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Sample records for systemic antibody responses

  1. Antibody response against gastrointestinal antigens in demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system

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    Banati, M; Csecsei, P; Koszegi, E

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies against gastrointestinal antigens may indicate altered microbiota and immune responses in the gut. Recent experimental data suggest a connection between gastrointestinal immune responses and CNS autoimmunity. METHODS: Antibodies against gliadin, tissue transglutaminase (tTG...

  2. Systemic and Mucosal Antibody Responses to Soluble and Nanoparticle-Conjugated Antigens Administered Intranasally

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    Savannah E. Howe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are increasingly being used for drug delivery, as well as antigen carriers and immunostimulants for the purpose of developing vaccines. In this work, we examined how intranasal (i.n. priming followed by i.n. or subcutaneous (s.c. boosting immunization affects the humoral immune response to chicken ovalbumin (Ova and Ova conjugated to 20 nm NPs (NP-Ova. We show that i.n. priming with 20 mg of soluble Ova, a dose known to trigger oral tolerance when administered via gastric gavage, induced substantial systemic IgG1 and IgG2c, as well as mucosal antibodies. These responses were further boosted following a s.c. immunization with Ova and complete Freund’s adjuvant (Ova+CFA. In contrast, 100 µg of Ova delivered via NPs induced an IgG1-dominated systemic response, and primed the intestinal mucosa for secretion of IgA. Following a secondary s.c. or i.n. immunization with Ova+CFA or NP-Ova, systemic IgG1 titers significantly increased, and serum IgG2c and intestinal antibodies were induced in mice primed nasally with NP-Ova. Only Ova- and NP-Ova-primed mice that were s.c.-boosted exhibited substantial systemic and mucosal titers for up to 6 months after priming, whereas the antibodies of i.n.-boosted mice declined over time. Our results indicate that although the amount of Ova delivered by NPs was 1000-fold less than Ova delivered in soluble form, the antigen-specific antibody responses, both systemic and mucosal, are essentially identical by 6 months following the initial priming immunization. Additionally, both i.n.- and s.c.-boosting strategies for NP-Ova-primed mice were capable of inducing a polarized Th1/Th2 immune response, as well as intestinal antibodies; however, it is only by using a heterogeneous prime-boost strategy that long-lasting antibody responses were initiated. These results provide valuable insight for future mucosal vaccine development, as well as furthering our understanding of mucosal antibody responses.

  3. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

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    Akcalı, Aliye; Bostanci, Nagihan; Özçaka, Özgün; Öztürk-Ceyhan, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Buduneli, Nurcan; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  4. Association between polycystic ovary syndrome, oral microbiota and systemic antibody responses.

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    Aliye Akcalı

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a hormonal disorder of women that not only is the leading cause of infertility but also shows a reciprocal link with oral health. This study aimed to investigate the hypothesis that the levels of putative periodontal pathogens in saliva and their antibody response in serum are elevated in PCOS, compared to systemic health. A total of 125 women were included in four groups; 45 women with PCOS and healthy periodontium, 35 women with PCOS and gingivitis, 25 systemically and periodontally healthy women, 20 systemically healthy women with gingivitis. Salivary levels of seven putative periodontal pathogens were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and serum antibody levels were analyzed by ELISA. In women with PCOS, salivary Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus oralis and Tannerella forsythia levels were higher than matched systemically healthy women, particularly in the case of gingivitis. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Treponema denticola levels were similar among study groups. The presence of PCOS also enhanced P. gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and S. oralis serum antibody levels, when gingivitis was also present. Gingival inflammation correlated positively with levels of the studied taxa in saliva, particularly in PCOS. The presence of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum in saliva also exhibited a strong positive correlation with the corresponding serum antibody levels. In conclusion, as an underlying systemic endocrine condition, PCOS may quantitatively affect the composition of oral microbiota and the raised systemic response to selective members of this microbial community, exerting a confounding role in resultant gingival inflammation and periodontal health. The most consistent effect appeared to be exerted on P. gingivalis.

  5. A microculture system for generating haemolytic antibody responses from human tonsillar lymphocytes.

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    Booth, R J

    1979-01-01

    Small numbers of Ficoll-Hypaque purified human tonsillar lymphocytes were stimulated with PWM to produce SRBC-specific PFC in a microculture system. The magnitude of the response varied among different tonsils but was typically between 200 and 1000 PFC/10(6) cells cultured. Little or no response was observed in the absence of PWM. SRBC failed to stimulate a SRBC-specific response and the presence of this antigen in PWM-stimulated cultures depressed the response. The time of the maximum response was inversely related to the number of cells cultured. In addition, the duration of the response was limited by rapid depletion of critical medium requirements and/or build up of inhibitory factors especially when the cell concentration exceeded 5 x 10(5) cells/culture. This effect could be partially overcome by daily feeding of cultures with fresh medium. Fractionation studies indicated a requirement for both T and B cell populations. Constant efficiency of PFC production with respect to cell number could be achieved by the addition of inactivated autologous 'filler' cells. The significance of these results and applicability of the microculture system to a detailed analysis of human antibody responses will be discussed.

  6. Treatment with belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus does not impair antibody response to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

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    Nagel, J; Saxne, T; Geborek, P; Bengtsson, A A; Jacobsen, S; Svaerke Joergensen, C; Nilsson, J-Å; Skattum, L; Jönsen, A; Kapetanovic, M C

    2017-09-01

    Background/purpose The objective of this study was to explore the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus and belimumab given in addition to standard of care therapy on 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) response. Methods Forty-seven systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 21 healthy controls were immunized with a single dose of 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine. Forty systemic lupus erythematosus patients were treated with traditional disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs, 11 of those received belimumab in addition, and 32 patients were treated with concomitant prednisolone. Quantification of serotype specific IgG levels to 12 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides was performed in serum taken before and four to six weeks after vaccination using multiplex fluorescent microsphere immunoassay. IgG levels against serotypes 23F and 6B were also analyzed using standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Opsonophagocytic assay was performed on serotype 23F to evaluate the functionality of the antibodies. Pre- and post-vaccination log transformed antibody levels were compared to determine the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis and different treatments on antibody response. Results Systemic lupus erythematosus patients as a group showed lower post-vaccination antibody levels and lower fold increase of antibody levels after vaccination compared to controls ( p = 0.02 and p = 0.009, respectively). Systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated with belimumab in addition to standard of care therapy or with only hydroxychloroquine did not differ compared to controls, whereas the other treatment groups had significantly lower fold increase of post-vaccination antibody levels. Higher age was associated with lower post-vaccination antibody levels among systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Conclusion Belimumab given in addition to traditional disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs or prednisolone did not further impair antibody

  7. Intramuscular delivery of a cholera DNA vaccine primes both systemic and mucosal protective antibody responses against cholera.

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    Xu, Guifang; Wang, Shixia; Zhuang, Ling; Hackett, Anthony; Gu, Ling; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Hua; Huang, Zuhu; Lu, Shan

    2009-06-12

    Cholera is a potentially lethal diarrhea disease caused by the gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The need for an effective cholera vaccine is clearly indicated but the challenges of eliciting both systemic and mucosal immune responses remains a significant challenge. In the current report, we discovered that a DNA vaccine expressing a protective cholera antigen, cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), delivered parenterally can elicit both systemic and mucosal anti-CTB antibody responses in mice. The priming effect by DNA immunization was demonstrated by higher mucosal antibody responses following one boost with the inactivated cholera vaccine (KWC-B) delivered orally when compared to the twice oral administration of KWC-B alone. This finding indicates that DNA vaccines delivered parenterally are effective in eliciting mucosal protective immune responses--a unique advantage for DNA vaccination that has not yet been well realized and should bring value to the development of novel vaccination approaches against mucosally transmitted diseases.

  8. Treatment with belimumab in systemic lupus erythematosus does not impair antibody response to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagel, J.; Saxne, T.; Geborek, P.

    2017-01-01

    enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Opsonophagocytic assay was performed on serotype 23F to evaluate the functionality of the antibodies. Pre- and post-vaccination log transformed antibody levels were compared to determine the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosis and different treatments......Background/purpose The objective of this study was to explore the impact of systemic lupus erythematosus and belimumab given in addition to standard of care therapy on 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) response. Methods Forty-seven systemic lupus erythematosus patients and 21...... healthy controls were immunized with a single dose of 13-valent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine. Forty systemic lupus erythematosus patients were treated with traditional disease-modifying anti rheumatic drugs, 11 of those received belimumab in addition, and 32 patients were treated with concomitant...

  9. Anti-RAGE antibody selectively blocks acute systemic inflammatory responses to LPS in serum, liver, CSF and striatum.

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    Gasparotto, Juciano; Ribeiro, Camila Tiefensee; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; Somensi, Nauana; Fernandes, Henrique Schaan; Teixeira, Alexsander Alves; Guasselli, Marcelo Otavio Rodrigues; Agani, Crepin Aziz Jose O; Souza, Natália Cabral; Grings, Mateus; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Gomes, Henrique Mautone; de Bittencourt Pasquali, Matheus Augusto; Dunkley, Peter R; Dickson, Phillip W; Moreira, José Claudio Fonseca; Gelain, Daniel Pens

    2017-05-01

    Systemic inflammation induces transient or permanent dysfunction in the brain by exposing it to soluble inflammatory mediators. The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds to distinct ligands mediating and increasing inflammatory processes. In this study we used an LPS-induced systemic inflammation model in rats to investigate the effect of blocking RAGE in serum, liver, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra). Intraperitoneal injection of RAGE antibody (50μg/kg) was followed after 1h by a single LPS (5mg/kg) intraperitoneal injection. Twenty-four hours later, tissues were isolated for analysis. RAGE antibody reduced LPS-induced inflammatory effects in both serum and liver; the levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) were decreased and the phosphorylation/activation of RAGE downstream targets (ERK1/2, IκB and p65) in liver were significantly attenuated. RAGE antibody prevented LPS-induced effects on TNF-α and IL-1β in CSF. In striatum, RAGE antibody inhibited increases in IL-1β, Iba-1, GFAP, phospho-ERK1/2 and phospho-tau (ser202), as well as the decrease in synaptophysin levels. These effects were caused by systemic RAGE inhibition, as RAGE antibody did not cross the blood-brain barrier. RAGE antibody also prevented striatal lipoperoxidation and activation of mitochondrial complex II. In conclusion, blockade of RAGE is able to inhibit inflammatory responses induced by LPS in serum, liver, CSF and brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

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    Lamousé-Smith, Esi S; Tzeng, Alice; Starnbach, Michael N

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF) mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  11. The intestinal flora is required to support antibody responses to systemic immunization in infant and germ free mice.

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    Esi S Lamousé-Smith

    Full Text Available The presence of a complex and diverse intestinal flora is functionally important for regulating intestinal mucosal immune responses. However, the extent to which a balanced intestinal flora regulates systemic immune responses is still being defined. In order to specifically examine whether the acquisition of a less complex flora influences responses to immunization in the pre-weaning stages of life, we utilize a model in which infant mice acquire an intestinal flora from their mothers that has been altered by broad-spectrum antibiotics. In this model, pregnant dams are treated with a cocktail of antibiotics that alters both the density and microbial diversity of the intestinal flora. After challenge with a subcutaneous immunization, the antibiotic altered flora infant mice have lower antigen specific antibody titers compared to control age-matched mice. In a second model, we examined germ free (GF mice to analyze how the complete lack of flora influences the ability to mount normal antibody responses following subcutaneous immunization. GF mice do not respond well to immunization and introduction of a normal flora into GF mice restores the capacity of these mice to respond. These results indicate that a gastrointestinal flora reduced in density and complexity at critical time points during development adversely impacts immune responses to systemic antigens.

  12. Mucosal adjuvanticity of fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3: systemic and local antibody responses.

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    Zhisheng Dang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that a bacterial fibronectin attachment protein (FAP is able to stimulate strong systemic and mucosal antibody responses when it is used alone or co-administrated with other antigens (Ags. Thus, it has been suggested to be a promising adjuvant candidate for the development of efficient vaccines. However, the co-administered Ags and FAP were cloned, expressed and purified individually to date. In a recent study, we first evaluated the adjuvanticity of a fibronectin-binding peptide (FBP, 24 amino acids of Mycobacterium avium FAP fused with Echinococcus multilocularis tetraspanin 3 (Em-TSP3 by detecting systemic and local antibody responses in intranasally (i.n. immunized BALB/c mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Em-TSP3 and FBP fragments were linked with a GSGGSG linker and expressed as a single fusion protein (Em-TSP3-FBP using the pBAD/Thio-TOPO expression vector. BALB/c mice were immunized i.n. with recombinant Em-TSP3-FBP (rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG and the systemic and local antibody responses were detected by ELISA. The results showed that both rEm-TSP3-FBP and rEm-TSP3+CpG evoked strong serum IgG (p<0.001 and IgG1 responses (p<0.001, whereas only the latter induced a high level IgG2α production (p<0.001, compared to that of rEm-TSP3 alone without any adjuvant. There were no significant differences in IgG and IgG1 production between the groups. Low level of serum IgA and IgM were detected in both groups. The tendency of Th1 and Th2 cell immune responses were assessed via detecting the IgG1/IgG2α ratio after the second and third immunizations. The results indicated that i.n. immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP resulted in an increased IgG1/IgG2α ratio (a Th2 tendency, while rEm-TSP3+CpG caused a rapid Th1 response that later shifted to a Th2 response. Immunization with rEm-TSP3-FBP provoked significantly stronger IgA antibody responses in intestine (p<0.05, lung (p<0.001 and spleen (p<0.001 compared to those

  13. Novel ISCOMs from Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce mucosal and systemic antibody production, T-cell responses and improved antigen uptake.

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    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Quirici, Lenora; Roehe, Paulo Michel; Ferreira, Fernando; Silveira, Fernando

    2016-02-24

    In the last decades, significant efforts have been dedicated to the search for novel vaccine adjuvants. In this regard, saponins and its formulations as "immunostimulating complexes" (ISCOMs) have shown to be capable of stimulating potent humoral and cellular immune responses, enhanced cytokine production and activation of cytotoxic T cells. The immunological activity of ISCOMs formulated with a saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis (QB-90 fraction) as an alternative to classical ISCOMs based on Quil A(®) (IQA) is presented here. The ISCOMs prepared with QB-90, named IQB-90, typically consist of 40-50 nm, spherical, cage-like particles, built up by QB-90, cholesterol, phospholipids and antigen (ovalbumin, OVA). These nanoparticles were efficiently uptaken in vitro by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Subcutaneously inoculated IQB-90 induced strong serum antibody responses encompassing specific IgG1 and IgG2a, robust DTH reactions, significant T cell proliferation and increases in Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) cytokine responses. Intranasally delivered IQB-90 elicited serum IgG and IgG1, and mucosal IgA responses at distal systemic sites (nasal passages, large intestine and vaginal lumen). These results indicate that IQB-90 is a promising alternative to classic ISCOMs as vaccine adjuvants, capable of enhancing humoral and cellular immunity to levels comparable to those induced by ISCOMs manufactured with Quillaja saponaria saponins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, R.; Terres, G.; Cottier, H.; Hess, M.

    1976-01-01

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3 H--thymidine ( 3 H--TdR) and incorporation of 3 H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  15. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation on IgE antibody responses in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Terr, A.I.; Moss, R.B.; Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Thirteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and nephritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation because of severe disease refractory to other forms of treatment. Serum samples before and after irradiation were tested for changes in total serum IgE and for changes in specific IgE antibodies to ryegrass pollen, dust mite, cat dander, and Alternaria. There were no statistically significant changes in total or specific IgE from lymphoid irradiation in these patients. The therapy caused a significant decrease in circulating total lymphocyte and Leu-3 (helper/inducer) T-lymphocyte counts. Therefore, reduction in circulating levels of helper/inducer T cells does not appear to influence preexisting levels of IgE antibodies.

  16. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation on IgE antibody responses in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terr, A.I.; Moss, R.B.; Strober, S.

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen patients with rheumatoid arthritis and four patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and nephritis were treated with total lymphoid irradiation because of severe disease refractory to other forms of treatment. Serum samples before and after irradiation were tested for changes in total serum IgE and for changes in specific IgE antibodies to ryegrass pollen, dust mite, cat dander, and Alternaria. There were no statistically significant changes in total or specific IgE from lymphoid irradiation in these patients. The therapy caused a significant decrease in circulating total lymphocyte and Leu-3 (helper/inducer) T-lymphocyte counts. Therefore, reduction in circulating levels of helper/inducer T cells does not appear to influence preexisting levels of IgE antibodies

  17. Passive therapy with humanized anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B antibodies attenuates systemic inflammatory response and protects from lethal pneumonia caused by staphylococcal enterotoxin B-producing Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Karau, Melissa J; Tilahun, Mulualem E; Krogman, Ashton; Osborne, Barbara A; Goldsby, Richard A; David, Chella S; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2017-10-03

    Drugs such as linezolid that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis may be beneficial in treating infections caused by toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus. As protein synthesis inhibitors have no effect on preformed toxins, neutralization of pathogenic exotoxins with anti-toxin antibodies may be beneficial in conjunction with antibacterial therapy. Herein, we evaluated the efficacy of human-mouse chimeric high-affinity neutralizing anti-staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) antibodies in the treatment of experimental pneumonia caused by SEB-producing S. aureus. Since HLA class II transgenic mice mount a stronger systemic immune response following challenge with SEB and are more susceptible to SEB-induced lethal toxic shock than conventional mice strains, HLA-DR3 transgenic mice were used. Lethal pneumonia caused by SEB-producing S. aureus in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice was characterized by robust T cell activation and elevated systemic levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Prophylactic administration of a single dose of linezolid 30 min prior to the onset of infection attenuated the systemic inflammatory response and protected from mortality whereas linezolid administered 60 min after the onset of infection failed to confer significant protection. Human-mouse chimeric high-affinity neutralizing anti-SEB antibodies alone, but not polyclonal human IgG, mitigated this response and protected from death when administered immediately after initiation of infection. Further, anti-SEB antibodies as well as intact polyclonal human IgG, but not its Fab or Fc fragments, protected from lethal pneumonia when followed with linezolid therapy 60 min later. In conclusion, neutralization of superantigens with high-affinity antibodies may have beneficial effects in pneumonia.

  18. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

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    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  19. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance.

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    Emily Xie

    Full Text Available The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  20. Oral Delivery of a Novel Recombinant Streptococcus mitis Vector Elicits Robust Vaccine Antigen-Specific Oral Mucosal and Systemic Antibody Responses and T Cell Tolerance

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    Xie, Emily; Kotha, Abhiroop; Biaco, Tracy; Sedani, Nikita; Zou, Jonathan; Stashenko, Phillip; Duncan, Margaret J.; Campos-Neto, Antonio; Cayabyab, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    The pioneer human oral commensal bacterium Streptococcus mitis has unique biologic features that make it an attractive mucosal vaccine or therapeutic delivery vector. S. mitis is safe as a natural persistent colonizer of the mouth, throat and nasopharynx and the oral commensal bacterium is capable of inducing mucosal antibody responses. A recombinant S. mitis (rS. mitis) that stably expresses HIV envelope protein was generated and tested in the germ-free mouse model to evaluate the potential usefulness of this vector as a mucosal vaccine against HIV. Oral vaccination led to the efficient and persistent bacterial colonization of the mouth and the induction of both salivary and systemic antibody responses. Interestingly, persistently colonized animals developed antigen-specific systemic T cell tolerance. Based on these findings we propose the use of rS. mitis vaccine vector for the induction of mucosal antibodies that will prevent the penetration of the mucosa by pathogens such as HIV. Moreover, the first demonstration of rS. mitis having the ability to elicit T cell tolerance suggest the potential use of rS. mitis as an immunotherapeutic vector to treat inflammatory, allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26618634

  1. Severe antiphospholipid antibody syndrome - response to plasmapheresis and rituximab.

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    Gkogkolou, Paraskevi; Ehrchen, Jan; Goerge, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent abortions and detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. In fulminant cases, involvement of multiple organs can lead to significant morbidity and even fatal outcomes, so that a rapid, interdisciplinary treatment is needed. Here, we describe the case of a 39-year-old woman with a severe hard-to-treat APS with arterial occlusion and progressive skin necrosis, who was successfully treated with a combination therapy with plasmapheresis and rituximab. The treatment led to complete remission of the skin lesions for over a year. Clinical response correlated with a long-lasting reduction of antiphospholipid antibodies and B-cell depletion. This case demonstrates the use of antiphospholipid antibodies for monitoring APS-activity and shows that this severe vascular disease requires rigorous therapeutic approaches.

  2. Enhancement of anamnestic immunospecific antibody response in orally immunized chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayo, Susan; Carlsson, Hans-Erik; Zagon, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Production of immunospecific egg yolk antibodies (IgY antibodies) in egg laying hens through oral immunization is an attractive alternative to conventional antibody production in mammals for economic reasons as well as for animal welfare reasons. Oral immunization results in a systemic humoral...... response, but oral booster immunizations lack efficiency. The aim of the present study was to develop immunization schemes in which the concentration of immunospecific IgY would increase following oral booster immunizations. Two groups of egg laying hens (5 in each group) were immunized orally (each...... and one oral dose with BSA+RV. The eggs of the chickens in this group had a significantly higher immunospecific anti BSA IgY-concentration than did any of the eggs from the orally immunized chickens. One of the immunization regimes (immunizations in weeks 1, 7 and 18) clearly included a booster effect...

  3. Antibody B cell responses in HIV-1 infection.

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    Mouquet, Hugo

    2014-11-01

    In rare cases, B cells can supply HIV-1-infected individuals with unconventional antibodies equipped to neutralize the wide diversity of viral variants. Innovations in single-cell cloning, high-throughput sequencing, and structural biology methods have enabled the capture and thorough characterization of these exceptionally potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Here, I review the recent findings in humoral responses to HIV-1, focusing on the interplay between naturally occurring bNAbs and the virus both at systemic and mucosal levels. In this context, I discuss how an improved understanding of bNAb generation may provide invaluable insight into the fundamental mechanisms governing adaptive B cell responses to viruses, and how this knowledge is currently contributing to the development of vaccine and therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten A Nielsen

    Full Text Available The disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf involves different clinical manifestations that, cumulatively, kill hundreds of thousands every year. Placental malaria (PM is one such manifestation in which Pf infected erythrocytes (IE bind to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA through expression of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally constrained receptor-binding domains may, theoretically, circumvent polymorphisms, reduce the risk of escape-mutants and induce cross-reactive antibodies. However, the sub-unit composition and small differences in the borders, may lead to exposure of novel immuno-dominant antibody epitopes that lead to non-functional antibodies, and furthermore influence the folding, stability and yield of expression. Candidate antigens from the pre-clinical development expressed in High-Five insect cells using the baculovirus expression vector system were transitioned into the Drosophila Schneider-2 cell (S2 expression-system compliant with clinical development. The functional capacity of antibodies against antigens expressed in High-Five cells or in S2 cells was equivalent. This enabled an extensive down-selection of S2 insect cell-expressed antigens primarily encompassing the minimal CSA-binding region of VAR2CSA. In general, we found differential potency of inhibitory antibodies against antigens with the same borders but of different var2csa sequences. Likewise, we found that subtle size differences in antigens of the same sequence gave varying levels of inhibitory antibodies. The study shows that induction of a functional response against recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens

  5. Vaccine-induced antibody responses in relation to season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termorshuizen F; Sleijffers A; Hof S van den; Melker H de; Garssen J; Boland GJ; Hattum J van; Gruijl FR de; Loveren H van; LPI

    2001-01-01

    The effect of season on the antibody response after Hepatitis B (HB), Measles and Rubella vaccination in humans was investigated. In view of the immunosuppressive effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), especially the B-waveband (UVB), it was hypothesised that a lower antibody response after

  6. Motavizumab, A Neutralizing Anti-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv Monoclonal Antibody Significantly Modifies The Local And Systemic Cytokine Responses Induced By Rsv In The Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafri Hasan S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motavizumab (MEDI-524 is a monoclonal antibody with enhanced neutralizing activity against RSV. In mice, motavizumab suppressed RSV replication which resulted in significant reduction of clinical parameters of disease severity. We evaluated the effect of motavizumab on the local and systemic immune response induced by RSV in the mouse model. Balb/c mice were intranasally inoculated with 106.5 PFU RSV A2 or medium. Motavizumab was given once intraperitoneally (1.25 mg/mouse as prophylaxis, 24 h before virus inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and serum samples were obtained at days 1, 5 (acute and 28 (long-term post inoculation and analyzed with a multiplex assay (Beadlyte Upstate, NY for simultaneous quantitation of 18 cytokines: IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, KC (similar to human IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, TNF-α, MCP-1, RANTES, IFN-γ and GM-CSF. Overall, cytokine concentrations were lower in serum than in BAL samples. By day 28, only KC was detected in BAL specimens at low concentrations in all groups. Administration of motavizumab significantly reduced (p

  7. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    Interactions between host and pathogen, as in the case of fish pathogenic viruses, represent interesting models for analyses of the relationships between structure and function of the teleost immune system. Two salmonid rhabdoviruses, IHNV and VHSV, have received special attention due......, have demonstrated that rainbow trout can produce specific and highly functional antibodies that are able to neutralise virus pathogenicity in vitro as well as in vivo. The apparently more restricted antibody response to IHNV and VHSV antigens in fish compared to mammals could possibly be explained...... by different kinds of epitopes being differently immunogenic in fish and in mammals. Also, it may be assumed that the requirements for the assay-antigens in terms of antigenicity, may differ for mammals and fish. The present text includes an initial presentation of the pathogens, followed by basic and applied...

  8. Sustained systemic delivery of monoclonal antibodies by genetically modified skin fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noël, D; Pelegrin, M; Brockly, F

    2000-01-01

    In vivo production and systemic delivery of therapeutic antibodies by engineered cells might advantageously replace injection of purified antibodies for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases, including cancer, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and autoimmune diseases. We report here...... that skin fibroblasts retrovirally transduced to express immunoglobulin genes can be used for sustained long-term systemic delivery of cloned antibodies in immunocompetent mice. Importantly, no anti- idiotypic response against the ectopically expressed model antibody used in this study was observed...

  9. Cocoa Diet and Antibody Immune Response in Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Camps-Bossacoma

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of cocoa to interact with the immune system in vitro and in vivo has been described. In the latter context, a cocoa-enriched diet in healthy rats was able to modify the immune system’s functionality. This fact could be observed in the composition and functionality of lymphoid tissues, such as the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. Consequently, immune effector mechanisms, such as antibody synthesis, were modified. A cocoa-enriched diet in young rats was able to attenuate the serum levels of immunoglobulin (Ig G, IgM, and IgA and also the intestinal IgM and IgA secretion. Moreover, in immunized rats, the intake of cocoa decreased specific IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2c, and IgM concentrations in serum. This immune-regulator potential was then tested in disease models in which antibodies play a pathogenic role. A cocoa-enriched diet was able to partially prevent the synthesis of autoantibodies in a model of autoimmune arthritis in rats and was also able to protect against IgE and T helper 2-related antibody synthesis in two rat models of allergy. Likewise, a cocoa-enriched diet prevented an oral sensitization process in young rats. In this review, we will focus on the influence of cocoa on the acquired branch of the immune function. Therefore, we will focus on how a cocoa diet influences lymphocyte function both in the systemic and intestinal immune system. Likewise, its potential role in preventing some antibody-induced immune diseases is also included. Although further studies must characterize the particular cocoa components responsible for such effects and nutritional studies in humans need to be carried out, cocoa has potential as a nutraceutical agent in some hypersensitivity status.

  10. The Human Antibody Response to Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravinda M. de Silva

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENV are the causative agents of dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. Here we review the current state of knowledge about the human antibody response to dengue and identify important knowledge gaps. A large body of work has demonstrated that antibodies can neutralize or enhance DENV infection. Investigators have mainly used mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs to study interactions between DENV and antibodies. These studies indicate that antibody neutralization of DENVs is a “multi-hit” phenomenon that requires the binding of multiple antibodies to neutralize a virion. The most potently neutralizing mouse MAbs bind to surface exposed epitopes on domain III of the dengue envelope (E protein. One challenge facing the dengue field now is to extend these studies with mouse MAbs to better understand the human antibody response. The human antibody response is complex as it involves a polyclonal response to primary and secondary infections with 4 different DENV serotypes. Here we review studies conducted with immune sera and MAbs isolated from people exposed to dengue infections. Most dengue-specific antibodies in human immune sera are weakly neutralizing and bind to multiple DENV serotypes. The human antibodies that potently and type specifically neutralize DENV represent a small fraction of the total DENV-specific antibody response. Moreover, these neutralizing antibodies appear to bind to novel epitopes including complex, quaternary epitopes that are only preserved on the intact virion. These studies establish that human and mouse antibodies recognize distinct epitopes on the dengue virion. The leading theory proposed to explain the increased risk of severe disease in secondary cases is antibody dependent enhancement (ADE, which postulates that weakly neutralizing antibodies from the first infection bind to the second serotype and enhance infection of FcγR bearing myeloid cells such as monocytes and macrophages. Here

  11. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Suppression of the immune response to ovalbumin in vivo by anti-idiotypic antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinevich, A.S.; Pinegin, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    Conditions of suppression of the immune response to a food allergin (ovalbumin) were studied with the aid of anti-idiotypic (AID) antibodies. Hen ovalbumin was used and the experiments were performed on mice. Antibodies were isolated from the resulting protein fractions and tested for inhibitor activity by the method of direct radioimmunologic analysis. The test system consisted of the reaction of binding the globulin fraction to the total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin from mice and a 125 I-labeled total preparation of antibodies to ovalbumin of the same animals

  13. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  14. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibody response after influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Song; Sasaki, Sanae; Narvaez, Carlos F; Zhang, Caiqiu; Liu, Hui; Woo, Jennifer C; Kemble, George W; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Greenberg, Harry B

    2011-02-28

    Conventional measurement of antibody responses to vaccines largely relies on serum antibodies, which are primarily produced by bone marrow plasma cells and may not represent the entire vaccine-induced B cell repertoire, including important functional components such as those targeted to mucosal sites. After immunization or infection, activated B cells differentiate into plasmablasts in local lymphoid organs, then traffic through circulation to the target sites where they further develop into plasma cells. On day 7 after influenza vaccination, a burst of plasmablasts, highly enriched for vaccine-specific antibody secreting cells, appears in the peripheral blood. This provides a unique window to the overall B cell response to the vaccine, without interference of pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibody. In this study we isolated B cells from volunteers on day 7 after immunization with the inactivated influenza vaccine and cultured them ex vivo to collect plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAb). The PPAb contained secreted IgG and IgA, which was approximately 0.2ng per antibody secreting cell. Influenza-specific IgG and IgA binding activity was detected in PPAb at dilutions up to 10(5) by ELISA. The ratio of the titers of influenza-specific IgA to IgG by ELISA was 4-fold higher in PPAb than in day 28 post-vaccination sera, suggesting that vaccine-induced IgA is enriched in PPAb compared to sera. Functional activity was also detected in PPAb as determined by microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays. In addition to bulk B cell cultures, we also cultured plasmablast subsets sorted by cell surface markers to generate PPAb. These results suggest that PPAb better reflects the mucosal IgA response than serum samples. Since PPAb are exclusively produced by recently activated B cells, it allows assessing vaccine-induced antibody response without interference from pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibodies and permits an assessment of antibody

  15. The Bordetella pertussis Type III Secretion System Tip Complex Protein Bsp22 Is Not a Protective Antigen and Fails To Elicit Serum Antibody Responses during Infection of Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarino Romero, Rodrigo; Bibova, Ilona; Cerny, Ondrej; Vecerek, Branislav; Wald, Tomas; Benada, Oldrich; Zavadilova, Jana; Sebo, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of pathogenic bordetellae employs a self-associating tip complex protein Bsp22. This protein is immunogenic during infections by Bordetella bronchiseptica and could be used as a protective antigen to immunize mice against B. bronchiseptica challenge. Since low-passage clinical isolates of the human pathogen Bordetella pertussis produce a highly homologous Bsp22 protein (97% homology), we examined its vaccine and diagnostic potential. No Bsp22-specific antibodies were, however, detected in serum samples from 36 patients with clinically and serologically confirmed whooping cough disease (pertussis syndrome). Moreover, although the induction of Bsp22 secretion by the laboratory-adapted 18323 strain in the course of mice lung infection was observed, the B. pertussis 18323-infected mice did not mount any detectable serum antibody response against Bsp22. Furthermore, immunization with recombinant Bsp22 protein yielded induction of high Bsp22-specific serum antibody titers but did not protect mice against an intranasal challenge with B. pertussis 18323. Unlike for B. bronchiseptica, hence, the Bsp22 protein is nonimmunogenic, and/or the serum antibody response to it is suppressed, during B. pertussis infections of humans and mice. PMID:23690400

  16. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  17. New vaccine strategies against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: II: Enhanced systemic and secreted antibody responses against the CFA/I fimbriae by priming with DNA and boosting with a live recombinant Salmonella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Lásaro

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The induction of systemic (IgG and mucosal (IgA antibody responses against the colonization factor I antigen (CFA/I of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC was evaluated in mice primed with an intramuscularly delivered CFA/I-encoding DNA vaccine followed by two oral immunizations with a live recombinant Salmonella typhimurium vaccine strain expressing the ETEC antigen. The booster effect induced by the oral immunization was detected two weeks and one year after the administration of the DNA vaccine. The DNA-primed/Salmonella-boosted vaccination regime showed a synergistic effect on the induced CFA/I-specific systemic and secreted antibody levels which could not be attained by either immunization strategy alone. These results suggest that the combined use of DNA vaccines and recombinant Salmonella vaccine strains can be a useful immunization strategy against enteric pathogens.

  18. Contrasting antibody responses to intrasubtype superinfection with CRF02_AG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen R Courtney

    Full Text Available HIV superinfection describes the sequential infection of an individual with two or more unrelated HIV strains. Intersubtype superinfection has been shown to cause a broader and more potent heterologous neutralizing antibody response when compared to singly infected controls, yet the effects of intrasubtype superinfection remain controversial. Longitudinal samples were analyzed phylogenetically for pol and env regions using Next-Generation Sequencing and envelope cloning. The impact of CRF02_AG intrasubtype superinfection was assessed for heterologous neutralization and antibody binding responses. We compared two cases of CRF02_AG intrasubtype superinfection that revealed complete replacement of the initial virus by superinfecting CRF02_AG variants with signs of recombination. NYU6564, who became superinfected at an early time point, exhibited greater changes in antibody binding profiles and generated a more potent neutralizing antibody response post-superinfection compared to NYU6501. In contrast, superinfection occurred at a later time point in NYU6501 with strains harboring significantly longer V1V2 regions with no observable changes in neutralization patterns. Here we show that CRF02_AG intrasubtype superinfection can induce a cross-subtype neutralizing antibody response, and our data suggest timing and/or superinfecting viral envelope characteristics as contributing factors. These results highlight differential outcomes in intrasubtype superinfection and provide the first insight into cases with CRF02_AG, the fourth most prevalent HIV-1 strain worldwide.

  19. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  20. Boosting antibody responses by targeting antigens to dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminschi, Irina; Shortman, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Delivering antigens directly to dendritic cells (DCs) in situ, by injecting antigens coupled to antibodies specific for DC surface molecules, is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. Enhanced cytotoxic T cell responses are obtained if an adjuvant is co-administered to activate the DC. Such DC targeting is also effective at enhancing humoral immunity, via the generation of T follicular helper cells. Depending on the DC surface molecule targeted, antibody production can be enhanced even in the absence of adjuvants. In the case of Clec9A as the DC surface target, enhanced antibody production is a consequence of the DC-restricted expression of the target molecule. Few other cells absorb the antigen-antibody construct, therefore, it persists in the bloodstream, allowing sustained antigen presentation, even by non-activated DCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Phase I clinical and pharmacological study of suppression of human antimouse antibody response to monoclonal antibody L6 by deoxyspergualin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, K; Fritsche, H; Murray, J L; LoBuglio, A F; Khazaeli, M B; Kelley, S; Tepper, M A; Grasela, D; Buzdar, A; Valero, V

    1995-07-15

    Development of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) is a major limiting factor in the application of murine mAb for clinical use. A novel immunomodulatory drug, deoxyspergualin (DSG), has shown potential to suppress antimouse antibody response in preclinical model systems. We conducted a Phase I trial to determine the effect of DSG on HAMA response to murine mAb L6 administered to patients with advanced cancers (in previous trials, this antibody elicited HAMA in two-thirds of the treated patients). L6 mAb was administered at a fixed dose of 200 mg/m2 on days 1-5. DSG was administered at doses of 50 mg/m2 [dose level (dl) 1] or 150 mg/m2 (dls II and III) on days 1-7. Treatment courses were repeated every 6 weeks (dls I and II) or every 3 weeks (dl III). HAMAs were quantitated by a commercially available ELISA assay (ImmuSTRIP; anti-isotypic antibodies) and a radiometric assay (antiisotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies). Pharmacokinetics of L6 and DSG was also studied in all consenting patients. Among 24 evaluable patients, 2 patients developed detectable HAMAs using the ELISA (one each at dls I and II) after a median follow-up of 122 days (P = 0.0001 as compared to historical controls). Even in the two patients who developed HAMA, the HAMA levels were quite low (160 and 181 ng/ml; historical experience, 70-38,744 ng/ml). The radiometric assay detected anti-L6 antibodies in 13 patients (4, 6, and 3 at dls I-III, respectively) after a median of 82 days. The median highest anti-L6 antibody level was 129 ng/ml (range, 21-2150). The highest anti-L6 antibody level at dl III was only 44 ng/ml. The results suggest suppression of anti-idiotypic response also. No clinical antitumor activity was observed, and no significant changes in T4/T8 subsets or immunoglobulins occurred (suggesting a lack of generalized immunosuppression). We conclude that DSG can suppress HAMA response to L6. A starting dose of 150 mg/m2/day is recommended for Phase II trials to confirm this observation.

  2. Systemic antibody responses induced by a two-component Clostridium difficile toxoid vaccine protect against C. difficile-associated disease in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Natalie G; Brown, Anna M; Li, Lu; Liu, Nana; Cole, Leah E; Zhang, Jinrong; Mehta, Hersh; Kleanthous, Harry

    2013-09-01

    measurements of pre-challenge sera showed that the median anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B IgG titres in the group of surviving animals were significantly higher than the median values in the group of animals that did not survive challenge. Assessment of the neutralizing activity of these sera revealed a statistically significant difference between the levels of both toxin A and toxin B neutralizing titres in protected versus unprotected animals as the median anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B neutralizing titres from surviving animals were higher than the median values from animals that succumbed to challenge. Statistically significant correlations between the toxin-specific binding titres and toxin neutralizing titres were seen for both toxin A and toxin B responses. The role of circulating anti-toxin antibodies in immunity against disease was evaluated by passive transfer of immune sera against C. difficile toxoids to naïve hamsters. Passively immunized animals were protected against morbidity and mortality associated with C. difficile challenge. Taken together, these results indicate the ability of i.m. immunization with inactivated toxins A and B to induce robust dose-dependent anti-toxin A and anti-toxin B IgG responses, the principal role of circulating anti-toxin antibody in immunity against disease and that antibody toxin binding and neutralization titres can serve as correlates of protection in the hamster challenge model of C. difficile.

  3. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VNcontrols (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk enriched in BRV-specific IgY represents a promising strategy to prevent BRV diarrhea. Moreover a strong active ASC immune response is induced in the

  4. Smoking and periodontal disease: discrimination of antibody responses to pathogenic and commensal oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, L; Steffen, M J; Stevens, J; Badger, E; Tempro, P; Fuller, B; McGuire, A; Al-Sabbagh, Mohanad; Thomas, M V; Ebersole, J L

    2011-04-01

    Smoking is an independent risk factor for the initiation, extent and severity of periodontal disease. This study examined the ability of the host immune system to discriminate commensal oral bacteria from pathogens at mucosal surfaces, i.e. oral cavity. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody reactive with three pathogenic and five commensal oral bacteria in 301 current smokers (age range 21-66 years) were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Clinical features of periodontal health were used as measures of periodontitis. Antibody to the pathogens and salivary cotinine levels were related positively to disease severity; however, the antibody levels were best described by the clinical disease unrelated to the amount of smoking. The data showed a greater immune response to pathogens than commensals that was related specifically to disease extent, and most noted in black males. Significant correlations in individual patient responses to the pathogens and commensals were lost with an increasing extent of periodontitis and serum antibody to the pathogens. Antibody to Porphyromonas gingivalis was particularly distinct with respect to the discriminatory nature of the immune responses in recognizing the pathogens. Antibody responses to selected pathogenic and commensal oral microorganisms differed among racial groups and genders. The antibody response to the pathogens was related to disease severity. The level of antibody to the pathogens, and in particular P. gingivalis, was correlated with disease severity in black and male subsets of patients. The amount of smoking did not appear to impact directly serum antibody levels to these oral bacteria. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Ranitidine improves postoperative suppression of antibody response to preoperative vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1992-01-01

    The effect of the histamine-2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (100 mg intravenously every 12 hours for 72 hours) on postoperative serum antibody responses to preoperative immunization with six limit of flocculation tetanus toxoid and six limit of flocculation diphtheria toxoid was assessed...... and antidiphtheria toxoid were drawn before skin incision and on postoperative days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 28. Ranitidine significantly increased the postoperative antibody response to tetanus toxoid, (p less than 0.01) and insignificantly increased that to diphtheria toxoid vaccination (p less than 0...

  6. Human antibody and antigen response to IncA antibody of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, P Y; Hsu, M C; Huang, C T; Li, S Y

    2007-01-01

    The high prevalence of C. trachomatis worldwide has underscored the importance of identifying specific immunogenic antigens in facilitating diagnosis as well as vaccine development. The aim of this study is to evaluate IncA antibody and antigen production in natural human infections. Our temporal expression study showed that IncA transcription and protein expression could be detected as early as 4 hours after the start of infection. Antibody responses could be detected in urine and genital swab samples from C. trachomatis-positive patients. It is especially interesting to note that the IncA antigen could be detected in urine. In conclusion, we have identified IncA as an important antigen in human. The potential applicability of the IncA antibody or antigen in the diagnosis as well as to vaccine development for C. trachomatis is also discussed.

  7. Maternal and infant antibody response to meningococcal vaccination in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade Carvalho, A; Giampaglia, C M; Kimura, H; de Pereira, O A; Farhat, C K; Neves, J C; Prandini, R; da Silva Carvalho, E; Zarvos, A M

    1977-10-15

    The antigenic capacity of a mixed vaccine prepared with polysaccharides of meningococcus groups A and C, the placental transfer of antibodies, and the persistence of positive titres in the infant were evaluated in 21 pregnant women and their offspring during an epidemic of meningitis in São Paulo, Brazil; and antibody response was assessed in 29 infants vaccinated at less than 6 months of age. Antibodies were detected by passive haemagglutination; the high titres found and the high frequency of positive results are thought to be due to the use of a more sensitive technique. Increased antibody titres were found in most women, and there was evidence for passive transfer to the newborn, especially with regard to antibody type C. However, passive transfer was irregular, and the presence of antibodies in the mother did not guarantee their presence in the child. Passive transfer lasted for only 2-5 months. Vaccination in children under 6 months of age had poor results; only 1 child seroconverted.

  8. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  9. Evaluation of antibody response in mice against avian influenza A

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 39; Issue 3. Evaluation of antibody response in mice against avian influenza A (H5N1) strain neuraminidase expressed in yeast Pichia pastoris. Murugan Subathra Ponsekaran Santhakumar Mangamoori Lakshmi Narasu Syed Sultan Beevi Sunil K Lal. Articles Volume 39 ...

  10. Antibody response to routine measles vaccination among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Despite a global decline in mortality and morbidity from measles in the last decade, outbreaks continue to occur in some parts of the world including Nigeria. Objective: To determine antibody response to routine measles vaccination in Nigerian children and evaluate vaccine potency. Methods: A prospective ...

  11. Antibody response to routine measles vaccination among a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2013-02-08

    Feb 8, 2013 ... Abstract Background: Despite a global decline in mortality and morbidity from measles in the last decade, outbreaks continue to occur in some parts of the world including Nigeria. Objective: To determine antibody response to routine measles vacci- nation in Nigerian children and evaluate vaccine potency.

  12. Maternal antibodies: clinical significance, mechanism of interference with immune responses, and possible vaccination strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eNiewiesk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonates have an immature immune system which cannot adequately protect against infectious diseases. Early in life, immune protection is accomplished by maternal antibodies transferred from mother to offspring. However, decaying maternal antibodies inhibit vaccination as is examplified by the inhibition of seroconversion after measles vaccination. This phenomenon has been described in both human and veterinary medicine and is independent of the type of vaccine being used. This review will discuss the use of animal models for vaccine research. I will review clinical solutions for inhibition of vaccination by maternal antibodies, and the testing and development of potentially effective vaccines. These are based on new mechanistic insight about the inhibitory mechanism of maternal antibodies. Maternal antibodies inhibit the generation of antibodies whereas the T cell response is usually unaffected. B cell inhibition is mediated through a cross-link between B-cell receptor (BCR with the Fcg receptor IIB (FcgRIIB by a vaccine-antibody complex. In animal experiments, this inhibition can be partially overcome by injection of a vaccine-specific monoclonal IgM antibody. IgM stimulates the B-cell directly through cross-linking the BCR via complement protein C3d and antigen to the complement receptor 2 (CR2 signaling complex. In addition, it was shown that interferon alpha binds to the CD21 chain of CR2 as well as the interferon receptor and that this dual receptor usage drives B cell responses in the presence of maternal antibodies. In lieu of immunizing the infant the concept of maternal immunization as a strategy to protect neonates has been proposed. This approach would still not solve the question of how to immunize in the presence of maternal antibodies but would defer the time of infection to an age where infection might not have such a detrimental outcome as in neonates. I will review successful examples and potential challenges of implementing

  13. Duration of antibody response following vaccination against feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Mark E; Malik, Richard; Hall, Evelyn; Harris, Matthew; Hosie, Margaret J; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2017-10-01

    Objectives Recently, two point-of-care (PoC) feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody test kits (Witness and Anigen Rapid) were reported as being able to differentiate FIV-vaccinated from FIV-infected cats at a single time point, irrespective of the gap between testing and last vaccination (0-7 years). The aim of the current study was to investigate systematically anti-FIV antibody production over time in response to the recommended primary FIV vaccination series. Methods First, residual plasma from the original study was tested using a laboratory-based ELISA to determine whether negative results with PoC testing were due to reduced as opposed to absent antibodies to gp40. Second, a prospective study was performed using immunologically naive client-owned kittens and cats given a primary FIV vaccination series using a commercially available inactivated whole cell/inactivated whole virus vaccine (Fel-O-Vax FIV, three subcutaneous injections at 4 week intervals) and tested systematically (up to 11 times) over 6 months, using four commercially available PoC FIV antibody kits (SNAP FIV/FeLV Combo [detects antibodies to p15/p24], Witness FeLV/FIV [gp40], Anigen Rapid FIV/FeLV [p24/gp40] and VetScan FeLV/FIV Rapid [p24]). Results The laboratory-based ELISA showed cats from the original study vaccinated within the previous 0-15 months had detectable levels of antibodies to gp40, despite testing negative with two kits that use gp40 as a capture antigen (Witness and Anigen Rapid kits). The prospective study showed that antibody testing with SNAP Combo and VetScan Rapid was positive in all cats 2 weeks after the second primary FIV vaccination, and remained positive for the duration of the study (12/12 and 10/12 cats positive, respectively). Antibody testing with Witness and Anigen Rapid was also positive in a high proportion of cats 2 weeks after the second primary FIV vaccination (8/12 and 7/12, respectively), but antibody levels declined below the level of detection in

  14. Cyclosporin A is an adjuvant in murine IgE antibody responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.S.; Stanescu, G.; Magalski, A.E.; Qian, Y.Y.

    1989-06-15

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an undecapeptide fungal metabolite and is generally regarded as a new generation of immunosuppressive drugs. We uncovered a novel immunomodulatory property of CsA as a potent immunologic stimulator in the murine IgE antibody system. The enhancement of IgE responses was observed in mice receiving as few as three daily i.m. injections before Ag priming. Our studies demonstrate the three points listed below. First, CsA potentiates murine IgE responses regardless of Ag specificities in inbred mice. A hierarchy of immunopotentiation by CsA follows the order of low, intermediate, and high IgE responder mice. Second, CsA, when administered along with Ag, exerts a thorough and long lasting impact on the Ag-specific IgE antibody response, and leads to an Ag-specific breakthrough of IgE antibody synthesis in mice rendered tolerant in the IgE antibody system by soluble Ag pretreatment or neonatal IgE treatment. Third, IgE enhancer cells become sensitive to a low dose of irradiation. Two enhancer cellular components are identified, those of the Th cells and B cells, which appear to favor the induction of IgE responses. Understanding the cellular basis of the immunopotentiating effect of CsA will provide further insight into the murine IgE antibody system.

  15. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  16. Antibody response to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection in vaccinated pigs with or without maternal antibodies induced by sow vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, P; Terreni, M; Guazzetti, S; Cavirani, S

    2006-06-01

    Vaccination with bacterins is an important tool for the control of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae infection of pigs. Because such vaccination often involves piglets that have suckled M. hyopneumoniae antibody-positive dams it is important to understand the effect of pre-existing (passively acquired) antibody on vaccine-induced immunity. To investigate this issue experimentally, 20 sows that were seronegative for M. hyopneumoniae were selected from a M. hyopneumoniae-infected herd and then randomly allocated to one of four treatment groups (five sows/group): Group A, vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group B, vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets; Group C, non-vaccinated sows/vaccinated piglets; Group D, non-vaccinated sows/non-vaccinated piglets. Sows (Groups A and B) were vaccinated 14 days before farrowing and seroconverted within the next 14 days. Conversely, none of the non-vaccinated sows was seropositive at farrowing. Piglets (Groups A and C) were vaccinated when they were 7 days of age. Regardless of treatments none of the piglets had any evidence of an active immune response until many of those of Groups A and C and a few of those of Groups B and D seroconverted after it had been shown that at least some pigs of all groups had been naturally infected with a field strain of M. hyopneumoniae. This pattern of immune responsiveness (i.e. the collective results of Groups A, B, C and D) suggested that vaccination of pigs had primed their immune system for subsequent exposure to M. hyopneumoniae, and that passively acquired antibody had little or no effect on either a vaccine-induced priming or a subsequent anamnestic response. According to the statistical analysis sow serological status did not interfere with the antibody response in early vaccinated piglets. In conclusion, the results pointed out that early vaccination of piglets may assist M. hyopneumoniae control independently from the serological status of sows.

  17. Opposite effects of total lymphoid irradiation on T cell-dependent and T cell-independent antibody responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1984-02-01

    The effect of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on the primary antibody response to the dinitrophenylated heterologous protein, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH), in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and to the trinitrophenylated polysaccharide antigen, Brucella abortus (TNP-BA), was studied in BALB/c mice. The antibody response to both antigens was diminished in comparison with nonirradiated mice when antigens were injected within 3 days after TLI. When the mice were immunized 30 days after completion of TLI the antibody response to DNP-KLH in CFA was still diminished, but the antibody response to TNP-BA was enhanced 5- to 10-fold as compared with that of control animals. The opposite effect of TLI on the two antibody responses was also observed in a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system.

  18. An unexpected antibody response to an engineered influenza virus modifies CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul G; Brown, Scott A; Yue, Wen; So, Jenny; Webby, Richard J; Doherty, Peter C

    2006-02-21

    The ovalbumin(323-339) peptide that binds H2I-A(b) was engineered into the globular heads of hemagglutinin (H) molecules from serologically non-cross-reactive H1N1 and H3N2 influenza A viruses, the aim being to analyze recall CD4+ T cell responses in a virus-induced respiratory disease. Prime/challenge experiments with these H1ova and H3ova viruses in H2(b) mice gave the predicted, ovalbumin-specific CD4+ T cell response but showed an unexpectedly enhanced, early expansion of viral epitope-specific CD8+ T cells in spleen and a greatly diminished inflammatory process in the virus-infected respiratory tract. At the same time, the primary antibody response to the H3N2 challenge virus was significantly reduced, an effect that has been associated with preexisting neutralizing antibody in other experimental systems. Analysis of serum from the H1ova-primed mice showed low-level binding to H3ova but not to the wild-type H3N2 virus. Experiments with CD4+ T cell-depleted and Ig-/- mice indicated that this cross-reactive Ig is indeed responsible for the modified pathogenesis after respiratory challenge. Furthermore, the effect does not seem to be virus-dose related, although it does require infection. These findings suggest intriguing possibilities for vaccination and, at the same time, emphasize that engineered modifications in viruses may have unintended immunological consequences.

  19. Activated human nasal epithelial cells modulate specific antibody response against bacterial or viral antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiou-Yueh Yeh

    Full Text Available Nasal mucosa is an immune responsive organ evidenced by eliciting both specific local secretory IgA and systemic IgG antibody responses with intra-nasal administration of antigens. Nevertheless, the role of nasal epithelial cells in modulating such responses is unclear. Human nasal epithelial cells (hNECs obtained from sinus mucosa of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were cultured in vitro and firstly were stimulated by Lactococcus lactis bacterium-like particles (BLPs in order to examine their role on antibody production. Secondly, both antigens of immunodominant protein IDG60 from oral Streptococcus mutans and hemagglutinin (HA from influenza virus were tested to evaluate the specific antibody response. Stimulated hNECs by BLPs exhibited a significant increase in the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP. Conditioned medium of stimulated hNECs has effects on enhancing the proliferation of CD4+ T cells together with interferon-γ and IL-5 production, increasing the costimulatory molecules on dendritic cells and augmenting the production of IDG60 specific IgA, HA specific IgG, IgA by human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Such production of antigen specific IgG and IgA is significantly counteracted in the presence of IL-6 and TSLP neutralizing antibodies. In conclusion, properly stimulated hNECs may impart immuno-modulatory effects on the antigen-specific antibody response at least through the production of IL-6 and TSLP.

  20. The Complexity of Antibody Responses Elicited against the Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoproteins in Hospitalized Children Younger than 2 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonsina Trento

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the antibody responses to human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV glycoproteins in very young children has been a matter of controversy. Both, immaturity of the immune system at very early age and suppression of the host immune response by high level of maternal antibodies have been claimed to limit the host antibody response to virus infection and to jeopardize the use of hRSV vaccines under development in that age group. Hence, the antibody responses to the two major hRSV glycoproteins (F and G were evaluated in children younger than 2 years, hospitalized with laboratory confirmed hRSV bronchiolitis. A strong negative correlation was found between the titre of circulating ELISA antibodies directed against either prefusion or postfusion F in the acute phase, but not age, and their fold change at convalescence. These changes correlated also with the level of circulating neutralizing antibodies in sera. As reported in adults, most neutralizing antibodies in a subset of tested sera could not be depleted with postfusion F, suggesting that they were mostly directed against prefusion-specific epitopes. In contrast, a weak negative association was found for group-specific anti-G antibodies in the acute phase and their fold change at convalescence only after correcting for the antigenic group of the infecting virus. In addition, large discrepancies were observed in some individuals between the antibody responses specific for F and G glycoproteins. These results illustrate the complexity of the anti-hRSV antibody responses in children experiencing a primary severe infection and the influence of preexisting maternal antibodies on the host response, factors that should influence hRSV serological studies as well as vaccine development.

  1. Effect of maternal antibodies and pig age on the antibody response after vaccination against Glässers disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Rachubik, Jarosław; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2011-08-01

    The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the development and duration of postvaccinal antibody response against Glässer's disease were investigated. Pigs born to immune (MDA-positive) and non-immune (MDA-negative) sows were vaccinated with inactivated vaccine. Vaccination was done according to three different protocols: at 1 and 4, at 2 and 5 or at 4 and 7 weeks of age. There were also two control groups for MDA-negative and MDA-positive pigs. The level of Haemophilus parasuis (Hps) specific antibodies were determined using commercial ELISA test. No serological responses were seen in any of the groups after the first vaccination. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) against Hps were above the positive level until approximately 3 weeks of life in MDA-positive pigs. In those pigs the strongest postvaccinal humoral response was observed in piglets vaccinated at 4 and 7 weeks of age. In the remaining MDA-positive piglets only slight seroconversion was noted but levels of antibodies never exceeded values considered as positive. All MDA-negative pigs produced Hps-specific antibodies after the second vaccination. The results of the present study indicated that MDA may alter the development and duration of active postvaccinal antibody response. Age of pigs at the moment of vaccination was not associated with the significant differences in the magnitude of antibody response, however influenced the kinetics of decline of Hps-specific antibodies.

  2. The bright and the dark side of human antibody responses to flaviviruses: lessons for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A; Stiasny, Karin; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Dellarole, Mariano; Heinz, Franz X

    2018-02-01

    Zika and dengue viruses belong to the Flavivirus genus, a close group of antigenically related viruses that cause significant arthropod-transmitted diseases throughout the globe. Although infection by a given flavivirus is thought to confer lifelong protection, some of the patient's antibodies cross-react with other flaviviruses without cross-neutralizing. The original antigenic sin phenomenon may amplify such antibodies upon subsequent heterologous flavivirus infection, potentially aggravating disease by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The most striking example is provided by the four different dengue viruses, where infection by one serotype appears to predispose to more severe disease upon infection by a second one. A similar effect was postulated for sequential infections with Zika and dengue viruses. In this review, we analyze the molecular determinants of the dual antibody response to flavivirus infection or vaccination in humans. We highlight the role of conserved partially cryptic epitopes giving rise to cross-reacting and poorly neutralizing, ADE-prone antibodies. We end by proposing a strategy for developing an epitope-focused vaccine approach to avoid eliciting undesirable antibodies while focusing the immune system on producing protective antibodies only. © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  3. Human antibody responses to Schistosoma mansoni: does antigen directed, isotype restriction result in the production of blocking antibodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Dunne

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available After treatment young Kenyan schoolchildren are highly susceptible to reinfection with Schistosoma mansoni. Older children and adults are resistant to reinfection. There is no evidence that this age related resistance is due to a slow development of protective immunological mechanisms, rather, it appears that young children are susceptible because of the presence of blocking antibodies which decline with age, thus allowing the expression of protective responses. Correlations between antibody responses to different stages of the parasite life-cycle suggest that, in young children, antigen directed, isotype restriction of the response against cross-reactive polysaccharide egg antigens results in an ineffectual, or even blocking antibody response to the schistosomulum.

  4. Clonal analysis of a human antimouse antibody (HAMA) response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, S J; Turner, C; Heath, A; Feavers, I; Vatn, I; Natvig, J B; Thompson, K M

    2003-01-01

    Circulating human antimouse antibodies (HAMAs) directed to mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) are clinically significant, compromising mouse antibody therapy and imaging, and interfering in immunological assays. To investigate the HAMA response, 20 stable cell lines secreting human monoclonal antibodies reactive with mouse IgG were established from a donor with a history of exposure to mice. Their subclass and domain specificities were established by solid-phase binding, indirect haemagglutination assays and immunoblotting, using Igs of known subclass and Ig fragments. The heavy-chain variable region gene usage was determined for 12 HAMAs. Eight HAMAs were IgM, 11 HAMAs were IgG4 and one HAMA was IgG1, indicating an IgG4-dominated response. All of the IgG HAMAs reacted with epitopes present on the Fc portion; one was subclass-specific, nine were subclass-restricted and two were pan-IgG-reactive. Measurement of their affinities gave dissociation constants typically in the nanomolar range. Seven and five HAMAs were derived from variable heavy-chain 3 (VH3) and VH1 gene segments, respectively. The IgG HAMAs used different VH segments to the IgM HAMAs. JH regions were coded by JH4 in eight HAMAs. DH segment usage appeared to be restricted in the IgM HAMAs. Two IgG HAMAs were clonally related. These monoclonal HAMAs are potentially useful as reagents for detecting mouse IgG and as reference reagents for the investigation of the HAMA response in patients undergoing mouse monoclonal antibody therapy and for the investigation of the influence of HAMAs on immunodiagnostic tests.

  5. Mice with different susceptibility to tick-borne encephalitis virus infection show selective neutralizing antibody response and inflammatory reaction in the central nervous system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palus, Martin; Vojtíšková, Jarmila; Salát, Jiří; Kopecký, Jan; Grubhoffer, Libor; Lipoldová, Marie; Demant, P.; Růžek, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, JUN 2013 (2013), s. 77 E-ISSN 1742-2094 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0006/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : Tick-borne encephalitis * Flavivirus encephalitis * Neuroinflammation * Antibody production Subject RIV: EC - Immunology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 4.902, year: 2013

  6. The Influence of Sub-Unit Composition and Expression System on the Functional Antibody Response in the Development of a VAR2CSA Based Plasmodium falciparum Placental Malaria Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten A; dos Santos Marques Resende, Mafalda; de Jongh, Willem A

    2015-01-01

    of VAR2CSA, a parasite-derived antigen. Protection against PM is mediated by antibodies that inhibit binding of IE in the placental intervillous space. VAR2CSA is a large antigen incompatible with large scale recombinant protein expression. Vaccines based on sub-units encompassing the functionally...... recombinant subunits of the VAR2CSA antigen is unpredictable, demonstrating the need for large-scale screening in order to identify antigens that induce a broadly strain-transcending antibody response....

  7. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaval Kaur

    Full Text Available Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus.

  8. The antibody response against human and chimeric anti-TNF therapeutic antibodies primarily targets the TNF binding region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schie, K. A.; Hart, M. H.; de Groot, E. R.; Kruithof, S.; Aarden, L. A.; Wolbink, G. J.; Rispens, T.

    2015-01-01

    In a subset of patients, anti tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapeutic antibodies are immunogenic, resulting in the formation of antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Neutralising ADAs compete with TNF for its binding site and reduces the effective serum concentration, causing clinical non-response. It is

  9. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Alam, Jahangir; Afsar, Nure Alam; Huda, Nazmul; Kabir, Yearul; Qadri, Firdausi; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2016-04-02

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy. Infants received tetanus and pertussis vaccines at 6, 10 and 14 wk of age. TT and PT anti-IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes was measured at 15 wk. Plasma antibodies were measured at 6 wk (pre-vaccination), 15 wk and 1 y of age. Prior to vaccination, TT and PT antibody were detected in 94.6% and 15.2% of infants. At 15 wk anti-TT-IgG and anti-PT-IgG in plasma was increased by 7-9 fold over pre-vaccination levels, while at 1 y plasma anti-TT-IgG was decreased by approximately 5-fold from the peak and had returned to near the pre-vaccination level. At 1 y plasma anti-PT-IgG was decreased by 2-fold 1 yfrom the 15 wk level. However, 89.5% and 82.3% of infants at 1 y had protective levels of anti-TT and anti-PT IgG, respectively. Pre-vaccination plasma IgG levels were associated with lower vaccine-specific IgG secretion by infant lymphocytes at 15 wk (p < 0.10). This apparent inhibition was seen for anti-TT-IgG at both 15 wk (p < 0.05) and t 1 y (p < 0.10) of age. In summary, we report an apparent inhibitory effect of passively derived maternal antibody on an infants' own antibody response to the same vaccine. However, since the cut-off values for protective titers are low, infants had protective antibody levels throughout infancy.

  10. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Moroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumornecrosis-factor (TNF ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10, Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies.

  11. Long-Term Antibody and Immune Memory Response Induced by Pulmonary Delivery of the Influenza Iscomatrix Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Vujanic, Ana; Snibson, Kenneth J.; Wee, Janet L. K.; Edwards, Stirling J.; Pearse, Martin J.; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y.; Sutton, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary delivery of an influenza Iscomatrix adjuvant vaccine induces a strong systemic and mucosal antibody response. Since an influenza vaccine needs to induce immunological memory that lasts at least 1 year for utility in humans, we examined the longevity of the immune response induced by such a pulmonary vaccination, with and without antigen challenge. Sheep were vaccinated in the deep lung with an influenza Iscomatrix vaccine, and serum and lung antibody levels were quantified for up to...

  12. Diversity Against Adversity: How Adaptive Immune System Evolves Potent Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Muyoung; Zeldovich, Konstantin B.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2011-07-01

    Adaptive immunity is an amazing mechanism, whereby new protein functions—affinity of antibodies (Immunoglobulins) to new antigens—evolve through mutation and selection in a matter of a few days. Despite numerous experimental studies, the fundamental physical principles underlying immune response are still poorly understood. In considerable departure from past approaches, here, we propose a microscopic multiscale model of adaptive immune response, which consists of three essential players: The host cells, viruses, and B-cells in Germinal Centers (GC). Each moiety carries a genome, which encodes proteins whose stability and interactions are determined from their sequences using laws of Statistical Mechanics, providing an exact relationship between genomic sequences and strength of interactions between pathogens and antibodies and antibodies and host proteins (autoimmunity). We find that evolution of potent antibodies (the process known as Affinity Maturation (AM)) is a delicate balancing act, which has to reconcile the conflicting requirements of protein stability, lack of autoimmunity, and high affinity of antibodies to incoming antigens. This becomes possible only when antibody producing B cells elevate their mutation rates (process known as Somatic Hypermutation (SHM)) to fall into a certain range—not too low to find potency increasing mutations but not too high to destroy stable Immunoglobulins and/or already achieved affinity. Potent antibodies develop through clonal expansion of initial B cells expressing marginally potent antibodies followed by their subsequent affinity maturation through mutation and selection. As a result, in each GC the population of mature potent Immunoglobulins is monoclonal being ancestors of a single cell from initial (germline) pool. We developed a simple analytical theory, which provides further rationale to our findings. The model and theory reveal the molecular factors that determine the efficiency of affinity maturation

  13. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular nuclear... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  14. Serum and intestinal isotype antibody responses to Wa human rotavirus in gnotobiotic pigs are modulated by maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreño, V; Hodgins, D C; de Arriba, L; Kang, S Y; Yuan, L; Ward, L A; Tô, T L; Saif, L J

    1999-06-01

    The effects of passive antibodies on protection and active immune responses to human rotavirus were studied in gnotobiotic pigs. Pigs were injected at birth with saline or sow serum of high (immunized) or low (control) antibody titre and subsets of pigs were fed colostrum and milk from immunized or control sows. Pigs were inoculated at 3-5 days of age and challenged at 21 days post-inoculation (p.i.) with virulent Wa human rotavirus. Pigs receiving immune serum with or without immune colostrum/milk were partially protected against diarrhoea and virus shedding after inoculation, but had significantly lower IgA antibody titres in serum and small intestinal contents at 21 days p.i. and lower protection rates after challenge compared with pigs given control or no maternal antibodies. IgG antibody titres were consistently higher in small than in large intestinal contents. Pigs given control serum with control colostrum/milk had lower rates of virus shedding after inoculation than those given control serum alone. In summary, high titres of circulating maternal antibodies with or without local (milk) antibodies provided passive protection after inoculation but suppressed active mucosal antibody responses. These findings may have implications for the use of live, oral rotavirus vaccines in breast-fed infants.

  15. Respons Antibodi Sekunder Terhadap Penyakit Tetelo pada Ayam Petelur Pascavaksinasi Ulangan dengan Vaksin Tetelo Aktif (NEWCASTLE DISEASESECONDARY ANTIBODY RESPONSE AFTER REVACCINATION IN LAYER WITH THE ACTIVE ND VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andika Budi Kurnianto

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Revaccination is required in order to preventNewcastle Disease (ND reccurence inlayers chickens. Oneof vaccine for ND revaccination is freeze-died ND active vaccine containing e” 106,5EID50. Revaccinationisdone to trigger a faster secondary antibody responses in layers and can achieve protective antibody titersagainst ND that can be monitored by a hemagglutinationinhibition (HI. The aim of this study was todetermine the ND secondary antibody responses in layers after revaccination with ND active vaccine.Antibody titer of 20 layers chickens of 20 week old were determined before revaccinations (week 0 andafter revaccinations (week 1 until week 9. The first vaccination was conducted using ND-IB (NewcastleDisease-Infectious Bronchitis at the age of 2 days through eye drops and subcutaneous injection at the ageof 5 days using a dose of 1 ampoule.Vaccination is repeated at the age of 20 weeks at a dose of 1 ½ ampoule through drinking water. Blood samples were collected on the wing vein (venous cutane ulnar and left for 5-10 minutes at room temperature.Sera were then collected and stored at -20oC until use. HI antibody titerwas determined by micro titeration system. The HI mean titers were analyzed by Duncan test. The studyresults showed that antibody titer before revaccination was3,47 HI log 2 and the HI titers after revaccinationwere 4,02; 5,22; 6,52; 7,85; 8,4; 8,6; 7,7; 5,92; dan 3,87 HI log 2 respectivelly at weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and9.The NDV revaccination with ND active vaccine significantly (P <0.01 increased in antibody titer inlayers starting from week 1 to week 6, but decreased following week 7 to week-9. It can be concluded thatrevaccinantion with ND active vaccine increases the antibody titers in layer chickens.

  16. Microculture system for detection of Newcastle disease virus antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooley, R E; Brown, J; Gratzek, J B; Kleven, S H; Scott, T A

    1974-05-01

    A microculture system utilizing cytopathic effect (CPE) and hemadsorption (HAd) end points was effective in determining the level of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) antibodies. The microculture system was of comparable sensitivity to the plaque reduction test for the detection of NDV antibodies. The standards by which the CPE and HAd microculture tests would be considered reproducible were defined. The results indicate that the CPE and HAd microculture tests are reproducible within one twofold dilution.

  17. MERS-CoV Antibody Responses 1 Year after Symptom Onset, South Korea, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Perera, R A P M; Park, Wan Beom; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Bang, Ji Hwan; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Ko, Long Wei Ronald; Park, Sang Won; Kim, Nam-Joong; Lau, Eric H Y; Poon, Leo L M; Peiris, Malik; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the kinetics of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) neutralizing and spike protein antibody titers over the course of 1 year in 11 patients who were confirmed by reverse transcription PCR to have been infected during the outbreak in South Korea in 2015. Robust antibody responses were detected in all survivors who had severe disease; responses remained detectable, albeit with some waning, for <1 year. The duration of viral RNA detection (but not viral load) in sputum significantly correlated with the antibody response magnitude. The MERS S1 ELISA antibody titers correlated well with the neutralizing antibody response. Antibody titers in 4 of 6 patients who had mild illness were undetectable even though most had evidence of pneumonia. This finding implies that MERS-CoV seroepidemiologic studies markedly underestimate the extent of mild and asymptomatic infection. Obtaining convalescent-phase plasma with high antibody titers to treat MERS will be challenging.

  18. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    in detail so far. Analysis of the specificity of anti-virus trout antibodies has been complicated by a generally insufficient ability of the antibodies to bind the viral proteins in assays such as immunoblotting. However, other assays, specifically designed for detection of fish anti IHNV/VHSV antibodies...

  19. B cells and functional antibody responses to combat influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eLofano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against influenza (Flu is the most effective way to protect the population. Current vaccines provide protection by stimulating functional B- and T-cell responses, however, they are poorly immunogenic in particular segments of the population and need to be reformulated almost every year due to the genetic instability of the virus. Next generation Flu vaccines should be designed to induce cross-reactivity, confer protection against pandemic outbreaks, and promote long-lasting immune responses among individuals at higher risk of infection. Multiple strategies are being developed for the induction of broad functional humoral immunity, including the use of adjuvants, heterologous prime-boost strategies, and epitope-based antigen design. The basic approach is to mimic natural responses to influenza virus infection by promoting cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies that directly prevent the infection. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms underlying humoral responses to influenza vaccination or natural infection, and discusses promising strategies to control influenza virus.

  20. Regulation of Polysaccharide- and Protein- Specific Antibody Responses to Intact Extracellular Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-11

    1 | P a g e “Regulation of polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” By Swagata Kar...the thesis manuscript entitled: “Regulation of polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” Is...polysaccharide- and protein- specific antibody responses to intact extracellular bacteria ” Author: Swagata Kar, Ph.D., 2016. Uniformed Services University

  1. Effects of deceleration on the humoral antibody response in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, R. P.; Caren, L. D.; Oyama, J.

    1985-01-01

    Effects of hypergravity, simulated by chronic centrifugation, followed by a return to normal G (deceleration) on the immune system of rats were investigated. Two groups of male rats (28 days at 2.1 G, and 3.1 G) were compared to the control group (1.0 G). The animals were immunized by i.p. injections of sheep red blood cells on days 29, 42, and 57, and bled on days 36, 47, and 62. While the centrifuged rats ate and gainedsignificantly less than the control rats, the antibody titers and the organ/body mass ratios for the adrenal glands, kidneys, lungs, heart, and thymus were unaffected by gravity exposures, as were the values of the hematocrit and the white blood cell counts. It is concluded that deceleration does not adversely affect these particular aspects of the immune system.

  2. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the "reservoir". We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART.We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR; integrated DNA (Alu PCR; unspliced RNA (rtPCR, multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA, residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR, and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay. We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR. Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables.Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years, the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004 and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003. However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results.Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV during treatment.

  4. Longitudinal study of interferon-gamma, serum antibody and milk antibody responses in cattle infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, A.; Jungersen, Gregers; Lind, Peter

    2004-01-01

    -blood lymphocytes (IFN-gamma test), and measurement of antibody responses against M. paratuberculosis in serum and milk by an in-house absorbed ELISA. The IFN-gamma test diagnosed higher proportions of infected and exposed animals than the antibody ELISAs. The highest sensitivity of IFN-gamma test was in infected...... cattle of 2+ years of age. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses supported the assumption that the IFN-gamma test had a better performance than antibody tests of animals of 1+ and 2+ years of age. However, for animals of 3+ years all tests performed equally well. Application of single sampling...... compared with repeated samplings showed better performance of the IFN-gamma test by repeated samplings, and the milk antibody ELISA in animals of 3+ years of age performed significantly better with repeated sampling compared with single sampling. In conclusion, the IFN-gamma test may be applied...

  5. Dashboard systems: Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic mediated dose optimization for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Dubinsky, Marla C

    2015-03-01

    Many marketed drugs exhibit high variability in exposure and response. While these drugs are efficacious in their approved indications, finding appropriate dose regimens for individual patients is not straightforward. Similar dose adjustment problems are also seen with drugs that have a complex relationship between exposure and response and/or a narrow therapeutic window. This is particularly true for monoclonal antibodies, where prolonged dosing at a sub-therapeutic dose can also elicit anti-drug antibodies which will further compromise safety and efficacy. Thus, finding appropriate doses quickly would represent a substantial improvement in healthcare. Dashboard systems, which are decision-support tools, offer an improved, convenient means of tailoring treatment for individual patients. This article reviews the clinical need for this approach, particularly with monoclonal antibodies, the design, development, and testing of such systems, and the likely benefits of dashboard systems in clinical practice. We focus on infliximab for reference. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  6. Immune response in mice to ingested soya protein: antibody production, oral tolerance and maternal transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne Risager; Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2004-01-01

    by ELISA, and to the presence of oral tolerance detected as a suppressed antibody and cell-proliferation response upon immunisation with soya protein. F0 mice generated soya-specific antibodies, while oral tolerance to the same soya proteins was also clearly induced. When F0 dams were transferred to soya...... antibody response in the offspring, bat in this case in the absence of oral tolerance. This indicates that, under certain conditions, factors involved in spontaneous antibody production can be transmitted from mother to offspring. Understanding the immune response to soya protein ingested under healthy...

  7. Mixed adjuvant formulations reveal a new combination that elicit antibody response comparable to Freund's adjuvants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P J Lai

    Full Text Available Adjuvant formulations capable of inducing high titer and high affinity antibody responses would provide a major advance in the development of vaccines to viral infections such as HIV-1. Although oil-in-water emulsions, such as Freund's adjuvant (FCA/FIA, are known to be potent, their toxicity and reactogenicity make them unacceptable for human use. Here, we explored different adjuvants and compared their ability to elicit antibody responses to FCA/FIA. Recombinant soluble trimeric HIV-1 gp140 antigen was formulated in different adjuvants, including FCA/FIA, Carbopol-971P, Carbopol-974P and the licensed adjuvant MF59, or combinations of MF59 and Carbopol. The antigen-adjuvant formulation was administered in a prime-boost regimen into rabbits, and elicitation of antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs was evaluated. When used individually, only FCA/FIA elicited significantly higher titer of nAbs than the control group (gp140 in PBS (p<0.05. Sequential prime-boost immunizations with different adjuvants did not offer improvements over the use of FCA/FIA or MF59. Remarkably however, the concurrent use of the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 induced potent adjuvant activity with significantly higher titer nAbs than FCA/FIA (p<0.05. This combination was not associated with any obvious local or systemic adverse effects. Antibody competition indicated that the majority of the neutralizing activities were directed to the CD4 binding site (CD4bs. Increased antibody titers to the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER and gp120 V3 were detected when the more potent adjuvants were used. These data reveal that the combination of Carbopol-971P and MF59 is unusually potent for eliciting nAbs to a variety of HIV-1 nAb epitopes.

  8. Comprehensive Profiling of Immune Responses in MARV Survivors Demonstrates Robust Th1-Skewing with Short Lived Neutralizing Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    infection would be highly valuable for the evaluation of candidate vaccines that would seek to be broadly protective. Results and Discussion T...survivors (Sobarzo et al., 2015). Neutralizing antibody responses have been achieved through vaccination against MARV GP in mouse, guinea pig and...neutralizing antibodies elicited by vaccination against filoviruses is a coveted immune response, functions of non-neutralizing antibodies have been

  9. Impaired antibody response causes persistence of prototypic T cell-contained virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Bergthaler

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T cells are recognized key players in control of persistent virus infections, but increasing evidence suggests that assistance from other immune mediators is also needed. Here, we investigated whether specific antibody responses contribute to control of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, a prototypic mouse model of systemic persistent infection. Mice expressing transgenic B cell receptors of LCMV-unrelated specificity, and mice unable to produce soluble immunoglobulin M (IgM exhibited protracted viremia or failed to resolve LCMV. Virus control depended on immunoglobulin class switch, but neither on complement cascades nor on Fc receptor gamma chain or Fc gamma receptor IIB. Cessation of viremia concurred with the emergence of viral envelope-specific antibodies, rather than with neutralizing serum activity, and even early nonneutralizing IgM impeded viral persistence. This important role for virus-specific antibodies may be similarly underappreciated in other primarily T cell-controlled infections such as HIV and hepatitis C virus, and we suggest this contribution of antibodies be given consideration in future strategies for vaccination and immunotherapy.

  10. Observed parent-child relationship quality predicts antibody response to vaccination in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Thomas G; Wang, Hongyue; Moynihan, Jan A; Wyman, Peter A; Carnahan, Jennifer; Lofthus, Gerry; Quataert, Sally A; Bowman, Melissa; Burke, Anne S; Caserta, Mary T

    2015-08-01

    Quality of the parent-child relationship is a robust predictor of behavioral and emotional health for children and adolescents; the application to physical health is less clear. We investigated the links between observed parent-child relationship quality in an interaction task and antibody response to meningococcal conjugate vaccine in a longitudinal study of 164 ambulatory 10-11 year-old children; additional analyses examine associations with cortisol reactivity, BMI, and somatic illness. Observed Negative/Conflict behavior in the interaction task predicted a less robust antibody response to meningococcal serotype C vaccine in the child over a 6 month-period, after controlling for socio-economic and other covariates. Observer rated interaction conflict also predicted increased cortisol reactivity following the interaction task and higher BMI, but these factors did not account for the link between relationship quality and antibody response. The results begin to document the degree to which a major source of child stress exposure, parent-child relationship conflict, is associated with altered immune system development in children, and may constitute an important public health consideration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  12. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Gilbert

    Full Text Available Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10 to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10 (P<0.0001. Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21 (P<0.0001. Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800 compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600 produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  13. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy E; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Lacy, Katie; Josephs, Debra H; Takhar, Pooja; Geh, Jenny L C; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M; Rudman, Sarah M; Beavil, Rebecca L; Blower, Philip J; Beavil, Andrew J; Gould, Hannah J; Spicer, James; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2011-04-29

    Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10) to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10) (P<0.0001). Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21) (P<0.0001). Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800) compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600) produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  14. Screening response to hepatitis c virus antibodies among diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is a debilitating disease condition, especially in individuals above 30 years of age, these results highlight the need for screening to determine the presence of HCV among diabetic patients. Keywords: Hepatitis C virus, antibodies, type 2 diabetics, antibodies, Nigeria International Journal of Natural and Applied Sciences, ...

  15. A stable reagent system for screening and identifying red blood cell irregular antibodies: application to commercial antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, L; Pellerin, C; Marchand-Arvier, M; Vigneron, C

    1998-01-01

    Development of a new solid-phase system for screening and identifying irregular red cell antibodies. Red blood cell membranes were prepared by a semi-automated procedure in which the hemolysate solution was passed through a hollow-fiber system. The membranes were fixed to the solid phase (microtiter plates) by centrifugation and incubated with 8% fat-free milk. Antibodies added to the microtiter plate were detected by anti-human antibodies adsorbed onto yellow latex particles. The system had good sensitivity (titer antibodies that are important in transfusion.

  16. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a T h 1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  17. Effectiveness of slow-release systems in CD40 agonistic antibody immunotherapy of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, Marieke F.; Cordfunke, Robert A.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Van Steenbergen, Mies J.; Drijfhout, Jan W.; Ossendorp, Ferry; Hennink, Wim E.; Melief, Cornelis J M

    2014-01-01

    Slow-release delivery has great potential for specifically targeting immune-modulating agents into the tumor-draining area. In prior work we showed that local treatment of slowly delivered anti-CD40 antibody induced robust anti-tumor CD8+ T cell responses without systemic toxicity. We now report on

  18. Evaluation of Vaccine-induced Antibody Responses: Impact of New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaro, Daniel J.; Wagener, Diane K.; Whisnant, Carol C.; Staats, Herman F.

    2013-01-01

    Host response to vaccination has historically been evaluated based on a change in antibody titer that compares the post-vaccination titer to the pre-vaccination titer. A four-fold or greater increase in antigen-specific antibody has been interpreted to indicate an increase in antibody production in response to vaccination. New technologies, such as the bead-based assays, provide investigators and clinicians with precise antibody levels (reported as concentration per mL) in ranges below and above those previously available through standard assays such as ELISA. Evaluations of bead assay data to determine host response to vaccination using fold change and absolute change, witha general linear models used to calculate adjusted statistics, present very different pictures of the antibody response when pre-vaccination antibody levels are low. Absolute changes in bead assay values, although not a standard computation, appears to more accurately reflect the host response to vaccination for those individuals with extremely low pre-vaccination antibody levels. Conversely, for these same individuals, fold change may be very high while post-vaccination antibodies do not achieve seroprotective levels. Absolute change provides an alternate method to characterize host response to vaccination, especially when pre-vaccination levels are very low, and may be useful in studies designed to determine associations between host genotypes and response to vaccination. PMID:23583812

  19. Characterization of isotypes of antibody response against leishmania parasite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elassad, Asma M.S.; Ghalib, Hashim W.; Younis, Saddia A.

    1994-01-01

    In this study an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELIZA) was developed to detect IgG,IgM and IgA response in visceral leishmaniasis patients (VL) against L.donovain and L. major antigens compared to control groups; cutaneous leishmaniasis patients (CL), mucosal leishmaniasis patients (ML), patients with other tropical diseases and healthy controls.Highly specific IgG were found in VL patients with test specificity (93.7%) and sensitivity(93.4%). A moderate IgG were found in VL patients but non-specific while no IgA were detected in all studied groups. Also VL patients showed high specificity and sensitivity (95.2 and 96.6% respectively) against L.major antigen.The distribution of IgG subclasses (IgG1,IgG2,IgG3 and IgG4) antibodies in VL patients were assayed.IgG3 showed the highest specificity and sensitivity and titers followed by IgG1.Also the diagnostic value of ELIZA test for different leishmaniasis forms were discussed. (Author)

  20. Human immunological response to mouse monoclonal antibodies in the treatment or diagnosis of malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kroonenburgh, M J; Pauwels, E K

    1988-11-01

    An overview of the literature is presented concerning the formation, detection, incidence and effect of the human immunoglobulin response on immunoscintigraphy. The following conclusions are drawn. The production of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) is associated with a diminished therapeutic response; adequate prevention of HAMA production is not yet possible; high HAMA titres give rise to rapid clearance of MoAb into the liver and marked reduction of tumour uptake which results in reduced image quality on immunoscintigraphy; alteration of antibody biodistribution is likely to be related to the in vivo formation of antibody-antibody complexes which could interfere with image quality when sequential imaging is carried out.

  1. Wildtype p53-specific Antibody and T-Cell Responses in Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune

    2011-01-01

    Mutation in the p53 gene based on single amino acid substitutions is a frequent event in human cancer. Accumulated mutant p53 protein is released to antigen presenting cells of the immune system and anti-p53 immune responses even against wt p53 is induced and observed in a number of human cancer...... patients. Detection of antibodies against wt p53 protein has been used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker and discovery of new T-cell epitopes has enabled design of cancer vaccination protocols with promising results. Here, we identified wt p53-specific antibodies in various cancer patients......(264-272) in breast cancer patients and against HLA-A*01:01 binding peptide wt p53(226-234) and HLA-B*07:02 binding peptide wt p53(74-82) in renal cell cancer and breast cancer patients, respectively. Finally, we analyzed antibody and T-cell responses against wt p53 15-mer peptides in patients with metastatic renal...

  2. Antiphospholipid antibodies in Chilean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Ivan; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcon, Marcelo; Larrain, Ana Maria; Pinochet, Carmen; Vasquez, Marcela; Velez, Maria T; Leon, M; Espinola, Ricardo; Pierangeli, Silvia

    2002-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are a heterogeneous family of antibodies found in autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, and other situations. The presence of different aPLs has been associated with various clinical manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aPLs in a group of 90 Chilean patients with systemic lupus erytematosus (SLE) and 90 healthy controls. We measured anticardiolipin antibodies (aCLs), antiphosphatidylserine antibodies (aPSs), anti-beta(2) glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta(2)GPIs), and antiprothrombin antibodies (aPTs) with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent technique using "in-house" assays. Fifty-four of 90 SLE patients (60.0%) had some type of aPL. Forty of 90 (44.4%) were positive for aCLs, 9 of 61 (14.8%) had aPSs, 21 of 90 (23.3%) had anti-beta(2)GPIs, and 18 of 90 (20.0%) had aPTs. In the control group, prevalences were as follows: aCLs, 3.3%; aPSs, 1.1%; anti-beta(2)GPIs, 1.1%; aPTs, 2.2%. In most cases, values were in the low-positive range. Of all aPL detected, 29.5% was of the IgG isotype, 37.5% IgM, and 33.0% IgA. We observed a correlation between aCLs and aPSs and of these antibodies with anti-beta(2)GPIs and aPTs but not between anti-beta(2)GPIs and aPTs. Our results show a high prevalence of aPLs in SLE patients. An association between different specificities and isotypes of aPLs was also observed.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies for the measurement of class-specific antibody responses in the green turtle, Chelonia mydas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, L H; Klein, P A

    1995-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were developed against the known immunoglobulin classes of the green turtle, Chelonia mydas. Plasma protein fractions enriched for 5.7S IgY, 7S IgY, and IgM turtle immunoglobulins were used to immunize Balb/c mice for hybridoma production and for hybridoma screening. Fifteen hybridomas produced Mabs with specificity for turtle immunoglobulins and for affinity purified dinitrophenol (DNP) specific turtle antibodies. Three Mabs specific for either turtle 5.7S IgY heavy chain (HL814), 7S IgY heavy chain (HL857), or IgM heavy chain (HL846) were purified and used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure antibody responses in two turtles immunized with 2,4-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) over a 10 month period. In both turtles the 7S IgY antibody response developed within 5 weeks of the first inoculation and remained high over the following 9 months. The 5.7S IgY antibody response was detected in one turtle at 3-4 months and in the other at 8 months, and reached high levels in both individuals by 10 months. The IgM responses were difficult to interpret. One turtle had pre-inoculation anti-DNP IgM antibody in its plasma and the other developed only a weak, transient response at about 4 months. The class-specific antibody activity in immune turtle plasma could be strongly inhibited by soluble DNP or by rabbit anti-DNP specific antiserum, showing that these antibody responses were directed predominantly to the DNP hapten on the DNP-BSA antigen. Antibody responses to the BSA carrier could not be detected in either turtle over the course of the immunization. Mab HL814, specific for an epitope on the 5.7S green turtle immunoglobulin heavy chain, will be useful for characterizing the molecular relationships of 5.7S, 7S and IgM heavy chains and the role of 5.7S antibody in humoral immunity in this species. All anti-turtle Ig Mabs were screened against the plasma globulins of Loggerhead (Caretta caretta), Olive

  4. Protein dynamics and the diversity of an antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-08-03

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved.

  5. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  6. Immunoglobulin E Antileishmanial Antibody Response in Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Atta, Maria L. B.; Salamé, Gregório S.; D’Oliveira, Argemiro; Almeida, Roque P.; Atta, Ajax M.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2002-01-01

    High levels of antileishmanial immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies are associated with disease activity in visceral leishmaniasis. Herein, we report our observations about the relationship between antileishmanial IgE antibodies and clinical aspects of cutaneous leishmaniasis. This study was carried out with 45 patients (29 male and 16 female), with ages ranging from 11 to 48 years. All subjects were from an area to which leishmaniasis is endemic, Corte de Pedra (Bahia, Brazil), and the duration of the illness was ≤30 days. The patients were classified as positive or negative for IgE serology in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with leishmanial antigens. IgE antibodies were detected in 18 patients (optical density, 0.421 ± 0.30; 95% confidence interval, 0.27 to 0.57), and only 3 (17%) had more than one ulcer. In this group the diameter of Montenegro’s reaction was 18 ± 12.2 mm. In the group with negative IgE serology, 11 of 27 patients (48%) presented two or more cutaneous ulcers, and the mean of the skin test result was 9 ± 6.9 mm. There was a positive correlation between IgE antibody levels and Montenegro’s reaction size and an inverse correlation between IgE antileishmanial antibodies and the number of skin ulcers. The presence of antileishmanial IgE antibodies in cutaneous leishmaniasis may be a result of immunoregulatory events with clinical implications. PMID:11777837

  7. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-01-01

    of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from...

  8. Different levels of natural antibodies in chickens divergently selected for specific antibody responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Lammers, A.; Hoekman, J.J.; Vries Reilingh, de G.; Zaanen, I.T.A.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the presence of Natural antibodies in plasma samples from individual birds from selected chicken lines at young and old age. Binding, specificity, and relative affinity to various antigens were determined in plasma from non-immunized female chickens at 5 weeks of age, and in plasma

  9. In-Depth Analysis of the Antibody Response of Individuals Exposed to Primary Dengue Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Beltramello, Martina; Messer, William B.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Wahala, Wahala M. P. B.; Kraus, Annette; Olivarez, Nicholas P.; Pham, Quang; Brian, James; Tsai, Wen-Yang; Wang, Wei-Kung; Halstead, Scott; Kliks, Srisakul; Diamond, Michael S.; Baric, Ralph; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2011-01-01

    Humans who experience a primary dengue virus (DENV) infection develop antibodies that preferentially neutralize the homologous serotype responsible for infection. Affected individuals also generate cross-reactive antibodies against heterologous DENV serotypes, which are non-neutralizing. Dengue cross-reactive, non-neutralizing antibodies can enhance infection of Fc receptor bearing cells and, potentially, exacerbate disease. The actual binding sites of human antibody on the DENV particle are not well defined. We characterized the specificity and neutralization potency of polyclonal serum antibodies and memory B-cell derived monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) from 2 individuals exposed to primary DENV infections. Most DENV-specific hMAbs were serotype cross-reactive and weakly neutralizing. Moreover, many hMAbs bound to the viral pre-membrane protein and other sites on the virus that were not preserved when the viral envelope protein was produced as a soluble, recombinant antigen (rE protein). Nonetheless, by modifying the screening procedure to detect rare antibodies that bound to rE, we were able to isolate and map human antibodies that strongly neutralized the homologous serotype of DENV. Our MAbs results indicate that, in these two individuals exposed to primary DENV infections, a small fraction of the total antibody response was responsible for virus neutralization. PMID:21713020

  10. Interferon gamma modulation of disease manifestation and the local antibody response to alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Victoria K; Griffin, Diane E

    2016-11-01

    Infection of mice with Sindbis virus (SINV) produces encephalomyelitis and provides a model for examination of the central nervous system (CNS) immune response to alphavirus infection. Clearance of infectious virus is accomplished through a cooperative effort between SINV-specific antibody and IFN-γ, but the regulatory interactions are poorly understood. To determine the effects of IFN-γ on clinical disease and the antiviral immune response, C57BL/6 mice lacking IFN-γ (Ifng-/-) or IFN-γ receptor (Ifngr1-/-) were studied in comparison to WT mice. Maximum production of Ifng mRNA and IFN-γ protein in the CNS of WT and Ifngr1-/- mice occurred 5-7 days after infection, with higher levels of IFN-γ in Ifngr1-/- mice. Onset of clinical disease was earlier in mice with impaired IFN-γ signalling, although Ifngr1-/- mice recovered more rapidly. Ifng-/- and Ifngr1-/- mice maintained body weight better than WT mice, associated with better food intake and lower brain levels of inflammatory cytokines. Clearance of infectious virus from the spinal cords was slower, and CNS, but not serum, levels of SINV-specific IgM, IgG2a and IgG2b were lower in Ifngr1-/- and Ifng-/- mice compared to WT mice. Decreased CNS antiviral antibody was associated with lower expression of mRNAs for B-cell attracting chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL13 and fewer B cells in the CNS. Therefore, IFN-γ signalling increases levels of CNS pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to clinical disease, but synergistically clears virus with SINV-specific antibody at least in part by increasing chemokine production important for infiltration of antibody-secreting B cells into the CNS.

  11. Vaccination of horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs induces short-lasting antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Cassandra; Asbie, Sanda; Rohde, Jennifer; Glaser, Amy; Wagner, Bettina

    2017-07-24

    Borrelia burgdorferi can induce Lyme disease. Approved Lyme vaccines for horses are currently not available. In an effort to protect horses, veterinarians are using Lyme vaccines licensed for dogs. However, data to assess the response of horses to, or determine the efficacy of this off-label vaccine use are missing. Here, antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA), OspC, and OspF were quantified in diagnostic serum submissions from horses with a history of vaccination with canine Lyme vaccines. The results suggested that many horses respond with low and often short-lasting antibody responses. Subsequently, four experimental vaccination trials were performed. First, we investigated antibody responses to three canine vaccines in B. burgdorferi-naïve horses. One killed bacterin vaccine induced antibodies against OspC. OspA antibodies were low for all three vaccines and lasted less than 16weeks. The second trial tested the impact of the vaccine dose using the OspA/OspC inducing bacterin vaccine in horses. A 2mL dose produced higher OspA and OspC antibody values than a 1mL dose. However, the antibody response again quickly declined, independent of dose. Third, the horses were vaccinated with 2 doses of a recombinant OspA vaccine. Previous vaccination and/or environmental exposure enhanced the magnitude and longevity of the OspA antibody response to about 20weeks. Last, the influence of intramuscular versus subcutaneous vaccine administration was investigated for the recombinant OspA vaccine. OspA antibody responses were not influenced by injection route. The current work highlights that commercial Lyme vaccines for dogs induce only transient antibody responses in horses which can also be of low magnitude. Protection from infection with B. burgdorferi should not be automatically assumed after vaccinating horses with Lyme vaccines for dogs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby

    2017-01-01

    Introduction BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG......) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Methods Within 7 days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination...... included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by ‘age at randomisation’ we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B...

  13. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...... in antibody response was compared to the findings in 12 healthy volunteers with the aim of establishing the optimal time for vaccination. Serum antibodies against 6 of the pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens (types 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C and 23F) contained in the vaccine were determined by an ELISA. Antibody...

  14. Protective Capacity of the Human Anamnestic Antibody Response during Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meihui; Züst, Roland; Toh, Ying Xiu; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Davidson, Edgar; Doranz, Benjamin J; Velumani, Sumathy; Tukijan, Farhana; Wang, Cheng-I; Fink, Katja

    2016-12-15

    Half of the world's population is exposed to the risk of dengue virus infection. Although a vaccine for dengue virus is now available in a few countries, its reported overall efficacy of about 60% is not ideal. Protective immune correlates following natural dengue virus infection remain undefined, which makes it difficult to predict the efficacy of new vaccines. In this study, we address the protective capacity of dengue virus-specific antibodies that are produced by plasmablasts a few days after natural secondary infection. Among a panel of 18 dengue virus-reactive human monoclonal antibodies, four groups of antibodies were identified based on their binding properties. While antibodies targeting the fusion loop of the glycoprotein of dengue virus dominated the antibody response, two smaller groups of antibodies bound to previously undescribed epitopes in domain II of the E protein. The latter, largely serotype-cross-reactive antibodies, demonstrated increased stability of binding at pH 5. These antibodies possessed weak to moderate neutralization capacity in vitro but were the most efficacious in promoting the survival of infected mice. Our data suggest that the cross-reactive anamnestic antibody response has a protective capacity despite moderate neutralization in vitro and a moderate decrease of viremia in vivo IMPORTANCE: Antibodies can protect from symptomatic dengue virus infection. However, it is not easy to assess which classes of antibodies provide protection because in vitro assays are not always predictive of in vivo protection. During a repeat infection, dengue virus-specific immune memory cells are reactivated and large amounts of antibodies are produced. By studying antibodies cloned from patients with heterologous secondary infection, we tested the protective value of the serotype-cross-reactive "recall" or "anamnestic" response. We found that results from in vitro neutralization assays did not always correlate with the ability of the antibodies to

  15. Serum and skin surface antibody responses in merino sheep given three successive inoculations with Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, S S; Ellis, T M; Robertson, G M; Gregory, A R

    1987-11-01

    Three antigens prepared from different phases of the life cycle of Dermatophilus congolensis were used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum and skin surface antibody responses in sheep after a first, second and third inoculation with D. congolensis. After the first inoculation, a strong antibody response to the flagella, filament and soluble antigens was detected after 7-21 days in the sera from sheep that were regularly biopsied; the antibody response at the skin surface was detected 28-42 days after inoculation, when the lesions were resolving. Strong anamnestic responses were detected in the serum of sheep that were biopsied and some of the nonbiopsied sheep after the second and third inoculations, but the skin surface antibody response at these times was variable.

  16. Antibody response to equine coronavirus in horses inoculated with a bovine coronavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Manabu; Kanno, Toru; Bannai, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Koji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kokado, Hiroshi

    2017-11-17

    A vaccine for equine coronavirus (ECoV) is so far unavailable. Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) is antigenically related to ECoV; it is therefore possible that BCoV vaccine will induce antibodies against ECoV in horses. This study investigated antibody response to ECoV in horses inoculated with BCoV vaccine. Virus neutralization tests showed that antibody titers against ECoV increased in all six horses tested at 14 days post inoculation, although the antibody titers were lower against ECoV than against BCoV. This study showed that BCoV vaccine provides horses with antibodies against ECoV to some extent. It is unclear whether antibodies provided by BCoV vaccine are effective against ECoV, and therefore ECoV challenge studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine in the future.

  17. Antibody response of sandhill and whooping cranes to an eastern equine encephalitis virus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, G.G.; Dein, F.J.; Crabbs, C.L.; Carpenter, J.W.; Watts, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    As a possible strategy to protect whooping cranes (Grus americana) from fatal eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viral infection, studies were conducted to determine the immune response of this species and sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to a formalin-inactivated EEE viral vaccine. Viral-specific neutralizing antibody was elicited in both species after intramuscular (IM) vaccination. Subcutaneous and intravenous routes of vaccination failed to elicit detectable antibody in sandhill cranes. Among the IM vaccinated cranes, the immune response was characterized by nondetectable or low antibody titers that waned rapidly following primary exposure to the vaccine. However, one or more booster doses consistently elicited detectable antibody and/or increased antibody titers in the whooping cranes. In contrast, cranes with pre-existing EEE viral antibody, apparently induced by natural infection, exhibited a rapid increase and sustained high-antibody titers. Even though EEE virus vaccine induced neutralizing antibody and produced no adverse side effects, further studies will be required to determine the protective efficacy of the antibody.

  18. Antibody response to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of Salmonella typhi during typhoid infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, R.S.W.; Chau, P.Y.; Lam, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    Serum antibody responses to the lipopolysaccharide and protein antigens of S. typhi in typhoid patients were studied using a solid-phase radioimmunoassay technique with 125 I labelled anti-immunoglobulin antibody. Sera from 24 adult typhoid patients and 20 non-typhoid adult controls were compared. As a group, sera from typhoid patients showed increased IgA, IgG and IgM immunoglobulin levels and gave significantly higher anti-LPS and anti-protein antibody titres in all three major immunoglobulin classes than did non-typhoid controls. Levels of antibodies against LPS or protein in sera of typhoid patients were highly variable with a skew distribution. A good correlation was found between antibody titres to the LPS antigen and those to a protein antigen. No correlation, however, was found between the anti-LPS antibody titres measured by radioimmunoassay and the anti-O antibody titres measured by the Widal agglutination test. Titration of anti-LPS or anti-protein antibodies by radioimmunoassay was found to be more sensitive and specific than Widal test for the serological diagnosis of typhoid fever. The advantages of measuring antibody response by radioimmunoassay over conventional Widal test are discussed. (author)

  19. Human anti-mouse antibody response induced by anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneff, G; Winkler, T; Kalden, J R; Emmrich, F; Burmester, G R

    1991-04-01

    The development of human anti-mouse monoclonal antibodies (HAMAs) was investigated in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had undergone an experimental therapeutic trial with an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. In this patient group, the antibody 16H5 of the IgG1 isotype had been administered in a median total dosage of 140 mg per treatment cycle. Four patients took part in a second treatment regimen 6-8 weeks later. After the first treatment cycle, detectable HAMAs developed in 5 out of 10 patients. In 4 individuals undergoing a second course of therapy, increases of HAMAs were evident only in the 3 patients with previous HAMA responses. HAMAs were primarily of the IgG isotype, while the presence of rheumatoid factors usually interfered with the detectability of IgM HAMAs. However, using isolated F(ab)2 fragments of the monoclonal reagent used for therapy, HAMAs of the IgM isotype were also detectable. HAMAs of the IgG isotype did not exceed levels of 2.0 mg/liter after a single treatment cycle and 2.2 mg/liter after a repeated cycle. No IgE responses were detectable. Absorption experiments indicated that approximately 25% of the HAMA activity was directed against specific determinants of the 16H5 monoclonal antibody, presumably including anti-idiotypic reactivities. These data demonstrate that HAMAs developed only in a proportion of RA patients treated with the anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody 16H5. However, the amounts were rather low compared to other monoclonal reagents used in cancer patients and were therefore allowed for repeated applications without an apparent loss of efficacy.

  20. Protective immunization with B16 melanoma induces antibody response and not cytotoxic T cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarzotti, M.; Sriyuktasuth, P.; Klimpel, G.R.; Cerny, J.

    1986-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice immunized with three intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic, irradiated B16 melanoma cells, became resistant to B16 tumor challenge. Immunized mice had high levels of serum antibody against a membrane antigen of B16 cells. The B16 antigen recognized by the anti-B16 sera formed a major band of 90 KD in gel electrophoresis. The anti-B16 antibody was partially protective when mixed with B16 cells and injected into normal recipient mice. Surprisingly, B16 resistance mice were incapable of generating cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific for the B16 tumor. Both spleen and lymph node cell populations from immunized mice did not generate B16-specific CTL. Allogeneic mice (DBA/2 or C3H) were also unable to generate B16-specific CTL: however, alloreactive CTL produced in these strains of mice by immunization with C57BL/6 lymphocytes, did kill B16 target cells. Interestingly, spleen cells from syngeneic mice immunized with B16 tumor produced 6-fold more interleukin-2 (IL-2) than normal spleen cells, in vitro. These data suggest that immunization with B16 tumor activates a helper subset of T cells (for antibody and IL-2 production) but not the effector CTL response

  1. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  2. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ( 9 0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ( 1 31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  3. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  4. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    OpenAIRE

    Minozzi, Giulietta; Parmentier, Henk K; Mignon-Grasteau, Sandrine; Nieuwland, Mike GB; Bed'hom, Bertrand; Gourichon, David; Minvielle, Francis; Pinard-van der Laan, Marie-Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background - The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab) to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three different general immune criteria; high antibody response to Newcastle disease virus 3 weeks after vaccination (ND3), high cell-mediated immune response, using the wing web response to phytohemglu...

  5. Serum antibody response to human and bovine IRBP in uveitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, R.; Hwan, S. B.; Rothova, A.; van Haren, M. A.; Donoso, L. A.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) is a 136,000 molecular weight photoreceptor cell protein capable of inducing an experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU) in susceptible animal strains. The occurrence of serum antibodies against human (Hu) or bovine (Bo) IRBP was investigated in

  6. Are anticardiolipin antibodies responsible for some of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. What were first called simply false-positive Wassermann reactions and then lupus anticoagulant are now known as antiphospholipid or anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). These are known to cause a tendency to thrombosis and are frequently present in many neurological conditions and infections. The pathological ...

  7. Evaluation of antibody response by dogs vaccinated with low egg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve dogs were immunized with live attenuated flury strain antirabies vaccine using single, double and triple inoculation sites of the recommended dose, but in divided doses for the double and triple sites. All the dogs were screened for neutralizing antibodies against rabies before immunization, while sera were collected ...

  8. [The IgG antibody response in patients colonized by Helicobacter pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, G; Acuña, R; Jashés, M; Troncoso, M; Toledo, M S; Arellano, L

    1990-11-01

    The IgG antibody response specific to Helicobacter pylori was evaluated through ELISA in a group of 92 gastric patients colonized by this bacteria. 74 had gastritis and 19 gastroduodenal ulcer. Three control groups were studied in a similar way: normal adult volunteers (n = 17), adults with E coli or S typhi bacteremia (n = 30) and normal infants (n = 30). IgG antibody response to H pylori was demonstrated in 98% of colonized patients and 0% of infants. Asymptomatic individuals and those with bacteremia had high rates of antibody response (76 and 90% respectively), although this rate and also the titers of antibody response were significantly lower than that of colonized patients (p pylori in the majority of colonized gastric patients and asymptomatic adults suggests that this infection is very common in our population.

  9. Demonstration of the salmonid humoral response to Renibacterium salmoninarum using a monoclonal antibody against salmonid immunoglobulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, J.L.; Arkoosh , M.R.; Rohovec, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The specificity of the antibody response of salmonids to Renibacterium salmoninarum antigens was demonstrated by western blotting techniques that utilized a monoclonal antibody against salmonid immunoglobulin. In this study, the specificity of the response in immunized chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytschawas compared with the response in naturally infected chinook salmon and coho salmon O. kisutch, and immunized rabbits. The antibody response in immunized salmon and rabbits and the naturally infected fish was primarily against the 57–58kilodalton protein complex. In addition to recognizing these proteins in the extracellular fraction and whole-cell preparations, antibody from the immunized salmon and rabbits detected four proteins with lower molecular masses. Western blotting techniques allow identification of the specific antigens recognized and are a useful tool for comparing the immunogenicity of different R. salmoninarumpreparations. Immunofluorescent techniques with whole bacteria were less sensitive than western blotting in detecting salmonid anti-R. salmoninarumantibody.

  10. Non-association between anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies and ABO blood group system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ACF Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii infects humans through the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, which elicits humoral immune response with specific antibodies. The expression of the ABO blood group glycoconjugates also occurs in this same system and may influence the human susceptibility of infection by T. gondii. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between ABO blood group phenotypes and the presence of anti-T. gondii antibodies. Data - including age, results of serology tests for T. gondii infection and ABO blood group phenotypes - were assembled from the medical records of 1,006 pregnant women attended in the Base Hospital of the Medical School of São José do Rio Preto, Brazil, between 2001 and 2004. The chi-square test was used to compare the results with the level of significance set at 5%. Of the studied cases, 64.1% (645/1006 and 35.9% (391/1006 presented respectively positive and negative serology tests for anti-T. gondii antibodies. The mean age of those who tested positive was higher than those with negative serology tests (p = 0.0004. The frequencies of ABO blood group phenotypes were similar in those with and without anti-T. gondii antibodies (p = 0.35. In conclusion, the ABO blood group system is not associated with the presence or absence of anti-T. gondii antibodies.

  11. Formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcus vaccine - effect of aluminum adjuvants on the antibody and IL-17 response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenesch, Harm; Dunham, Anisa; Hansen, Bethany; Anderson, Kathleen; Maisonneuve, Jean-Francois; Hem, Stanley L

    2011-07-29

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes widespread morbidity and mortality. Current vaccines contain free polysaccharides or protein-polysaccharide conjugates, and do not induce protection against serotypes that are not included in the vaccines. An affordable and broadly protective vaccine is very desirable. The goal of this study was to determine the optimal formulation of a killed whole cell pneumococcal vaccine with aluminum-containing adjuvants for intramuscular injection. Four aluminium-containing adjuvants were prepared with different levels of surface phosphate groups resulting in different adsorptive capacities and affinities for the vaccine antigens. Mice were immunized three times and the antigen-specific antibody titers and IL-17 responses in blood were analyzed. Although all adjuvants induced significantly higher antibody titers than antigen without adjuvant, the vaccine containing aluminum phosphate adjuvant (AP) produced the highest antibody response when low doses of antigen were used. Aluminum hydroxide adjuvant (AH) induced an equal or better antibody response at high doses compared with AP. Vaccines formulated with AH, but not with AP, induced an IL-17 response. The vaccine formulated with AH was stable and retained full immunogenicity when stored at 4°C for 4 months. Antibodies are important for protection against systemic streptococcal disease and IL-17 is critical in the prevention of nasopharyngeal colonization by S. pneumoniae in the mouse model. The formulation of the whole killed bacterial cells with AH resulted in a stable vaccine that induced both antibodies and an IL-17 response. These experiments underscore the importance of formulation studies with aluminium containing adjuvants for the development of stable and effective vaccines.

  12. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika I Zarnitsyna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza's major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza.

  13. HP-1γ Controls High-Affinity Antibody Response to T-Dependent Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ngoc; Pham, Duc-Hung; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Naruse, Chie; Asano, Masahide; Thai, To-Ha

    2014-01-01

    In vitro observations suggest a role for the mouse heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP-1γ) in the immune system. However, it has not been shown if and how HP-1γ contributes to immunity in vivo. Here we show that in mice, HP-1γ positively regulates the germinal center reaction and high-affinity antibody response to thymus (T)-dependent antigens by limiting the size of CD8(+) regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment without affecting progenitor B- or T-cell-development. Moreover, HP-1γ does not control cell proliferation or class switch recombination. Haploinsufficiency of cbx-3 (gene encoding HP-1γ) is sufficient to expand the CD8(+) Treg population and impair the immune response in mice despite the presence of wild-type HP-1α and HP-1β. This is the first in vivo evidence demonstrating the non-redundant role of HP-1γ in immunity.

  14. Cytokine profiles and antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimated higher ratios of IFN-γ/IL-10 and IFN-γ/IL-12 were also observed in the symptomatic children while the asymptomatic controls had higher IL-12/IL-10 ratio. The mean concentration levels of anti-P. falciparum IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 antibodies were statistically significantly higher in the individuals >5 years of age than <5 ...

  15. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  16. Longitudinal studies of neutralizing antibody responses to rotavirus in stools and sera of children following severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, B S

    1998-11-01

    Rotavirus-neutralizing antibody responses in sera and stools of children hospitalized with rotavirus gastroenteritis and then monitored longitudinally were optimally detected by using local rotavirus strains. Stool responses were highest on days 5 to 8 after the onset of diarrhea. Longitudinal monitoring suggested that serum neutralizing antibody responses were a more useful measure of severely symptomatic rotavirus infection than stool responses but that stool antibody responses may be a useful measure of rotavirus immunity.

  17. Longitudinal Studies of Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Rotavirus in Stools and Sera of Children following Severe Rotavirus Gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Coulson, Barbara S.

    1998-01-01

    Rotavirus-neutralizing antibody responses in sera and stools of children hospitalized with rotavirus gastroenteritis and then monitored longitudinally were optimally detected by using local rotavirus strains. Stool responses were highest on days 5 to 8 after the onset of diarrhea. Longitudinal monitoring suggested that serum neutralizing antibody responses were a more useful measure of severely symptomatic rotavirus infection than stool responses but that stool antibody responses may be a use...

  18. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. DeFranco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  19. T cell regulation of the thymus-independent antibody response to trinitrophenylated-Brucella abortus (TNP-BA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanay, A.; Strober, S.

    1985-06-01

    The authors have previously observed a reduction of the T cell-dependent primary antibody response to dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and an enhancement of the T cell-independent response to trinitrophenylated Brucella abortus (TNP-BA) in BALB/c mice after treatment with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). To elucidate the relative contribution of T and B cells to the enhanced T cell-independent antibody responses after TLI, a syngeneic primary adoptive transfer system was utilized whereby irradiated hosts were reconstituted with unfractionated spleen cells or a combination of purified T and B cells from TLI-treated and untreated control mice. Antibody responses of purified splenic B cells from TLI-treated BALB/c mice (TLI/B) to TNP-BA were enhanced 10-fold as compared with those of unfractionated (UF) spleen cells or B cells from normal (NL) BALB/c mice (NL/UF and NL/B, respectively). Splenic T cells from normal animals (NL/T) suppressed the anti-TNP-BA response of TLI/B by more than 100-fold. NL/T neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of NL/B. On the other hand, T cells from TLI-treated mice (TLI/T) enhanced by 100-fold the anti-TNP-BA response of NL/B, but neither suppressed nor enhanced the response of TLI/B. Thus, T cells can regulate the T cell-independent antibody response to TNP-BA. However, experimental manipulation of the T and B cell populations is needed to demonstrate the regulatory functions.

  20. [Antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides among the children population in the Ustí Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J; Stiborová, I; Pohorská, J; Dobiásová, L; Král, V

    2005-11-01

    A group of 156 children aged between 10 and 12 years were screened for IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides. The study subjects were 64 children of Romany origin and 92 children from the majority population. IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides were detected in 112 (71.8%) children. No difference in the prevalence of IgG antibodies was found between Romany children and those from the majority population. As many as 34.1% of the study subjects had IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides, again with no difference between the two ethnic groups. Children with IgG antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides had significantly higher total IgE levels compared to those who had tested IgG negative. To demonstrate induction of a non-specific IgE response was one of the study objectives. The high prevalence rates of IgG and IgE antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides are suggestive of a high frequency of cross- and non-specific reactions. Possible effect of cross-reactivity to other antigens on the specific IgG and IgE antibody response to Ascaris lumbricoides is discussed.

  1. Antibody and T cell responses to Fusobacterium nucleatum and Treponema denticola in health and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Shin

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the T cell response to the members of oral flora are poorly understood. We characterized the antibody and T cell responses to FadA and Td92, adhesins from Fusobacterium nucleatum, an oral commensal, and Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen, respectively. Peripheral blood and saliva were obtained from healthy individuals and patients with untreated chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 11 paris and after successful treatment of the disease (n = 9. The levels of antigen-specific antibody were measured by ELISA. In plasma, IgG1 was the most abundant isotype of Ab for both Ags, followed by IgA and then IgG4. The levels of FadA-specific salivary IgA (sIgA were higher than Td92-specific sIgA and the FadA-specific IgA levels observed in plasma. However, the periodontal health status of the individuals did not affect the levels of FadA- or Td92-specific antibody. Even healthy individuals contained FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells, as determined by the detection of intracytoplasmic CD154 after short-term in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs with the antigens. Patients with CP tended to possess increased numbers of FadA- and Td92-specific CD4(+ T cells but reduced numbers of Td92-specific Foxp3(+CD4(+ Tregs than the healthy subjects. Both FadA and Td92 induced the production of IFNγ and IL-10 but inhibited the secretion of IL-4 by PBMCs. In conclusion, F. nucleatum induced Th3 (sIgA- and Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant immune responses, whereas T. denticola induced a Th1 (IFNγ and IgG1-dominant response. This IFNγ-dominant cytokine response was impaired in CP patients, and the Td92-induced IFNγ levels were negatively associated with periodontal destruction in patients. These findings may provide new insights into the homeostatic interaction between the immune system and oral bacteria and the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  2. 21 CFR 864.9175 - Automated blood grouping and antibody test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. An automated blood grouping and antibody test system is a device used to group erythrocytes (red blood cells) and to detect antibodies to blood group antigens. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated blood grouping and antibody test system...

  3. The effect of prophylactic antipyretic administration on post-vaccination adverse reactions and antibody response in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Panigrahi, Inusha; Naik, Sushree Samiksha

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children. A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic antipyretic treatment versus placebo post-vaccination in children ≤ 6 years of age were included. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed the studies for methodological quality, and extracted data [PROSPERO registration: CRD42014009717]. Of 2579 citations retrieved, a total of 13 RCTs including 5077 children were included in the review. Prophylactic antipyretic administration significantly reduced the febrile reactions (≥ 38.0 °C) after primary and booster vaccinations. Though there were statistically significant differences in the antibody responses between the two groups, the prophylactic PCM group had what would be considered protective levels of antibodies to all of the antigens given after the primary and booster vaccinations. No significant difference in the nasopharyngeal carriage rates (short-term and long-term) of H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae serotypes was found between the prophylactic and no prophylactic PCM group. There was a significant reduction in the local and systemic symptoms after primary, but not booster vaccinations. Though prophylactic antipyretic administration leads to relief of the local and systemic symptoms after primary vaccinations, there is a reduction in antibody responses to some vaccine antigens without any effect on the nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae & H. influenza serotypes. Future trials and surveillance programs should also aim at assessing the

  4. The effect of prophylactic antipyretic administration on post-vaccination adverse reactions and antibody response in children: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Ranjan Das

    Full Text Available Prophylactic antipyretic administration decreases the post-vaccination adverse reactions. Recent study finds that they may also decrease the antibody responses to several vaccine antigens. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence for a relationship between prophylactic antipyretic administration, post-vaccination adverse events, and antibody response in children.A systematic search of major databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE was carried out till March 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing prophylactic antipyretic treatment versus placebo post-vaccination in children ≤ 6 years of age were included. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed the studies for methodological quality, and extracted data [PROSPERO registration: CRD42014009717].Of 2579 citations retrieved, a total of 13 RCTs including 5077 children were included in the review. Prophylactic antipyretic administration significantly reduced the febrile reactions (≥ 38.0 °C after primary and booster vaccinations. Though there were statistically significant differences in the antibody responses between the two groups, the prophylactic PCM group had what would be considered protective levels of antibodies to all of the antigens given after the primary and booster vaccinations. No significant difference in the nasopharyngeal carriage rates (short-term and long-term of H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae serotypes was found between the prophylactic and no prophylactic PCM group. There was a significant reduction in the local and systemic symptoms after primary, but not booster vaccinations.Though prophylactic antipyretic administration leads to relief of the local and systemic symptoms after primary vaccinations, there is a reduction in antibody responses to some vaccine antigens without any effect on the nasopharyngeal carriage rates of S. pneumoniae & H. influenza serotypes. Future trials and surveillance programs should also aim at

  5. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in rheumatoid arthritis: antibody response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    OpenAIRE

    Tabarya, D; Hoffman, W L

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage and to compare antibody responses to two superantigens, staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), in rheumatoid arthritis patients and normal subjects. METHODS: 88 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 110 control subjects were cultured for nasal carriage of S aureus; 62 isolates were bacteriophage typed. Twenty five patients and 11 spouses were tested for antibodies t...

  6. Circulating CXCR5+PD-1+ response predicts influenza vaccine antibody responses in young adults but not elderly adults

    OpenAIRE

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Reuter, Morgan A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Mansfield, Kathleen D.; Aung, Htin; Badwan, Osama Z.; Kurupati, Raj K.; Kannan, Senthil; Ertl, Hildegund; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Betts, Michael R.; Canaday, David H.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recommended for all adults annually, the incidence of vaccine failure, defined as weak or absent increase in neutralizing antibody titers, is increased in the elderly compared to young adults. The T follicular helper subset of CD4 T cells (Tfh) provides B cell help in germinal centers and is necessary for class-switched antibody responses. Previous studies suggested a role for circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) following influenza vaccination in adu...

  7. Ontogeny of adaptive antibody response to a model antigen in captive altricial zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess L Killpack

    Full Text Available Based on studies from the poultry literature, all birds are hypothesized to require at least 4 weeks to develop circulating mature B-cell lineages that express functionally different immunoglobulin specificities. However, many altricial passerines fledge at adult size less than four weeks after the start of embryonic development, and therefore may experience a period of susceptibility during the nestling and post-fledging periods. We present the first study, to our knowledge, to detail the age-related changes in adaptive antibody response in an altricial passerine. Using repeated vaccinations with non-infectious keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH antigen, we studied the ontogeny of specific adaptive immune response in altricial zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. Nestling zebra finches were first injected at 7 days (7d, 14 days (14d, or 21 days post-hatch (21d with KLH-adjuvant emulsions, and boosted 7 days later. Adults were vaccinated in the same manner. Induced KLH-specific IgY antibodies were measured using ELISA. Comparisons within age groups revealed no significant increase in KLH-specific antibody levels between vaccination and boost in 7d birds, yet significant increases between vaccination and boost were observed in 14d, 21d, and adult groups. There was no significant difference among age groups in KLH antibody response to priming vaccination, yet KLH antibody response post-boost significantly increased with age among groups. Post-boost antibody response in all nestling age groups was significantly lower than in adults, indicating that mature adult secondary antibody response level was not achieved in zebra finches prior to fledging (21 days post-hatch in zebra finches. Findings from this study contribute fundamental knowledge to the fields of developmental immunology and ecological immunology and strengthen the utility of zebra finches as a model organism for future studies of immune ontogeny.

  8. Theobromine Is Responsible for the Effects of Cocoa on the Antibody Immune Status of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Bossacoma, Mariona; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Franch, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2018-03-01

    A 10% cocoa-enriched diet influences immune system functionality including the prevention of the antibody response and the induction of lower immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations. However, neither cocoa polyphenols nor cocoa fiber can totally explain these immunoregulatory properties. This study aimed to establish the influence of cocoa theobromine in systemic and intestinal Ig concentrations and to determine the effect of cocoa or theobromine feeding on lymphoid tissue lymphocyte composition. Three-week-old female Lewis rats were fed either a standard diet (AIN-93M; RF group), a 10% cocoa diet (CC group), or a 0.25% theobromine diet (the same amount provided by the cocoa diet; TB group) in 2 separate experiments that lasted 19 (experiment 1) or 8 (experiment 2) d. Serum IgG, IgM, IgA, and intestinal secretory IgA (sIgA) concentrations were determined. In addition, at the end of experiment 2, thymus, mesenteric lymph node (MLN), and spleen lymphocyte populations were analyzed. Both CC and TB groups in experiments 1 and 2 showed similar serum IgG, IgM, and IgA and intestinal sIgA concentrations, which were lower than those in the RF group (46-98% lower in experiment 1 and 23-91% lower in experiment 2; P theobromine diets similarly changed the thymocyte composition by increasing CD4-CD8- (+133%) and CD4+CD8- (+53%) proportions (P theobromine in cocoa plays an immunoregulatory role that is responsible for cocoa's influence on both systemic and intestinal antibody concentrations and also for modifying lymphoid tissue lymphocyte composition in young healthy Lewis rats. The majority of these changes are observed after a single week of being fed a diet containing 0.25% theobromine.

  9. Intratracheally administered pathogen-associated molecular patterns affect antibody responses of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploegaert, T C W; De Vries Reilingh, G; Nieuwland, M G B; Lammers, A; Savelkoul, H F J; Parmentier, H K

    2007-08-01

    Various potential immune-modulating microbially derived pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP), or so called homotopes, are present in high concentrations in the environment of food animals. In previous studies, intravenously administered PAMP had variable effects on specific primary and secondary immune responses of poultry to systemically administered antigens. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of intratracheal (i.t.) challenge with the PAMP lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and Zymosan-A (containing 1,3 beta-glucan) on primary and secondary (total) antibody (Ab) responses and (isotype) IgM, IgG, and IgA responses to systemically administered human serum albumin (HuSA), and Ab titers to infectious bursal disease (Gumboro virus) and infectious bronchitis vaccines in layer hens at 9 and 22 wk of age. Birds were challenged via the trachea with PAMP for 5 consecutive days prior to primary and secondary immunization with HuSA. Intratracheally administered LTA and, to a minor extent, lipopolysaccharide significantly enhanced secondary total and IgG Ab responses to HuSA. 1,3 beta-Glucan did not significantly affect Ab responses to HuSA. All birds challenged with PAMP showed a decreased BW. Higher total Ab titers to infectious bursal disease and infectious bronchitis were found in birds challenged with LTA. The present results indicate that i.t. administered PAMP affect the humoral immune responsiveness of poultry, which may lead to an enhanced status of immune reactivity. Furthermore, our results suggest that the hygienic status of the environment influences BW (gain). The consequences of immune modulation by airborne PAMP or hygienic conditions in chicken husbandry for vaccine delivery and immune responsiveness of poultry are discussed.

  10. Anti-HERV-K (HML-2) capsid antibody responses in HIV elite controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mulder, Miguel; SenGupta, Devi; Deeks, Steven G; Martin, Jeffrey N; Pilcher, Christopher D; Hecht, Frederick M; Sacha, Jonah B; Nixon, Douglas F; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre

    2017-08-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) comprise approximately 8% of the human genome and while the majority are transcriptionally silent, the most recently integrated HERV, HERV-K (HML-2), remains active. During HIV infection, HERV-K (HML-2) specific mRNA transcripts and viral proteins can be detected. In this study, we aimed to understand the antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag in the context of HIV-1 infection. We developed an ELISA assay using either recombinant protein or 164 redundant "15mer" HERV-K (HML-2) Gag peptides to test sera for antibody reactivity. We identified a total of eight potential HERV-K (HML-2) Gag immunogenic domains: two on the matrix (peptides 16 and 31), one on p15 (peptide 85), three on the capsid (peptides 81, 97 and 117), one on the nucleocapsid (peptide 137) and one on the QP1 protein (peptide 157). Four epitopes (peptides 16, 31, 85 and 137) were highly immunogenic. No significant differences in antibody responses were found between HIV infected participants (n = 40) and uninfected donors (n = 40) for 6 out of the 8 epitopes tested. The antibody response against nucleocapsid (peptide 137) was significantly lower (p K (HML-2) capsid recombinant peptide in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme immunospot (Elispot) assays. We found that the HERV-K (HML-2) Gag antibody and T cell response by Elispot were significantly correlated. HIV elite controllers had a strong cellular and antibody response against HERV-K (HML-2) Gag directed mainly against the Capsid region. Collectively, these data suggest that anti-HERV-K (HML-2) antibodies targeting capsid could have an immunoprotective effect in HIV infection.

  11. Delivering HIV Gagp24 to DCIR Induces Strong Antibody Responses In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Flamar

    Full Text Available Targeting dendritic cell-specific endocytic receptors using monoclonal antibodies fused to desired antigens is an approach widely used in vaccine development to enhance the poor immunogenicity of protein-based vaccines and to induce immune responses. Here, we engineered an anti-human DCIR recombinant antibody, which cross-reacts with the homologous cynomolgous macaque receptor and was fused via the heavy chain C-terminus to HIV Gagp24 protein (αDCIR.Gagp24. In vitro, αDCIR.Gagp24 expanded multifunctional antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells recognizing multiple Gagp24 peptides from HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In non human primates, priming with αDCIR.Gagp24 without adjuvant elicited a strong anti-Gagp24 antibody response after the second immunization, while in the non-targeted HIV Gagp24 protein control groups the titers were weak. The presence of the double-stranded RNA poly(I:C adjuvant significantly enhanced the anti-Gagp24 antibody response in all the groups and reduced the discrimination between the different vaccine groups. The avidity of the anti-Gagp24 antibody responses was similar with either αDCIR.Gagp24 or Gagp24 immunization, but increased from medium to high avidity in both groups when poly(I:C was co-administered. This data provides a comparative analysis of DC-targeted and non-targeted proteins for their capacity to induce antigen-specific antibody responses in vivo. This study supports the further development of DCIR-based DC-targeting vaccines for protective durable antibody induction, especially in the absence of adjuvant.

  12. Direct Probing of Germinal Center Responses Reveals Immunological Features and Bottlenecks for Neutralizing Antibody Responses to HIV Env Trimer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Carnathan, Diane G.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Pauthner, Matthias; Briney, Bryan; Reiss, Samantha M.; Wood, Jennifer S.; Kaushik, Kirti; van Gils, Marit J.; Rosales, Sandy L.; van der Woude, Patricia; Locci, Michela; Le, Khoa M.; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Mohammed, Ata Ur Rasheed; Huang, Jessica; Gumber, Sanjeev; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Kasturi, Sudhir P.; Pulendran, Bali; Moore, John P.; Ahmed, Rafi; Seumois, Grégory; Burton, Dennis R.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Silvestri, Guido; Crotty, Shane

    2016-01-01

    Generating tier 2 HIV-neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses by immunization remains a challenging problem, and the immunological barriers to induction of such responses with Env immunogens remain unclear. Here, some rhesus monkeys developed autologous tier 2 nAbs upon HIV Env trimer immunization

  13. Radioimmunoassay test system for detection of anti-insulin antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudko, N.V.; Piven', N.V.; Ibragimova, G.V.; Kasatkin, Yu.N.

    1995-01-01

    A radiodiagnostic test system has been developed and commercial kit for radioimmunoassay of anti-insulin antibodies in human blood serum created. Clinical trials of the kit in patients (150 diabetics with types 1 and 2 condition) and normal subjects (n=100) demonstrated the possibility of using this kit for the detection of preclinical forms of diabetes and for distinguishing groups at risk of diabetes among children and adults, for the detection of insulin resistance, for the differential diagnosis of diabetes, and for monitoring the efficacy of insulin therapy. 9 refs.; 1 tab

  14. Identification, production, and use of polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies for immunoaffinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Nancy E; Foley, Katherine M; Stalder, Elizabeth S; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful tool for purification of proteins and protein complexes. The availability of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized the field of immunoaffinity chromatography by providing a continuous supply of highly uniform antibody. Before the availability of mAbs, the recovery of the target protein from immobilized polyclonal antibodies usually required very harsh, often denaturing conditions. Although harsh conditions are often still used to disrupt the antigen-antibody interaction when using a mAb, various methods have been developed to exploit the uniformity of the antigen-antibody reaction in order to identify agents or conditions that gently disrupt this interaction and thus result in higher recovery of active protein from immunoaffinity chromatography. We discuss here the use of a specific type of monoclonal antibody that we have designated "polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies" (PR-mAbs). These are naturally occurring mAbs that have high affinity for the antigen under binding conditions, but have low affinity in the presence of a combination of low molecular weight hydroxylated compounds (polyols) and nonchaotropic salts. Therefore, these PR-mAbs can be used for gentle immunoaffinity chromatography. PR-mAbs can be easily identified and adapted to a powerful protein purification method for a target protein.

  15. Prevalence of antibodies to a new histo-blood system: the FORS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Carlos; Hesse, Camilla; Rocha, Clara; Osório, Nádia; Valado, Ana; Caseiro, Armando; Gabriel, António; Svensson, Lola; Moslemi, Ali-Reza; Siba, Wafa Abu; Srour, Mahmoud A; Pereira, Cristina; Tomaz, Jorge; Teixeira, Paulo; Mendes, Fernando

    2018-02-01

    In 1987, three unrelated English families were reported with a putative blood subgroup called A pae . Swedish researchers later found evidence leading to abolishment of the A pae subgroup and establishment instead of the FORS blood group system (System 31 - ISBT, 2012). It is important to know the prevalence of antibodies in order to make the best decisions in transfusion medicine. Cells expressing the Forssman saccharide, such as sheep erythrocytes, are needed to detect the anti-Forssman antibody. The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of human anti-Forssman antibody. Plasma samples from 800 individuals were studied. Sheep erythrocytes or Forssman "kodecytes" were mixed with the plasma samples using the tube technique. Plasma from an A pae individual was used as a negative control and monoclonal anti-Forssman antibody (M1/22.25.8HL cell line supernatant) was used as the positive control. Of the 800 individuals tested, one was negative for the presence of anti-Forssman antibody. We compared the anti-Forssman antibody reaction pattern between genders and found that males have weaker reactions than females, both at room temperature (p=0.026) and at 37 °C (p=0.043). We also investigated the reaction pattern of anti-Forssman antibody in relation to ABO and Rh blood group types without finding any significant differences. Sheep erythrocytes are suitable for searching for human anti-Forssman antibody. The quantity of anti-Forssman antibodies in plasma is higher in females than in males. In the population (n=800) studied here, we found one individual lacking the anti-Forssman antibody. These results contribute to the data already published, confirming that FORS is a rare blood group.

  16. An HIV-1 Env-Antibody Complex Focuses Antibody Responses to Conserved Neutralizing Epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yajing; Wilson, Richard; O'Dell, Sijy; Guenaga, Javier; Feng, Yu; Tran, Karen; Chiang, Chi-I; Arendt, Heather E; DeStefano, Joanne; Mascola, John R; Wyatt, Richard T; Li, Yuxing

    2016-11-15

    Elicitation of broadly neutralizing Ab (bNAb) responses to the conserved elements of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), including the primary receptor CD4 binding site (CD4bs), is a major focus of vaccine development yet to be accomplished. However, a large number of CD4bs-directed bNAbs have been isolated from HIV-1-infected individuals. Comparison of the routes of binding used by the CD4bs-directed bNAbs from patients and the vaccine-elicited CD4bs-directed mAbs indicates that the latter fail to neutralize primary virus isolates because they approach the Env spike with a vertical angle and contact the specific surface residues occluded in the native spike, including the bridging sheet on gp120. To preferentially expose the CD4bs and direct the immune response away from the bridging sheet, resulting in an altered angle of approach, we engineered an immunogen consisting of gp120 core in complex with the prototypic CD4-induced Ab, 17b. This mAb directly contacts the bridging sheet but not the CD4bs. The complex was further stabilized by chemical crosslinking to prevent dissociation. Rabbits immunized with the crosslinked complex displayed earlier affinity maturation, achieving tier 1 virus neutralization compared with animals immunized with gp120 core alone. Immunization with the crosslinked complex induced transient Ab responses with binding specificity similar to the CD4bs-directed bNAbs. mAbs derived from complex-immunized rabbits displayed footprints on gp120 more distal from the bridging sheet as compared with previous vaccine-elicited CD4bs Abs, indicating that Env-Ab complexes effectively dampen immune responses to undesired immunodominant bridging sheet determinants. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Effect of increased CRM₁₉₇ carrier protein dose on meningococcal C bactericidal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucia H; Blake, Milan S

    2012-04-01

    New multivalent CRM(197)-based conjugate vaccines are available for childhood immunization. Clinical studies were reviewed to assess meningococcal group C (MenC) antibody responses following MenC-CRM(197) coadministration with CRM(197)-based pneumococcal or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines. Infants receiving a total CRM(197) carrier protein dose of ∼50 μg and concomitant diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP)-containing vaccine tended to have lower MenC geometric mean antibody titers and continued to have low titers after the toddler dose. Nevertheless, at least 95% of children in the reported studies achieved a MenC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titer of ≥ 1:8 after the last infant or toddler dose. SBA was measured using an assay with a baby rabbit or human complement source. Additional studies are needed to assess long-term antibody persistence and MenC CRM(197) conjugate vaccine immunogenicity using alternative dosing schedules.

  18. [Study on antibody response to revaccination of hepatitis B vaccine among firstly low-response adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Yan, Bing-yu; Zhang, Li; Lü, Jing-jing; Liu, Jia-ye; Gong, Xiao-hong; Cui, Fu-qiang; Liang, Xiao-feng; Chen, Shi-yu; Xu, Ai-qiang

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate and compare the antibody to hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (anti-HBs) response and the influent factors of revaccination of 4 kinds of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB) among firstly low-response adults. A total of 11 590 adults who were 18 - 49 years old, never received HepB vaccination, without HBV infection history, HBs-Ag negative, and had been living at 3 towns of Zhangqiu county in Shandong province Ji'nan city for more than half a year, were selected in the study in July, 2009. Self-designed questionnaire was used to select the basic information of the subjects. The subjects were divided into 4 groups by cluster sampling, and were vaccinated according to the "0-1-6" immune procedure with 10 µg HepB made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (HepB-SC), 10 µg HepB made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in Hansenula Polymorpha (HepB-HP), 20 µg HepB-SC and 20 µg HepB made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in Chinese hamster ovary cell (HepB-CHO), 3 doses respectively. The adults who were low-response to the primary hepatitis B vaccination (10 mU/ml ≤ anti-HBs Anti-HBs was detected by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and compared by the vaccine type. The influence factors about antibody response were also analyzed. Out of the 11 590 subjects, 8592 adults had accepted the primary vaccination of hepatitis B and been collected the blood samples; among whom, 1306 subjects showed low-response, at the rate of 15.20%. A total of 1034 low-response subjects accepted secondary strengthened vaccination and were collected blood samples; 55.13% of them showed anti-HBs seroconversion (anti-HBs ≥ 100 mU/ml); while the seroconversion rate in each group was 44.54% (106/238) in 10 µg HepB-SC group, 57.14% (156/273) in 10 µg HepB-HP group, 56.08% (143/255) in 20 µg HepB-SC group and 61.57% (165/268) in 20 µg HepB-CHO group, respectively. There was significant difference among the

  19. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-07

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Global Stability of Delayed Viral Infection Models with Nonlinear Antibody and CTL Immune Responses and General Incidence Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Hui; Teng, Zhidong; Li, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical behaviors for a five-dimensional viral infection model with three delays which describes the interactions of antibody, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immune responses, and nonlinear incidence rate are investigated. The threshold values for viral infection, antibody response, CTL immune response, CTL immune competition, and antibody competition, respectively, are established. Under certain assumptions, the threshold value conditions on the global stability of the infection-free, im...

  1. Antibody Responses to Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Health Care Personnel Previously Vaccinated and Vaccinated for The First Time

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan-Ying A. Huang; Shih-Cheng Chang; Yhu-Chering Huang; Cheng-Hsun Chiu; Tzou-Yien Lin

    2017-01-01

    Inactivated influenza vaccination induces a hemagglutinin-specific antibody response to the strain used for immunization. Annual vaccination is strongly recommended for health care personnel. However, it is debatable if repeated vaccination would affect the antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccine through the time. We enrolled health care personnel who had repeated and first trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in 2005?2008. Serological antibody responses were measured by hem...

  2. Association between plasma antibody response and protection in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss immersion vaccinated against Yersinia ruckeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Martin Kristian; Nylén, Jørgen; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    2011-01-01

    A key hallmark of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the generation of antigen-specific antibodies from B cells. Fish are the most primitive gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) possessing an adaptive immune system. Vaccination of rainbow trout against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) by immersion...... in Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers a high degree of protection to the fish. The immune mechanisms responsible for protection may comprise both cellular and humoral elements but the role of specific immunoglobulins in this system has been questioned and not previously described. The present study...... demonstrates significant increase in plasma antibody titers following immersion vaccination and significantly reduced mortality during Y. ruckeri challenge.Rainbow trout were immersion-vaccinated, using either a commercial ERM vaccine (AquaVac™ ERM vet) or an experimental Y. ruckeri bacterin. Half of the trout...

  3. Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccine in patients with early stage Hodgkin's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B.; Specht, L.; Henrichsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase in antib......Antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination was studied in 76 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) before, during and at different time intervals after cessation of therapy. All patients were in pathological stage I and II following explorative laparatomy with splenectomy. The increase...

  4. A new automatic system for Cytomegalovirus antibodies screening: preliminary evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna De Angelis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the automated enhanced-chemiluminescence VITROS EciQ (Ortho system compared to the EIA ALISEI (Radim system for the first level detection of CMV IgG and IgM antibodies. Samples derived from 95 immunocompetent patients were examined. Both systems showed similar results for CMV IgG: 63 samples were positive, 28 negative and 4 samples were weakly positive. The four weakly positive samples were subsequently confirmed with the LIAISON (DiaSorin system. Agreement was 91% concerning CMV IgM detection: 79 samples were negative, 7 positive and 9 samples releved discrepancy between the two systems.When these 9 cases were tested with LIAISON system for CMV IgM and IgG and the CMV IgG avidity test, data revealed complete agreement between VITROS EciQ and LIAISON systems.VITROS EciQ system seems to be a valuable system for the first level diagnosis of CMV infection.

  5. Filamentous phage as an immunogenic carrier to elicit focused antibody responses against a synthetic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houten, N.E.; Zwick, M.B.; Menendez, A.; Scott, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Filamentous bacteriophage are widely used as immunogenic carriers for “phage-displayed” recombinant peptides. Here we report that they are an effective immunogenic carrier for synthetic peptides. The f1.K phage was engineered to have an additional Lys residue near the N-terminus of the major coat protein, pVIII, so as to enhance access to chemical cross-linking agents. The dimeric synthetic peptide, B2.1, was conjugated to f1.K (f1.K/B2.1) in high copy number and compared as an immunogen to B2.1 conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA/B2.1) and to phage-displayed, recombinant B2.1 peptide. All immunogens were administered without adjuvant. The serum antibody titers were measured against: the peptide, the carrier, and, if appropriate, the cross-linker. All immunogens elicited anti-peptide antibody titers, with those elicited by OVA/B2.1 exceeding those by f1.K/B2.1; both titers were greater than that elicited by recombinant B2.1 phage. Comparison of the anti-peptide and anti-carrier antibody responses showed that f1.K/B2.1 elicited a more focused anti-peptide antibody response than OVA/B2.1. The anti-peptide antibody response against f1.K/B2.1 was optimized for the injection route, dose and adjuvant. Dose and adjuvant did not have a significant effect on anti-peptide antibody titers, but a change in injection route from intraperitoneal (IP) to subcutaneous (SC) enhanced anti-peptide antibody titers after seven immunizations. The optimized anti-peptide antibody response exceeded the anti-carrier one by 21-fold, compared to 0.07-fold elicited by OVA/B2.1. This indicates that phage as a carrier can focus the antibody response against the peptide. The results are discussed with respect to the advantages of phage as an alternative to traditional carrier proteins for synthetic peptides, carbohydrates and haptens, and to further improvements in phage as immunogenic carriers. PMID:16488517

  6. Differential effects of preirradiation on adoptive antibody responses in DBA/2 and BALB/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonkosky, D.; Buffett, R.F.; Bennett, M.

    1978-01-01

    Mice were lethally irradiated on the same day or 3 days prior to the infusion of syngeneic thymus and marrow cells. Mice were immunized with sheep erythrocytes and direct plaque-forming cells per spleen were determined 8 days after cell transfer. Preirradiation of hosts 3 days before cell transfer had varying effects on the level of adoptive antibody responses in mice of different strains: Responses of DBA/2 and DBA/1 were deficient, responses of CD2F1, B10, B10;D2, C3H, C3BF1 and SJL were unaffected, and responses of BALB/c, CBA, and 129 mice were enhanced. The defect in the antibody responses of DBA/2 hosts was dependent on the combination of a DBA/2 host and a DBA/2 cell inoculum. Differentiation of both DBA/2 thymus and marrow cells was deficient in the preirradiated DBA/2 host. This defect did not appear to be the result of loss of adherent cells from the preirradiated DBA/2 host. The enhanced antibody response observed in BALB/c mice appeared to be due to altered activity of BALB/c thymus cells. Preirradiated BALB/c or DBA/2 recipients reconstituted with BALB/c thymus cells and BALB/c or DBA/2 marrow cells showed enhanced antibody responses, while preirradiated BALB/c or DBA/2 recipients reconstituted with BALB/c marrow cells and DBA/2 thymus cells showed no change in degree of antibody responses when compared to control recipients. The preirradiated host had altered its ability to control BALB/c thymus cell activity; this lack of control may be due to loss of regulator cells from the host

  7. Pregnancies in women with systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, K

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has preponderance in women in their childbearing years; consequently pregnancy has always been an important issue of concern for the patient and the treating physician. Based upon numerous reports on successful pregnancy outcomes in the past decades, the initial advice against pregnancy in the 1950s has been replaced by a common understanding that women with SLE often have successful pregnancy outcomes, and clinicians therefore advise on pregnancy planning, including possible drug adjustments, timing and close surveillance. The recently published Predictors of Pregnancy Outcome: Biomarkers in Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (PROMISSE) study, so far the largest multicentre cohort study of pregnant women with underlying stable SLE, has given some important answers to long-discussed questions. Future studies on data collected from the PROMISSE cohort will hopefully identify serological biomarkers, possibly genes, and in addition, give valuable information about underlying disease mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. [Salmonella typhi vaccination response study reveals defective antibody production selective IgA deficiency patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleguezuelo, Daniel E; Gianelli, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD) is the most prevalent immunodeficiency worldwide, progressing to common variable immunodeficiency only in few reported cases. We report the case of a Spanish female aged 22 and diagnosed of selective IgA deficiency, a long history of bronchitis, several episodes of pneumonia, bilateral bronchiectasis, normal IgG, IgM, IgG subclasses, and detectable pre-vaccination IgG antibodies against tetanus toxoid and Streptococcus pneumoniae. She was evaluated in our clinic in order to rule out common variable immunodeficiency. We observed good antibody response to tetanus toxoid, absence of circulating switched memory B cells, decreased response to pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and a lack of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine. Most SIgAD patients presents with upper respiratory tract infections or mild diarrhea. Those with lower tract infections, pneumonia or untreatable diarrhea should follow B-cell subpopulations' study and antibody response to vaccines. Absence of response to Salmonella typhi vaccine allowed us to expose the defective antibody production.

  9. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacky Flipse

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection.

  10. Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus: a syndrome with diverse clinical features and antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugaiv, Erkingül; Leite, Maria Isabel; Şehitoğlu, Elçin; Woodhall, Mark; Çavuş, Filiz; Waters, Patrick; İçöz, Sema; Birişik, Ömer; Uğurel, Elif; Ulusoy, Canan; Kürtüncü, Murat; Vural, Burçak; Vincent, Angela; Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Tüzün, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    To better characterize progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) syndrome and identify novel PERM phenotypes. The clinical features and antibody status of PERM patients were investigated using immunoblots, cell-based assays, RIA, protein macroarray and ELISA. Two patients with supratentorial involvement showed abnormal PET or EEG findings. One patient was discovered to have renal cell carcinoma, and protein macroarray revealed Ma3-antibodies. Another patient with leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies showed a good response to immunotherapy. The heterogeneity of the immunological features suggests that PERM is caused by diverse pathogenic mechanisms. Seropositivity to well-characterized neuronal cell surface antigens might indicate a good treatment response. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. The Complexity of a Dengue Vaccine: A Review of the Human Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flipse, Jacky; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide. Yet, there are no vaccines or specific antivirals available to prevent or treat the disease. Several dengue vaccines are currently in clinical or preclinical stages. The most advanced vaccine is the chimeric tetravalent CYD-TDV vaccine of Sanofi Pasteur. This vaccine has recently cleared Phase III, and efficacy results have been published. Excellent tetravalent seroconversion was seen, yet the protective efficacy against infection was surprisingly low. Here, we will describe the complicating factors involved in the generation of a safe and efficacious dengue vaccine. Furthermore, we will discuss the human antibody responses during infection, including the epitopes targeted in humans. Also, we will discuss the current understanding of the assays used to evaluate antibody response. We hope this review will aid future dengue vaccine development as well as fundamental research related to the phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection. PMID:26065421

  12. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack

    2017-01-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  13. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack, E-mail: gabiortegacoelho@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Costa, Andrea da; Rodrigues, Jaqueline Pollizeli; Galisteo Júnior, Andrés Jimenez; Andrade Júnior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br, E-mail: raquelaires@itpacporto.com.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Protozoologia; Seibert, Carla Simone, E-mail: seibertcs@uft.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  14. Variable Domain N-Linked Glycans Acquired During Antigen-Specific Immune Responses Can Contribute to Immunoglobulin G Antibody Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleur S. van de Bovenkamp

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG can contain N-linked glycans in the variable domains, the so-called Fab glycans, in addition to the Fc glycans in the CH2 domains. These Fab glycans are acquired following introduction of N-glycosylation sites during somatic hypermutation and contribute to antibody diversification. We investigated whether Fab glycans may—in addition to affecting antigen binding—contribute to antibody stability. By analyzing thermal unfolding profiles of antibodies with or without Fab glycans, we demonstrate that introduction of Fab glycans can improve antibody stability. Strikingly, removal of Fab glycans naturally acquired during antigen-specific immune responses can deteriorate antibody stability, suggesting in vivo selection of stable, glycosylated antibodies. Collectively, our data show that variable domain N-linked glycans acquired during somatic hypermutation can contribute to IgG antibody stability. These findings indicate that introducing Fab glycans may represent a mechanism to improve therapeutic/diagnostic antibody stability.

  15. Immune System and Genetics: A Different Approach to the Diversity of Antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Camacho, Nubia Estela

    2011-01-01

    It is common to find in immunology or genetic books a chapter entitled immune system and genetics; this association focuses on how the generation of antibodies broke the paradigm one gene, one protein, since in this case one gene generates millions of proteins. However, the immune system has many more links to genetics and heredity. For example, any substance or compound that an organism produces is a potential antigen, when it is recognized as foreign by the immune system of another organism from the same or different species. The proteins that are potentially antigenic are encoded by the individual's genotype. The ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic proteins, as well as the type and intensity of that response, are also correlated with the organism's genotype. In addition, deficiencies in the immune response may be associated with mutations or genetic polymorphisms, which result in susceptibility to infection diseases.

  16. Antibody Response to Lyme Disease Spirochetes in the Context of VlsE-Mediated Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogovskyy, Artem S; Gillis, David C; Ionov, Yurij; Gerasimov, Ekaterina; Zelikovsky, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Lyme disease (LD), the most prevalent tick-borne illness in North America, is caused by Borrelia burgdorferi The long-term survival of B. burgdorferi spirochetes in the mammalian host is achieved though VlsE-mediated antigenic variation. It is mathematically predicted that a highly variable surface antigen prolongs bacterial infection sufficiently to exhaust the immune response directed toward invariant surface antigens. If the prediction is correct, it is expected that the antibody response to B. burgdorferi invariant antigens will become nonprotective as B. burgdorferi infection progresses. To test this assumption, changes in the protective efficacy of the immune response to B. burgdorferi surface antigens were monitored via a superinfection model over the course of 70 days. B. burgdorferi-infected mice were subjected to secondary challenge by heterologous B. burgdorferi at different time points postinfection (p.i.). When the infected mice were superinfected with a VlsE-deficient clone (ΔVlsE) at day 28 p.i., the active anti-B. burgdorferi immune response did not prevent ΔVlsE-induced spirochetemia. In contrast, most mice blocked culture-detectable spirochetemia induced by wild-type B. burgdorferi (WT), indicating that VlsE was likely the primary target of the antibody response. As the B. burgdorferi infection further progressed, however, reversed outcomes were observed. At day 70 p.i. the host immune response to non-VlsE antigens became sufficiently potent to clear spirochetemia induced by ΔVlsE and yet failed to prevent WT-induced spirochetemia. To test if any significant changes in the anti-B. burgdorferi antibody repertoire accounted for the observed outcomes, global profiles of antibody specificities were determined. However, comparison of mimotopes revealed no major difference between day 28 and day 70 antibody repertoires. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells Mediate IgE Antibody Response to Airborne Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Dent, Alexander L.; Kita, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Background Type 2 helper T (Th2) cells have long been believed to play a pivotal role in allergic immune responses, including IgE antibody production and type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and pathology. A new T cell subset, T follicular helper cells (Tfh) cells, is specialized in supporting B cell maturation and antibody production. Objective To investigate the roles of Tfh cells in allergic immune responses. Methods Naïve mice were exposed to cytokines or natural allergens through the airways. Development of allergic immune responses was analyzed by collecting draining lymph nodes (LNs) and sera and by challenging the animals. Cytokine reporter mice and gene-deficient mice were used to dissect the immunologic mechanisms. Results We observed the development of IL-4-producing Tfh cells and Th2 cells in draining LNs following airway exposure to IL-1 family cytokines or natural allergens. Tfh cells and Th2 cells demonstrated unique phenotypes, tissue localization, and cytokine responses. Tfh cells supported the sustained production of IgE antibody in vivo in the absence of other T cell subsets or even when Th2 cell functions were severely compromised. Conversely, conditional deficiency of the master regulator Bcl6 in CD4+ T cells resulted in a marked reduction in Tfh cells and IgE antibody levels, but type 2 cytokine responses and eosinophilic inflammation in the airways remained unaffected. Conclusion Tfh cells play critical roles in the regulation of IgE antibody production. Allergic immune responses to airborne allergens likely involve two distinct subsets of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells, namely Tfh cells and Th2 cells. PMID:27325434

  18. Follicular helper T cells mediate IgE antibody response to airborne allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takao; Iijima, Koji; Dent, Alexander L; Kita, Hirohito

    2017-01-01

    T H 2 cells have long been believed to play a pivotal role in allergic immune responses, including IgE antibody production and type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation and pathology. A new T-cell subset, follicular helper T (T FH ) cells, is specialized in supporting B-cell maturation and antibody production. We sought to investigate the roles of T FH cells in allergic immune responses. Naive mice were exposed to cytokines or natural allergens through the airways. Development of allergic immune responses was analyzed by collecting draining lymph nodes and sera and by challenging the animals. Cytokine reporter mice and gene-deficient mice were used to dissect the immunologic mechanisms. We observed the development of IL-4-producing T FH cells and T H 2 cells in draining lymph nodes after airway exposure to IL-1 family cytokines or natural allergens. T FH and T H 2 cells demonstrated unique phenotypes, tissue localization, and cytokine responses. T FH cells supported the sustained production of IgE antibody in vivo in the absence of other T-cell subsets or even when T H 2 cell functions were severely compromised. Conversely, conditional deficiency of the master regulator Bcl6 in CD4 + T cells resulted in a marked reduction in T FH cell numbers and IgE antibody levels, but type 2 cytokine responses and eosinophilic inflammation in the airways remained unaffected. T FH cells play critical roles in the regulation of IgE antibody production. Allergic immune responses to airborne allergens likely involve 2 distinct subsets of IL-4-producing CD4 + T cells, namely T FH and Th2 cells. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Squalene-containing licensed adjuvants enhance strain-specific antibody responses against the influenza hemagglutinin and induce subtype-specific antibodies against the neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Rebecca; Holznagel, Edgar; Neumann, Britta; Alex, Nina; Sawatsky, Bevan; Enkirch, Theresa; Pfeffermann, Kristin; Kruip, Carina; von Messling, Veronika; Wagner, Ralf

    2016-10-17

    While seasonal influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted, H1N1pdm09 vaccines were formulated with different squalene-containing adjuvants, to enable the reduction of antigen content thus increasing the number of doses available. To comparatively assess the effects of these adjuvants on antibody responses against matched and mismatched strains, and to correlate antibody levels with protection from disease, ferrets were immunized with 2μg of commercial H1N1pdm09 vaccine antigen alone or formulated with different licensed adjuvants. The use of squalene-containing adjuvants increased neutralizing antibody responses around 100-fold, and resulted in a significantly reduced viral load after challenge with a matched strain. While all animals mounted strong total antibody responses against the homologous H1N1 hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which correlated with the respective neutralizing antibody titers, no reactivity with the divergent H3, H5, H7, and H9 proteins were detected. Only the adjuvanted vaccines also induced antibodies against the neuraminidase (NA) protein, which were able to also recognize NA proteins from other N1 carrying strains. These findings not only support the use of squalene-containing adjuvants in dose-sparing strategies but also support speculations that the induction of NA-specific responses associated with the use of these adjuvants may confer partial protection to heterologous strains carrying the same NA subtype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Gyhrs, A; Lausen, B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibody response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine (HibCP-TT) in preterm infants. SUBJECTS: Thirty-five healthy preterm infants with gestational ages (GA) from 27 to 36 weeks and birth weights from...

  1. A life-style physical activity intervention and the antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, J.E.; Ring, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Eves, F.; Drayson, M.T.; Calver, R.; Say, V.; Allen, D.; Burns, V.E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether a life-style physical activity intervention improved antibody response to a pneumococcal vaccination in sedentary middle-aged women. Methods: Eighty-nine sedentary women completed a 16-week exercise (physical activity consultation, pedometer, telephone/e-mail prompts; n

  2. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Rowe, P; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...

  3. Persistence of Serogroup C Antibody Responses Following Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccination in United States Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-14

    available at ScienceDirect Vaccine j our na l ho me page: www.elsev ier .com/ locate /vacc ine ersistence of serogroup C antibody responses following...22] Auckland C, Gray S, Borrow R, Andrews N, Goldblatt D, Ramsay M, et al. Clinical and immunologic risk factors for meningococcal C conjugate

  4. T cell responsiveness correlates differentially with antibody isotype levels in clinical and asymptomatic filariasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Paxton, W. A.; Kruize, Y. C.; Sartono, E.; Kurniawan, A.; van het Wout, A.; Selkirk, M. E.; Partono, F.; Maizels, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    To establish the relationships among T and B cell responses, active infection, and clinical manifestations in lymphatic filariasis, filarial-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IgG antibody isotypes, and IgE levels were determined in an exposed population: 31 asymptomatic amicrofilaremics, 43

  5. Selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells and layer age affect egg quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. After 22 generations of divergent selection for antibody response against sheep red blood cells (SRBC), hatchability differed between the selected lines. Whether there is a relationship between hatchability and egg traits in these lines is not clear. 2. The aim of the present study was to

  6. A VAR2CSA:CSP conjugate capable of inducing dual specificity antibody responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matondo, Sungwa; Thrane, Susan; Janitzek, Christoph Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Catcher peptide. The covalent interaction between SpyTag/SpyCatcher enables the formation of DBL1x-DBL2x-ID2a:CSP conjugate vaccine. Immunogenicity and quality of antibody responses induced by the conjugate vaccine, as well as a control CSP-SpyCatcher vaccine, was tested in BALB/c mice.  Results: Serum samples...

  7. Immune-mediated steroid-responsive epileptic spasms and epileptic encephalopathy associated with VGKC-complex antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleiman, Jehan; Brenner, Tanja; Gill, Deepak; Troedson, Christopher; Sinclair, Adriane J; Brilot, Fabienne; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Dale, Russell C

    2011-11-01

    Autoantibodies that bind to voltage-gated potassium-channel complex proteins (VGKC-complex antibodies) occur frequently in adults with limbic encephalitis presenting with cognitive impairment and seizures. Recently, VGKC-complex antibodies have been described in a few children with limbic encephalitis, and children with unexplained encephalitis presenting with status epilepticus. We report a case of infantile-onset epileptic spasms and developmental delay compatible with epileptic encephalopathy. Our patient was a female infant, aged 4 months at presentation. She had evidence of immune activation in the central nervous system with elevated cerebrospinal fluid neopterin and mirrored oligoclonal bands, which prompted testing for autoantibodies. VGKC-complex antibodies were elevated (201 pmol/L, normaltreatment, which was started late in the disease course. On review at 13 months of age, her development was consistent with an age of 5 to 6 months. These results suggest that VGKC-complex antibodies might represent a marker of immune therapy responsiveness in a subgroup of patients with infantile epileptic encephalopathy. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2011 Mac Keith Press.

  8. Quantification of the antibody response to Propionibacterium acnes in a patient with prosthetic valve endocarditis: - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herren, T; Middendorp, M A; Zbinden, R

    2016-04-29

    The isolation of Propionibacterium acnes in blood cultures is often considered a contaminant. On rare occasions, P. acnes can cause severe infections, including endocarditis and intravascular prosthesis-associated infections. To evaluate the discrimination between a contaminant and a clinically relevant infection we used an Ouchterlony test system to quantify the antibody response to P. acnes in a patient with a proven P. acnes endocarditis. We report on a 64-year-old Caucasian man who developed P. acnes endocarditis four years following a composite valve-graft conduit replacement of the aortic root. Bacterial growth in blood cultures was detected after an incubation period of 6 days. However, the antibody titer to P. acnes was 1:8 at the time of diagnosis and declined slowly thereafter over 2½ years. The patient's response to the antibiotic treatment was excellent, and no surgical re-intervention was necessary. The working hypothesis of infective endocarditis can be substantiated by serologic testing, which, if positive, provides one additional minor criterion. Moreover, quantification of the antibody response to P. acnes, though not specific, may assist in the differentiation between contaminants and an infection. This quantification may have implications for the patient management, e.g. indication for and choice of the antibiotic therapy.

  9. Correlation of pharmacodynamic activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses to anti-IL-21R antibody therapeutics following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaulding Vikki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-IL-21R antibodies are potential therapeutics for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This study evaluated correlations between the pharmacodynamic (PD activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses of human anti-IL-21R antibodies Ab-01 and Ab-02 following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys. Methods The PD assay was based on the ability of recombinant human IL-21 (rhuIL-21 to induce expression of the IL-2RA gene in cynomolgus monkey whole blood samples ex vivo. Monkeys screened for responsiveness to rhuIL-21 stimulation using the PD assay, were given a single 10 mg/kg IV dosage of Ab-01, Ab-02, or a control antibody (3/group, and blood samples were evaluated for PD activity (inhibition of IL-2RA expression for up to 148 days. Anti-IL-21R antibody concentrations and anti-product antibody responses were measured in serum using immunoassays and flow cytometry. Results Following IV administration of Ab-01 and Ab-02 to cynomolgus monkeys, PD activity was observed as early as 5 minutes (first time point sampled. This PD activity had good correlation with the serum concentrations and anti-product antibody responses throughout the study. The mean terminal half-life (t1/2 was ~10.6 and 2.3 days for Ab-01 and Ab-02, respectively. PD activity was lost at ~5-13 weeks for Ab-01 and at ~2 weeks for Ab-02, when serum concentrations were relatively low. The estimated minimum concentrations needed to maintain PD activity were ~4-6 nM for Ab-01 and ~2.5 nM for Ab-02, and were consistent with the respective KD values for binding to human IL-21R. For Ab-01, there was noticeable inter-animal variability in t1/2 values (~6-14 days and the resulting PD profiles, which correlated with the onset of anti-product antibody formation. While all three Ab-01-dosed animals were positive for anti-Ab-01 antibodies, only one monkey (with the shortest t1/2 and the earliest loss of PD activity had evidence of neutralizing anti-Ab-01

  10. Lack of association between mannose binding lectin and antibody responses after acellular pertussis vaccinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is one of the key molecules in innate immunity and its role in human vaccine responses is poorly known. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of MBL polymorphisms with antibody production after primary and booster vaccinations with acellular pertussis vaccines in infants and adolescents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five hundred and sixty eight subjects were included in this study. In the adolescent cohort 355 subjects received a dose of diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis (dTpa vaccine ten years previously. Follow-up was performed at 3, 5 and 10 years. Infant cohort consisted of 213 subjects, who had received three primary doses of DTaP vaccine at 3, 5, and 12 months of age according to Finnish immunization program. Blood samples were collected before the vaccinations at 2,5 months of age and after the vaccinations at 13 months and 2 years of age. Concentrations of IgG antibodies to pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin and antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids were measured by standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of MBL2 gene exon1 (codons 52, 54, 57 were examined. MBL serum concentration was also measured from the adolescent cohort. No association was found with MBL2 exon 1 polymorphisms and antibody responses against vaccine antigens, after primary and booster dTpa vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that MBL polymorphisms do not affect the production and persistence of antibodies after acellular pertussis vaccination. Our finding also suggests that MBL might not be involved in modulating antibody responses to the vaccines made of purified bacterial proteins.

  11. Mapping Polyclonal HIV-1 Antibody Responses via Next-Generation Neutralization Fingerprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Doria-Rose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational neutralization fingerprinting, NFP, is an efficient and accurate method for predicting the epitope specificities of polyclonal antibody responses to HIV-1 infection. Here, we present next-generation NFP algorithms that substantially improve prediction accuracy for individual donors and enable serologic analysis for entire cohorts. Specifically, we developed algorithms for: (a selection of optimized virus neutralization panels for NFP analysis, (b estimation of NFP prediction confidence for each serum sample, and (c identification of sera with potentially novel epitope specificities. At the individual donor level, the next-generation NFP algorithms particularly improved the ability to detect multiple epitope specificities in a sample, as confirmed both for computationally simulated polyclonal sera and for samples from HIV-infected donors. Specifically, the next-generation NFP algorithms detected multiple specificities in twice as many samples of simulated sera. Further, unlike the first-generation NFP, the new algorithms were able to detect both of the previously confirmed antibody specificities, VRC01-like and PG9-like, in donor CHAVI 0219. At the cohort level, analysis of ~150 broadly neutralizing HIV-infected donor samples suggested a potential connection between clade of infection and types of elicited epitope specificities. Most notably, while 10E8-like antibodies were observed in infections from different clades, an enrichment of such antibodies was predicted for clade B samples. Ultimately, such large-scale analyses of antibody responses to HIV-1 infection can help guide the design of epitope-specific vaccines that are tailored to take into account the prevalence of infecting clades within a specific geographic region. Overall, the next-generation NFP technology will be an important tool for the analysis of broadly neutralizing polyclonal antibody responses against HIV-1.

  12. Mapping the AAV capsid host antibody response towards the development of second generation gene delivery vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shan eTseng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recombinant Adeno-associated virus (rAAV gene delivery system is entering a crucial and exciting phase with the promise of more than 20 years of intense research now realized in a number of successful human clinical trials. However, as a natural host to AAV infection, anti-AAV antibodies are prevalent in the human population. For example, ~70% of human sera samples are positive for AAV serotype 2 (AAV2. Furthermore, low levels of pre-existing neutralizing antibodies in the circulation are detrimental to the efficacy of corrective therapeutic AAV gene delivery. A key component to overcoming this obstacle is the identification of regions of the AAV capsid that participate in interactions with host immunity, especially neutralizing antibodies, to be modified for neutralization escape. Three main approaches have been utilized to map antigenic epitopes on AAV capsids. The first is directed evolution in which AAV variants are selected in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or pooled human sera. This results in AAV variants with mutations on important neutralizing epitopes. The second is epitope searching, achieved by peptide scanning, peptide insertion or site-directed mutagenesis. The third, a structure biology-based approach, utilizes cryo-electron microscopy and image reconstruction of AAV capsids complexed to fragment antibodies, which are generated from monoclonal antibodies, to directly visualize the epitopes. In this review, the contribution of these three approaches to the current knowledge of AAV epitopes and success in their use to create second generation vectors will be discussed.

  13. Anti-double stranded DNA antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus : Detection and clinical relevance of IgM-class antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, H; Spronk, PE; Hummel, EJ; deBoer, G; terBorg, EJ; Limburg, PC; Kallenberg, CGM

    1996-01-01

    We determined the discriminative value of the Farr assay in comparison to ELISA and Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescence assay (IFT) for detecting anti-dsDNA antibodies as a diagnostic tool for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Special attention was paid to the diagnostic significance of

  14. Immunization with recombinant enterovirus 71 viral capsid protein 1 fragment stimulated antibody responses in hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch’ng Wei-Choong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 causes severe neurological diseases resulting in high mortality in young children worldwide. Development of an effective vaccine against EV71 infection is hampered by the lack of appropriate animal models for efficacy testing of candidate vaccines. Previously, we have successfully tested the immunogenicity and protectiveness of a candidate EV71 vaccine, containing recombinant Newcastle disease virus capsids that display an EV71 VP1 fragment (NPt-VP11-100 protein, in a mouse model of EV71 infection. A drawback of this system is its limited window of EV71 susceptibility period, 2 weeks after birth, leading to restricted options in the evaluation of optimal dosing regimens. To address this issue, we have assessed the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine in a hamster system, which offers a 4-week susceptibility period to EV71 infection. Results obtained showed that the NPt-VP11-100 candidate vaccine stimulated excellent humoral immune response in the hamsters. Despite the high level of antibody production, they failed to neutralize EV71 viruses or protect vaccinated hamsters in viral challenge studies. Nevertheless, these findings have contributed towards a better understanding of the NPt-VP11-100 recombinant protein as a candidate vaccine in an alternative animal model system.

  15. Cytokine profiles and antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Background: The ability of the host immune system to efficiently clear Plasmodium falciparum parasites during a malaria infection ... infection, in an attempt to identify immunological signs indicative of the development of natural immunity against malaria in Ibadan, ..... Stephens R, Langhorne J. Priming of CD4+ T cells and.

  16. Anti-α-galactosidase A antibody response to agalsidase beta treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcox, William R; Linthorst, Gabor E; Germain, Dominique P

    2012-01-01

    Agalsidase beta, a form of recombinant human α-galactosidase A (αGAL), is approved for use as enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Fabry disease. An immunogenic response against a therapeutic protein could potentially impact its efficacy or safety. The development of anti-αGAL IgG antibodies...... was evaluated in 571 men and 251 women from the Fabry Registry who were treated with agalsidase beta. Most men developed antibodies (416 of 571, 73%), whereas most women did not (31 of 251, 12%). Women were also significantly more likely to tolerize than men; whereas 18 of 31 women tolerized (58%, 95%CI: 52...

  17. Antibody response of five bird species after vaccination with a killed West Nile virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Llizo, Shirley Yeo; Miller, Christine L; Glaser, Amy L

    2007-06-01

    West Nile virus has been associated with numerous bird mortalities in the United States since 1999. Five avian species at three zoological parks were selected to assess the antibody response to vaccination for West Nile virus: black-footed penguins (Spheniscus demersus), little blue penguins (Eudyptula minor), American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber), Chilean flamingos (Phoenicopterus chilensis), and Attwater's prairie chickens (Tympanuchus cupido attwateri). All birds were vaccinated intramuscularly at least twice with a commercially available inactivated whole virus vaccine (Innovator). Significant differences in antibody titer over time were detected for black-footed penguins and both flamingo species.

  18. Role of the Antigen Capture Pathway in the Induction of a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Anthrax Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Verma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Toxin neutralizing antibodies represent the major mode of protective immunity against a number of toxin-mediated bacterial diseases, including anthrax; however, the cellular mechanisms that lead to optimal neutralizing antibody responses remain ill defined. Here we show that the cellular binding pathway of anthrax protective antigen (PA, the binding component of anthrax toxin, determines the toxin neutralizing antibody response to this antigen. PA, which binds cellular receptors and efficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, was found to elicit robust anti-PA IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses. In contrast, a receptor binding-deficient mutant of PA, which does not bind receptors and only inefficiently enters antigen-presenting cells by macropinocytosis, elicited very poor antibody responses. A chimeric protein consisting of the receptor binding-deficient PA mutant tethered to the binding subunit of cholera toxin, which efficiently enters cells using the cholera toxin receptor rather than the PA receptor, elicited an anti-PA IgG antibody response similar to that elicited by wild-type PA; however, the chimeric protein elicited a poor toxin neutralizing antibody response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the antigen capture pathway can dictate the magnitudes of the total IgG and toxin neutralizing antibody responses to PA as well as the ratio of the two responses.

  19. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with. gamma. -irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.L.; Doy, T.G. (Agricultural Research Council, Compton (UK). Inst. for Research on Animal Diseases); Hanna, R.E.B. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK))

    1982-05-01

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given ..gamma..-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy.

  20. Direct Probing of Germinal Center Responses Reveals Immunological Features and Bottlenecks for Neutralizing Antibody Responses to HIV Env Trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Carnathan, Diane G; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Pauthner, Matthias; Briney, Bryan; Reiss, Samantha M; Wood, Jennifer S; Kaushik, Kirti; van Gils, Marit J; Rosales, Sandy L; van der Woude, Patricia; Locci, Michela; Le, Khoa M; de Taeye, Steven W; Sok, Devin; Mohammed, Ata Ur Rasheed; Huang, Jessica; Gumber, Sanjeev; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Kasturi, Sudhir P; Pulendran, Bali; Moore, John P; Ahmed, Rafi; Seumois, Grégory; Burton, Dennis R; Sanders, Rogier W; Silvestri, Guido; Crotty, Shane

    2016-11-22

    Generating tier 2 HIV-neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses by immunization remains a challenging problem, and the immunological barriers to induction of such responses with Env immunogens remain unclear. Here, some rhesus monkeys developed autologous tier 2 nAbs upon HIV Env trimer immunization (SOSIP.v5.2) whereas others did not. This was not because HIV Env trimers were immunologically silent because all monkeys made similar ELISA-binding antibody responses; the key difference was nAb versus non-nAb responses. We explored the immunological barriers to HIV nAb responses by combining a suite of techniques, including longitudinal lymph node fine needle aspirates. Unexpectedly, nAb development best correlated with booster immunization GC B cell magnitude and Tfh characteristics of the Env-specific CD4 T cells. Notably, these factors distinguished between successful and unsuccessful antibody responses because GC B cell frequencies and stoichiometry to GC Tfh cells correlated with nAb development, but did not correlate with total Env Ab binding titers. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, M

    1992-01-01

    The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP...... the antigens, the responses were often short-lived. In adults, the antibody responses to the GLURP489-1271 fusion protein and the (EENV)6 peptide peaked after 2 weeks, and not all individuals responded to all antigens. The antibody response, even against large fragments of conserved antigens, is not uniformly...

  2. Antibody Response is More Likely to Pneumococcal Proteins Than to Polysaccharide After HIV-associated Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Green, Nicola; Goldblatt, David

    2015-01-01

    to at least 1 protein compared to 51% of non-IPD controls. HIV IPD cases responded to more proteins than non-IPD controls (8.6 ± 8.4 vs 4.2 ± 7.6 proteins; P = .01), and had a significantly higher probability of yielding an antibody response to the proteins PiaA, PsaA, and PcpA. Twenty-two percent of HIV......-infected individuals with IPD had a serotype-specific antibody response. Younger age at the time of IPD was the only predictor of a serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody response, whereas we did not identify predictors of a protein-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: Antibody responses occurred more frequently...

  3. Antibody responses of cervids (Cervus elaphus) following experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection and the implications for immunodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Noel P; Surujballi, Om P; Prescott, John F; Duncan, J Robert; Waters, W Ray; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena

    2008-11-01

    Captive and free-ranging wildlife animals are implicated in the maintenance and transmission of bovine tuberculosis and therefore pose a significant obstacle to eradication of the disease from domestic livestock. The current antemortem diagnostic method, the intradermal tuberculin skin test, is impractical for routine use with many wild animals. Antibody-based assays are particularly attractive because the animals are handled only once and immediate processing of the sample is not required. This report characterizes the antibody responses of red deer-elk hybrids (Cervus elaphus) against Mycobacterium bovis and subsequently evaluates the diagnostic performance of select antigens in a rapid-test format. Sequential serum samples were collected from 10 animals experimentally infected with M. bovis and 5 noninfected animals over a 7-month period postinfection (p.i.). Samples were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunoblot analyses, and multiantigen print immunoassays for seroreactivity to mycobacterial antigens. Although all infected animals produced antibodies to M. bovis protein antigens, there was significant animal-to-animal variation in the kinetics and magnitudes of responses and the antigens recognized. The most frequently recognized antigens included MPB83, ESAT-6, CFP10, and MPB70. Responses to some antigens, such as MPB83, were consistently detected as early as 4 weeks after inoculation, whereas other antigens were detected only much later (>140 days p.i.). Antibody responses were boosted by injection of tuberculin for intradermal tuberculin skin testing. Comparison of single-antigen (fluorescence polarization assay) with multiantigen (CervidTB STAT-PAK) rapid tests demonstrated that a highly sensitive and specific serodiagnostic test for tuberculosis in cervids will require multiple and carefully selected seroreactive antigens covering a broad spectrum of antibody specificities.

  4. Prospective evaluation of antibody response to Streptococcus gallolyticus and risk of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Julia; Jenab, Mazda; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Michel, Angelika; Pawlita, Michael; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Severi, Gianluca; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kühn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; la Vecchia, Carlo; Karakatsani, Anna; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Agnoli, Claudia; Palli, Domenico; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Sánchez, Maria-José; Bonet Bonet, Catalina; Huerta, José María; Ardanaz, Eva; Bradbury, Kathryn; Gunter, Marc; Murphy, Neil; Freisling, Heinz; Riboli, Elio; Tsilidis, Kostas; Aune, Dagfinn; Waterboer, Tim; Hughes, David J

    2018-01-29

    The gut microbiome is increasingly implicated in colorectal cancer (CRC) development. A subgroup of patients diagnosed with CRC show high antibody responses to Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus (SGG). However, it is unclear whether the association is also present pre-diagnostically. We assessed the association of antibody responses to SGG proteins in pre-diagnostic serum samples with CRC risk in a case-control study nested within a prospective cohort. Pre-diagnostic serum samples from 485 first incident CRC cases (mean time between blood draw and diagnosis 3.4 years) and 485 matched controls in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) study were analyzed for antibody responses to 11 SGG proteins using multiplex serology. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models. Antibody positivity for any of the 11 SGG proteins was significantly associated with CRC risk with 56% positive controls compared to 63% positive cases (OR: 1.36, 95% CI: 1.04-1.77). Positivity for two or more proteins of a previously identified SGG 6-marker panel with greater CRC-specificity was also observed among 9% of controls compared to 17% of CRC cases, corresponding to a significantly increased CRC risk (OR: 2.17, 95% CI: 1.44-3.27). In this prospective nested case-control study, we observed a positive association between antibody responses to SGG and CRC development in serum samples taken before evident disease onset. Further work is required to establish the possibly etiological significance of these observations and whether SGG serology may be applicable for CRC risk stratification. © 2018 UICC.

  5. Correlated effects of selection for immunity in White Leghorn chicken lines on natural antibodies and specific antibody responses to KLH and M. butyricum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minozzi, G.; Parmentier, H.K.; Mignon-Grasteau, S.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Bed'hom, B.; Gourichon, D.; Minvielle, F.; Pinard-van der Laan, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background - The effect of selection for three general immune response traits on primary antibody responses (Ab) to Mycobacterium butyricum or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) was studied in four experimental lines of White Leghorn chicken. Birds underwent 12 generations of selection for one of three

  6. Paediatric systemic lupus erythematosus: prognostic impact of antiphospholipid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, E; Durieu, I; Cochat, P; Vital Durand, D; Ninet, J; Fabien, N; Cimaz, R

    2008-02-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the prognostic impact of aPL in paediatric onset systemic lupus erythematosus (p-SLE). This retrospective study included 56 patients with p-SLE. Chi2-test, Fisher's exact test, incidence rate ratio and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to compare aPL-positive and aPL-negative patients considering the value of SDI (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index for SLE) at the end of follow-up, the occurrence of thromboses, organ system involvements and need for immunosuppressive treatment in addition to corticosteroids. Anti-cardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulants were detected in 27 (49%) and 19 (35%) patients, respectively. These aPL were frequently transient or intermittent (10 and 15 cases, respectively), and only rarely persistent over time (five cases). The risk of thrombosis was significantly higher (odds ratio = 6.42) and occurred earlier in the presence of aPL, especially if aPL were persistent (P or = 1. The risk of damage (SDI > or = 1) in aPL-positive patients was three times higher than in aPL-negative patients (P < 0.05). Four of the six fatal cases occurred in the aPL-positive group. The presence of aPL in p-SLE could represent not only a risk factor for thrombosis but also a poor prognostic factor overall.

  7. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques the antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements aid in the diagnosis... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test...

  8. Functionally fused antibodies--a novel adjuvant fusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin; Jensen, Kim Bak; Christensen, Peter Astrup

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies capable of recognizing key molecular targets isolated e.g. by phage display technology have been used in the pursuit of new and improved therapies for prevalent human diseases. These approaches often take advantage of non-immunogenic antibody fragments to achieve specific toxin-, radio...

  9. Salivary antibody levels in adolescents in response to a meningococcal serogroup C conjugate booster vaccination nine years after priming : systemically induced local immunity and saliva as potential surveillance tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoof, Susanne P; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Rooijen, Debbie M; Bogaert, Debby|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/264105834; Trzcinski, Krzysztof|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323349609; Sanders, Elisabeth A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/126771960; Berbers, Guy A M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In several countries large-scale immunization of children and young adults with Meningococcal serogroup C (MenC) conjugate vaccines has induced long-standing herd protection. Salivary antibodies may play an important role in mucosal protection against meningococcal acquisition and

  10. Genomic copy number variants: evidence for association with antibody response to anthrax vaccine adsorbed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael I Falola

    Full Text Available Anthrax and its etiologic agent remain a biological threat. Anthrax vaccine is highly effective, but vaccine-induced IgG antibody responses vary widely following required doses of vaccinations. Such variation can be related to genetic factors, especially genomic copy number variants (CNVs that are known to be enriched among genes with immunologic function. We have tested this hypothesis in two study populations from a clinical trial of anthrax vaccination.We performed CNV-based genome-wide association analyses separately on 794 European Americans and 200 African-Americans. Antibodies to protective antigen were measured at week 8 (early response and week 30 (peak response using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We used DNA microarray data (Affymetrix 6.0 and two CNV detection algorithms, hidden markov model (PennCNV and circular binary segmentation (GeneSpring to determine CNVs in all individuals. Multivariable regression analyses were used to identify CNV-specific associations after adjusting for relevant non-genetic covariates.Within the 22 autosomal chromosomes, 2,943 non-overlapping CNV regions were detected by both algorithms. Genomic insertions containing HLA-DRB5, DRB1 and DQA1/DRA genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC region (chromosome 6p21.3 were moderately associated with elevated early antibody response (β = 0.14, p = 1.78×10(-3 among European Americans, and the strongest association was observed between peak antibody response and a segmental insertion on chromosome 1, containing NBPF4, NBPF5, STXMP3, CLCC1, and GPSM2 genes (β = 1.66, p = 6.06×10(-5. For African-Americans, segmental deletions spanning PRR20, PCDH17 and PCH68 genes on chromosome 13 were associated with elevated early antibody production (β = 0.18, p = 4.47×10(-5. Population-specific findings aside, one genomic insertion on chromosome 17 (containing NSF, ARL17 and LRRC37A genes was associated with elevated peak antibody

  11. Humoral antibody response to glutaraldehyde-treated antigens of Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A; Molokwu, J U; Ezeh, A O

    1986-04-01

    Glutaraldehyde-treated whole cell antigens (GA.WcA) of Dermatophilus congolensis induced in guinea pigs immunological memory in contrast to cell wall antigens treated similarly (GA.CwA). However, GA.WcA could not induce a secondary response in animals primed with untreated WcA while GA.CwA on the other hand did stimulate a secondary response in animals primed with untreated CwA. Primary antibody production was induced by both GA.CwA and untreated CwA to a similar level in their respective hosts but it was the secondary response that was found similar in response to GA.WcA and untreated WcA. However, both untreated WcA and CwA induced primary and secondary antibody production in their respective hosts though these responses were considerably higher in guinea pigs given untreated CwA. This study showed that both untreated and GA-treated antigens of D. congolensis are capable of stimulating antibody production in guinea pigs but they differ in their levels of stimulation.

  12. Antibody response to actinomyces antigen and dental caries experience: implications for caries susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Martin; Owen, Willis L; Avery, Kevin T

    2005-06-01

    Fluoridated dentifrices reduce dental caries in subjects who perform effective oral hygiene. Actinomyces naeslundii increases in teeth-adherent microbial biofilms (plaques) in these subjects, and a well-characterized serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody response (Actinomyces antibody [A-Ab]) is also increased. Other studies suggest that a serum IgG antibody response to streptococcal d-alanyl poly(glycerophosphate) (S-Ab) may indicate caries experience associated strongly with gingival health and exposure to fluoridated water. The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between A-Ab response, oral hygiene, S-Ab response, and caries experience. Measurements were made of A-Ab and S-Ab concentrations, caries experience (number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth [DMFT], number of teeth surfaces [DMFS], and number of decayed teeth needing treated [DT]), exposure to fluoridated water (Flu), mean clinical pocket depth (PD; in millimeters), and extent of plaque (PL) and gingival bleeding on probing (BOP). A-Ab concentration, the dependent variable in a multiple regression analysis, increased with S-Ab concentration and decreased with PL and DMFT adjusted for Flu (R(2) = 0.51, P caries in subjects performing effective oral hygiene using fluoridated dentifrices. Conversely, a low A-Ab response is suggestive of decreased A. naeslundii binding to saliva-coated apatite and greater caries experience, as reported by others.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  14. HIV-1 Cross-Reactive Primary Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response Elicited by Immunization in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; O'Dell, Sijy; Turner, Hannah L; Chiang, Chi-I; Lei, Lin; Guenaga, Javier; Wilson, Richard; Martinez-Murillo, Paola; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Wyatt, Richard T; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Li, Yuxing

    2017-11-01

    Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses is a major goal for the development of an HIV-1 vaccine. Current HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) vaccine candidates elicit predominantly tier 1 and/or autologous tier 2 virus neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses, as well as weak and/or sporadic cross-reactive tier 2 virus NAb responses with unknown specificity. To delineate the specificity of vaccine-elicited cross-reactive tier 2 virus NAb responses, we performed single memory B cell sorting from the peripheral blood of a rhesus macaque immunized with YU2gp140-F trimers in adjuvant, using JR-FL SOSIP.664, a native Env trimer mimetic, as a sorting probe to isolate monoclonal Abs (MAbs). We found striking genetic and functional convergence of the SOSIP-sorted Ig repertoire, with predominant VH4 or VH5 gene family usage and Env V3 specificity. Of these vaccine-elicited V3-specific MAbs, nearly 20% (6/33) displayed cross-reactive tier 2 virus neutralization, which recapitulated the serum neutralization capacity. Substantial similarities in binding specificity, neutralization breadth and potency, and sequence/structural homology were observed between selected macaque cross-reactive V3 NAbs elicited by vaccination and prototypic V3 NAbs derived from natural infections in humans, highlighting the convergence of this subset of primate V3-specific B cell repertories. Our study demonstrated that cross-reactive primary virus neutralizing B cell lineages could be elicited by vaccination as detected using a standardized panel of tier 2 viruses. Whether these lineages could be expanded to acquire increased breadth and potency of neutralization merits further investigation. IMPORTANCE Elicitation of antibody responses capable of neutralizing diverse HIV-1 primary virus isolates (designated broadly neutralizing antibodies [bNAbs]) remains a high priority for the vaccine field. bNAb responses were so far observed only in response to natural infection within a subset

  15. Vibrio cholerae O1 secretes an extracellular matrix in response to antibody-mediated agglutination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle E Baranova

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is one of two serogroups responsible for epidemic cholera, a severe watery diarrhea that occurs after the bacterium colonizes the human small intestine and secretes a potent ADP-ribosylating toxin. Immunity to cholera is associated with intestinal anti-lipopolysaccharide (LPS antibodies, which are known to inhibit V. cholerae motility and promote bacterial cell-cell crosslinking and aggregation. Here we report that V. cholerae O1 classical and El Tor biotypes produce an extracellular matrix (ECM when forcibly immobilized and agglutinated by ZAC-3 IgG, an intestinally-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb against the core/lipid A region of LPS. ECM secretion, as demonstrated by crystal violet staining and scanning electron microscopy, occurred within 30 minutes of antibody exposure and peaked by 3 hours. Non-motile mutants of V. cholerae did not secrete ECM following ZAC-3 IgG exposure, even though they were susceptible to agglutination. The ECM was enriched in O-specific polysaccharide (OSP but not Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS. Finally, we demonstrate that ECM production by V. cholerae in response to ZAC-3 IgG was associated with bacterial resistant to a secondary complement-mediated attack. In summary, we propose that V. cholerae O1, upon encountering anti-LPS antibodies in the intestinal lumen, secretes an ECM (or O-antigen capsule possibly as a strategy to shield itself from additional host immune factors and to exit an otherwise inhospitable host environment.

  16. Serum antibody responses to periodontal microbiota in chronic and aggressive periodontitis: a postulate revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Andrew M; Stoupel, Janet; Celenti, Romanita; Demmer, Ryan T; Papapanou, Panos N

    2014-04-01

    The authors revisited the 1999 International Workshop postulate of robust serum antibody responses to infecting agents in localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) and weak responses in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP). Antibody responses were further examined in localized and generalized chronic periodontitis (LCP and GCP). The study includes 119 patients (60 males and 59 females, aged 11 to 76 years), 18 with LAgP, 37 with GAgP, 37 with LCP, and 27 with GCP. Multiple subgingival plaque samples/patient (1,057 in total) were analyzed with respect to 11 bacterial species using checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridizations, and serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels were measured against the same bacteria using checkerboard immunoblotting. Further, infection ratios (antibody level over the average bacterial colonization by the homologous species) were computed for each patient. Comparisons of bacterial colonization, serum IgG levels, and infection ratios were made across the diagnostic categories using multivariable linear regression models adjusting for age and race/ethnicity. There were no statistically significant differences in serum IgG levels to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans among the four diagnostic categories. IgG levels to several species, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Campylobacter rectus, were highest in patients with GAgP and significantly different from LCP and GCP, but not from LAgP. Comparisons based on infection ratios showed no statistically significant differences for any species between GAgP and LAgP. This study provides evidence against the 1999 Workshop's postulate of weak serum antibody responses in patients with GAgP and shows that serum IgG responses in GAgP are comparable to those in LAgP, but higher than in GCP or LCP for several species.

  17. Immunological development in nestling American kestrels Falco sparverius: post-hatching ontogeny of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Judit E G; Bortolotti, Gary R

    2008-12-01

    Avian research involving examination of immune function or testing of immunocompetence in wild birds has been based upon information on Galliforms, (chicken and quail) even though they are precocial, whereas most wild species with which ecologists, biologists and toxicologists work are altricial; blind, naked and completely dependent at hatching. Here we begin to address this gap in knowledge, offering insight into the early, post-hatching, humoral immune response in an altricial bird, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Over two breeding seasons, nestling kestrels were immunized with a non-pathogenic antigen, dinitrophenol keyhole limpet hemocyanin (DNP-KLH), between 3 and 9 days post-hatching and boostered 6 days later. Background levels, primary and secondary immune responses were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The specificity of our laboratory produced rabbit, anti-kestrel antibody was determined using a double immunodiffusion assay. Results showed the rabbit antiserum to have specific anti-kestrel IgG activity. Birds as young as three days old could successfully mount an antibody response, the magnitude of which increased with age at first vaccination. Early immunization did not compromise growth rate, nor did it affect the maximum secondary response. Comparatively, adult kestrels immunized during the same season and following the same protocol, had antibody levels four times higher than those of the nestlings.

  18. Immune response to pneumococcal polysaccharides 4 and 14 in elderly and young adults. I Antibody concentrations, avidity and functional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlone George M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious worldwide pathogen and the focus of numerous vaccine development projects. Currently the most widely accepted surrogate marker for evaluating the efficacy of a given vaccine is to utilize ELISA. Measurement of antibody concentration by ELISA without reduction in cross-reactive antibodies causes an overestimation of antibody concentration and therefore protection, this is most notable in the aged, an at risk group for this infection. We compared the immune response to the pneumococcal polysaccharides (PPS 4 and 14 of 20 young to 20 elderly adults. Pre-and post-vaccination IgG antibody concentrations and antibody avidity against PPS4 and PPS14 were measured using two different enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA absorption protocols. All sera were pre-absorbed with either cell-wall polysaccharide (CPS, or CPS and serotype 22F polysaccharide. Pre- and post-vaccination IgG antibody concentrations for serotype 4, but not 14, were significantly lowered with the additional absorption with serotype 22F polysaccharide in both age groups. Young and elderly demonstrated a significant increase from pre- to post-immunization antibody concentration, using either absorption method; and opsonophagocytic antibody titers in response to both PPS4 and PPS14. The correlation coefficients between ELISA and opsonophagocytic assays were improved by additional absorption with serotype 22F in response to serotype 4, but not serotype 14 in all age groups. Opsonophagocytic antibody titers in a sub-group of elderly (>77 years of age were significantly lower than the opsonophagocytic antibody concentrations in young adults. These results suggest the importance of eliminating cross-reactive antibodies from ELISA measurements by absorption of serum and an age-related impairment in the antibody response to pneumococcal polysaccharides.

  19. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkworth, J.B.; Antrim, L.A.; Sack, G.

    1986-01-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue

  20. Granulocyte antigen systems and antibodies and their clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCullough, J.

    1983-01-01

    Granulocyte alloantibodies and autoantibodies have a key role in the pathophysiology of several clinical problems. These include febrile transfusion reactions, severe pulmonary reactions to transfusion, isoimmune neonatal neutropenia, failure of effective granulocyte transfusion, autoimmune neutropenia, drug-induced neutropenia, and neutropenias secondary to many other diseases. Although many techniques are available for detecting granulocyte antibodies, the optimal in-vitro tests for predicting the antibodies' clinical effects are not established. Use of indium-111-labeled granulocytes may provide valuable information regarding the in-vivo effects of different granulocyte antibodies. Granulocyte transfusions continue to be used for a limited number of severely infected neutropenic patients who do not respond to antibiotic therapy

  1. Antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İlgen, U; Yayla, M E; Ateş, A; Okatan, İ E; Yurteri, E U; Torgutalp, M; Keleşoğlu, A B D; Turgay, T M; Kınıklı, G

    2018-04-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the association between antiphospholipid antibodies and non-thrombotic and non-gestational manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies or lupus anticoagulant were identified and grouped as systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-APS), systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antiphospholipid antibodies/lupus anticoagulant without antiphospholipid syndrome (SLE-aPL), and systemic lupus erythematosus with negative aPLs (SLE-No aPL). Groups were compared in terms of non-thrombotic systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations and laboratory features retrospectively. Results A total of 150 systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 26 with SLE-APS, 25 with SLE-aPL, and 99 with SLE-No aPL, were identified. Livedo reticularis, neurologic involvement, and thrombocytopenia were more common in antiphospholipid antibody positive systemic lupus erythematosus cases. Malar rash, arthritis, and pleuritis were more common in the SLE-No aPL, SLE-APS, and SLE-aPL groups, respectively. Positivity rates and titers of specific antiphospholipid antibodies did not differ between the SLE-APS and SLE-aPL groups. Conclusions Presence of antiphospholipid syndrome or persistent antiphospholipid antibodies may be related to non-thrombotic and non-gestational systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus plus antiphospholipid syndrome and persistent antiphospholipid antibodies without antiphospholipid syndrome also differ in terms of systemic lupus erythematosus manifestations.

  2. Mapping the Human Memory B Cell and Serum Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Infection and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivarthi, Usha K; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Widman, Douglas; Gallichotte, Emily; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro; Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Steve S; Baric, Ralph; Crowe, James E; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2017-03-01

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes are mosquito-borne flaviviruses responsible for dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to DENV develop antibodies (Abs) that strongly neutralize the serotype responsible for infection. Historically, infection with DENV serotype 4 (DENV4) has been less common and less studied than infections with the other three serotypes. However, DENV4 has been responsible for recent large and sustained epidemics in Asia and Latin America. The neutralizing antibody responses and the epitopes targeted against DENV4 have not been characterized in human infection. In this study, we mapped and characterized epitopes on DENV4 recognized by neutralizing antibodies in people previously exposed to DENV4 infections or to a live attenuated DENV4 vaccine. To study the fine specificity of DENV4 neutralizing human antibodies, B cells from two people exposed to DENV4 were immortalized and screened to identify DENV-specific clones. Two human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralized DENV4 were isolated, and their epitopes were finely mapped using recombinant viruses and alanine scan mutation array techniques. Both antibodies bound to quaternary structure epitopes near the hinge region between envelope protein domain I (EDI) and EDII. In parallel, to characterize the serum neutralizing antibody responses, convalescence-phase serum samples from people previously exposed to primary DENV4 natural infections or a monovalent DENV4 vaccine were analyzed. Natural infection and vaccination also induced serum-neutralizing antibodies that targeted similar epitope domains at the EDI/II hinge region. These studies defined a target of neutralizing antigenic site on DENV4 targeted by human antibodies following natural infection or vaccination. IMPORTANCE The four serotypes of dengue virus are the causative agents of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. People exposed to primary DENV infections develop long-term neutralizing antibody responses

  3. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... absorbed by the body. The measurements aid in the diagnosis of vitamin B12 deficiency (or pernicious anemia... resulting when the body produces antibodies against its own tissues). (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. The clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Ozan; Zuily, Stephane; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the association of thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Thirty to forty percent of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are tested positive for aPL, which may have an impact on the SLE presentation, management, and prognosis. Compared with SLE patients without aPL, those with aPL have a higher prevalence of thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity, valve disease, pulmonary hypertension, livedo reticularis, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, acute/chronic renal vascular lesions, and moderate/severe cognitive impairment; worse quality of life; and higher risk of organ damage. The use of low-dose aspirin (LDA) is controversial for primary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention because of the lack of strong prospective controlled data. Similarly, the use of anticoagulation is controversial for patients with an aPL-related nephropathy. Until further studies are available, physicians should discuss the risk/benefits of LDA or anticoagulation as well as the available literature with patients. PMID:27708976

  5. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki Masuda; Masahiro Mori; Shoichi Ito; Toshiyuki Yagishita; Satoshi Kuwabara

    2014-01-01

    Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who ...

  6. Humoral antibody response after receipt of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccinations one year apart in children

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, VJ; Ip, DKM; Ng, S; Chiu, SS; Cowling, BJ; Leung, GM; Peiris, JSM

    2012-01-01

    Background: Annual vaccination against seasonal influenza viruses is recommended for school-age children in some countries. There are limited data on the immunogenicity and efficacy of repeated influenza vaccinations. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, we administered seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo to 64 children 6-15 years of age in two consecutive years and explored their humoral antibody responses. Results: Receipt of TIV in the first year was ass...

  7. Neutralizing antibody response in the patients with hand, foot and mouth disease to enterovirus 71 and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liye

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a significant pathogen causing large outbreaks in China for the past 3 years. Developing an EV71 vaccine is urgently needed to stop the spread of the disease; however, the adaptive immune response of humans to EV71 infection remains unclear. We examined the neutralizing antibody titers in HFMD patients and compared them to those of asymptomatic healthy children and young adults. We found that 80% of HFMD patients became positive for neutralizing antibodies against EV71 (GMT = 24.3 one day after the onset of illness. The antibody titers in the patients peaked two days (GMT = 79.5 after the illness appeared and were comparable to the level of adults (GMT = 45.2. Noticeably, the antibody response was not correlated with disease severity, suggesting that cellular immune response, besides neutralizing antibodies, could play critical role in controlling the outcome of EV71 infection in humans.

  8. Antibody response in cattle after vaccination with inactivated and attenuated rabies vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES da SILVA Andréa de Cássia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of current official reports showing the number of cattle infected by rabies, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 bovines are lost each year in Brazil. In order to minimize the important economic losses, control of the disease is achieved by eliminating bat colonies and by herd vaccination. In this study, we compare the antibody response in cattle elicited by vaccination with an attenuated ERA vaccine (AEvac and an inactivated-adjuvanted PV (IPVvac vaccine. The antibody titers were appraised by cell-culture neutralization test and ELISA, and the percentage of seropositivity was ascertained for a period of 180 days. IPVvac elicited complete seropositivity rates from day 30 to day 150, and even on day 180, 87% of the sera showed virus-neutralizing antibody titers (VNA higher than 0.5IU/ml. There were no significant differences between the VNA titers and seropositivity rates obtained with IPVvac in the two methods tested. AEvac, however, elicited significantly lower titers than those observed in the group receiving inactivated vaccine. In addition, the profiles of antirabies IgG antibodies, evaluated by ELISA, and VNA, appraised by cell-culture neutralization test, were slightly different, when both vaccines were compared.

  9. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-05-01

    When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  10. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Masuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC. Case Report: We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions: A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion.

  11. Steroid-Responsive Epilepsia Partialis Continua with Anti-Thyroid Antibodies: A Spectrum of Hashimoto's Encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Hiroki; Mori, Masahiro; Ito, Shoichi; Yagishita, Toshiyuki; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background When a neuropsychiatric symptom due to encephalopathy develops in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies, especially when the symptom is steroid-responsive, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of the patient. Although HE is an elusive disease, it is thought to cause various clinical presentations including seizures, myoclonus, and epilepsia partialis continua (EPC). Case Report We present the case of a 33-year-old Japanese woman who acutely developed EPC in the right hand as an isolated manifestation. A thyroid ultrasound showed an enlarged hypoechogenic gland, and a thyroid status assessment showed euthyroid with high titers of thyroid antibodies. A brain MRI revealed a nodular lesion in the left precentral gyrus. Corticosteroid treatment resulted in a cessation of the symptom. Conclusions A precentral nodular lesion can be responsible for steroid-responsive EPC in a patient with anti-thyroid antibodies and may be caused by HE. The serial MRI findings of our case suggest the presence of primary demyelination, with ischemia possibly due to vasculitis around the demyelinating lesion. PMID:24932178

  12. Antibody responses to Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein in a porcine model: relevance to immunodiagnosis of recent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampton, Melanie; Walton, Shelley F; Holt, Deborah C; Pasay, Cielo; Kelly, Andrew; Currie, Bart J; McCarthy, James S; Mounsey, Kate E

    2013-01-01

    No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA). Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8-16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations.

  13. Antibody responses to Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein in a porcine model: relevance to immunodiagnosis of recent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rampton

    Full Text Available No commercial immunodiagnostic tests for human scabies are currently available, and existing animal tests are not sufficiently sensitive. The recombinant Sarcoptes scabiei apolipoprotein antigen Sar s 14.3 is a promising immunodiagnostic, eliciting high levels of IgE and IgG in infected people. Limited data are available regarding the temporal development of antibodies to Sar s 14.3, an issue of relevance in terms of immunodiagnosis. We utilised a porcine model to prospectively compare specific antibody responses to a primary infestation by ELISA, to Sar s 14.3 and to S. scabiei whole mite antigen extract (WMA. Differences in the antibody profile between antigens were apparent, with Sar s 14.3 responses detected earlier, and declining significantly after peak infestation compared to WMA. Both antigens resulted in >90% diagnostic sensitivity from weeks 8-16 post infestation. These data provide important information on the temporal development of humoral immune responses in scabies and further supports the development of recombinant antigen based immunodiagnostic tests for recent scabies infestations.

  14. Antibody responses against epitopes on the F protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus differ in infected or vaccinated cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Hensen, E.J.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Daus, F.; Middel, W.G.J.; Kramps, J.A.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1997-01-01

    The fusion protein F of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) is an important target for humoral and cellular immune responses, and antibodies against the F protein have been associated with protection. However, the F protein can induce antibodies with different biological activity, possibly

  15. Role of plant expression systems in antibody production for passive immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdi, Vikram; Depicker, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunization is a method to achieve immediate protection against infectious agents by administering pathogen-specific antibodies. It has proven to be lifesaving for many acute infections, and it is now also used for cancer treatment. Passive immunization therapies, however, are extremely expensive because they require large amounts of specific antibodies that are produced predominantly in mammalian expression systems. The cost for manufacturing plant-made antibodies is estimated to be comparatively low since plant production systems require relatively less capital investments. In addition, they are not prone to mammalian pathogens, which also eases downstream processing along with making it a safe expression system. Moreover, some of the recent developments in transient expression have enabled rapid, cGMP (current Good Manufacturing Practices) compliant manufacturing of antibodies. Whether lower production costs will be reflected in a lower market price for purified antibodies will be known when more plant-produced antibodies come to the market. Promisingly, the current molecular techniques in the field of in planta expression have enabled high-level production of a variety of antibodies in different plant organs, like roots/tubers/fruits, leaves and seeds, of a variety of plants, like potato, tobacco, maize, rice, tomato and pea, providing a very wide range of possible plant-based passive immunization therapies. For instance, the production of antibodies in edible tissues would allow for a unique, convenient, needle-less, oral passive immunization at the gastric mucosal surface. The technological advances, together with the innate capacity of plant tissues to assemble complex antibodies, will enable carving a niche in the antibody market. This non-exhaustive review aims to shed light on the role of plants as a flexible expression system for passive immunotherapy, which we envisage to progress alongside the conventional production platforms to manufacture

  16. A life-style physical activity intervention and the antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joanna E; Ring, Chris; Bosch, Jos A; Eves, Francis; Drayson, Mark T; Calver, Rebecca; Say, Vanessa; Allen, Daniel; Burns, Victoria E

    2013-10-01

    To assess whether a life-style physical activity intervention improved antibody response to a pneumococcal vaccination in sedentary middle-aged women. Eighty-nine sedentary women completed a 16-week exercise (physical activity consultation, pedometer, telephone/e-mail prompts; n = 44) or control (advisory leaflet; n = 45) intervention. Pneumococcal vaccination was administered at 12 weeks, and antibody titers (11 of the 23 contained in the pneumococcal vaccine) were determined before vaccination and 4 weeks and 6 months later. Physical activity, aerobic fitness, body composition, and psychological factors were measured before and after the intervention. The intervention group displayed a greater increase in walking behavior (from mean [standard deviation] = 82.16 [90.90] to 251.87 [202.13]) compared with the control condition (111.67 [94.64] to 165.16 [117.22]; time by group interaction: F(1,68) = 11.25, p = .001, η(2) = 0.14). Quality of life also improved in the intervention group (from 19.37 [3.22] to 16.70 [4.29]) compared with the control condition (19.97 [4.22] to 19.48 [5.37]; time by group interaction: F(1,66) = 4.44, p = .039, η(2) = 0.06). However, no significant effects of the intervention on antibody response were found (time by group η(2) for each of the 11 pneumococcal strains ranged from 0.001 to 0.018; p values all >.264). Participation in a life-style physical activity intervention increased subjective and objective physical activity levels and quality of life but did not affect antibody response to pneumococcal vaccination.

  17. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... techniques, antibodies to S. cerevisiae (baker's or brewer's yeast) in human serum or plasma. Detection of S...) antibody (ASCA) test systems. 866.5785 Section 866.5785 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES...

  18. Interaction of Bacteriophages with the Immune System: Induction of Bacteriophage-Specific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2018-01-01

    In all cases when a bacteriophage makes direct contact with a mammalian organism, it may challenge the mammalian immunological system. Its major consequence is production of antibodies specific to the bacteriophage. Here we present protocols applicable in studies of bacteriophage ability to induce specific antibodies. The protocols have been divided into three parts: purification, immunization, and detection (ELISA).

  19. Marfan syndrome with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated systemic vasculitis presenting as severe anaemia and haematuria after the Bentall procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijia, Li; Shuangxin, Liu; Wei, Shi; Yanhai, Cui

    2013-08-01

    One month previously, a 28-year old male underwent an emergency modified Bentall procedure because of Marfan syndrome with acute aortic dissection Stanford Class A. Computed tomography of the chest did not reveal severe graft stenosis of the anastomosis. To explore the cause of anaemia, renal dysfunction and macroscopic haematuria, the patient was tested for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV). Antimyeloperoxidase antibodies (MPO)-ANCA and antiproteinase 3 antibodies (PR3)-ANCA were strongly positive. Corticosteroid therapy was applied, followed by cyclophosphamide and azathioprine. In response to treatment, the MPO-ANCA and PR3-ANCA levels gradually decreased, proteinuria was alleviated and haemoglobin levels returned to normal after 6 months. This is the first report to highlight haemolytic anaemia and AASV with Marfan syndrome after surgery for aortic dissection.

  20. The IgM Response to Modified LDL in Experimental Atherosclerosis Hypochlorite-modified LDL IgM Antibodies versus Classical Natural T15 IgM Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Marcella; Damoiseaux, Jan; Duijvestijn, Adriaan; Heeringa, Peter; Gijbels, Marion; de Winther, Menno; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Shoenfeld, Y; Gershwin, ME

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: It is hypothesized that IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL are anti-atherogenic. Myeloperoxidase from plaque-infiltrating neutrophils catalyzes the production of hypochlorite (HOCl), which oxidizes LDL. Here we study the IgM response to HOCl-modified LDL in comparison to titers of T15

  1. Early and enhanced antitoxin responses elicited with complexes of tetanus toxoid and specific mouse and human antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, R.D.; Terres, G.; Hess, M.W.

    1975-01-01

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were early and enhanced in mice when tetanus toxoid was administered in complex with specific isologous antitoxin or specific mouse γ-globulin. Antitoxin responses were enhanced when fluid tetanus toxoid was complexed in vitro in antigen-to-antibody ratios of equivalence or antigen excess; responses to complexed toxoid in antibody excess were comparatively repressed. Primary responses were greatly inhibited in mice immunized with the same amount of toxoid complexed at equivalence or in antibody excess with specific human γ-globulin. Although primary responses were totally repressed, a primed state developed; a second injection of fluid toxoid within a few days produced excellent antitoxin responses. Separate injections of antigen and antibody at different sites produced an excellent in vivo primed state for early and high responses. Antibody production after stimulation with complexed toxoid was also enhanced in mice irradiated with 400 rads, a dose that ordinarily completely suppresses primary responses with fluid toxoid alone. These data provide evidence for the efficacy of antigen-antibody complexes in early and active immunization. (U.S.)

  2. Cross-Linking of a CD4-Mimetic Miniprotein with HIV-1 Env gp140 Alters Kinetics and Specificities of Antibody Responses against HIV-1 Env in Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoying; Bogers, Willy M; Yates, Nicole L; Ferrari, Guido; Dey, Antu K; Williams, William T; Jaeger, Frederick H; Wiehe, Kevin; Sawant, Sheetal; Alam, S Munir; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Martin, Loic; Srivastava, Indresh; Heeney, Jonathan; Barnett, Susan W; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2017-10-01

    Evaluation of the epitope specificities, locations (systemic or mucosal), and effector functions of antibodies elicited by novel HIV-1 immunogens engineered to improve exposure of specific epitopes is critical for HIV-1 vaccine development. Utilizing an array of humoral assays, we evaluated the magnitudes, epitope specificities, avidities, and functions of systemic and mucosal immune responses elicited by a vaccine regimen containing Env cross-linked to a CD4-mimetic miniprotein (gp140-M64U1) in rhesus macaques. Cross-linking of gp140 Env to M64U1 resulted in earlier increases of both the magnitude and avidity of the IgG binding response than those with Env protein alone. Notably, IgG binding responses at an early time point correlated with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) function at the peak immunity time point, which was higher for the cross-linked Env group than for the Env group. In addition, the cross-linked Env group developed higher IgG responses against a linear epitope in the gp120 C1 region of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. These data demonstrate that structural modification of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen by cross-linking of gp140 with the CD4-mimetic M64U1 elicited an earlier increase of binding antibody responses and altered the specificity of the IgG responses, correlating with the rise of subsequent antibody-mediated antiviral functions. IMPORTANCE The development of an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine remains a global priority to prevent new cases of HIV-1 infection. Of the six HIV-1 efficacy trials to date, only one has demonstrated partial efficacy, and immune correlate analysis of that trial revealed a role for binding antibodies and antibody Fc-mediated effector functions. New HIV-1 envelope immunogens are being engineered to selectively expose the most vulnerable and conserved sites on the HIV-1 envelope, with the goal of eliciting antiviral antibodies. Evaluation of the humoral responses elicited by these novel immunogen designs in

  3. LOCAL ANTIBODY AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES TO INFLUENZA INFECTION AND VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Petukhova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Local immune responses of mucous membranes of an organism are the first and most significant barriers preventing many virus infections, including influenza. The barrier against influenza infection is the mucosalassociated lymphoid tissue of the upper airways. It is considered, that nasopharyngeal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT in rodents is an equivalent of lymphoid tissue in human Waldeyer’s ring. Present work is the first attempt to analyze and compare the development of cellular and antibody immune responses in NALT in a mouse model of experimental influenza infection using a pathogenic influenza A (H1N1 virus and an attenuated reassorted (2/6 genetic formula live influenza A (H1N1 vaccine.It was shown, that the vaccine strain inherits the ability to induce high-grade local antibody responses like as the virulent parental strain. However, the vaccine strain is inferior to virulent parental strain in capacity to stimulate production of circulating antibodies. Both parental and Р 2/6 strains are equally able to induce lymphoproliferative immune response in NALT lymphocytes. The attenuated reassortant virus is able to stimulate proliferation of Th (CD4+, B-cells (CD19+ and CTL (CD8+ in NALT. As shown by the cytokine activity testing (IFN-γ, IL-6, the attenuated reassortant virus activates both Th1- and Th2-lymphocytes in NALT.This data suggest that intranasal immunization with live attenuated reassortant viruses (genetic formula 2/6 results into active and balanced stimulation of both Th1-and Th2-immune responses at the primary site of infection (NALT.

  4. Systemic sclerosis without antinuclear antibodies or Raynaud's phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneeberger, D.; Tyndall, A.; Walker, U.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess patients with SSc who present without circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP). Methods: 5390 patients who fulfilled the ACR criteria for SSc and were enrolled in the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) database were screened for the ab......Objective: To assess patients with SSc who present without circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) or Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP). Methods: 5390 patients who fulfilled the ACR criteria for SSc and were enrolled in the EULAR Scleroderma Trials And Research (EUSTAR) database were screened...

  5. Antibody response in naïve and sensitised goats infested by Sarcoptes scabiei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simson Tarigan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize the IgG and IgE antibody responses in goats infested repeatedly with Sarcoptes scabiei. Ten goats purchased from scabies-free farms were infested with 2000 live mites on the auricles. Fifty days after the initial infestation, the goats were treated with ivermectin. After being completely recovered, the goats were reinfested then treated again at 50 days post infestation. Blood samples were collected at the time of the first infestation, then every 10 days afterwards for 270 days. Seroconversion for IgG took place after 30 days following the first infestation, whereas the maximum level of the specific IgG antibodies occurred after 50 days. Immunoblot analysis identified a number of antigens (Mr 180, 135, 43 and 38 KDa that recognised by the IgG at 10 days and continuously recognised throughout the course of the multiple infestations. Being consistently recognised, those antigens should be essential in the development immunological diagnostic tests for scabies. The levels of scabies-specific IgE antibodies increased slowly during the first infestation and rapidly dropped following treatment of the animals with ivermectin. In the second and third infestations, however, the reaginic antibodies rose rapidly and with a grater level. On immunoblot analysis, at least 10 antigens (Mr 130, 72, 64, 58, 48, 44, 41, 39, 27 and 25 KDa were observed to be recognised by the IgE present in the sera from scabies-infested animals. Since IgE response is considered to play a major role in the immune protection, those allergens, therefore, could be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine.

  6. Specificity of Subcapsular Antibody Responses in Ethiopian Patients following Disease Caused by Serogroup A Meningococci▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, Gunnstein; Aseffa, Abraham; Yassin, Mohammed Ahmed; Mengistu, Getahun; Kassu, Afework; Fikremariam, Dereje; Tamire, Wegene; Merid, Yared; Høiby, E. Arne; Caugant, Dominique A.; Fritzsønn, Elisabeth; Tangen, Torill; Melak, Berhanu; Berhanu, Degu; Harboe, Morten; Kolberg, Jan; Rosenqvist, Einar

    2008-01-01

    Dissecting the specificities of human antibody responses following disease caused by serogroup A meningococci may be important for the development of improved vaccines. We performed a study of Ethiopian patients during outbreaks in 2002 and 2003. Sera were obtained from 71 patients with meningitis caused by bacteria of sequence type 7, as confirmed by PCR or culture, and from 113 Ethiopian controls. Antibody specificities were analyzed by immunoblotting (IB) against outer membrane antigen extracts of a reference strain and of the patients' own isolates and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels against lipooligosaccharide (LOS) L11 and the proteins NadA and NspA. IB revealed that the main antigens targeted were the proteins PorA, PorB, RmpM, and Opa/OpcA, as well as LOS. MenA disease induced significant increases in IgG against LOS L11 and NadA. The IgG levels against LOS remained elevated following disease, whereas the IgG anti-NadA levels returned to acute-phase levels in the late convalescent phase. Among adults, the anti-LOS IgG levels were similar in acute-phase patient sera as in control sera, whereas anti-NadA IgG levels were significantly higher in acute-phase sera than in controls. The IgG antibody levels against LOS and NadA correlated moderately but significantly with serum bactericidal activity against MenA strains. Future studies on immune response during MenA disease should take into account the high levels of anti-MenA polysaccharide IgG commonly found in the population and seek to clarify the role of antibodies against subcapsular antigens in protection against MenA disease. PMID:18337382

  7. Neutralizing antibodies obtained in a persistent immune response are effective against deleterious effects induced by the Thalassophryne nattereri fish venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran-Soares, Ana Amélia; Komegae, Evilin Naname; Souza, Valdênia Maria Oliveira; Fonseca, Luiz Alberto; Lima, Carla; Lopes-Ferreira, Mônica

    2007-06-01

    Thalassophryne nattereri envenoming represents a great cost to North and Northeast Brazilian communities in terms of public healths, leisure and tourism. Victims rapidally develop symptoms as pain, local swelling, erythema followed by intense necrosis that persist for long days. The aim of this work was tested the immune competence of neutralizing antibodies in pre-immunized mice against principal toxic activities induced by venom. During the primary antibody response in mice, an elevation of IgG antibody levels was only observed on day 28. After boosting, high antibody levels were detected between days 49 and 70, with a 12-fold increase in IgG level over control values at day 49. We confirmed the in vitro neutralizing capacity of T. nattereri anti-venom against toxic effects and thereafter we show that neutralizing antibodies obtained in a persistent immune response are more effective, inclusive against edematous reaction. After boosting during the secondary response mice with high antibody levels do not present any alterations in venule or arteriole after topical application of venom on cremaster muscle. In addition, CK activity diminished in these mice with high neutralizing antibody levels corroborating the attenuation of the myonecrotic effect by venom. In addition, we determined the presence of high IgG antibodies levels in patients 6 months after injury by T. nattereri. In conclusion, the presence of neutralizing antibodies against to T. nattereri venom in the serum of pre-immunized mice could change the outcome of lesion at site of posterior envenoming. Antigen-specific antibodies of high affinity in consequence to specific immune response, dependent of T lymphocyte activation, could minimize the symptoms of intense and immediate inflammatory reaction caused by T. nattereri venom. These finding prompt us to the possibility of development of immune therapeutic strategies using specific anti-venom as an efficient intervention for protecting human victims.

  8. Molecular dissection of the human antibody response to the structural repeat epitope of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite from a protected donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circumsporozoite surface protein is the primary target of human antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites, these antibodies are predominantly directed to the major repetitive epitope (Asn-Pro-Asn-Alan, (NPNAn. In individuals immunized by the bites of irradiated Anopheles mosquitoes carrying P. falciparum sporozoites in their salivary glands, the anti-repeat response dominates and is thought by many to play a role in protective immunity. Methods The antibody repertoire from a protected individual immunized by the bites of irradiated P. falciparum infected Anopheles stephensi was recapitulated in a phage display library. Following affinity based selection against (NPNA3 antibody fragments that recognized the PfCSP repeat epitope were rescued. Results Analysis of selected antibody fragments implied the response was restricted to a single antibody fragment consisting of VH3 and VκI families for heavy and light chain respectively with moderate affinity for the ligand. Conclusion The dissection of the protective antibody response against the repeat epitope revealed that the response was apparently restricted to a single VH/VL pairing (PfNPNA-1. The affinity for the ligand was in the μM range. If anti-repeat antibodies are involved in the protective immunity elicited by exposure to radiation attenuated P. falciparum sporozoites, then high circulating levels of antibodies against the repeat region may be more important than intrinsic high affinity for protection. The ability to attain and sustain high levels of anti-(NPNAn will be one of the key determinants of efficacy for a vaccine that relies upon anti-PfCSP repeat antibodies as the primary mechanism of protective immunity against P. falciparum.

  9. Localization of radiolabeled anti-DNA monoclonal antibodies in murine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.; Hahn, B.; Ebling, F.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of SLE can be extremely difficult. This multi-system disease is characterized by the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA antibody (Ab) complexes in many tissues, producing glomerulonephritis and systemic vasculitis. This study evaluates an IGG monoclonal (Mo) Ab directe3d against DNA (MrSSl) for potential radioimmunodiagnosis of SLE. Six 15 wk. old F-1 female hybrids of NZB+NZW mice (an animal SLE model that develops vasculitis and nephritis) were injected with 50 μCl of I-131 MrSSl and 15 μCl of I-125 isotype-matched control mouse myeloma (LPC-1) (non-reactive with DNA). Imaging and tissue distribution were studied. Two animals were also imaged using I-131 LPC Ab. Images at 2 and 9 days showed no clear differences in scan patterns using MrSSl or LPC-1 Ab. Tissue distribution studies at six days, however, showed a significantly higher accumulation of MrSSl in the kidneys vs. control Ab (2.7% vs. 1.8% of injected dose) (p < .04). Similarly, higher levels of MrSS were also seen in the spleen, liver and lungs (p < .03). Blood levels tended to be higher with the specific antibody as well. These differences were not apparent at 3 days post injection. The increased concentration of MrSSl present at 9 days in several organs may be secondary to MrSSl binding to DNA containing immune complexes present in diseased tissues. Blocked clearance by immune complexes or DNA, or differences in electrical charges of the antibodies could be contributing to the higher MrSSl levels seen. Images did not suggest deiodination as responsible. Further studies are necessary to determine if the amount of MrSSl retained by diseased animals is indicative of SLE disease activity

  10. Localization of radiolabeled anti-DNA monoclonal antibodies in murine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, R.; Hahn, B.; Ebling, F.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of SLE can be extremely difficult. This multi-system disease is characterized by the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA antibody (Ab) complexes in many tissues, producing glomerulonephritis and systemic vasculitis. This study evaluates an IGG monoclonal (Mo) Ab directe3d against DNA (MrSSl) for potential radioimmunodiagnosis of SLE. Six 15 wk. old F-1 female hybrids of NZB+NZW mice (an animal SLE model that develops vasculitis and nephritis) were injected with 50 ..mu..Cl of I-131 MrSSl and 15 ..mu..Cl of I-125 isotype-matched control mouse myeloma (LPC-1) (non-reactive with DNA). Imaging and tissue distribution were studied. Two animals were also imaged using I-131 LPC Ab. Images at 2 and 9 days showed no clear differences in scan patterns using MrSSl or LPC-1 Ab. Tissue distribution studies at six days, however, showed a significantly higher accumulation of MrSSl in the kidneys vs. control Ab (2.7% vs. 1.8% of injected dose) (p < .04). Similarly, higher levels of MrSS were also seen in the spleen, liver and lungs (p < .03). Blood levels tended to be higher with the specific antibody as well. These differences were not apparent at 3 days post injection. The increased concentration of MrSSl present at 9 days in several organs may be secondary to MrSSl binding to DNA containing immune complexes present in diseased tissues. Blocked clearance by immune complexes or DNA, or differences in electrical charges of the antibodies could be contributing to the higher MrSSl levels seen. Images did not suggest deiodination as responsible. Further studies are necessary to determine if the amount of MrSSl retained by diseased animals is indicative of SLE disease activity.

  11. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  12. Association between total immunoglobulin E and antibody responses to naturally acquired Ascaris lumbricoides infection and polymorphisms of immune system-related LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, N; Mercado, D; Vergara, C; Sánchez, J; Kennedy, M W; Jiménez, S; Fernández, A M; Gutiérrez, M; Puerta, L; Caraballo, L

    2009-08-01

    The 13q33-34 region harbours a susceptibility locus to Ascaris lumbricoides, although the underlying genes are unknown. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG confer protective immunity and here we sought to investigate in an endemic population whether LIG4, TNFSF13B and IRS2 genes influence IgE and IgG levels against Ascaris and the ABA-1 allergen as a putative resistance marker. Mite-allergic asthmatic patients were analysed for potential relationships between Ascaris predisposition and allergy. One thousand and sixty-four subjects from Cartagena, Colombia, were included. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using TaqMan assays. Antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear and logistic regressions were used to model effects of genotypes on antibody levels. The GG genotype of LIG4 (rs1805388) was associated with higher IgE levels to Ascaris compared with other genotypes. TNFSF13B (rs10508198) was associated positively with IgG levels against Ascaris extract and IgE levels against ABA-1. In asthmatics, IRS2 (rs2289046) was associated with high total IgE levels. Associations held up after correction by population stratification using a set of 52 ancestry markers, age, sex and disease status. There was no association with asthma or mite sensitization. In a tropical population, LIG4 and TNFSF13B polymorphisms are associated with specific IgE and IgG to Ascaris, supporting previous linkage studies implicating the 13q33 region. Our results suggest that genes protecting against parasite infections can be different to those predisposing to asthma and atopy.

  13. Diclofenac hypersensitivity: antibody responses to the parent drug and relevant metabolites.

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    Andrea Harrer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity reactions against nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like diclofenac (DF can manifest as Type I-like allergic reactions including systemic anaphylaxis. However, except for isolated case studies experimental evidence for an IgE-mediated pathomechanism of DF hypersensitivity is lacking. In this study we aimed to investigate the possible involvement of drug- and/or metabolite-specific antibodies in selective DF hypersensitivity.DF, an organochemically synthesized linkage variant, and five major Phase I metabolites were covalently coupled to carrier proteins. Drug conjugates were analyzed for coupling degree and capacity to crosslink receptor-bound IgE antibodies from drug-sensitized mice. With these conjugates, the presence of hapten-specific IgE antibodies was investigated in patients' samples by ELISA, mediator release assay, and basophil activation test. Production of sulfidoleukotrienes by drug conjugates was determined in PBMCs from DF-hypersensitive patients. All conjugates were shown to carry more than two haptens per carrier molecule. Immunization of mice with drug conjugates induced drug-specific IgE antibodies capable of triggering mediator release. Therefore, the conjugates are suitable tools for detection of drug-specific antibodies and for determination of their anaphylactic activity. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled and categorized as hypersensitive either selectively to DF or to multiple NSAIDs. In none of the patients' samples evidence for drug/metabolite-specific IgE in serum or bound to allergic effector cells was found. In contrast, a small group of patients (8/59, 14% displayed drug/metabolite-specific IgG.We found no evidence for an IgE-mediated effector mechanism based on haptenation of protein carriers in DF-hypersensitive patients. Furthermore, a potential involvement of the most relevant metabolites in DF hypersensitivity reactions could be excluded.

  14. STUDIES ON THE ANTIBODIES IN RABBIT ANTISERA RESPONSIBLE FOR SENSITIZATION OF HUMAN SKIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, John H.; Kabat, Elvin A.

    1953-01-01

    The capacity of rabbit anti-egg albumin sera to sensitize human skin has been studied. It has been shown that passive transfer by these sera is completely unrelated to the egg albumin-anti-egg albumin system, as demonstrated by a failure of passive transfer by some antisera containing ample anti-egg albumin and persistence of passive transfer in other antisera from which all anti-egg albumin had been removed by precipitation with homologous antigen. Three preparations of non-precipitating anti-egg albumin have been shown to have sensitizing capacities which bear no relation to their non-precipitating anti-egg albumin contents. From a portion of one of these the non-precipitating anti-egg albumin was removed without impairing its sensitizing ability, while in another portion obliteration of the sensitizing capacity was accomplished without reducing the anti-egg albumin. Evidence is presented to show that there are at least two possible antibodies in anti-egg albumin sera which are capable of inducing skin sensitivity and that they are antibodies against egg white impurities in crystalline egg albumin other than anti-conalbumin, anti-ovomucoid, and anti-lysozyme. The usefulness of a suitable quantitative precipitin technic for the analysis for antibodies against antigen impurities and for their selective absorption from sera is illustrated. The principle governing the procedure is described. The technic allows for the determination of a given trace antibody by working with such small concentrations of its purified specific antigen that whatever other antigen-antibody compounds are formed simultaneously with that to be determined will be below their solubility levels and consequently will not contribute appreciably to the precipitate. PMID:13069639

  15. [Irregular antierythocytic antibodies outside of the ABO system in the perinatal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista-González, H A; Rosenfeld-Mann, F; Pérez-Pérez, J D; Quintanar-García, E

    1991-11-01

    Included in this study are the results of the tests done with irregular anti-erythrocytic antibodies outside of the ABO system of women in reproductive stage. In 2,623 cases considered, 279 samples positive for the antibodies were found (10.6%). In 184 cases (65.9%), the antibodies were classified as "immune irregular". The most frequently found antibodies from this group were the anti-D (63.08%), followed by the anti-c (1.07%), the anti-Kell (0.72%), anti-C, anti-E and an anti-Rh system (0.36% for each one). In 52 cases (18.6%) there were irregular "natural" antibodies, predominantly the anti-Lewis (9.68%), followed by anti-P (5.02%), the anti-I (3.2%), an anti-M and an anti-N (0.36% each one). In 43 (15.4%) cases, we were not able to identify the specificity of the antibody found. We include a discussion and a comparison of the frequency of these antibodies in our population. Based on these data, we recommend the clinician to consider the existence and specificity of the irregular anti-erythrocytic antibodies in their obstetric patients, candidates to transfusional therapy, as well as those newborn with hemolytic diseases.

  16. BAFF mediates splenic B cell response and antibody production in experimental Chagas disease.

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    Daniela A Bermejo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B cells and antibodies are involved not only in controlling the spread of blood circulating Trypanosoma cruzi, but also in the autoreactive manifestations observed in Chagas disease. Acute infection results in polyclonal B cell activation associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, delayed specific humoral immunity and high levels of non-parasite specific antibodies. Since TNF superfamily B lymphocyte Stimulator (BAFF mediates polyclonal B cell response in vitro triggered by T. cruzi antigens, and BAFF-Tg mice show similar signs to T. cruzi infected mice, we hypothesized that BAFF can mediate polyclonal B cell response in experimental Chagas disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BAFF is produced early and persists throughout the infection. To analyze BAFF role in experimental Chagas disease, Balb/c infected mice were injected with BR3:Fc, a soluble receptor of BAFF, to block BAFF activity. By BAFF blockade we observed that this cytokine mediates the mature B cell response and the production of non-parasite specific IgM and IgG. BAFF also influences the development of antinuclear IgG and parasite-specific IgM response, not affecting T. cruzi-specific IgG and parasitemia. Interestingly, BAFF inhibition favors the parasitism in heart. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, an active role for BAFF in shaping the mature B cell repertoire in a parasite infection.

  17. Immunity to Brugia pahangi in athymic nude and normal mice: eosinophilia, antibody and hypersensitivity responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, A C; Vincent, A L

    1984-11-01

    Congenitally athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, immunologically reconstituted by thymus grafting before inoculation with infective larvae, and mice heterozygous for the nu gene (nu/+), mounted potent protective humoral and cellular immune responses to Brugia pahangi. Although responses were not identical, both groups of mice produced IgM, IgG and IgE antibodies specific for adult worm antigen (S-Ag) present in a crude aqueous extract, made immediate and delayed hypersensitivity footpad swelling responses when challenged with S-Ag and eliminated their infection in the early larval stages. Heterozygotes also exhibited a marked eosinophilia which peaked coincident with larval killing. In contrast, thymus grafting of patent nudes had no effect upon microfilaraemias or adult worm burdens and did not completely protect against a challenge larval inoculum although antibodies specific for S-Ag were produced. With the occasional exceptions of moderate immediate footpad swelling and very low titres of IgM specific for S-Ag, no specific immune responses to B. pahangi were found in ungrafted nude mice which allowed full development of adult worms and supported patent infections.

  18. Differential lymphocyte and antibody responses in deer mice infected with Sin Nombre hantavirus or Andes hantavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schountz, Tony; Quackenbush, Sandra; Rovnak, Joel; Haddock, Elaine; Black, William C; Feldmann, Heinz; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-08-01

    Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) is a rodent-borne disease with a high case-fatality rate that is caused by several New World hantaviruses. Each pathogenic hantavirus is naturally hosted by a principal rodent species without conspicuous disease and infection is persistent, perhaps for life. Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) are the natural reservoirs of Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the etiologic agent of most HCPS cases in North America. Deer mice remain infected despite a helper T cell response that leads to high-titer neutralizing antibodies. Deer mice are also susceptible to Andes hantavirus (ANDV), which causes most HCPS cases in South America; however, deer mice clear ANDV. We infected deer mice with SNV or ANDV to identify differences in host responses that might account for this differential outcome. SNV RNA levels were higher in the lungs but not different in the heart, spleen, or kidneys. Most ANDV-infected deer mice had seroconverted 14 days after inoculation, but none of the SNV-infected deer mice had. Examination of lymph node cell antigen recall responses identified elevated immune gene expression in deer mice infected with ANDV and suggested maturation toward a Th2 or T follicular helper phenotype in some ANDV-infected deer mice, including activation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) pathway in T cells and B cells. These data suggest that the rate of maturation of the immune response is substantially higher and of greater magnitude during ANDV infection, and these differences may account for clearance of ANDV and persistence of SNV. Hantaviruses persistently infect their reservoir rodent hosts without pathology. It is unknown how these viruses evade sterilizing immune responses in the reservoirs. We have determined that infection of the deer mouse with its homologous hantavirus, Sin Nombre virus, results in low levels of immune gene expression in antigen-stimulated lymph node cells and a poor antibody response. However, infection of deer mice with a

  19. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts' antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in

  20. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Rowe, P; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...... in May and in October. Seropositivity rates increased with age to a maximum of 77% for IgM and 95% for IgG in adults. High prevalences of seropositivity were associated with certain human leukocyte antigen class II alleles (DRw8, DR9, DR7, DR4, DQw7, and DQw2) or haplotypes. The relationship between anti......-GLURP489-1271 antibodies and clinical immunity is not clear; asymptomatically infected children aged 5 to 8 years had significantly higher levels of IgG than clinically ill children of the same age, suggesting that antibodies to the carboxy-terminal part of the GLURP may contribute to immunity to P...

  1. Guinea pig complement potently measures vibriocidal activity of human antibodies in response to cholera vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Whun; Jeong, Soyoung; Ahn, Ki Bum; Yang, Jae Seung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-12-01

    The vibriocidal assay using guinea pig complement is widely used for the evaluation of immune responses to cholera vaccines in human clinical trials. However, it is unclear why guinea pig complement has been used over human complement in the measurement of vibriocidal activity of human sera and there have not been comparison studies for the use of guinea pig complement over those from other species. Therefore, we comparatively investigated the effects of complements derived from human, guinea pig, rabbit, and sheep on vibriocidal activity. Complements from guinea pig, rabbit, and human showed concentration-dependent vibriocidal activity in the presence of quality control serum antibodies. Of these complements, guinea pig complement was the most sensitive and effective over a wide concentration range. When the vibriocidal activity of complements was measured in the absence of serum antibodies, human, sheep, and guinea pig complements showed vibriocidal activity up to 40-fold, 20-fold, and 1-fold dilution, respectively. For human pre- and post-vaccination sera, the most potent vibriocidal activity was observed when guinea pig complement was used. In addition, the highest fold-increases between pre- and post- vaccinated sera were obtained with guinea pig complement. Furthermore, human complement contained a higher amount of V. cholerae- and its lipopolysaccharide-specific antibodies than guinea pig complement. Collectively, these results suggest that guinea pig complements are suitable for vibriocidal assays due to their high sensitivity and effectiveness to human sera.

  2. Synthetic Three-Component HIV-1 V3 Glycopeptide Immunogens Induce Glycan-Dependent Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hui; Orwenyo, Jared; Giddens, John P; Yang, Qiang; Zhang, Roushu; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2017-12-21

    Eliciting broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) responses against HIV-1 is a major goal for a prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine. One approach is to design immunogens based on known broadly neutralizing epitopes. Here we report the design and synthesis of an HIV-1 glycopeptide immunogen derived from the V3 domain. We performed glycopeptide epitope mapping to determine the minimal glycopeptide sequence as the epitope of V3-glycan-specific bNAbs PGT128 and 10-1074. We further constructed a self-adjuvant three-component immunogen that consists of a 33-mer V3 glycopeptide epitope, a universal T helper epitope P30, and a lipopeptide (Pam 3 CSK 4 ) that serves as a ligand of Toll-like receptor 2. Rabbit immunization revealed that the synthetic self-adjuvant glycopeptide could elicit substantial glycan-dependent antibodies that exhibited broader recognition of HIV-1 gp120s than the non-glycosylated V3 peptide. These results suggest that the self-adjuvant synthetic glycopeptides can serve as an important component to elicit glycan-specific antibodies in HIV vaccine design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between plasma antibody response and protection in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss immersion vaccinated against Yersinia ruckeri.

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    Martin K Raida

    Full Text Available A key hallmark of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the generation of antigen-specific antibodies from B cells. Fish are the most primitive gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates possessing an adaptive immune system. Vaccination of rainbow trout against enteric redmouth disease (ERM by immersion in Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers a high degree of protection to the fish. The immune mechanisms responsible for protection may comprise both cellular and humoral elements but the role of specific immunoglobulins in this system has been questioned and not previously described. The present study demonstrates significant increase in plasma antibody titers following immersion vaccination and significantly reduced mortality during Y. ruckeri challenge.Rainbow trout were immersion-vaccinated, using either a commercial ERM vaccine (AquaVac™ ERM vet or an experimental Y. ruckeri bacterin. Half of the trout vaccinated with AquaVac™ ERM vet received an oral booster (AquaVac™ ERM Oral vet. Sub-groups of the fish from each group were subsequently exposed to 1 x 10⁹ CFU Y. ruckeri/ml either eight or twenty-six weeks post vaccination (wpv. All vaccinated groups showed 0% mortality when challenged, which was highly significant compared to the non-vaccinated controls (40 and 28% mortality eight and twenty-six weeks post vaccination (wpv, respectively (P<0.0001. Plasma samples from all groups of vaccinated fish were taken 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 26 wpv. and Y. ruckeri specific IgM antibody levels were measured with ELISA. A significant increase in titers was recorded in vaccinated fish, which also showed a reduced bacteremia during challenge. In vitro plasma studies showed a significantly increased bactericidal effect of fresh plasma from vaccinated fish indicating that plasma proteins may play a role in protection of vaccinated rainbow trout.

  4. Intrasubtype B HIV-1 Superinfection Correlates with Delayed Neutralizing Antibody Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, Elise; Caballero, Gemma; Phung, Pham; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Poignard, Pascal; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Smith, Davey M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding whether the neutralizing antibody (NAb) response impacts HIV-1 superinfection and how superinfection subsequently modulates the NAb response can help clarify correlates of protection from HIV exposures and better delineate pathways of NAb development. We examined associations between the development of NAb and the occurrence of superinfection in a well-characterized, antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, primary infection cohort of men who have sex with men. Deep sequencing was applied to blood plasma samples from the cohort to detect cases of superinfection. We compared the NAb activity against autologous and heterologous viruses between 10 participants with intrasubtype B superinfection and 19 monoinfected controls, matched to duration of infection and risk behavior. Three to 6 months after primary infection, individuals who would later become superinfected had significantly weaker NAb activity against tier 1 subtype B viruses (P = 0.003 for SF-162 and P = 0.017 for NL4-3) and marginally against autologous virus (P = 0.054). Lower presuperinfection NAb responses correlated with weaker gp120 binding and lower plasma total IgG titers. Soon after superinfection, the NAb response remained lower, but between 2 and 3 years after primary infection, NAb levels strengthened and reached those of controls. Superinfecting viruses were typically not susceptible to neutralization by presuperinfection plasma. These observations suggest that recently infected individuals with a delayed NAb response against primary infecting and tier 1 subtype B viruses are more susceptible to superinfection. IMPORTANCE Our findings suggest that within the first year after HIV infection, a relatively weak neutralizing antibody response against primary and subtype-specific neutralization-sensitive viruses increases susceptibility to superinfection in the face of repeated exposures. As natural infection progresses, the immune response strengthens significantly in some

  5. Optimal Sequential Immunization Can Focus Antibody Responses against Diversity Loss and Distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen

    2017-01-01

    Affinity maturation is a Darwinian process in which B lymphocytes evolve potent antibodies to encountered antigens and generate immune memory. Highly mutable complex pathogens present an immense antigenic diversity that continues to challenge natural immunity and vaccine design. Induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against this diversity by vaccination likely requires multiple exposures to distinct but related antigen variants, and yet how affinity maturation advances under such complex stimulation remains poorly understood. To fill the gap, we present an in silico model of affinity maturation to examine two realistic new aspects pertinent to vaccine development: loss in B cell diversity across successive immunization periods against different variants, and the presence of distracting epitopes that entropically disfavor the evolution of bnAbs. We find these new factors, which introduce additional selection pressures and constraints, significantly influence antibody breadth development, in a way that depends crucially on the temporal pattern of immunization (or selection forces). Curiously, a less diverse B cell seed may even favor the expansion and dominance of cross-reactive clones, but only when conflicting selection forces are presented in series rather than in a mixture. Moreover, the level of frustration due to evolutionary conflict dictates the degree of distraction. We further describe how antigenic histories select evolutionary paths of B cell lineages and determine the predominant mode of antibody responses. Sequential immunization with mutationally distant variants is shown to robustly induce bnAbs that focus on conserved elements of the target epitope, by thwarting strain-specific and distracted lineages. An optimal range of antigen dose underlies a fine balance between efficient adaptation and persistent reaction. These findings provide mechanistic guides to aid in design of vaccine strategies against fast mutating pathogens.

  6. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  7. Complexity of Human Antibody Response to Dengue Virus: Implication for Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yang Tsai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV are the leading cause of arboviral diseases in humans. Decades of efforts have made remarkable progress in dengue vaccine development. Despite the first dengue vaccine (dengvaxia from Sanofi Pasteur, a live-attenuated tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-dengue vaccine, has been licensed by several countries since 2016, its overall moderate efficacy (56.5–60.8% in the presence of neutralizing antibodies during the Phase 2b and 3 trials, lower efficacy among dengue naïve compared with dengue experienced individuals, and increased risk of hospitalization among young children during the follow-up highlight the need for a better understanding of humoral responses after natural DENV infection. Recent studies of more than 300 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV have led to the discovery of several novel epitopes on the envelope protein recognized by potent neutralizing mAbs. This information together with in-depth studies on polyclonal sera and B-cells following natural DENV infection has tremendous implications for better immunogen design for a safe and effective dengue vaccine. This review outlines the progress in our understanding of mouse mAbs, human mAbs, and polyclonal sera against DENV envelope and precursor membrane proteins, two surface proteins involved in vaccine development, following natural infection; analyses of these discoveries have provided valuable insight into new strategies involving molecular technology to induce more potent neutralizing antibodies and less enhancing antibodies for next-generation dengue vaccine development.

  8. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

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    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  9. Immunomodulatory activity of andrographolide on macrophage activation and specific antibody response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Dong, Sheng-fu; Liu, Chun-hong; Italiani, Paola; Sun, Shu-hui; Xu, Jing; Boraschi, Diana; Ma, Shi-ping; Qu, Di

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of andrographolide on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Methods: Andrographolide (10 μg/mL in vitro or 1 mg/kg in vivo) was used to modulate LPS-induced classical activated (M1) or IL-4-induced alternative activated (M2) macrophages in vitro and humor immune response to HBsAg in vivo. Cytokine gene expression profile (M1 vs M2) was measured by real-time PCR, IL-12/IL-10 level was detected by ELISA, and surface antigen expression was evaluated by flow cytometry, whereas phosphorylation level of ERK 1/2 and AKT was determined by Western blot. The level of anti-HBs antibodies in HBsAg immunized mice was detected by ELISA, and the number of HBsAg specific IL-4-producing splenocyte was enumerated by ELISPOT. Results: Andrographolide treatment in vitro attenuated either LPS or IL-4 induced macrophage activation, inhibited both M1 and M2 cytokines expression and decreased IL-12/IL-10 ratio (the ratio of M1/M2 polarization). Andrographolide down-regulated the expression of mannose receptor (CD206) in IL-4 induced macrophages and major histocompability complex/costimulatory molecules (MHC I, CD40, CD80, CD86) in LPS-induced macrophages. Correspondingly, anti-HBs antibody production and the number of IL-4-producing splenocytes were reduced by in vivo administration of andrographolide. Reduced phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and AKT were observed in macrophages treated with andrographolide. Conclusion: Andrographolide can modulate the innate and adaptive immune responses by regulating macrophage phenotypic polarization and Ag-specific antibody production. MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways may participate in the mechanisms of andrographolide regulating macrophage activation and polarization. PMID:20139902

  10. Multiple antigen target approach using the Accuplex4 BioCD system to detect Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in experimentally infected and vaccinated dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroff, Scott; Woodruff, Colby; Woodring, Todd; Sokolchik, Irene; Lappin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    The primary objective of our study was to optimize detection of serum antibodies to Borrelia burgdorferi using a new commercial automated fluorescence system (Accuplex4 BioCD system, Antech Diagnostics, Lake Success, New York). The system used multiple natural and artificial peptides-outer surface proteins (OspA, OspC, OspF), an outer membrane protein (P39), and a proprietary synthetic peptide (small Lyme peptide [SLP])-and the results were compared with a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses a proprietary peptide (C6). Sera from 4 groups were evaluated: dogs vaccinated with 1 of 3 commercially available vaccines (n = 18); dogs infested with adult Ixodes scapularis (black-legged tick; n = 18); dogs previously vaccinated and then infested with I. scapularis (n = 18); and dogs with B. burgdorferi infection that were then vaccinated (n = 14). All of the vaccines evaluated induced OspA responses. However, antibodies against OspF or C6 were not induced in any of the vaccinated dogs. Additionally, the OspF antibodies had 100% sensitivity and specificity when compared to antibodies against C6 peptide. In B. burgdorferi-infected dogs, antibodies against OspC and SLP were detected in serum sooner than antibodies against the other targets. Low levels of antibodies against OspA developed in 6 of 14 B. burgdorferi-infected, unvaccinated dogs and had the shortest duration compared to the other antibodies. Detection of antibody responses to multiple B. burgdorferi targets with this system can be used to help differentiate vaccinated dogs from exposed dogs as well as acute infection from chronic infection. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Pre-existing neutralizing antibody mitigates B cell dysregulation and enhances the Env-specific antibody response in SHIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Jaworski

    Full Text Available Our central hypothesis is that protection against HIV infection will be powerfully influenced by the magnitude and quality of the B cell response. Although sterilizing immunity, mediated by pre-formed abundant and potent antibodies is the ultimate goal for B cell-targeted HIV vaccine strategies, scenarios that fall short of this may still confer beneficial defenses against viremia and disease progression. We evaluated the impact of sub-sterilizing pre-existing neutralizing antibody on the B cell response to SHIV infection. Adult male rhesus macaques received passive transfer of a sub-sterilizing amount of polyclonal neutralizing immunoglobulin (Ig purified from previously infected animals (SHIVIG or control Ig prior to intra-rectal challenge with SHIVSF162P4 and extensive longitudinal sampling was performed. SHIVIG treated animals exhibited significantly reduced viral load and increased de novo Env-specific plasma antibody. Dysregulation of the B cell profile was grossly apparent soon after infection in untreated animals; exemplified by a ≈50% decrease in total B cells in the blood evident 2-3 weeks post-infection which was not apparent in SHIVIG treated animals. IgD+CD5+CD21+ B cells phenotypically similar to marginal zone-like B cells were highly sensitive to SHIV infection, becoming significantly decreased as early as 3 days post-infection in control animals, while being maintained in SHIVIG treated animals, and were highly correlated with the induction of Env-specific plasma antibody. These results suggest that B cell dysregulation during the early stages of infection likely contributes to suboptimal Env-specific B cell and antibody responses, and strategies that limit this dysregulation may enhance the host's ability to eliminate HIV.

  12. Epstein-Barr virus but not cytomegalovirus is associated with reduced vaccine antibody responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Holder

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and cytomegalovirus (CMV are persistent herpesviruses that have various immunomodulatory effects on their hosts. Both viruses are usually acquired in infancy in Sub-Saharan Africa, a region where childhood vaccines are less effective than in high income settings. To establish whether there is an association between these two observations, we tested the hypothesis that infection with one or both viruses modulate antibody responses to the T-cell independent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and the T-cell dependent measles vaccines.Infection with EBV and CMV was diagnosed by the presence of virus-specific IgM in the peripheral blood or by the presence of IgG at higher levels than that found in umbilical cord blood. Anti-meningococcus IgG and IgM were quantified by ELISA. Anti-measles antibody responses were quantified by haemagglutinin antibody inhibition assay. Infants infected with EBV had reduced IgG and IgM antibody responses to meningococcal polysaccharides and to measles vaccine. Infection with CMV alone predicted no changes in the response to meningococcal polysaccharide. While CMV alone had no discernable effect on the antibody response to measles, the response of infants infected with both CMV and EBV was similar to that of infants infected with neither, suggesting that the effects of CMV infection countered the effects of EBV on measles antibody responses.The results of this exploratory study indicate that infection with EBV is associated with reduced antibody responses to polysaccharides and to measles vaccine, but suggest that the response to T-cell dependent antigens such as measles haemagglutinin may be restored by infection with CMV.

  13. Serologic profile of a cohort of pigs and antibody response to an autogenous vaccine for Actinobacillus suis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapointe, L; D'Allaire, S; Lacouture, S; Gottschalk, M

    2001-01-01

    Actinobacillus suis is a commensal opportunistic pathogen in swine. However, in recent years, an increasing prevalence of clinical signs associated with A. suis has been observed in high health status herds in North America. The objectives of the study were to assess the kinetics of antibodies to A. suis in pigs from a herd showing clinical signs of A. suis infection and, to evaluate the antibody response in gilts following vaccination with an autogenous vaccine. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a saline extract of boiled-formalinized whole cells of a field strain as the coating antigen was standardized. This ELISA was used as a tool for monitoring, in a comparative way, the variations in A. suis antibody levels. The herd selected for the serologic profile was negative for Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection and showed clinical signs of A. suis infection in 16 to 19-week-old pigs. A cohort of 20 pigs was blood sampled at 5, 8, 12, and 16 weeks of age. The lowest level of serum antibodies was observed between weeks 8 and 12, this probably corresponding to a decrease in maternal immunity. A marked increase in the antibody response was seen at 16-week of age, at the approximate time of onset of A. suis clinical signs in the herd. The evaluation of serum antibody responses to an autogenous vaccine revealed that the humoral immunity of gilts further increased following vaccination although the level of antibodies was already high prior to vaccination. The magnitude of the response to vaccination was higher when the level of antibodies was low prior to the first injection. The ELISA test seems to detect antibodies against the O-chain LPS.

  14. Influence of routes and administration parameters on antibody response of pigs following DNA vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Annette Malene; Kirstensen, Birte; Dannemann-Jensen, Tove

    2004-01-01

    Using the nucleoprotein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus as model antigen, we optimised parameters for gene gun vaccination of pigs, including firing pressure and vaccination site. As criteria for optimisation, we characterised particle penetration and local tissue damage...... by histology. For selected combinations, vaccination efficiency in terms of antibody response was studied. Gene gun vaccination on ear alone was as efficient as a multi-site (ear, thorax, inguinal area, tongue mucosa) gene gun approach, and more efficient than combined intramuscular (i.m.)/intradermal (i.......d.) injection of plasmid DNA. This indicates, that the ear is an attractive site for gene gun vaccination of pigs....

  15. Antibody responses in pregnancy-induced transmammary transmission of Ancylostoma caninum hookworm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasu, P; Heller, A

    1999-09-20

    Third stage larvae of the Ancylostoma caninum hookworm nematode have the capacity to infect a dog, abort the normal maturation pathway to become blood-feeding intestinal worms, and instead distribute throughout the body in a developmentally arrested state that is relatively resilient to most chemotherapeutic agents. During pregnancy, a percentage of the arrested larvae reactivate and transmit via the mammary glands to infect the nursing puppies with resulting iron-deficiency anemia and potential mortality. To determine if the suppression of parasite-specific antibody responses during pregnancy facilitates the reactivation and transmammary transfer of hookworm larvae, a murine model of A. caninum infection was used to compare the infected versus uninfected animals that were either bred or not bred. Initial comparisons of genetically divergent BALB/c versus C57BL/6 mice showed that both the strains mounted strong Th2 biased IgG1 and IgE antibody responses to A. caninum infection. Using the BALB/c strain for the breeding analyses, it was confirmed that larval transfer to the mouse pups only occurred during the post-partum lactational period. In the dams, levels of total and antigen-specific IgG1 and total IgE were highly correlated with parasite burden. During most phases of pregnancy and lactation, infected dams had lower total IgG1, IgG2a and IgE levels as compared to unbred mice at comparable times post-infection; this downward modulation of antibody responses supports the established dogma of a generalized immunosuppression associated with pregnancy. However, at parturition and post-partum lactation, antigen-specific IgG1 levels measured at 1:5000 serum dilutions were comparable between bred and unbred mice, and antigen-specific IgG2a levels at 1:100 serum dilutions were also not significantly different except for a marginal reduction in the bred mice at the lactational timepoint. The comparable anti-A. caninum IgG1 levels between bred and unbred mice, and low

  16. Equine Arteritis Virus Elicits a Mucosal Antibody Response in the Reproductive Tract of Persistently Infected Stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carossino, Mariano; Wagner, Bettina; Loynachan, Alan T; Cook, R Frank; Canisso, Igor F; Chelvarajan, Lakshman; Edwards, Casey L; Nam, Bora; Timoney, John F; Timoney, Peter J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2017-10-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) has the ability to establish persistent infection in the reproductive tract of the stallion (carrier) and is continuously shed in its semen. We have recently demonstrated that EAV persists within stromal cells and a subset of lymphocytes in the stallion accessory sex glands in the presence of a significant local inflammatory response. In the present study, we demonstrated that EAV elicits a mucosal antibody response in the reproductive tract during persistent infection with homing of plasma cells into accessory sex glands. The EAV-specific immunoglobulin isotypes in seminal plasma included IgA, IgG1, IgG3/5, and IgG4/7. Interestingly, seminal plasma IgG1 and IgG4/7 possessed virus-neutralizing activity, while seminal plasma IgA and IgG3/5 did not. However, virus-neutralizing IgG1 and IgG4/7 in seminal plasma were not effective in preventing viral infectivity. In addition, the serological response was primarily mediated by virus-specific IgM and IgG1, while virus-specific serum IgA, IgG3/5, IgG4/7, and IgG6 isotype responses were not detected. This is the first report characterizing the immunoglobulin isotypes in equine serum and seminal plasma in response to EAV infection. The findings presented herein suggest that while a broader immunoglobulin isotype diversity is elicited in seminal plasma, EAV has the ability to persist in the reproductive tract, in spite of local mucosal antibody and inflammatory responses. This study provides further evidence that EAV employs complex immune evasion mechanisms during persistence in the reproductive tract that warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. An effective intracellular delivery system of monoclonal antibody for treatment of tumors: erythrocyte membrane-coated self-associated antibody nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lipeng; Han, Lin; Ding, Xiaoling; Xu, Jiaojiao; Wang, Jing; Zhu, Jianzhong; Lu, Weiyue; Sun, Jihong; Yu, Lei; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Yiting

    2017-08-01

    Antibody-based drugs have attracted much attention for their targeting ability, high efficacy and low toxicity. But it is difficult for those intrabodies, a kind of antibody whose targets are intracellular biomarkers, to become effective drugs due to the lack of intracellular delivery strategy and their short circulation time in blood. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), an important biomarker for tumors, is expressed only in cytoplasm instead of on cell membrane. In this study, the anti-hTERT blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb), as the model intrabody, was used to prepare nanoparticles (NPs), followed by the encapsulation of erythrocyte membrane (EM), to obtain the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs delivery system. The final NPs showed a z-average hydrodynamic diameter of about 197.3 nm. The in vitro cellular uptake by HeLa cells confirmed that compared with free anti-hTERT mAb, the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs exhibited a significantly increased uptake by tumor cells. Besides, the pharmacokinetic study confirmed that the EM encapsulation can remarkably prolong the circulation time and increase the area under curve (AUC) of NPs in blood. The EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs exhibited a remarkably decreased uptake by macrophages than uncoated NPs, which may be responsible for the prolonged circulation time and increased AUC. Furthermore, the frozen section of tumor tissue was performed and proved that the EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs can be more effectively accumulated in tumor tissues than the free mAb and uncoated NPs. In summary, this study indicated that EM-coated anti-hTERT mAb NPs are an effective delivery system for the long circulation and intracellular delivery of an intrabody, and make it possible for the intracellular biomarkers to become the potential targets of drugs.

  18. Serum antibody levels correlate with oral fungal cell numbers and influence the patients' response to chronic paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carli, Marina Lara; Cardoso, Beatriz Cristina Bachião; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme Cotta; Nonogaki, Suely; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa

    2015-06-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a neglected fungal disease that elicits an important granulomatous inflammatory reaction which aims to isolate the fungi and resolve the infection; besides the innate cellular response, the patients' sera may contain different levels of antibodies directed against PCM's pathogenic agent: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb). The aim of the study was to assess the distinct serum antibody levels of 19 chronic PCM patients and to associate these levels to the granulomatous inflammatory response and presence of fungi in oral lesions caused by Pb. The presence of Pb was detected and counted within oral tissues using immunohistochemistry; antibody levels were classified as negative, low-grade, moderate or high-grade groups. The Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's test were used to verify possible associations among the groups. Interestingly, lower antibody titres were associated with lesser numbers of Pb, which favours the cellular response over the humoral response to fight PCM. On the other hand, negative serological results were linked to a higher presence of Pb in the tissues, indicating that a deficient humoral response supports the fungal proliferation. The number of Pb was conveniently associated with the level of serum antibodies, showing that the humoral immune response is required, however, not solely responsible to restrain the dissemination of Pb. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. A large population-based association study between HLA and KIR genotypes and measles vaccine antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Schaid, Daniel J; Larrabee, Beth R; Haralambieva, Iana H; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2017-01-01

    Human antibody response to measles vaccine is highly variable in the population. Host genes contribute to inter-individual antibody response variation. The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are recognized to interact with HLA molecules and possibly influence humoral immune response to viral antigens. To expand on and improve our previous work with HLA genes, and to explore the genetic contribution of KIR genes to the inter-individual variability in measles vaccine-induced antibody responses, we performed a large population-based study in 2,506 healthy immunized subjects (ages 11 to 41 years) to identify HLA and KIR associations with measles vaccine-induced neutralizing antibodies. After correcting for the large number of statistical tests of allele effects on measles-specific neutralizing antibody titers, no statistically significant associations were found for either HLA or KIR loci. However, suggestive associations worthy of follow-up in other cohorts include B*57:01, DQB1*06:02, and DRB1*15:05 alleles. Specifically, the B*57:01 allele (1,040 mIU/mL; p = 0.0002) was suggestive of an association with lower measles antibody titer. In contrast, the DQB1*06:02 (1,349 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) and DRB1*15:05 (2,547 mIU/mL; p = 0.0004) alleles were suggestive of an association with higher measles antibodies. Notably, the associations with KIR genotypes were strongly nonsignificant, suggesting that KIR loci in terms of copy number and haplotypes are not likely to play a major role in antibody response to measles vaccination. These findings refine our knowledge of the role of HLA and KIR alleles in measles vaccine-induced immunity.

  20. Immunoglobulin G1 Allotype Influences Antibody Subclass Distribution in Response to HIV gp140 Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kratochvil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibody subclasses exhibit extensive polymorphisms (allotypes that could potentially impact the quality of HIV-vaccine induced B cell responses. Allotypes of immunoglobulin (Ig G1, the most abundant serum antibody, have been shown to display altered functional properties in regard to serum half-life, Fc-receptor binding and FcRn-mediated mucosal transcytosis. To investigate the potential link between allotypic IgG1-variants and vaccine-generated humoral responses in a cohort of 14 HIV vaccine recipients, we developed a novel protocol for rapid IgG1-allotyping. We combined PCR and ELISA assays in a dual approach to determine the IgG1 allotype identity (G1m3 and/or G1m1 of trial participants, using human plasma and RNA isolated from PBMC. The IgG1-allotype distribution of our participants mirrored previously reported results for caucasoid populations. We observed elevated levels of HIV gp140-specific IgG1 and decreased IgG2 levels associated with the G1m1-allele, in contrast to G1m3 carriers. These data suggest that vaccinees homozygous for G1m1 are predisposed to develop elevated Ag-specific IgG1:IgG2 ratios compared to G1m3-carriers. This elevated IgG1:IgG2 ratio was further associated with higher FcγR-dimer engagement, a surrogate for potential antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP function. Although preliminary, these results suggest that IgG1 allotype may have a significant impact on IgG subclass distribution in response to vaccination and associated Fc-mediated effector functions. These results have important implications for ongoing HIV vaccine efficacy studies predicated on engagement of FcγR-mediated cellular functions including ADCC and ADCP, and warrant further investigation. Our novel allotyping protocol provides new tools to determine the potential impact of IgG1 allotypes on vaccine efficacy.

  1. Cutaneous and Systemic Findings Associated With Nuclear Matrix Protein 2 Antibodies in Adult Dermatomyositis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Anna; Chung, Lorinda; Li, Shufeng; Casciola-Rosen, Livia; Fiorentino, David F

    2017-12-01

    To characterize the cutaneous and systemic clinical phenotype of dermatomyositis patients with antinuclear matrix protein 2 (anti-NXP-2) antibodies. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 178 dermatomyositis patients seen at the Stanford University Clinic. An electronic chart review employing a keyword search strategy was performed to collect clinical and laboratory data. Anti-NXP-2 antibodies were assayed by immunoprecipitation using NXP-2 produced by in vitro transcription/translation. Antibodies to NXP-2 were detected in 20 of the 178 patients (11%). Anti-NXP-2 antibodies were associated with male sex (50% versus 25%; P = 0.02), dysphagia (74% versus 39%; P = 0.006), myalgia (89% versus 52%; P = 0.002), peripheral edema (35% versus 11%; P = 0.016), and calcinosis (37% versus 11%; P = 0.007). These patients were less likely to be clinically amyopathic (5% versus 23%; P = 0.08). Five of the 20 patients with anti-NXP-2 antibodies (25%) had an associated internal malignancy. No other cutaneous characteristics were associated with anti-NXP-2 antibodies, except a decreased frequency of Gottron's sign (44% versus 75%; P = 0.012) and a greater likelihood of having mild skin disease. Dermatomyositis patients with anti-NXP-2 antibodies have a distinct and often severe systemic phenotype that includes myalgia, peripheral edema, and significant dysphagia, despite having milder inflammatory skin disease. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Evolution of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Genes and Neutralizing Antibody Response in an Individual with Broadly Cross Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    FBS, L-glutamine, penicillin, streptomycin (Gibeo), tylosin (Sigma), and puromycin. All cell cultures were maintained in a humidified atmosphere...white walled, flat- bottomed tissue culture plates (Costar, Coming NY). The virus-antibody mixtures were then combined with 1-2 x 104 HOS-CD4+-CCR5...all lineages combined obtained from 1986-1993 to sCD4 and eight cross-reactive mAbs targeting distinct neutralization epitope regions. We chose

  3. Heritability of antibody isotype and subclass responses to Plasmodium falciparum antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy O Duah

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It is important to understand the extent to which genetic factors regulate acquired immunity to common infections. A classical twin study design is useful to estimate the heritable component of variation in measurable immune parameters.This study assessed the relative heritability of different plasma antibody isotypes and subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM, IgA and IgE naturally acquired to P. falciparum blood stage antigens AMA1, MSP1-19, MSP2 (two allelic types and MSP3 (two allelic types. Separate analyses were performed on plasma from 213 pairs of Gambian adult twins, 199 child twin pairs sampled in a dry season when there was little malaria transmission, and another set of 107 child twin pairs sampled at the end of the annual wet season when malaria was common. There were significantly positive heritability (h(2 estimates for 48% (20/42 of the specific antibody assays (for the seven isotypes and subclasses to the six antigens tested among the adults, 48% (20/42 among the children in the dry season and 31% (13/42 among the children in the wet season. In children, there were significant heritability estimates for IgG4 reactivity against each of the antigens, and this subclass had higher heritability than the other subclasses and isotypes. In adults, 75% (15/20 of the significantly heritable antigen-specific isotype responses were attributable to non-HLA class II genetic variation, whereas none showed a significant HLA contribution.Genome-wide approaches are now warranted to map the major genetic determinants of variable antibody isotype and subclass responses to malaria, alongside evaluation of their impact on infection and disease. Although plasma levels of IgG4 to malaria antigens are generally low, the exceptionally high heritability of levels of this subclass in children deserves particular investigation.

  4. Antibody response to polyomavirus primary infection: high seroprevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus and lymphoid tissue involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Carolina; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zanotta, Nunzia; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Maestri, Iva; Tommasino, Massimo; Pawlita, Michael; Villani, Sonia; Comar, Manola; Delbue, Serena

    2018-01-12

    Human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) asymptomatically infect the human population establishing latency in the host, and their seroprevalence can reach 90% in healthy adults. Few studies have focused on the pediatric population, and there are no reports regarding the seroprevalence of all the newly isolated HPyVs among Italian children. Therefore, we investigated the frequency of serum antibodies against 12 PyVs in 182 immunocompetent children from Northeast Italy, by means of a multiplex antibody detection system. Additionally, secondary lymphoid tissues were collected to analyze the presence of HPyV DNA sequences using a specific real-time PCRs or PCRs. Almost 100% of subjects were seropositive for at least one PyV. Seropositivity ranged from 3% for antibodies against simian virus 40 (SV40) in children from 0 to 3 years, to 91% for antibodies against WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) and HPyV10 in children from 8 to 17 years. The mean number of PyV for which children were seropositive increased with the increasing of age: 4 standard deviations (SD) 1.8 in the 0-3-year group, 5 (SD 1.9) in the 4-7-year group, and 6 (SD 2.2) in the 8-17-year group. JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) DNA was detected in 1% of the adenoids, WUPyV in 12% of the tonsils, and 28% of the adenoids, and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was present in 6 and 2% of the tonsils and adenoids, respectively. Our study gives new insights on the serological evidence of exposure to PyVs during childhood, and on their possible respiratory route of transmission.

  5. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Charles M; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2006-04-01

    The systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is the body's response to an infectious or noninfectious insult. Although the definition of SIRS refers to it as an "inflammatory" response, it actually has pro- and anti-inflammatory components. This review outlines the pathophysiology of SIRS and highlights potential targets for future therapeutic intervention in patients with this complex entity.

  6. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...... antibody clones against GroEL. The appearance of new clones with time reflected the long duration of the chronic infection. A striking addition of new clonotypes during the observation period occurred when a new unrelated bacterium (Burkholderia cepacia) had become established as a cause of the pulmonary...

  7. Cryptosporidiosis in HIV/AIDS patients in Kenya: clinical features, epidemiology, molecular characterization and antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyiri, Jane W; Kanyi, Henry; Maina, Samuel; Wang, David E; Steen, Aaron; Ngugi, Paul; Kamau, Timothy; Waithera, Tabitha; O'Connor, Roberta; Gachuhi, Kimani; Wamae, Claire N; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Ward, Honorine D

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the epidemiological and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis, the molecular characteristics of infecting species and serum antibody responses to three Cryptosporidium-specific antigens in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in Kenya. Cryptosporidium was the most prevalent enteric pathogen and was identified in 56 of 164 (34%) of HIV/AIDS patients, including 25 of 70 (36%) with diarrhea and 31 of 94 (33%) without diarrhea. Diarrhea in patients exclusively infected with Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with the number of children per household, contact with animals, and water treatment. Cryptosporidium hominis was the most prevalent species and the most prevalent subtype family was Ib. Patients without diarrhea had significantly higher serum IgG levels to Chgp15, Chgp40 and Cp23, and higher fecal IgA levels to Chgp15 and Chgp40 than those with diarrhea suggesting that antibody responses to these antigens may be associated with protection from diarrhea and supporting further investigation of these antigens as vaccine candidates. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Antibody response between pigs of Piau and a commercial breed naturally infected with Porcine circovirus 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H.S. Bulos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Brazilian pig population is made up of several naturalized breeds; among them the Piau breed is known for its rusticity and large fat stores. The naturalized breeds, in comparison with commercial ones, may have an increased resistance to diseases circulating in their territory. Thus, this study aimed to verify if there are differences between the serologic profile against Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2 of Piau pigs and that of a commercial breed from a farm naturally infected by PCV2. The serum viral load was measured by qPCR, and levels of anti-PCV2 antibodies were measured by ELISA. The results showed that the serum viral load was similar across all animals. However, Piau piglets showed higher levels of antibodies compared to commercial piglets (P= 0.05, while sows of the commercial breed showed higher levels than the Piau breed (P< 0.01. There was not a statistical difference between pigs of different production stages in the seroprevalence of PCV2 or the blood viral load. This work demonstrates that, with regard to a natural PCV2 infection, the Piau breed has a different humoral immune response compared to the response developed by the commercial pigs. The results support the importance of conservation of native breeds.

  9. Heat shock proteins 70 and 90 from Clonorchis sinensis induce Th1 response and stimulate antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun Joo; Jeong, Young-Il; Lee, Myoung-Ro; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Sang-Eun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Park, Mi-Yeoun; Ju, Jung-Won

    2017-03-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are found in all prokaryotes and most compartments of eukaryotic cells. Members of the HSP family mediate immune responses to tissue damage or cellular stress. However, little is known about the immune response induced by the oriental liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, even though this organism is carcinogenic to humans. We address this issue in the present study in mouse bone marrow dendritic cells (mBMDCs), using recombinant HSP70 and 90 from C. sinensis (rCsHSP70 and rCsHSP90). rCsHSP70 and rCsHSP90 were produced in an E. coli system. Purified recombinant proteins were treated in BMDCs isolated from C57BL/6 mice. T cells were isolated from Balb/c mice and co-cultured with activated mBMDCs. Expression of surface molecules was measured by flow cytometry and cytokine secretion was quantified using ELISA. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups, including peptide alone, peptide/Freund's adjuvant, peptide/CsHSP70, peptide/CsHSP90, and were immunized intraperitoneally three times. Two weeks after final immunization, antibodies against peptide were measured using ELISA. Both proteins induced a dose-dependent upregulation in major histocompatibility complex and co-stimulatory molecule expression and increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, and -12p70 and tumor necrosis factor-α in mBMDCs. Furthermore, when allogenic T cells were incubated with mBMDCs activated by rCsHSP70 and rCsHSP90, the helper T cell (Th)1 cytokine interferon-γ was up-regulated whereas the level of the Th2 cytokine IL-4 was unchanged. These results indicate that rCsHSPs predominantly induce a Th1 response. Over and above these results, we also demonstrated that the production of peptide-specific antibodies can be activated after immunization via in vitro peptide binding with rCsHSP70 or rCsHSP90. This study showed for the first time that the HSP or HSP/peptide complexes of C. sinensis could be considered as a more effective

  10. Effect of Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae) aqueous extract on antibody response to Bothrops asper venom and immune cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernando; Chacón, Mauricio; Badilla, Beatriz; Arévalo, Carolina

    2007-03-01

    The effect of aqueous extract of Echinacea purpurea roots on the murine antibody response to Bothrops asper snake venom in vivo was studied. Three groups were used. Group #1, baseline control, was treated with snake venom plus PBS. Group #2 was treated with snake venom plus sodium alginate as adjuvant (routine method used at Instituto Clodomiro Picado), and group #3 or experimental group, was treated with snake venom plus aqueous extract ofE. purpurea root as adjuvant. In all groups, the first inoculation was done with Freund's complete adjuvant (FCA). By the time of the second bleeding, mice in group #3 showed a remarkable increment in the level of anti-venom antibodies compared with those in groups #1 or #2. In vitro immune cell proliferation as a response to aqueous extract of E. purpurea root was studied using human lymphocytes activated with different lectins (Con A, PHA and PWM). In all cases, increase in percentage of lymphoproliferation was greater when E. purpurea root extract was used in addition to individual lectins.

  11. Antibody responses to HIV-1 antigens are higher in HIV-1(+) intravenous drug users than in HIV-1(+) homosexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, J D; Bekesi, G J

    2001-07-01

    Immune responses to HIV-1 infection of 42 HIV-1-positive asymptomatic intravenous drug users (IVDUs) were compared with those of 135 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic homosexual men in the present study. Twenty-five HIV-1(-) individuals served as normal controls. The comparison included antibody responses to five computer-predicted epitopes of HIV-1 p17, and viral proteins gp120 and p24 as well as p17. Major immunophenotypes were also investigated. Results showed that antibody responses to the five epitopes were significantly higher in the IVDUs. A larger proportion of the IVDUs, with respect to that of homosexuals, showed positive antibody responses to p24 and p17, respectively. However, the antibody response to gp120 was similar between the two cohorts. Immunophenotyping showed that HIV-1(+) homosexuals had higher profiles in most of the major subsets than did the IVDUs, especially in the total count of lymphocytes, absolute numbers of CD3+ cells and CD8+ cells. It appeared that the HIV-1(+) IVDU cohort had higher antibody responses to most of the viral antigens, but had lower levels of lymphocyte subsets in comparison with HIV(+) homosexuals.

  12. The dynamics of HCV-specific antibody responses in HIV/HCV patients on long-term antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Silvia; Laiman, Alfred; French, Martyn A; Flexman, James; Watson, Mark W; Price, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    Antibody responses have not been fully characterised in chronically HIV/HCV patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Seventeen HIV/HCV patients receiving ART were followed for a median (range) interval of 597 (186-766) weeks. Prior to ART, HIV/HCV patients had lower levels of antibodies reactive with HCV core and JFH-1, and lower genotype cross-reactive neutralising antibodies (nAb) titres, than HCV patients. Levels of JFH-1 reactive antibody increased on ART, irrespective of CD4 + T-cell counts or changes in serum ALT levels. The appearance of nAb coincided with control of HCV viral replication in five HIV/HCV patients. In other patients, HCV viral loads remained elevated despite nAb responses. Sustained virological responses following HCV therapy were associated with reduced antibody responses to JFH-1 and core but elevated responses to non-structural proteins. We conclude that nAb responses alone may fail to clear HCV, but contribute to control of viral replication in some HIV/HCV patients responding to ART. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct correlation between potentiometric and impedance biosensing of antibody-antigen interactions using an integrated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Yen; Creedon, Niamh; Brightbill, Eleanor; Pavlidis, Spyridon; Brown, Billyde; Gray, Darren W.; Shields, Niall; Sayers, Ríona; Mooney, Mark H.; O'Riordan, Alan; Vogel, Eric M.

    2017-08-01

    A fully integrated system that combines extended gate field-effect transistor (EGFET)-based potentiometric biosensors and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)-based biosensors has been demonstrated. This integrated configuration enables the sequential measurement of the same immunological binding event on the same sensing surface and consequently sheds light on the fundamental origins of sensing signals produced by FET and EIS biosensors, as well as the correlation between the two. Detection of both the bovine serum albumin (BSA)/anti-BSA model system in buffer solution and bovine parainfluenza antibodies in complex blood plasma samples was demonstrated using the integrated biosensors. Comparison of the EGFET and EIS sensor responses reveals similar dynamic ranges, while equivalent circuit modeling of the EIS response shows that the commonly reported total impedance change (ΔZtotal) is dominated by the change in charge transfer resistance (Rct) rather than surface capacitance (Csurface). Using electrochemical kinetics and the Butler-Volmer equation, we unveil that the surface potential and charge transfer resistance, measured by potentiometric and impedance biosensors, respectively, are, in fact, intrinsically linked. This observation suggests that there is no significant gain in using the FET/EIS integrated system and leads to the demonstration that low-cost EGFET biosensors are sufficient as a detection tool to resolve the charge information of biomolecules for practical sensing applications.

  14. The Bordetella pertussis Type III Secretion System Tip Complex Protein Bsp22 Is Not a Protective Antigen and Fails To Elicit Serum Antibody Responses during Infection of Humans and Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romero, Rodrigo, Villarino; Bíbová, Ilona; Černý, Ondřej; Večerek, Branislav; Wald, Tomáš; Benada, Oldřich; Zavadilová, J.; Osička, Radim; Šebo, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 8 (2013), s. 2761-2767 ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/0580; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1940 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : ADENYLATE CYCLASE-HEMOLYSIN * T-CELL EPITOPES * IMMUNE-RESPONSES Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.156, year: 2013

  15. Antibody response following Hepatitis B vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients: does normalized urea clearance matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Dervisoglu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Data on the factors that contribute to the antibody response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in peritoneal dialysis patients are scarce. The current study was conducted on a group of peritoneal dialysis patients to learn how the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination varies according to the patient's clearance of urea normalized to total body water (Kt/V. METHODS: A convenience sample of 33 peritoneal dialysis patients (13 women and 20 men, with a mean age of 49¡12 years was administered double doses (20 μg IM in each deltoid muscle of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1, 2, and 6 months. Response to immunization was measured at one to three months after the final dose of vaccine. The subjects were divided into groups according to the level of antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs, including non-responders ( 100 IU/L. RESULTS: Among non-responders, weak responders, and good responders, significant differences were found in age (54 ± 12 vs. 56 ± 9 vs. 45¡12 years, respectively; p = 0.049 and recombinant human erythropoietin use (20 vs. 29 vs. 76%, respectively; p = 0.016. No significant differences in weekly total Kt/V (p = 0.704, weekly peritoneal Kt/V (p = 0.064 and residual glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.355 were found across the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: Delivered clearance measured by weekly peritoneal Kt/V and total clearance measured by weekly total Kt/V did not predict the response to hepatitis B virus vaccination in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

  16. DETECTION OF ANTIBODIES TO CANDIDA ALBICANS GERM TUBE BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE IN IMMUNOSUPPRESSED MICE WITH EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEMIC CANDIDIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zaini

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available "nThe increasing incidence of systemic candidiasis, which parallels the use of invasive and immunosuppressive medical procedures, necessitates development of rapid and cost effective tests for diagnosis of systemic candidiasis. Therefore in this study 85 mice were first immunosuppressed by cyclophosphamide and then infected by Candida albicans NCPF 3153. Other 85 mice were employed as control. The case and control mice were bled and then autopsied. Hearts and kidneys were checked by direct, histopathological and cultural examination for systemic candidiasis. The 85 sera from histological proven cases and 85 control mice were adsorbed with heat killed blastospores of same strain of C. albicans. Anti-Candida albicans germ tube antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay for diagnosis of invasive candidiasis in case and control mice. In addition, sera from 35 mice with proven cryptococcosis were also tested. While 84 mice with proven systemic candidiasis (100% had anti-germ tube antibodies, these antibodies were absent in all controls and mice with cryptococcosis. The specificity was 100%, indicating a high degree of discrimination was possible between systemic candidiasis and cryptococcosis in the mice studied. It must be concluded that anti-germ tube responses did not appear to be significantly reduced in immunocompromised mice.

  17. Adjuvant effect of Asparagus racemosus Willd. derived saponins in antibody production, allergic response and pro-inflammatory cytokine modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Nimisha; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Pandey, Pallavi; Patel, Dinesh Kumar; Banerjee, Suchitra; Darokar, Mahendra Pandurang; Pal, Anirban

    2017-02-01

    The study manifests the immunoadjuvant potential of saponin rich fraction from Asparagus racemosus in terms of cellular and humoral immune response that can be exploited against microbial infections. Asparagus racemosus (AR) has been attributed as an adaptogen and rasayana in traditional medication systems for enhancing the host defence mechanism. Spectrophotometric and HPTLC analysis ensured the presence of saponins. The saponin rich fractions were tested for immunoadjuvant property in ovalbumin immunised mice for the humoral response, quantified in terms of prolonged antibody production upto a duration of 56days. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF) were estimated for the cellular immune response in LPS stimulated primary murine macrophages. The safety evaluation in terms of cytotoxicity and allergic response has also been evaluated through in-vitro (MTT) and in-vivo (IgE) respectively. ARS significantly inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokines, in LPS stimulated murine macrophages with no intrinsic cytotoxicity. The significant increase in IgG production infers the utility of ARS for prolonged humoral response. Further, the antigen specific response of IL-12 at early stage and IgE titres also suggests the generation of cellular immune response and low allergic reaction respectively, as compared to conventional adjuvants. IL-6 and TNF fluctuations in LPS stimulated and non-stimulated macrophages along with IgG and IL-12 also confirmed the Th1/Th2 modulating effect of ARS. The study indicates potential effect of ARS as an adjuvant for the stimulation of cellular immune response in addition to generating a sustained adaptive response without any adverse effects paving way for further validation with pathogenic organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Covalent Linkage of HIV-1 Trimers to Synthetic Liposomes Elicits Improved B Cell and Antibody Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Shridhar; Goebrecht, Geraldine; Stano, Armando; Wilson, Richard; Ota, Takayuki; Tran, Karen; Ingale, Jidnyasa; Zwick, Michael B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2017-08-15

    We have demonstrated that a liposomal array of well-ordered trimers enhances B cell activation, germinal center formation, and the elicitation of tier-2 autologous neutralizing antibodies. Previously, we coupled well-ordered cleavage-independent NFL trimers via their C-terminal polyhistidine tails to nickel lipids integrated into the lipid bilayer. Despite favorable in vivo effects, concern remained over the potentially longer-term in vivo instability of noncovalent linkage of the trimers to the liposomes. Accordingly, we tested both cobalt coupling and covalent linkage of the trimers to the liposomes by reengineering the polyhistidine tail to include a free cysteine on each protomer of model BG505 NFL trimers to allow covalent linkage. Both cobalt and cysteine coupling resulted in a high-density array of NFL trimers that was stable in both 20% mouse serum and 100 mM EDTA, whereas the nickel-conjugated trimers were not stable under these conditions. Binding analysis and calcium flux with anti-Env-specific B cells confirmed that the trimers maintained conformational integrity following coupling. Following immunization of mice, serologic analysis demonstrated that the covalently coupled trimers elicited Env-directed antibodies in a manner statistically significantly improved compared to soluble trimers and nickel-conjugated trimers. Importantly, the covalent coupling not only enhanced gp120-directed responses compared to soluble trimers, it also completely eliminated antibodies directed to the C-terminal His tag located at the "bottom" of the spike. In contrast, soluble and noncovalent formats efficiently elicited anti-His tag antibodies. These data indicate that covalent linkage of well-ordered trimers to liposomes in high-density array displays multiple advantages in vitro and in vivo IMPORTANCE Enveloped viruses typically encode a surface-bound glycoprotein that mediates viral entry into host cells and is a primary target for vaccine design. Liposomes with

  19. Augmentation of the antibody response of Atlantic salmon by oral administration of alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihan Chen

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the effect of alginate-encapsulated infectious pancreatic necrosis virus antigens in inducing the immune response of Atlantic salmon as booster vaccines. One year after intraperitoneal injection with an oil-adjuvanted vaccine, post-smolts were orally boosted either by 1 alginate-encapsulated IPNV antigens (ENCAP; 2 soluble antigens (UNENCAP or 3 untreated feed (control. This was done twice, seven weeks apart. Sampling was done twice, firstly at 7 weeks post 1st oral boost and the 2nd, at 4 weeks after the 2nd oral boost. Samples included serum, head kidney, spleen and hindgut. Serum antibodies were analyzed by ELISA while tissues were used to assess the expression of IgM, IgT, CD4, GATA3, FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes by quantitative PCR. Compared to controls, fish fed with ENCAP had a significant increase (p<0.04 in serum antibodies following the 1st boost but not after the 2nd boost. This coincided with significant up-regulation of CD4 and GATA3 genes. In contrast, serum antibodies in the UNENCAP group decreased both after the 1st and 2nd oral boosts. This was associated with significant up-regulation of FOXP3, TGF-β and IL-10 genes. The expression of IgT was not induced in the hindgut after the 1st oral boost but was significantly up-regulated following the 2nd one. CD4 and GATA3 mRNA expressions exhibited a similar pattern to IgT in the hindgut. IgM mRNA expression on the other hand was not differentially regulated at any of the times examined. Our findings suggest that 1 Parenteral prime with oil-adjuvanted vaccines followed by oral boost with ENCAP results in augmentation of the systemic immune response; 2 Symmetrical prime and boost (mucosal with ENCAP results in augmentation of mucosal immune response and 3 Symmetrical priming and boosting (mucosal with soluble antigens results in the induction of systemic immune tolerance.

  20. The Antibody-Secreting Cell Response to Infection: Kinetics and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Carter

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of advances in molecular diagnostic testing for infectious disease, there is still a need for tools that advance clinical care and public health. Current methods focus on pathogen detection with unprecedented precision, but often lack specificity. In contrast, the host immune response is highly specific for the infecting pathogen. Serological studies are rarely helpful in clinical settings, as they require acute and convalescent antibody testing. However, the B cell response is much more rapid and short-lived, making it an optimal target for determining disease aetiology in patients with infections. The performance of tests that aim to detect circulating antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASCs has previously been unclear. Test performance is reliant on detecting the presence of ASCs in the peripheral blood. As such, the kinetics of the ASC response to infection, the antigen specificity of the ASC response, and the methods of ASC detection are all critical. In this review, we summarize previous studies that have used techniques to enumerate ASCs during infection. We describe the emergence, peak, and waning of these cells in peripheral blood during infection with a number of bacterial and viral pathogens, as well as malaria infection. We find that the timing of antigen-specific ASC appearance and disappearance is highly conserved across pathogens, with a peak response between day 7 and day 8 of illness and largely absent following day 14 since onset of symptoms. Data show a sensitivity of ~90% and specificity >80% for pathogen detection using ASC-based methods. Overall, the summarised work indicates that ASC-based methods may be very sensitive and highly specific for determining the etiology of infection and have some advantages over current methods. Important areas of research remain, including more accurate definition of the timing of the ASC response to infection, the biological mechanisms underlying variability

  1. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus Specific Antibody Response in Multiple Sclerosis Patients during 21 Months of Natalizumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Castellazzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Natalizumab, a humanized anti-α4 integrin monoclonal antibody, is a highly effective treatment approved for MS. An association between MS and an exposure to Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV sustained by the levels of antiviral capsid antigen (VCA and anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1 IgG has been described. Our goal was to verify the utility of EBV-specific IgG as a marker in Natalizumab treated MS. Twenty patients (17 female and 3 male in treatment with Natalizumab were enrolled. Serum levels of anti-VCA and anti-EBNA-1 IgG were determined and expressed as arbitrary units (AU before treatment and every three months for 21 months of therapy. Anti-VCA IgG levels were increased at the 15th month (235410 ± 196712 AU comparing with the 3rd (98146 ± 47145 AU and the 6th (109866 ± 52270 AU months of therapy p<0.05. No significant differences were found for serum anti-EBNA-1 IgG levels. Our data indicate that a transient, self-limited, EBV reactivation can occur in MS during Natalizumab therapy but our results do not support the use of serum EBV-specific antibody levels as biomarkers for monitoring therapeutic response to Natalizumab in the course of MS.

  3. Antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental human malaria infection or vaccination show limited relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen M; Okitsu, Shinji; Porter, David W; Duncan, Christopher; Amacker, Mario; Pluschke, Gerd; Cavanagh, David R; Hill, Adrian V S; Todryk, Stephen M

    2015-05-01

    This study examined specific antibody and T-cell responses associated with experimental malaria infection or malaria vaccination, in malaria-naive human volunteers within phase I/IIa vaccine trials, with a view to investigating inter-relationships between these types of response. Malaria infection was via five bites of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes, with individuals reaching patent infection by 11-12 days, having harboured four or five blood-stage cycles before drug clearance. Infection elicited a robust antibody response against merozoite surface protein-119 , correlating with parasite load. Classical class switching was seen from an early IgM to an IgG1-dominant response of increasing affinity. Malaria-specific T-cell responses were detected in the form of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) ELIspot, but their magnitude did not correlate with the magnitude of antibody or its avidity, or with parasite load. Different individuals who were immunized with a virosome vaccine comprising influenza antigens combined with P. falciparum antigens, demonstrated pre-existing interferon-γ, IL-2 and IL-5 ELIspot responses against the influenza antigens, and showed boosting of anti-influenza T-cell responses only for IL-5. The large IgG1-dominated anti-parasite responses showed limited correlation with T-cell responses for magnitude or avidity, both parameters being only negatively correlated for IL-5 secretion versus anti-apical membrane antigen-1 antibody titres. Overall, these findings suggest that cognate T-cell responses across a range of magnitudes contribute towards driving potentially effective antibody responses in infection-induced and vaccine-induced immunity against malaria, and their existence during immunization is beneficial, but magnitudes are mostly not inter-related. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. HIV-1 superinfection in women broadens and strengthens the neutralizing antibody response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Cortez

    Full Text Available Identifying naturally-occurring neutralizing antibodies (NAb that are cross-reactive against all global subtypes of HIV-1 is an important step toward the development of a vaccine. Establishing the host and viral determinants for eliciting such broadly NAbs is also critical for immunogen design. NAb breadth has previously been shown to be positively associated with viral diversity. Therefore, we hypothesized that superinfected individuals develop a broad NAb response as a result of increased antigenic stimulation by two distinct viruses. To test this hypothesis, plasma samples from 12 superinfected women each assigned to three singly infected women were tested against a panel of eight viruses representing four different HIV-1 subtypes at matched time points post-superinfection (~5 years post-initial infection. Here we show superinfected individuals develop significantly broader NAb responses post-superinfection when compared to singly infected individuals (RR = 1.68, CI: 1.23-2.30, p = 0.001. This was true even after controlling for NAb breadth developed prior to superinfection, contemporaneous CD4+ T cell count and viral load. Similarly, both unadjusted and adjusted analyses showed significantly greater potency in superinfected cases compared to controls. Notably, two superinfected individuals were able to neutralize variants from four different subtypes at plasma dilutions >1∶300, suggesting that their NAbs exhibit elite activity. Cross-subtype breadth was detected within a year of superinfection in both of these individuals, which was within 1.5 years of their initial infection. These data suggest that sequential infections lead to augmentation of the NAb response, a process that may provide insight into potential mechanisms that contribute to the development of antibody breadth. Therefore, a successful vaccination strategy that mimics superinfection may lead to the development of broad NAbs in immunized individuals.

  5. Antibody response to rabies vaccination in captive and freeranging wolves (Canis lupus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federoff, N.E.

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen captive and five free-ranging Minnesota gray wolves (Canis lupus) were tested for the presence of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) after vaccination with an inactivated canine rabies vaccine. Blood was collected from all wolves prior to vaccination and at 1 mo postvaccination (PV) and from all captive and three wild wolves at 3 mo PV. In addition, one free-ranging wolf was sampled at 4 mo PV, and two free-ranging wolves were sampled at 6 mo PV. All wolves were seronegative prior to vaccination. RVNA were detected in 14 (100%) captive wolves and in four of five (80%) free-ranging wolves. The geometric mean titer of the captive wolves at 1 mo PV was significantly higher (P = 0.023) than in the free-ranging wolves. Five of 13 (38.5%) captive wolves and none of the three (0%) free-ranging wolves had measurable RVNA at 3 mo PV. No measurable RVNA were detected in the serum samples collected from the free-ranging wolves at 4 and 6 mo PV. These results should be interpreted with caution because of the small number of free-ranging wolves tested. Further research is needed to properly assess immune function and antibody response to vaccination in captive wolves in comparison with their free-ranging counterparts.

  6. Neutralising antibody response in domestic cats immunised with a commercial feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Harris, Matthew; Techakriengkrai, Navapon; Beatty, Julia A; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-02-18

    Across human and veterinary medicine, vaccines against only two retroviral infections have been brought to market successfully, the vaccines against feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). FeLV vaccines have been a global success story, reducing virus prevalence in countries where uptake is high. In contrast, the more recent FIV vaccine was introduced in 2002 and the degree of protection afforded in the field remains to be established. However, given the similarities between FIV and HIV, field studies of FIV vaccine efficacy are likely to advise and inform the development of future approaches to HIV vaccination. Here we assessed the neutralising antibody response induced by FIV vaccination against a panel of FIV isolates, by testing blood samples collected from client-owned vaccinated Australian cats. We examined the molecular and phenotypic properties of 24 envs isolated from one vaccinated cat that we speculated might have become infected following natural exposure to FIV. Cats vaccinated against FIV did not display broadly neutralising antibodies, suggesting that protection may not extend to some virulent recombinant strains of FIV circulating in Australia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis by murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Rhizopus arrhizus (Rhizopus oryzae) were produced in vitro by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. Supernatants reacting only...... with homologous antigens in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were subsequently screened for reactivity with homologous fungi in immunohistochemical techniques. All four Mabs raised against the WF of A. arrhizus failed to react on tissues. However, four of the Mabs raised against the WSSA of R. arrhizus (Mab......-WSSA-RA-1 through Mab-WSSA-RA-4) revealed a high homologous reactivity on tissues and the cross-reactivity of these were subsequently evaluated on tissues containing other members of the family Mucoraceae and other unrelated fungi. On tissues and on immunoblots all four Mabs reacted identically...

  8. Comparison of specificities of serum antibody responses of horses to clinical infections caused by Streptococcus equi or zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velineni, Sridhar; DeNegri, Rafaela; Artiushin, Sergey C; Timoney, John F

    2015-11-18

    Streptococcus zooepidemicus (Sz) and its clonal derivative Streptococcus equi (Se) share greater than 96% DNA identity and elicit immune responses to many shared proteins. Identification of proteins uniquely targeted by the immune response to each infection would have diagnostic value. The aim of the study was to compare serum antibody responses of horses infected by Se or Sz. Antibody levels were measured to panels of recombinant proteins of Sz and Se in sera of horses and ponies before and after experimental and naturally occurring invasive infections by these organisms. Antibody responses to an Se extract vaccine were also measured. Sera diluted 1:200 were assayed in triplicate using optimum concentrations of 9 and 14 immunoreactive proteins of Se and Sz, respectively. Bound IgG was detected using HRP-Protein G conjugate. Antibodies specific for SeM-N2, IdeE2, Se42.0 and Se75.3 (SEQ2190) were elicited by Se but not by Sz infection. Commercial Se extract vaccine did not elicit responses to IdeE2 or Se75.3. Sz infections resulted in significant (p<0.01) responses to Sz115, SzM, ScpC, SzP, MAP and streptokinase an indication these proteins are expressed during opportunistic invasions of the respiratory tract. FSR and HylC specific responses were unique to infections by Sz. The data indicate antibodies to IdeE2, Se75.3 and SeM-N2 may be used to distinguish infection by Se from that caused by the closely related Sz. Se infection, but not vaccination with Se extract elicits antibody to IdeE2 and Se75.3. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Stringently Defined Otitis Prone Children Demonstrate Deficient Naturally Induced Mucosal Antibody Response to Moraxella catarrhalis Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Ren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Moraxella catarrhalis (Mcat is a prominent mucosal pathogen causing acute otitis media (AOM. We studied Mcat nasopharyngeal (NP colonization, AOM frequency and mucosal antibody responses to four vaccine candidate Mcat proteins: outer membrane protein (OMP CD, oligopeptide permease (Opp A, hemagglutinin (Hag, and Pilin A clade 2 (PilA2 from stringently defined otitis prone (sOP children, who experience the greatest burden of disease, compared to non-otitis prone (NOP children. sOP children had higher NP colonization of Mcat (30 vs. 22%, P = 0.0003 and Mcat-caused AOM rates (49 vs. 24%, P < 0.0001 than NOP children. Natural acquisition of mucosal antibodies to Mcat proteins OMP CD (IgG, P < 0.0001, OppA (IgG, P = 0.018, Hag (IgG and IgA, both P < 0.0001, and PilA2 (IgA, P < 0.0001 was lower in sOP than NOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to Hag (P = 0.039 and PilA2 (P = 0.0076, and IgA to OMP CD (P = 0.010, OppA (P = 0.030, and PilA2 (P = 0.043 were associated with lower carriage of Mcat in NOP but not sOP children. Higher levels of mucosal IgG to OMP CD (P = 0.0070 and Hag (P = 0.0003, and IgA to Hag (P = 0.0067 at asymptomatic colonization than those at onset of AOM were associated with significantly lower rate of Mcat NP colonization progressing to AOM in NOP compared to sOP children (3 vs. 26%, P < 0.0001. In conclusion, sOP children had a diminished mucosal antibody response to Mcat proteins, which was associated with higher frequencies of asymptomatic NP colonization and NP colonization progressing to Mcat-caused AOM. Enhancing Mcat antigen-specific mucosal immune responses to levels higher than achieved by natural exposure will be necessary to prevent AOM in sOP children.

  10. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig

  11. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L. (UNESA, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig.

  12. Naturally acquired antibody responses to recombinant Pfs230 and Pfs48/45 transmission blocking vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sophie; Grignard, Lynn; Nebie, Issa

    2015-01-01

    for the future evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in populations naturally exposed to malaria. METHODS: We determined naturally acquired antibody responses to the recombinant proteins Pfs48/45-10C and Pfs230-230CMB in children from three malaria endemic settings in Ghana, Tanzania and Burkina Faso......OBJECTIVES: Pfs48/45 and Pfs230 are Plasmodium falciparum sexual stage proteins and promising malaria transmission-blocking vaccine candidates. Antibody responses against these proteins may be naturally acquired and target antigens may be under selective pressure. This has consequences....... CONCLUSIONS: We conclude there are naturally acquired antibody responses to both vaccine candidates which have functional relevance by reducing the transmissibility of infected individuals. We identified genetic polymorphisms, in pfs48/45 which exhibited geographical specificity....

  13. Dissecting the hemagglutinin head and stalk-specific IgG antibody response in healthcare workers following pandemic H1N1 vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tete, Sarah M; Krammer, Florian; Lartey, Sarah; Bredholt, Geir; Wood, John; Skrede, Steinar; Cox, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, neutralising antibodies that are directed to the major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA) head domain are measured as surrogate correlates of protection against influenza. In addition to neutralization, hemagglutinin-specific antibodies may provide protection by mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). During the 2009 pandemic, vaccination induced HA-specific antibodies that were mostly directed to the conserved HA stalk domain. However, the protective role of these antibodies has not been investigated in detail. We quantified the HA head and stalk-specific antibodies, their avidity, ability to neutralise virus and activate natural killer cells in an ADCC assay. We analyzed sera obtained from 14 healthcare workers who had low hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titres at 3 months after pandemic H1N1 vaccination as well as from 22 controls. Vaccination resulted in a HA stalk dominant antibody response in both low responders and controls. Revaccination of low responders, 5 months later, resulted in a boost in antibodies, with HA head-specific antibodies dominating the response. Comparative analysis of head and stalk antibody avidities revealed that stalk-specific antibodies were qualitatively superior. Furthermore, stalk-specific antibodies mediated virus neutralization and had significantly higher ADCC activity than head-specific antibodies. Despite the head and stalk-specific antibodies being lower in low responders, they had comparable antibody avidity, ADCC functionality and neutralising capacity to those of controls who had high HI titres post-vaccination. Thus, our study has demonstrated that HA stalk-specific antibodies may have an important role in protection through neutralization and ADCC in low responders who do not maintain seroprotective HI antibodies.

  14. Proprietary arabinogalactan extract increases antibody response to the pneumonia vaccine: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot study in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udani Jay K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arabinogalactan from Larch tree (Larix spp. bark has previously demonstrated immunostimulatory activity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that ingestion of a proprietary arabinogalactan extract, ResistAid™, would selectively enhance the antibody response to the pneumococcal (pneumonia vaccine in healthy adults. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group pilot study included 45 healthy adults who had not previously been vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The volunteers began taking the study product or placebo (daily dosage 4.5 g at the screening visit (V1-Day 0 and continued over the entire 72 day study period. After 30 days the subjects received the 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine (V2. They were monitored the following day (V3-Day 31, as well as 21 days (V4-Day 51 and 42 days (V5-Day 72 after vaccination. Responses by the adaptive immune system (antigen specific were measured via pneumococcal IgG antibodies (subtypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F and salivary IgA levels. Responses by the innate immune system (non-specific were measured via white blood cell counts, inflammatory cytokines and the complement system. Results Vaccination significantly increased pneumococcal IgG levels as expected. The arabinogalactan group demonstrated a statistically significant greater IgG antibody response than the placebo group in two antibodies subtypes (18C and 23F at both Day 51 (p = 0.006 and p = 0.002 and at Day 72 (p = 0.008 and p = 0.041. These same subtypes (18C and 23F also demonstrated change scores from baseline which were significant, in favor of the arabinogalactan group, at Day 51 (p = 0.033 and 0.001 and at Day 72 (p = 0.012 and p = 0.003. Change scores from baseline and mean values were greater in the arabinogalactan group than placebo for most time points in antibody subtypes 4, 6B, 9V, and 19F, but these differences did not reach statistical significance. There

  15. Detection and identification of platelet antibodies using a sensitive multiplex assay system-platelet antibody bead array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzner, Krista; Bauer, Julie; Ponzi, Heather; Ujcich, Allison; Curtis, Brian R

    2017-07-01

    Tests for platelet-specific antibodies are important in the diagnosis of immune platelet disorders. Monoclonal antibody glycoprotein capture assays have been the gold standards in platelet antibody detection for almost 30 years. However, such assays are complex and cumbersome to perform, which limits their routine use. We report the performance of a newly developed, easy to perform platelet antibody bead array (PABA) for the detection of platelet-specific antibodies. PABA is the equivalent of the monoclonal antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (MACE) on a bead and instead with fluorescent detection of immunoglobulin (Ig)G platelet antibodies by Luminex. Antibodies against platelet glycoproteins (GP) GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX, GPIa/IIa, GPIV, and class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) could be detected in a patient's serum simultaneously in a single well of a microplate. Results from 80 patient samples and 20 normal donor samples were compared using PABA, MACE, and a commercial ELISA kit. PABA detected all antibodies, with specificity for human platelet antigens (HPAs) HPA-1a, HPA-1b, HPA-2a, HPA-2b, HPA-3a, HPA-3b, HPA-4a, HPA-4b, HPA-5a, HPA-5b, HPA-15b, and HLA. Overall, compared with MACE, the sensitivity and specificity of PABA were 99% and 97%, respectively, and both were significantly better than those of the commercial ELISA. PABA had greater analytic sensitivity than MACE for HPA-1a, HPA-3a, and HPA-5b antibodies. In addition, PABA detected HPA-5b and HPA-3b antibodies that were missed by MACE. The overall false-positive rate of PABA compared with MACE was 2.7%. The PABA is a rapid, highly sensitive and specific, multiplex bead-based assay for detecting human platelet antibodies. Such a simple yet high-throughput platform will facilitate practical, routine testing for the identification of platelet-specific antibodies. © 2017 AABB.

  16. Kinetic and HPV infection effects on cross-type neutralizing antibody and avidity responses induced by Cervarix®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Troy J.; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Hildesheim, Allan; Pan, Yuanji; Penrose, Kerri J.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Herrero, Rolando; Pinto, Ligia A.

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that Cervarix® elicits antibody responses against vaccine-related types for which clinical efficacy was demonstrated (HPV-31 and -45). Here, we evaluated the kinetics of neutralization titers and avidity of Cervarix®-induced antibodies up to 36 months of follow-up in unexposed and HPV infected women. Methods A subset of women who participated in the Cost Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial had pre- and post-vaccination sera tested for antibody responses to HPV-16, -18, -31, -45, and -58 using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay, and HPV-16 antibody avidity using an HPV-16 L1 VLP (virus-like particle)-based ELISA developed in our laboratory. Results In uninfected women, neutralizing antibody titers did not reach significance until after the 3rd dose for HPV-31 (month 12, p=0.009) and HPV-45 (month 12, p=0.003), but then persisted up to month 36 (HPV-31, p=0.01; HPV-45, p=0.002). Individuals infected with HPV-16 or HPV-31 at enrollment developed a significantly higher median antibody response to the corresponding HPV type after one dose, but there was not a difference between median titers after three doses compared to the HPV negative group. Median HPV-16 antibody avidity and titer increased over time up to month 12; however, the HPV-16 avidity did not correlate well with HPV-16 neutralizing antibody titers at each time point examined, except for month 6. The median avidity levels were higher in HPV-16 infected women at month 1 (p=0.04) and lower in HPV-16 infected women at month 12 (p=0.006) compared to the HPV negative women. Conclusions The persistence of cross-neutralization titers at month 36 suggests cross-reactive antibody responses are likely to persist long-term and are not influenced by infection status at enrollment. However, the weak correlation between avidity and neutralization titers emphasizes the need for examining avidity in efficacy studies to determine if high avidity antibodies play a critical role in

  17. Impact of child malnutrition on the specific anti-Plasmodium falciparum antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fillol Florie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, preschool children represent the population most vulnerable to malaria and malnutrition. It is widely recognized that malnutrition compromises the immune function, resulting in higher risk of infection. However, very few studies have investigated the relationship between malaria, malnutrition and specific immunity. In the present study, the anti-Plasmodium falciparum IgG antibody (Ab response was evaluated in children according to the type of malnutrition. Methods Anthropometric assessment and blood sample collection were carried out during a cross-sectional survey including rural Senegalese preschool children. This cross-sectional survey was conducted in July 2003 at the onset of the rainy season. Malnutrition was defined as stunting (height-for-age P. falciparum whole extracts (schizont antigens was assessed by ELISA in sera of the included children. Results Both the prevalence of anti-malarial immune responders and specific IgG Ab levels were significantly lower in malnourished children than in controls. Depending on the type of malnutrition, wasted children and stunted children presented a lower specific IgG Ab response than their respective controls, but this difference was significant only in stunted children (P = 0.026. This down-regulation of the specific Ab response seemed to be explained by severely stunted children (HAZ ≤ -2.5 compared to their controls (P = 0.03, while no significant difference was observed in mildly stunted children (-2.5 P. falciparum Ab response appeared to be independent of the intensity of infection. Conclusion Child malnutrition, and particularly stunting, may down-regulate the anti-P. falciparum Ab response, both in terms of prevalence of immune responders and specific IgG Ab levels. This study provides further evidence for the influence of malnutrition on the specific anti-malarial immune response and points to the importance of taking into account child

  18. Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines. A randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Birk, Nina Marie; Smits, Gaby; Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Netea, Mihai G; van der Klis, Fiona; Benn, Christine Stabell; Pryds, Ole

    2017-04-11

    BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination at birth, The Danish Calmette Study, we investigated the effect of BCG at birth on the antibody response to the three routine vaccines against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 in a subgroup of participants. Within 7days after birth, children were randomised 1:1 to BCG vaccination or to the control group (no intervention). After three routine vaccinations given at age 3, 5 and 12months, antibodies against DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 (Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype type 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F) were measured 4weeks after the third vaccine dose. Among the 300 included children (178 BCG; 122 controls), almost all children (>96%) had antibody responses above the protective levels. Overall BCG vaccination at birth did not affect the antibody level. When stratifying by 'age at randomisation' we found a possible inducing effect of BCG on antibodies against B. pertussis and all pneumococcal serotypes, when BCG was given after the first day of life. Girls had significantly higher antibody levels for Haemophilus influenza type b and pneumococcus than boys. Three routine vaccinations with DiTeKiPol/Act-Hib and Prevenar 13 induced sero-protective levels in almost all children. No overall effect of neonatal BCG vaccination was observed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Combination of poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 enhances activation of B cells in vitro and boosts antibody responses to protein vaccines in vivo.

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    Genevieve M Weir

    Full Text Available Vaccines that can rapidly induce strong and robust antibody-mediated immunity could improve protection from certain infectious diseases for which current vaccine formulations are inefficient. For indications such as anthrax and influenza, antibody production in vivo is a correlate of efficacy. Toll-like receptor (TLR agonists are frequently studied for their role as vaccine adjuvants, largely because of their ability to enhance initiation of immune responses to antigens by activating dendritic cells. However, TLRs are also expressed on B cells and may contribute to effective B cell activation and promote differentiation into antigen-specific antibody producing plasma cells in vivo. We sought to discover an adjuvant system that could be used to augment antibody responses to influenza and anthrax vaccines. We first characterized an adjuvant system in vitro which consisted of two TLR ligands, poly I:C (TLR3 and Pam3CSK4 (TLR2, by evaluating its effects on B cell activation. Each agonist enhanced B cell activation through increased expression of surface receptors, cytokine secretion and proliferation. However, when B cells were stimulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in combination, further enhancement to cell activation was observed. Using B cells isolated from knockout mice we confirmed that poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 were signaling through TLR3 and TLR2, respectively. B cells activated with Poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 displayed enhanced capacity to stimulate allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation and differentiate into antibody-producing plasma cells in vitro. Mice vaccinated with influenza or anthrax antigens formulated with poly I:C and Pam3CSK4 in DepoVax™ vaccine platform developed a rapid and strong antigen-specific serum antibody titer that persisted for at least 12 weeks after a single immunization. These results demonstrate that combinations of TLR adjuvants promote more effective B cell activation in vitro and can be used to augment antibody responses

  20. HIV-1 Env- and Vpu-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Associated with Elite Control of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavi, Vijaya; Wines, Bruce D; Amin, Janaki; Emery, Sean; Lopez, Ester; Kelleher, Anthony; Center, Rob J; Hogarth, P Mark; Chung, Amy W; Kent, Stephen J; Stratov, Ivan

    2017-09-15

    Studying HIV-infected individuals who control HIV replication (elite controllers [ECs]) enables exploration of effective anti-HIV immunity. HIV Env-specific and non-Env-specific antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) may contribute to protection from progressive HIV infection, but the evidence is limited. We recruited 22 ECs and matched them with 44 viremic subjects. HIV Env- and Vpu-specific ADCC responses in sera were studied using a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based dimeric recombinant soluble FcγRIIIa (rsFcγRIIIa)-binding assay, surface plasmon resonance, antibody-dependent natural killer (NK) cell activation assays, and ADCC-mediated killing assays. ECs had higher levels of HIV Env-specific antibodies capable of binding FcγRIIIa, activating NK cells, and mediating granzyme B activity (all P Env-specific and Vpu epitope-specific ADCC in effective immune responses against HIV among ECs. Our findings have implications for understanding the role of ADCC in HIV control. IMPORTANCE Understanding immune responses associated with elite control of HIV may aid the development of immunotherapeutic and vaccine strategies for controlling HIV infection. Env is a major HIV protein target of functional antibody responses that are heightened in ECs. Interestingly, EC antibodies also target Vpu, an accessory protein crucial to HIV, which degrades CD4 and antagonizes tetherin. Antibodies specific to Vpu are a common feature of the immune response of ECs that may prove to be of functional importance to the design of improved ADCC-based immunotherapy and preventative HIV vaccines. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. The influence of age and maternal antibodies on the postvaccinal response against swine influenza viruses in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2011-07-15

    The influence of age and maternal immunity on the development and duration of postvaccinal humoral response against swine influenza viruses (SIV) were investigated under experimental conditions. Piglets born to immune and non-immune sows were vaccinated twice with bivalent inactivated vaccine. Vaccination was done according to 5 different schedules: 1+4, 1+8, 4+8, 8+10 or 8+12 weeks of age. Antibodies to the haemagglutinin type 1 and 3 were determined using the haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) against H1N1 and H3N2 in the serum of unvaccinated piglets born to immune sows were above the positive level until about 13-14 and 9-10 weeks of life, respectively. No serological responses were seen in any of the groups after the first vaccination. After the second dose of vaccine production of antibodies was observed even before the complete disappearance of maternal antibodies. MDA, however, were associated with reduced antibody response. In MDA-negative piglets, an active humoral postvaccinal response was developed in all vaccinated pigs. The age at which the vaccine was given was associated with the differences in the magnitude of antibody response to SIV. In general those pigs that were vaccinated for the first time at the age of 1 week, developed lower maximum titres after the second vaccination, and become seronegative earlier than pigs that were vaccinated for the first time at 4 or 8 weeks of age. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus early antigen diffuse (EBV-EA/D)-directed immunoglobulin A antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draborg, A H; Jørgensen, J M; Müller, H; Nielsen, C T; Jacobsen, S; Iversen, L V; Theander, E; Nielsen, L P; Houen, G; Duus, K

    2012-08-01

    We sought to determine whether the serological response towards lytic cycle antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is altered in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to investigate the prevalence of EBV early antigen diffuse (EBV-EA/D) antibodies in sera from 60 patients with SLE, 40 with scleroderma (SSc), 20 with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), 20 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 20 healthy controls, and also subjects with various circulating autoantibodies. Samples from patients were obtained from clinics specialized within the diseases in Denmark and Sweden and samples from healthy controls were obtained from volunteers. A significant elevated titre of immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG, and IgM EBV-EA/D antibodies was found in SLE patients compared to healthy controls, a finding not explained by immunosuppressive treatment or disease activity. The largest difference was observed for IgA EBV-EA/D antibodies (p = 0.0013) with a seropositive rate of 58% in SLE patients and 0% in healthy controls. RA and SSc patients and individuals seropositive for anti-Scl-70 were additionally found to have elevated titres of IgA EBV-EA/D antibodies (40%, p = 0.014; 60%, p = 0.015; and 38.5%, p = 0.045, respectively). However, the titres were generally lower than in SLE patients. Our findings support an association between EBV and SLE. The elevated titre of EBV-EA/D-directed IgA antibodies found in SLE patients could suggest reactivation of EBV in epithelial cells or reinfection of epithelial cells after reactivation in B cells, indicating lack of control of the latent infection.

  3. Effects of sublethal gamma radiation on T and B cell activity in the antibody response of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, D.E.; Lubet, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The relative radiosensitivity of T and B cells was followed in sublethally irradiated mice reconstituted with bone marrow cells, thymus cells, or both, and simultaneously challenged with sheep erythrocytes. Numbers of antibody-forming cells in recipient spleens were determined on days 4 to 8. In this assay the response of mice given bone marrow cells was limited by the amount of residual T cell activity, while the response of mice given thymus cells was limited by the residual B cell activity. Although residual activity of both T and B cells was suppressed in mice given 300 to 700 rad at 80 rad/min, residual B cell activity was consistently lower in these animals. When antibody responses were initiated at intervals after irradiation, B cell activity was clearly limiting by 48 hr after 500 or 600 rad. The activity of both T and B cells was sensitive to differences in dose rate between 8 and 80 rad/min. The 4 to 7 fold dose-rate sensitivity of T cells paralleled that of differentially irradiated nonreconstituted mice. In contrast, dose-rate dependence of B cell activity varied from 10- to 20-fold between 8 and 80 rad/min. These results suggest that radiation suppression of antibody responses in mice is highly dependent upon B cell sensitivity, and that dose-rate dependence of the antibody response may be explained in large part by differential sensitivity of B cells

  4. Murine CR1/2 targeted antigenized single-chain antibody fragments induce transient low affinity antibodies and negatively influence an ongoing immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József; Molnár, Eszter; Szekeres, Zsuzsanna; Isaák, Andrea; Papp, Krisztián; Balogh, Péter; Erdei, Anna

    2007-01-01

    We have generated a single-chain antibody which recognizes murine CR1/2 and carries a genetically fused influenza hemagglutinin derived peptide. Theoretically such a construct is able to crosslink the B cell antigen receptor and CR1/2 on peptide specific B cells. The construct was able to reach its CR1/2 positive target cells, yet intraperitoneal delivery of the construct elicited an IgM response only slightly exceeding that induced by the free peptide. Providing T cell help by the injection of peptide specific lymphocytes did not alter the response in essence, that is anti-peptide IgG was not detectable even after booster immunizations. When used as a booster vaccine following injection of the peptide in adjuvant, the construct even inhibited the development of IgG1 and IgG3 anti-peptide antibodies. These data indicate that although targeting of antigen to CR1/2 on B cells can enhance transient proliferation or differentiation of antigen specific B cells it cannot induce strong, longlasting humoral immune responses. Furthermore, CR1/2 targeting constructs may negatively influence an ongoing immune reaction.

  5. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies related to depression in early clinical course of systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Mansoor Karimifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric lupus is still a major challenge in clinical practice. We investigated the association between depression and anti-ribosomal P (anti-P antibodies in a sample of Iranian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on adult patients with SLE referring to a referral out-patient clinic of rheumatology. Demographic data and clinical data with regards to measuring disease activity with the systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index were gathered. Anti-P antibodies were measured with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Depression severity was measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Results: One hundred patients (80% female and 20% male, age = 34.8 ± 10.9 years were included. Anti-P antibodies were present more frequently in depressed than non-depressed patients (30% vs. 10%, P = 0.015. Depression severity was correlated with anti-P antibodies level only in patients with disease duration of less than 2 years (r = 0.517, P = 0.019. There was no association between the depression severity and disease activity. Binary logistic regression analysis showed age (B = 0.953, CI 95%: 0.914-0.993 and positive anti-P antibodies (B = 4.30, CI 95%: 1.18-15.59 as factors that independently associated with depression. Conclusion: We found an association between depression and presence of anti-P antibodies, and also strong correlation between depression severity and anti-P antibodies level in newly diagnosed SLE patients. Depression severity in newly diagnosed SLE patients may reflect a neuropsychiatric involvement, and in later phases, it is more affected by the chronicity of the disease as well as other environmental factors.

  6. Lack of Sarcocystis neurona antibody response in Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) fed Sarcocystis neurona-infected muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, M A; Lindsay, D S; Greiner, E C

    2006-06-01

    Serum was collected from laboratory-reared Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) to determine whether experimentally infected opossums shedding Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts develop serum antibodies to S. neurona merozoite antigens. Three opossums were fed muscles from nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus), and 5 were fed muscles from striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). Serum was also collected from 26 automobile-killed opossums to determine whether antibodies to S. neurona were present in these opossums. Serum was analyzed using the S. neurona direct agglutination test (SAT). The SAT was modified for use with a filter paper collection system. Antibodies to S. neurona were not detected in any of the serum samples from opossums, indicating that infection in the opossum is localized in the small intestine. Antibodies to S. neurona were detected in filter-paper-processed serum samples from 2 armadillos naturally infected with S. neurona.

  7. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Harandi, Ali M

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes.

  8. Nasal Immunization Confers High Avidity Neutralizing Antibody Response and Immunity to Primary and Recurrent Genital Herpes in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Josefine; Zhang, Yuan; Olafsdottir, Thorunn A.; Thörn, Karolina; Cairns, Tina M.; Wegmann, Frank; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Harandi, Ali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections in both the developing and developed world. Following infection, individuals experience life-long latency associated with sporadic ulcerative outbreaks. Despite many efforts, no vaccine has yet been licensed for human use. Herein, we demonstrated that nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 gD envelope protein mounts significant protection to primary infection as well as the establishment of latency and recurrent genital herpes in guinea pigs. Nasal immunization was shown to elicit specific T cell proliferative and IFN-γ responses as well as systemic and vaginal gD-specific IgG antibody (Ab) responses. Furthermore, systemic IgG Abs displayed potent HSV-2 neutralizing properties and high avidity. By employing a competitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis combined with a battery of known gD-specific neutralizing monoclonal Abs (MAbs), we showed that nasal immunization generated IgG Abs directed to two major discontinuous neutralizing epitopes of gD. These results highlight the potential of nasal immunization with an adjuvanted HSV-2 envelope protein for induction of protective immunity to primary and recurrent genital herpes. PMID:28082979

  9. Mannosylated mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion proteins enhance antigen-specific antibody and T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Ahlén

    Full Text Available Targeting antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APC improve their immunogenicity and capacity to induce Th1 responses and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. We have generated a mucin-type immunoglobulin fusion protein (PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, which upon expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris became multivalently substituted with O-linked oligomannose structures and bound the macrophage mannose receptor (MMR and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN with high affinity in vitro. Here, its effects on the humoral and cellular anti-ovalbumin (OVA responses in C57BL/6 mice are presented.OVA antibody class and subclass responses were determined by ELISA, the generation of anti-OVA CTLs was assessed in (51Cr release assays using in vitro-stimulated immune spleen cells from the different groups of mice as effector cells and OVA peptide-fed RMA-S cells as targets, and evaluation of the type of Th cell response was done by IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 ELISpot assays.Immunizations with the OVA - mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b conjugate, especially when combined with the AbISCO®-100 adjuvant, lead to faster, stronger and broader (with regard to IgG subclass OVA IgG responses, a stronger OVA-specific CTL response and stronger Th1 and Th2 responses than if OVA was used alone or together with AbISCO®-100. Also non-covalent mixing of mannosylated PSGL-1/mIgG(2b, OVA and AbISCO®-100 lead to relatively stronger humoral and cellular responses. The O-glycan oligomannoses were necessary because PSGL-1/mIgG(2b with mono- and disialyl core 1 structures did not have this effect.Mannosylated mucin-type fusion proteins can be used as versatile APC-targeting molecules for vaccines and as such enhance both humoral and cellular immune responses.

  10. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  11. Study on Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Titer and Specific Interferon Gamma Response Among Dentists

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    Manoochehr Makvandi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major problem for healthcare workers worldwide, and among them, dentists are at risk of acquiring HBV infection. The prevalence of HBV infection has been reported among the dentists in different regions of the world. Since none of the available drugs can clear HBV infection, the presence of effective immunity against HBV infection is important to prevent HBV infection. Objectives This study aimed at determining HBs antibody and specific HBV gamma interferon among the dentists, who received hepatitis B vaccine. Methods The blood samples were collected from 40 dentists, including 7 endodontics, 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologist, 4 periodontics, 11 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 6 implantologists, 3 orthodontics, 1 oral and maxillofacial pathologist, 2 esthetic and restorative dentists, and 4 doctors of dental surgery (DDS at from dental college of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran during December, 2013. Overall, 31 (77.5% dentists had already received 3 doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, and 9 (22.5% had received only two doses of the vaccine. Their sera were tested for HBsAb and anti-HBc-IgG by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. The lymphocyte of individuals was separated from their blood sample by Ficoll-Hypaque, cells were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS by centrifugation, and finally the pellet cells was resuspended in RPMI-1640 media. Separated cells were exposed to 2.5 µg of purified recombinant HBs antigen, and supernatants were collected after 72 hours and tested for detection of specific interferon γ level by ELISA test. Results Overall, 97.5% of dentists showed positive HBs antibody test results while 36 showed (90% positive test results for specific interferon γ against hepatitis B virus infection. Conclusions High coverage of 97.5% immune response against hepatitis B infection was found, indicating high efficacy of recombinant

  12. Antibody response of healthy children to pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus

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    Esposito Susanna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the proportion of pediatric pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza cases who showed seroconversion, the magnitude of this seroconversion, or the factors that can affect the antibody level evoked by the pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza. Aims of this study were to analyse antibody responses and the factors associated with high antibody titres in a cohort of children with naturally acquired A/H1N1/2009 influenza infection confirmed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results Demographic, clinical and virologic data were collected from 69 otherwise healthy children with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza (27 females, mean age ± SD: 5.01 ± 4.55 years. Their antibody levels against pandemic A/H1N1/2009 and seasonal A/H1N1 influenza viruses were evaluated by measuring hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies using standard assays. Sixty-four patients (92.8% with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza had A/H1N1/2009 antibody levels of ≥40, whereas only 28/69 (40.6% were seroprotected against seasonal A/H1N1 influenza virus. Those who were seroprotected against seasonal A/H1N1 virus were significantly older, significantly more often hospitalised, had a diagnosis of pneumonia significantly more frequently, and were significantly more often treated with oseltamivir than those who were not seroprotected (p Conclusions Otherwise healthy children seem to show seroprotective antibody titres after natural infection with pandemic A/H1N1/2009 influenza virus. The strength of the immune response seems to be related to the severity of the disease, but not to previous seasonal A/H1N1 influenza immunity.

  13. Systemic immune response to Acanthamoeba keratitis in the Chinese hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Klink, F; Leher, H; Jager, M J; Alizadeh, H; Taylor, W; Niederkorn, J Y

    1997-12-01

    Recrudescence is a common and troubling feature of Acanthamoeba keratitis and suggests that corneal infection with this organism fails to stimulate the systemic immune apparatus. The present study examined the cell-mediated and humoral immune responses to Acanthamoeba keratitis in the Chinese hamster. Corneal infection with A. castellanii failed to induce either delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) or serum IgG antibody against parasite antigens. The failure to induce cell-mediated and humoral immunity did not result in anergy or tolerance since subsequent intramuscular (i.m.) immunization with parasite antigens elicited robust DTH and IgG antibody responses. The inability of corneal infections to induce primary cell-mediated immune responses was due to the absence of resident antigen-presenting cells in the central cornea because induction of Langerhans cell (LC) migration into the central cornea prior to infection with Acanthamoeba promoted the development of parasite-specific DTH. Although the presence of resident LC did not promote the development of a primary humoral immune response, subsequent i.m. immunization elicited heightened parasite-specific IgG antibody production which was indicative of an anamnestic response. Collectively, the results indicate that in the absence of resident antigen-presenting cells, corneal infection with Acanthamoeba fails to stimulate primary cell-mediated or humoral immunity. Induction of peripheral LC into the central corneal epithelium promotes the development of parasite-specific DTH, but does not exacerbate corneal disease.

  14. Delayed BCG immunization does not alter antibody responses to EPI vaccines in HIV-exposed and -unexposed South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesseling, Anneke C; Blakney, Anna K; Jones, Christine E; Esser, Monika M; de Beer, Corena; Kuhn, Louise; Cotton, Mark F; Jaspan, Heather B

    2016-07-12

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is routinely given at birth in tuberculosis-endemic settings due to its protective effect against disseminated tuberculosis in infants. BCG is however contraindicated in HIV-infected infants. We investigated whether delaying BCG vaccination to 14 weeks of age affected vaccine-induced antibody responses to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)-conjugate, pertussis, tetanus and Hepatitis B (HBV) vaccines, in HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and -unexposed uninfected (HUU) infants. Infants were randomized to receive BCG at birth or at 14 weeks of age. Blood was taken at 14, 24, and 52 weeks of age and analyzed for Hib, pertussis, tetanus and HBV specific antibodies. BCG was given either at birth (106 infants, 51 HEU) or at 14 weeks of age (74 infants, 50 HEU). The timing of BCG vaccination did not influence the antibody response to any antigen studied. However, in a non-randomized comparison, HEU infants had higher Hib antibody concentrations at weeks 14 and 24 (p=0.001 and BCG vaccination, was associated with antibody concentrations to Hib, pertussis, HBV and tetanus primary immunization. DOH-27-1106-1520. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cross-reactive IgE antibody responses to tropomyosins from Ascaris lumbricoides and cockroach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Beatriz R; Rocha, Gutemberg M; Oliver, Constance; Ferriani, Virgínia P L; Lima, Rodrigo C; Palma, Mário S; Sales, Valéria S F; Aalberse, Rob C; Chapman, Martin D; Arruda, L Karla

    2008-04-01

    Evidence indicates that infection with Ascaris lumbricoides may promote development of allergy and asthma. To study the role of tropomyosin, a pan-allergen in invertebrates, in IgE responses to A lumbricoides. Recombinant A lumbricoides and Periplaneta americana tropomyosins were expressed in Pichia pastoris. Levels of IgE to tropomyosins from A lumbricoides and P americana were determined by chimeric ELISA in sera from 119 children living in a parasite-endemic area and 112 patients with cockroach allergy from the allergy clinics. Presence of tropomyosin in A lumbricoides larvae at L3 stage was evaluated by immunofluorescence using mAb 1A6, directed against mite tropomyosin. Molecular modeling of P americana and A lumbricoides tropomyosins was performed by using the MODELLER program. A lumbricoides tropomyosin showed 69% to 98% sequence identity to tropomyosins from other invertebrates. The predicted structure of A lumbricoides tropomyosin was similar to that of P americana tropomyosin and showed the characteristic coiled-coil structure. Strong correlation was found for IgE antibodies to tropomyosins from A lumbricoides and P americana in sera from children living in a parasite-endemic area and from patients with cockroach allergy. Larvae of A lumbricoides reacted strongly with mAb 1A6. Tropomyosin induces IgE responses in A lumbricoides-infected children and in patients allergic to cockroach.

  16. Human antibody responses after dengue virus infection are highly cross-reactive to Zika virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyamvada, Lalita; Quicke, Kendra M.; Hudson, William H.; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Sewatanon, Jaturong; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Mulligan, Mark J.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Suthar, Mehul S.; Wrammert, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus of significant public health concern. ZIKV shares a high degree of sequence and structural homology compared with other flaviviruses, including dengue virus (DENV), resulting in immunological cross-reactivity. Improving our current understanding of the extent and characteristics of this immunological cross-reactivity is important, as ZIKV is presently circulating in areas that are highly endemic for dengue. To assess the magnitude and functional quality of cross-reactive immune responses between these closely related viruses, we tested acute and convalescent sera from nine Thai patients with PCR-confirmed DENV infection against ZIKV. All of the sera tested were cross-reactive with ZIKV, both in binding and in neutralization. To deconstruct the observed serum cross-reactivity in depth, we also characterized a panel of DENV-specific plasmablast-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for activity against ZIKV. Nearly half of the 47 DENV-reactive mAbs studied bound to both whole ZIKV virion and ZIKV lysate, of which a subset also neutralized ZIKV. In addition, both sera and mAbs from the dengue-infected patients enhanced ZIKV infection of Fc gamma receptor (FcγR)-bearing cells in vitro. Taken together, these findings suggest that preexisting immunity to DENV may impact protective immune responses against ZIKV. In addition, the extensive cross-reactivity may have implications for ZIKV virulence and disease severity in DENV-experienced populations. PMID:27354515

  17. Interpretation of serum antibody response to Anoplocephala perfoliata in relation to parasite burden and faecal egg count

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L.N.; Lungholt, M.M.; Nielsen, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    of development and gross pathological mucosal lesions were recorded and compared with serum antibody responses and faecal egg counts. Faecal egg counts were determined in samples from A. perfoliata infected horses using a semi-quantitative centrifugation/flotation technique. Blood samples collected at slaughter...

  18. Filarial-specific antibody response in East African bancroftian filariasis: effects of host infection, clinical disease, and filarial endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaoko, Walter G; Simonsen, Paul E; Meyrowitsch, Dan W

    2006-01-01

    The effect of host infection, chronic clinical disease, and transmission intensity on the patterns of specific antibody responses in Bancroftian filariasis was assessed by analyzing specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, and IgE profiles among adults from two communities with high and low Wuchereria...

  19. Differential expression of IgE and IgG4 specific antibody responses in asymptomatic and chronic human filariasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurniawan, A.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; van Ree, R.; Aalberse, R.; Selkirk, M. E.; Partono, F.; Maizels, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    A population of 164 adult individuals resident in an area endemic for Brugia malayi lymphatic filariasis has been studied for humoral immune responses to filarial parasites. Antibody levels to Ag extracted from adult worms were determined for each of the IgG subclasses, for IgM and for IgE. The

  20. Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination at birth and antibody responses to childhood vaccines. A randomised clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nissen, T.N.; Birk, N.M.; Smits, G.; Jeppesen, D.L.; Stensballe, L.G.; Netea, M.G.; Klis, F. van der; Benn, C.S.; Pryds, O.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: BCG vaccination has been associated with beneficial non-specific effects on child health. Some immunological studies have reported heterologous effects of vaccines on antibody responses to heterologous vaccines. Within a randomised clinical trial of Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

  1. Antibody responses measured by various serologic tests in pigs orally inoculated with low numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dubey, J. P.; Andrews, C.D.; Lind, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Objective-To follow antibody responses measured by various serologic tests in pigs orally inoculated with low (less than or equal to 10 oocysts) numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts. Animals-24, 2- to 3-month-old pigs. Procedure-Pigs (n = 42) were inoculated orally with 10 (14 pigs) or 1 (28 pigs...

  2. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus

    2015-01-01

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens ...

  3. Human immune response to anti-carcinoembryonic antigen murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losman, M J; DeJager, R L; Monestier, M; Sharkey, R M; Goldenberg, D M

    1990-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that patients with carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]-producing neoplastic tumors, treated with murine monoclonal antibody to CEA, produced antibodies directed against the constant regions [human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA)] and the idiotypes [anti-Id] of these murine immunoglobulins. In this study, we describe a method for analyzing the presence of such antibodies in the sera of these patients. The HAMAs were measured by enzyme immunoassay and removed by immunoadsorption on Affi-Gel mouse IgG. The unabsorbed fraction contained the anti-Id antibodies; their presence was demonstrated by binding to the CEA monoclonal antibody (Ab1). The specificity of the binding was assessed by preincubating the sera with Ab1 and measuring the residual nonspecific binding. When specific binding was detected, the anti-Id antibodies were isolated by adsorption and elution on Affi-Gel Ab1. The anti-Id antibodies were fixed on enzyme immunoassay plates and incubated with a panel of mouse anti-human immunoglobulin to determine their isotypes. In a first series of 24 patients, HAMAs were found in 20 cases and anti-Id antibodies in 19 cases. The isolation of a specific IgG to Ab1 was achieved in 2 cases. In an ongoing series, the HAMA and anti-Id antibodies were detected in all five patients given injections of another monoclonal antibody to CEA. In two patients an IgG1 kappa anti-Id was isolated from the serum. The potential therapeutic effect of these antibodies is under investigation.

  4. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Responses in a Large Longitudinal Sub-Saharan HIV Primary Infection Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Landais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are thought to be a critical component of a protective HIV vaccine. However, designing vaccines immunogens able to elicit bnAbs has proven unsuccessful to date. Understanding the correlates and immunological mechanisms leading to the development of bnAb responses during natural HIV infection is thus critical to the design of a protective vaccine. The IAVI Protocol C program investigates a large longitudinal cohort of primary HIV-1 infection in Eastern and South Africa. Development of neutralization was evaluated in 439 donors using a 6 cross-clade pseudo-virus panel predictive of neutralization breadth on larger panels. About 15% of individuals developed bnAb responses, essentially between year 2 and year 4 of infection. Statistical analyses revealed no influence of gender, age or geographical origin on the development of neutralization breadth. However, cross-clade neutralization strongly correlated with high viral load as well as with low CD4 T cell counts, subtype-C infection and HLA-A*03(- genotype. A correlation with high overall plasma IgG levels and anti-Env IgG binding titers was also found. The latter appeared not associated with higher affinity, suggesting a greater diversity of the anti-Env responses in broad neutralizers. Broadly neutralizing activity targeting glycan-dependent epitopes, largely the N332-glycan epitope region, was detected in nearly half of the broad neutralizers while CD4bs and gp41-MPER bnAb responses were only detected in very few individuals. Together the findings suggest that both viral and host factors are critical for the development of bnAbs and that the HIV Env N332-glycan supersite may be a favorable target for vaccine design.

  5. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  6. Vault nanocapsules as adjuvants favor cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immune responses following immunization of mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra K Kar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modifications of adjuvants that induce cell-mediated over antibody-mediated immunity is desired for development of vaccines. Nanocapsules have been found to be viable adjuvants and are amenable to engineering for desired immune responses. We previously showed that natural nanocapsules called vaults can be genetically engineered to elicit Th1 immunity and protection from a mucosal bacterial infection. The purpose of our study was to characterize immunity produced in response to OVA within vault nanoparticles and compare it to another nanocarrier. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized immunity resulting from immunization with the model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA encased in vault nanocapsules and liposomes. We measured OVA responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ memory T cell responses, cytokine production and antibody titers in vitro and in vivo. We found that immunization with OVA contain in vaults induced a greater number of anti-OVA CD8(+ memory T cells and production of IFNγ plus CD4(+ memory T cells. Also, modification of the vault body could change the immune response compared to OVA encased in liposomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments show that vault nanocapsules induced strong anti-OVA CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell memory responses and modest antibody production, which markedly differed from the immune response induced by liposomes. We also found that the vault nanocapsule could be modified to change antibody isotypes in vivo. Thus it is possible to create a vault nanocapsule vaccine that can result in the unique combination of immunogen-responsive CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell immunity coupled with an IgG1 response for future development of vault nanocapsule-based vaccines against antigens for human pathogens and cancer.

  7. A Potent Virus-Specific Antibody-Secreting Cell Response to Acute Enterovirus 71 Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuan-Ying Arthur; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yang, Shuan; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2015-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) remains a leading pathogen for acute infectious diseases in children, especially in Asia. The cellular basis for establishing a virus-specific antibody response to acute EV71 infections is unclear in children. We studied the magnitude of virus-specific antibody-secreting B cells (ASCs) and its relationship with serological response, clinical parameters, and virological parameters among children with laboratory-confirmed EV71 infection. A potent EV71 genogroup B- and virus-specific ASC response was detected in the first week of illness among genotype B5 EV71-infected children. The cross-reactive EV71-specific ASC response to genogroup C viral antigens composed about 10% of the response. The EV71-specific ASC response in children aged ≥3 years produced immunoglobulin G predominantly, but immunoglobulin M was predominant in younger children. Proliferation marker was expressed by the majority of circulating ASCs in the acute phase of EV71 infection. Virus-specific ASC responses significantly correlated with throat viral load, fever duration, and serological genogroup-specific neutralization titer. The presence of a virus-specific ASC response serves an early cellular marker of an EV71-specific antibody response. Further detailed study of EV71-specific ASCs at the monoclonal level is crucial to delineate the specificity and function of antibody immunity in children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. An animal model of pain produced by systemic administration of an immunotherapeutic anti-ganglioside antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slart, R.; Yu, A L; Yaksh, T L; Sorkin, L S

    For the management of pediatric neuroblastoma, a promising experimental treatment includes slow systemic infusion of a human/mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody against the GD2 ganglioside. Beneficial actions are however, accompanied by severe pain and altered cardiovascular tone. The pain is

  9. A simple vector system to improve performance and utilisation of recombinant antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Karen J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolation of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody libraries is well established using technologies such as phage display. Phage display vectors are ideal for efficient display of antibody fragments on the surface of bacteriophage particles. However, they are often inefficient for expression of soluble antibody fragments, and sub-cloning of selected antibody populations into dedicated soluble antibody fragment expression vectors can enhance expression. Results We have developed a simple vector system for expression, dimerisation and detection of recombinant antibody fragments in the form of single chain Fvs (scFvs. Expression is driven by the T7 RNA polymerase promoter in conjunction with the inducible lysogen strain BL21 (DE3. The system is compatible with a simple auto-induction culture system for scFv production. As an alternative to periplasmic expression, expression directly in the cytoplasm of a mutant strain with a more oxidising cytoplasmic environment (Origami 2™ (DE3 was investigated and found to be inferior to periplasmic expression in BL21 (DE3 cells. The effect on yield and binding activity of fusing scFvs to the N terminus of maltose binding protein (a solubility enhancing partner, bacterial alkaline phosphatase (a naturally dimeric enzymatic reporter molecule, or the addition of a free C-terminal cysteine was determined. Fusion of scFvs to the N-terminus of maltose binding protein increased scFv yield but binding activity of the scFv was compromised. In contrast, fusion to the N-terminus of bacterial alkaline phosphatase led to an improved performance. Alkaline phosphatase provides a convenient tag allowing direct enzymatic detection of scFv fusions within crude extracts without the need for secondary reagents. Alkaline phosphatase also drives dimerisation of the scFv leading to an improvement in performance compared to monovalent constructs. This is illustrated by ELISA, western blot and

  10. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as hypoglycaemia with insulin receptor antibodies and insulin autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Y; Zhou, J-G; Yuan, G

    2009-04-01

    A 37-year-old man presented with sweating, confusion, palpitations, hunger and tremor of 3 months duration. The symptoms disappeared after ingestion of food. After 3 months, he suffered from irregular fever, arthritis, rash, photosensitivity, and was admitted to the hospital. His antinuclear antibody, anti-double stranded DNA antibody, anti-smith antibody and lupus erythematosus cell phenomenon were all positive. Urine analysis showed albuminuria; his 24-h urine protein was 4.7 g. During hospitalisation, the patient presented with loss of consciousness three times because of hypoglycaemia. His serum insulin level during the hypoglycaemic episode was high at 490-1080 mmol/L (normal range: 6.00-27.00 mmol/L). He had never received an insulin rejection. Both insulin autoantibody and insulin receptor antibody were positive. Investigations confirmed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with autoimmune hypoglycaemia. High-dose of corticosteroids, chloroquine and cyclophosphamide therapy had resulted in remission of hypoglycaemia associated with resolution of circulating antibodies to insulin and insulin receptor, and improvement in clinical and laboratory features of SLE.

  11. The prevalence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome among systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M A; Keogan, M; O'Connell, P; Kearns, G

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterised by excess autoantibody production. It typically affects women of childbearing age. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLAs) is associated with serious co-morbidity to mother and child characterized by recurrent vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy associated morbidity. We reviewed SLE patients attending a specialist connective tissue disease clinic both to assess the occurrence of APLAs and its clinical presentations and to audit the effectiveness of screening for APL antibodies in a specialist clinic. 204 patients attended the newly established connective tissue disease outpatient clinic over a twenty-seven month period; 42 (34 female, 8 male) with a diagnosis of SLE. Ten patients (24%), eight female and 2 male with a median age of 38.5 years (range 20 to 64 years) fulfilled the ACR criteria for secondary APLAs (Table 2). The commonest clinical presentation was pulmonary embolus (five patients). Overall 37 patients (88%) with SLE were screened for APLAs during the study period: 94% of females and 62.5% of males were screened (for anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant or both), 27% had evidence of APLAs, 24% had positive antibodies but were asymptomatic. There is a significant occurrence of APLAs among SLE patients. Given the important clinical implications of this disorder including substantial risk of fetal loss and patient morbidity or mortality, routine screening of all SLE patients for APL antibodies is recommended.

  12. Neutralizing antibody response during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: type and group specificity and viral escape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Sönnerborg, A; Svennerholm, B

    1993-01-01

    demonstrated, suggesting that the majority of the change in neutralization sensitivity is driven by the selective pressure of type-specific NA. Furthermore, no differences were observed in sensitivity to neutralization by anti-carbohydrate neutralizing monoclonal antibodies or the lectin concanavalin A......The paradox that group-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) exist in the majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, whereas the NA response against autologous HIV-1 virus isolates is highly type-specific, motivated us to study the type- and group-specific NA...

  13. Salivary IgA antibody responses to Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus mutans in preterm and fullterm newborn children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Ruchele Dias; Sesso, Maria Lucia Talarico; Borges, Mariana Castro Loureiro; Mattos-Graner, Renata O; Smith, Daniel James; Ferriani, Virginia Paes Leme

    2012-06-01

    The intensities and specificities of salivary IgA antibody responses to antigens of Streptococcus mutans, the main pathogen of dental caries, may influence colonization by these organisms during the first 1.5 year of life. Thus, the ontogeny of salivary IgA responses to oral colonizers continues to warrant investigation, especially with regard to the influence of birth conditions, e.g. prematurity, on the ability of children to efficiently respond to oral microorganisms. In this study, we characterised the salivary antibody responses to two bacterial species which are prototypes of pioneer and pathogenic microorganisms of the oral cavity (Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus mutans, respectively) in fullterm (FT) and preterm (PT) newborn children. Salivas from 123 infants (70 FT and 53 PT) were collected during the first 10h after birth and levels of IgA and IgM antibodies and the presence of S. mutans and S. mitis were analysed respectively by ELISA and by chequerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Two subgroups of 24 FT and 24 PT children were compared with respect to patterns of antibody specificities against S. mutans and S. mitis antigens, using Western blot assays. Cross-adsorption of 10 infant's saliva was tested to S. mitis, S. mutans and Enterococcus faecalis antigens. Salivary levels of IgA at birth were 2.5-fold higher in FT than in PT children (Mann-Whitney; P<0.05). Salivary IgA antibodies reactive with several antigens of S. mitis and S. mutans were detected at birth in children with undetectable levels of those bacteria. Adsorption of infant saliva with cells of S. mutans produced a reduction of antibodies recognizing S. mitis antigens in half of the neonates. The diversity and intensity of IgA responses were lower in PT compared to FT children, although those differences were not significant. These data provide evidence that children have salivary IgA antibodies shortly after birth, which might influence the establishment of the oral microbiota, and that

  14. Novel anti-suprabasin antibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Kunihiro; Ohyama, Kaname; Furukawa, Kaori; Higuchi, Osamu; Mukaino, Akihiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Nakane, Shunya; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakajima, Hideki; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Yoshida, Mari; Kuroda, Naotaka; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-11-21

    Neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) is often difficult to diagnose and distinguish from other diseases, because no NPSLE-specific antibodies have been identified. We developed a novel proteomic strategy for identifying and profiling antigens in immune complexes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and applied this strategy to 26 NPSLE patients. As controls, we also included 25 SLE patients without neuropsychiatric manifestations (SLE), 15 with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and 10 with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). We identified immune complexes of suprabasin (SBSN) in the CSF of the NPSLE group. The titer of anti-SBSN antibodies was significantly higher in the CSF of the NPSLE group compared to those of the SLE, MS and NPH groups. Microarray data showed that the senescence and autophagy pathways were significantly changed in astrocytes exposed to anti-SBSN antibodies. Our findings indicate that SBSN could be a novel autoantibody for the evaluation of suspected NPSLE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Human Lysozyme –Camelid VHH HL6 Antibody System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yuan Su

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid diseases such as Alzheimer’s and thrombosis are characterized by an aberrant assembly of specific proteins or protein fragments into fibrils and plaques that are deposited in various tissues and organs. The single-domain fragment of a camelid antibody was reported to be able to combat against wild-type human lysozyme for inhibiting in-vitro aggregations of the amyloidogenic variant (D67H. The present study is aimed at elucidating the unbinding mechanics between the D67H lysozyme and VHH HL6 antibody fragment by using steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations on a nanosecond scale with different pulling velocities. The results of the simulation indicated that stretching forces of more than two nano Newton (nN were required to dissociate the protein-antibody system, and the hydrogen bond dissociation pathways were computed.

  16. Effect of HIV infection on the acute antibody response to malaria antigens in children: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinyanjui Samson M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, the distributions of malaria and HIV widely overlap. Among pregnant and non-pregnant adults, HIV affects susceptibility to malaria, its clinical course and impairs antibody responses to malaria antigens. However, the relationship between the two diseases in childhood, when most deaths from malaria occur, is less clear. It was previously reported that HIV is associated with admission to hospital in rural Kenya with severe malaria among children, except in infancy. HIV-infected children with severe malaria were older, had higher parasite density and increased mortality, raising a hypothesis that HIV interferes with naturally acquired immunity to malaria, hence with little effect at younger ages (a shorter history of exposure. To test this hypothesis, levels of anti-merozoite and schizont extract antibodies were compared between HIV-infected and uninfected children who participated in the original study. Methods IgG responses to malaria antigens that are potential targets for immunity to malaria (AMA1, MSP2, MSP3 and schizont extract were compared between 115 HIV-infected and 115 age-matched, HIV-uninfected children who presented with severe malaria. The children were classified as high and low responders for each antigen and assigned antibody-response breadth scores according to the number of antigens to which they were responsive. A predictive logistic regression model was used to test if HIV was an effect modifier on the age-related acquisition of antibody responses, with age as a continuous variable. Results Point estimates of the responses to all antigens were lower amongst HIV-infected children, but this was only statistically significant for AMA1 (P = 0.028. HIV-infected children were less likely to be high responders to AMA1 [OR 0.44 (95%CI, 0.2-0.90 P = 0.024]. HIV was associated with a reduced breadth of responses to individual merozoite antigens (P = 0.02. HIV strongly modified the acquisition

  17. Effect of Echinacea purpurea (Asteraceae aqueous extract on antibody response to Bothrops asper venom and immune cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Chaves

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of aqueous extract of Echinacea purpurea roots on the murine antibody response to Bothrops asper snake venom in vivo was studied. Three groups were used. Group #1, baseline control, was treated with snake venom plus PBS. Group #2 was treated with snake venom plus sodium alginate as adjuvant (routine method used at Instituto Clodomiro Picado, and group #3 or experimental group, was treated with snake venom plus aqueous extract of E. purpurea root as adjuvant. In all groups, the first inoculation was done with Freund’s complete adjuvant (FCA. By the time of the second bleeding, mice in group #3 showed a remarkable increment in the level of anti-venom antibodies compared with those in groups #1 or #2. In vitro immune cell proliferation as a response to aqueous extract of E. purpurea root was studied using human lymphocytes activated with different lectins (Con A, PHA and PWM. In all cases, increase in percentage of lymphoproliferation was greater when E. purpurea root extract was used in addition to individual lectins. Rev. Biol. Trop. 55 (1: 113-119. Epub 2007 March. 31.Se estudió in vivo, el efecto del extracto acuoso de las raíces de Echinacea purpurea en la respuesta de los anticuerpos murinos al veneno de la serpiente Bothrops asper. El grupo 1 control, fue tratado con el veneno y PBS. El grupo 2 con veneno y alginato de sodio (método utilizado en el Instituto Clodomiro Picado, y el grupo 3 o experimental, con veneno y extracto acuoso de las raíces de E. purpurea. En todos los grupos, la primera inmunización fue hecha con FCA (Freund’s Complete Adjuvant. En las muestras correspondientes a la segunda sangría, los ratones del grupo 3 mostraron un marcado incremento en el nivel de anticuerpos, en comparación con los ratones de los otros grupos. También se determinó la proliferación de células inmunes in vitro, como respuesta al extracto acuoso de la raíz de E. purpurea, utilizando linfocitos humanos activados con

  18. IgM antibody and colony fungal load impacts of orally administered ethanol extract of Plectranthus scutellarioides on mice with systemic candidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marni Br. Karo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: Candida albicans is a pathogenic fungus that causes vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, which presents significant clinical problems in immunocompromised patients. There are no studies that correlate IgM antibody responses and fungal loads following the use of ethanol leaf extract of Plectranthus scutellarioides (L. R.Br. (ELEP on VVC. Aims: To examine colony fungi loads, IgM antibody responses, and their correlation in Balb/c mice infected with C. albicans treated with orally administered ELEP. Methods: Twenty-five female Balb/c mice were randomly divided into five groups (five mice in each group: normal group (oral ELEP + not infected, VVC control (VCC group (infected + oral 0.2 mL saline, ketoconazole-treated in VCC group (infected + oral antifungal agents, and two treatment groups (infected + oral ELEP with 500 and 750 mg/kg b.w.. Treatments were administered for 14 days after infection with C. albicans. Colony fungal loads and IgM antibodies were measured by counting colony forming units and flow cytometry using anti-C. albicans antibody kits, respectively. Results: Ingestion of the ELEP significantly affected fungal load clearance and decreased IgM antibody levels compared to that in the VCC group (p<0.001. Furthermore, ingestion of the ELEP was associated with significantly lower concentrations of IgM antibodies and colony forming units (p<0.001. Conclusions: These data strongly suggest that IgM antibody response is involved in of the mechanism by which ELEP decreases C. albicans infection. Furthermore, these results provide important information for the potential application of ELEP in the treatment of Balb/C mice with systemic candidiasis.

  19. H. pylori-infection and antibody immune response in a rural Tanzanian population

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    Biggar Robert J

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is ubiquitous in sub-Saharan Africa, but paradoxically gastric cancer is rare. Methods Sera collected during a household-based survey in rural Tanzania in 1985 were tested for anti-H. pylori IgG and IgG subclass antibodies by enzyme immunoassay. Odds ratios (OR and confidence intervals (CI of association of seropositivity with demographic variables were computed by logistic regression models. Results Of 788 participants, 513 were aged ≤17 years. H. pylori seropositivity increased from 76% at 0–4 years to 99% by ≥18 years of age. Seropositivity was associated with age (OR 11.5, 95% CI 4.2–31.4 for 10–17 vs. 0–4 years, higher birth-order (11.1; 3.6–34.1 for ≥3rd vs. 1st born, and having a seropositive next-older sibling (2.7; 0.9–8.3. Median values of IgG subclass were 7.2 for IgG1 and 2.0 for IgG2. The median IgG1/IgG2 ratio was 3.1 (IQR: 1.7–5.6, consistent with a Th2-dominant immune profile. Th2-dominant response was more frequent in children than adults (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3–4.4. Conclusion H. pylori seropositivity was highly prevalent in Tanzania and the immunological response was Th2-dominant. Th2-dominant immune response, possibly caused by concurrent bacterial or parasitic infections, could explain, in part, the lower risk of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer in Africa.

  20. Noninfectious retrovirus particles drive the APOBEC3/Rfv3 dependent neutralizing antibody response.

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    Diana S Smith

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the APOBEC3 family of deoxycytidine deaminases counteract a broad range of retroviruses in vitro through an indirect mechanism that requires virion incorporation and inhibition of reverse transcription and/or hypermutation of minus strand transcripts in the next target cell. The selective advantage to the host of this indirect restriction mechanism remains unclear, but valuable insights may be gained by studying APOBEC3 function in vivo. Apobec3 was previously shown to encode Rfv3, a classical resistance gene that controls the recovery of mice from pathogenic Friend retrovirus (FV infection by promoting a more potent neutralizing antibody (NAb response. The underlying mechanism does not involve a direct effect of Apobec3 on B cell function. Here we show that while Apobec3 decreased titers of infectious virus during acute FV infection, plasma viral RNA loads were maintained, indicating substantial release of noninfectious particles in vivo. The lack of plasma virion infectivity was associated with a significant post-entry block during early reverse transcription rather than G-to-A hypermutation. The Apobec3-dependent NAb response correlated with IgG binding titers against native, but not detergent-lysed virions. These findings indicate that innate Apobec3 restriction promotes NAb responses by maintaining high concentrations of virions with native B cell epitopes, but in the context of low virion infectivity. Finally, Apobec3 restriction was found to be saturable in vivo, since increasing FV inoculum doses resulted in decreased Apobec3 inhibition. By analogy, maximizing the release of noninfectious particles by modulating APOBEC3 expression may improve humoral immunity against pathogenic human retroviral infections.

  1. Antibody response in cattle, sheep and rats to infection with γ-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, D.L.; Doy, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    Cattle, sheep and rats were infected orally with γ-irradiated metacercariae of Fasciola hepatica, or with normal metacercariae. The antibody response was monitored in each host to metacercarial tegument (T0), juvenile tegument (T1), adult tegument (T2) and gut antigens. The response was examined at weekly intervals for cattle and sheep throughout 15 weeks of infection and four weeks after infection in rats, using an indirect fluorescent antibody labelling technique. It was found that the irradiated metacercariae engendered a normal humoral response to T0, T1 and gut antigens in all three hosts although the antibody levels were somewhat reduced due to early death or stunting of the flukes. T0 and T1 appeared to be antigenically similar. Antibodies against T2 appeared late in the animals infected with γ-irradiated metacercariae and the titres attained were considerably lower than in the controls. The T2 antigen stimulus in the animals given γ-irradiated metacercariae was probably provided by flukes which 'broke through' the developmental barrier imposed by irradiation and which were found alive at autopsy. (author)

  2. Anti-ribosomal P antibody: a multicenter study in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valões, C C M; Molinari, B C; Pitta, A C G; Gormezano, N W S; Farhat, S C L; Kozu, K; Sallum, A M E; Appenzeller, S; Sakamoto, A P; Terreri, M T; Pereira, R M R; Magalhães, C S; Ferreira, J C O A; Barbosa, C M; Gomes, F H; Bonfá, E; Silva, C A

    2017-04-01

    Objectives Anti-ribosomal P protein (anti-P) autoantibodies are highly specific for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the evaluation of this autoantibody in childhood-onset SLE (cSLE) populations has been limited to a few small series, hampering the interpretation of the clinical and laboratorial associations. Therefore, the objective of this multicenter cohort study was to evaluate demographic, clinical/laboratorial features, and disease damage score in cSLE patients with and without the presence of anti-P antibody. Methods This was a retrospective multicenter study performed in 10 pediatric rheumatology services of São Paulo state, Brazil. Anti-P antibodies were measured by ELISA in 228 cSLE patients. Results Anti-P antibodies were observed in 61/228 (27%) cSLE patients. Frequencies of cumulative lymphadenopathy (29% vs. 15%, p = 0.014), acute confusional state (13% vs. 5%, p = 0.041), mood disorder (18% vs. 8%, p = 0.041), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (34% vs. 15%, p = 0.001), as well as presence of anti-Sm (67% vs. 40%, p = 0.001), anti-RNP (39% vs. 21%, p = 0.012) and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies (43% vs. 25%, p = 0.016) were significantly higher in cSLE patients with anti-P antibodies compared to those without these autoantibodies. A multiple regression model revealed that anti-P antibodies were associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (odds ratio (OR) = 2.758, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.304-5.833, p = 0.008) and anti-Sm antibody (OR = 2.719, 95% CI: 1.365-5.418, p = 0.004). The SLICC/ACR damage index was comparable in patients with and without anti-P antibodies ( p = 0.780). Conclusions The novel association of anti-P antibodies and autoimmune hemolytic anemia was evidenced in cSLE patients and further studies are necessary to determine if anti-P titers may vary with this hematological manifestation.

  3. Genetic variation and heritability of the antibody response to Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Danish Hostein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Hanne; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Berg, Peer

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the genetic variation and the heritability of the ability to establish an immune response by producing antibodies to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Antibody levels were determined using an ELISA and measuring optical density (OD) values from...... milk samples of 11,535 cows from 99 herds. The pedigree of the 11,535 cows and information about days in milk, parity, milk yield, and others were obtained from the Danish Cattle database. The statistical analyses were made using a bivariate mixed animal model. The bivariate model with daily milk yield...... and OD as dependent variables showed a significant heritability of the ability to produce Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies of 0.102 (genetic variance = 0.054) and a nonsignificant genetic correlation of −0.037 between daily milk yield and OD. When a sire model was used...

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60-specific antibody and cell-mediated responses predict tubal factor infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiitinen, A.; Surcel, H.-M.; Halttunen, M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the role of Chlamydia trachomatis-induced humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in predicting tubal factor infertility (TFI). METHODS: Blood samples were taken from 88 women with TFI and 163 control women. C. trachomatis and chlamydial heat shock protein 60 (CHSP......60)-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Proliferative reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was studied in vitro against Chlamydia elementary body (EB) and recombinant CHSP60 antigens. RESULTS: C. trachomatis......-specific IgG antibodies were found more frequently (43.2 versus 13.5%), and the antibody levels were higher in the TFI cases than in the controls (P cases and 58.9% of the controls (P

  5. Systems Analysis Reveals High Genetic and Antigen-Driven Predetermination of Antibody Repertoires throughout B Cell Development

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    Victor Greiff

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibody repertoire diversity and plasticity is crucial for broad protective immunity. Repertoires change in size and diversity across multiple B cell developmental stages and in response to antigen exposure. However, we still lack fundamental quantitative understanding of the extent to which repertoire diversity is predetermined. Therefore, we implemented a systems immunology framework for quantifying repertoire predetermination on three distinct levels: (1 B cell development (pre-B cell, naive B cell, plasma cell, (2 antigen exposure (three structurally different proteins, and (3 four antibody repertoire components (V-gene usage, clonal expansion, clonal diversity, repertoire size extracted from antibody repertoire sequencing data (400 million reads. Across all three levels, we detected a dynamic balance of high genetic (e.g., >90% for V-gene usage and clonal expansion in naive B cells and antigen-driven (e.g., 40% for clonal diversity in plasma cells predetermination and stochastic variation. Our study has implications for the prediction and manipulation of humoral immunity.

  6. Antibody Responses of Cervids (Cervus elaphus) following Experimental Mycobacterium bovis Infection and the Implications for Immunodiagnosis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Noel P.; Surujballi, Om P.; Prescott, John F.; Duncan, J. Robert; Waters, W. Ray; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena

    2008-01-01

    Captive and free-ranging wildlife animals are implicated in the maintenance and transmission of bovine tuberculosis and therefore pose a significant obstacle to eradication of the disease from domestic livestock. The current antemortem diagnostic method, the intradermal tuberculin skin test, is impractical for routine use with many wild animals. Antibody-based assays are particularly attractive because the animals are handled only once and immediate processing of the sample is not required. This report characterizes the antibody responses of red deer-elk hybrids (Cervus elaphus) against Mycobacterium bovis and subsequently evaluates the diagnostic performance of select antigens in a rapid-test format. Sequential serum samples were collected from 10 animals experimentally infected with M. bovis and 5 noninfected animals over a 7-month period postinfection (p.i.). Samples were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunoblot analyses, and multiantigen print immunoassays for seroreactivity to mycobacterial antigens. Although all infected animals produced antibodies to M. bovis protein antigens, there was significant animal-to-animal variation in the kinetics and magnitudes of responses and the antigens recognized. The most frequently recognized antigens included MPB83, ESAT-6, CFP10, and MPB70. Responses to some antigens, such as MPB83, were consistently detected as early as 4 weeks after inoculation, whereas other antigens were detected only much later (>140 days p.i.). Antibody responses were boosted by injection of tuberculin for intradermal tuberculin skin testing. Comparison of single-antigen (fluorescence polarization assay) with multiantigen (CervidTB STAT-PAK) rapid tests demonstrated that a highly sensitive and specific serodiagnostic test for tuberculosis in cervids will require multiple and carefully selected seroreactive antigens covering a broad spectrum of antibody specificities. PMID:18815233

  7. Immunoproteomics analysis of the murine antibody response to vaccination with an improved Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS.

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    Susan M Twine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is the causative agent of a spectrum of diseases collectively known as tularemia. An attenuated live vaccine strain (LVS has been shown to be efficacious in humans, but safety concerns have prevented its licensure by the FDA. Recently, F. tularensis LVS has been produced under Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP guidelines. Little is known about the immunogenicity of this new vaccine preparation in comparison with extensive studies conducted with laboratory passaged strains of LVS. Thus, the aim of the current work was to evaluate the repertoire of antibodies produced in mouse strains vaccinated with the new LVS vaccine preparation.In the current study, we used an immunoproteomics approach to examine the repertoire of antibodies induced following successful immunization of BALB/c versus unsuccessful vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with the new preparation of F. tularensis LVS. Successful vaccination of BALB/c mice elicited antibodies to nine identified proteins that were not recognized by antisera from vaccinated but unprotected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, the CGMP formulation of LVS stimulated a greater repertoire of antibodies following vaccination compared to vaccination with laboratory passaged ATCC LVS strain. A total of 15 immunoreactive proteins were identified in both studies, however, 16 immunoreactive proteins were uniquely reactive with sera from the new formulation of LVS.This is the first report characterising the antibody based immune response of the new formulation of LVS in the widely used murine model of tularemia. Using two mouse strains, we show that successfully vaccinated mice can be distinguished from unsuccessfully vaccinated mice based upon the repertoire of antibodies generated. This opens the door towards downselection of antigens for incorporation into tularemia subunit vaccines. In addition, this work also highlights differences in the humoral immune response to

  8. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus antibody response and viremia following highly active antiretroviral therapy in the Swiss HIV Cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Hirsch, Hans H; Franceschi, Silvia; Steffen, Ingrid; Amari, Emmanuelle Boffi El; Mueller, Nicolas J; Magouras, Ioannis; Biggar, Robert J; Rickenbach, Martin; Clifford, Gary M

    2010-09-10

    To describe the effect of HAART on Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antibody response and viremia among HIV-positive MSM. A follow-up study of 272 HIV-positive MSM (including 22 with Kaposi sarcoma) who first initiated HAART between January 1996 and July 2004 in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. For each individual, two serum samples, one at HAART initiation and another 24 months later, were tested for latent and lytic KSHV antibodies using immunofluorescence assays, and for KSHV viremia using PCR. Factors associated with changes in KSHV antibody titers and viremia were evaluated. At HAART initiation, 69.1 and 75.0% of patients were seropositive to latent and lytic KSHV antibodies, respectively. Seropositivity was associated with the presence of Kaposi sarcoma, older age, lower CD8 cell count and higher CD4/CD8 ratio. Prevalence of KSHV viremia at HAART initiation was 6.4%, being significantly higher among patients with Kaposi sarcoma (35.0%), and those with HIV viral loads 100 000 copies/ml (11.7%) or higher. At 24-month follow-up, geometric mean titers (GMTs) among KSHV seropositive patients increased and antibody seroprevalence was higher. Having Kaposi sarcoma and/or CD4 cell counts less than 50 cells/microl at HAART initiation was associated both with higher probability for antibody titers to increase (including seroconversion) and larger increases in GMTs. Only one of 17 viremic patients at HAART initiation had viremia at 24-month follow-up. HAART increases KSHV-specific humoral immune response and clearance of viremia among HIV-infected MSM, consistent with the dramatic protection offered by HAART against Kaposi sarcoma.

  9. IgG antibody response against salivary gland antigens from Oestrus ovis L. larvae (Diptera: Oestridae) in experimentally and naturally infected goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Valadez, C E; Cepeda-Palacios, R; Ascencio, F; Jacquiet, Ph; Dorchies, Ph; Ramírez-Orduña, J M; López, M A

    2009-05-12

    The aims of this study were to analyze the systemic IgG responses against third-instar salivary gland (L3SG) antigens by ELISA in Oestrus ovis experimentally infected kids (EIK) and in naturally exposed adult goats (NEG). Firstly, kids (n=4 per group) were assigned to receive intranasally 0, 12, 24, 36, and 48 first-instars in experimental infections. Blood samples were taken from EIK at Days 0, 14, 42 and 67 post-infection. At necropsy (Day 67), larval number and developmental instars were recorded. In an epidemiological study, blood serum samples were collected from 448 grazing NEG (n=20 flocks) in Baja California Sur, Mexico. Results showed that larval establishment rate was similar in EIK groups. Systemic IgG response reached the threshold after Day 42, but humoral response was not statistically different among EIK groups receiving experimental infections. In NEG, all surveyed flocks (100%) showed specific systemic IgG antibodies to L3SG antigens and the overall goat oestrosis prevalence was 59.2%. In conclusion, larval L3SG antigens were effective in detection of specific systemic IgG antibodies against O. ovis infected kids and goats by ELISA.

  10. Differential regulation of T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antibody responses through arginine methyltransferase PRMT1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kikumi; Yanase, Noriko; Sudo, Katsuko; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Mukumoto, Yoshiko; Mizuguchi, Junichiro; Yokosuka, Tadashi

    2016-04-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), a major PRMT in mammalian cells, has been shown to play a crucial role in multiple biological functions in vitro. To explore the role of PRMT1 in B cells in vivo, we generated B cell-specific PRMT1-deficient (Prmt1(-/-) ) mice using a Cre-loxP system. Prmt1(-/-) mice showed a defect in B-cell development with diminished levels of serum antibodies. Antibody responses in Prmt1(-/-) mice were absent after stimulation with the type 2 T cell-independent antigen NP-Ficoll but intact after stimulation with the T cell-dependent antigen NP-OVA. Our findings comprise the first evidence showing that PRMT1 is necessary for lymphocyte functions in vivo. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Immunoglobulin M and G antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum glutamate-rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Rowe, P; Bennett, S

    1993-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to describe the age-related immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG response to part of a 220-kDa glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) from Plasmodium falciparum and to determine possible correlations of possession of these antibodies with malaria morbidity. IgM and IgG levels...... were measured with a recombinant fusion protein consisting of the carboxy-terminal 783 amino acids of the GLURP. Samples for the study were obtained during a longitudinal malaria morbidity survey performed in The Gambia; cross-sectional surveys were performed at the beginning of the transmission season...... in May and in October. Seropositivity rates increased with age to a maximum of 77% for IgM and 95% for IgG in adults. High prevalences of seropositivity were associated with certain human leukocyte antigen class II alleles (DRw8, DR9, DR7, DR4, DQw7, and DQw2) or haplotypes. The relationship between anti...

  12. Clinical response, pharmacokinetics, development of human anti-chimaeric antibodies, and synovial tissue response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, R. M.; Teng, O.; Vos, K.; Gerlag, D. M.; Aarden, L.; Stapel, S. O.; van Laar, J. M.; Tak, P. P.; Wolbink, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    To analyse whether persistence of synovial B lineage cells and lack of clinical response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated with low rituximab serum levels and anti-rituximab antibody (ARA) formation. Fifty-eight patients with RA were treated with

  13. Clinical response, pharmacokinetics, development of human anti-chimaeric antibodies, and synovial tissue response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thurlings, R.M.; Teng, O.; Vos, K.; Gerlag, D.M.; Aarden, L.; Stapel, S.O.; van Laar, J.M.; Tak, P.P.; Wolbink, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyse whether persistence of synovial B lineage cells and lack of clinical response to rituximab treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are associated with low rituximab serum levels and anti-rituximab antibody (ARA) formation. Methods: Fifty-eight patients with RA

  14. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Shedding and Antibody Response in Swine Farms: a Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Bertasio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV causes an acute and highly contagious enteric disease characterized by severe enteritis, vomiting, watery diarrhea and a high mortality rate in seronegative neonatal piglets. In the last few years, PED had a large economic impact on the swine industries in Asia and the United States, and in 2014, the PEDV also re-emerged in Europe. Two main PEDV variants circulate worldwide but only the S INDEL variant, considered a mild strain, is spreading in Europe. To gain insights into the pathogenicity of this variant, its viral load and temporal shedding pattern were evaluated in piglets from infected farms. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR targeting the spike gene, was validated according to the minimum information for quantitative real-time PCR experiments guidelines. The qPCR was applied to longitudinal studies conducted in four swine farms naturally infected with the PEDV S INDEL variant. Clinical data, fecal swabs and blood samples were collected from 103 piglets at 15–30-day intervals for 2–5 months. On all four farms, diarrhea was observed in sows during gestation and in farrowing units, and the mortality rates of piglets were 18, 25, 30 and 35%. Different clinical pictures (0-50% of diarrhea positivity, viral titer levels (mean 5.3-7.2 log10 genome copies/mL and antibody conditions (30-80% of positivity were registered among sows on the four farms. The percentage of qPCR positive piglets varied greatly from the beginning (63–100% to the end (0% of the infection course. Clinical signs were present in 96% of the qPCR positive animals. Viral loads ranged from 8.5 log10 to 4 log10 genome copies/mL in suckling pigs at 3–6 days of age and were not statistically different among farms, despite the different patterns observed in sows. After 2–3 weeks, only a few piglets still showed detectable viral levels and clinical signs, and they developed antibody responses. Moreover, co-infections with other

  15. Antibody response to a T-cell-independent antigen is preserved after splenic artery embolization for trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, D C; Lammers, A J J; van Leeuwen, E M M; Hoekstra, J B L; ten Berge, I J M; Goslings, J C

    2014-11-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is increasingly being used as a nonoperative management strategy for patients with blunt splenic injury following trauma. The aim of this study was to assess the splenic function of patients who were embolized. A clinical study was performed, with splenic function assessed by examining the antibody response to polysaccharide antigens (pneumococcal 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine), B-cell subsets, and the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB). The data were compared to those obtained from splenectomized patients and healthy controls (HC) who had been included in a previously conducted study. A total of 30 patients were studied: 5 who had proximal SAE, 7 who had distal SAE, 8 who had a splenectomy, and 10 HC. The median vaccine-specific antibody response of the SAE patients (fold increase, 3.97) did not differ significantly from that of the HC (5.29; P = 0.90); however, the median response of the splenectomized patients (2.30) did differ (P = 0.003). In 2 of the proximally embolized patients and none of the distally embolized patients, the ratio of the IgG antibody level postvaccination compared to that prevaccination was <2. There were no significant differences in the absolute numbers of lymphocytes or B-cell subsets between the SAE patients and the HC. HJB were not observed in the SAE patients. The splenic immune function of embolized patients was preserved, and therefore routine vaccination appears not to be indicated. Although the median antibody responses did not differ between the patients who underwent proximal SAE and those who underwent distal SAE, 2 of the 5 proximally embolized patients had insufficient responses to vaccination, whereas none of the distally embolized patients exhibited an insufficient response. Further research should be done to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Structure-Based Design of Hepatitis C Virus Vaccines That Elicit Neutralizing Antibody Responses to a Conserved Epitope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Brian G.; Boucher, Elisabeth N.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Ejemel, Monir; Rapp, Chelsea A.; Thomas, William D.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Weng, Zhiping; Wang, Yang; Diamond, Michael S.

    2017-08-09

    Despite recent advances in therapeutic options, hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a severe global disease burden, and a vaccine can substantially reduce its incidence. Due to its extremely high sequence variability, HCV can readily escape the immune response; thus, an effective vaccine must target conserved, functionally important epitopes. Using the structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody in complex with a conserved linear epitope from the HCV E2 envelope glycoprotein (residues 412 to 423; epitope I), we performed structure-based design of immunogens to induce antibody responses to this epitope. This resulted in epitope-based immunogens based on a cyclic defensin protein, as well as a bivalent immunogen with two copies of the epitope on the E2 surface. We solved the X-ray structure of a cyclic immunogen in complex with the HCV1 antibody and confirmed preservation of the epitope conformation and the HCV1 interface. Mice vaccinated with our designed immunogens produced robust antibody responses to epitope I, and their serum could neutralize HCV. Notably, the cyclic designs induced greater epitope-specific responses and neutralization than the native peptide epitope. Beyond successfully designing several novel HCV immunogens, this study demonstrates the principle that neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies can be induced by epitope-based, engineered vaccines and provides the basis for further efforts in structure-based design of HCV vaccines.

    IMPORTANCEHepatitis C virus is a leading cause of liver disease and liver cancer, with approximately 3% of the world's population infected. To combat this virus, an effective vaccine would have distinct advantages over current therapeutic options, yet experimental vaccines have not been successful to date, due in part to the virus's high sequence variability leading to immune escape. In this study, we rationally designed several vaccine immunogens based on the structure of a conserved epitope that

  17. Tissue tropisms, infection kinetics, histologic lesions, and antibody response of the MR766 strain of Zika virus in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawiecki, Anna B; Mayton, E Handly; Dutuze, M Fausta; Goupil, Brad A; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Del Piero, Fabio; Christofferson, Rebecca C

    2017-04-18

    The appearance of severe Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in the most recent outbreak has prompted researchers to respond through the development of tools to quickly characterize transmission and pathology. We describe here another such tool, a mouse model of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis using the MR766 strain of virus that adds to the growing body of knowledge regarding ZIKV kinetics in small animal models. We infected mice with the MR766 strain of ZIKV to determine infection kinetics via serum viremia. We further evaluated infection-induced lesions via histopathology and visualized viral antigen via immunohistochemical labeling. We also investigated the antibody response of recovered animals to both the MR766 and a strain from the current outbreak (PRVABC59). We demonstrate that the IRF3/7 DKO mouse is a susceptible, mostly non-lethal model well suited for the study of infection kinetics, pathological progression, and antibody response. Infected mice presented lesions in tissues that have been associated with ZIKV infection in the human population, such as the eyes, male gonads, and central nervous system. In addition, we demonstrate that infection with the MR766 strain produces cross-neutralizing antibodies to the PRVABC59 strain of the Asian lineage. This model provides an additional tool for future studies into the transmission routes of ZIKV, as well as for the development of antivirals and other therapeutics, and should be included in the growing list of available tools for investigations of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis.

  18. Combination therapy with L-arginine and α-PD-L1 antibody boosts immune response against osteosarcoma in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaojun; Lin, Haiqing; Yuan, Li; Li, Binghao

    2017-02-01

    L-arginine supplementation was recently proved to promote the function of immune cells, especially T-cells, by facilitating T-cell proliferation, differentiation and survival in vivo. Cytotoxic CD8 + plays a crucial role in modulating anti-cancer response mediated by the immune system, but was restricted by exhaustion. Thus, we hypothesized that L-arginine, in combination with α-PD-L1 antibody, may provide a favored environment for T-cell response against osteosarcoma. Immunocompetent BALB/c mouse models bearing orthotopic and metastatic osteosarcoma were established to validate this conjecture. We found that L-arginine significantly elevated the number of splenic CD8 + T-cells, the level of serum interferon-γ, and CD8 + T-cell infiltration. Furthermore, α-PD-L1 antibody protected these amplified CD8 + T-cells from exhaustion, and therefore strengthened the secretion of interferon-γ, granzyme B and perforin by these T-cells. As a result, this combination treatment strategy significantly prolonged survival of osteosarcoma bearing mice, suggesting that L-arginine supplementation in combination with α-PD-L1 antibody may be a promising method for osteosarcoma patients.

  19. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O; Fang, H; Alarcón, G S; Gordon, C; Merrill, Jt; Fortin, P R; Bruce, I N; Isenberg, D A; Wallace, D J; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Bae, S-C; Hanly, J G; Sanchez-Guerrero, J; Clarke, A E; Aranow, C B; Manzi, S; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Kalunian, K C; Costner, M I; Werth, V P; Zoma, A; Bernatsky, S; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Khamashta, M A; Jacobsen, S; Buyon, J P; Maddison, P; Dooley, M A; Van Vollenhoven, R F; Ginzler, E; Stoll, T; Peschken, C; Jorizzo, J L; Callen, J P; Lim, S S; Fessler, B J; Inanc, M; Kamen, D L; Rahman, A; Steinsson, K; Franks, A G; Sigler, L; Hameed, S; Pham, N; Brey, R; Weisman, M H; McGwin, G; Magder, L S; Petri, M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. Information and blood samples were obtained in a cross-sectional study from patients with SLE (n = 308) and other rheumatologic diseases (n = 389) from 25 clinical sites (84% female, 68% Caucasian, 17% African descent, 8% Asian, 7% other). IgG anti-C1q against the collagen-like region was measured by ELISA. Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis recombinant MOMP encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles triggers primarily T helper 1 cellular and antibody immune responses in mice: a desirable candidate nanovaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairley SJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stacie J Fairley, Shree R Singh, Abebayehu N Yilma, Alain B Waffo, Praseetha Subbarayan, Saurabh Dixit, Murtada A Taha, Chino D Cambridge, Vida A Dennis Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA Abstract: We recently demonstrated by in vitro experiments that PLGA (poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolide potentiates T helper 1 (Th1 immune responses induced by a peptide derived from the recombinant major outer membrane protein (rMOMP of Chlamydia trachomatis, and may be a promising vaccine delivery system. Herein we evaluated the immune-potentiating potential of PLGA by encapsulating the full-length rMOMP (PLGA-rMOMP, characterizing it in vitro, and investigating its immunogenicity in vivo. Our hypothesis was that PLGA-rMOMP triggers Th1 immune responses in mice, which are desirable prerequisites for a C. trachomatis candidate nanovaccine. Physical-structural characterizations of PLGA-rMOMP revealed its size (approximately 272 nm, zeta potential (−14.30 mV, apparent spherical smooth morphology, and continuous slow release pattern. PLGA potentiated the ability of encapsulated rMOMP to trigger production of cytokines and chemokines by mouse J774 macrophages. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with PLGA-rMOMP had elevated numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, and secreted more rMOMP-specific interferon-gamma (Th1 and interleukin (IL-12p40 (Th1/Th17 than IL-4 and IL-10 (Th2 cytokines. PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice produced higher serum immunoglobulin (IgG and IgG2a (Th1 than IgG1 (Th2 rMOMP-specific antibodies. Notably, sera from PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice had a 64-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, whereas mice immunized with rMOMP in Freund's adjuvant had only a four-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, suggesting primarily induction of a Th1 antibody response in PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice. Our data underscore PLGA as an effective delivery system for a C

  1. Comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant epitopes in the West Nile virus nonstructural protein 1 recognized by avian antibody responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Encheng Sun

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that primarily infects birds but occasionally infects humans and horses. Certain species of birds, including crows, house sparrows, geese, blue jays and ravens, are considered highly susceptible hosts to WNV. The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of WNV can elicit protective immune responses, including NS1-reactive antibodies, during infection of animals. The antigenicity of NS1 suggests that NS1-reactive antibodies could provide a basis for serological diagnostic reagents. To further define serological reagents for diagnostic use, the antigenic sites in NS1 that are targeted by host immune responses need to be identified and the potential diagnostic value of individual antigenic sites also needs to be defined. The present study describes comprehensive mapping of common immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes in the WNV NS1 using avian WNV NS1 antisera. We screened antisera from chickens, ducks and geese immunized with purified NS1 for reactivity against 35 partially overlapping peptides covering the entire WNV NS1. This study identified twelve, nine and six peptide epitopes recognized by chicken, duck and goose antibody responses, respectively. Three epitopes (NS1-3, 14 and 24 were recognized by antibodies elicited by immunization in all three avian species tested. We also found that NS1-3 and 24 were WNV-specific epitopes, whereas the NS1-14 epitope was conserved among the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV serocomplex viruses based on the reactivity of avian WNV NS1 antisera against polypeptides derived from the NS1 sequences of viruses of the JEV serocomplex. Further analysis showed that the three common polypeptide epitopes were not recognized by antibodies in Avian Influenza Virus (AIV, Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV, Duck Plague Virus (DPV and Goose Parvovirus (GPV antisera. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study have potential applications in differential diagnostic approaches and

  2. Antibody responses to influenza viruses in paediatric patients and their contacts at the onset of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Novales, Guadalupe; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes; Herrera-Castillo, Cristina; Pastelin-Palacios, Rodolfo; Valero-Pacheco, Nuriban; Pérez-Toledo, Marisol; Ferat-Osorio, Eduardo; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino; Vázquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Espitia-Pinzón, Clara; Zamudio-Lugo, Irma; Meza-Chávez, Abigail; Klenerman, Paul; Isibasi, Armando; López-Macías, Constantino

    2015-03-15

    On April 2009, the Mexican Ministry of Health received notification of cases of severe pneumonia mostly affecting young healthy people; this was the beginning of the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. The nature of the immune response to the influenza A(H1N1)2009 pandemic strain in Mexico at the beginning of the pandemic outbreak has not been completely defined. We describe the serological response to the 2009 pandemic influenza virus in paediatric patients with influenza-like illness, their household contacts (HHCs), and exposed health-care workers (HCWs) at the beginning of the pandemic outbreak in Mexico City. thirty pre-epidemic and 129 epidemic samples were collected and serum antibodies were measured against A(H1N1)2009 pandemic virus and two non-pandemic swine influenza viruses by an haemagglutination inhibition assay . 91% (29/32) of the convalescence samples from confirmed patients had an antibody titre ≥ 10 (GMT 25), 63% (41/65) of the HHCs (GMT 12), 41% of HCWs (GMT 6) and 13% (4/30) of pre-epidemic samples (GMT 6) for the pandemic influenza virus. Of the 32 confirmed cases, 60% had an antibody titre ≥ 40 for the pandemic strain, 53% for the A/swine/Iowa(H1N1) virus (GMT 62) and 43% for the A/swine/Texas(H3N2) virus (GMT 66). The antibody response to 2009 pandemic influenza virus was widespread in convalescence samples from patients with confirmed pandemic influenza infection but the GMT was below the protective titre. There was no evidence that antibodies to the swine influenza viruses had cross-protective effect against the 2009 pandemic influenza virus.

  3. Influenza vaccination can induce new onset anticardiolipins but not β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vista, Evan S.; Crowe, Sherry R.; Thompson, Linda F.; Air, Gillian M.; Robertson, Julie M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; James, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by autoantibodies against cardiolipins (aCL), lupus anticoagulant, and independent β2-glycoprotein (β2GPI). Controversy exists as to whether vaccination triggers the development of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Methods SLE patients (101) and matched controls (101) were enrolled from 2005 to 2009 and received seasonal influenza vaccinations. Sera were tested by ELISA for aCL at baseline, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after vaccination. Vaccine responses were ranked according to an overall anti-influenza antibody response index. Individuals with positive aCL were further tested for β2GPI antibodies. Results SLE patients and healthy controls developed new onset aCL post-vaccination (12/101 cases and 7/101 controls, OR 1.81, p=0.34). New onset moderate aCL are slightly enriched in African American SLE patients (5/36 cases; p=0.094). The optical density (OD) measurements for aCL reactivity in patients were significantly higher than baseline at 2 weeks (pvaccination. No new β2GPI antibodies were detected among patients with new aCL reactivity. Vaccine response was not different between patients with and without new onset aCL reactivity (p=0.43). Conclusions This study shows transient increases in aCL, but not anti-β2GPI responses, after influenza vaccination. PMID:22235049

  4. Influenza vaccination can induce new-onset anticardiolipins but not β2-glycoprotein-I antibodies among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vista, E S; Crowe, S R; Thompson, L F; Air, G M; Robertson, J M; Guthridge, J M; James, J A

    2012-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by autoantibodies against cardiolipins (aCL), lupus anticoagulant, and independent β2-glycoprotein (β2GPI). Controversy exists as to whether vaccination triggers the development of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients with SLE (101) and matched controls (101) were enrolled from 2005-2009 and received seasonal influenza vaccinations. Sera were tested by ELISA for aCL at baseline, 2, 6, and 12 weeks after vaccination. Vaccine responses were ranked according to an overall anti-influenza antibody response index. Individuals with positive aCL were further tested for β2GPI antibodies. Patients with SLE and healthy controls can develop new-onset aCL post vaccination, although at rates which do not differ between patients and controls (12/101 cases and 7/101 controls, OR 1.81, p = 0.34). New-onset moderate aCL are slightly enriched in African American SLE patients (5/36 cases; p = 0.094). The optical density measurements for aCL reactivity in patients were significantly higher than baseline at 2 weeks (p vaccination. No new β2GPI antibodies were detected among patients with new aCL reactivity. Vaccine response was not different between patients with and without new-onset aCL reactivity (p = 0.43). This study shows transient increases in aCL, but not anti-β2GPI responses, after influenza vaccination.

  5. Feasibility studies of using the Catfish Immune System to produce monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, T.M.

    1987-03-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine the feasibility of using a teleost cell line to produce monoclonal antibodies. Studies were undertaken to demonstrate the production of a polyclonal response of channel catfish (Icatalurus punctatus) challenged with mycotoxins coupled to a protein carrier. Companion studies were also performed to induce a permanent cell line with catfish lymphocytes. Attempts to demonstrate a polyclonal response to haptenized mycotoxins were inconclusive. Tests to induce an immortal, permanent cell line with benzene and x-ray irradiated cells were also inconclusive. 3 refs., 13 tabs.

  6. Zika Virus-Induced Antibody Response Enhances Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Replication In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawiecki, Anna B; Christofferson, Rebecca C

    2016-11-01

    Zika virus has emerged in the Americas, where dengue virus is endemic. Among the 4 serotypes of dengue virus, antibody-dependent enhancement is thought to enhance viral replication and disease severity. Reports suggest that anti-dengue virus antibody may enhance Zika virus replication. We investigated whether Zika virus antibodies enhance dengue virus replication, by exposing C57Bl/6 mice to Zika virus. Polyclonal serum was verified for strong Zika virus-neutralizing, dengue virus-subneutralizing capacity. Then we determined the enhancement capabilities of Zika virus-immune serum for dengue virus in vitro. We showed that Zika virus antibodies have the ability to enhance dengue virus infections, which is important, because in many Zika virus-affected areas, dengue virus is expected to remain endemic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Hypersensitivity Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Asgari, Nasrin; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen

    2015-01-01

    of pathology in neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease where activated neutrophils infiltrate, unlike in MS. The most widely used model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is an autoantigen-immunized disease that can be transferred to naive animals......Immune-mediated tissue damage or hypersensitivity can be mediated by autospecific IgG antibodies. Pathology results from activation of complement, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, mediated by inflammatory effector leukocytes include macrophages, natural killer cells, and granulocytes...... injection of antibody and complement to the CNS, or experimental manipulations to induce BBB breakdown. We here review studies in MS and NMO that elucidate roles for IgG and complement in the induction of BBB breakdown, astrocytopathy, and demyelinating pathology. These studies point to significance of T...

  8. Differential antibody response of Gambian donors to soluble Plasmodium falciparum antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Riley, E M; Allen, S J

    1991-01-01

    A seroepidemiological and clinical study was performed in an area of West Africa (The Gambia) where Plasmodium falciparum is endemic with seasonal transmission. Plasma samples were tested by intermediate gel immunoelectrophoresis for antibodies against 7 soluble P. falciparum antigens. There were...... who had had a documented attack of clinical malaria or parasitaemia. There was no difference in antibody profiles to soluble antigens between children with sickle cell trait and children with normal haemoglobin....

  9. The bright and the dark side of human antibody responses to flaviviruses: lessons for vaccine design

    OpenAIRE

    Rey, Félix A; Stiasny, Karin; Vaney, Marie‐Christine; Dellarole, Mariano; Heinz, Franz X

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Zika and dengue viruses belong to the Flavivirus genus, a close group of antigenically related viruses that cause significant arthropod‐transmitted diseases throughout the globe. Although infection by a given flavivirus is thought to confer lifelong protection, some of the patient's antibodies cross‐react with other flaviviruses without cross‐neutralizing. The original antigenic sin phenomenon may amplify such antibodies upon subsequent heterologous flavivirus infection, potentially ...

  10. Acquired Antibody Responses against Plasmodium vivax Infection Vary with Host Genotype for Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, Amanda; Muskus, Carlos; Duque, Victoria; Agudelo, Olga; Liu, Pu; Takagi, Akihide; Ntumngia, Francis B.; Adams, John H.; Sim, Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Corradin, Giampietro; Velez, Ivan D.; Wang, Ruobing

    2010-01-01

    Background Polymorphism of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) is associated with susceptibility to and the severity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in humans. P. vivax uses DARC to invade erythrocytes. Individuals lacking DARC are ‘resistant’ to P. vivax erythrocytic infection. However, susceptibility to P. vivax in DARC+ individuals is reported to vary between specific DARC genotypes. We hypothesized that the natural acquisition of antibodies to P. vivax blood stages may vary with the host genotype and the level of DARC expression. Furthermore, high parasitemia has been reported to effect the acquisition of immunity against pre-erythrocytic parasites. We investigated the correlation between host DARC genotypes and the frequency and magnitude of antibodies against P. vivax erythrocytic stage antigens. Methodology/Findings We assessed the frequencies and magnitudes of antibody responses against P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite and erythrocytic antigens in Colombian donors from malaria-endemic regions. The frequency and level of naturally-acquired antibodies against the P. vivax erythrocytic antigens merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1) and Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) varied with the host DARC genotypes. Donors with one negative allele (FY*B/FY*Bnull and FY*A/FY*Bnull) were more likely to have anti-PvMSP1 and anti-PvDBP antibodies than those with two positive alleles (FY*B/FY*B and FY*A/FY*B). The lower IgG3 and IgG1 components of the total IgG response may account for the decreased responses to P. vivax erythrocytic antigens with FY*A/FY*B and FY*B/FY*B genotypes. No such association was detected with P. falciparum erythrocytic antigens, which does not use DARC for erythrocyte invasion. Conclusion/Significance Individuals with higher DARC expression, which is associated with higher susceptibility to P. vivax infection, exhibited low frequencies and magnitudes of P. vivax blood-stage specific antibody responses. This may indicate that one of the

  11. Acquired antibody responses against Plasmodium vivax infection vary with host genotype for duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Maestre

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphism of the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC is associated with susceptibility to and the severity of Plasmodium vivax malaria in humans. P. vivax uses DARC to invade erythrocytes. Individuals lacking DARC are 'resistant' to P. vivax erythrocytic infection. However, susceptibility to P. vivax in DARC+ individuals is reported to vary between specific DARC genotypes. We hypothesized that the natural acquisition of antibodies to P. vivax blood stages may vary with the host genotype and the level of DARC expression. Furthermore, high parasitemia has been reported to effect the acquisition of immunity against pre-erythrocytic parasites. We investigated the correlation between host DARC genotypes and the frequency and magnitude of antibodies against P. vivax erythrocytic stage antigens.We assessed the frequencies and magnitudes of antibody responses against P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite and erythrocytic antigens in Colombian donors from malaria-endemic regions. The frequency and level of naturally-acquired antibodies against the P. vivax erythrocytic antigens merozoite surface protein 1 (PvMSP1 and Duffy binding protein (PvDBP varied with the host DARC genotypes. Donors with one negative allele (FY*B/FY*Bnull and FY*A/FY*Bnull were more likely to have anti-PvMSP1 and anti-PvDBP antibodies than those with two positive alleles (FY*B/FY*B and FY*A/FY*B. The lower IgG3 and IgG1 components of the total IgG response may account for the decreased responses to P. vivax erythrocytic antigens with FY*A/FY*B and FY*B/FY*B genotypes. No such association was detected with P. falciparum erythrocytic antigens, which does not use DARC for erythrocyte invasion.Individuals with higher DARC expression, which is associated with higher susceptibility to P. vivax infection, exhibited low frequencies and magnitudes of P. vivax blood-stage specific antibody responses. This may indicate that one of the primary mechanisms by which P. vivax evades

  12. A Role for the Autonomic Nervous System in Modulating the Immune Response during Mild Emotional Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croiset, Gerda; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Wal, Wim E. van der; Boer, Sietse F. de; Wied, David de

    1990-01-01

    The role of the autonomic nervous system in the modulation of the immune response to emotional stimuli, was established in rats subjected to the passive avoidance test. An increase in splenic primary antibody response directed against SRBC was found after exposure of rats to the passive avoidance

  13. Prevalence and clinical significance of cathepsin G antibodies in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Favaro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of cathepsin G antibodies in patients affected with systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma. Methods: 115 patients affected by SSc, 55 (47,8% with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc and 60 (52,2% with limited scleroderma (lSSc, were tested for cathepsin G antibodies by ELISA method. Moreover these sera were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on ethanol and formalin fixed human neutrophils. Results: By means of the ELISA method 16 (13,9% patients were found to be sera positive for anti-cathepsin G, 2 (12.5% of which showed a perinuclear fluorescence pattern (P-ANCA and 4 (25% an atypical ANCA staining, while 10 (62,5% were negative on IIF. The IIF on scleroderma sera revealed 5 (4,3% P-ANCA and 18 (15,7% atypical ANCA patterns. The anti-cathepsin G antibodies significantly prevailed in scleroderma sera (p=0.02 when their frequency was compared with that of healthy controls; while they were not significantly associated to any clinical or serological features of SSc patients. Conclusions: The anti-cathepsin G antibodies were significantly frequent in scleroderma sera; however, no clinical correlations were found. Thus, the significance of their presence in SSc still needs to be clarified.

  14. Antibody response of cattle to vaccination with commercial modified live rabies vaccines in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy; Greenberg, Lauren; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo; Alvarado, Marlon; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Vampire bat rabies is a public and animal health concern throughout Latin America. As part of an ecological study of vampire bat depredation on cattle in southern Guatemala, we conducted a vaccine seroconversion study among three dairy farms. The main objectives of this cross sectional and cohort study were to understand factors associated with bat bites among cattle, to determine whether unvaccinated cattle had evidence of rabies virus exposure and evaluate whether exposure was related to bat bite prevalence, and to assess whether cattle demonstrate adequate seroconversion to two commercial vaccines used in Guatemala. In 2012, baseline blood samples were collected immediately prior to intramuscular inoculation of cattle with one of two modified live rabies vaccines. Post vaccination blood samples were collected 13 and 393 days later. Sera were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNA) by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Across two years of study, 36% (254/702) of inspected cattle presented gross evidence of vampire bat bites. Individual cattle with a bat bite in 2012 were more likely have a bat bite in 2013. Prior to vaccination, 12% (42/350) of cattle sera demonstrated rVNA, but bite status in 2012 was not associated with presence of rVNA. Vaccine brand was the only factor associated with adequate rVNA response of cattle by day 13. However, vaccine brand and rVNA status at day 13 were associated with an adequate rVNA titer on day 393, with animals demonstrating an adequate titer at day 13 more likely to have an adequate titer at day 393. Our findings support stable levels of vampire bat depredation and evidence of rVNA in unvaccinated cattle. Brand of vaccine may be an important consideration impacting adequate rVNA response and long-term maintenance of rVNA in cattle. Further, the results demonstrate that initial response to vaccination is associated with rVNA status over one year following vaccination. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Age affects quantity but not quality of antibody responses after vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Stiasny

    Full Text Available The impairment of immune functions in the elderly (immunosenescence results in post-vaccination antibody titers that are significantly lower than in young individuals. It is, however, a controversial question whether also the quality of antibodies declines with age. In this study, we have therefore investigated the age-dependence of functional characteristics of antibody responses induced by vaccination with an inactivated flavivirus vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE. For this purpose, we quantified TBE virus-specific IgG and neutralizing antibody titers in post-vaccination sera from groups of young and elderly healthy adults and determined antibody avidities and NT/ELISA titer ratios (functional activity. In contrast to the quantitative impairment of antibody production in the elderly, we found no age-related differences in the avidity and functional activity of antibodies induced by vaccination, which also appeared to be independent of the age at primary immunization. There was no correlation between antibody avidity and NT/ELISA ratios suggesting that additional factors affect the quality of polyclonal responses, independent of age. Our work indicates that healthy elderly people are able to produce antibodies in response to vaccination with similar avidity and functional activity as young individuals, albeit at lower titers.

  16. Drug delivery systems--2. Site-specific drug delivery utilizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, V V

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are purified antibodies produced by a single clone of cells. They are engineered to recognize and bind to a single specific antigen. Accordingly, when administered, MAbs home in on a particular circulating protein or on cells that bear the correct antigenic signature on their surfaces. It is the specificity of MAbs that has made them valuable tools for health professions. Following the discovery of Kohler and Milstein regarding the method of somatic cell hybridization, a number of investigators have successfully adopted this technique to obtain T-lymphocyte hybrid cell lines by fusion of activated T (thymus derived) lymphocytes with a T lymphoma cell line leading to an immortalization of a specific differentiated function. The hybrids thus obtained were subsequently shown to produce homogeneous effector molecules with a wide variety of immune functions such as enhancement or suppression of antibody responses, generation of helper T cells, suppressor T cells and cytotoxic T cells. Study of these regulatory molecules has been further shown to provide a greater insight into the genetic, biochemical and molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular development, and the interaction and triggering of various cell types. The successful application of hybridoma technology has now resulted into several advances in the understanding the mechanism and treatment of diseases, especially cancer and development of vaccines, promotion of organ transplantation and therapy against parasites as well. Since monoclonal antibodies could be made in unlimited supply, they have been used in genetic studies such as mRNA and gene isolation, chromosomal isolation of specific genes, immunoglobulin structure, detection of new or rare immunoglobulin gene products, structural studies of enzymes and other proteins and structural and population studies of protein polymorphisms. In some instances, the monoclonal antibodies have been found to replace conventional antisera

  17. Toxorhynchites-fluorescent antibody system for the detection of bluetongue virus from Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibur Rahman, A; Manickam, R

    1997-12-01

    A new system, the Toxorhynchites-fluorescent antibody (TFA) test in which the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens mosquitoes were used for the detection of bluetongue virus (BTV) from Culicoides midges, was developed. Twenty-seven pools of Culicoides midges were collected from bluetongue-prone areas of Tamil Nadu by use of the light-trap and suction-trap methods. A suspension of each pool was injected intrathoracically into T. splendens IV instar larvae and inoculated onto Vero cell monolayers. An indirect fluorescent antibody technique and an immunoperoxidase test were used to detect BTV antigen in smears of crushed midges, crushed larval head smears after incubation for 7 d at 28 degrees and cell monolayers showing cytopathic effects 48 h post inoculation. The suspensions were also injected intravenously into embryonated chicken eggs, and the characteristic BTV-induced lesion(s), viz. cherry-red appearance of embryos, were observed after 48 h. Virus was confirmed by a qualitative neutralization test conducted simultaneously in embryonated chicken eggs. A total of seven out of 27 samples (26%) were positive for the presence of BTV antigen in all the diagnostic systems used. Since BTV propagates readily in experimentally infected T. splendens larvae and the BTV antigen can be detected by the fluorescent antibody technique with a sensitivity comparable to that for virus propagated in tissue culture and embryonated eggs, the TFA system can be adopted as a new method for the isolation of BTV from vectors. The advantages of the TFA system are discussed.

  18. Influenza A virus infection engenders a poor antibody response against the ectodomain of matrix protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunner William

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matrix protein 2 (M2 is an integral tetrameric membrane protein of influenza A virus (IAV. Its ectodomain (M2e shows remarkably little diversity amongst human IAV strains. As M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to reduce the severity of infection in animals, M2e is being studied for its capability of providing protection against a broad range of IAV strains. Presently, there is little information about the concentration of M2e-specific Abs in humans. Two previous studies made use of ELISA and Western blot against M2e peptides and recombinant M2 protein as immunosorbents, respectively, and reported Ab titers to be low or undetectable. An important caveat is that these assays may not have detected all Abs capable of binding to native tetrameric M2e. Therefore, we developed an assay likely to detect all M2e tetramer-specific Abs. Results We generated a HeLa cell line that expressed full length tetrameric M2 (HeLa-M2 or empty vector (HeLa-C10 under the control of the tetracycline response element. These cell lines were then used in parallel as immunosorbents in ELISA. The assay was standardized and M2e-specific Ab titers quantified by means of purified murine or chimeric (mouse variable regions, human constant regions M2e-specific Abs in the analysis of mouse and human sera, respectively. We found that the cell-based ELISA was substantially more effective than immobilized M2e peptide in detecting M2e-specific Abs in sera of mice that had recovered from repetitive IAV infections. Still, titers remained low ( Conclusion The results provide convincing evidence that M2e-specific Ab-mediated protection is currently lacking or suboptimal in humans.

  19. Precisely Molded Nanoparticle Displaying DENV-E Proteins Induces Robust Serotype-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Metz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the causative agent of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The virus is endemic in over 120 countries, causing over 350 million infections per year. Dengue vaccine development is challenging because of the need to induce simultaneous protection against four antigenically distinct DENV serotypes and evidence that, under some conditions, vaccination can enhance disease due to specific immunity to the virus. While several live-attenuated tetravalent dengue virus vaccines display partial efficacy, it has been challenging to induce balanced protective immunity to all 4 serotypes. Instead of using whole-virus formulations, we are exploring the potentials for a particulate subunit vaccine, based on DENV E-protein displayed on nanoparticles that have been precisely molded using Particle Replication in Non-wetting Template (PRINT technology. Here we describe immunization studies with a DENV2-nanoparticle vaccine candidate. The ectodomain of DENV2-E protein was expressed as a secreted recombinant protein (sRecE, purified and adsorbed to poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles of different sizes and shape. We show that PRINT nanoparticle adsorbed sRecE without any adjuvant induces higher IgG titers and a more potent DENV2-specific neutralizing antibody response compared to the soluble sRecE protein alone. Antigen trafficking indicate that PRINT nanoparticle display of sRecE prolongs the bio-availability of the antigen in the draining lymph nodes by creating an antigen depot. Our results demonstrate that PRINT nanoparticles are a promising platform for delivering subunit vaccines against flaviviruses such as dengue and Zika.

  20. The Celiac Patient Antibody Response to Conventional and Gluten-Removed Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Laura K; Lesko, Katherine; McKiernan, Diane; Kupper, Cynthia; Guandalini, Stefano

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic digestion, or hydrolysis, has been proposed for treating gluten-containing foods and beverages to make them safe for persons with celiac disease (CD). There are no validated testing methods that allow the quantitation of all the hydrolyzed or fermented gluten peptides in foods and beverages that might be harmful to CD patients, making it difficult to assess the safety of hydrolyzed products. This study examines an ELISA-based method to determine whether serum antibody binding of residual peptides in a fermented barley-based product is greater among active-CD patients than a normal control group, using commercial beers as a test case. Sera from 31 active-CD patients and 29 nonceliac control subjects were used to assess the binding of proteins from barley, rice, traditional beer, gluten-free beer, and enzymatically treated (gluten-removed) traditional beer. In the ELISA, none of the subjects' sera bound to proteins in the gluten-free beer. Eleven active-CD patient serum samples demonstrated immunoglobulin A (IgA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to a barley extract, compared to only one nonceliac control subject. Of the seven active-CD patients who had an IgA binding response to barley, four also responded to traditional beer, and two of these responded to the gluten-removed beer. None of the nonceliac control subjects' sera bound to all three beer samples. Binding of protein fragments in hydrolyzed or fermented foods and beverages by serum from active-CD patients, but not nonceliac control subjects, may indicate the presence of residual peptides that are celiac-specific.

  1. A computational approach to the description of individual immune responses. IgE and IgG-subclass allergen-specific antibodies formed during immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, I; Poulsen, L K; Osterballe, O

    1991-01-01

    are "distance" between antibody responses and "immune response width". The 20 patients included in this study were pollen-allergic patients who underwent specific immunotherapy in a 3-year prospective study. It was found that the immune response during immunotherapy was restricted to IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies......Detailed evaluation of the IgE and IgG-subclass immune response during immunotherapy can now be performed by crossed radio immunoelectrophoresis (CRIE). Some new concepts are introduced facilitating the handling of the vast amount of data obtained by quantitating the immune response. These concepts...... and decreased towards six. For the IgG4 antibodies the number of reactions increased towards 15 antigens and decreased towards four. The increase is generally paralleled by an increase in quantitative immune response as well. For some of the antigens a rise in the IgE antibodies is contrasted by a fall...

  2. NRPB emergency response information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, N.A.; Casey, K.

    1993-01-01

    To enhance emergency response management NRPB has introduced an advanced information handling and map display facility. The NRPB Emergency Response Information System (NERIS) provides a central resource which holds, displays and analyses the available information on an accidental release of radioactivity. The bringing together of the commercial tools of computerised map display and database technology, capable of storing geographically referenced information, provided the initial building blocks for the development of NERIS. The rapid manipulation of the large amounts of data used by NERIS is achieved by the use of complex software on powerful computers and a substantial investment of both staff time and resources. The synthesis of these products with the analysis tools under development by NRPB staff will provide a system which will greatly enhance the organisation's emergency response capability. The need to assess the consequences of an accident and give advice on countermeasure strategies and actions will inevitably place high demands on NRPB staff. NERIS will enable a more complete understanding of the situation to be gained and give staff the time and tools to cope effectively with all exigencies. (Author)

  3. HLA-A(∗)02, gender and tobacco smoking, but not multiple sclerosis, affects the IgG antibody response against human herpesvirus 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Elin; Gustafsson, Rasmus; Ramanujam, Ryan; Sundqvist, Emilie; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Kockum, Ingrid; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to disease susceptibility and two viruses associated with MS are human herpesvirus (HHV)-6A and HHV-6B, together referred to as HHV-6. This study characterized the plasma IgG antibody response against HHV-6 in MS patients (n=446) and healthy controls (n=487), and the relationship between MS susceptibility factors and the anti-HHV-6 response was investigated. In addition, 134 samples were further investigated for IgG against the early HHV-6 antigen p41. Antibody levels were measured with ELISA. The overall seroprevalence against HHV-6 was 90%, with no significant difference in positivity or levels between MS patients and controls. Interestingly, carriership of HLA-A(∗)02 and tobacco smoking was associated with lower anti-HHV-6 IgG levels (p=0.0017 and p=0.026 respectively), whereas females sex was associated with higher levels (p=0.0090). No difference in IgG titers against p41 was observed between MS patients and controls. In conclusion, the IgG response against HHV-6 was associated with several factors that have previously been associated with MS susceptibility, possibly reflecting a relation between autoimmunity and how the immune system handles viral infections. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibody responses to a major Pneumocystis carinii antigen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with and without P. carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Nielsen, T

    1992-01-01

    Antibody responses to a major purified human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen (gp95) were determined by ELISA in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Serum IgG directed against gp95 was measured in 129 consecutive HIV-infected patients who underwent bronchoscopy for evaluation...... was higher (mean optical density ratio: 0.6 vs. 0.23 and 0.2, respectively; P less than .01). Changes in antibody response were investigated in 78 patients for whom serial serum samples taken around the time of bronchoscopy were available. Of the 47 patients with verified PCP, 20 (43%) mounted an antibody...... of pulmonary symptoms. Significantly more patients with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) had detectable antibodies compared with HIV-infected patients without PCP and with HIV-negative controls (50 [66%] of 76 vs. 18 [34%] of 53 and 7 [35%] of 20, respectively; P less than .001), and the level of antibody response...

  5. Serum antibody responses in pigs trickle-infected with Ascaris and Trichuris: Heritabilities and associations with parasitological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kringel, Helene; Thamsborg, Stig Milan; Petersen, Heidi Huus; Göring, Harald Heinz Herbert; Skallerup, Per; Nejsum, Peter

    2015-07-30

    A humoral immune response following helminth infection in pigs is well documented. However, it has been difficult to confirm the existence of antibody mediated resistance against the large roundworm, Ascaris suum, and whipworm, Trichuris suis, in experimental settings by correlating worm burdens or egg excretion with specific antibody levels. We set out to investigate the association between worm load and T. suis and A. suum specific serum antibody levels (IgG1, IgG2 and IgA) against excretory-secretory products of adults and third stage larvae, respectively, measured at 0, 7 and 14 weeks p.i. in a trickle-infected F1-resource-population of crossbred pigs (n=195). Furthermore, we wanted to determine the heritability of these antibody isotypes during the course of infection. Most pigs remained infected with A. suum throughout the experiment while they expelled T. suis between 7 and 14 weeks post infection (p.i.). Parasite specific IgG1 and IgA were significantly (P<0.001) elevated after 7 and 14 weeks of infection, whereas parasite specific IgG2 levels only changed slightly at 14 weeks p.i.. However, the observed association between specific antibody isotype levels and faecal egg counts and macroscopic worm load was weak. The relative heritabilities of the different parasite specific isotypes were assessed and resulted in significant heritability estimates for parasite specific IgG1 and IgA. The highest heritabilities were found for A. suum specific IgG1 (h(2)=0.41 and 0.46 at 7 and 14 weeks p.i., respectively). Thus, the present study demonstrates that host genetic factors influence the IgG1 and IgA antibody isotype responses specific to two of the most common gastrointestinal nematodes of swine whereas specific antibody levels were poorly associated with egg excretion and the presence of macroscopic worms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Antibodies against small heat-shock proteins in Alzheimer's disease as a part of natural human immune repertoire or activation of humoral response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papuć, Ewa; Krupski, Witold; Kurys-Denis, Ewa; Rejdak, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of autoantibodies specific for some disease-related proteins, would allow to better assess their role as diagnostic and prognostic markers. In the light of increasing evidence for both humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and data on the increased small heat-shock proteins (sHSP) expression in this disease, it seemed justified to assess humoral response against sHSP in AD patients. The aim of the study was to check whether AD has the ability to elicit immune response against small HSP, which could also serve as disease biomarkers. IgG and IgM autoantibodies against alpha B-crystallin and anti-HSP 60 IgG autoantibodies were assessed in 59 AD patients and 59 healthy subjects. Both IgM and IgG autoantibodies against alpha B-crystallin in AD patients were significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p immune repertoire, and chronic neurodegenerative process does not have significant inducing effect on the systemic immunoreactivity against HSP60. Increased titers of IgM and IgG autoantibodies against alpha B-crystallin in AD patients may reflect activation of humoral immune response in the course of this chronic disease, probably secondary to its increased expression. Further prospective studies, on larger group of AD patients and measuring a change in antibodies titers with disease progression are necessary to assess the exact role of these antibodies in AD.

  7. Antibody-enhanced dengue disease generates a marked CNS inflammatory response in the black-tufted marmoset Callithrix penicillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Barbara Cristina Baldez; Vieira, Juliana Almeida; Silva, Geane Oliveira; Fernandes, Taiany Nogueira; Rocha, Luciano Chaves; Viana, André Pereira; Serique, Cássio Diego Sá; Filho, Carlos Santos; Bringel, Raissa Aires Ribeiro; Teixeira, Francisco Fernando Dacier Lobato; Ferreira, Milene Silveira; Casseb, Samir Mansour Moraes; Carvalho, Valéria Lima; de Melo, Karla Fabiane Lopes; de Castro, Paulo Henrique Gomes; Araújo, Sanderson Corrêa; Diniz, José Antonio Picanço; Demachki, Samia; Anaissi, Ana Karyssa Mendes; Sosthenes, Marcia Consentino Kronka; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Anthony, Daniel Clive; Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley Picanço; Diniz, Daniel Guerreiro

    2016-02-01

    Severe dengue disease is often associated with long-term neurological impairments, but it is unclear what mechanisms are associated with neurological sequelae. Previously, we demonstrated antibody-enhanced dengue disease (ADE) dengue in an immunocompetent mouse model with a dengue virus 2 (DENV2) antibody injection followed by DENV3 virus infection. Here we migrated this ADE model to Callithrix penicillata. To mimic human multiple infections of endemic zones where abundant vectors and multiple serotypes co-exist, three animals received weekly subcutaneous injections of DENV3 (genotype III)-infected supernatant of C6/36 cell cultures, followed 24 h later by anti-DENV2 antibody for 12 weeks. There were six control animals, two of which received weekly anti-DENV2 antibodies, and four further animals received no injections. After multiple infections, brain, liver, and spleen samples were collected and tissue was immunolabeled for DENV3 antigens, ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1, Ki-67, TNFα. There were marked morphological changes in the microglial population of ADE monkeys characterized by more highly ramified microglial processes, higher numbers of trees and larger surface areas. These changes were associated with intense TNFα-positive immunolabeling. It is unclear why ADE should generate such microglial activation given that IgG does not cross the blood-brain barrier, but this study reveals that in ADE dengue therapy targeting the CNS host response is likely to be important. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Antibody responses of domestic animals to salivary antigens of Triatoma infestans as biomarkers for low-level infestation of triatomines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Sternberg, Jeremy M.; Johnston, Valerie; Medrano-Mercado, Nora; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Hume, Jen C.C.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Schaub, Günter A.; Billingsley, Peter F.

    2009-01-01

    Hematophagous arthropods such as Triatoma infestans, the vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, elicit host-immune responses during feeding. Characterization of antibody responses to salivary antigens offers the potential to develop immunologically based monitoring techniques for exposure to re-emergent triatomine bug populations in peridomestic animals. IgG-antibody responses to the salivary antigens of T. infestans have been detected in chickens as soon as 2 days after the first exposure to five adult bugs. Chickens and guinea pigs regularly exposed to this number of triatomines showed a significantly lower anti-saliva antibody titre than animals exposed to 25 adults and fifth instars of four different T. infestans strains originating from Bolivia and from Northern Chile. Highly immunogenic salivary antigens of 14 and 21 kDa were recognised by all chicken sera and of 79 kDa by all guinea pig sera. Cross-reactivity studies using saliva or salivary gland extracts from different hematophagous species, e.g. different triatomines, bed bugs, mosquitoes, sand flies and ticks, as well as chicken sera exposed to triatomines and mosquitoes, demonstrated that the 14 and 21 kDa salivary antigens were only found in triatomines. Sera from peridomestic chickens and guinea pigs in sites of known T. infestans challenge in Bolivia also recognised the 14 and 21 kDa antigens. These represent promising epidemiological markers for the detection of small numbers of feeding bugs and hence may be a new tool for vector surveillance in Chagas disease control programs. PMID:19248784

  9. Antibody responses of domestic animals to salivary antigens of Triatomainfestans as biomarkers for low-level infestation of triatomines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Sternberg, Jeremy M; Johnston, Valerie; Medrano-Mercado, Nora; Anderson, Jennifer M; Hume, Jen C C; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Schaub, Günter A; Billingsley, Peter F

    2009-07-15

    Hematophagous arthropods such as Triatoma infestans, the vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, elicit host-immune responses during feeding. Characterization of antibody responses to salivary antigens offers the potential to develop immunologically based monitoring techniques for exposure to re-emergent triatomine bug populations in peridomestic animals. IgG-antibody responses to the salivary antigens of T.infestans have been detected in chickens as soon as 2 days after the first exposure to five adult bugs. Chickens and guinea pigs regularly exposed to this number of triatomines showed a significantly lower anti-saliva antibody titre than animals exposed to 25 adults and fifth instars of four different T.infestans strains originating from Bolivia and from Northern Chile. Highly immunogenic salivary antigens of 14 and 21kDa were recognised by all chicken sera and of 79kDa by all guinea pig sera. Cross-reactivity studies using saliva or salivary gland extracts from different hematophagous species, e.g. different triatomines, bed bugs, mosquitoes, sand flies and ticks, as well as chicken sera exposed to triatomines and mosquitoes, demonstrated that the 14 and 21kDa salivary antigens were only found in triatomines. Sera from peridomestic chickens and guinea pigs in sites of known T.infestans challenge in Bolivia also recognised the 14 and 21kDa antigens. These represent promising epidemiological markers for the detection of small numbers of feeding bugs and hence may be a new tool for vector surveillance in Chagas disease control programs.

  10. Comparison of the adjuvant activity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response towards Bothrops asper snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedo, Hidekel; Herrera, María; Rojas, Leonardo; Villalta, Mauren; Vargas, Mariángela; Leiguez, Elbio; Teixeira, Catarina; Estrada, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, José María; León, Guillermo; Montero, Mavis L

    2014-01-01

    The adjuvanticity of aluminum hydroxide and calcium phosphate on the antibody response in mice towards the venom of the snake Bothrops asper was studied. It was found that, in vitro, most of the venom proteins are similarly adsorbed by both mineral salts, with the exception of some basic phospholipases A2, which are better adsorbed by calcium phosphate. After injection, the adjuvants promoted a slow release of the venom, as judged by the lack of acute toxicity when lethal doses of venom were administered to mice. Leukocyte recruitment induced by the venom was enhanced when it was adsorbed on both mineral salts; however, venom adsorbed on calcium phosphate induced a higher antibody response towards all tested HPLC fractions of the venom. On the other hand, co-precipitation of venom with calcium phosphate was the best strategy for increasing: (1) the capacity of the salt to couple venom proteins in vitro; (2) the venom ability to induce leukocyte recruitment; (3) phagocytosis by macrophages; and (4) a host antibody response. These findings suggest that the chemical nature is not the only one determining factor of the adjuvant activity of mineral salts.

  11. Anti-nuclear antibodies positive serum from systemic lupus erythematosus patients promotes cardiovascular manifestations and the presence of human antibody in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Worden, Marie; Hammer, Leslie; Gebhard, Robyn; Schrader, Lauran; Griffin, Marley; Cooper, Dalahnna

    2014-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by the presence of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs) in the serum of patients. These antibodies may cross over into the brain resulting in the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms and result in abnormal pathology in other organs such as the heart and kidneys. The objective of this study was to determine if SLE pathology could be detected in the hearts and brains of rats injected with positive human ANA serum. Lewis rats (n = 31) were selected for this study due to documented research already performed with this strain in the investigation of serum sickness, encephalitis and autoimmune related carditis. Rats were injected once a week with either ANA positive or negative control serum or saline. Hearts were examined for initial signs of heart disease including the presence of lipid deposits, vegetation, increased ventricular thickness and a change in heart weight. Brains were examined for the presence of human antibody and necrotic lesions. Animals were observed for outward signs of neuropathy as well. Blood samples were taken in order to determine final circulating concentrations of IgG and monitor histamine levels. Animals injected with ANA were significantly higher for lipid deposits in the heart and an increased ventricular thickness was noted. One animal even displayed Libman-Sacks endocarditis. Brains were positive for the presence of human IgG and diffuse internal lesions occurred in 80% of the ANA positive serum injected animals examined. Blood histamine levels were not significantly different, but actually lower than controls by the end of the experiment. Since human antibodies were detected in the brain, further studies will have to identify which antibody cross reactions are occurring within the brain, examine cell infiltration as well as characterize the antibodies associated with more destructive consequences such as lesion formation.

  12. Timing of the human prenatal antibody response to Plasmodium falciparum antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Tassi Yunga

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-specific T- and B-cell responses may be present at birth; however, when during fetal development antibodies are produced is unknown. Accordingly, cord blood samples from 232 preterm (20-37 weeks of gestation and 450 term (≥37 weeks babies were screened for IgM to Pf blood-stage antigens MSP1, MSP2, AMA1, EBA175 and RESA. Overall, 25% [95% CI = 22-28%] of the 682 newborns were positive for IgM to ≥1 Pf antigens with the earliest response occurring at 22 weeks. Interestingly, the odds of being positive for cord blood Pf IgM decreased with gestational age (adjusted OR [95% CI] at 20-31 weeks = 2.55 [1.14-5.85] and at 32-36 weeks = 1.97 [0.92-4.29], with ≥37 weeks as reference; however, preterm and term newborns had similar levels of Pf IgM and recognized a comparable breadth of antigens. Having cord blood Pf IgM was associated with placental malaria (adjusted OR [95% CI] = 2.37 [1.25-4.54]. To determine if in utero exposure occurred via transplacental transfer of Pf-IgG immune complexes (IC, IC containing MSP1 and MSP2 were measured in plasma of 242 mother-newborn pairs. Among newborns of IC-positive mothers (77/242, the proportion of cord samples with Pf IC increased with gestational age but was not associated with Pf IgM, suggesting that fetal B cells early in gestation had not been primed by IC. Finally, when cord mononuclear cells from 64 term newborns were cultured in vitro, only 11% (7/64 of supernatants had Pf IgM; whereas, 95% (61/64 contained secreted Pf IgG. These data suggest fetal B cells are capable of making Pf-specific IgM from early in the second trimester and undergo isotype switching to IgG towards term.

  13. Novel polyol-responsive monoclonal antibodies against extracellular β-D-glucans from Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semedo, Magda C; Karmali, Amin; Martins, Sónia; Fonseca, Luís

    2016-01-01

    β-D-glucans from mushroom strains play a major role as biological response modifiers in several clinical disorders. Therefore, a specific assay method is of critical importance to find useful and novel sources of β-d-glucans with anti-tumor activity. Hybridoma technology was used to raise monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against extracellular β-d-glucans (EBG) from Pleurotus ostreatus. Two of these hybridoma clones (3F8_3H7 and 1E6_1E8_B3) secreting Mabs against EBG from P. ostreatus were selected and 3F8_3H7 was used to investigate if they are polyol-responsive Mabs (PR-Mabs) by using ELlSA-elution assay. This hybridoma cell line secreted Mab of IgM class, which was purified in a single step by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-300HR, which revealed a protein band on native PAGE with Mr of 917 kDa. Specificity studies of Mab 3F8_3H7 revealed that it recognized a common epitope on several β-d-glucans from different basidiomycete strains as determined by indirect ELlSA and Western blotting under native conditions. This Mab exhibited high apparent affinity constant (KApp) for β-d-glucans from several mushroom strains. However, it revealed differential reactivity to some heat-treated β-d-glucans compared with the native forms suggesting that it binds to a conformation-sensitive epitope on β-d-glucan molecule. Epitope analysis of Mab 3F8_3H7 and 1E6_1E8_B3 was investigated by additivity index parameter, which revealed that they bound to the same epitope on some β-d-glucans and to different epitopes in other antigens. Therefore, these Mab can be used to assay for β-d-glucans as well as to act as powerful probes to detect conformational changes in these biopolymers. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Altered antibody response to influenza H1N1 vaccine in healthy elderly people as determined by HI, ELISA, and neutralization assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remarque, E.J.; Bruijn, de I.A.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Masurel, N.; Ligthart, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the influence of ageing per se as well as of priming histories on the antibody response to influenza vaccination, haemagglutination inhibition (HI), ELISA IgG, IgA, IgM and neutralizing antibody titres were studied in 43 healthy young subjects (mean age 23 years) and 55 healthy elderly

  15. Characterization of epitope-specific anti-RSV antibody responses after natural infection and after vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widjaja, Ivy; Wicht, Oliver; Luytjes, Willem; Leenhouts, Kees; Rottier, Peter J M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Haijema, Bert Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against the fusion (F) protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) play an important role in the protective immune response against this important respiratory virus. Little is known, however, about antibody levels against multiple F-specific epitopes induced by infection or after

  16. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  17. Antibody-secreting cell responses and protective immunity assessed in gnotobiotic pigs inoculated orally or intramuscularly with inactivated human rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, L; Kang, S Y; Ward, L A; To, T L; Saif, L J

    1998-01-01

    Newborn gnotobiotic pigs were inoculated twice perorally (p.o.) (group 1) or intramuscularly (i.m.) (group 2) or three times i.m. (group 3) with inactivated Wa strain human rotavirus and challenged with virulent Wa human rotavirus 20 to 24 days later. To assess correlates of protection, antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were enumerated in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues from pigs in each group at selected postinoculation days (PID) or postchallenge days. Few virus-specific ASC were detected in any tissues of group 1 pigs prior to challenge. By comparison, groups 2 and 3 had significantly greater numbers of virus-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) ASC in intestinal and splenic tissues at PID 8 and significantly greater numbers of virus-specific IgG ASC and IgG memory B cells in spleen and blood at challenge. However, as for group 1, few virus-specific IgA ASC or IgA memory B cells were detected in any tissues of group 2 and 3 pigs. Neither p.o. nor i.m. inoculation conferred significant protection against virulent Wa rotavirus challenge (0 to 6% protection rate), and all groups showed significant anamnestic virus-specific IgG and IgA ASC responses. Hence, high numbers of IgG ASC or memory IgG ASC in the systemic lymphoid tissues at the time of challenge did not correlate with protection. Further, our findings suggest that inactivated Wa human rotavirus administered either p.o. or parenterally is significantly less effective in inducing intestinal IgA ASC responses and conferring protective immunity than live Wa human rotavirus inoculated orally, as reported earlier (L. Yuan, L. A. Ward, B. I. Rosen, T. L. To, and L. J. Saif, J. Virol. 70:3075-3083, 1996). Thus, more efficient mucosal delivery systems and rotavirus vaccination strategies are needed to induce intestinal IgA ASC responses, identified previously as a correlate of protective immunity to rotavirus.

  18. Circulating proteins in response to combined-modality therapy in rectal cancer identified by antibody array screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalanxhi, Erta; Hektoen, Helga Helseth; Meltzer, Sebastian; Dueland, Svein; Flatmark, Kjersti; Ree, Anne Hansen

    2016-07-26

    The increasingly complex programs of contemporary cancer therapy emphasize the need for biological indicators of both therapeutic response and adverse effects. One example is combined-modality treatment aimed at improving long-term outcome in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer, which commonly comes at the price of extended limits of patient tolerance. In a prospective study with intensified neoadjuvant treatment of rectal cancer patients, using an antibody array, the profiling of approximately 500 proteins was performed in serial serum samples collected at different stages of the treatment course. The small number of proteins whose levels significantly changed after induction neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) expanded substantially following the sequential chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and persisted four weeks later at treatment evaluation before pelvic surgery. Serum levels of proteins selected for validation of the experimental design, lipocalin-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9, declined after NACT and gradually reverted to baseline values during the remaining neoadjuvant course. Of note, the greater the decline in post-NACT and post-CRT matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels, the more favorable progression-free survival. No correlation was found, however, with diarrhea scores, the clinical correlate of adverse therapeutic effects. Even though the findings were indicative of only tumor and not normal tissue effects, multiplex immunoassay analysis of circulating proteins in patients undergoing combined-modality therapy may in principle dissect the contribution of the individual modalities to overall systemic responses in patient outcome and tolerance. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00278694 ; registration date: January 16, 2006, retrospective to enrollment of the first 10 patients of the current report.

  19. Protein microarray analysis of antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum in western Kenyan highland sites with differing transmission levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Baum

    Full Text Available Malaria represents a major public health problem in Africa. In the East African highlands, the high-altitude areas were previously considered too cold to support vector population and parasite transmission, rendering the region particularly prone to epidemic malaria due to the lack of protective immunity of the population. Since the 1980's, frequent malaria epidemics have been reported and these successive outbreaks may have generated some immunity against Plasmodium falciparum amongst the highland residents. Serological studies reveal indirect evidence of human exposure to the parasite, and can reliably assess prevalence of exposure and transmission intensity in an endemic area. However, the vast majority of serological studies of malaria have been, hereto, limited to a small number of the parasite's antigens. We surveyed and compared the antibody response profiles of age-stratified sera from residents of two endemic areas in the western Kenyan highlands with differing malaria transmission intensities, during two distinct seasons, against 854 polypeptides of P. falciparum using high-throughput proteomic microarray technology. We identified 107 proteins as serum antibody targets, which were then characterized for their gene ontology biological process and cellular component of the parasite, and showed significant enrichment for categories related to immune evasion, pathogenesis and expression on the host's cell and parasite's surface. Additionally, we calculated age-fitted annual seroconversion rates for the immunogenic proteins, and contrasted the age-dependent antibody acquisition for those antigens between the two sampling sites. We observed highly immunogenic antigens that produce stable antibody responses from early age in both sites, as well as less immunogenic proteins that require repeated exposure for stable responses to develop and produce different seroconversion rates between sites. We propose that a combination of highly and less

  20. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J

    1998-01-01

    heterozygous for the CCR5 deletion were infected with virus of NSI phenotype. In contrast, all RPI individuals who were heterozygous for the CCR5 deletion were infected with virus of SI phenotype (p = .028). Thus, a beneficial effect of having a partly nonfunctional CCR5 coreceptor may depend on the viral SI......We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand...

  1. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP......, and a synthetic peptide (EENV)6 representing the C-terminal repeats from Pf155/RESA, were investigated longitudinally in 13 children and 7 adults living under conditions of continuous, intense malaria transmission. Some subjects did not recognize the antigens after malaria infection, and in subjects recognizing...

  2. Identification of cellular responses to low-dose radiation by antibody array in human B-lymphoblasts IM-9 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. LTD., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The low-dose radiation (LDR)-induced various responses can reduce genetic mutation, enhance cell survival, and increase infection resistance (1). The antibody array for global analysis of phosphorylated proteins might be very useful to study signaling networks of LDR-induced cellular responses (2). Therefore, global analysis of phospho- proteins in cells exposed to radiation is important to understand the signaling mechanisms induced by changes of protein phosphorylation which lead to various biological effects by radiation. The aim is to explore the possibility of LDR-specific signaling for various beneficial effects and elucidate the potential signaling pathways representing LDR responses. Our results suggest that LDR did not affect cell death and that the increased proteins phosphorylation by LDR might be involved in various cellular responses for cell homeostasis. These results might be useful to further studies aimed at investigating potential regulatory markers that represent responses to LDR.

  3. Antinuclear antibody-negative systemic lupus erythematosus in a case with pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qibing; Liu, Yi; Yang, Nanping; Yin, Geng

    2012-10-01

    We described a 30-year-old pregnant woman developing antinuclear antibodies (ANA)-negative systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) accompanied with arthritis, malar rash, lymphopenia, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, pericardial and pleural effusion, proteinuria and seizures. All serum autoantibodies except anti-Ro antibody were negative. An artificially induced abortion was performed to prevent SLE deterioration. Steroid and cyclophosphamide therapy were effective for this patient. During the 2-year follow-up period, her ANA and other SLE-related autoantibodies in serum remained negative. This case suggests that ANA may not be required in the pathogenesis of SLE, even in the case with pregnancy, and ANA-negative SLE may also have a dangerous clinical course.

  4. Effects of inhaled fine dust on lung tissue changes and antibody response induced by spores of opportunistic fungi in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Charles W; Layton, Robert C; Straus, David C; Ayers, J R

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the effects of sterile fine dust aerosol inhalation on antibody responses and lung tissue changes induced by Mucor ramosissimus or Trichoderma viride spores following intratracheal inoculation in goats. 36 weanling Boer-Spanish goats. 6 goats were allocated to each of 2 M ramosissimus-inoculated groups, 2 T viride-inoculated groups, and 2 control (tent or pen) groups. One of each pair of sporetreated groups and the tent control group were exposed 7 times to sterilized fine feedyard dust (mean+/-SD particle diameter, dust. Goats received an IV challenge with equine RBCs to assess antibody responses to foreign antigens. Postmortem examinations were performed at study completion (day 68) to evaluate lung tissue lesions. 5 of 7 deaths occurred between days 18 and 45 and were attributed to fine dust exposures prior to fungal treatments. Fine dust inhalation induced similar lung lesions and precipitating antibodies among spore-treated goats. Following spore inoculations, dust-exposed goats had significantly more spores per gram of consolidated lung tissue than did their nonexposed counterparts. Fine dust inhalation appeared to decrease the ability of goats to successfully clear fungal spores from the lungs following intratracheal inoculation.

  5. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODIES AND GENE MUTATIONS IN HEMOSTASIS OF CHILDREN WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Solntseva

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilia in children with diffuse connective tissue disorders as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM could arise from various causes including peripherial blood circulation of antiphospholipid antibodies (APH and genetic mutations in the system of hemostasis. Thrombosis is a serious and prognostically unfavorable complication that has negative impact on the underlying disease course. The study included 96 children, 65 of them had diagnosed SLE and the other 31 had JDM. The Elisa method was used to detect antiphospholipid antibodies, coagulation method was used to detect lupus anticoagulant (LAC and antibodies to cardiolipins (anticl, ?2:glycoprotein 1 (anti ? 2 gp 1 and prothrombin (APT. The PCR method (DNA diagnostics was used to detect DNA mutations as factor resistance to of activated protein c (Leiden 5,10 methylen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene polymorphism. The incidence of APL antibodies was registered in 61.5% patients with SLE and in 32.2% of patients with JDM. Ac ligg, anti ?2 gp 1 Igg were clinically significant in thrombotic events in patients with SLE and JDM, and so was LAC in patients with SLE. The prevalence of the hemostasis system mutations is concordant with reported data. Conclusion thrombophilia is frequently associated with APH antibodies or combination of APH antibodies with genetic abnormalities. Sole genetic mutations are salient in patients with JDM.Key words: thrombophilia, systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, leiden, prothrombin, methylentet rahydrofolate reductase.

  6. Characterization of Guinea Pig Antibody Responses to Salivary Proteins of Triatoma infestans for the Development of a Triatomine Exposure Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorňáková, Veronika; Salazar-Sanchez, Renzo; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Carrion-Navarro, Oscar; Levy, Michael Z.; Schaub, Günter A.; Schwarz, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Background Salivary proteins of Triatoma infestans elicit humoral immune responses in their vertebrate hosts. These immune responses indicate exposure to triatomines and thus can be a useful epidemiological tool to estimate triatomine infestation. In the present study, we analyzed antibody responses of guinea pigs to salivary antigens of different developmental stages of four T. infestans strains originating from domestic and/or peridomestic habitats in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru. We aimed to identify developmental stage- and strain-specific salivary antigens as potential markers of T. infestans exposure. Methodology and Principal Findings In SDS-PAGE analysis of salivary proteins of T. infestans the banding pattern differed between developmental stages and strains of triatomines. Phenograms constructed from the salivary profiles separated nymphal instars, especially the 5th instar, from adults. To analyze the influence of stage- and strain-specific differences in T. infestans saliva on the antibody response of guinea pigs, twenty-one guinea pigs were exposed to 5th instar nymphs and/or adults of different T. infestans strains. Western blot analyses using sera of exposed guinea pigs revealed stage- and strain-specific variations in the humoral response of animals. In total, 27 and 17 different salivary proteins reacted with guinea pig sera using IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Despite all variations of recognized salivary antigens, an antigen of 35 kDa reacted with sera of almost all challenged guinea pigs. Conclusion Salivary antigens are increasingly considered as an epidemiological tool to measure exposure to hematophagous arthropods, but developmental stage- and strain-specific variations in the saliva composition and the respective differences of immunogenicity are often neglected. Thus, the development of a triatomine exposure marker for surveillance studies after triatomine control campaigns requires detailed investigations. Our study resulted

  7. Characterization of guinea pig antibody responses to salivary proteins of Triatoma infestans for the development of a triatomine exposure marker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Dorňáková

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Salivary proteins of Triatoma infestans elicit humoral immune responses in their vertebrate hosts. These immune responses indicate exposure to triatomines and thus can be a useful epidemiological tool to estimate triatomine infestation. In the present study, we analyzed antibody responses of guinea pigs to salivary antigens of different developmental stages of four T. infestans strains originating from domestic and/or peridomestic habitats in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru. We aimed to identify developmental stage- and strain-specific salivary antigens as potential markers of T. infestans exposure.In SDS-PAGE analysis of salivary proteins of T. infestans the banding pattern differed between developmental stages and strains of triatomines. Phenograms constructed from the salivary profiles separated nymphal instars, especially the 5th instar, from adults. To analyze the influence of stage- and strain-specific differences in T. infestans saliva on the antibody response of guinea pigs, twenty-one guinea pigs were exposed to 5th instar nymphs and/or adults of different T. infestans strains. Western blot analyses using sera of exposed guinea pigs revealed stage- and strain-specific variations in the humoral response of animals. In total, 27 and 17 different salivary proteins reacted with guinea pig sera using IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Despite all variations of recognized salivary antigens, an antigen of 35 kDa reacted with sera of almost all challenged guinea pigs.Salivary antigens are increasingly considered as an epidemiological tool to measure exposure to hematophagous arthropods, but developmental stage- and strain-specific variations in the saliva composition and the respective differences of immunogenicity are often neglected. Thus, the development of a triatomine exposure marker for surveillance studies after triatomine control campaigns requires detailed investigations. Our study resulted in the identification of a potential

  8. Formation of antibodies against infliximab and adalimumab strongly correlates with functional drug levels and clinical responses in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radstake, T R D J; Svenson, M; Eijsbouts, A M

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) neutralising antibody constructs are increasingly being used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: To determine potential differences in clinical responses, soluble drug levels and antibody formation between patients with RA receiving...... infliximab and adalimumab. METHODS: 69 patients with RA fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria and about to start treatment with infliximab or adalimumab, were enrolled consecutively. All patients had active disease (28-joint count Disease Activity Score >3.2). Infliximab was given...... intravenously at 3 mg/kg at baseline and after 2, 6 and 14 weeks. Adalimumab was administered as 40 mg biweekly subcutaneously. Concomitant drug treatment was monitored and continued at constant dosage during the study. All serum samples were tested for infliximab/adalimumab levels and anti...

  9. T-cell independent Thy-1 allo-antibody response with the use of transgenic mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K-I. Isobe; G. Kollias (George); A-B. Kolsto; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractWe have introduced a mouse Thy-1.1 gene into the germline of Thy-1.2 mice. The introduced gene was shown to be expressed at very high levels in thymocytes when compared with the endogenous gene. Transgenic thymocytes were shown to evoke a higher than normal primary anti-Thy-1.1 antibody

  10. Antibody response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease according to risk group and disease stage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucher, C. A.; de Jager, M. H.; Debouck, C.; Epstein, L. G.; de Wolf, F.; Wolfs, T. F.; Goudsmit, J.

    1989-01-01

    Three groups with different routes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission (homosexual men, hemophiliacs, and children) were studied for serum antibodies to a recombinant form of the HIV-1 protease using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. At 1 year after seroconversion, defined as the

  11. The schistosoma-specific antibody response after treatment in non-immune travellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Liv Marie; Christensen, Anders Vittrup; Navntoft, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    for up to 6 months after treatment and average duration of positive GAA antibody was approximately 10 y. The study confirms that the GAA- and MBA-IFAT are not suitable in monitoring results of therapy. Treatment failure in 15% of non-immune patients indicates that studies are needed to define the correct...

  12. Serum antibody responses in Creole kids experimentally infected with Haemonchus contortus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bambou, Jean-Christophe; de la Chevrotière, Claudia; Varo, Hugues; Arquet, Remy; Kooyman, Frans N J; Mandonnet, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of parasite-specific serum antibodies with the resistance status of Creole kids. The average breeding values on egg output predicted in a context of natural infection at 11 months of age were distant of 1.07 genetic standard deviation

  13. Targeting HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers to B Cells by Using APRIL Improves Antibody Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchers, Mark; Bontjer, Ilja; Tong, Tommy; Chung, Nancy P. Y.; Klasse, Per Johan; Eggink, Dirk; Montefiori, David C.; Gentile, Maurizio; Cerutti, Andrea; Olson, William C.; Berkhout, Ben; Binley, James M.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2012-01-01

    An HIV-1 vaccine remains elusive, in part because various factors limit the quantity and quality of the antibodies raised against the viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). We hypothesized that targeting Env vaccines directly to B cells, by fusing them to molecules that bind and activate these

  14. A double-inactivated whole virus candidate SARS coronavirus vaccine stimulates neutralising and protective antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruth, Martin; Kistner, Otfried; Savidis-Dacho, Helga; Hitter, Elisabeth; Crowe, Brian; Gerencer, Marijan; Brühl, Peter; Grillberger, Leopold; Reiter, Manfred; Tauer, Christa; Mundt, Wolfgang; Barrett, P Noel

    2006-01-30

    A double-inactivated, candidate whole virus vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) was developed and manufactured at large scale using fermenter cultures of serum protein free Vero cells. A two step inactivation procedure involving sequential formaldehyde and U.V. inactivation was utilised in order to ensure an extremely high safety margin with respect to residual infectivity. The immunogenicity of this double-inactivated vaccine was characterised in the mouse model. Mice that were immunised twice with the candidate SARS-CoV vaccine developed high antibody titres against the SARS-CoV spike protein and high levels of neutralising antibodies. The use of the adjuvant Al(OH)3 had only a minor effect on the immunogenicity of the vaccine. In addition, cell mediated immunity as measured by interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 stimulation, was elicited by vaccination. Moreover, the vaccine confers protective immunity as demonstrated by prevention of SARS-CoV replication in the respiratory tract of mice after intranasal challenge with SARS-CoV. Protection of mice was correlated to antibody titre against the SARS-CoV S protein and neutralising antibody titre.

  15. Reporter gene assay for the quantification of the activity and neutralizing antibody response to TNFα antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lallemand, Christophe; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Steenholdt, Casper

    2011-01-01

    A cell-based assay has been developed for the quantification of the activity of TNFa antagonists based on human erythroleukemic K562 cells transfected with a NF¿B regulated firefly luciferase reporter-gene construct. Both drug activity and anti-drug neutralizing antibodies can be quantified...

  16. Exploring the antigenic response to multiplexed immunizations in a chicken model of antibody production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousted, Tina Mostrup; Kalliokoski, Otto; Christensen, Sofie Kjellerup

    2017-01-01

    Hens have a tremendous capacity for producing polyclonal antibodies that can subsequently be isolated in high concentrations from their eggs. An approach for further maximizing their potential is to produce multiple antisera in the same individual through multiplexed (multiple simultaneous) immun...

  17. Murine Antibody Responses to Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimers Are Highly Restricted in Specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Joyce K.; Crampton, Jordan C.; Cupo, Albert; Ketas, Thomas; van Gils, Marit J.; Sliepen, Kwinten; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Deresa, Isaiah; Stanfield, Robyn; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Crotty, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Generating neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of many current HIV-1 vaccine efforts. To be of practical value, these nAbs must be both potent and cross-reactive in order to be capable of preventing the transmission of the highly diverse and generally neutralization resistant (Tier-2)

  18. Antibody response to booster vaccination with tetanus and diphtheria in adults exposed to perfluorinated alkylates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, Katrine; Shamim, Zaiba; Ryder, Lars P.

    2016-01-01

    prospectively followed for 30 days after a booster vaccination with diphtheria and tetanus. The results indicated that serum-PFAS concentrations were positively correlated and positively associated with age and male sex. The specific antibody concentrations in serum were increased from Day 4 to Day 10 post...

  19. Antibody response and maternal immunity upon boosting PRRSV-immune sows with experimental farm-specific and commercial PRRSV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldhof, Marc F; Van Breedam, Wander; De Jong, Ellen; Lopez Rodriguez, Alfonso; Karniychuk, Uladzimir U; Vanhee, Merijn; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Maes, Dominiek; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-12-27

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes reproductive failure in sows and respiratory disease in pigs of all ages. Despite the frequent use of vaccines to maintain PRRSV immunity in sows, little is known on how the currently used vaccines affect the immunity against currently circulating and genetically divergent PRRSV variants in PRRSV-immune sows, i.e. sows that have a pre-existing PRRSV-specific immunity due to previous infection with or vaccination against the virus. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the capacity of commercially available attenuated/inactivated PRRSV vaccines and autogenous inactivated PRRSV vaccines - prepared according to a previously optimized in-house protocol - to boost the antibody immunity against currently circulating PRRSV variants in PRRSV-immune sows. PRRSV isolates were obtained from 3 different swine herds experiencing PRRSV-related problems, despite regular vaccination of gilts and sows against the virus. In a first part of the study, the PRRSV-specific antibody response upon booster vaccination with commercial PRRSV vaccines and inactivated farm-specific PRRSV vaccines was evaluated in PRRSV-immune, non-pregnant replacement sows from the 3 herds. A boost in virus-neutralizing antibodies against the farm-specific isolate was observed in all sow groups vaccinated with the corresponding farm-specific inactivated vaccines. Use of the commercial attenuated EU type vaccine boosted neutralizing antibodies against the farm-specific isolate in sows derived from 2 farms, while use of the commercial attenuated NA type vaccine did not boost farm-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in any of the sow groups. Interestingly, the commercial inactivated EU type vaccine boosted farm-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in sows from 1 farm. In the second part of the study, a field trial was performed at one of the farms to evaluate the booster effect of an inactivated farm-specific vaccine and a commercial

  20. Dengue E Protein Domain III-Based DNA Immunisation Induces Strong Antibody Responses to All Four Viral Serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Poggianella

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection is a major emerging disease widely distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the world affecting several millions of people. Despite constants efforts, no specific treatment or effective vaccine is yet available. Here we show a novel design of a DNA immunisation strategy that resulted in the induction of strong antibody responses with high neutralisation titres in mice against all four viral serotypes. The immunogenic molecule is an engineered version of the domain III (DIII of the virus E protein fused to the dimerising CH3 domain of the IgG immunoglobulin H chain. The DIII sequences were also codon-optimised for expression in mammalian cells. While DIII alone is very poorly secreted, the codon-optimised fusion protein is rightly expressed, folded and secreted at high levels, thus inducing strong antibody responses. Mice were immunised using gene-gun technology, an efficient way of intradermal delivery of the plasmid DNA, and the vaccine was able to induce neutralising titres against all serotypes. Additionally, all sera showed reactivity to a recombinant DIII version and the recombinant E protein produced and secreted from mammalian cells in a mono-biotinylated form when tested in a conformational ELISA. Sera were also highly reactive to infective viral particles in a virus-capture ELISA and specific for each serotype as revealed by the low cross-reactive and cross-neutralising activities. The serotype specific sera did not induce antibody dependent enhancement of infection (ADE in non-homologous virus serotypes. A tetravalent immunisation protocol in mice showed induction of neutralising antibodies against all four dengue serotypes as well.

  1. Double-Blind, Randomized Study of the Effects of Influenza Vaccination on the Specific Antibody Response and Clinical Course of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenna M Sleigh

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine whether influenza immunization is associated with early side effects, a deleterious impact on the illness course and depressed antibody response in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS.

  2. An improved microculture-hemolytic spot assay for the study of carrier-specific antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotkes, P; Weisman, Z; Mozes, E; Bentwich, Z

    1984-11-30

    A microculture system based on limiting dilution and a hemolytic spot assay was adapted for study of the carrier-specific anti-hapten response in vitro. Spleen or lymph node cells from normal mice or mice immunized with NIP-ovalbumin (NIP-OVA) or NIP-human thyroglobulin (NIP-Tg) were cultured for 5 days by the microculture technique. The anti-hapten (anti-NIP) response was measured by assaying the supernatants of the microcultures in a hemolytic spot test with NIP coupled to sheep red blood cells. A micro-ELISA reader was adapted to read the degree of lysis in the spot assay which gives an objective quantitation of the degree of lysis and thus reduces the number of culture replicates. In vivo induced specific helper cells in mice immunized with the carrier protein, human thyroglobulin, as well as carrier-specific T cell factors, gave rise to carrier-specific anti-NIP responses. The microculture system may enhance the expression of T-cell helper function when suppressor cells or their precursors are present in the initial cell preparation.

  3. Aqueous two-phase system patterning of detection antibody solutions for cross-reaction-free multiplex ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, John P.; White, Joshua B.; Simon, Arlyne B.; Tsuei, Michael; Paczesny, Sophie; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-05-01

    Accurate disease diagnosis, patient stratification and biomarker validation require the analysis of multiple biomarkers. This paper describes cross-reactivity-free multiplexing of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) using aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to confine detection antibodies at specific locations in fully aqueous environments. Antibody cross-reactions are eliminated because the detection antibody solutions are co-localized only to corresponding surface-immobilized capture antibody spots. This multiplexing technique is validated using plasma samples from allogeneic bone marrow recipients. Patients with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD), a common and serious condition associated with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, display higher mean concentrations for four multiplexed biomarkers (HGF, elafin, ST2 and TNFR1) relative to healthy donors and transplant patients without GVHD. The antibody co-localization capability of this technology is particularly useful when using inherently cross-reactive reagents such as polyclonal antibodies, although monoclonal antibody cross-reactivity can also be reduced. Because ATPS-ELISA adapts readily available antibody reagents, plate materials and detection instruments, it should be easily transferable into other research and clinical settings.

  4. Expression and detection of ScFvB9 and its mutant in recombinant phage antibody system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E J; Kwak, J W; Chang, H C

    2001-01-01

    Recombinant single-chain antibody (ScFvB9) and its mutant (ScFvB9-6) were generated by using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the Fab fragment of the murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) B9, MabB9 (gamma2b,kappa), which is specific for human plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-100 of low density lipopreotein (LDL). In the recombinant phage antibody system (RPAS), the constructed ScFvB9 and ScFvB9-6 antibody genes were cloned into the pCANTAB5E phagemid vector and expressed in E. coli. The active forms of single-chain antibodies (ScFvB9 and ScFvB9-6) were produced as phage-displayed recombinant antibodies or soluble antibody forms in E. coli. The activities of ScFvB9 and ScFvB9-6 were confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting analysis; the generated mutant ScFvB9-6 showed slightly higher antigen binding activity than native ScFvB9 as a soluble antibody in this RPAS.

  5. Intratypic heterologous vaccination of calves can induce an antibody response in presence of maternal antibodies against foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, A.; Eble, P.L.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Chenard, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background - Maternal antibodies can interfere with foot-and-mouth disease vaccination. In this study we determined whether intratypic heterologous vaccination could help to improve herd immunity. Results - In unvaccinated calves, a half-life of maternal antibodies of 21 days was determined. At two

  6. Antibody-Secreting Cell Responses and Protective Immunity Assessed in Gnotobiotic Pigs Inoculated Orally or Intramuscularly with Inactivated Human Rotavirus†

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Lijuan; Kang, S.-Y.; Ward, Lucy A.; To, Thanh L.; Saif, Linda J.

    1998-01-01

    Newborn gnotobiotic pigs were inoculated twice perorally (p.o.) (group 1) or intramuscularly (i.m.) (group 2) or three times i.m. (group 3) with inactivated Wa strain human rotavirus and challenged with virulent Wa human rotavirus 20 to 24 days later. To assess correlates of protection, antibody-secreting cells (ASC) were enumerated in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues from pigs in each group at selected postinoculation days (PID) or postchallenge days. Few virus-specific ASC were dete...

  7. Design of an Expression System for Rapid Production of Tri-Functional Antibody Substitution of Hybrid Hybridoma Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dehghani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tri-functional antibodies, as an effective novel tumor targeting agents, are composed of anti-CD3 rat IgG2b and an anti-tumor antigen antibody. We have intended to develop a novel drug system to induce the apoptosis of HER2-expressing tumor cells, activate and engage cytotoxic T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and macrophages. In addition, the drug can  inhibit programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1-expressing tumor cells. We have designed a mammalian vector system suitable to express the trifunctional antibody composed of antiHER2×human-CD80: human-IgG1Fc antibody. This antibody contains four chains of anti-HER2/CL, anti-HER2/CH1-3, B7.1/CL, and B7.1/CH1-3 within the human IgG1 framework and so the vector system will simultaneously express the four chains. The amino acid/nucleotide sequences datasets were retrieved from the GenBank, UniProtKB and PDB databases. The heavy and light chains variable domain framework regions and complementarity determining regions of scA21 antibody were determined by IMGT/V-QUEST and Paratome software. The amino acid sequences of tri-functional antibody chains manually were assembled and converted to DNA sequences by sequence manipulation suite software. The adapting codon usage of these DNA sequences was performed by JCAT software. Finally, the secondary structures of obtained RNAs from the DNAs were individually analyzed by RNAfold program. The Prodigy equilibrium dissociation constant, a ratio of koff/kon, between the antibody and its antigen for hantiHER2VHCH-HER2, hantiHER2VLCL-HER2, CD80CH-CD28, and CD80CL-CD28 were equal to 3.60E-10, 3.10E-9, 1.10E-8 and 2.70E-10; respectively. These findings were confirmed the composition and nano-molar affinity of the respective constructs. A single specific no-cloning expression vector, pHuchiTriomAb, was designed in silico with a desirable length of 8.292 Kbps and bidirectional expression potential for the four chimeric antibody chains. This construct was designed, and

  8. Prevalence and clinical associations of lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Kwang-Sook; Kim, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Jeong Man; Han, Jin-Yeong; Chung, Won-Tae; Kim, Kyeong-Hee

    2010-02-01

    The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) is associated with the clinical features of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which comprises venous and arterial thrombosis and pregnancy loss, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The prevalence of aPLs has been reported to be different in patient populations affected by either of these conditions. We performed a retrospective study to evaluate the prevalence and clinical associations of aPLs, including lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anticardiolipin (aCL), and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta2-GPI) in a cohort of Korean patients with SLE. This study included samples from 88 SLE patients for whom aPL testing had been advised between June 2006 and July 2009 at the Dong-A University Hospital. Serum and plasma samples were tested for LAC, aCL (IgG, IgM), and anti-beta2-GPI (IgG, IgM) antibodies. Clinical data from patients were obtained from a review of medical records. LAC was the most common (34.1% of total patients, 30/88) antibody, followed by IgM aCL (31.8%, 28/88), IgG aCL (18.2%, 16/88), and IgM and IgG anti-beta2-GPI (both 5.7%, 5/88 each). Positivity for LAC was strongly associated with venous/arterial thrombosis (P=0.002). LAC was the most common antibody detected in Korean SLE patients and is shown to have a significant association with the presence of venous/arterial thrombosis. The measurement of LAC may be clinically useful in identifying patients with SLE who are at a high risk for venous/arterial thrombosis.

  9. Anti-ganglioside antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and neurological manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador-Horrillo, M; Martinez-Valle, F; Gallardo, E; Rojas-Garcia, R; Ordi-Ros, J; Vilardell, M

    2012-05-01

    Anti-ganglioside antibodies (AGA) have been associated with several peripheral neuropathies, such as Miller-Fisher syndrome, Guillain-Barré syndrome and multifocal motor neuropathy. They have also been studied in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), focusing on neuropsychiatric manifestations and peripheral neuropathy, but the results are contradictory. To study the presence of AGA in a large cohort of patients with SLE and neuropsychiatric manifestations. Serum from 65 consecutive patients with SLE and neuropsychiatric manifestations, collected from 1985 to 2009, was tested for the presence of AGA antibodies (GM1, GM2, GM3, asialo-GM1 GD1a, GD1b, GD3, GT1b, GQ1b) using a standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISA test (INCAT 1999) and thin layer chromatography (TLC). Positive results for asialo-GM1 (IgM) were found in 10 patients, 6 were positive for asialo-GM1 (IgM and IgG), and 4 were positive for other AGA such as GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1b, GT1b, GD3, (mainly IgM). Clinical and statistical studies showed no correlation between AGA and neuropsychiatric manifestations of SLE. Although some patients showed reactivity to AGA, these antibodies are not a useful marker of neuropsychiatric manifestations in SLE patients.

  10. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  11. An alphavirus vector overcomes the presence of neutralizing antibodies and elevated numbers of Tregs to induce immune responses in humans with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Hubby, Bolyn; Negri, Sarah; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Devi, Gayathri R; Burnett, Bruce K; Clay, Timothy M; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H Kim

    2010-09-01

    Therapeutic anticancer vaccines are designed to boost patients' immune responses to tumors. One approach is to use a viral vector to deliver antigen to in situ DCs, which then activate tumor-specific T cell and antibody responses. However, vector-specific neutralizing antibodies and suppressive cell populations such as Tregs remain great challenges to the efficacy of this approach. We report here that an alphavirus vector, packaged in virus-like replicon particles (VRP) and capable of efficiently infecting DCs, could be repeatedly administered to patients with metastatic cancer expressing the tumor antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and that it overcame high titers of neutralizing antibodies and elevated Treg levels to induce clinically relevant CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses. The CEA-specific antibodies mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against tumor cells from human colorectal cancer metastases. In addition, patients with CEA-specific T cell responses exhibited longer overall survival. These data suggest that VRP-based vectors can overcome the presence of neutralizing antibodies to break tolerance to self antigen and may be clinically useful for immunotherapy in the setting of tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  12. Antiphospholipid antibody profiles and their clinical associations in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Mo Yin; Chan, Eric Yuk Tat; Fong, Daniel Yee Tak; Leung, Kate Fung Shan; Wong, Woon Sing; Lau, Chak Sing

    2005-04-01

    Different prevalences of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been reported in different populations of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Chinese are generally believed to have lower risk of vascular thrombosis. We examined the prevalence of aPL including lupus anticoagulant (LAC), anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I (anti-beta2-GPI) antibodies, the level of thrombotic risk, and the association of aPL with thrombotic and pregnancy outcomes in a Chinese cohort with SLE at the university lupus clinic during the period 1986-2003. aPL were measured in 272 SLE patients, and medical records were reviewed for vascular thrombosis and pregnancy outcomes. The prevalence of LAC, IgG aCL, and IgG anti-beta2-GPI antibodies was 22.4%, 29.0%, and 7.7%, respectively. There were 38 episodes of thrombosis after a mean duration of followup of 11.0 +/- 6.8 SD years, giving a thrombotic rate of 1.26/100 patient-years. All aPL were shown to be associated with vascular thrombosis. IgG anti-beta2-GPI antibodies were found to be associated with recurrent thrombosis [8.0/100 patient-years or 25.0% (7/28)]. Patients taking hydroxychloroquine were found to have fewer thrombotic complications than those who were not (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.07-0.44; p prevalence of aPL in our cohort may suggest a role of other prothrombotic factors in predisposition to thrombosis.

  13. Novel adenoviral vector induces T-cell responses despite anti-adenoviral neutralizing antibodies in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Chaudhry, Arvind; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Clay, Timothy M; Amalfitano, Andrea; Burnett, Bruce K; Devi, Gayathri R; Hsu, David S; Xu, Younong; Balcaitis, Stephanie; Dua, Rajesh; Nguyen, Susan; Balint, Joseph P; Jones, Frank R; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-08-01

    First-generation, E1-deleted adenovirus subtype 5 (Ad5)-based vectors, although promising platforms for use as cancer vaccines, are impeded in activity by naturally occurring or induced Ad-specific neutralizing antibodies. Ad5-based vectors with deletions of the E1 and the E2b regions (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]), the latter encoding the DNA polymerase and the pre-terminal protein, by virtue of diminished late phase viral protein expression, were hypothesized to avoid immunological clearance and induce more potent immune responses against the encoded tumor antigen transgene in Ad-immune hosts. Indeed, multiple homologous immunizations with Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D), encoding the tumor antigen carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), induced CEA-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses with antitumor activity in mice despite the presence of preexisting or induced Ad5-neutralizing antibody. In the present phase I/II study, cohorts of patients with advanced colorectal cancer were immunized with escalating doses of Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-CEA(6D). CEA-specific CMI responses were observed despite the presence of preexisting Ad5 immunity in a majority (61.3 %) of patients. Importantly, there was minimal toxicity, and overall patient survival (48 % at 12 months) was similar regardless of preexisting Ad5 neutralizing antibody titers. The results demonstrate that, in cancer patients, the novel Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] gene delivery platform generates significant CMI responses to the tumor antigen CEA in the setting of both naturally acquired and immunization-induced Ad5-specific immunity.

  14. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  15. Use of Antibody Responses against Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE)-Encoded Antigens To Monitor Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Infections on Cattle Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, Maria-Adelheid; Vanrompay, Daisy; Verstraete, Karen; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is a significant zoonotic pathogen causing severe disease associated with watery and bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and the hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. Infections are frequently associated with contact with EHEC-contaminated ruminant feces. Both natural and experimental infection of cattle induces serum antibodies against the LEE-encoded proteins intimin, EspA, EspB, and Tir and the Shiga toxins Stx1 and Stx2, although the latter are poorly immunogenic in cattle. We determined whether antibodies and/or the kinetics of antibody responses against intimin, Tir, EspA, and/or EspB can be used for monitoring EHEC infections in beef cattle herds in order to reduce carcass contamination at slaughter. We examined the presence of serum antibodies against recombinant O157:H7 E. coli intimin EspA, EspB, and Tir during a cross-sectional study on 12 cattle farms and during a longitudinal time course study on two EHEC-positive cattle farms. We searched for a possible correlation between intimin, Tir, EspA, and/or EspB antibodies and fecal excretion of EHEC O157, O145, O111, O103, or O26 seropathotypes. The results indicated that serum antibody responses to EspB and EspA might be useful for first-line screening at the herd level for EHEC O157, O26, and most likely also for EHEC O103 infections. However, antibody responses against EspB are of less use for monitoring individual animals, since some EHEC-shedding animals did not show antibody responses and since serum antibody responses against EspB could persist for several months even when shedding had ceased. PMID:23563950

  16. Effects of saffron (Crocus sativus petal ethanolic extract on hematology, antibody response, and spleen histology in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Babaei

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Saffron petal is a by-product that contains flavonoids and anthocyanins. In order to study the effects of saffron petal extract (SPE on blood parameters, immune system, and spleen histology, five treatments (n=6 were used in a completely randomized design. Materials and Methods: The treatments were 0, 75, 150, 225, and 450 mg/kg body weight of SPE. The SPE was injected intraperitoneally to 30 rats (10-week old, weighing 225±15 g for 14 days. Immunization was performed using 1×108 sheep red blood cells (SRBC on days 0 and 7 subcutaneously in all treatment groups. On day 15, blood was collected from the heart of rats after anesthesia. One part of samples were poured in heparinized tubes for counting whole blood cells (CBC and different white blood cells (WBC and the other part was used to measure IgG using ELISA technique. The spleen was stained by hematoxylin- eosin for histological study. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA program and the means evaluation was done using Tukey’s test. Results are presented as mean±SD. Results: Results showed no significant difference between treatments and control group regarding the amount of RBC, HGB, HCT, and PLT. The level of IgG at 75 mg/kg was significantly increased in comparison with other groups. No changes were observed in spleen histology. Conclusion: The results indicate that use of SPE at dose of 75 mg/kg causes an increase in antibody response without any change in hematological parameters and spleen histology.

  17. Cellular response of ovarian carcinoma cells to antibody-photosensitizer-mediated injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Tayyaba; Sherwood, M. E.; Anderson, T.; Bamberg, Mike; Flotte, Thomas J.; Zurawski, Vince R., Jr.

    1990-07-01

    An anti-ovarian carcinoma antibody OC125 was conjugated to a derivative of the photosensitizer (PS) chiorin e6 yj polyglutamic acid. Target cells from a human ovarian cancer cell line were treated with this conjugate and laser irradiation at 656 rim (absorption maximum of PS) and fixed 24 h later for electron microscopy. Electron niicrographs showed a high degree of vacoulization, generalized cell necrosis, and extrusion of organelles. No specific damage to the plasma membrane was noted. Untreated control cells, or cells treated with conjugate or light alone exhibited no injury. These data suggest that even though the antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen, the conjugate is internalized under the conditions of the experiment.

  18. Chemokine receptor polymorphism and autologous neutralizing antibody response in long-term HIV-1 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Joost, Mette; Gram, G J

    1998-01-01

    samples. Finally, late virus isolates from individuals with SPI generally remained sensitive to neutralization by early serum samples. Virus phenotype (SI/NSI) and CCR5 genotype was determined for all individuals. Neither showed significant correlation with SPI. However, all SPI individuals who were...... heterozygous for the CCR5 deletion were infected with virus of NSI phenotype. In contrast, all RPI individuals who were heterozygous for the CCR5 deletion were infected with virus of SI phenotype (p = .028). Thus, a beneficial effect of having a partly nonfunctional CCR5 coreceptor may depend on the viral SI......We have previously reported that slowly progressing HIV infection (SPI) was associated with the presence of contemporaneous autologous neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, a group of individuals with more rapidly progressing infection (RPI) generally lacked these antibodies. To understand...

  19. The initial antibody response to HIV-1: induction of ineffective early B cell responses against GP41 by the transmitted/founder virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Leslie L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    A window of opportunity for immune responses to extinguish HIV -1 exists from the moment of transmission through establishment of the latent pool of HIV -I-infected cells. A critical time to study the initial immune responses to the transmitted/founder virus is the eclipse phase of HIV-1 infection (time from transmission to the first appearance of plasma virus) but, to date, this period has been logistically difficult to analyze. Studies in non-human primates challenged with chimeric simianhuman immunodeficiency virus have shown that neutralizing antibodies, when present at the time of infection, can prevent virus infection.

  20. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly B McClellan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available B cells can use antibody-dependent mechanisms to control latent viral infections. It is unknown whether this represents the sole function of B cells during chronic viral infection. We report here that hen egg lysozyme (HEL-specific B cells can contribute to the control of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68 latency without producing anti-viral antibody. HEL-specific B cells normalized defects in T cell numbers and proliferation observed in B cell-/- mice during the early phase of gammaHV68 latency. HEL-specific B cells also reversed defects in CD8 and CD4 T cell cytokine production observed in B cell-/- mice, generating CD8 and CD4 T cells necessary for control of latency. Furthermore, HEL-specific B cells were able to present virally encoded antigen to CD8 T cells. Therefore, B cells have antibody independent functions, including antigen presentation, that are important for control of gamma-herpesvirus latency. Exploitation of this property of B cells may allow enhanced vaccine responses to chronic virus infection.

  1. Protection and antibody isotype responses against Fasciola hepatica with specific antibody to pIII-displayed peptide mimotopes of cathepsin L1 in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Mancera, Abel; Méndez-Mendoza, Maximino

    2012-10-01

    Fluke burdens, liver fluke size and biomass, fecal eggs counts, serum levels of hepatic enzymes and immune response were assessed in sheep immunized with peptide mimotopes of cathepsin L1 and challenged with Fasciola hepatica metacercariae. Twenty sheep were randomly allocated to four groups of five animals each; groups 1 and 2 were immunized at weeks 0 and 2 with mimotopes YVYRWVEAECVA and FSPAYLRDAALK, respectively; group 3 was immunized with wild-type M13KE phage and the control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All groups were challenged with 300 metacercariae at week 6 and slaughtered 16 weeks later. Groups 1 and 2 showed a reduction in fluke burden of 51.7% and 35.9%, respectively, when compared to the control group, but only the former was significant at the 5% level. Vaccinated animals showed a significant reduction in fluke length and width, wet weights and egg output. A significant diminution in the total biomass of parasites recovered was also observed in group 1. Levels of anti-phage total IgG increased rapidly within 2 weeks of the first immunization and were always significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 than in the infected control group. The fluke burden in group 1 was significantly correlated with IgG1 and total IgG. The vaccinated sheep with phage clones produced significantly high titres of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies indicating a mixed Th1/Th2 response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibody response to 17D yellow fever vaccine in Ghanaian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei-Kwasi, M; Dunyo, S K; Koram, K A; Afari, E A; Odoom, J K; Nkrumah, F K

    2001-01-01

    To assess the seroresponses to yellow fever vaccination at 6 and 9 months of age; assess any possible adverse effects of immunization with the 17D yellow fever vaccine in infants, particularly at 6 months of age. Four hundred and twenty infants who had completed BCG, OPV and DPT immunizations were randomized to receive yellow fever immunization at either 6 or 9 months. A single dose of 0.5 ml of the reconstituted vaccine was administered to each infant by subcutaneous injection. To determine the yellow fever antibody levels of the infants, each donated 1 ml whole blood prior to immunization and 3 months post-immunization. Each serum sample was titred on Vero cells against the vaccine virus. The most common adverse reactions reported were fever, cough, diarrhoea and mild reactions at the inoculation site. The incidences of adverse reactions were not statistically different in both groups. None of the pre-immunization sera in both age groups had detectable yellow fever antibodies. Infants immunized at 6 months recorded seroconversion of 98.6% and those immunized at 9 months recorded 98% seroconversion. The GMT of their antibodies were 158.5 and 129.8, respectively. The results indicate that seroresponses to yellow fever immunization at 6 and 9 months as determined by seroconversion and GMTs of antibodies are similar. The findings of good seroresponses at 6 months without significant adverse effects would suggest that the 17D yellow fever vaccine could be recommended for use in children at 6 months in outbreak situations or in high risk endemic areas.

  3. Antibody Responses in the Nonhuman Primate, Macaca Fascicularis, to Protein Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    Desensitization t patients to bee venom or dust mite involves chronic exposure to the partiular antigen. Patients in which d