ways throughout the history. Today, information system is a necessity in the global business system. Globalisation processes have changed the traditional concept of doing business and brought about the need for information management as an integral part of overall company assets and rapid developme...

  4. Thermodynamic versus non-equilibrium stability of palmitic acid monolayers in calcium-enriched sea spray aerosol proxy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen Rudd, Bethany A; Vidalis, Andrew S; Allen, Heather C

    2018-04-16

    Of the major cations in seawater (Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+, K+), Ca2+ is found to be the most enriched in fine sea spray aerosols (SSA). In this work, we investigate the binding of Ca2+ to the carboxylic acid headgroup of palmitic acid (PA), a marine-abundant fatty acid, and the impact such binding has on the stability of PA monolayers in both equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems. A range of Ca2+ conditions from 10 μM to 300 mM was utilized to represent the relative concentration of Ca2+ in high and low relative humidity aerosol environments. The CO2- stretching modes of PA detected by surface-sensitive infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) reveal ionic binding motifs of the Ca2+ ion to the carboxylate group with varying degrees of hydration. Surface tensiometry was used to determine the thermodynamic equilibrium spreading pressure (ESP) of PA on the various aqueous CaCl2 subphases. Up to concentrations of 1 mM Ca2+, each system reached equilibrium, and Ca2+:PA surface complexation gave rise to a lower energy state revealed by elevated surface pressures relative to water. We show that PA films are not thermodynamically stable at marine aerosol-relevant Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+] ≥ 10 mM). IRRAS and vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy were used to investigate the surface presence of PA on high concentration Ca2+ aqueous subphases. Non-equilibrium relaxation (NER) experiments were also conducted and monitored by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) to determine the effect of the Ca2+ ions on PA stability. At high surface pressures, the relaxation mechanisms of PA varied among the systems and were dependent on Ca2+ concentration.

  5. Characteristics of a simple blackbody measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, C.; Anger, N.H.; Kaehms, R.; Jaeger, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    An axially symmetric blackbody (BB) measurement system with a circular aperture and a circular detector is considered. The BB can be of a right circular conical shape, a right cylindrical shape, or a combination of these two shapes. Assuming that the BB is ideal, the power received by the detector is calculated. 8 references

  6. Swine production characteristics and management systems of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nematode parasites of economic importance in the study area include Ascaris spp, Stronghyle spp. and Trichuris spp. Segments of ... Smallholder farmers practised semi-intensive system of management where pigs usually scavenge for food and supplemented with cereal brans, kitchen wastes and vegetables. Farmers ...

  7. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Systemic Lupus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a wide spectrum of manifestations, shows considerable variation across the globe, although there is data from Africa is limited. Quantifying the burden of SLE across Africa can help raise awareness and knowledge about the ...

  8. Safety characteristics of decay heat removal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, F.

    1991-01-01

    Safety features of the decay heat removal systems including power sunply and final heat sink are described. A rather high reliability and an utmost degree of independence from energy supply are goals to be attained in the design of the European Fast Reactor (EFR) decay heat removal scheme. Natural circulation is an ambitious design goal for EFR. All the considerations are performed within the frame of risk minimization

  9. The size distribution of desert dust aerosols and its impact on the Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahowald, Natalie; Albani, Samuel; Kok, Jasper F.; Engelstaeder, Sebastian; Scanza, Rachel; Ward, Daniel S.; Flanner, Mark G.

    2014-12-01

    The global cycle of desert dust aerosols responds strongly to climate and human perturbations, and, in turn, impacts climate and biogeochemistry. Here we focus on desert dust size distributions, how these are characterized, emitted from the surface, evolve in the atmosphere, and impact climate and biogeochemistry. Observations, theory and global model results are synthesized to highlight the evolution and impact of dust sizes. Individual particles sizes are, to a large extent, set by the soil properties and the mobilization process. The lifetime of different particle sizes controls the evolution of the size distribution as the particles move downwind, as larger particles fall out more quickly. The dust size distribution strongly controls the radiative impact of the aerosols, as well as their interactions with clouds. The size of particles controls how far downwind they travel, and thus their ability to impact biogeochemistry downwind of the source region.

  10. Top-of-Atmosphere Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Satellite Instrument (CERES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.

    2002-01-01

    Nine months of CERES/TRMM broadband fluxes combined with VIRS high-resolution imager measurements are used to estimate the daily average direct radiative effect of aerosols for clear-sky conditions over the tropical oceans. On average, aerosols have a cooling effect over the tropics of 4.6 +/- 1 W/sq m. The magnitude is approx.2 W/sq m smaller over the southern tropical oceans than it is over northern tropical oceans. The direct effect derived from CERES is highly correlated with coincident aerosol optical depth retrievals inferred from 0.63 microns VIRS radiances (correlation coefficient of 0.96). The slope of the regression line is approx. -32 W/sq m/t over the equatorial Pacific Ocean, but changes both regionally and seasonally, depending on the aerosol characteristics. Near sources of biomass burning and desert dust, the aerosol direct effect reaches -25 W sq m to -30 W/sq m. The direct effect from CERES also shows a dependence on wind speed. The reason for this dependence is unclear-it may be due to increased aerosol (e.g. sea-salt or aerosol transport) or increased surface reflection (e.g. due to whitecaps). The uncertainty in the tropical average direct effect from CERES is approx. 1 W/sq m (approx. 20%) due mainly to cloud contamination, the radiance-to-flux conversion, and instrument calibration. By comparison, uncertainties in the direct effect from the ERBE and CERES "ERBE-Like" products are a factor of 3 to 5 larger.

  11. Aerosol Optical Depth over Europe: Evaluation of the CALIOPE air quality modelling system with direct-sun AERONET observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basart, Sara; Pay, María. Teresa; Pérez, Carlos; Cuevas, Emilio; Jorba, Oriol; Piot, Matthias; María Baldasano, Jose

    2010-05-01

    In the frame of the CALIOPE project (Baldasano et al., 2008), the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC-CNS) currently operates a high-resolution air quality forecasting system based on daily photochemical forecasts in Europe (12km x 12km resolution) with the WRF-ARW/HERMES/CMAQ modelling system (http://www.bsc.es/caliope) and desert dust forecasts over Southern Europe with BSC-DREAM8b (Pérez et al., 2006; http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM). High resolution simulations and forecasts are possible through their implementation on MareNostrum supercomputer at BSC-CNS. As shown in previous air quality studies (e.g. Rodríguez et al., 2001; Jiménez-Guerrero et al., 2008), the contribution of desert dust on particulate matter levels in Southern Europe is remarkable due to its proximity to African desert dust sources. When considering only anthropogenic emissions (Baldasano et al., 2008) and the current knowledge about aerosol physics and chemistry, chemistry-transport model simulations underestimate the PM10 concentrations by 30-50%. As a first approach, the natural dust contribution from BSC-DREAM8b is on-line added to the anthropogenic aerosol output of CMAQ. The aim of the present work is the quantitative evaluation of the WRF-ARW/HERMES/ CMAQ/BSC-DREAM8b forecast system to simulate the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over Europe. The performance of the modelled AOD has been quantitatively evaluated with discrete and categorical (skill scores) statistics by a comparison to direct-sun AERONET observations for 2004. The contribution of different types of aerosols will be analyzed by means of the O'Neill fine mode AOD products (O'Neill et al., 2001). A previous aerosol characterization of AERONET data was performed (Basart et al., 2009) in order to discriminate the different aerosol source contributions within the study region. The results indicate a remarkable improvement in the discrete and skill-scores evaluation (accuracy, critical success index and

  12. Characteristics of Southern California coastal aquifer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B.D.; Hanson, R.T.; Reichard, E.G.; Johnson, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    Most groundwater produced within coastal Southern California occurs within three main types of siliciclastic basins: (1) deep (>600 m), elongate basins of the Transverse Ranges Physiographic Province, where basin axes and related fluvial systems strike parallel to tectonic structure, (2) deep (>6000 m), broad basins of the Los Angeles and Orange County coastal plains in the northern part of the Peninsular Ranges Physiographic Province, where fluvial systems cut across tectonic structure at high angles, and (3) shallow (75-350 m), relatively narrow fluvial valleys of the generally mountainous southern part of the Peninsular Ranges Physiographic Province in San Diego County. Groundwater pumped for agricultural, industrial, municipal, and private use from coastal aquifers within these basins increased with population growth since the mid-1850s. Despite a significant influx of imported water into the region in recent times, groundwater, although reduced as a component of total consumption, still constitutes a significant component of water supply. Historically, overdraft from the aquifers has caused land surface subsidence, flow between water basins with related migration of groundwater contaminants, as well as seawater intrusion into many shallow coastal aquifers. Although these effects have impacted water quality, most basins, particularly those with deeper aquifer systems, meet or exceed state and national primary and secondary drinking water standards. Municipalities, academicians, and local water and governmental agencies have studied the stratigraphy of these basins intensely since the early 1900s with the goals of understanding and better managing the important groundwater resource. Lack of a coordinated effort, due in part to jurisdictional issues, combined with the application of lithostratigraphic correlation techniques (based primarily on well cuttings coupled with limited borehole geophysics) have produced an often confusing, and occasionally conflicting

  13. Physiochemical characteristics of aerosol particles collected from the Jokhang Temple indoors and the implication to human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lulu; Duo, Bu; Zhang, Fei; Li, Chunlin; Fu, Hongbo; Chen, Jianmin

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the indoor air pollution in the Jokahng Temple at Tibet Plateau, and its implication to human health. The mean concentrations of PM 1.0 and PM 2.5 were 435.0 ± 309.5 and 483.0 ± 284.9 μg/m 3 , respectively. The PM 2.5 concentration exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (75 μg/m 3 ) by 6.4 times. The size-segregated aerosols displayed a bimodal distribution. One peak was observed in the fine mode (0.4-2.1 μm) and the other peak appeared in the coarse mode (2.1-9.0 μm). The concentration of the total size-resolved PM was 794.3 ± 84.9 μg/m 3 . The mass fraction of coarse particles shared by 41.1%, apparently higher than that reported at low altitudes, probably due to incomplete combustion at Tibet Plateau with hypoxic atmospheric environment. The total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was 331.2 ± 60.3 ng/m 3 , in which the concentration of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was 18.5 ± 4.3 ng/m 3 , over ten times higher than the maximum permissible risk value of 1 ng/m 3 on account of carcinogenic potency of particulate PAHs through inhalation. PAHs exhibited a trimodal distribution, of which two peaks were observed in the fine mode and one peak in the coarse mode. With the aromatic rings increasing, the peak intensity increased in the fine mode. Na, Ca, Al, Mg and K dominated the elemental mass profiles, and metals displayed a bimodal distribution with a dominant peak in the coarse range. The total PAH deposition flux was 123.6 and 53.1 ng/h for adults and children, respectively. Coarse particles contributed most deposition flux in the head region, while fine particles contribute most deposition flux in the alveolar region. The increment lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) of PAHs ranaged at 10 -5 -10 -4 , indicating potential cancer risk to human health. The total deposition flux of metals was estimated at 1.4-13.2 ng/h. With the size increasing, deposition flux increased in the head

  14. Atmospheric aerosol in an urban area: Comparison of measurement instruments and methodologies and pulmonary deposition assessment; Aerosol atmosferico in area urbanae di misura e valutazione di deposizione polmonare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Luciani, A.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Bologna (Italy). Dip. Ambiente

    1996-07-01

    In March 1995 a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol in the Bologna urban area (Italy) was carried out. A transportable laboratory, set up by ENEA (Italian national Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) Environmental Department (Bologna), was utilized with instruments for measurement of atmospheric aerosol and meteorological parameters. The aim of this campaign was of dual purpose: to characterize aerosol in urban area and to compare different instruments and methodologies of measurements. Mass concentrations measurements, evaluated on a 23-hour period with total filter, PM10 dichotomous sampler and low pressure impactor (LPI Berner), have provided information respectively about total suspended particles, respirable fraction and granulometric parameters of aerosol. Eight meteorologic parameters, number concentration of submicromic fraction of aerosol and mass concentration of micromic fraction have been continually measured. Then, in a daytime period, several number granulometries of atmospheric aerosol have also been estimated by means of diffusion battery system. Results related to different measurement methodologies and granulometric characteristics of aerosol are presented here. Pulmonary deposition of atmospheric aerosol is finally calculated, using granulometries provided by LPI Brener and ICRP 66 human respiratory tract model.

  15. Current-potential characteristics of electrochemical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, Vincent S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    This dissertation contains investigations in three distinct areas. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an analysis of the effects of electromagnetic phenomena during the initial stages of cell discharge. Chapter 1 includes the solution to Maxwell`s equations for the penetration of the axial component of an electric field into an infinitely long cylindrical conductor. Chapter 2 contains the analysis of the conductor included in a radial circuit. Chapter 3 provides a complete description of the equations that describe the growth of an oxide film. A finite difference program was written to solve the equations. The system investigated is the iron/iron oxide in a basic, aqueous solution. Chapters 4 and 5 include the experimental attempts for replacing formaldehyde with an innocuous reducing agent for electroless deposition. In chapter 4, current-versus-voltage curves are provided for a sodium thiosulfate bath in the presence of a copper disk electrode. Also provided are the cathodic polarization curves of a copper/EDTA bath in the presence of a copper electrode. Chapter 5 contains the experimental results of work done with sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. Mixed-potential-versus-time curves for solutions containing various combinations of copper sulfate, nickel chloride, and hypophosphite in the presence of a palladium disk electrode provide an indication of the reducing power of the solutions.

  16. Aerosols in the CALIOPE air quality modelling system: evaluation and analysis of PM levels, optical depths and chemical composition over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basart

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The CALIOPE air quality modelling system is developed and applied to Europe with high spatial resolution (12 km × 12 km. The modelled daily-to-seasonal aerosol variability over Europe in 2004 is evaluated and analysed. Aerosols are estimated from two models, CMAQv4.5 (AERO4 and BSC-DREAM8b. CMAQv4.5 calculates biogenic, anthropogenic and sea salt aerosol and BSC-DREAM8b provides the natural mineral dust contribution from North African deserts. For the evaluation, we use daily PM10, PM2.5 and aerosol components data from 55 stations of the EMEP/CREATE network and total, coarse and fine aerosol optical depth (AOD data from 35 stations of the AERONET sun photometer network. Annual correlations between modelled and observed values for PM10 and PM2.5 are 0.55 and 0.47, respectively. Correlations for total, coarse and fine AOD are 0.51, 0.63, and 0.53, respectively. The higher correlations of the PM10 and the coarse mode AOD are largely due to the accurate representation of the African dust influence in the forecasting system. Overall PM and AOD levels are underestimated. The evaluation of the aerosol components highlights underestimations in the fine fraction of carbonaceous matter (EC and OC and secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA; i.e. nitrate, sulphate and ammonium. The scores of the bulk parameters are significantly improved after applying a simple model bias correction based on the observed aerosol composition. The simulated PM10 and AOD present maximum values over the industrialized and populated Po Valley and Benelux regions. SIA are dominant in the fine fraction representing up to 80% of the aerosol budget in latitudes north of 40° N. In southern Europe, high PM10 and AOD are linked to the desert dust transport from the Sahara which contributes up to 40% of the aerosol budget. Maximum seasonal ground-level concentrations (PM10 > 30 μg m−3 are

  17. Quantifying Aerosol Delivery in Simulated Spontaneously Breathing Patients With Tracheostomy Using Different Humidification Systems With or Without Exhaled Humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ari, Arzu; Harwood, Robert; Sheard, Meryl; Alquaimi, Maher Mubarak; Alhamad, Bshayer; Fink, James B

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol and humidification therapy are used in long-term airway management of critically ill patients with a tracheostomy. The purpose of this study was to determine delivery efficiency of jet and mesh nebulizers combined with different humidification systems in a model of a spontaneously breathing tracheotomized adult with or without exhaled heated humidity. An in vitro model was constructed to simulate a spontaneously breathing adult (tidal volume, 400 mL; breathing frequency, 20 breaths/min; inspiratory-expiratory ratio, 1:2) with a tracheostomy using a teaching manikin attached to a test lung through a collecting filter (Vital Signs Respirgard II). Exhaled heat and humidity were simulated using a cascade humidifier set to deliver 37°C and >95% relative humidity. Albuterol sulfate (2.5 mg/3 mL) was administered with a jet nebulizer (AirLife Misty Max) operated at 10 L/min and a mesh nebulizer (Aeroneb Solo) using a heated pass-over humidifier, unheated large volume humidifier both at 40 L/min output and heat-and-moisture exchanger. Inhaled drug eluted from the filter was analyzed via spectrophotometry (276 nm). Delivery efficiency of the jet nebulizer was less than that of the mesh nebulizer under all conditions (P humidity decreased drug delivery up to 44%. The jet nebulizer was less efficient than the mesh nebulizer in all conditions tested in this study. Aerosol deposition with each nebulizer was lowest with the heated humidifier with high flow. Exhaled humidity reduced inhaled dose of drug compared with a standard model with nonheated/nonhumidified exhalation. Further clinical research is warranted to understand the impact of exhaled humidity on aerosol drug delivery in spontaneously breathing patients with tracheostomy using different types of humidifiers. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  18. Should Aerosolized Antibiotics Be Used to Treat Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Berra, Lorenzo; Klompas, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, systemic use of antibiotics is the cornerstone of medical management. Supplemental use of aerosolized antibiotics with intravenous antibiotics in both experimental and clinical studies has been shown to have the following pharmacologic benefits: (1) aerosolized antibiotics reach the infected lung parenchyma without crossing the pulmonary alveolar capillary barrier; (2) aerosolized antibiotics increase anti-bacterial efficacy through increased local antibiotic concentration; and (3) aerosolized antibiotics decrease systemic toxicity. These benefits may be particularly beneficial to treat pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Clinical data on the benefits of aerosolized antibiotics are more limited. Studies to date have not clearly shown improvements in time to extubation, mortality, or other patient-centered outcomes. At present, amikacin, colistin, and ceftazidime are the most frequently used and studied aerosolized antibiotics. This review summarizes the characteristics of aerosolized antibiotics, reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using aerosolized antibiotics, and calls for future investigations based on animal study data. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  19. A generic-tee-plenum mixing system for application to single point aerosol sampling in stacks and ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Taewon; O'Neal, Dennis L; Ortiz, Carlos A

    2007-01-01

    The ANSI/HPS-N13.1-1999 standard is based on the concept of obtaining a single point representative sample from a location where the velocity and contaminant profiles are relatively uniform. It is difficult to predict the level of mixing in an arbitrary stack or duct without experimental data to meet the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements. The goal of this study was to develop experimental data for a range of conditions in "S" (S-shaped configuration) duct systems with different mixing elements and "S" systems having one or two mixing elements. Results were presented in terms of the coefficients of variation (COVs) for velocity, tracer gas, and 10-mum aerodynamic diameter (AD) aerosol particle profiles at different downstream locations for each mixing element. Five mixing elements were tested, including a 90 degrees elbow, a commercial static mixer, a Small-Horizontal Generic-Tee-Plenum (SH-GTP), a Small-Vertical Generic-Tee-Plenum (SV-GTP), and a Large-Horizontal Generic-Tee-Plenum (LH-GTP) system. The COVs for velocity, gas concentration, and aerosol particles for the three GTP systems were all determined to be less than 8%. Tests with two different sizes of GTPs were conducted, and the results showed the performance of the GTPs was relatively unaffected by either size or velocity as reflected by the Reynolds number. The pressure coefficients were 0.59, 0.57, and 0.65, respectively, for the SH-GTP, SV-GTP, and LH-GTP. The pressure drop for the GTPs was approximately twice that of the round elbow, but a factor of 5 less than a Type IV Air Blender. The GTP was developed to provide a sampling location less than 4-duct diameters downstream of a mixing element with low pressure drop condition. The object of the developmental effort was to provide a system that could be employed in new stack; however, the concept of GTPs could also be retrofitted onto existing system applications as well. Results from these tests show that the system performance is well within the ANSI

  20. Lidar and Laser Technology for NASA’S Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS Payload on The International Space Station (JEM-EF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Mark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the ISS lidar technology provided by Fibertek, Inc. in support of the NASA GSFC CATS mission and provides an assessment of the in-flight systems performance and lessons learned. During February the systems successfully operated in space for more than 300 hours using 25 W average power lasers and photon counting of aerosol atmospheric returns.

  1. Aerosol effects on cloud water amounts were successfully simulated by a global cloud-system resolving model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yousuke; Goto, Daisuke; Michibata, Takuro; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Takemura, Toshihiko; Tomita, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2018-03-07

    Aerosols affect climate by modifying cloud properties through their role as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei, called aerosol-cloud interactions. In most global climate models (GCMs), the aerosol-cloud interactions are represented by empirical parameterisations, in which the mass of cloud liquid water (LWP) is assumed to increase monotonically with increasing aerosol loading. Recent satellite observations, however, have yielded contradictory results: LWP can decrease with increasing aerosol loading. This difference implies that GCMs overestimate the aerosol effect, but the reasons for the difference are not obvious. Here, we reproduce satellite-observed LWP responses using a global simulation with explicit representations of cloud microphysics, instead of the parameterisations. Our analyses reveal that the decrease in LWP originates from the response of evaporation and condensation processes to aerosol perturbations, which are not represented in GCMs. The explicit representation of cloud microphysics in global scale modelling reduces the uncertainty of climate prediction.

  2. Investigation of aerosol distribution patterns and its optical properties at different time scale by using LIDAR system and AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fuyi; Khor, Wei Ying; Hee, Wan Shen; Choon, Yeap Eng; San, Lim Hwee; Abdullah, Khiruddin

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol is a major health-impairment issue in Malaysia especially during southeast monsoon period (June-September) due to the active open burning activities. However, hazy days were an issue in Penang, Malaysia during March, 2014. Haze intruded Penang during March and lasted for a month except for the few days after rain. Rain water had washed out the aerosols from the atmosphere. Therefore, this study intends to analyse the aerosol profile and the optical properties of aerosol during this haze event and after rain. Meanwhile, several days after the haze event (during April, 2014) were also analyzed for comparison purposes. Additionally, the dominant aerosol type (i.e., dust, biomass burning, industrial and urban, marine, and mixed aerosol) during the study period was identified according to the scattering plots of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) against the Angstrom exponent.

  3. Preliminary aerosol generator design studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, J. F., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The design and construction of a prototype vaporization generator for highly dispersed sodium chloride aerosols is described. The aerosol generating system is to be used in the Science Simulator of the Cloud Physics Laboratory Project and as part of the Cloud Physics Laboratory payload to be flown on the shuttle/spacelab.

  4. Aerosol extinction in coastal zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piazzola, J.; Kaloshin, G.; Leeuw, G. de; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2004-01-01

    The performance of electro-optical systems can be substantially affected by aerosol particles that scatter and absorb electromagnetic radiation. A few years ago, an empirical model was developed describing the aerosol size distributions in the Mediterranean coastal atmosphere near Toulon (France).

  5. The Effect of Aerosol-Cloud-Vegetation Interactions and Intraseasonal Meteorological Variability on Warm Cloud Development during the Amazonian Biomass Burning Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hoeve, J. E.; Remer, L. A.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of aerosols on the hydrological cycle remains one of the largest uncertainties in our climate system. Biomass burning, from both deforestation and annual agricultural burning, is the largest anthropogenic source of these aerosols in the Southern Hemisphere. Biomass burning aerosols have competing effects on clouds: Depending on the level of aerosol loading and the background cloud characteristics, biomass burning aerosols have been shown in observational studies to invigorate or inhibit cloud formation and/or growth through microphysical and absorptive pathways, respectively. Many of these previous studies have employed all days during the Amazonian burning season months of August through October to formulate aerosol-cloud correlations, assuming relatively constant meteorological conditions exist throughout these months. This study investigates how intraseasonal trends of precipitable water vapor and aerosol loading between August and October impact these aerosol-cloud correlations. Other factors affecting aerosol-cloud relationships, such as atmospheric stability, are also investigated. This study is focused on a small 3 degree NE x 4 degree WE region in Rondonia, Brazil that encompasses extensive, contiguous areas of both forested and deforested land. High resolution aerosol, cloud, water vapor, and atmospheric profile data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the Terra and Aqua satellites, as well as aerosol and water vapor data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET), are used collectively to explore the effect of aerosols on water vapor loading and warm cloud development over the Amazon. The difference in aerosol effects on the local hydrological cycle over forested and deforested areas is also examined. This final exercise provides insight into the relationship between aerosols, land-atmosphere processes, and warm clouds.

  6. On the relationship between perceived importance of ERP systems selection characteristics and satisfaction with selected ERP systems in these characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek; Pucihar, Andreja; Lenart, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems have been widely adopted not only by large but still more even by small and medium enterprises. Although there had been some research conducted in ERP systems selection criteria and ERP systems satisfaction characteristics, very little was done in resear...

  7. Why Is Improvement of Earth System Models so Elusive? Challenges and Strategies from Dust Aerosol Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ronald L.; Garcia-Pando, Carlos Perez; Perlwitz, Jan; Ginoux, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Past decades have seen an accelerating increase in computing efficiency, while climate models are representing a rapidly widening set of physical processes. Yet simulations of some fundamental aspects of climate like precipitation or aerosol forcing remain highly uncertain and resistant to progress. Dust aerosol modeling of soil particles lofted by wind erosion has seen a similar conflict between increasing model sophistication and remaining uncertainty. Dust aerosols perturb the energy and water cycles by scattering radiation and acting as ice nuclei, while mediating atmospheric chemistry and marine photosynthesis (and thus the carbon cycle). These effects take place across scales from the dimensions of an ice crystal to the planetary-scale circulation that disperses dust far downwind of its parent soil. Representing this range leads to several modeling challenges. Should we limit complexity in our model, which consumes computer resources and inhibits interpretation? How do we decide if a process involving dust is worthy of inclusion within our model? Can we identify a minimal representation of a complex process that is efficient yet retains the physics relevant to climate? Answering these questions about the appropriate degree of representation is guided by model evaluation, which presents several more challenges. How do we proceed if the available observations do not directly constrain our process of interest? (This could result from competing processes that influence the observed variable and obscure the signature of our process of interest.) Examples will be presented from dust modeling, with lessons that might be more broadly applicable. The end result will either be clinical depression or there assuring promise of continued gainful employment as the community confronts these challenges.

  8. Seasonal characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) based on high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometric (HR-ToF-AMS) measurements at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Lee, B. P.; Su, L.; Fung, J. C. H.; Chan, C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) remains poorly understood due to the lack of comprehensive measurements at high time resolution for tracking its dynamic features and the lack of long-term observation for tracking its seasonal variability. Here, we present highly time-resolved and seasonal compositions and characteristics of non-refractory components in PM with a diameter less than 1 μm (NR-PM1) at a suburban site in Hong Kong. The measurements were made with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Air Quality Research Supersite for 4 months, with one in each season of the year. The average NR-PM1 concentration of ~ 15 μg m-3 is higher than those AMS measurements made in South Korea and Japan, but lower than those in North China, the Yangtze River Delta and the nearby Pearl River Delta. The seasonal dependence of the total NR-PM1 monthly averaged concentrations was small, but that of the fractions of the species in NR-PM1 was significant. Site characteristic plays an important role in the relative fractions of species in NR-PM1 and our results are generally consistent with measurements at other non-urban sites in this regard. Detailed analyses were conducted on the AMS data in the aspects of (1) species concentrations, (2) size distributions, (3) degree of oxygenation of organics, and (4) positive matrix factorization (PMF)-resolved organic factors in a seasonal context, as well as with air mass origin from back-trajectory analysis. Sulfate had the highest fraction in NR-PM1 (> 40%), and the surrogates of secondary organic species - semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA) and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA) - prevailed (~ 80%) in the organic portion of NR-PM1. Local contributions to the organic portion of NR-PM1 at this suburban site was strongly dependent on season. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor related to

  9. Seasonal characteristics of fine particulate matter (PM) based on high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometric (HR-ToF-AMS) measurements at the HKUST Supersite in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. J.; Lee, B. P.; Su, L.; Fung, J. C. H.; Chan, C. K.

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) remains poorly understood due to the lack of comprehensive measurements at high time resolution for tracking its dynamic features and the lack of long-term observation for tracking its seasonal variability. Here, we present highly time-resolved and seasonal compositions and characteristics of non-refractory components in PM with diameter less than 1 μm (NR-PM1) at a suburban site in Hong Kong. The measurements were made with an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Air Quality Research Supersite for four months, with one in each season of the year. The average NR-PM1 concentration of ~15 μg m-3 is higher than those AMS measurements made in South Korea and Japan, but lower than those in North China, the Yangtze River Delta and the nearby Pearl River Delta. The seasonal dependence of the total NR-PM1 monthly averaged concentrations was small but that of the fractions of the species in NR-PM1 was significant. Site characteristic plays an important role in the relative fractions of species in NR-PM1 and our results are generally consistent with measurements at other non-urban sites in this regard. Detailed analyses were conducted on the AMS data in the aspects of (1) species concentrations, (2) size distributions, (3) degree of oxygenation of organics, and (4) positive matrix factorization (PMF)-resolved organic factors in a seasonal context, as well as with air mass origin from back-trajectory analysis. Sulfate had the highest fraction in NR-PM1 (> 40%) and the surrogates of secondary organic species, semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA) and low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA), prevailed (~80%) in the organic portion of NR-PM1. Local contributions to the organic portion of NR-PM1 at this suburban site was strongly dependent on season. The hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor related to local

  10. A new eye-safe lidar design for studying atmospheric aerosol distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nianwen; Zhou, Xiaobing; Li, Shusun; Chen, Zhongrong

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents the design, eye-safe characteristics, and performance of a new eye-safe infrared lidar system for studying city fog. It includes a compact infrared (1574 nm) transmitter, a telescope receiver, and a computer to acquire, store, and process and analyze the measurement data. The development of such a system makes it possible for routine aerosol monitoring in a populated area using lidar technology. A simulation study and a field test show that the system was capable of aerosol monitoring in cities. This lidar system will be used to study the distribution of aerosol over an urban area of 100-200 km(2) and will be useful for routine multidimensional aerosol measurements with high resolution in an urban environment.

  11. New insights in the production of aerosol antibiotics. Evaluation of the optimal aerosol production system for ampicillin-sulbactam, meropenem, ceftazidime, cefepime and piperacillin-tazobactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kioumis, Ioannis; Ritzoulis, Christos; Petridis, Dimitris; Darwiche, Kaid; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Spyratos, Dionysis; Parrish, Scott; Browning, Robert; Li, Qiang; Turner, J Francis; Freitag, Lutz; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-10-15

    Several aerosol antibiotics are on the market and several others are currently being evaluated. Aim of the study was to evaluate the aerosol droplet size of five different antibiotics for future evaluation as an aerosol administration. The nebulizers Sunmist(®), Maxineb(®) and Invacare(®) were used in combination with four different "small <6 ml" residual cups and two "large <10 ml" with different loadings 2-4-6-8 ml (8 ml only for large residual cups) with five different antibiotic drugs (ampicilln-sulbactam, meropenem, ceftazidime, cefepime and piperacillin-tazobactam). The Mastersizer 2000 (Malvern) was used to evaluate the produced droplet size from each combination Significant effect on the droplet size produced the different antibiotic (F=96.657, p<0.001) and the residual cup design (F=68.535, p<0.001) but not the different loading amount (p=0.127) and the nebulizer (p=0.715). Interactions effects were found significant only between antibiotic and residual cup (F=16.736, p<0.001). No second order interactions were found statistically significant. Our results firstly indicate us indirectly that the chemical formulation of the drug is the main factor affecting the produced droplet size and secondly but closely the residual cup design. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    entrainment may account for the large discrepancy in energy input for the two systems. In the third study, the temperature dependence of sea spray aerosol production is probed with the use of a highly stable temperature controlled plunging jet. Similar to previous studies, particle production increases...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  13. The Determination of the Aerosol Microphysical Characteristics in the Lower Part of the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer from Lidar Data and Accompanying Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zolotov, Ilia G

    2005-01-01

    Successful inversions of nephelometer data into the aerosol particle size distributions by the method of mean ordinates 1 encouraged us to apply this method to the data on the oceanic volume scattering function (VSF...

  14. Expert system characteristics and potential applications in safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, L.D.

    1986-01-01

    The general growth of expert, knowledge-based (KB) or rule based systems will significantly increase in the next three to five years. Improvements in computer hardware (speed, reduced size, power) and software (rule based, data based, user interfaces) in recent years are providing the foundations for the growth of expert systems. A byproduct of this growth will undoubtedly be the application of expert systems to various safeguards problems. Characteristics of these expert systems will involve 1) multiple rules governing an outcome, 2) confidence factors on individual variables and rule sets, 3) priority, cost, and risk based rule sets, and 4) the reasoning behind the advice or decision given by the expert system. This paper presents characteristics, structures, and examples of simple rule based systems. Potential application areas for these expert systems may include training, operations, management, designs, evaluations, and specific hardware operation

  15. Aerosol resuspension in the reactor cooling system of LWR's under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Bolado, R.; Hontanon, E.

    1991-07-01

    Aerosol resuspension from the pipes of the RCS under severe accident conditions happens when the carrier gas flow is turbulent. The origin of such phenomenon seems to be the existence of turbulent bursts in the neighbourhood of the pipe wall. These bursts are of random nature, in space and time. Three theoretical models have been found in available literature; those are: Cleaver and Yates', RESUS and Reeks' models. The first two of them are force balance models, in which particle detachment is supposed whenever aerodynamic lift or drag forces, respectively exceed adhesive forces, and the third one is an energy balance model in which resuspension happens when particle vibrational energy exceeds adhesive potential. From experimental evidence it seems that the studied phenomenon is a force balance problem and RESUS seems to be the most appropriate to it, among the available ones. Small-scale experiments have shown, as main parameters affecting resuspension, the Reynolds number of the flow, aerosol composition and initial loading per unit of area. Moreover, the resuspension rate decreases with time in all experiments where temporal measurements were taken

  16. Characterization of aerosols in Beijing during severe aerosol loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Cheng, Tianhai; Gu, Xingfa; Wu, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Severe aerosol pollutions in China significantly impact radiative forcing of climate at regional and global scales. Until now, the uncertainties in net climate forcing from severe aerosol pollutions in China are substantial, largely due to the lack of detailed knowledge of radiative properties of severe aerosol pollutions. Here the characteristics of aerosols under severe aerosol pollution days (APs) in Beijing are studied by analyzing the ground-based radiance measurements during the period from 2002 to 2014. We show that the mean single scattering albedo (SSA) values increase by 0.03-0.06 (7%) in APs, and the mean asymmetry (ASY) parameter values increase by 0.03-0.04 (6%) for the four wavelengths of 440-1020 nm. The atmospheric forcing of the APs is 2 times higher than that in other days. Contrary to the RF values, the radiative forcing efficiencies in the APs are 38% lower than those in the other days. Larger values of SSA and ASY under APs represent larger presence of more scattering aerosols and irregular-sized aerosols such as dust and non-absorbing fine mode particles. These particles are also verified by the much lower radiative forcing efficiency values. Analyses are applied on the dataset of the APs over Beijing, to group them into four discrete clusters. The two fine-size absorbing aerosols show larger mean atmospheric radiative forcing values (152.5 W/m2 and 184.5 W/m2 respectively) and forcing efficiency values (83.5 W/m2 and 108.5 W/m2 respectively). The non-absorbing aerosols and coarse aerosols exert large planetary cooling (-86.7 W/m2 and -77.3 W/m2) and low atmospheric heating effect.

  17. The frequency characteristics of medium voltage distribution system impedances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Emil Petrean

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the frequency characteristics of impedances involved in the electrical equivalent circuit of a large medium voltage distribution system. These impedances influence harmonics distortions propagation occurring due to the nonsinusoidal loads. We analyse the case of a 10 kV large urban distribution system which supplies industrial, commercial and residential customers. The influence of various parameters of the distribution network on the frequency characteristics are presented, in order to assess the interaction of harmonic distortion and distribution system network.

  18. Magnetic mirror fusion systems: Characteristics and distinctive features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    A tutorial account is given of the main characteristics and distinctive features of conceptual magnetic fusion systems employing the magnetic mirror principle. These features are related to the potential advantages that mirror-based fusion systems may exhibit for the generation of economic fusion power

  19. CATS Aerosol Typing and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matt; Yorks, John; Scott, Stan; Palm, Stephen; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Nowottnick, Ed; Selmer, Patrick; Kupchock, Andrew; Midzak, Natalie; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS), launched in January of 2015, is a lidar remote sensing instrument that will provide range-resolved profile measurements of atmospheric aerosols and clouds from the International Space Station (ISS). CATS is intended to operate on-orbit for at least six months, and up to three years. Status of CATS Level 2 and Plans for the Future:Version. 1. Aerosol Typing (ongoing): Mode 1: L1B data released later this summer; L2 data released shortly after; Identify algorithm biases (ex. striping, FOV (field of view) biases). Mode 2: Processed Released Currently working on correcting algorithm issues. Version 2 Aerosol Typing (Fall, 2016): Implementation of version 1 modifications Integrate GEOS-5 aerosols for typing guidance for non spherical aerosols. Version 3 Aerosol Typing (2017): Implementation of 1-D Var Assimilation into GEOS-5 Dynamic lidar ratio that will evolve in conjunction with simulated aerosol mixtures.

  20. Sensitivity studies of different aerosol indirect effects in mixed-phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hoose

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols affect the climate system by changing cloud characteristics. Using the global climate model ECHAM5-HAM, we investigate different aerosol effects on mixed-phase clouds: The glaciation effect, which refers to a more frequent glaciation due to anthropogenic aerosols, versus the de-activation effect, which suggests that ice nuclei become less effective because of an anthropogenic sulfate coating. The glaciation effect can partly offset the indirect aerosol effect on warm clouds and thus causes the total anthropogenic aerosol effect to be smaller. It is investigated by varying the parameterization for the Bergeron-Findeisen process and the threshold coating thickness of sulfate (SO4-crit, which is required to convert an externally mixed aerosol particle into an internally mixed particle. Differences in the net radiation at the top-of-the-atmosphere due to anthropogenic aerosols between the different sensitivity studies amount up to 0.5 W m−2. This suggests that the investigated mixed-phase processes have a major effect on the total anthropogenic aerosol effect.

  1. Atmospheric aerosol in an urban area: Comparison of measurement instruments and methodologies and pulmonary deposition assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berico, M.; Luciani, A.; Formignani, M.

    1996-07-01

    In March 1995 a measurement campaign of atmospheric aerosol in the Bologna urban area (Italy) was carried out. A transportable laboratory, set up by ENEA (Italian national Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) Environmental Department (Bologna), was utilized with instruments for measurement of atmospheric aerosol and meteorological parameters. The aim of this campaign was of dual purpose: to characterize aerosol in urban area and to compare different instruments and methodologies of measurements. Mass concentrations measurements, evaluated on a 23-hour period with total filter, PM10 dichotomous sampler and low pressure impactor (LPI Berner), have provided information respectively about total suspended particles, respirable fraction and granulometric parameters of aerosol. Eight meteorologic parameters, number concentration of submicromic fraction of aerosol and mass concentration of micromic fraction have been continually measured. Then, in a daytime period, several number granulometries of atmospheric aerosol have also been estimated by means of diffusion battery system. Results related to different measurement methodologies and granulometric characteristics of aerosol are presented here. Pulmonary deposition of atmospheric aerosol is finally calculated, using granulometries provided by LPI Brener and ICRP 66 human respiratory tract model

  2. Theoretical studies on aerosol agglomeration processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtinen, K.E.J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1997-12-31

    In this thesis, theoretical modeling of certain aerosol systems has been presented. At first, the aerosol general dynamic equation is introduced, along with a discretization routine for its numerical solution. Of the various possible phenomena affecting aerosol behaviour, this work is mostly focused on aerosol agglomeration. The fundamentals of aerosol agglomeration theory are thus briefly reviewed. The two practical applications of agglomeration studied in this thesis are flue gas cleaning using an electrical agglomerator and nanomaterial synthesis with a free jet reactor. In an electrical agglomerator the aerosol particles are charged and brought into an alternating electric field. The aim is to remove submicron particles from flue gases by collisions with larger particles before conventional gas cleaning devices that have a clear penetration window in the problematic 0.1-1{mu}m size range. A mathematical model was constructed to find out the effects of the different system parameters on the agglomerator`s performance. A crucial part of this task was finding out the collision efficiencies of particles of varying size and charge. The original idea was to use unipolar charging of the particles, and a laboratory scale apparatus was constructed for this purpose. Both theory and experiments clearly show that significant removal of submicron particles can not be achieved by such an arrangement. The theoretical analysis further shows that if the submicron particles and the large collector particles were charged with opposite polarity, significant removal of the submicron particles could be obtained. The second application of agglomeration considered in this thesis is predicting/controlling nanoparticle size in the gas-to-particle aerosol route to material synthesis. In a typical material reactor, a precursor vapor reacts to form molecules of the desired material. In a cooling environment, a particulate phase forms, the dynamics of which are determined by the rates of

  3. On the robustness of aerosol effects on an idealized supercell storm simulated with a cloud system-resolving model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Morrison

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A cloud system-resolving model (the Weather Research and Forecasting model with 1 km horizontal grid spacing is used to investigate the response of an idealized supercell storm to increased cloud droplet concentrations associated with polluted conditions. The primary focus is on exploring robustness of simulated aerosol effects in the face of complex process interactions and feedbacks between the cloud microphysics and dynamics. Simulations are run using sixteen different model configurations with various microphysical or thermodynamic processes modified or turned off. Robustness of the storm response to polluted conditions is also explored for each configuration by performing additional simulations with small perturbations to the initial conditions. Differences in the domain-mean accumulated surface precipitation and convective mass flux between polluted and pristine conditions are small for almost all model configurations, with relative differences in each quantity generally less than 15%. Configurations that produce a decrease (increase in cold pool strength in polluted conditions also tend to simulate a decrease (increase in surface precipitation and convective mass flux. Combined with an analysis of the dynamical and thermodynamic fields, these results indicate the importance of interactions between microphysics, cold pool evolution, and dynamics along outflow boundaries in explaining the system response. Several model configurations, including the baseline, produce an overall similar storm response (weakening in polluted conditions despite having different microphysical or thermodynamic processes turned off. With hail initiation turned off or the hail fallspeed-size relation set to that of snow, the model produces an invigoration instead of weakening of the storm in polluted conditions. These results highlight the difficulty of foreseeing impacts of changes to model parameterizations and isolating process interactions that drive the system

  4. Characteristics of aerosol types during large-scale transport of air pollution over the Yellow Sea region and at Cheongwon, Korea, in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Sung; Chung, Yong-Seung; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2012-04-01

    Episodes of large-scale transport of airborne dust and anthropogenic pollutant particles from different sources in the East Asian continent in 2008 were identified by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite RGB (red, green, and blue)-composite images and the mass concentrations of ground level particulate matter. These particles were divided into dust, sea salt, smoke plume, and sulfate by an aerosol classification algorithm. To analyze the aerosol size distribution during large-scale transport of atmospheric aerosols, aerosol optical depth (AOD) and fine aerosol weighting (FW) of moderate imaging spectroradiometer aerosol products were used over the East Asian region. Six episodes of massive airborne dust particles, originating from sandstorms in northern China, Mongolia, and the Loess Plateau of China, were observed at Cheongwon. Classified dust aerosol types were distributed on a large-scale over the Yellow Sea region. The average PM10 and PM2.5 ratio to the total mass concentration TSP were 70% and 15%, respectively. However, the mass concentration of PM2.5 among TSP increased to as high as 23% in an episode where dust traveled in by way of an industrial area in eastern China. In the other five episodes of anthropogenic pollutant particles that flowed into the Korean Peninsula from eastern China, the anthropogenic pollutant particles were largely detected in the form of smoke over the Yellow Sea region. The average PM10 and PM2.5 ratios to TSP were 82% and 65%, respectively. The ratio of PM2.5 mass concentrations among TSP varied significantly depending on the origin and pathway of the airborne dust particles. The average AOD for the large-scale transport of anthropogenic pollutant particles in the East Asian region was measured to be 0.42 ± 0.17, which is higher in terms of the rate against atmospheric aerosols as compared with the AOD (0.36 ± 0.13) for airborne dust particles with sandstorms. In particular, the region ranging from eastern

  5. Integrated Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Characteristics Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian GAICEANU

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to deduce the specific characteristics of the CHP 100kWe Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC Power System from the steady state experimental data. From the experimental data, the authors have been developed and validated the steady state mathematical model. From the control room the steady state experimental data of the SOFC power conditioning are available and using the developed steady state mathematical model, the authors have been obtained the characteristic curves of the system performed by Siemens-Westinghouse Power Corporation. As a methodology the backward and forward power flow analysis has been employed. The backward power flow makes possible to obtain the SOFC power system operating point at different load levels, resulting as the load characteristic. By knowing the fuel cell output characteristic, the forward power flow analysis is used to predict the power system efficiency in different operating points, to choose the adequate control decision in order to obtain the high efficiency operation of the SOFC power system at different load levels. The CHP 100kWe power system is located at Gas Turbine Technologies Company (a Siemens Subsidiary, TurboCare brand in Turin, Italy. The work was carried out through the Energia da Ossidi Solidi (EOS Project. The SOFC stack delivers constant power permanently in order to supply the electric and thermal power both to the TurboCare Company and to the national grid.

  6. [Distribution characteristics of pollution gases and water soluble ion in aerosol during the Asian Youth Games of Nanjing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jia-Nan; An, Jun-Lin; Wang, Hong-Lei; Shao, Ping; Duan, Qing; Xue, Guo-Qiang; Pang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble ions were observed by an Andersen cascade impactor (Andersen) and ion chromatography in Nanjing during the Asian Youth Games (AYG), and PM2.5, NO, NO2, O3 and CO were observed by ray β dust instrument, EMS pollution gases monitoring system. Concentrations of PM2.5, NO2, O3 and CO, were 37.0, 19.3, 48.1 and 0.7 x 10(3) μg x m(-3) during the AYG period, 26.0%, 42.6%, 36.1% and 46.1% lower than the value before the AYG period. During the AYG period, the main water-soluble ions in PM2.1 were Na(+), NH4(+) , Ca(2+) and SO4(2-), accounting for 80.6%; the main water-soluble ions in PM2.1-10 were Na(+), Ca(2+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-), accounting for 77.9%. The spectral distribution of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and NO3(-) were bimodal during the AYG period, other ions were three models. Before and after the AYG period, all ions were three models. From NO3(-)/SO4(2-), we can judge SO2 and NO(x) mainly come from the mobile source before and after the AYG period, from stationary sources during the AYG period.

  7. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia: AEROSOL AND MONSOON CLIMATE INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhanqing [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Lau, W. K. -M. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Ramanathan, V. [Department of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences, University of California, San Diego California USA; Wu, G. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Ding, Y. [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing China; Manoj, M. G. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Liu, J. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Qian, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Li, J. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Zhou, T. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Fan, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Rosenfeld, D. [Institute of Earth Sciences, Hebrew University, Jerusalem Israel; Ming, Y. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamic Laboratory, NOAA, Princeton New Jersey USA; Wang, Y. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena California USA; Huang, J. [College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou China; Wang, B. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Hawaii, Honolulu Hawaii USA; School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Xu, X. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Lee, S. -S. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Cribb, M. [Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science and ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland USA; Zhang, F. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Yang, X. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Zhao, C. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Takemura, T. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Wang, K. [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology and College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing China; Xia, X. [Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing China; Yin, Y. [School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing China; Zhang, H. [National Climate Center, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing China; Guo, J. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Zhai, P. M. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing China; Sugimoto, N. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba Japan; Babu, S. S. [Space Physics Laboratory, Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Thiruvananthapuram India; Brasseur, G. P. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2016-11-15

    Asian monsoons and aerosols have been studied extensively which are intertwined in influencing the climate of Asia. This paper provides a comprehensive review of ample studies on Asian aerosol, monsoon and their interactions. The region is the primary source of aerosol emissions of varies species, influenced by distinct weather and climatic regimes. On continental scale, aerosols reduce surface insolation and weaken the land-ocean thermal contrast, thus inhibiting the development of monsoons. Locally, aerosol radiative effects alter the thermodynamic stability and convective potential of the lower atmosphere leading to reduced temperatures, increased atmospheric stability, and weakened wind and atmospheric circulation. The atmospheric thermodynamic state may also be altered by the aerosol serving as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. Many mechanisms have been put forth regarding how aerosols modulate the amplitude, frequency, intensity, and phase of numerous monsoon climate variables. A wide range of theoretical, observational, and modeling findings on the Asian monsoon, aerosols, and their interactions are synthesized. A new paradigm is proposed on investigating aerosol-monsoon interactions, in which natural aerosols such as desert dust, black carbon from biomass burning, and biogenic aerosols from vegetation are considered integral components of an intrinsic aerosol-monsoon climate system, subject to external forcings of global warming, anthropogenic aerosols, and land use and change. Future research on aerosol-monsoon interactions calls for an integrated approach and international collaborations based on long-term sustained observations, process measurements, and improved models, as well as using observations to constrain model simulations and projections.

  8. Temporal heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiative impacts at a tropical coastal station – Part 2: Direct short wave radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Suresh Babu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal distinctiveness in the microphysical and optical properties of columnar and near-surface (in the well mixed region aerosols, associated with changes in the prevailing synoptic conditions, were delineated based on extensive (spread over 4 years and collocated measurements at the tropical coastal location, Trivandrum (8.55° N; 76.97° E, 3 m a.m.s.l., and the results were summarized in Part 1 of this two-part paper. In Part 2, we use these properties to develop empirical seasonal aerosol models, which represent the observed features fairly accurately, separately for winter monsoon season (WMS, December through March, inter-monsoon season (IMS, April and May, summer monsoon season (SMS, June through September and post monsoon season (PMS, October and November. The models indicate a significant transformation in the aerosol environment from an anthropogenic-dominance in WMS to a natural-dominance in SMS. The modeled aerosol properties are used for estimating the direct, short wave aerosol radiative forcing, under clear-sky conditions. Our estimates show large seasonal changes. Under clear sky conditions, the daily averaged short-wave TOA forcing changes from its highest values during WMS, to the lowest values in SMS; this seasonal change being brought-in mainly by the reduction in the abundance and the mass fraction (to the composite of black carbon aerosols and of accumulation mode aerosols. The resulting atmospheric forcing varies from the highest, (47 to 53 W m−2 in WMS to the lowest (22 to 26 W m−2 in SMS.

  9. A data-base system for seepage characteristics of geomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydan, O. [Tokai University, Shimizu (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Fluid flow through geomaterials is of great concern as it plays an important role in many engineering applications such as dam, underground storage of oil, water, nuclear waste disposals etc. Therefore, information on seepage characteristics of geomaterials is necessary for assessing fluid transport and its mechanical effect. In this paper, the author describes an integrated data-base system for seepage characteristics of geomaterials. This data-base system is used to study interrelations between permeability and pore diameter, porosity, discontinuity aperture, RQD and confining pressure as well as to check the validity of theoretical relations. 5 refs.

  10. Comparisons Between MISR and AERONET Retrieved Aerosol Particle Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2009-12-01

    Barbara J. Gaitley1, Ralph Kahn2, 1Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91109; 818-354-0552; 2NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; e-mail: barbara.gaitley@jpl.nasa.gov As a further step in validating the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol products, an extensive statistical comparison of particle micro-physical properties has been completed against Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. Angstrom exponent, single scattering albedo, and size distribution characteristic values and variance envelopes for individual sites and aggregates are compared, stratified by expected aerosol air mass type, optical depth magnitude and season. Specific examples illustrating strengths and weaknesses of this approach will be shown. Eight years of data from 52 geographically diverse sites having good long-term measurement records are first stratified based on six broad aerosol air mass type categories: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, urban pollution, continental and mixed dust+smoke aerosols. The number of actual coincident measurements is limited by requiring AERONET direct sun aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data be obtained from a two-hour window centered on the MISR overpass time, and AERONET sky scans, which provide particle micro-physical properties and are taken only once an hour, obtained from a four-hour window also centered on the overpass. 3995 coincident observations are included in the data set. Both AERONET sun and sky data are averaged over the measurements obtained within these windows and are then interpolated to the MISR characteristic wavelengths to facilitate comparison. All AERONET measurements are Level 1.5, Version 2 data. A previous, systematic comparison of MISR and AERONET aerosol optical depth data [Kahn, Gaitley et al., JGR 110, 2005] identified specific, suggested improvements to the early post-launch MISR Standard Aerosol retrieval algorithms

  11. a Study of the Origin of Atmospheric Organic Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildemann, Lynn Mary

    1990-01-01

    The sources of ambient organic particulate matter in urban areas are investigated through a program of emission source measurements, atmospheric measurements, and mathematical modeling of source/receptor relationships. A dilution sampler intended to collect fine organic aerosol from combustion sources is designed to simulate atmospheric cooling and dilution processes, so that organic vapors which condense under ambient conditions will be collected as particulate matter. This system is used to measure the emissions from a boiler burning distillate oil, a home fireplace, catalyst and noncatalyst automobiles, heavy-duty diesel trucks, natural gas home appliances, and meat cooking operations. Alternate techniques are used to sample the particulate matter emitted from cigarette smoking, a roofing tar pot, paved road dust, brake lining wear, tire wear, and vegetative detritus. The bulk chemical characteristics of the fine aerosol fraction are presented for each source. Over half of the fine aerosol mass emitted from automobiles, wood burning, meat cooking, home appliances, cigarettes, and tar pots is shown to consist of organic compounds. The organic material collected from these sources is analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography. Using a simple analytical protocol, a quantitative, 50-parameter characterization of the elutable fine organic aerosol emitted from each source type is obtained, which proves to be a unique fingerprint that can be used to distinguish most sources from each other. A mathematical model is used to predict the characteristics of fine ambient organic aerosol in the Los Angeles area that would prevail if the primary organic emissions are transported without chemical reaction. The model is found to track the seasonal variations observed in the ambient aerosol at the three sites studied. Emissions from vehicles and fireplaces are identified as significant sources of solvent-extractable organic aerosol. Differences between the model

  12. Characteristics of the Audit Processes for Distributed Informatics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius POPA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains issues regarding: main characteristics and examples of the distributed informatics systems and main difference categories among them, concepts, principles, techniques and fields for auditing the distributed informatics systems, concepts and classes of the standard term, characteristics of this one, examples of standards, guidelines, procedures and controls for auditing the distributed informatics systems. The distributed informatics systems are characterized by the following issues: development process, resources, implemented functionalities, architectures, system classes, particularities. The audit framework has two sides: the audit process and auditors. The audit process must be led in accordance with the standard specifications in the IT&C field. The auditors must meet the ethical principles and they must have a high-level of professional skills and competence in IT&C field.

  13. Operational Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimpland, Robert Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Operational characteristics represent the set of responses that a nuclear system exhibits during normal operation. Operators rely on this behavior to assess the status of the system and to predict the consequences of off-normal events. These characteristics largely refer to the relationship between power and system operating conditions. The static and dynamic behavior of a chain-reacting system, operating at sufficient power, is primarily governed by reactivity effects. The science of reactor physics has identified and evaluated a number of such effects, including Doppler broadening and shifts in the thermal neutron spectrum. Often these reactivity effects are quantified in the form of feedback coefficients that serve as coupling coefficients relating the neutron population and the physical mechanisms that drive reactivity effects, such as fissile material temperature and density changes. The operational characteristics of such nuclear systems usually manifest themselves when perturbations between system power (neutron population) and system operating conditions arise. Successful operation of such systems requires the establishment of steady equilibrium conditions. However, prior to obtaining the desired equilibrium (steady-state) conditions, an approach from zero-power (startup) must occur. This operational regime may possess certain limiting system conditions that must be maintained to achieve effective startup. Once steady-state is achieved, a key characteristic of this operational regime is the level of stability that the system possesses. Finally, a third operational regime, shutdown, may also possess limiting conditions of operation that must be maintained. This report documents the operational characteristics of a ''generic'' Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution (ADFS) system during the various operational regimes of startup, steady-state operation, and shutdown. Typical time-dependent behavior for each operational regime will be

  14. Operational Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Operational characteristics represent the set of responses that a nuclear system exhibits during normal operation. Operators rely on this behavior to assess the status of the system and to predict the consequences of off-normal events. These characteristics largely refer to the relationship between power and system operating conditions. The static and dynamic behavior of a chain-reacting system, operating at sufficient power, is primarily governed by reactivity effects. The science of reactor physics has identified and evaluated a number of such effects, including Doppler broadening and shifts in the thermal neutron spectrum. Often these reactivity effects are quantified in the form of feedback coefficients that serve as coupling coefficients relating the neutron population and the physical mechanisms that drive reactivity effects, such as fissile material temperature and density changes. The operational characteristics of such nuclear systems usually manifest themselves when perturbations between system power (neutron population) and system operating conditions arise. Successful operation of such systems requires the establishment of steady equilibrium conditions. However, prior to obtaining the desired equilibrium (steady-state) conditions, an approach from zero-power (startup) must occur. This operational regime may possess certain limiting system conditions that must be maintained to achieve effective startup. Once steady-state is achieved, a key characteristic of this operational regime is the level of stability that the system possesses. Finally, a third operational regime, shutdown, may also possess limiting conditions of operation that must be maintained. This report documents the operational characteristics of a “generic” Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution (ADFS) system during the various operational regimes of startup, steady-state operation, and shutdown. Typical time-dependent behavior for each operational regime will be illustrated, and key system

  15. AEROSOL VARIABILITY OBSERVED WITH RPAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Altstädter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To observe the origin, vertical and horizontal distribution and variability of aerosol particles, and especially ultrafine particles recently formed, we plan to employ the remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS Carolo-P360 "ALADINA" of TU Braunschweig. The goal of the presented project is to investigate the vertical and horizontal distribution, transport and small-scale variability of aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer using RPAS. Two additional RPAS of type MASC of Tübingen University equipped with turbulence instrumentation add the opportunity to study the interaction of the aerosol concentration with turbulent transport and exchange processes of the surface and the atmosphere. The combination of different flight patterns of the three RPAS allows new insights in atmospheric boundary layer processes. Currently, the different aerosol sensors are miniaturized at the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig and together with the TU Braunschweig adapted to fit into the RPAS. Moreover, an additional meteorological payload for measuring temperature, humidity and turbulence properties is constructed by Tübingen University. Two condensation particle counters determine the total aerosol number with a different lower detection threshold in order to investigate the horizontal and vertical aerosol variability and new particle formation (aerosol particles of some nm diameter. Further the aerosol size distribution in the range from about 0.300 to ~5 μm is given by an optical particle counter.

  16. Educator Perceptions of Virtual Learning System Quality Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Padayachee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In higher education institutions, digital learning environments, referred to as virtual learning systems in this article, have been adopted and are becoming increasingly popular among academics. A virtual learning system (VLS has a suite of tools with associated functions and non-functional system characteristics. Higher education institutions (HEIs implement a VLS with the intent to assimilate e-Learning with face-to-face instruction and thereby derive associated benefits from its usage. Currently there is limited information on educators’ perceptions on the usefulness of VLS tool functionality, and the importance assigned to non-functional characteristics. This article adapted the generic framework of the ISO 9126 external software quality model to ascertain the perceptions of educators with regards to VLS functionality and non-functional quality characteristics. A case study research strategy was adopted, using two South African higher education institutions. The main contribution of this article is a proposed model representing VLS quality in use characteristics, measured by the constructs of perceived usefulness and perceived importance. In addition to the theoretical contribution, this article makes a practical contribution by providing educators’ recommendations on the improvement of VLS quality characteristics. This article has potentially useful implications for the use of a VLS by educators and future VLS design iterations.

  17. Effect of finishing system on carcass characteristics and composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of finishing system on carcass characteristics and composition of Mubende goats and their Boer goat crossbreds. ... Dissectible lean and fat percentages varied in an ascending order of 66%, 72%, 72.6% and 8%, 14% and 16.5% for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. A reverse trend was observed for bone percentages with ...

  18. Characteristics of Appraisal Systems That Promote Job Satisfaction of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneire, Alexia; Vanhoof, Jan; Faddar, Jerich; Gijbels, David; Van Petegem, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article examines if and how characteristics of appraisal systems used for secondary school teachers affect job satisfaction. Using multilevel analyses on data of 3 473 teachers in Flanders (Belgium), we found that appraisals with a developmental purpose and appraisals perceived as being a fair judgement, both have a positive impact on job…

  19. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS OF THE CHARACTERISTIC PERFORMANCE OF STANDALONE PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Birendra Kishore; Anirban Nandy*; O.P. Pandey

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates an insight solar PV Stand Alone system which is a practical model with a halogen light source. At different situations the performance of solar PV cells are analyzed. The system produces power with depending on the change in halogen light intensity & temperature. A theoretical & experimental analysis of the PV cell can be achieved. In this paper the I-V & P-V characteristic of the solar photovoltaic cells with changes in temperature and isolation have been showed. With...

  20. Aerosol Remote Sensing in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface-atmosphere system over polar regions.

  1. 49 CFR 234.205 - Operating characteristics of warning system apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Operating characteristics of warning system... characteristics of warning system apparatus. Operating characteristics of electromagnetic, electronic, or... limits within which the system is designed to operate. ...

  2. A fibre-optic UV system for H$_{2}$SO$_{4}$ production in aerosol chambers causing minimal thermal effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kupc, A; Onnela, A; Duplissy, J; Mathot, S; Danielczok, A; Walther, H; Minginette, P; Rondo, L; Ickes, L; Curtius, J; Wagner, P E; Amorim, A; Lima, J M; Ehrhart, S; Kurten, A

    2011-01-01

    A novel fibre-optic UV illumination system for sulphuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) production has been developed. The illumination system described in this paper provides sufficient ultraviolet light (UV) power while causing practically no thermal effect on the aerosol chamber (temperature variation <0.005 degrees C at full UV illumination). A similar thermal stability has not been achieved in other comparable experimental set-ups so far. The spectrum provided by the fibre-optic UV system corresponds to the UVB region, illuminates the chamber in a reasonably uniform way and is comparable to the ground level actinic flux. The UV system has been installed for the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber experiments at CERN. Precise, easily-adjustable and reproducible concentrations of H(2)SO(4) were generated by adjusting the UV light intensity. This paper gives an overview on the design of this new system as well as insights on its performance and application. (C) 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Particulate matter (PM) episodes at a suburban site in Hong Kong: evolution of PM characteristics and role of photochemistry in secondary aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi Ming; Jie Li, Yong; Wang, Hao; Lee, Berto Paul Yok Long; Huang, Dan Dan; Keung Chan, Chak

    2016-11-01

    Episodes with high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) across the seasons were investigated during four 1-month campaigns at a suburban site in Hong Kong. High-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measurements revealed that both regional transport and secondary formation contributed to high PM levels during the episodes at this site. Based on distinct meteorological conditions, episodes were categorized into three types: liquid water content (LWC), solar irradiance (IR), and long-range transport (LRT). Despite the difference in meteorological conditions, all episodes were characterized by a high fraction of sulfate (45-56 %) and organics (23-34 %). However, aerosols in LWC episodes were less aged, consisting of the lowest fraction of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the highest fraction of small particles. Large particles mixed internally while freshly formed small particles mixed externally in LWC episodes. Aerosols in LRT episodes, by contrast, were the most aged and consisted of the highest proportion of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA) and the lowest proportion of small particles. Both small and large particles mixed externally in LRT episodes. The highest proportion of semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SVOOA) and a medium proportion of small particles were observed in IR episodes. Both small and large particles were likely externally mixed during IR episodes. Furthermore, aerosols experienced the most dramatic size increase and diurnal variation, with a time lag between SVOOA and LVOOA and a gradual increase in carbon oxidation state (OSc ≈ 2 × O : C - H : C). Five out of 10 episodes were of the IR type, further reflecting the importance of this type of episode. The evolution of aerosol components in one particular episode of the IR type, which exhibited a clear land-sea breeze pattern, was examined in detail. Sulfate and SOA due to photochemical aging were very efficiently produced during the

  4. Limitations and corrections in measuring dynamic characteristics of structural systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, P.L.

    1978-10-01

    The work deals with limitations encountered in measuring the dynamic characteristics of structural systems. Structural loading and response are measured by transducers possessing multiple resonant frequencies in their transfer function. In transient environments, the resultant signals from these transducers are shown to be analytically unpredictable in amplitude level and frequency content. Data recorded during nuclear effects simulation testing on structures are analyzed. Results of analysis can be generalized to any structure which encounters dynamic loading. Methods to improve the recorded data are described which can be implemented on a frequency selective basis during the measurement process. These improvements minimize data distortion attributable to the transfer characteristics of the measuring transducers

  5. Dome diagnostics system of optical parameters and characteristics of LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretyagin, Vladimir S.; Pavlenko, Nikita A.

    2017-09-01

    Scientific and technological progress of recent years in the production of the light emitting diodes (LEDs) has led to the expansion of areas of their application from the simplest systems to high precision lighting devices used in various fields of human activity. However, development and production (especially mass production) of LED lighting devices are impossible without a thorough analysis of its parameters and characteristics. There are many ways and devices for analysis the spatial, energy and colorimetric parameters of LEDs. The most methods are intended for definition only one parameter (for example, luminous flux) or one characteristic (for example, the angular distribution of energy or the spectral characteristics). Besides, devices used these methods are intended for measuring parameters in only one point or plane. This problem can be solved by using a dome diagnostics system of optical parameters and characteristics of LEDs, developed by specialists of the department OEDS chair of ITMO University in Russia. The paper presents the theoretical aspects of the analysis of LED's spatial (angular), energy and color parameters by using mentioned of diagnostics system. The article also presents the results of spatial), energy and color parameters measurements of some LEDs brands.

  6. Characteristics of the terrestrial field-aligned current system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Gjerloev

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first ever comprehensive statistical study of the spatiotemporal characteristics of field-aligned currents in the terrestrial magnetosphere-ionosphere system using multi point measurements. We determine how the FAC density, variability and scale size are coupled. The three ST 5 satellites were in a pearls-on-a-string formation making measurements of the magnetic field with variable inter-spacecraft separations ranging from a few seconds to about 10 min. More than 4700 sets of satellite passes are analyzed using a robust correlation analysis aimed at determining the variability of the FAC system as a function of scale size and satellite spacing. We find significant differences between the FAC characteristics on the dayside and on the nightside in terms of dynamics of the current systems. On the dayside the FAC characteristics are found to be independent of IMF Bz and geomagnetic activity while the nightside indicates increased variability during disturbed conditions. The boundary separating highly and poorly correlated FACs can be fitted by a linear line for satellite separations shorter than 60 s (dayside and 160 s (nightside. We interpret this as the dayside and nightside magnetospheric reconfiguration times respectively. For times exceeding this the FAC characteristics are suggested to be controlled by the solar wind (dayside and plasma sheet (nightside dynamics. Finally, the characteristics of FAC system with scale sizes larger than ~200 km (at ionospheric altitude appear to be stable and repeatable on time scales of the order of a minute (i.e. comparable to the low-altitude orbiting satellite's traverse time across the auroral belt. In this sense, our results effectively validate the Iijima and Potemra (1978 assumption that on average the large-scale currents with scale sizes of the Region1 and Region2 are quasi-persistently significant in the transport of energy and momentum between the magnetosphere and the ionosphere.

  7. Power system transient stability analysis based on branch potential characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Huan; Wang, Zengping

    2017-09-01

    Branch potential function is proposed based on the power system network preserving model. The concept of thermodynamics-entropy, is introduced to describe spatial distribution characteristics of the branch potential energy. Branch potential energy was analysed in time and space domain., with transient stability index proposed accordingly. The larger disturbance energy line fault injected to grid is, the larger branch energy entropy will be, and the more energy accumulated on key branches is, the more prone to lose stability the system will be. Simulation results on IEEE system proved its feasibility.

  8. ESSENTIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF AN ERP SYSTEM : CONCEPTUALIZATION AND OPERATIONALIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvestre Uwizeyemungu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The interest of firms in ERP systems has been echoed in both the scientific andprofessional literature. It is worth noting however that while this literature has becomeincreasingly abundant, there does not yet exist an operational definition of the ERP conceptthat is, if not unanimously, at least widely accepted. This constitutes a handicap for boththe research and practice communities. The present study outlines what could beconsidered as an ERP by first determining the essentially required characteristics of such asystem: integration, flexibility and transversality. Indicators are then provided in order tooperationalise these three characteristics. The study concludes by proposing a researchframework on the impact of an ERP’s key characteristics upon the performance of thesystem in a given organisational setting.

  9. Further evaluation of alternative air-filtration systems for reducing the transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    Dee, Scott A.; Deen, John; Cano, Jean Paul; Batista, Laura; Pijoan, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 4 methods for the reduction of aerosol transmission of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration, 2×-low-cost filtration, bag filtration, and use of a filter tested against particles derived from dioctylphthalate (DOP). The HEPA-filtration system used a prefilter screen, a bag filter (Eurovent [EU] 8 rating), and a HEPA filter (EU13 rating). The low-cost-filtration system contained mo...

  10. A European Aerosol Phenomenology - 3: Physical and Chemical 2 Characteristics of Particulate Matter from 60 Rural, Urban, and Kerbside Sites Across Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Putaud, J.-P.; Van Dingenen, R.; Alastuey, A.; Bauer, H.; Birmili, W.; Cyrys, J.; Flentje, H.; Fuzzi, S.; Gehrig, R.; Harrison, R.M.; Hansson, H.C.; Herrmann, H.; Hitzenberger, R.; Hüglin, C.; Jones, A.M.; Kasper-Giebl, A.; Kiss, G.; Kousa, A.; Kuhlbusch, T.A.J.; Löschau, G.; Maenhaut, W.; Molnar, A.; Moreno, T.; Pekkanen, J.; Perrino, C.; Pitz, M.; Puxbaum, H.; Querol, X.; Rodriguez, S.; Salma, I.; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Smolík, Jiří; Schneider, J.; Spindler, G.; ten Brink, H.; Tursic, J.; Viana, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Raes, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 10 (2010), s. 1308-1320 ISSN 1352-2310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : aerosol * chemical composition * number concentration Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.226, year: 2010

  11. Numerical Analysis of Combined Valve Hydrodynamic Characteristics for Turbine System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmik, P. K.; Shamim, J. A.; Gairola, A.; Arif, M.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Flow characteristic curves are plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate. The flow characteristic curves are utilized to accurately test the performance of the control valve of turbine system to ensure the highest controllability and reliability of the power conversion system of large and small power plants. Turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in power conversion system. The electrical energy output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate (steam or gas) to the turbine through valves and nozzles. The turbine comprises fast acting governing control valves and stop valves acting against the seat in the flow passage in the closed position. The turbine control valve regulates the mass flow rate entering the first nozzle of a turbine. The main function of stop valve is to close the fluid inlet rapidly in response to a fast close signal to swiftly cut off the flow through the valve inlet. Both these valves contribute attractively to improvement of the power system transient stability as well. To improve the efficiency of power conversion system many investigation have been done by researcher by focusing on the cycle layout or working fluid or by improving the flow path of the working fluid. The main focus is to find out the best option for combined cycle power plant by analyzing four different cycle configuration. Next research phase focused on different way to enhance the cycle efficiency. As the electrical power output from the generator is proportional to the mass flow rate to the turbine through the valve, it should preferably operate linearly. In reality, however, the valve has the various flow characteristics pursuant to the stem lift. Thus, the flow characteristic and control performance are needed to be designed

  12. Monsoon sensitivity to aerosol direct radiative forcing in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aerosol forcing remains a dominant uncertainty in climate studies. The impact of aerosol direct radiative forcing on Indian monsoon is extremely complex and is strongly dependent on the model, aerosol distribution and characteristics specified in the model, modelling strategy employed as well as on spatial and temporal ...

  13. Quantitative analysis and design of a spray aerosol inhaler. Part 1: effects of dilution air inlets and flow paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longest, P Worth; Hindle, Michael

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of modifying inhaler design variables on aerosol drug deposition within the mouthpiece for a representative spray system using a quantitative analysis and design approach. Capillary aerosol generation (CAG) was selected as a model spray aerosol system in conjunction with four prototype inhaler body and mouthpiece combinations. In vitro experiments were used to determine drug deposition in the mouthpiece and induction port. Validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were implemented to establish relationships between design variables, transport characteristics, and aerosol drug deposition. Results of this study indicated that both the size of the upstream dilution air inlets and the flow pathway configuration near the spray nozzle significantly influenced aerosol transport and deposition. CFD results showed that the primary transport characteristics associated with drug deposition were turbulence intensity and the effective diameter of the mouthpiece. Strong quantitative correlations were developed between the identified transport characteristics and mouthpiece drug deposition. Based on quantitative analysis and design, turbulence intensity and effective mouthpiece diameter were identified as key transport characteristics within the design space that directly influenced aerosol deposition and may be used to predict and optimize drug delivery to the patient.

  14. Historical (1750-2014) anthropogenic emissions of reactive gases and aerosols from the Community Emissions Data System (CEDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesly, Rachel M.; Smith, Steven J.; Feng, Leyang; Klimont, Zbigniew; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Pitkanen, Tyler; Seibert, Jonathan J.; Vu, Linh; Andres, Robert J.; Bolt, Ryan M.; Bond, Tami C.; Dawidowski, Laura; Kholod, Nazar; Kurokawa, June-ichi; Li, Meng; Liu, Liang; Lu, Zifeng; Moura, Maria Cecilia P.; O'Rourke, Patrick R.; Zhang, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    We present a new data set of annual historical (1750-2014) anthropogenic chemically reactive gases (CO, CH4, NH3, NOx, SO2, NMVOCs), carbonaceous aerosols (black carbon - BC, and organic carbon - OC), and CO2 developed with the Community Emissions Data System (CEDS). We improve upon existing inventories with a more consistent and reproducible methodology applied to all emission species, updated emission factors, and recent estimates through 2014. The data system relies on existing energy consumption data sets and regional and country-specific inventories to produce trends over recent decades. All emission species are consistently estimated using the same activity data over all time periods. Emissions are provided on an annual basis at the level of country and sector and gridded with monthly seasonality. These estimates are comparable to, but generally slightly higher than, existing global inventories. Emissions over the most recent years are more uncertain, particularly in low- and middle-income regions where country-specific emission inventories are less available. Future work will involve refining and updating these emission estimates, estimating emissions' uncertainty, and publication of the system as open-source software.

  15. Historical (1750–2014 anthropogenic emissions of reactive gases and aerosols from the Community Emissions Data System (CEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Hoesly

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new data set of annual historical (1750–2014 anthropogenic chemically reactive gases (CO, CH4, NH3, NOx, SO2, NMVOCs, carbonaceous aerosols (black carbon – BC, and organic carbon – OC, and CO2 developed with the Community Emissions Data System (CEDS. We improve upon existing inventories with a more consistent and reproducible methodology applied to all emission species, updated emission factors, and recent estimates through 2014. The data system relies on existing energy consumption data sets and regional and country-specific inventories to produce trends over recent decades. All emission species are consistently estimated using the same activity data over all time periods. Emissions are provided on an annual basis at the level of country and sector and gridded with monthly seasonality. These estimates are comparable to, but generally slightly higher than, existing global inventories. Emissions over the most recent years are more uncertain, particularly in low- and middle-income regions where country-specific emission inventories are less available. Future work will involve refining and updating these emission estimates, estimating emissions' uncertainty, and publication of the system as open-source software.

  16. Evaluation of a valveless thermal desorption system for organic aerosols and vapors. Transfer lines and preconcentration module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modey, William K; Doskey, Paul V

    2006-07-14

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are distributed in the atmosphere between the gas- and aerosol-phases. The low vapor pressures of some SVOCs makes thermal extraction and transfer through gas chromatographic (GC) systems difficult. We evaluated a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) GC inlet, which served as the preconcentration module, and four open-tubular capillaries (Silcosteel- and Siltek-treated stainless steel, Silcosteel-treated stainless steel coated with 100% dimethylpolysiloxane, and deactivated fused silica) as transfer lines in a valveless, whole-sample analytic system. Thermal extraction of C(9)-C(36)n-alkanes at 300 and 320 degrees C from fused silica and quartz wool in the PTV inlet was equally efficient. Adsorptive losses of C(22)-C(36)n-alkanes to stainless steel surfaces that protruded into the PTV inlet were suspected. Thus, treatment of the outer surfaces of transfer lines is recommended for effective thermal transfer of SVOCs. Transfer efficiencies began to decline after n-C(24), n-C(28), and n-C(30) in Silcosteel-treated stainless steel, deactivated fused silica, and Siltek-treated stainless steel transfer lines, respectively. Thus, quantitative recovery at 320 degrees C of compounds with vapor pressures less than about 3 x 10(-8)Pa is not expected in valveless SVOC thermal desorption systems that use Siltek-treated stainless steel transfer lines and fused silica or quartz wool as preconcentration substrates.

  17. Diversity of Aerosol Optical Thickness in analysis and forecasting modes of the models from the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, P.

    2014-12-01

    With the emergence of global aerosol models intended for operational forecasting use at global numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers, the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) was founded in 2010. One of the objectives of ICAP is to develop a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble (ICAP-MME) for operational and basic research use. To increase the accuracy of aerosol forecasts, several of the NWP centers have incorporated assimilation of satellite and/or ground-based observations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT), the most widely available and evaluated aerosol parameter. The ICAP models are independent in their underlying meteorology, as well as aerosol sources, sinks, microphysics and chemistry. The diversity of aerosol representations in the aerosol forecast models results in differences in AOT. In addition, for models that include AOT assimilations, the diversity in assimilation methodology, the observed AOT data to be assimilated, and the pre-assimilation treatments of input data also leads to differences in the AOT analyses. Drawing from members of the ICAP latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, five day AOT forecasts and AOT analyses are analyzed from four multi-species models which have AOT assimilations: ECMWF, JMA, NASA GSFC/GMAO, and NRL/FNMOC. For forecast mode only, we also include the dust products from NOAA NGAC, BSC, and UK Met office in our analysis leading to a total of 7 dust models. AOT at 550nm from all models are validated at regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and a data assimilation grade multi-satellite aerosol analysis. These analyses are also compared with the recently developed AOT reanalysis at NRL. Here we will present the basic verification characteristics of the ICAP-MME, and identify regions of diversity between model analyses and forecasts. Notably, as in many other ensemble environments, the multi model ensemble consensus mean outperforms all of the

  18. MISR Global Aerosol Product Assessment by Comparison with AERONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Barbara J. Gaitley1, Ralph Kahn2, 1Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91109; 818-354-0552; 2NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; e-mail: barbara.gaitley@jpl.nasa.gov As a further step in validating the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol products, an extensive statistical comparison between MISR optical depth and Angstrom exponent and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals has been completed. Angstrom exponent was interpreted in terms of components and mixtures used by the retrieval algorithm. Specific examples illustrating the analysis approach will be shown. Eight years of data from 81 geographically diverse sites having good long-term measurement records were first stratified based on locations where six broad aerosol air mass type categories are likely to occur: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, urban pollution, continental and mixed dust+smoke aerosols. The number of actual coincident measurements was constrained by requiring that the AERONET direct sun aerosol optical depth (AOD) data was obtained within a two-hour window centered on the MISR overpass time. 5156 coincident observations are included in this AOD data set. AERONET direct sun data were averaged over the measurements obtained within this window, and were then interpolated to the MISR characteristic wavelengths to facilitate comparison. All AERONET measurements are Level 2.0, Version 2 data. A previous, systematic comparison of MISR and AERONET aerosol optical depth data [Kahn, Gaitley et al., JGR 110, 2005] identified specific, suggested improvements to the early post-launch MISR Standard Aerosol retrieval algorithms. Most of these suggestions were implemented in the uniformly reprocessed MISR Version 22 aerosol products used in the current study. We documented the performance of the current MISR products based on the comparison statistics. For example, agreement between AERONET and

  19. Study on TV X-ray system characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, A.P.; Volkov, A.V.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of comparative investigations into the main characteristics of TV X-ray systems (TXS) and X-ray radiography when X-raying of the 1Kh18N9T steel. The following characteristics are considered: the threshold contrast sensitivity, the sensitivity to revealing standard defects, and the dose rate of X-radiation at the input of the X-ray converter. Practical recommendations are given on the use of TXS in flaw detection of various materials. It is remarked to use introscopes for testing of thick welded products articles, and X-ray vidicon systems for study of low-contrast images (in testing of welds made by point welding, and of thin-wall products)

  20. System Quality Characteristics for Selecting Mobile Learning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed SARRAB

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The majority of M-learning (Mobile learning applications available today are developed for the formal learning and education environment. These applications are characterized by the improvement in the interaction between learners and instructors to provide high interaction and flexibility to the learning process. M-learning is gaining increased recognition and adoption by different organizations. With the high number of M-learning applications available today, making the right decision about which, application to choose can be quite challenging. To date there is no complete and well defined set of system characteristics for such M-learning applications. This paper presents system quality characteristics for selecting M-learning applications based on the result of a systematic review conducted in this domain.

  1. A review of dynamic characteristics of magnetically levitated vehicle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamic response of magnetically levitated (maglev) ground transportation systems has important consequences for safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. Ride quality is determined by vehicle response and by environmental factors such as humidity and noise. The dynamic response of the vehicles is the key element in determining ride quality, while vehicle stability is an important safety-related element. To design a guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, vehicle dynamics must be understood. Furthermore, the trade-off between guideway smoothness and levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. The link between the guideway and the other maglev components is vehicle dynamics. For a commercial maglev system, vehicle dynamics must be analyzed and tested in detail. This report, which reviews various aspects of the dynamic characteristics, experiments and analysis, and design guidelines for maglev systems, discusses vehicle stability, motion dependent magnetic force components, guideway characteristics, vehicle/ guideway interaction, ride quality, suspension control laws, aerodynamic loads and other excitations, and research needs.

  2. SAFARI 2000 AERONET Ground-based Aerosol Data, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) is an optical ground-based aerosol monitoring network and data archive system. AERONET measurements of the...

  3. Characteristics of Strategies in Product/Service-System Development

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Adrian; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2006-01-01

    The underlying principle in Product/Service-Systems (PSS) strategy is to shift from business based on the value of the transfer of product ownership and responsibility, to business based on the value of utility of the product and services. This paper identifies characteristics of various strategies that may be applied in PSS development. PSS concepts created in projects by third year Design & Innovation students at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) working with product-life orient...

  4. A GC-TCD method for measuring the liquid water mass of collected aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Te; Chang, Shih-Yu

    This work presents a gas chromatographic method that uses a thermal conductivity detector (GC-TCD) to measure the liquid water mass (LWM) of collected aerosols. The method is a modification of the previously developed EA-TCD method (Journal of Aerosol Science 29, 827). A microcomputer was incorporated into the system to control the analytical procedures, improve the measurement precision, and make possible a continuous operation. To validate the method, the aerosol LWMs of NaCl, Na 2SO 4, NH 4NO 3, (NH 4) 2SO 4, NH 4Cl, and Na 2CO 3 were measured at room temperature under relative humidities (RHs) varying between 20% and 90%, in both humidifying and dehumidifying conditions. Estimates of aerosol LWMs for varying aerosol chemical compositions and RHs by various measurement methods and predictive models are comprehensively compared. The comparison shows that the GC-TCD measurements agree closely with those of the other methods. The GC-TCD measurements are closer to the ISORROPIA model predictions than those of the AIM2 model. Most notably, our method determines, for the first time, the hygroscopic behavior of Na 2CO 3 aerosol yielding the deliquescence relative humidity and crystallization relative humidity at 78% and 39% RH, respectively. The hygroscopic characteristics of various NaCl mole fractions in mixed NaCl-Na 2SO 4 aerosols, determined by GC-TCD, are used to show the discrepancy between the measurements and the model's prediction.

  5. Intrusion Detection in Control Systems using Sequence Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Mai; Onoda, Takashi

    Intrusion detection is considered effective in control systems. Sequences of the control application behavior observed in the communication, such as the order of the control device to be controlled, are important in control systems. However, most intrusion detection systems do not effectively reflect sequences in the application layer into the detection rules. In our previous work, we considered utilizing sequences for intrusion detection in control systems, and demonstrated the usefulness of sequences for intrusion detection. However, manually writing the detection rules for a large system can be difficult, so using machine learning methods becomes feasible. Also, in the case of control systems, there have been very few observed cyber attacks, so we have very little knowledge of the attack data that should be used to train the intrusion detection system. In this paper, we use an approach that combines CRF (Conditional Random Field) considering the sequence of the system, thus able to reflect the characteristics of control system sequences into the intrusion detection system, and also does not need the knowledge of attack data to construct the detection rules.

  6. Role of system characteristics in evolution of pump hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walia, Mohinder; Misri, Vijay; Sharma, A.K.; Bapat, C.N.

    1994-01-01

    Primary heat transport (PHT) main circuit provides the means for transferring the heat produced in the fuel by circulating heavy water in the main circuit loop by primary coolant pumps (PCPs). The procurement specification of PCPs for 500 MWe pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR) was prepared based upon the first order hydraulic analysis of the primary heat transport system and accordingly duty point was fixed. With this specification the manufacturer carried out model testing to arrive at optimum size of the impeller followed by determination of pump characteristics curves using full scale impeller during type testing. The duty point thus obtained was higher than specified necessitating the trimming of impeller. However, in order to make use of available higher duty point from system considerations, the duty point was redefined for production of subsequent pumps within specified tolerances governed by manufacturing limitations. PHT main system sizing (piping and feeders) was carried out based upon pump (delivering maximum flow) characteristics curve. Pressure profiles of PHT system at various operating modes were drawn and corresponding power drawn by motor was calculated. The interfacing of reactor coolant main system with hydraulic characteristics of PCP plays a significant role in establishing the requisite capability and capacity of PHT system in performing its intended functions. Therefore the paper traces the evolution of design parameters for PCP and subsequent generation of pressure profiles commensurate with the changes made in power profile including their impact on feeder sizing. The paper also highlights the scope of interaction between process designer and pump manufacturer in formulating a mutually acceptable and efficient hydraulic performance for PCP. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  7. TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Washington University St Louis — TOMS_AI_G is an aerosol related dataset derived from the Total Ozone Monitoring Satellite (TOMS) Sensor. The TOMS aerosol index arises from absorbing aerosols such...

  8. Development of Advanced Korean Reference HLW Disposal System - Site Characteristics -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Kyung Woo; Kin, Geon Young; Choi, Heui Joo

    2011-01-01

    In order to dispose of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) safely in geological formations, an advanced Korean reference high-level waste disposal system(A-KRS) is being investigated to cope with the HLWs from pyro-processing of the spent nuclear fuel. This is a summarized comprehensive KURT site characterization report for the development of an A-KRS and the scope is as follows; topographical and geological characteristics, hydrogeological conceptual model and groundwater flow simulation, groundwater chemistry and geothermal gradient, and potential layout for deep geological repository. The geological, geo-structural, hydrogeological, and geochemical information, which are investigated and estimated up to -500m depth using various investigation methods, has been providing for development of disposal system, engineered barrier system, radionuclide migration properties in natural barrier system, and their total safety assessment

  9. Analysis of the characteristics of thick-film NTC thermistor devices manufactured by screen-printing and firing technique and by room temperature aerosol deposition method (ADM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Michaela; Kita, Jaroslaw; Münch, Christian; Moos, Ralf

    The study compares thick-film NTC thermistor devices, produced by the screen-printing (and firing) technique and by the Aerosol Deposition Method (ADM) at room temperature. The devices are compared with respect to film quality (optical, mechanical) and to the negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) parameters ρ25 and B. While the screen-printed films are porous, the Aerosol Deposited (AD) films are characterized by high tightness, mechanical stability, and a production at room temperature. The electrical analysis shows that the AD films reach the ρ25- and B-values of bulk NTCRs from literature after a moderate tempering step below 400∘C in air. The screen-printed films show B-values that are comparable to the values of bulk NTCRs from literature and ρ25-values that are significantly higher.

  10. Characteristic of oil palm residue for energy conversion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muharnif; Zainal, Z.A.

    2006-01-01

    Malaysia is the major producer of palm oil in the world. It produces 8.5 tones per year (8.5 x 10 6 ty -1 ) of palm oil from 38.6 x 10 6 ty - 1 of fresh fruit bunches. Palm oil production generates large amounts of process residue such as fiber (5.4 x 10 6 ty - 1 ), shell (2.3 x 10 6 ty - 1 ), and empty fruit bunches (8.8 x 10 6 ty - 1 ). A large fraction of the fiber and much of the shell are used as fuel to generate process steam and electricity. The appropriate energy conversion system depends on the characteristic of the oil palm residue. In this paper, a description of characteristic of the oil palm residue is presented. The types of the energy conversion system presented are stoker type combustor and gasified. The paper focuses on the pulverized biomass material and the use of fluidized bed gasified. In the fluidized bed gasified, the palm shell and fiber has to be pulverized before feeding into gasified. For downdraft gasified and furnace, the palm shell and fiber can be used directly into the reactor for energy conversion. The heating value, burning characteristic, ash and moisture content of the oil palm residue are other parameters of the study

  11. Nonlinear Vibroimpact Characteristics of a Planetary Gear Transmission System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxing Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the vibroimpact characteristics of a planetary gear transmission system under high speed and lightly loaded conditions, a new modeling method is proposed. In the modeling process, linear spring was used to simulate gear mesh elasticity under heavy load cases, and Hertz contact theory was used to calculate the contact force of gear pair under light load cases. Then, effects of the working conditions on the system vibroimpact characteristics are analyzed. The results show that, with input speed growing, the mesh force produced obvious fluctuations on the resonance frequencies of the sun gear and carrier torsion vibration, ring gear’s transverse vibration under the heavy load. Under light load condition, the collision vibration occurs in the gear pair; the changing trend of the contact force shows strongly nonlinear characteristics. The time of mesh-apart in gears pair decreases gradually as the load is increased; until it reaches collision vibration threshold value, the gear pair is no longer mesh-apart. With increasing of the input speed, the time of mesh-apart is decreased gradually; the fluctuation amplitude of contact force shows a linearly increasing trend. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for planetary gear transmission low-noise design.

  12. Transactive memory system links work team characteristics and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Xue; Hempel, Paul S; Han, Yu-Lan; Tjosvold, Dean

    2007-11-01

    Teamwork and coordination of expertise among team members with different backgrounds are increasingly recognized as important for team effectiveness. Recently, researchers have examined how team members rely on transactive memory system (TMS; D. M. Wegner, 1987) to share their distributed knowledge and expertise. To establish the ecological validity and generality of TMS research findings, this study sampled 104 work teams from a variety of organizational settings in China and examined the relationships between team characteristics, TMS, and team performance. The results suggest that task interdependence, cooperative goal interdependence, and support for innovation are positively related to work teams' TMS and that TMS is related to team performance; moreover, structural equation analysis indicates that TMS mediates the team characteristics-performance links. Findings have implications both for team leaders to manage their work teams effectively and for team members to improve their team performance. (c) 2007 APA

  13. Aerosol Inlet Characterization Experiment Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullard, Robert L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kuang, Chongai [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Uin, Janek [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Aerosol Observation System inlet stack was characterized for particle penetration efficiency from 10 nm to 20 μm in diameter using duplicate scanning mobility particle sizers (10 nm-450 nm), ultra-high-sensitivity aerosol spectrometers (60 nm-μm), and aerodynamic particle sizers (0.5 μm-20 μm). Results show good model-measurement agreement and unit transmission efficiency of aerosols from 10 nm to 4 μm in diameter. Large uncertainties in the measured transmission efficiency exist above 4 μm due to low ambient aerosol signal in that size range.

  14. Performance of multiple HEPA filters against plutonium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, M.; Elder, J.; Ettinger, H.

    1975-01-01

    Performance of multiple stages of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters against aerosols similar to those produced by plutonium processing facilities has been verified as part of an experimental program. A system of three HEPA filters in series was tested against 238 PuO 2 aerosol concentrations as high as 3.3 x 10 10 d/s-m 3 . An air nebulization aerosol generation system, using ball milled plutonium oxide suspended in water, provided test aerosols with size characteristics similar to those defined by a field sampling program at several different AEC plutonium processing facilities. Aerosols have been produced ranging from 0.22 μm activity median aerodynamic diameter (amad) to 1.6 μm amad. The smaller size distributions yield 10 to 30 percent of the total activity in the less than 0.22 μm size range allowing efficiency measurement as a function of size for the first two HEPA filters in series. The low level of activity on the sampler downstream of the third HEPA filter (approximately 0.01 c/s) precludes aerosol size characterization downstream of this filter. For the first two HEPA filters, overall efficiency, and efficiency as a function of size, exceeds 99.98 percent including the <0.12 μm and the 0.12 to 0.22 μm size intervals. Efficiency of the third HEPA filter is somewhat lower with an overall average efficiency of 99.8 percent and an apparent minimum efficiency of 99.5 percent. This apparently lower efficiency is an artifact due to the low level of activity on the sampler downstream of HEPA No. 3 and the variations due to counting statistics. Recent runs with higher concentrations, thereby improving statistical variations, show efficiencies well within minimum requirements. (U.S.)

  15. Monolithic Controlled Delivery Systems: Part I. Basic Characteristics and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiana Blagoeva

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The article considers contemporary systems for controlled delivery of active agents, such as drugs, agricultural chemicals, pollutants and additives in the environment. A useful classification of the available controlled release systems (CRS is proposed according to the type of control (passive, active or self-preprogrammed and according to the main controlling mechanism (diffusion, swelling, dissolution or erosion. Special attention is given to some of the most used CRS - polymer monoliths. The structural and physical-chemical characteristics of CRS as well as the basic approaches to their production are examined. The basic mechanisms of controlled agent release are reviewed in detail and factors influencing the release kinetics are classified according to their importance. The present study can be helpful for understanding and applying the available mathematical models and for developing more comprehensive ones intended for design of new controlled delivery systems.

  16. Evaluation of the TSI aerosol impactor 3306/3321 system using a redesigned impactor stage with solution and suspension metered-dose inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Julie A; Stein, Stephen W; Myrdal, Paul B

    2006-03-10

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate a redesigned impactor stage for the TSI Model 3306 Impactor Inlet with nozzles adjusted to obtain a target cut-point of 4.7 microm. It has been determined that the previous cut-point used in the Model 3306 was nominally closer to 4.14 microm, thus potentially impacting the characterization of aerosol mass. The reassessment of the Model 3306 was performed on 4 solution and 2 suspension metered-dose inhaler (MDI) formulations. The redesigned impactor stage resulted in a 5% to 6% increase in aerosol mass when compared with the previous impactor stage for the products Ventolin-HFA, Proventil-HFA, and 2 cyclosporin solution formulations with high ethanol concentrations (15% wt/wt). For the formulations with low ethanol concentrations (3% wt/wt), minimal differences were observed between the 2 cut-points. In addition, this study reevaluated the requirement of a vertical inlet extension length when using the TSI 3306/3321 system with the redesigned cut-point. It was shown that the use of a 20-cm extension provides mass and aerosol size distributions that are comparable to the Andersen 8-stage Cascade Impactor, for both solution and suspension MDIs. This work indicates that the TSI 3306/3321 system is suitable for preformulation studies of both suspension and solution MDI systems.

  17. Seasonal variation of spherical aerosols distribution in East Asia based on ground and space Lidar observation and a Chemical transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Y.; Yumimoto, K.; Uno, I.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Ohara, T.

    2009-12-01

    The anthropogenic aerosols largely impact on not only human health but also global climate system, therefore air pollution in East Asia due to a rapid economic growth has been recognized as a significant environmental problem. Several international field campaigns had been conducted to elucidate pollutant gases, aerosols characteristics and radiative forcing in East Asia. (e.g., ACE-Asia, TRACE-P, ADEC, EAREX 2005). However, these experiments were mainly conducted in springtime, therefore seasonal variation of aerosols distribution has not been clarified well yet. National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) has been constructing a lidar networks by automated dual wavelength / polarization Mie-lidar systems to observe the atmospheric environment in Asian region since 2001. Furthermore, from June 2006, space-borne backscatter lidar, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), onboard NASA/CALIPSO satellite, measures continuous global aerosol and cloud vertical distribution with very high spatial resolution. In this paper, we will show the seasonal variation of aerosols distribution in East Asia based on the NIES lidar network observation, Community Multi-scale Air Quality Modeling System (CMAQ) chemical transport model simulation and CALIOP observation over the period from July 2006 to December 2008. We found that CMAQ result explains the typical seasonal aerosol characteristics by lidar observations. For example, CMAQ and ground lidar showed a summertime peak of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at Beijing, an autumn AOT peak at Guangzhou and summertime AOT trough at Hedo, Okinawa. These characteristics are mainly controlled by seasonal variations of Asian summer/winter monsoon system. We also examined the CMAQ seasonal average aerosol extinction profiles with ground lidar and CALIOP extinction data. These comparisons clarified that the CMAQ reproduced the observed aerosol layer depth well in the downwind region. Ground lidar and CALIOP seasonal

  18. Effects of System Characteristics on Adopting Web-Based Advanced Traveller Information System: Evidence from Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Wei Lin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a behavioural intention model that integrates information quality, response time, and system accessibility into the original technology acceptance model (TAM to investigate whether system characteristics affect the adoption of Web-based advanced traveller information systems (ATIS. This study empirically tests the proposed model using data collected from an online survey of Web-based advanced traveller information system users. Con­firmatory factor analysis (CFA was performed to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement model, and structural equation modelling (SEM was used to evaluate the structural model. The results indicate that three system characteristics had indirect effects on the intention to use through perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and attitude toward using. Information quality was the most im­portant system characteristic factor, followed by response time and system accessibility. This study presents implica­tions for practitioners and researchers, and suggests direc­tions for future research.

  19. Meteorological support for aerosol radiometers: special aerosol sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkina, S.K.; Zalmanzon, Yu.E.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Fertman, D.E.

    1988-07-01

    A new method is described for transfer of the measure of unit volume activity of radioactive aerosols from the state special standard to the working instruments in the stage of regular operation. The differences from existing methods are examined. The principal distinction of the new method is the possibility of direct (rather than through the conversion factor) determination and subsequent testing of the fundamental meteorological characteristics of the instrument by means of special aerosol sources, which fosters a significant reduction in individual components of the indicated errors.

  20. Lightning characteristics of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Mace L.; Franks, John R.; Suranovic, Katelyn R.; Barbachem, Brent; Cannon, Declan; Cooper, Stonie R.

    2016-06-01

    Derechos, or widespread, convectively induced wind storms, are a common warm season phenomenon in the Central and Eastern United States. These damaging and severe weather events are known to sweep quickly across large spatial regions of more than 400 km and produce wind speeds exceeding 121 km h-1. Although extensive research concerning derechos and their parent mesoscale convective systems already exists, there have been few investigations of the spatial and temporal distribution of associated cloud-to-ground lightning with these events. This study analyzes twenty warm season (May through August) derecho events between 2003 and 2013 in an effort to discern their lightning characteristics. Data used in the study included cloud-to-ground flash data derived from the National Lightning Detection Network, WSR-88D imagery from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and damaging wind report data obtained from the Storm Prediction Center. A spatial and temporal analysis was conducted by incorporating these data into a geographic information system to determine the distribution and lightning characteristics of the environments of derecho producing mesoscale convective systems. Primary foci of this research include: (1) finding the approximate size of the lightning activity region for individual and combined event(s); (2) determining the intensity of each event by examining the density and polarity of lightning flashes; (3) locating areas of highest lightning flash density; and (4) to provide a lightning spatial analysis that outlines the temporal and spatial distribution of flash activity for particularly strong derecho producing thunderstorm episodes.

  1. Studying Diurnal Variations of Aerosols with NASA MERRA-2 Reanalysis Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Suhung; Ostrenga, Dana M.; Zeng, Jian; Vollmer, Bruce E.

    2018-01-01

    Aerosols play an important role in atmospheric dynamics, climate variations, and Earth's energy cycle by altering the radiation balance in the atmosphere through interaction with clouds, providing fertilizer for forests and canopy, and as a supply of iron to the ocean over long time periods. Studies suggest that much of the feedback between dust aerosols and dynamics is associated with diurnal and synoptic scale variability. However, the lack of sub-daily resolution of aerosols from satellite observations makes it difficult to study the diurnal characteristics, especially over tropical and subtropical regions. Investigation of this topic utilizes over 37 years of simulated global aerosol products from NASA atmospheric reanalysis, in the second Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA-2) data set, available from NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC). MERRA-2 covers the period 1980-present, and is continuing as an ongoing climate analysis. Aerosol assimilation is included throughout the period, using data from MODIS, MISR, AERONET, and AVHRR (in the pre-EOS period). The aerosols are assimilated using the MERRA-2 aerosol model, which interacts directly with radiation parameterization, and is radiatively coupled with atmospheric model dynamics in the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5). Hourly, monthly, and monthly diurnal data are available at spatial resolution of 0.5o x 0.625o (latitude x longitude). By using MERRA-2 hourly and monthly diurnal products, different aerosol diurnal variabilities are observed over North America, Africa, Asia, and Australia, that may be due to different meteorological conditions and aerosol sources. The presentation will also provide an overview of MERRA-2 data services at GES DISC, such as how to find and download data, and how to quickly visualize and analyze data online with Giovanni.

  2. The aerosol optical properties and PM2.5 components over the world's largest industrial zone in Tangshan, North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kequan; Ma, Yongjing; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Zirui; Ma, Yining; Gao, Dongdong; Wu, Junsong; Zhang, Wenyu; Wang, Yuesi; Shen, Pengke

    2018-03-01

    To achieve an in-depth understanding of the aerosol optical properties in the highly-industrial region of Tangshan, we provided systematic aerosol optical properties analysis in this largest industrial zone for the first time. The aerosol optical datasets (2013.05-2015.04) and chemical component data of PM2.5 (2014-2015) obtained from the Tangshan site of the campaign on atmospheric aerosol research (CARE-China) network were analyzed. The results showed that the Tangshan region was seriously affected by fine-mode industrial aerosols all year, which would promote the accumulation of pollutants and influence the atmospheric circulation through changing the vertical temperature gradient. The annual average aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångstrӧm exponent (α) were 0.80 ± 0.26 and 1.05 ± 0.10, respectively. The aerosol optical properties revealed significant seasonal characteristics. The maximum seasonal average AOD (1.03 ± 0.62) and α (1.12 ± 0.19) accompanied the highest seasonal secondary inorganic aerosol concentrations (SIA: SO42 -, NO3-, NH4+), 53.33 μg/m3, occurred in summer, and this phenomenon was attributed to the photochemical reactions favored by the high temperature and humidity. During the spring, frequent dust events led to the maximum Ca2 + concentration of 6.57 μg/m3 and the lowest seasonal α of 0.98 ± 0.31. Coal was used for generating heat in winter, resulting in the highest levels of pollutant emissions (Cl-, Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC)). The aerosol type classifications showed that the industrial aerosols were the main controls in the summer and fall, representing 56%-58% of the total aerosols. While for spring and winter, mixed aerosols represented 53%-54% of the total aerosols. Hygroscopic growth effect of aerosols existed all year, which could enhance the negative radiative forcing and eventually cool the earth-atmosphere system. The classification Wing for Tangshan data showed high AOD values (> 0.70) were mainly

  3. Aerosol Particle Property Comparisons Between MISR and AERONET Retrieved Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitley, B. J.; Kahn, R.

    2008-12-01

    As a further step in validating the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol products, an extensive comparison of particle micro-physical properties has been made against the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Angstrom exponent, single scattering albedo, and size distribution characteristic values and variance envelopes for individual sites and aggregates are compared, stratified by expected aerosol air mass type, optical depth magnitude and season. Specific examples illustrating strengths and weaknesses of this approach will be shown. More than seven years of data from about 52 geographically diverse sites having good long-term measurement records are first stratified by expected aerosol air mass types: maritime, biomass burning, desert dust, urban pollution, continental and mixed dust+smoke aerosols. Having observations in at least three of the four seasons is an additional constraint on the selection of sites. The number of actual coincident measurements is limited by requiring AERONET direct sun aerosol optical thickness (AOT) data be obtained from a two-hour window centered on the MISR overpass time, and AERONET sky scans, which provide particle micro-physical properties and are taken only once an hour, obtained from a four-hour window also centered on the overpass. 3605 coincident observations are included in the data set. Both AERONET sun and sky data are averaged over the measurements obtained within these windows and are then interpolated to the MISR wavelengths to facilitate comparison. All AERONET measurements are Level 1.5, Version 2 data. A previous, systematic comparison of MISR and AERONET AOT data [Kahn, Gaitley et al., JGR 110, 2005] was used to suggest improvements to the MISR Standard Aerosol retrieval algorithms. The MISR aerosol products have been almost completely reprocessed with the upgraded algorithms. This new, uniformly processed database, that is used in the current study, which

  4. Evaluation of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2. Part 3: Influence of the tobacco blend on the formation of harmful and potentially harmful constituents of the Tobacco Heating System 2.2 aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jean-Pierre; Pijnenburg, Johannes P M; Ajithkumar, Anu; Tricker, Anthony R

    2016-11-30

    The Tobacco Heating System (THS2.2), which uses "heat-not-burn" technology, generates an aerosol from tobacco heated to a lower temperature than occurs when smoking a combustible cigarette. The concentrations of harmful and potentially harmful constituents (HPHCs) are significantly lower in THS2.2 mainstream aerosol than in smoke produced by combustible cigarettes. Different tobacco types and 43 tobacco blends were investigated to determine how the blend impacted the overall reductions of HPHCs in the THS2.2 mainstream aerosol. The blend composition had minimal effects on the yields of most HPHCs in the aerosol. Blends containing high proportions of nitrogen-rich tobacco, e.g., air-cured, and some Oriental tobaccos, produced higher acetamide, acrylamide, ammonia, and nitrogen oxide yields than did other blends. Most HPHCs were found to be released mainly through the distillation of HPHCs present in the tobacco plug or after being produced in simple thermal reactions. HPHC concentrations in the THS2.2 aerosol may therefore be further minimized by limiting the use of flue- and fire-cured tobaccos which may be contaminated by HPHCs during the curing process and carefully selecting nitrogen rich tobaccos with low concentrations of endogenous HPHCs for use in the tobacco plug blend. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolution of microbial aerosol behaviour in heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems--quantification of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Penicillium oxalicum viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forthomme, A; Andrès, Y; Joubert, A; Simon, X; Duquenne, P; Bemer, D; Le Coq, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an experimental set-up and a methodology to uniformly contaminate several filter samples with high concentrations of cultivable bacteria and fungi. An experimental set-up allows contaminating simultaneously up to four filters for range of velocities representative of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning systems. The test aerosol was composed of a microbial consortium of one bacterium (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and one fungus (Penicillium oxalicum) and aerosol generation was performed in wet conditions. Firstly, the experimental set-up was validated in regards to homogeneity of the air flows. The bioaerosol was also characterized in terms of number and particle size distribution using two particle counters: optical particle counter Grimm 1.109 (optical diameters) and TSI APS 3321 (aerodynamic diameters). Moreover, stabilities of the number of particles generated were measured. Finally, concentrations of cultivable microorganisms were measured with BioSamplers (SKC) downstream of the four filters.

  6. Aerosol and monsoon climate interactions over Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Lau, W. K.-M.; Ramanathan, V.; Wu, G.; Ding, Y.; Manoj, M. G.; Liu, J.; Qian, Y.; Li, J.; Zhou, T.; Fan, J.; Rosenfeld, D.; Ming, Y.; Wang, Y.; Huang, J.; Wang, B.; Xu, X.; Lee, S.-S.; Cribb, M.; Zhang, F.; Yang, X.; Zhao, C.; Takemura, T.; Wang, K.; Xia, X.; Yin, Y.; Zhang, H.; Guo, J.; Zhai, P. M.; Sugimoto, N.; Babu, S. S.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2016-12-01

    biomass burning, and biogenic aerosols from vegetation are considered integral components of an intrinsic aerosol-monsoon climate system, subject to external forcing of global warming, anthropogenic aerosols, and land use and change. Future research on aerosol-monsoon interactions calls for an integrated approach and international collaborations based on long-term sustained observations, process measurements, and improved models, as well as using observations to constrain model simulations and projections.

  7. The Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CATT-BRAMS – Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Freitas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the Coupled Aerosol and Tracer Transport model to the Brazilian developments on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (CATT-BRAMS. CATT-BRAMS is an on-line transport model fully consistent with the simulated atmospheric dynamics. Emission sources from biomass burning and urban-industrial-vehicular activities for trace gases and from biomass burning aerosol particles are obtained from several published datasets and remote sensing information. The tracer and aerosol mass concentration prognostics include the effects of sub-grid scale turbulence in the planetary boundary layer, convective transport by shallow and deep moist convection, wet and dry deposition, and plume rise associated with vegetation fires in addition to the grid scale transport. The radiation parameterization takes into account the interaction between the simulated biomass burning aerosol particles and short and long wave radiation. The atmospheric model BRAMS is based on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, with several improvements associated with cumulus convection representation, soil moisture initialization and surface scheme tuned for the tropics, among others. In this paper the CATT-BRAMS model is used to simulate carbon monoxide and particulate material (PM2.5 surface fluxes and atmospheric transport during the 2002 LBA field campaigns, conducted during the transition from the dry to wet season in the southwest Amazon Basin. Model evaluation is addressed with comparisons between model results and near surface, radiosondes and airborne measurements performed during the field campaign, as well as remote sensing derived products. We show the matching of emissions strengths to observed carbon monoxide in the LBA campaign. A relatively good comparison to the MOPITT data, in spite of the fact that MOPITT a priori assumptions imply several difficulties, is also obtained.

  8. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  9. Modeling ozone and aerosol formation and transport in the pacific northwest with the community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lamb, Brian K; Chen, Jack; Claiborn, Candis; Finn, Dennis; Otterson, Sally; Figueroa, Cristiana; Bowman, Clint; Boyer, Mike; Wilson, Rob; Arnold, Jeff; Aalbers, Steven; Stocum, Jeffrey; Swab, Christopher; Stoll, Matt; Dubois, Mike; Anderson, Mary

    2006-02-15

    The Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was used to investigate ozone and aerosol concentrations in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) during hot summertime conditions during July 1-15, 1996. Two emission inventories (El) were developed: emissions for the first El were based upon the National Emission Trend 1996 (NET96) database and the BEIS2 biogenic emission model, and emissions for the second El were developed through a "bottom up" approach that included biogenic emissions obtained from the GLOBEIS model. The two simulations showed that elevated PM2.5 concentrations occurred near and downwind of the Interstate-5 corridor along the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and in forested areas of central Idaho. The relative contributions of organic and inorganic aerosols varied by region, but generally organic aerosols constituted the largest fraction of PM2.5. In wilderness areas near the 1-5 corridor, organic carbon from anthropogenic sources contributed approximately 50% of the total organic carbon with the remainder from biogenic precursors, while in wilderness areas in Idaho, biogenic organic carbon accounted for 80% of the total organic aerosol. Regional analysis of the secondary organic aerosol formation in the Columbia River Gorge, Central Idaho, and the Olympics/Puget Sound showed that the production rate of secondary organic carbon depends on local terpene concentrations and the local oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, which was strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. Comparison with observations from 12 IMPROVE sites and 21 ozone monitoring sites showed that results from the two El simulations generally bracketed the average observed PM parameters and that errors calculated for the model results were within acceptable bounds. Analysis across all statistical parameters indicated that the NW-AIRQUEST El solution performed better at predicting PM2.5, PM1, and beta(ext) even though organic carbon PM was over-predicted, and the NET96 El

  10. MCS precipitation and downburst intensity response to increased aerosol concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavner, M.; Cotton, W. R.; van den Heever, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are important contributors to rainfall in the High Plains of the United States as well as producers of severe weather such as hail, tornados and straight-line wind events known as derechos. Past studies have shown that changes in aerosol concentrations serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) alter the MCS hydrometeor characteristics which in turn modify precipitation yield, downdraft velocity, cold-pool strength, storm propagation and the potential for severe weather to occur. In this study, the sensitivity of MCS precipitation characteristics and convective downburst velocities associated with a derecho to changes in CCN concentrations were examined by simulating a case study using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The case study of the 8 May 2009 "Super-Derecho" MCS was chosen since it produced a swath of widespread wind damage in association with an embedded large-scale bow echo, over a broad region from the High Plains of western Kansas to the foothills of the Appalachians. The sensitivity of the storm to changes in CCN concentrations was examined by conducting a set of three simulations which differed in the initial aerosol concentration based on output from the 3D chemical transport model, GEOS-Chem. Results from this study indicate that while increasing CCN concentrations led to an increase in precipitation rates, the changes to the derecho strength were not linear. A moderate increase in aerosol concentration reduced the derecho strength, while the simulation with the highest aerosol concentrations increased the derecho intensity. These changes are attributed to the impact of enhanced CCN concentration on the production of convective downbursts. An analysis of aerosol loading impacts on these MCS features will be presented.

  11. Environmental Characteristics of Convective Systems During TRMM-LBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Rickenbach, Thomas; Roy, Biswadev; Pierce, Harold; Williams, Earle; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, data collected from 51 days of continual upper atmospheric soundings and TOGA radar at ABRACOS Hill during the TRMM-LBA experiment are used to describe the mean thermodynamic and kinematic airmass properties of wet season convection over Rondonia, Brazil. Distinct multi-day easterly and westerly lower tropospheric wind regimes occurred during the campaign with contrasting airmass characteristics. Westerly wind periods featured modest CAPE (1000 J/kg), moist conditions (>90% RH) extending through 700 mb and shallow (900 mb) speed shear on the order of 10(exp -4)/s. This combination of characteristics promoted convective systems that featured a relatively large fraction of stratiform rainfall and weak convection nearly devoid of lightning. The environment is very similar to the general airmass conditions experienced during the Darwin, Australia monsoon convective regime. In contrast, easterly regime convective systems were more strongly electrified and featured larger convective rain rates and reduced stratiform rainfall fraction. These systems formed in an environment with significantly larger CAPE (1500 J/kg), drier lower and middle level humidities (in the lowest 1-2 km, thus contributing to a more explosive growth of convection. The time series of low- and mid-level averaged humidity exhibited marked variability between westerly and easterly regimes and was characterized by low frequency (i.e., multi-day to weekly) oscillations. The synoptic scale origins of these moisture fluctuations are examined, which include the effects of variable low-level airmass trajectories and upper-level, westward migrating cyclonic vortices. The results reported herein provide an environmental context for ongoing dual Doppler analyses and numerical modeling case studies of individual TRMM-LBA convective systems.

  12. Characteristics and major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in PM2.5 in Emilia Romagna Region (Northern Italy) from four-year observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Bacco, Dimitri; Ferrari, Silvia; Ricciardelli, Isabella; Scotto, Fabiana; Trentini, Arianna; Visentin, Marco

    2016-05-15

    The concentrations of organic and elemental carbon in PM2.5 aerosol samples were measured in two sites of Emilia Romagna (Po Valley, Northern Italy) in eight campaigns during different seasons from 2011 to 2014. Strong seasonality was observed with the highest OC concentrations during the cold periods (≈ 5.5 μg m(-3)) and the lowest in the warm months (≈ 2.7 μg m(-3)) as well as with higher EC levels in fall/winter (≈ 1.4 μg m(-3)) in comparison with spring/summer (≈ 0.6 μg m(-3)). Concerning spatial variability, there were no statistically significant difference (pfossil fuels burning - including traffic vehicle emission - residential wood burning, and bio-aerosol released from plants and microorganisms, and the atmospheric photo-oxidation processes generating OCsec. The investigated markers were low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids - to describe the contribution of secondary organic aerosol - anhydrosugars - to quantify primary emissions from biomass burning - bio-sugars - to qualitatively estimate biogenic sources - and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - to differentiate among different combustion emissions. Using the levoglucosan tracer method, contribution of wood smoke to atmospheric OC concentration was computed. Wood burning accounts for 33% of OC in fall/winter and for 3% in spring/summer. A clear seasonal trend is also observed for the impact of secondary processes with higher contribution in the warm seasons (≈ 63%) in comparison with that in colder months (≈ 33%), that is consistent with enhanced solar radiation in spring/summer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characteristics and major sources of carbonaceous aerosols in PM2.5 in Emilia Romagna Region (Northern Italy) from four-year observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara, E-mail: mpc@unife.it [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17/19, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Bacco, Dimitri [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17/19, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Regional Agency for Prevention and Environment—ARPA, Emilia-Romagna (Italy); Ferrari, Silvia; Ricciardelli, Isabella; Scotto, Fabiana; Trentini, Arianna [Regional Agency for Prevention and Environment—ARPA, Emilia-Romagna (Italy); Visentin, Marco [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara 17/19, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    The concentrations of organic and elemental carbon in PM{sub 2.5} aerosol samples were measured in two sites of Emilia Romagna (Po Valley, Northern Italy) in eight campaigns during different seasons from 2011 to 2014. Strong seasonality was observed with the highest OC concentrations during the cold periods (≈ 5.5 μg m{sup −3}) and the lowest in the warm months (≈ 2.7 μg m{sup −3}) as well as with higher EC levels in fall/winter (≈ 1.4 μg m{sup −3}) in comparison with spring/summer (≈ 0.6 μg m{sup −3}). Concerning spatial variability, there were no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between OC concentrations at the two sampling sites in each campaign, while the EC values were nearly twofold higher levels at the urban site than those at the rural one. Specific molecular markers were investigated to attempt the basic apportionment of OC by discriminating between the main emission sources of primary OC, such as fossil fuels burning – including traffic vehicle emission – residential wood burning, and bio-aerosol released from plants and microorganisms, and the atmospheric photo-oxidation processes generating OC{sub sec}. The investigated markers were low-molecular-weight carboxylic acids – to describe the contribution of secondary organic aerosol – anhydrosugars – to quantify primary emissions from biomass burning – bio-sugars – to qualitatively estimate biogenic sources – and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons – to differentiate among different combustion emissions. Using the levoglucosan tracer method, contribution of wood smoke to atmospheric OC concentration was computed. Wood burning accounts for 33% of OC in fall/winter and for 3% in spring/summer. A clear seasonal trend is also observed for the impact of secondary processes with higher contribution in the warm seasons (≈ 63%) in comparison with that in colder months (≈ 33%), that is consistent with enhanced solar radiation in spring/summer. - Highlights:

  14. Ozonolysis and Subsequent Photolysis of unsaturated organic molecules: Model Systems for Photochemical Aging of Organic Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Gomez, A. L.; Walser, M. L.; Lin, A.; Nizkorodov, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical and photochemical aging of organic species adsorbed on aerosol particle surfaces is believed to have a significant effect on cloud condensation properties of atmospheric aerosols. Ozone initiated oxidation reactions of thin films of undecylenic acid and alkene-terminated self assembled monolayers (SAMs) on SiO2 surface were investigated using a combination of spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. Photolysis of the oxidized film in the tropospheric actinic region (λ>290 nm) readily produces formaldehyde and formic acid as gas-phase products. Photodissociation action spectra of the oxidized film suggest that organic peroxides are responsible for the enhanced photochemical activity. The presence of peroxides in the oxidized sample was confirmed by mass-spectrometric analysis and by an iodometric test. Significant polymerization resulting from secondary reactions of Criegee radicals during ozonolysis of the film is also observed. The reaction mechanism and its implications for photochemical aging of atmospheric aerosol particles will be discussed.

  15. On the impact of pacific ocean free tropospheric background aerosols at the surface of the earth-atmosphere system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeFelice, T. P. [Dept. Geosciences, A.S.G., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Individual tropospheric particles (0.03 to several {mu}m in diameter) were sampled using wire impactors on a DC-864 aircraft along and within Pacific Rim, from 125 degrees E to 120 degrees W and 70 degrees S to 70 degrees N, during the November 1989 and May 1990 Global Backscattering Experiment (GLOBE) deployments of NASA. A simple radiative balance model was used to determine the first order radiative effect of this aerosol layer at the surface. The results indicate that: (i) The background (optical thickness of {approx_equal}0.005) tropospheric aerosols between 2.4 - 12.2 km exert a warming tendency on surfaces with albedos {>=}0.02 in both the visible and infrared. (ii) There is an apparent increase in the coarse mode sulfur containing aerosol abundance compared to {approx_equal} 15 years ago, suggesting that the background aerosol layer exerted a stronger tendency of planetary warming {approx_equal} 15 years ago. [Spanish] Se muestrearon particulas troposfericas individuales (0.03 a varias {mu}m de diametro) usando impactadores de alambre en un avion DC-864 a lo largo y dentro de la region del Pacifico de 125 grados E a 120 grados W y 70 grados S a 70 grados N, durante los desplegamientos de NASA del Experimento Global de Retrospeccion (GLOBE) en noviembre de 1989 y mayo de 1990. Fue usado un modelo de balance simple de radiacion para determinar el efecto radiativo de primer orden de esta capa de aerosoles en la superficie. Los resultados indican que: (i) los aerosoles troposfericos de fondo (espesor optico de {approx_equal} 0.05) entre 2.4 - 12.2 km ejercen una tendencia al calentamiento sobre superficies con albedo {>=} 0.02, tanto en el visible como en el infrarrojo. (ii) hay un aparente aumento en el modo tosco del sulfuro conteniendo abundancia de aerosoles comparado con {approx_equal} hace 15 anos, sugiriendo que la capa de trasfondo de aerosoles ejercio una tendencia mas fuerte de calentamiento planetario {approx_equal} hace 15 anos.

  16. INFLUENCE OF THE ENVIRONMENT CHARACTERISTICS ON INDUSTRY SYSTEM EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markov L. S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the constructed evolutionary model in relation to branch of production of steam coals its structural transformation at taking note of various environmental characteristics is considered: endogenous competition, antimonopoly and anti-recessionary regulation. As an indicator of evolution of system it is offered to consider its structural change (Herfindahl-Hirschman index. The executed modeling showed that the speed of evolution of system, more intensive processes of concentration is in direct dependence on a price factor and in inverse relationship from rigidity of criteria of a dominant position. Frequency of transformation of system grows at increase in sensitivity of market price to a ratio of supply and demand and at cancellation of restrictions on the maximum volume, and decreases at liberalization of anti-recessionary regulation. It is shown that actions of antimonopoly and antirecessionary regulation can make sense in the short-term period, but in long-term prospect they lead to braking of development of system.

  17. Characteristic parameters of electromagnetic signals from a human heart system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xin-Yuan; Wang Yin; Zhang Su-Ming; Gao Hong-Lei; Pei Liu-Qing; Dai Yuan-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The electromagnetic field of a human heart system is a bioelectromagnetic field. Electrocardiography (ECG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) are both carriers of electromagnetic information about the cardiac system, and they are nonstationary signals. In this study, ECG and MCG data from healthy subjects are acquired; the MCG data are captured using a high-T c radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (HTc rf SQUIDs) and the QRS complexes in these data are analysed by the evolutionary spectrum analysis method. The results show that the quality factor Q and the central frequency f z of the QRS complex evolutionary spectrum are the characteristic parameters (CHPs) of ECG and MCG in the time—frequency domain. The confidence intervals of the mean values of the CHPs are estimated by the Student t distribution method in mathematical statistics. We believe that there are threshold ranges of the mean values of Q and f z for healthy subjects. We have postulated the following criterion: if the mean values of CHPs are in the proper ranges, the cardiac system is in a normal condition and it possesses the capability of homeostasis. In contrast, if the mean values of the CHPs do not lie in the proper ranges, the homeostasis of the cardiac system is lacking and some cardiac disease may follow. The results and procedure of MCG CHPs in the study afford a technological route for the application of HTc rf SQUIDs in cardiology. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  18. Total aerosol effect

    OpenAIRE

    Lohmann, Ulrike; Rotstayn, Leon; Storelvmo, Trude; Jones, Andrew; Menon, Surabi; Quaas, Johannes; Ekman, Annica M. L.; Koch, Dorothy; Ruedy, Reto A.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainties in aerosol radiative forcings, especially those associated with clouds, contribute to a large extent to uncertainties in the total anthropogenic forcing. The interaction of aerosols with clouds and radiation introduces feedbacks which can affect the rate of precipitation formation. In former assessments of aerosol radiative forcings, these effects have not been quantified. Also, with global aerosol-climate models simulating interactively aerosols and cloud microphysical prope...

  19. Study of uranium mine aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzic, J.-Y.

    1976-05-01

    With a view to radiation protection of uranium-miners a study was made of the behaviour of radioactive and non-radioactive aerosols in the atmosphere of an experimental mine where temperature, pressure, relative himidity and ventilation are kept constant and in the air of a working area where the nature of the aerosol is dependent on the stage of work. Measurements of radon and daughter products carried out in various points of working areas showed that the gas was quickly diluted, equilibrium between radon and its daughter products (RaA, RaB, RaC) was never reached and the radon-aerosol contact was of short duration (a few minutes). Using a seven-stage Andersen impactor particle size distribution of the mine aerosol (particle diameter >0.3μm) was studied. The characteristic diameters were determined for each stage of the Andersen impactor and statistical analysis verified that aerosol distributions on the lower stages of the impactor were log-normal in most cases. Finally, determination of size distribution of α-radioactivity showed it was retained on fine particles. The percentage of free α-activity was evaluated using a diffusion battery [fr

  20. A Miniature System for Separating Aerosol Particles and Measuring Mass Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Liang; Shih; Chen; Dai

    2010-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d < 2.28 μm, 2.28 μm ≤ d ≤ 3.20 μm, d > 3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hy...

  1. Characteristics of Strategies in Product/Service-System Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Adrian; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2006-01-01

    The underlying principle in Product/Service-Systems (PSS) strategy is to shift from business based on the value of the transfer of product ownership and responsibility, to business based on the value of utility of the product and services. This paper identifies characteristics of various strategies...... that may be applied in PSS development. PSS concepts created in projects by third year Design & Innovation students at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) working with product-life oriented design approaches were reviewed, and the strategies developed were analysed. This identification and mapping...... of PSS strategy types gives us the opportunity to develop methods and approaches to PSS development, more tailored to specific business strategies....

  2. [Systemic lupus erythematosus in the aged: clinical and laboratory characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, V; Bonfá, E; Levy Neto, M; Kumeda, C; Daud, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    The clinical and serologic characteristics of 199 systemic lupus erythematosus patients with early and late onset of disease were compared to determine if the disease in the older age group defines a specific subset of SLE. This study demonstrated that SLE in the elderly patients exhibits peculiar clinical features with a high frequency of muscular involvement (p manifestations (p manifestation was muscular pain and stiffness, arthritis and weight loss (over 10 kg). This condition is often hard to distinguish from polymyalgia rheumatica or underlying malignancy. The frequency of autoantibodies was similar in both groups. The absence of anti-La was surprising, however it was confirmed by "Western blotting". The symptoms of late onset SLE are not very prominent however the diagnosis should be considered in order to avoid delays in treatment.

  3. Discharge characteristics of a simulated unit injection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Edred T

    1938-01-01

    Rate-of-discharge curves that show the discharge characteristics of an injection system having a very short fuel passage are presented. The rate of discharge closely follows the rate of displacement of the injection-pump plunger for open nozzles in which the maximum calculated pressures at the orifice do not exceed a certain value, which is dependent on the particular injection pump. With small orifices and high pump speeds, the rate of discharge does not follow the rate of plunger displacement because the higher discharge pressure results in increased leakage with corresponding decrease in discharge rate. The rate of discharge is not directly related to the rate of plunger displacement with automatic injection valves having closed nozzles. The types of pump check valve tested did not control the rate of cut-off or the discharge rate but they did affect the injection lag. Use of the short fuel passage eliminated the formation of secondary discharges.

  4. Characteristics of large thermal energy storage systems in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwierzchowski Ryszard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In District Heating Systems (DHS there are significant fluctuations in demand for heat by consumers during both the heating and the summer seasons. These variations are considered primarily in the 24-hour time horizon. These problems are aggravated further if the DHS is supplied by a CHP plant, because fluctuations in heat demand adversely affect to a significant degree the stable production of electricity at high overall efficiency. Therefore, introducing Thermal Energy Storage (TES would be highly recommended on these grounds alone. The characteristics of Large (i.e. over 10 000 m3 TES in operation in Poland are presented. Information is given regarding new projects (currently in design or construction that apply TES technology in DHS in Poland. The paper looks at the methodology used in Poland to select the TES system for a particular DHS, i.e., procedure for calculating capacity of the TES tank and the system to prevent water stored in the tank from absorbing oxygen from atmospheric air. Implementation of TES in DHS is treated as a recommended technology in the Polish District Heating sector. This technology offers great opportunities to improve the operating conditions of DHS, cutting energy production costs and emissions of pollutants to the atmosphere.

  5. Characteristics of large thermal energy storage systems in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwierzchowski, Ryszard

    2017-11-01

    In District Heating Systems (DHS) there are significant fluctuations in demand for heat by consumers during both the heating and the summer seasons. These variations are considered primarily in the 24-hour time horizon. These problems are aggravated further if the DHS is supplied by a CHP plant, because fluctuations in heat demand adversely affect to a significant degree the stable production of electricity at high overall efficiency. Therefore, introducing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) would be highly recommended on these grounds alone. The characteristics of Large (i.e. over 10 000 m3) TES in operation in Poland are presented. Information is given regarding new projects (currently in design or construction) that apply TES technology in DHS in Poland. The paper looks at the methodology used in Poland to select the TES system for a particular DHS, i.e., procedure for calculating capacity of the TES tank and the system to prevent water stored in the tank from absorbing oxygen from atmospheric air. Implementation of TES in DHS is treated as a recommended technology in the Polish District Heating sector. This technology offers great opportunities to improve the operating conditions of DHS, cutting energy production costs and emissions of pollutants to the atmosphere.

  6. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mahowald

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  7. Intercomparison and closure calculations using measurements of aerosol species and optical properties during the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, William C.; Day, Derek E.; Carrico, Christian; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Collett, Jeffrey L.; McMeeking, Gavin; Lee, Taehyoung; Carrillo, Jacqueline; Schichtel, Bret

    2005-07-01

    Physical and optical properties of inorganic aerosols have been extensively studied, but less is known about carbonaceous aerosols, especially as they relate to the non-urban settings such as our nation's national parks and wilderness areas. Therefore an aerosol characterization study was conceived and implemented at one national park that is highly impacted by carbonaceous aerosols, Yosemite. The primary objective of the study was to characterize the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a carbon-dominated aerosol, including the ratio of total organic matter weight to organic carbon, organic mass scattering efficiencies, and the hygroscopic characteristics of a carbon-laden ambient aerosol, while a secondary objective was to evaluate a variety of semi-continuous monitoring systems. Inorganic ions were characterized using 24-hour samples that were collected using the URG and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) monitoring systems, the micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) cascade impactor, as well as the semi-continuous particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS) technology. Likewise, carbonaceous material was collected over 24-hour periods using IMPROVE technology along with the thermal optical reflectance (TOR) analysis, while semi-continuous total carbon concentrations were measured using the Rupprecht and Patashnick (R&P) instrument. Dry aerosol number size distributions were measured using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and optical particle counter, scattering coefficients at near-ambient conditions were measured with nephelometers fitted with PM10 and PM2.5 inlets, and "dry" PM2.5 scattering was measured after passing ambient air through Perma Pure Nafion® dryers. In general, the 24-hour "bulk" measurements of various aerosol species compared more favorably with each other than with the semi-continuous data. Semi-continuous sulfate measurements correlated well with the 24-hour measurements, but were biased low by

  8. Analysis of dynamic characteristics of stochastic influences in cognitive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Solodov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to provide an analytical description of the dynamics of the processes to form images in the cognitive system and their subsequent processing by the consciousness, as well as the study of the simplest characteristics of the quality of the cognitive system functioning in the form of the signal/noise ratio.In accordance with the ideas of the cognitive theory, it is believed that images (schemes, categories, Gestalt, systems, archetypes, etc. are firstly generated in the human brain and then processed by the consciousness.These images are formed at random in time and are characterized by a random force of effects and subsequently processed by the consciousness.The images are characterized by random numbers, the common interpretation of which is the amount of information corresponding to the appearance of a certain image. The times of appearance are points on the time axis; their number and position are random as well.The work consists of a logically completed model including the following components:• Justification of a statistical model of the appearance of effects during the operation of the cognitive system in the form of the Poisson point process, characterized by the intensity of occurrence of effects and the random values of those effects.• Development of a mathematical model in the consciousness processing of the random effects in the form of reducing response function, which depends on the current time, the time of occurrence of effects and the magnitudes of these effects. To obtain applied results, exponential response function was applied and the analytical results for the mathematical expectations of the processed and not processed information by the consciousness were received.• Introduction for consideration of the signal/noise ratio, characterizing the performance of cognitive systems in the presence of interference and study of its behavior in the situations with the presence of random background noise

  9. Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the ability of the recent chemistry version (v3.3 of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem model to simulate boundary layer structure, aerosols, stratocumulus clouds, and energy fluxes over the Southeast Pacific Ocean. Measurements from the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx and satellite retrievals (i.e., products from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES, and GOES-10 are used for this assessment. The Morrison double-moment microphysics scheme is newly coupled with interactive aerosols in the model. The 31-day (15 October–16 November 2008 WRF-Chem simulation with aerosol-cloud interactions (AERO hereafter is also compared to a simulation (MET hereafter with fixed cloud droplet number concentrations in the microphysics scheme and simplified cloud and aerosol treatments in the radiation scheme. The well-simulated aerosol quantities (aerosol number, mass composition and optical properties, and the inclusion of full aerosol-cloud couplings lead to significant improvements in many features of the simulated stratocumulus clouds: cloud optical properties and microphysical properties such as cloud top effective radius, cloud water path, and cloud optical thickness. In addition to accounting for the aerosol direct and semi-direct effects, these improvements feed back to the simulation of boundary-layer characteristics and energy budgets. Particularly, inclusion of interactive aerosols in AERO strengthens the temperature and humidity gradients within the capping inversion layer and lowers the marine boundary layer (MBL depth by 130 m from that of the MET simulation. These differences are associated with weaker entrainment and stronger mean subsidence at the top of the MBL in AERO. Mean top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave fluxes, surface latent heat, and surface downwelling longwave fluxes are in better agreement with

  10. Water soluble ionic characteristics of Natural and Anthropogenic Aerosol Measured at Research Vessel Gisang 1 over the Yellow Sea during KORUS-AQ Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, J. W.; Shin, B.; Hee-Jung, K.; Yun Kyu, L.; Ryoo, S. B.

    2017-12-01

    The major compositions of water-soluble ionic species were collected in particle matter under 10 ?m (PM10) and 2.5 ?m (PM2.5) in diameter over the Yellow sea during KORUS-AQ (Korea-United States Air Quality Study) campaign using the research vessel Gisang 1 in 2016. These secondary ionic species (NH4+, SO42-, and NO3-) in PM10 and PM2.5 occupied 84 % and 89% of total analyzed species. The NH4+ had strong correlation with nss(non-sea salt)-SO42- in PM10 and PM2.5 and the NO3- had good correlation with Na+, Mg2+, and nss-Ca2+ in PM10 and NH4+ in PM2.5. The methanesulfonic acid (MSA,CH3SO3-) , a main source of natural sulfate over the sea, was observed high mass concentration and this study newly found that it trended to be increased over the Yellow sea in Northeast Asia at recently. The biogenic sulfur contribution to the total nss-SO42-, MSA/nss-SO42-ⅹ100 ratios, over the Yellow sea totally ranged from 1.4% to 9.2% in PM10 and from 0.68% to 9.5% in PM2.5 during the cruise. Therefore the biogenic nss-SO42- cannot be ignored especially in spring and early summer with elevated biological activity. We classified the high aerosol mass concentration cases; Asian dust case (AD), haze & mist case from Northeast China (HMNC), haze case from Korean peninsula (HKP), and haze case from Shandong peninsula in China (HSPC). In AD the ratio of NO3- to nss-SO42- in aerosol showed the mobile source more affected the sample of PM10 and the stationary source more contributed to that of PM2.5. The major chemical species in AD were CaCO3, Ca(NO3)2, Mg(NO3)2, Na(NO3)2, and sea salt. Thus, this study clearly showed that the dust particle reacted with gaseous nitric acid in PM10 of AD. In HKP and HSPC the major species were (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3 in PM10 and PM2.5. Interestingly, NH4NO3 was not estimated in HMNC under the condition of high relative humidity and mass concentration nss-SO42-. The ammonium ion (NH4+) reacted SO42 in PM2.5 of the most of haze cases affected the atmospheric

  11. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  12. Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems among Office-Based Physician Practices: United States, ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Use and Characteristics of Electronic Health Record Systems Among Office-based ... physicians that collects information on physician and practice characteristics, including the adoption and use of EHR systems. ...

  13. A laboratory exposure system to study the effects of aging on super-micron aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santarpia, Joshua; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Servantes, Brandon Lee; Hubbard, Joshua Allen

    2014-02-01

    A laboratory system was constructed that allows the super-micron particles to be aged for long periods of time under conditions that can simulate a range of natural environments and conditions, including relative humidity, oxidizing chemicals, organics and simulated solar radiation. Two proof-of-concept experiments using a non-biological simulant for biological particles and a biological simulant demonstrate the utility of these types of aging experiments. Green Visolite®, which is often used as a tracer material for model validation experiments, does not degrade with exposure to simulated solar radiation, the actual biological material does. This would indicate that Visolite® should be a good tracer compound for mapping the extent of a biological release using fluorescence as an indicator, but that it should not be used to simulate the decay of a biological particle when exposed to sunlight. The decay in the fluorescence measured for B. thurengiensis is similar to what has been previously observed in outdoor environments.

  14. Characteristics of aerosols in Beijing-Tianjin area of China by PIXE and INAA and identification of their sources by CEB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sha Yin; Liu Pingsheng; Hu Zhaohui; Zhong Ming; Yang Shaojin; Yang Yinan; Qian Qinfang; Chen Bingru

    1992-01-01

    Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) techniques were used to measure the contents of 45 elements in 150 air-filter samples collected by cascade impactor with 8 stages at 10 sites in Beijing-Tianjin area of China during the periods of the winter of 1983 and the summer of 1984. It was noticed that the toxic elements such as As, Sb, Se, Pb, Hg, Cu and Ni were mainly enriched in fine particles with diameter less than 2 μm. The major seven sources of coal burning, soil dust, oil burning, sea-salt aerosol, motor vehicle emission, limestone dust and industrial refuse attributing to the pollution in Tianjin area were identified by Chemical Elements Balance method (CEB). Among them the most important sources were the soil dust and the emission from coal-combustion followed by contributions from limestone and industrial refuse. (author)

  15. Characteristic analysis of a photovoltaic system flying at fixed latitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shun Ching

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Relative sunrise and noon are different for different flight speeds. → ECSC cells are disposed for ECSC batteries matching each PV module. → Working ranges of ECSC battery are determined. → Secondary ECSC battery is considered. → Heat energy to thermostat keeps PV modules at ice point. - Abstract: The characteristic analysis of a PV system equipped with ECSC battery and moving in the air at fixed latitude is presented. The flight plans for 1 year trips at three latitudes from four seasons and with four speeds are considered under the condition that the flying system must come back every 24 h whatever the speed may be. The relative sunrise, solar noon, and sunset are different on each day not only for different seasons but also for different flight speeds, so the times for the moving PV system to take two U turns on each day are different and the durations of insolation on PV modules on each day are also different. The ECSC cells are disposed in series and in parallel for ECSC batteries matching each PV module. The working ranges of ECSC battery are determined by the characteristics of two components, ECSC battery and DC motor, for ensuring that the discharge current from an ECSC battery is always larger than the current driving the DC motor. While the PV modules on the flying machine are not under insolation or does not produce enough after relative sunrise, the primary ECSC battery discharges. The PV generator drives the DC motor and charges the primary ECSC battery during the time about solar noon, and it will charge the secondary ECSC battery when the primary battery is recharged to the full state. Once the PV generator does not produce enough again before relative sunset, the secondary battery discharges until its fractional state of charge backs to the minimum. The thermostat keeps the PV modules at ice point, if the temperature of PV module in the air is less than the 0 deg. C. The heat energy controlled by the thermostat is supplied

  16. FEASIBILITY OF THE AEROSOL-TO-LIQUID PARTICLE EXTRACTION SYSTEM (ALPES) FOR COLLECTION OF VIABLE FRANCISELLA SP.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitkamp, M

    2006-08-07

    Several Biowatch monitoring sites in the Houston area have tested positive for Francisella tularensis and there is a need to determine whether natural occurring Francisella-related microorganism(s) may be responsible for these observed positive reactions. The collection, culturing and characterization of Francisella-related natural microorganisms will provide the knowledge base to improve the future selectivity of Biowatch monitoring for Francisella. The aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPES) is a high-efficiency, dual mechanism collection system that utilizes a liquid collection medium for capture of airborne microorganisms. Since the viability of microorganisms is preserved better in liquid medium than on air filters, this project was undertaken to determine whether Francisella philomiragia and Francisella tularensis LVS maintain acceptable viability in the continuous liquid recirculation, high direct current voltage and residual ozone concentrations which occur during ALPES operation. Throughout a series of preliminary trial runs with representative gram-negative and gram-positive microorganisms, several design modifications and improvements to the ALPES optimized liquid handling, electrical stability, sampling and overall performance for biological sampling. Initial testing with Francisella philomiragia showed viability was preserved better in PBS buffer than HBSS buffer. Trial runs at starting cell concentrations of 1.8 x 10{sup 6} and 2.5 x 10{sup 4} CFU/L showed less than a 1-log decrease in viability for F. philomiragia after 24 h in the ALPES. Francisella tularensis LVS (live vaccine strain) was used as a surrogate for virulent F. tularensis in ALPES trial runs conducted at starting cell concentrations of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} CFU/L. F. tularensis LVS was slow-growing and required highly selective growth media to prevent overgrowth by collected airborne microorganisms. In addition, one ALPES unit intake was HEPA filtered during

  17. Potential climatic effects of anthropogenic aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pueschel, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    Aerosols act as part of the climate system through their influence on solar and terrestrial radiation. The effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the reduction of visibility is explored in this chapter. Elemental carbon has been identified as the most effective visibility-reducing species. Most of the visibility reduction is due to particles with diameter smaller than 2.5 μm. Studies indicate that sulfate is also a very important aerosol species that results in low visibility and high turbidity. Radiative properties such as aerosol single-scattering albedo values and absorption-to-backscatter ratios purported to produce warming or cooling effects of aerosols are discussed. It is concluded that aerosol clouds have a tendency to cool when they are over a low-albedo surface and have a tendency to warm when they are over high-albedo surfaces such as snow. Anthropogenic aerosols have a tendency to warm the earth's atmospheric system, based on calculations and assumed aerosol optical properties. However, this effect is somewhat offset by the absorption and re-emission into space of infrared terrestrial radiation. The net effect depends on the ratio of the absorption coefficients in the visible and infrared and also on the surface albedo. The effects on infrared radiation are documented for two anthropogenic aerosol sources in the United States, the Denver metropolitan area and power plant plumes in New Mexico, through calculations and measurements. Measured cooling rates within an aerosol plume are not sufficient to offset the warming rate due to absorption of short-wave radiation. Research indicates that anthropogenic aerosols can possibly cause local-scale warming of the atmosphere, but global-scale climatic effects remain an open question

  18. Volatility measurement of atmospheric submicron aerosols in an urban atmosphere in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Ming; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Min; He, Ling-Yan

    2018-02-01

    Aerosol pollution has been a very serious environmental problem in China for many years. The volatility of aerosols can affect the distribution of compounds in the gas and aerosol phases, the atmospheric fates of the corresponding components, and the measurement of the concentration of aerosols. Compared to the characterization of chemical composition, few studies have focused on the volatility of aerosols in China. In this study, a thermodenuder aerosol mass spectrometer (TD-AMS) system was deployed to study the volatility of non-refractory submicron particulate matter (PM1) species during winter in Shenzhen. To our knowledge, this paper is the first report of the volatilities of aerosol chemical components based on a TD-AMS system in China. The average PM1 mass concentration during the experiment was 42.7±20.1 µg m-3, with organic aerosol (OA) being the most abundant component (43.2 % of the total mass). The volatility of chemical species measured by the AMS varied, with nitrate showing the highest volatility, with a mass fraction remaining (MFR) of 0.57 at 50 °C. Organics showed semi-volatile characteristics (the MFR was 0.88 at 50 °C), and the volatility had a relatively linear correlation with the TD temperature (from the ambient temperature to 200 °C), with an evaporation rate of 0.45 % °C-1. Five subtypes of OA were resolved from total OA using positive matrix factorization (PMF) for data obtained under both ambient temperature and high temperatures through the TD, including a hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, accounting for 13.5 %), a cooking OA (COA, 20.6 %), a biomass-burning OA (BBOA, 8.9 %), and two oxygenated OAs (OOAs): a less-oxidized OOA (LO-OOA, 39.1 %) and a more-oxidized OOA (MO-OOA, 17.9 %). Different OA factors presented different volatilities, and the volatility sequence of the OA factors at 50 °C was HOA (MFR of 0.56) > LO-OOA (0.70) > COA (0.85) ≈ BBOA (0.87) > MO-OOA (0.99), which was not completely consistent with the sequence of their O

  19. Wintertime Arctic Ocean sea water properties and primary marine aerosol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols are an important part of the climate system through their direct and indirect effects. Due to the diminishing sea ice, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing sea spray aerosol source areas. However, the influence of these changes on primary particle production is not known.

    In laboratory experiments we examined the influence of Arctic Ocean water temperature, salinity, and oxygen saturation on primary particle concentration characteristics. Sea water temperature was identified as the most important of these parameters. A strong decrease in sea spray aerosol production with increasing water temperature was observed for water temperatures between −1°C and 9°C. Aerosol number concentrations decreased from at least 1400 cm−3 to 350 cm−3. In general, the aerosol number size distribution exhibited a robust shape with one mode close to dry diameter Dp 0.2 μm with approximately 45% of particles at smaller sizes. Changes in sea water temperature did not result in pronounced change of the shape of the aerosol size distribution, only in the magnitude of the concentrations. Our experiments indicate that changes in aerosol emissions are most likely linked to changes of the physical properties of sea water at low temperatures. The observed strong dependence of sea spray aerosol concentrations on sea water temperature, with a large fraction of the emitted particles in the typical cloud condensation nuclei size range, provide strong arguments for a more careful consideration of this effect in climate models.

  20. Evaluation of operational forecast model of aerosol transportation using ceilometer network measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ka Lok; Wiegner, Matthias; Flentje, Harald; Mattis, Ina; Wagner, Frank; Gasteiger, Josef; Geiß, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Due to technical improvements of ceilometers in recent years, ceilometer measurements are not only limited to determine cloud base heights but also providing information on the vertical aerosol distribution. Therefore, several national weather services implemented ceilometer networks. These measurements are e.g. valuable for the evaluation of the chemical transport model simulations. In this study, we present comparisons of European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast Integrated Forecast System (ECMWF-IFS) model simulation of aerosol backscatter coefficients with ceilometer network measurements operated by the German weather service (DWD) . Five different types of aerosol are available in the model simulations which include two natural aerosols, sea salt and dust. The other three aerosol types, i.e. sulfate, organic carbon and black carbon, have significant anthropogenic contributions. As the model output provides mass mixing ratios of the above mentioned types of aerosol and the ceilometers measure attenuated backscatter (β∗) provided that calibration took place, it is necessary to determine a common physical quantity for the comparison. We have chosen the aerosol backscatter coefficient (β) for this purpose. The β-profiles are calculated from the mass mixing ratios of the model output assuming the inherent aerosol microphysics properties. It shall be emphasized that in the model calculations, all particles are assumed to be spherical. We have examined the sensitivity of the intercomparison on the hygroscopic growth of particles and on the role of particle shape. Our results show that the hygroscopic growth of particle is crucial (up to a factor of 22) in converting the model output to backscatter coefficient profiles whereas the effect of non-sphericity of dust particles is comparably small (˜44%). Furthermore, the calibration of the ceilometer signals can be an issue. The agreements between modeled and retrieved β-profiles show different

  1. Computer Simulation of Hydraulic Systems with Typical Nonlinear Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Popov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The task was to synthesise an adjustable hydraulic system structure, the mathematical model of which takes into account its inherent nonlinearity. Its solution suggests using a successive computer simulations starting with a structure of the linearized stable hydraulic system, which is then complicated by including the essentially non-linear elements. The hydraulic system thus obtained may be unable to meet the Lyapunov stability criterion and be unstable. This can be eliminated through correcting elements. Control of correction results is provided according to the form of transition processes due to stepwise variation of the control signal.Computer simulation of a throttle-controlled electrohydraulic servo drive with the rotary output element illustrates the proposed method application. A constant pressure power source provides fluid feed for the drive under pressure.For drive simulation the following models were involved: the linear model, the model taking into consideration a non-linearity of the flow-dynamic characteristics of a spool-type valve, and the non-linear models that take into account the dry friction in the spool-type valve, the backlash in the steering angle sensor of the motor shaft.The paper shows possibility of damping oscillation caused by variable hydrodynamic forces through introducing a correction device.The list of references attached contains 16 sources, which were used to justify and explain certain factors of the automatic control theory and the fluid mechanics of unsteady flows.The article presents 6 block-diagrams of the electrohydraulic servo drive and their appropriate transition processes, which have been studied.

  2. Informing Aerosol Transport Models With Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbacher, J.; Patadia, F.; Petrenko, M.; Martin, M. Val; Chin, M.; Gaitley, B.; Garay, M.; Kalashnikova, O.; Nelson, D.; Scollo, S.

    2011-01-01

    As the aerosol products from the NASA Earth Observing System's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) mature, we are placing greater focus on ways of using the aerosol amount and type data products, and aerosol plume heights, to constrain aerosol transport models. We have demonstrated the ability to map aerosol air-mass-types regionally, and have identified product upgrades required to apply them globally, including the need for a quality flag indicating the aerosol type information content, that varies depending upon retrieval conditions. We have shown that MISR aerosol type can distinguish smoke from dust, volcanic ash from sulfate and water particles, and can identify qualitative differences in mixtures of smoke, dust, and pollution aerosol components in urban settings. We demonstrated the use of stereo imaging to map smoke, dust, and volcanic effluent plume injection height, and the combination of MISR and MODIS aerosol optical depth maps to constrain wildfire smoke source strength. This talk will briefly highlight where we stand on these application, with emphasis on the steps we are taking toward applying the capabilities toward constraining aerosol transport models, planet-wide.

  3. Black carbon aerosol mixing state, organic aerosols and aerosol optical properties over the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. McMeeking

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC aerosols absorb sunlight thereby leading to a positive radiative forcing and a warming of climate and can also impact human health through their impact on the respiratory system. The state of mixing of BC with other aerosol species, particularly the degree of internal/external mixing, has been highlighted as a major uncertainty in assessing its radiative forcing and hence its climate impact, but few in situ observations of mixing state exist. We present airborne single particle soot photometer (SP2 measurements of refractory BC (rBC mass concentrations and mixing state coupled with aerosol composition and optical properties measured in urban plumes and regional pollution over the United Kingdom. All data were obtained using instrumentation flown on the UK's BAe-146-301 large Atmospheric Research Aircraft (ARA operated by the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM. We measured sub-micron aerosol composition using an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS and used positive matrix factorization to separate hydrocarbon-like (HOA and oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA. We found a higher number fraction of thickly coated rBC particles in air masses with large OOA relative to HOA, higher ozone-to-nitrogen oxides (NOx ratios and large concentrations of total sub-micron aerosol mass relative to rBC mass concentrations. The more ozone- and OOA-rich air masses were associated with transport from continental Europe, while plumes from UK cities had higher HOA and NOx and fewer thickly coated rBC particles. We did not observe any significant change in the rBC mass absorption efficiency calculated from rBC mass and light absorption coefficients measured by a particle soot absorption photometer despite observing significant changes in aerosol composition and rBC mixing state. The contributions of light scattering and absorption to total extinction (quantified by the single scattering albedo; SSA did change for

  4. Characterisation of boric acid aerosol behaviour and interactions with stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.B.; Beard, A.M.; Bennett, P.J.; Benson, C.G.

    1991-03-01

    Experiments have been conducted to determine the physical characteristics of boric acid aerosol. Aqueous solutions of boric acid (either 200 or 2000 ppm boron) were injected at a controlled rate onto a 304 stainless steel cone held at 1000 o C. The transport and deposition of the resulting aerosol was studied through a system including pipework and a dilution chamber. Work was also undertaken to characterise the interaction between boric acid and stainless steel. Boric acid was vaporized in steam-argon atmospheres at 300 o C and passed over 304 stainless steel coupons held at temperatures between 400 and 1000 o C. (author)

  5. Investigation of aerosol optical properties for remote sensing through DRAGON (distributed regional aerosol gridded observation networks) campaign in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Hyun; Ahn, Joon Young; Park, Jin-Soo; Hong, You-Deok; Han, Jin-Seok; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2014-11-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere, including dust and pollutants, scatters/absorbs solar radiation and change the microphysics of clouds, thus influencing the Earth's energy budget, climate, air quality, visibility, agriculture and water circulation. Pollutants have also been reported to threaten the human health. The present research collaborated with the U.S. NASA and the U.S. Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) is to study the aerosol characteristics in East Asia and improve the long-distance transportation monitoring technology by analyzing the observations of aerosol characteristics in East Asia during Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March 2012-May 2012). The sun photometers that measure the aerosol optical characteristics were placed evenly throughout the Korean Peninsula and concentrated in Seoul and the metropolitan area. Observation data are obtained from the DRAGON campaign and the first year (2012) observation data (aerosol optical depth and aerosol spatial distribution) are analyzed. Sun photometer observations, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), are utilized to validate satellite observations from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Additional analysis is performed associated with the Northeast Asia, the Korean Peninsula in particular, to determine the spatial distribution of the aerosol.

  6. A novel continuous powder aerosolizer (CPA) for inhalative administration of highly concentrated recombinant surfactant protein-C (rSP-C) surfactant to preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, G; Iwatschenko, P; Koch, W; Windt, H; Rast, M; de Abreu, M Gama; Taut, F J H; De Muynck, C

    2013-12-01

    In pulmonary medicine, aerosolization of substances for continuous inhalation is confined to different classes of nebulizers with their inherent limitations. Among the unmet medical needs is the lack of an aerosolized surfactant preparation for inhalation by preterm neonates, to avoid the risks associated with endotracheal intubation and surfactant bolus instillation. In the present report, we describe a high-concentration continuous powder aerosolization system developed for delivery of inhalable surfactant to preterm neonates. The developed device uses a technique that allows efficient aerosolization of dry surfactant powder, generating a surfactant aerosol of high concentration. In a subsequent humidification step, the heated aerosol particles are covered with a surface layer of water. The wet surfactant aerosol is then delivered to the patient interface (e.g., nasal prongs) through a tube. The performance characteristics of the system are given as mass concentration, dose rate, and size distribution of the generated aerosol. Continuous aerosol flows of about 0.84 L/min can be generated from dry recombinant surfactant protein-C surfactant, with concentrations of up to 12 g/m(3) and median particle sizes of the humidified particles in the range of 3 to 3.5 μm at the patient interface. The system has been successfully used in preclinical studies. The device with its continuous high-concentration delivery is promising for noninvasive delivery of surfactant aerosol to neonates and has the potential for becoming a versatile disperser platform closing the gap between continuously operating nebulizers and discontinuously operating dry powder inhaler devices.

  7. Characteristics of Local Modulation Beam Propagating through Spatial Filter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewei You

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As local defects may significantly harm beam quality and affect safe operation, a systematic analysis of the ability of a spatial filter to alleviate these adverse effects is required. Thus, the evolutional characteristics of a beam modulated by a local defect propagating through a spatial filter system at an image reply plane and a downstream plane are analyzed in detail. Modulation stripes appear at the image reply plane; these are caused by the pinhole cutoff effect. The modulation degree increases with increasing defect size. The maximum intensification factor can reach 3.2 under certain conditions. Thus, the defect size should be restricted to a reasonable size for safe operation with a specified pinhole size. Moreover, a maximal value appears at the downstream plane, and the intensity enhances with increasing defect size. To ensure beam quality, the maximum allowable defect size and angle of the spatial filter should meet special constraints. The maximum allowable defect size is calculated based on practical configuration parameters.

  8. Explicit Cloud Nucleation from Arbitrary Mixtures of Aerosol Types and Sizes Using an Ultra-Efficient In-Line Aerosol Bin Model in High-Resolution Simulations of Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walko, R. L.; Ashby, T.; Cotton, W. R.

    2017-12-01

    The fundamental role of atmospheric aerosols in the process of cloud droplet nucleation is well known, and there is ample evidence that the concentration, size, and chemistry of aerosols can strongly influence microphysical, thermodynamic, and ultimately dynamic properties and evolution of clouds and convective systems. With the increasing availability of observation- and model-based environmental representations of different types of anthropogenic and natural aerosols, there is increasing need for models to be able to represent which aerosols nucleate and which do not in supersaturated conditions. However, this is a very complex process that involves competition for water vapor between multiple aerosol species (chemistries) and different aerosol sizes within each species. Attempts have been made to parameterize the nucleation properties of mixtures of different aerosol species, but it is very difficult or impossible to represent all possible mixtures that may occur in practice. As part of a modeling study of the impact of anthropogenic and natural aerosols on hurricanes, we developed an ultra-efficient aerosol bin model to represent nucleation in a high-resolution atmospheric model that explicitly represents cloud- and subcloud-scale vertical motion. The bin model is activated at any time and location in a simulation where supersaturation occurs and is potentially capable of activating new cloud droplets. The bins are populated from the aerosol species that are present at the given time and location and by multiple sizes from each aerosol species according to a characteristic size distribution, and the chemistry of each species is represented by its absorption or adsorption characteristics. The bin model is integrated in time increments that are smaller than that of the atmospheric model in order to temporally resolve the peak supersaturation, which determines the total nucleated number. Even though on the order of 100 bins are typically utilized, this leads only

  9. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  10. Impact of Radiatively Interactive Dust Aerosols on Dust Transport and Mobilization in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) Earth Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarco, P. R.; Rocha Lima, A.; Darmenov, A.; Bloecker, C.

    2017-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosols scatter and absorb solar and infrared radiation, impacting the energy budget of the Earth system which in turns feeds back on the dynamical processes responsible for mobilization of dust in the first place. In previous work with radiatively interactive aerosols in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System global model (GEOS-5) we found a positive feedback between dust absorption and emissions. Emissions were the largest for the highest shortwave absorption considered, which additionally produced simulated dust transport in the best agreement with observations. The positive feedback found was in contrast to other modeling studies which instead found a negative feedback, where the impact of dust absorption was to stabilize the surface levels of the atmosphere and so reduce wind speeds. A key difference between our model and other models was that in GEOS-5 we simulated generally larger dust particles, with correspondingly larger infrared absorption that led to a pronounced difference in the diurnal cycle of dust emissions versus simulations where these long wave effects were not considered. In this paper we seek to resolve discrepancies between our previous simulations and those of other modeling groups. We revisit the question of dust radiative feedback on emissions with a recent version of the GEOS-5 system running at a higher spatial resolution and including updates to the parameterizations for dust mobilization, initial dust particle size distribution, loss processes, and radiative transfer, and identify key uncertainties that remain based on dust optical property assumptions.

  11. The continuous monitoring of the artificial beta aerosol activity by measuring the alpha and beta activity in aerosol simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hironobu; Oonishi, Masaki; Matsuura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    We have constructed the system to monitor the artificial beta aerosol activity around the nuclear power plants continuously in real time. The smaller releases of artificial radionuclides from the nuclear power plants can be lost in the fluctuations of the natural background of the beta aerosol activity, when only the beta activity of the aerosol is measured. This method to discriminate the artificial and the natural beta activity of the aerosol is based on the fact that the ratio of the natural alpha and beta activities of the aerosol is almost constant. The detection limit of this system is below 3 Bq/m 3 . (author)

  12. Spectra Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Laboratory and Urban Aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, Madhu S.

    a shell-core model, we verified, for the first time, that AEA can be as high as 1.6 even for non-absorbing coating on BC, suggesting that the organic coating need not be intrinsically brown to observe effects commonly attributed to BrC absorption. Additionally, for laboratory generated incense burning aerosols, AEA varied as lambda -4.5for wavelengths ranging from 355 to 1047 nm. In contrast, the wood smoke aerosols during winter had a much weaker wavelength dependence (lambda-1.1), comparable to that of traffic emission aerosols. During these observations, the multispectral SSA decreased with the wavelength for traffic-related emissions, yet it increased for biomass and incense burning aerosol. The strong spectral dependence was due to the enhanced light absorption by BrC at UV and blue wavelengths. In all cases, results of this analysis suggested that inefficient smoldering combustion processes can emit predominantly BrC, in comparison to high-temperature and flaming burning processes. During the CARES field campaign, aerosols were dominated by biogenic emissions. Aerosol light absorption was modestly enhanced (lambda -1.6) at shorter wavelengths (355, 375, 405, and 532 nm) compared to 870 and 1047 nm, likely due to the spectral dependence of coating on BC. The secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentration steadily increased in the latter half of the campaign, with strong 355 nm aerosol light scattering. Overall, results of this field campaign showed that the biogenic SOA was not BrC, i.e. it didn't have intrinsic characteristics near UV absorption. These results should be further tested and analyzed to assess the full implications of BrC aerosol light absorption.

  13. Spectral radiation balance of absorbing aerosols over clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stammes, Piet; de Graaf, Martin; Deneke, Hartwig

    2017-04-01

    Absorption by aerosols, like smoke and desert dust, may lead to strong atmospheric warming, surface cooling, and cloud dynamical responses. Therefore, detection of absorbing aerosols and assessment of their radiative effects is important. However, absorbing aerosols are difficult to detect, especially in cloudy scenes. Here we use a satellite detection technique which can be used to determine the spectral absorption effects of smoke aerosols over clouds, using the fact that aerosols have a much stronger effect at UV and visible wavelengths than at longer wavelengths. We also analyse the shortwave radiative balance of absorbing aerosols over clouds. We have developed a technique of measuring aerosols from their absorption effect using multi-spectral satellite data (De Graaf et al., JGR, 2012). Using a wide spectral range, from the UV (300-400 nm) up to the shortwave (SW) IR (1000-1750 nm), it is possible to distinguish the absorption by aerosols from the scattering by clouds. No microphysical assumptions are needed for the aerosols, except that their absorption must vanish at long wavelengths. With this method, called the Differential Aerosol Absorption (DAA) technique, which was applied to SCIAMACHY satellite data, we measured the direct radiative effect of absorbing biomass burning aerosols over clouds in the South-East Atlantic. We measured instantaneous direct radiative effects by the aerosols of the order of 100 W/m2 at top-of-atmosphere. The spectral radiation balance at both top-of-atmosphere and surface is needed to estimate the amount of absorption inside the aerosol layer. We therefore perform a simulation study, using accurate spectral RT modelling, in which we compute the profile of absorption in the aerosol layer. We find that the atmospheric absorption characteristics cannot be measured only from satellite by using reflected light, also the transmission at the surface has to be measured. Therefore, field campaigns are needed in addition to satellite

  14. Factors Affecting Aerosol Radiative Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Lin, J.; Ni, R.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid industrial and economic growth has meant large amount of aerosols in the atmosphere with strong radiative forcing (RF) upon the climate system. Over parts of the globe, the negative forcing of aerosols has overcompensated for the positive forcing of greenhouse gases. Aerosol RF is determined by emissions and various chemical-transport-radiative processes in the atmosphere, a multi-factor problem whose individual contributors have not been well quantified. In this study, we analyze the major factors affecting RF of secondary inorganic aerosols (SIOAs, including sulfate, nitrate and ammonium), primary organic aerosol (POA), and black carbon (BC). We analyze the RFof aerosols produced by 11 major regions across the globe, including but not limited to East Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, North America, and Western Europe. Factors analyzed include population size, per capita gross domestic production (GDP), emission intensity (i.e., emissionsper unit GDP), chemical efficiency (i.e., mass per unit emissions) and radiative efficiency (i.e., RF per unit mass). We find that among the 11 regions, East Asia produces the largest emissions and aerosol RF, due to relatively high emission intensity and a tremendous population size.South Asia produce the second largest RF of SIOA and BC and the highest RF of POA, in part due to its highest chemical efficiency among all regions. Although Southeast Asia also has large emissions,its aerosol RF is alleviated by its lowest chemical efficiency.The chemical efficiency and radiative efficiency of BC produced by the Middle East-North Africa are the highest across the regions, whereas its RF is loweredbyasmall per capita GDP.Both North America and Western Europe have low emission intensity, compensating for the effects on RF of large population sizes and per capita GDP. There has been a momentum to transfer industries to Southeast Asia and South Asia, and such transition is expected to continue in the coming years. The resulting

  15. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent of aerosols observed by the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network from August 2004 to September 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinyuan Xin; Yuesi Wang; Zhanqing Li; Pucai Wang; Wei Min Hao; Bryce L. Nordgren; Shigong Wang; Guangren Lui; Lili Wang; Tianxue Wen; Yang Sun; Bo Hu

    2007-01-01

    To reduce uncertainties in the quantitative assessment of aerosol effects on regional climate and environmental changes, extensive measurements of aerosol optical properties were made with handheld Sun photometers in the Chinese Sun Hazemeter Network (CSHNET) starting in August 2004. Regional characteristics of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm and Angstrom...

  16. Retrieval of tropospheric aerosol properties over land from visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance: Application over Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert Carroll

    Aerosols are major components of the Earth's global climate system, affecting the radiation budget and cloud processes of the atmosphere. When located near the surface, high concentrations lead to lowered visibility, increased health problems and generally reduced quality of life for the human population. Over the United States mid-Atlantic region, aerosol pollution is a problem mainly during the summer. Satellites, such as the MODerate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), from their vantage point above the atmosphere, provide unprecedented coverage of global and regional aerosols over land. During MODIS' eight-year operation, exhaustive data validation and analyses have shown how the algorithm should be improved. This dissertation describes the development of the 'second-generation' operational algorithm for retrieval of global tropospheric aerosol properties over dark land surfaces, from MODIS-observed spectral reflectance. New understanding about global aerosol properties, land surface reflectance characteristics, and radiative transfer properties were learned in the process. This new operational algorithm performs a simultaneous inversion of reflectance in two visible channels (0.47 and 0.66 mum) and one shortwave infrared channel (2.12 mum), thereby having increased sensitivity to coarse aerosol. Inversion of the three channels retrieves the aerosol optical depth (tau) at 0.55 mum, the percentage of non-dust (fine model) aerosol (eta) and the surface reflectance. This algorithm is applied globally, and retrieves tau that is highly correlated (y = 0.02 + 1.0x, R=0.9) with ground-based sunphotometer measurements. The new algorithm estimates the global, over-land, long-term averaged tau ˜ 0.21, a 25% reduction from previous MODIS estimates. This leads to reducing estimates of global, non-desert, over-land aerosol direct radiative effect (all aerosols) by 1.7 W·m-2 (0.5 W·m-2 over the entire globe), which significantly impacts assessment of aerosol direct radiative

  17. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiation Impact Assessment Section, Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable Syste