WorldWideScience

Sample records for systematic literature search

  1. Searching for Grey Literature for Systematic Reviews: Challenges and Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahood, Quenby; Van Eerd, Dwayne; Irvin, Emma

    2014-01-01

    There is ongoing interest in including grey literature in systematic reviews. Including grey literature can broaden the scope to more relevant studies, thereby providing a more complete view of available evidence. Searching for grey literature can be challenging despite greater access through the Internet, search engines and online bibliographic…

  2. Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Thomas; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten Bogh

    2016-01-01

    , PsychINFO, SCOPUS, SportDISCUS and Web of Science. Cumulative median recall for combined searching in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was 88.9% and increased to 90.9% when adding 10 additional databases. CONCLUSION: Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was not sufficient for identifying all effect studies...

  3. [Systematic literature search in PubMed : A short introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümle, A; Lagrèze, W A; Motschall, E

    2018-03-01

    In order to identify current (and relevant) evidence for a specific clinical question within the unmanageable amount of information available, solid skills in performing a systematic literature search are essential. An efficient approach is to search a biomedical database containing relevant literature citations of study reports. The best known database is MEDLINE, which is searchable for free via the PubMed interface. In this article, we explain step by step how to perform a systematic literature search via PubMed by means of an example research question in the field of ophthalmology. First, we demonstrate how to translate the clinical problem into a well-framed and searchable research question, how to identify relevant search terms and how to conduct a text word search and a search with keywords in medical subject headings (MeSH) terms. We then show how to limit the number of search results if the search yields too many irrelevant hits and how to increase the number in the case of too few citations. Finally, we summarize all essential principles that guide a literature search via PubMed.

  4. Systematic review of the literature on postpartum care: methodology and literature search results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Cheryl; Shaw, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Springate, Russ; Sellors, John; Enkin, Murray

    2004-09-01

    The postpartum period is a time for multiple clinical interventions. To date, no critical review of these interventions exists. This systematic review examined evidence for the effectiveness of postpartum interventions that have been reported in the literature. MEDLINE, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials of interventions initiated from immediately after birth to 1 year in postnatal women that were conducted in North America, Europe, Australia, or New Zealand. The initial literature search was done in 1999, using postpartum content search terms, and was enhanced in 2003. In both years, bibliographic databases were searched from their inception. Studies were categorized into key topic areas. Data extraction forms were developed and completed for each study, and the quality of each study was systematically reviewed. Groups of studies in a topic area were reviewed together, and clinically relevant questions emanating from the studies were identified to determine whether the studies, alone or together, provided evidence to support the clinical intervention. In the 1999 search, of 671 studies identified, 140 studies were randomized controlled trials that met the selection criteria: 41 studies related to breastfeeding, 33 to postpartum perineal pain management, and 63 to 11 other key topic areas (Papanicolaou test, rubella immunization, contraception, postpartum support, early discharge, postpartum depression and anxiety, postpartum medical disorders, smoking cessation, nutrition supplements other than breastfeeding, effects of pelvic floor exercise, and effects of early newborn contact). The results of the systematic review of each topic will be summarized in separate papers as they are completed. This systematic search has identified key topic areas in postpartum care for which randomized controlled trials have been conducted. Our ultimate goal is to provide evidence-based guidelines on the use of routine postpartum

  5. Literature search strategies for conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating qualitative systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finfgeld-Connett, Deborah; Johnson, E Diane

    2013-01-01

    To report literature search strategies for the purpose of conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating qualitative systematic reviews. Qualitative systematic reviews lie on a continuum from knowledge-building and theory-generating to aggregating and summarizing. Different types of literature searches are needed to optimally support these dissimilar reviews. Articles published between 1989-Autumn 2011. These documents were identified using a hermeneutic approach and multiple literature search strategies. Redundancy is not the sole measure of validity when conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating systematic reviews. When conducting these types of reviews, literature searches should be consistent with the goal of fully explicating concepts and the interrelationships among them. To accomplish this objective, a 'berry picking' approach is recommended along with strategies for overcoming barriers to finding qualitative research reports. To enhance integrity of knowledge-building and theory-generating systematic reviews, reviewers are urged to make literature search processes as transparent as possible, despite their complexity. This includes fully explaining and rationalizing what databases were used and how they were searched. It also means describing how literature tracking was conducted and grey literature was searched. In the end, the decision to cease searching also needs to be fully explained and rationalized. Predetermined linear search strategies are unlikely to generate search results that are adequate for purposes of conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating qualitative systematic reviews. Instead, it is recommended that iterative search strategies take shape as reviews evolve. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Impact of librarians on reporting of the literature searching component of pediatric systematic reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Deborah Meert, MLIS; Nazi Torabi, MLIS; John Costella, DDS, MSc, MLIS

    2017-01-01

    Objective: A critical element in conducting a systematic review is the identification of studies. To date, very little empirical evidence has been reported on whether the presence of a librarian or information professional can contribute to the quality of the final product. The goal of this study was to compare the reporting rigor of the literature searching component of systematic reviews with and without the help of a librarian. Method: Systematic reviews published from 2002 to 2011 in ...

  7. Google Scholar as replacement for systematic literature searches: good relative recall and precision are not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeker, Martin; Vach, Werner; Motschall, Edith

    2013-10-26

    Recent research indicates a high recall in Google Scholar searches for systematic reviews. These reports raised high expectations of Google Scholar as a unified and easy to use search interface. However, studies on the coverage of Google Scholar rarely used the search interface in a realistic approach but instead merely checked for the existence of gold standard references. In addition, the severe limitations of the Google Search interface must be taken into consideration when comparing with professional literature retrieval tools.The objectives of this work are to measure the relative recall and precision of searches with Google Scholar under conditions which are derived from structured search procedures conventional in scientific literature retrieval; and to provide an overview of current advantages and disadvantages of the Google Scholar search interface in scientific literature retrieval. General and MEDLINE-specific search strategies were retrieved from 14 Cochrane systematic reviews. Cochrane systematic review search strategies were translated to Google Scholar search expression as good as possible under consideration of the original search semantics. The references of the included studies from the Cochrane reviews were checked for their inclusion in the result sets of the Google Scholar searches. Relative recall and precision were calculated. We investigated Cochrane reviews with a number of included references between 11 and 70 with a total of 396 references. The Google Scholar searches resulted in sets between 4,320 and 67,800 and a total of 291,190 hits. The relative recall of the Google Scholar searches had a minimum of 76.2% and a maximum of 100% (7 searches). The precision of the Google Scholar searches had a minimum of 0.05% and a maximum of 0.92%. The overall relative recall for all searches was 92.9%, the overall precision was 0.13%. The reported relative recall must be interpreted with care. It is a quality indicator of Google Scholar confined to

  8. Electronic searching of the literature for systematic reviews of screening and diagnostic tests for preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honest, Honest; Bachmann, Lucas M; Khan, Khalid

    2003-03-26

    Published systematic reviews on prediction of preterm birth have tended to focus on a limited number of tests and their search strategies have often been relatively simple. Evaluation of all available tests in a systemic review will require a broad search strategy. To describe a case study of electronic searching for a systematic review of accuracy studies evaluating all tests for predicting preterm birth. The search strategy, developed to capture literatures concerning all the tests en-masse consisted of formulation of an appropriate combination of search terms, pilot searches to refine the search term combination, selection of relevant databases, and citation retrieval from the refined searches for selection of potentially relevant papers. Electronic searches were carried out on general bibliographic databases (Biosis, Embase, Medline, Pascal and Scisearch), specialised databases (Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, Medion, National Research Register, Cochrane Controlled Trial Register and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews). A total of 30076 citations were identified. Of these 8855 (29%) citations were duplications either within a database or across databases. Of the remaining 21221 citations, 3333 were considered potentially relevant to the review after assessment by two reviewers. These citations covered 19 different tests for predicting preterm birth. This case study suggests that with use of a concerted effort to organise and manage the electronic searching it is feasible to undertake broad searches for systematic reviews with multiple questions.

  9. Medication administration errors and the pediatric population: a systematic search of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Kelly

    2010-12-01

    There are a variety of factors that make the pediatric population more susceptible to medication errors and potential complications resulting from medication administration including the availability of different dosage forms of the same medication, incorrect dosing, lack of standardized dosing regimen, and organ system maturity. A systematic literature search on medication administration errors in the pediatric population was conducted. Five themes obtained from the systematic literature search include incidence rate of medication administration errors; specific medications involved in medication administration errors and classification of the errors; why medication administration errors occur; medication error reporting; and interventions to reduce medication errors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of a new method for librarian-mediated literature searches for systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramer, Wichor M; Rethlefsen, Melissa L; Mast, Frans; Kleijnen, Jos

    2017-10-26

    To evaluate and validate the time of completion and results of a new method of searching for systematic reviews, the exhaustive search method (ESM), using a pragmatic comparison. Single-line search strategies were prepared in a text document. Term completeness was ensured with a novel optimization technique. Macros in MS Word converted the syntaxes between databases and interfaces almost automatically. We compared search characteristics, such as number of search terms and databases, and outcomes, such as number of included and retrieved references and precision, from ESM searches and other Dutch academic hospitals identified by searching PubMed for systematic reviews published between 2014 and 2016. We compared time to perform the ESM with a secondary comparator of recorded search times from published literature and contact with authors to acquire unpublished data. We identified 73 published Erasmus MC systematic reviews and 258 published by other Dutch academic hospitals meeting our criteria. We pooled search time data from 204 other systematic reviews. The ESM searches differed by using 2 times more databases, retrieving 44% more references, including 20% more studies in the final systematic review, but the time needed for the search was 8% of that of the control group. Similarities between methods include precision and the number of search terms. The evaluated similarities and differences suggest that the ESM is a highly efficient way to locate more references meeting the specified selection criteria in systematic reviews than traditional search methods. Further prospective research is required. © 2017 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Semi-automating the manual literature search for systematic reviews increases efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Andrea L; Morgan, Laura C; Gartlehner, Gerald

    2010-03-01

    To minimise retrieval bias, manual literature searches are a key part of the search process of any systematic review. Considering the need to have accurate information, valid results of the manual literature search are essential to ensure scientific standards; likewise efficient approaches that minimise the amount of personnel time required to conduct a manual literature search are of great interest. The objective of this project was to determine the validity and efficiency of a new manual search method that utilises the scopus database. We used the traditional manual search approach as the gold standard to determine the validity and efficiency of the proposed scopus method. Outcome measures included completeness of article detection and personnel time involved. Using both methods independently, we compared the results based on accuracy of the results, validity and time spent conducting the search, efficiency. Regarding accuracy, the scopus method identified the same studies as the traditional approach indicating its validity. In terms of efficiency, using scopus led to a time saving of 62.5% compared with the traditional approach (3 h versus 8 h). The scopus method can significantly improve the efficiency of manual searches and thus of systematic reviews.

  12. [Titanium or steel as osteosynthesis material : Systematic literature search for clinical evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeris, Alexander; Goldhahn, Sabine; Rometsch, Elke; Höntzsch, Dankward

    2017-02-01

    The selection of the appropriate implant material, stainless steel or titanium, is still the decision of the surgeon and/or the affiliated institution. Additionally, remarkable international differences can be found between the different markets, which cannot really be explained. A systematic literature search was performed to verify whether there is clinical evidence for the preference of one material over the other. The systematic literature search was performed utilizing the internet databases PubMed, Cochrane and Web of Science. Comparative studies were included that reported on adult patients with osteosynthesis of extremities after trauma using either stainless steel or titanium implants. Information was extracted about infection rates, incidence of clinically relevant allergies, problems with implant removal and other complications. A total of 18 publications were identified to be eligible and 2 referenced articles were added. In summary, there is insufficient clinical evidence that the use of titanium or steel implants has a positive or negative effect on fracture healing, shows different rates of allergies, different rates of infections or mechanical failure. No supporting evidence could be identified for the difficulties with removal of titanium implants reported by surgeons. This systematic literature search did not provide any clinical evidence for material-related differences between titanium or stainless steel implants for fracture fixation. Based on the current clinical evidence both titanium and steel implants can be considered to be of equal value. The reported difficulties with implant removal are not reflected in the published literature.

  13. Grey Literature Searching for Health Sciences Systematic Reviews: A Prospective Study of Time Spent and Resources Utilized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ahlam A.; Ratajeski, Melissa A.; Bertolet, Marnie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify estimates of time taken to search grey literature in support of health sciences systematic reviews and to identify searcher or systematic review characteristics that may impact resource selection or time spent searching. Methods A survey was electronically distributed to searchers embarking on a new systematic review. Characteristics of the searcher and systematic review were collected along with time spent searching and what resources were searched. Time and resources were tabulated and resources were categorized as grey or non-grey. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results Out of 81 original respondents, 21% followed through with completion of the surveys in their entirety. The median time spent searching all resources was 471 minutes, and of those a median of 85 minutes were spent searching grey literature. The median number of resources used in a systematic review search was four and the median number of grey literature sources searched was two. The amount of time spent searching was influenced by whether the systematic review was grant funded. Additionally, the number of resources searched was impacted by institution type and whether systematic review training was received. Conclusions This study characterized the amount of time for conducting systematic review searches including searching the grey literature, in addition to the number and types of resources used. This may aid searchers in planning their time, along with providing benchmark information for future studies. This paper contributes by quantifying current grey literature search patterns and associating them with searcher and review characteristics. Further discussion and research into the search approach for grey literature in support of systematic reviews is encouraged. PMID:25914722

  14. Grey Literature Searching for Health Sciences Systematic Reviews: A Prospective Study of Time Spent and Resources Utilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ahlam A; Ratajeski, Melissa A; Bertolet, Marnie

    To identify estimates of time taken to search grey literature in support of health sciences systematic reviews and to identify searcher or systematic review characteristics that may impact resource selection or time spent searching. A survey was electronically distributed to searchers embarking on a new systematic review. Characteristics of the searcher and systematic review were collected along with time spent searching and what resources were searched. Time and resources were tabulated and resources were categorized as grey or non-grey. Data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Out of 81 original respondents, 21% followed through with completion of the surveys in their entirety. The median time spent searching all resources was 471 minutes, and of those a median of 85 minutes were spent searching grey literature. The median number of resources used in a systematic review search was four and the median number of grey literature sources searched was two. The amount of time spent searching was influenced by whether the systematic review was grant funded. Additionally, the number of resources searched was impacted by institution type and whether systematic review training was received. This study characterized the amount of time for conducting systematic review searches including searching the grey literature, in addition to the number and types of resources used. This may aid searchers in planning their time, along with providing benchmark information for future studies. This paper contributes by quantifying current grey literature search patterns and associating them with searcher and review characteristics. Further discussion and research into the search approach for grey literature in support of systematic reviews is encouraged.

  15. A systematic literature search on psychological first aid: lack of evidence to develop guidelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Dieltjens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Providing psychological first aid (PFA is generally considered to be an important element in preliminary care of disaster victims. Using the best available scientific basis for courses and educational materials, the Belgian Red Cross-Flanders wants to ensure that its volunteers are trained in the best way possible. OBJECTIVE: To identify effective PFA practices, by systematically reviewing the evidence in existing guidelines, systematic reviews and individual studies. METHODS: Systematic literature searches in five bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, PILOTS and G-I-N were conducted from inception to July 2013. RESULTS: Five practice guidelines were included which were found to vary in the development process (AGREE II score 20-53% and evidence base used. None of them provides solid evidence concerning the effectiveness of PFA practices. Additionally, two systematic reviews of PFA were found, both noting a lack of studies on PFA. A complementary search for individual studies, using a more sensitive search strategy, identified 11 237 references of which 102 were included for further full-text examination, none of which ultimately provides solid evidence concerning the effectiveness of PFA practices. CONCLUSION: The scientific literature on psychological first aid available to date, does not provide any evidence about the effectiveness of PFA interventions. Currently it is impossible to make evidence-based guidelines about which practices in psychosocial support are most effective to help disaster and trauma victims.

  16. Impact of librarians on reporting of the literature searching component of pediatric systematic reviews*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Deborah; Torabi, Nazi; Costella, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective A critical element in conducting a systematic review is the identification of studies. To date, very little empirical evidence has been reported on whether the presence of a librarian or information professional can contribute to the quality of the final product. The goal of this study was to compare the reporting rigor of the literature searching component of systematic reviews with and without the help of a librarian. Method Systematic reviews published from 2002 to 2011 in the twenty highest impact factor pediatrics journals were collected from MEDLINE. Corresponding authors were contacted via an email survey to determine if a librarian was involved, the role that the librarian played, and functions that the librarian performed. The reviews were scored independently by two reviewers using a fifteen-item checklist. Results There were 186 reviews that met the inclusion criteria, and 44% of the authors indicated the involvement of a librarian in conducting the systematic review. With the presence of a librarian as coauthor or team member, the mean checklist score was 8.40, compared to 6.61 (previews without a librarian. Conclusions Findings indicate that having a librarian as a coauthor or team member correlates with a higher score in the literature searching component of systematic reviews. PMID:27822147

  17. Impact of librarians on reporting of the literature searching component of pediatric systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Deborah; Torabi, Nazi; Costella, John

    2016-10-01

    A critical element in conducting a systematic review is the identification of studies. To date, very little empirical evidence has been reported on whether the presence of a librarian or information professional can contribute to the quality of the final product. The goal of this study was to compare the reporting rigor of the literature searching component of systematic reviews with and without the help of a librarian. Systematic reviews published from 2002 to 2011 in the twenty highest impact factor pediatrics journals were collected from MEDLINE. Corresponding authors were contacted via an email survey to determine if a librarian was involved, the role that the librarian played, and functions that the librarian performed. The reviews were scored independently by two reviewers using a fifteen-item checklist. There were 186 reviews that met the inclusion criteria, and 44% of the authors indicated the involvement of a librarian in conducting the systematic review. With the presence of a librarian as coauthor or team member, the mean checklist score was 8.40, compared to 6.61 ( p <0.001) for reviews without a librarian. Findings indicate that having a librarian as a coauthor or team member correlates with a higher score in the literature searching component of systematic reviews.

  18. Systematic literature searching in policy relevant, inter-disciplinary reviews: an example from culture and sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schucan Bird, Karen; Tripney, Janice

    2011-09-01

    Within the systematic review process, the searching phase is critical to the final synthesis product, its use and value. Yet, relatively little is known about the utility of different search strategies for reviews of complex, inter-disciplinary evidence. This article used a recently completed programme of work on cultural and sporting engagement to conduct an empirical evaluation of a comprehensive search strategy. Ten different types of search source were evaluated, according to three dimensions: (i) effectiveness in identifying relevant studies; (ii) efficiency in identifying studies; and (iii) adding value by locating studies that were not identified by any other sources. The study found that general bibliographic databases and specialist databases ranked the highest on all three dimensions. Overall, websites and journals were the next most valuable types of source. For reviewers, these findings highlight that general and specialist databases should remain a core component of the comprehensive search strategy, supplemented with other types of sources that can efficiently identify unique or grey literature. For policy makers and other research commissioners, this study highlights the value of methodological analysis for improving the understanding of, and practice in, policy relevant, inter-disciplinary systematic reviews. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Literature Search Strategies for Conducting Knowledge-building and Theory-generating Qualitative Systematic Reviews: Discussion Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. Diane

    2012-01-01

    Aim This paper is a report of literature search strategies for the purpose of conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating qualitative systematic reviews. Background Qualitative systematic reviews lie on a continuum from knowledge-building and theory-generating to aggregating and summarizing. Different types of literature searches are needed to optimally support these dissimilar reviews. Data Sources Articles published between 1989 - Autumn 2011. These documents were identified using a hermeneutic approach and multiple literature search strategies. Discussion Redundancy is not the sole measure of validity when conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating systematic reviews. When conducting these types of reviews, literature searches should be consistent with the goal of fully explicating concepts and the interrelationships among them. To accomplish this objective, a berry picking approach is recommended along with strategies for overcoming barriers to finding qualitative research reports. Implications To enhance integrity of knowledge-building and theory-generating systematic reviews, reviewers are urged to make literature search processes as transparent as possible, despite their complexity. This includes fully explaining and rationalizing what databases were used and how they were searched. It also means describing how literature tracking was conducted and grey literature was searched. In the end, the decision to cease searching also needs to be fully explained and rationalized. Conclusion Predetermined linear search strategies are unlikely to generate search results that are adequate for purposes of conducting knowledge-building and theory-generating qualitative systematic reviews. Instead, it is recommended that iterative search strategies take shape as reviews evolve. PMID:22591030

  20. Systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnard, K. D.; Lloyd, C. E.; Skinner, T. C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To review systematically the published literature addressing whether continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides any quality of life benefits to people with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Electronic databases and published references were searched and a consultation with two professi...

  1. Support needs of patients with COPD: a systematic literature search and narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardener, A Carole; Ewing, Gail; Kuhn, Isla; Farquhar, Morag

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the breadth of patients' support needs is important for the delivery of person-centered care, particularly in progressive long-term conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Existing reviews identify important aspects of managing life with COPD with which patients may need support (support needs); however, none of these comprehensively outlines the full range of support needs that patients can experience. We therefore sought to systematically determine the full range of support needs for patients with COPD to inform development of an evidence-based tool to enable person-centered care. We conducted a systematic search and narrative review of the literature. Medline (Ovid), EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were systematically searched for papers which included data addressing key aspects of support need, as identified by patients with COPD. Relevant data were extracted, and a narrative analysis was conducted. Thirty-one papers were included in the review, and the following 13 domains (broad areas) of support need were identified: 1) understanding COPD, 2) managing symptoms and medication, 3) healthy lifestyle, 4) managing feelings and worries, 5) living positively with COPD, 6) thinking about the future, 7) anxiety and depression, 8) practical support, 9) finance work and housing, 10) families and close relationships, 11) social and recreational life, 12) independence, and 13) navigating services. These 13 domains of support need were mapped to three of the four overarching categories of need commonly used in relevant national strategy documents (ie, physical, psychological, and social); however, support needs related to the fourth category (spiritual) were notably absent. This review systematically identifies the comprehensive set of domains of support need for patients with COPD. The findings provide the evidence base for a tool to help patients identify and express their support needs, which underpins a proposed

  2. Testing search strategies for systematic reviews in the Medline literature database through PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Enilze S N; Betini, Marluci; El Dib, Regina

    2014-04-01

    A high-quality electronic search is essential in ensuring accuracy and completeness in retrieved records for the conducting of a systematic review. We analysed the available sample of search strategies to identify the best method for searching in Medline through PubMed, considering the use or not of parenthesis, double quotation marks, truncation and use of a simple search or search history. In our cross-sectional study of search strategies, we selected and analysed the available searches performed during evidence-based medicine classes and in systematic reviews conducted in the Botucatu Medical School, UNESP, Brazil. We analysed 120 search strategies. With regard to the use of phrase searches with parenthesis, there was no difference between the results with and without parenthesis and simple searches or search history tools in 100% of the sample analysed (P = 1.0). The number of results retrieved by the searches analysed was smaller using double quotations marks and using truncation compared with the standard strategy (P = 0.04 and P = 0.08, respectively). There is no need to use phrase-searching parenthesis to retrieve studies; however, we recommend the use of double quotation marks when an investigator attempts to retrieve articles in which a term appears to be exactly the same as what was proposed in the search form. Furthermore, we do not recommend the use of truncation in search strategies in the Medline via PubMed. Although the results of simple searches or search history tools were the same, we recommend using the latter.

  3. Support needs of patients with COPD: a systematic literature search and narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardener AC

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A Carole Gardener,1 Gail Ewing,2 Isla Kuhn,3 Morag Farquhar4 1Primary Care Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 2Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 3University of Cambridge Medical School Library, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; 4School of Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Introduction: Understanding the breadth of patients’ support needs is important for the delivery of person-centered care, particularly in progressive long-term conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Existing reviews identify important aspects of managing life with COPD with which patients may need support (support needs; however, none of these comprehensively outlines the full range of support needs that patients can experience. We therefore sought to systematically determine the full range of support needs for patients with COPD to inform development of an evidence-based tool to enable person-centered care.Methods: We conducted a systematic search and narrative review of the literature. Medline (Ovid, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were systematically searched for papers which included data addressing key aspects of support need, as identified by patients with COPD. Relevant data were extracted, and a narrative analysis was conducted.Results: Thirty-one papers were included in the review, and the following 13 domains (broad areas of support need were identified: 1 understanding COPD, 2 managing symptoms and medication, 3 healthy lifestyle, 4 managing feelings and worries, 5 living positively with COPD, 6 thinking about the future, 7 anxiety and depression, 8 practical support, 9 finance work and housing, 10 families and close relationships, 11 social and recreational life, 12 independence, and 13 navigating services. These 13 domains of support need were mapped to three of the four overarching categories of need

  4. Compliance of systematic reviews in veterinary journals with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) literature search reporting guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Lorraine C

    2017-07-01

    Complete, accurate reporting of systematic reviews facilitates assessment of how well reviews have been conducted. The primary objective of this study was to examine compliance of systematic reviews in veterinary journals with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines for literature search reporting and to examine the completeness, bias, and reproducibility of the searches in these reviews from what was reported. The second objective was to examine reporting of the credentials and contributions of those involved in the search process. A sample of systematic reviews or meta-analyses published in veterinary journals between 2011 and 2015 was obtained by searching PubMed. Reporting in the full text of each review was checked against certain PRISMA checklist items. Over one-third of reviews (37%) did not search the CAB Abstracts database, and 9% of reviews searched only 1 database. Over two-thirds of reviews (65%) did not report any search for grey literature or stated that they excluded grey literature. The majority of reviews (95%) did not report a reproducible search strategy. Most reviews had significant deficiencies in reporting the search process that raise questions about how these searches were conducted and ultimately cast serious doubts on the validity and reliability of reviews based on a potentially biased and incomplete body of literature. These deficiencies also highlight the need for veterinary journal editors and publishers to be more rigorous in requiring adherence to PRISMA guidelines and to encourage veterinary researchers to include librarians or information specialists on systematic review teams to improve the quality and reporting of searches.

  5. The discordance between clinical and radiographic knee osteoarthritis: A systematic search and summary of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croft Peter R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have suggested that the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA are rather weakly associated with radiographic findings and vice versa. Our objectives were to identify estimates of the prevalence of radiographic knee OA in adults with knee pain and of knee pain in adults with radiographic knee OA, and determine if the definitions of x ray osteoarthritis and symptoms, and variation in demographic factors influence these estimates. Methods A systematic literature search identifying population studies which combined x rays, diagnosis, clinical signs and symptoms in knee OA. Estimates of the prevalence of radiographic OA in people with knee pain were determined and vice versa. In addition the effects of influencing factors were scrutinised. Results The proportion of those with knee pain found to have radiographic osteoarthritis ranged from 15–76%, and in those with radiographic knee OA the proportion with pain ranged from 15% – 81%. Considerable variation occurred with x ray view, pain definition, OA grading and demographic factors Conclusion Knee pain is an imprecise marker of radiographic knee osteoarthritis but this depends on the extent of radiographic views used. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis is likewise an imprecise guide to the likelihood that knee pain or disability will be present. Both associations are affected by the definition of pain used and the nature of the study group. The results of knee x rays should not be used in isolation when assessing individual patients with knee pain.

  6. Searching for Animal Sentience: A Systematic Review of the Scientific Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Amelia R. Cornish; Helen S. Proctor; Gemma Carder

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary The emotional lives of animals is often doubted and questioned. Due to the subjective nature of animal emotions, many think that they are out of the reach of scientific measurement. In this systematic review, of over two decades of scientific literature, we found that this was not actually the case. By using a list of keywords, formed of both positive and negative emotions, and terminology relating to animal sentience, we reviewed the scientific literature. We found that the su...

  7. Evidence for treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: results of a systematic literature search update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffer, Michaela A.; Schoels, Monika M.; Smolen, Josef S.; Aletaha, Daniel; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Burmester, Gerd; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Haraoui, Boulos; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Kvien, Tore K.; Nash, Peter; Navarro-Compan, Victoria; Voshaar, Maria Johanna Helène; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; van der Heijde, Desiree; Stamm, Tanja A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic literature review (SLR; 2009–2014) to compare a target-oriented approach with routine management in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to allow an update of the treat-to-target recommendations. Methods Two SLRs focused on clinical trials employing a treatment approach

  8. Evidence for treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: results of a systematic literature search update

    OpenAIRE

    Stoffer, Michaela A.; Schoels, Monika M.; Smolen, Josef S.; Aletaha, Daniel; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Burmester, Gerd; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Haraoui, Boulos; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Kvien, Tore K.; Nash, Peter; Navarro-Compan, Victoria; Voshaar, Maria Johanna Helène

    2015-01-01

    Objective A systematic literature review (SLR; 2009?2014) to compare a target-oriented approach with routine management in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to allow an update of the treat-to-target recommendations. Methods Two SLRs focused on clinical trials employing a treatment approach targeting a specific clinical outcome were performed. In addition to testing clinical, functional and/or structural changes as endpoints, comorbidities, cardiovascular risk, work productivity and e...

  9. Epidemiological trends of dengue disease in Mexico (2000-2011: a systematic literature search and analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Gómez Dantés

    Full Text Available This systematic literature review describes the epidemiology of dengue disease in Mexico (2000-2011. The annual number of uncomplicated dengue cases reported increased from 1,714 in 2000 to 15,424 in 2011 (incidence rates of 1.72 and 14.12 per 100,000 population, respectively. Peaks were observed in 2002, 2007, and 2009. Coastal states were most affected by dengue disease. The age distribution pattern showed an increasing number of cases during childhood, a peak at 10-20 years, and a gradual decline during adulthood. All four dengue virus serotypes were detected. Although national surveillance is in place, there are knowledge gaps relating to asymptomatic cases, primary/secondary infections, and seroprevalence rates of infection in all age strata. Under-reporting of the clinical spectrum of the disease is also problematic. Dengue disease remains a serious public health problem in Mexico.

  10. Epidemiological Trends of Dengue Disease in Mexico (2000–2011): A Systematic Literature Search and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantés, Héctor Gómez; Farfán-Ale, José Arturo; Sarti, Elsa

    2014-01-01

    This systematic literature review describes the epidemiology of dengue disease in Mexico (2000–2011). The annual number of uncomplicated dengue cases reported increased from 1,714 in 2000 to 15,424 in 2011 (incidence rates of 1.72 and 14.12 per 100,000 population, respectively). Peaks were observed in 2002, 2007, and 2009. Coastal states were most affected by dengue disease. The age distribution pattern showed an increasing number of cases during childhood, a peak at 10–20 years, and a gradual decline during adulthood. All four dengue virus serotypes were detected. Although national surveillance is in place, there are knowledge gaps relating to asymptomatic cases, primary/secondary infections, and seroprevalence rates of infection in all age strata. Under-reporting of the clinical spectrum of the disease is also problematic. Dengue disease remains a serious public health problem in Mexico. PMID:25375162

  11. Searching for Animal Sentience: A Systematic Review of the Scientific Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia R. Cornish

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of animal sentience is fundamental to many disciplines and imperative to the animal welfare movement. In this review, we examined what is being explored and discussed, regarding animal sentience, within the scientific literature. Rather than attempting to extract meaning from the many complex and abstract definitions of animal sentience, we searched over two decades of scientific literature using a peer-reviewed list of 174 keywords. The list consisted of human emotions, terminology associated with animal sentience, and traits often thought to be indicative of subjective states. We discovered that very little was actually being explored, and instead there was already much agreement about what animals can feel. Why then is there so much scepticism surrounding the science of animal sentience? Sentience refers to the subjective states of animals, and so is often thought to be impossible to measure objectively. However, when we consider that much of the research found to accept and utilise animal sentience is performed for the development of human drugs and treatment, it appears that measuring sentience is, after all, not quite as impossible as was previously thought. In this paper, we explored what has been published on animal sentience in the scientific literature and where the gaps in research lie. We drew conclusions on the implications for animal welfare science and argued for the importance of addressing these gaps in our knowledge. We found that there is a need for more research on positive emotional states in animals, and that there is still much to learn about taxa such as invertebrates. Such information will not only be useful in supporting and initiating legislative amendments but will help to increase understanding, and potentially positive actions and attitudes towards animals.

  12. Searching for Animal Sentience: A Systematic Review of the Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Helen S; Carder, Gemma; Cornish, Amelia R

    2013-09-04

    Knowledge of animal sentience is fundamental to many disciplines and imperative to the animal welfare movement. In this review, we examined what is being explored and discussed, regarding animal sentience, within the scientific literature. Rather than attempting to extract meaning from the many complex and abstract definitions of animal sentience, we searched over two decades of scientific literature using a peer-reviewed list of 174 keywords. The list consisted of human emotions, terminology associated with animal sentience, and traits often thought to be indicative of subjective states. We discovered that very little was actually being explored, and instead there was already much agreement about what animals can feel. Why then is there so much scepticism surrounding the science of animal sentience? Sentience refers to the subjective states of animals, and so is often thought to be impossible to measure objectively. However, when we consider that much of the research found to accept and utilise animal sentience is performed for the development of human drugs and treatment, it appears that measuring sentience is, after all, not quite as impossible as was previously thought. In this paper, we explored what has been published on animal sentience in the scientific literature and where the gaps in research lie. We drew conclusions on the implications for animal welfare science and argued for the importance of addressing these gaps in our knowledge. We found that there is a need for more research on positive emotional states in animals, and that there is still much to learn about taxa such as invertebrates. Such information will not only be useful in supporting and initiating legislative amendments but will help to increase understanding, and potentially positive actions and attitudes towards animals.

  13. Testing of the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for a soluble biomarker reflecting structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic literature search on 5 candidate biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syversen, Silje W; Landewe, Robert; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for soluble biomarkers by assessing the strength of literature evidence in support of 5 candidate biomarkers. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted on the 5 soluble biomarkers RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), matrix metallopr......OBJECTIVE: To test the OMERACT 8 draft validation criteria for soluble biomarkers by assessing the strength of literature evidence in support of 5 candidate biomarkers. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted on the 5 soluble biomarkers RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), matrix...

  14. Medical literature search dot com

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Internet provides a quick access to a plethora of the medical literature, in the form of journals, databases, dictionaries, textbooks, indexes, and e-journals, thereby allowing access to more varied, individualized, and systematic educational opportunities. Web search engine is a tool designed to search for information on the World Wide Web, which may be in the form of web pages, images, information, and other types of files. Search engines for internet-based search of medical literature include Google, Google scholar, Yahoo search engine, etc., and databases include MEDLINE, PubMed, MEDLARS, etc. Commercial web resources (Medscape, MedConnect, MedicineNet add to the list of resource databases providing some of their content for open access. Several web-libraries (Medical matrix, Emory libraries have been developed as meta-sites, providing useful links to health resources globally. Availability of specific dermatology-related websites (DermIs, DermNet, and Genamics Jornalseek is useful addition to the ever growing list of web-based resources. A researcher must keep in mind the strengths and limitations of a particular search engine/database while searching for a particular type of data. Knowledge about types of literature and levels of detail available, user interface, ease of access, reputable content, and period of time covered allow their optimal use and maximal utility in the field of medicine.

  15. Applying systematic review search methods to the grey literature: a case study examining guidelines for school-based breakfast programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Katelyn; Stapleton, Jackie; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Hanning, Rhona M; Leatherdale, Scott T

    2015-10-22

    Grey literature is an important source of information for large-scale review syntheses. However, there are many characteristics of grey literature that make it difficult to search systematically. Further, there is no 'gold standard' for rigorous systematic grey literature search methods and few resources on how to conduct this type of search. This paper describes systematic review search methods that were developed and applied to complete a case study systematic review of grey literature that examined guidelines for school-based breakfast programs in Canada. A grey literature search plan was developed to incorporate four different searching strategies: (1) grey literature databases, (2) customized Google search engines, (3) targeted websites, and (4) consultation with contact experts. These complementary strategies were used to minimize the risk of omitting relevant sources. Since abstracts are often unavailable in grey literature documents, items' abstracts, executive summaries, or table of contents (whichever was available) were screened. Screening of publications' full-text followed. Data were extracted on the organization, year published, who they were developed by, intended audience, goal/objectives of document, sources of evidence/resources cited, meals mentioned in the guidelines, and recommendations for program delivery. The search strategies for identifying and screening publications for inclusion in the case study review was found to be manageable, comprehensive, and intuitive when applied in practice. The four search strategies of the grey literature search plan yielded 302 potentially relevant items for screening. Following the screening process, 15 publications that met all eligibility criteria remained and were included in the case study systematic review. The high-level findings of the case study systematic review are briefly described. This article demonstrated a feasible and seemingly robust method for applying systematic search strategies to

  16. Optimizing literature search in systematic reviews - are MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL enough for identifying effect studies within the area of musculoskeletal disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Thomas; Lund, Hans; Juhl, Carsten

    2016-11-22

    When conducting systematic reviews, it is essential to perform a comprehensive literature search to identify all published studies relevant to the specific research question. The Cochrane Collaborations Methodological Expectations of Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) guidelines state that searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL should be considered mandatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the MECIR recommendations to use MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined, and examine the yield of using these to find randomized controlled trials (RCTs) within the area of musculoskeletal disorders. Data sources were systematic reviews published by the Cochrane Musculoskeletal Review Group, including at least five RCTs, reporting a search history, searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and adding reference- and hand-searching. Additional databases were deemed eligible if they indexed RCTs, were in English and used in more than three of the systematic reviews. Relative recall was calculated as the number of studies identified by the literature search divided by the number of eligible studies i.e. included studies in the individual systematic reviews. Finally, cumulative median recall was calculated for MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL combined followed by the databases yielding additional studies. Deemed eligible was twenty-three systematic reviews and the databases included other than MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was AMED, CINAHL, HealthSTAR, MANTIS, OT-Seeker, PEDro, PsychINFO, SCOPUS, SportDISCUS and Web of Science. Cumulative median recall for combined searching in MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was 88.9% and increased to 90.9% when adding 10 additional databases. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL was not sufficient for identifying all effect studies on musculoskeletal disorders, but additional ten databases did only increase the median recall by 2%. It is possible that searching databases is not sufficient to identify all relevant references, and that reviewers must rely upon

  17. The characteristics, implementation and effects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion tools: a systematic literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCalman, Janya; Tsey, Komla; Bainbridge, Roxanne; Rowley, Kevin; Percival, Nikki; O'Donoghue, Lynette; Brands, Jenny; Whiteside, Mary; Judd, Jenni

    2014-07-11

    Health promotion by and with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (hereafter Indigenous) Australians is critically important given a wide gap in health parity compared to other Australians. The development and implementation of step-by-step guides, instruments, packages, frameworks or resources has provided a feasible and low-resource strategy for strengthening evidence-informed health promotion practice. Yet there has been little assessment of where and how these tools are implemented or their effectiveness. This paper reviews the characteristics, implementation and effects of Indigenous health promotion tools. Indigenous health promotion tools were identified through a systematic literature search including a prior scoping study, eight databases, references of other reviews and the authors' knowledge (n = 1494). Documents in the peer reviewed and grey literature were included if they described or evaluated tools designed, recommended or used for strengthening Indigenous Australian health promotion. Eligible publications were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and documented tools classified according to their characteristics, implementation and effects. Quality was appraised using the Dictionary for Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) and Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP) tools for quantitative and qualitative studies respectively. The review found that Indigenous health promotion tools were widely available. Of 74 publications that met inclusion criteria, sixty (81%) documented tools developed specifically for the Indigenous Australian population. All tools had been developed in reference to evidence; but only 22/74 (30%) publications specified intended or actual implementation, and only 11/74 (15%) publications evaluated impacts of the implemented tools. Impacts included health, environmental, community, organisational and health care improvements. The quality of impact evaluations was strong for only five (7%) studies. The small number and

  18. What methods do reviews of normative ethics literature use for search, selection, analysis, and synthesis? In-depth results from a systematic review of reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Marcel; Strech, Daniel; Kahrass, Hannes

    2017-12-19

    (Semi-)systematic approaches to finding, analysing, and synthesising ethics literature on medical topics are still in their infancy. However, our recent systematic review showed that the rate of publication of such (semi-)systematic reviews has increased in the last two decades. This is not only true for reviews of empirical ethics literature, but also for reviews of normative ethics literature. In the latter case, there is currently little in the way of standards and guidance available. Therefore, the methods and reporting strategies of such reviews vary greatly. The purpose of the follow-up study we present was to obtain deeper methodological insight into the ways reviews of normative literature are actually conducted and to analyse the methods used. Our search in the PubMed, PhilPapers, and Google Scholar databases led to the identification of 183 reviews of ethics literature published between 1997 and 2015, of which 84 were identified as reviews of normative and mixed literature. Qualitative content analysis was used to extract and synthesise descriptions of search, selection, quality appraisal, analysis, and synthesis methods. We further assessed quantitatively how often certain methods (e.g. search strategies, data analysis procedures) were used by the reviews. The overall reporting quality varies among the analysed reviews and was generally poor even for major criteria regarding the search and selection of literature. For example, only 24 (29%) used a PRISMA flowchart. Also, only 55 (66%) reviews mentioned the information unit they sought to extract, and 12 (14%) stated an ethical approach as the theoretical basis for the analysis. Interpretable information on the synthesis method was given by 47 (60%); the most common methods applied were qualitative methods commonly used in social science research (83%). Reviews which fail to provide sufficient relevant information to readers have reduced methodological transparency regardless of actual methodological

  19. The use of grounded theory in studies of nurses and midwives' coping processes: a systematic literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheer, Karen; MacLaren, David; Tsey, Komla

    2015-01-01

    Researchers are increasingly using grounded theory methodologies to study the professional experience of nurses and midwives. To review common grounded theory characteristics and research design quality as described in grounded theory studies of coping strategies used by nurses and midwives. A systematic database search for 2005-2015 identified and assessed grounded theory characteristics from 16 studies. Study quality was assessed using a modified Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Grounded theory was considered a methodology or a set of methods, able to be used within different nursing and midwifery contexts. Specific research requirements determined the common grounded theory characteristics used in different studies. Most researchers did not clarify their epistemological and theoretical perspectives. To improve research design and trustworthiness of grounded theory studies in nursing and midwifery, researchers need to state their theoretical stance and clearly articulate their use of grounded theory methodology and characteristics in research reporting.

  20. Literature searches on Ayurveda: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggithaya, Madhur G; Narahari, Saravu R

    2015-01-01

    The journals that publish on Ayurveda are increasingly indexed by popular medical databases in recent years. However, many Eastern journals are not indexed biomedical journal databases such as PubMed. Literature searches for Ayurveda continue to be challenging due to the nonavailability of active, unbiased dedicated databases for Ayurvedic literature. In 2010, authors identified 46 databases that can be used for systematic search of Ayurvedic papers and theses. This update reviewed our previous recommendation and identified current and relevant databases. To update on Ayurveda literature search and strategy to retrieve maximum publications. Author used psoriasis as an example to search previously listed databases and identify new. The population, intervention, control, and outcome table included keywords related to psoriasis and Ayurvedic terminologies for skin diseases. Current citation update status, search results, and search options of previous databases were assessed. Eight search strategies were developed. Hundred and five journals, both biomedical and Ayurveda, which publish on Ayurveda, were identified. Variability in databases was explored to identify bias in journal citation. Five among 46 databases are now relevant - AYUSH research portal, Annotated Bibliography of Indian Medicine, Digital Helpline for Ayurveda Research Articles (DHARA), PubMed, and Directory of Open Access Journals. Search options in these databases are not uniform, and only PubMed allows complex search strategy. "The Researches in Ayurveda" and "Ayurvedic Research Database" (ARD) are important grey resources for hand searching. About 44/105 (41.5%) journals publishing Ayurvedic studies are not indexed in any database. Only 11/105 (10.4%) exclusive Ayurveda journals are indexed in PubMed. AYUSH research portal and DHARA are two major portals after 2010. It is mandatory to search PubMed and four other databases because all five carry citations from different groups of journals. The hand

  1. Borderline Intellectual Functioning: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltopuro, Minna; Ahonen, Timo; Kaartinen, Jukka; Seppälä, Heikki; Närhi, Vesa

    2014-01-01

    The literature related to people with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) was systematically reviewed in order to summarize the present knowledge. Database searches yielded 1,726 citations, and 49 studies were included in the review. People with BIF face a variety of hardships in life, including neurocognitive, social, and mental health…

  2. Customer Journeys: A Systematic Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Følstad, Asbjørn; Kvale, Knut

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – Customer journeys has become an increasingly important topic in service management and design. The study reviews customer journey terminology and approaches within the research literature prior to 2013, mainly from the fields of design, management, and marketing. Design/methodology/approach - The study was conducted as a systematic literature review. Searches in Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, ACM Digital Library, and ScienceDirect identified 45 papers for analysis. The pa...

  3. Gray literature: An important resource in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Arsenio

    2017-08-01

    Systematic reviews aide the analysis and dissemination of evidence, using rigorous and transparent methods to generate empirically attained answers to focused research questions. Identifying all evidence relevant to the research questions is an essential component, and challenge, of systematic reviews. Gray literature, or evidence not published in commercial publications, can make important contributions to a systematic review. Gray literature can include academic papers, including theses and dissertations, research and committee reports, government reports, conference papers, and ongoing research, among others. It may provide data not found within commercially published literature, providing an important forum for disseminating studies with null or negative results that might not otherwise be disseminated. Gray literature may thusly reduce publication bias, increase reviews' comprehensiveness and timeliness, and foster a balanced picture of available evidence. Gray literature's diverse formats and audiences can present a significant challenge in a systematic search for evidence. However, the benefits of including gray literature may far outweigh the cost in time and resource needed to search for it, and it is important for it to be included in a systematic review or review of evidence. A carefully thought out gray literature search strategy may be an invaluable component of a systematic review. This narrative review provides guidance about the benefits of including gray literature in a systematic review, and sources for searching through gray literature. An illustrative example of a search for evidence within gray literature sources is presented to highlight the potential contributions of such a search to a systematic review. Benefits and challenges of gray literature search methods are discussed, and recommendations made. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Grey literature: An important resource in systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Arsenio

    2017-12-21

    Systematic reviews aid the analysis and dissemination of evidence, using rigorous and transparent methods to generate empirically attained answers to focused research questions. Identifying all evidence relevant to the research questions is an essential component, and challenge, of systematic reviews. Grey literature, or evidence not published in commercial publications, can make important contributions to a systematic review. Grey literature can include academic papers, including theses and dissertations, research and committee reports, government reports, conference papers, and ongoing research, among others. It may provide data not found within commercially published literature, providing an important forum for disseminating studies with null or negative results that might not otherwise be disseminated. Grey literature may thusly reduce publication bias, increase reviews' comprehensiveness and timeliness and foster a balanced picture of available evidence. Grey literature's diverse formats and audiences can present a significant challenge in a systematic search for evidence. However, the benefits of including grey literature may far outweigh the cost in time and resource needed to search for it, and it is important for it to be included in a systematic review or review of evidence. A carefully thought out grey literature search strategy may be an invaluable component of a systematic review. This narrative review provides guidance about the benefits of including grey literature in a systematic review, and sources for searching through grey literature. An illustrative example of a search for evidence within grey literature sources is presented to highlight the potential contributions of such a search to a systematic review. Benefits and challenges of grey literature search methods are discussed, and recommendations made. © 2017 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Reproducibility of Automated Voice Range Profiles, a Systematic Literature Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Printz, Trine; Rosenberg, Tine; Godballe, Christian

    2018-01-01

    literature on test-retest accuracy of the automated voice range profile assessment. Study design: Systematic review. Data sources: PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, ComDisDome, Embase, and CINAHL (EBSCO). Methods: We conducted a systematic literature search of six databases from 1983 to 2016. The following...

  6. Managing Large-Volume Literature Searches in Research Synthesis Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havill, Nancy L.; Leeman, Jennifer; Shaw-Kokot, Julia; Knafl, Kathleen; Crandell, Jamie; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2014-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews typically require searching for, retrieving, and screening a large volume of literature, yet little guidance is available on how to manage this volume. Purpose We detail methods used to search for and manage the yield of relevant citations for a mixed-methods mixed research synthesis study focused on the intersection between family life and childhood chronic physical conditions. Method We designed inclusive search strings and searched nine bibliographic databases to identify relevant research regardless of methodological origin. We customized searches to individual databases, developed workarounds for transferring large volumes of citations and eliminating duplicate citations using reference management software, and used this software as a portal to select citations for inclusion or exclusion. We identified 67,555 citations, retrieved and screened 3,617 reports, and selected 802 reports for inclusion. Discussion/Conclusions Systematic reviews require search procedures to allow consistent and comprehensive approaches and the ability to work around technical obstacles. PMID:24345615

  7. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  8. Education of student nurses - A systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Kathrine Håland; Christiansen, Sytter; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    systematically searched in PubMed, Cinahl, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted that included quantitative and qualitative studies. Quality assessment was made in accordance with Malterud's guidelines on qualitative research and Polit and Beck's guidelines...

  9. Motivation in pediatric motor rehabilitation: A systematic search of the literature using the self-determination theory as a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyns, Pieter; Roman de Mettelinge, Tine; van der Spank, Judith; Coussens, Marieke; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2017-03-09

    Motivation is suggested as an important factor in pediatric motor rehabilitation. Therefore, we reviewed the existing evidence of (motivational) motor rehabilitation paradigms, and how motivation influences rehabilitation outcome using self-determination theory as conceptual framework. PubMed and Web-of-Science databases were systematically searched until June 2015. Data were independently extracted and critiqued for quality by three authors. Studies reporting motivational aspects were included. Most studies examined new technology (e.g., virtual reality [VR]). Out of 479 records, three RCT, six case-control, and six non-comparative studies were included with mixed quality. Motivation was rarely reported. Training individualization to the child's capabilities with more variety seemed promising to increase motivation. Motivation increased when the exercises seemed helpful for daily activities. Motivation in pediatric rehabilitation should be comprehensively assessed within a theoretical framework as there are indications that motivated children have better rehabilitation outcomes, depending on the aspect of motivation.

  10. Searching for non-genetic molecular and imaging PTSD risk and resilience markers: Systematic review of literature and design of the German Armed Forces PTSD biomarker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Ulrike; Willmund, Gerd-Dieter; Holsboer, Florian; Wotjak, Carsten T; Gallinat, Jürgen; Kowalski, Jens T; Zimmermann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers allowing the identification of individuals with an above average vulnerability or resilience for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) would especially serve populations at high risk for trauma exposure like firefighters, police officers and combat soldiers. Aiming to identify the most promising putative PTSD vulnerability markers, we conducted the first systematic review on potential imaging and non-genetic molecular markers for PTSD risk and resilience. Following the PRISMA guidelines, we systematically screened the PubMed database for prospective longitudinal clinical studies and twin studies reporting on pre-trauma and post-trauma PTSD risk and resilience biomarkers. Using 25 different combinations of search terms, we retrieved 8151 articles of which we finally included and evaluated 9 imaging and 27 molecular studies. In addition, we briefly illustrate the design of the ongoing prospective German Armed Forces (Bundeswehr) PTSD biomarker study (Bw-BioPTSD) which not only aims to validate these previous findings but also to identify novel and clinically applicable molecular, psychological and imaging risk, resilience and disease markers for deployment-related psychopathology in a cohort of German soldiers who served in Afghanistan. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of Google Scholar in Evidence Reviews and Its Applicability to Grey Literature Searching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Robert Haddaway

    Full Text Available Google Scholar (GS, a commonly used web-based academic search engine, catalogues between 2 and 100 million records of both academic and grey literature (articles not formally published by commercial academic publishers. Google Scholar collates results from across the internet and is free to use. As a result it has received considerable attention as a method for searching for literature, particularly in searches for grey literature, as required by systematic reviews. The reliance on GS as a standalone resource has been greatly debated, however, and its efficacy in grey literature searching has not yet been investigated. Using systematic review case studies from environmental science, we investigated the utility of GS in systematic reviews and in searches for grey literature. Our findings show that GS results contain moderate amounts of grey literature, with the majority found on average at page 80. We also found that, when searched for specifically, the majority of literature identified using Web of Science was also found using GS. However, our findings showed moderate/poor overlap in results when similar search strings were used in Web of Science and GS (10-67%, and that GS missed some important literature in five of six case studies. Furthermore, a general GS search failed to find any grey literature from a case study that involved manual searching of organisations' websites. If used in systematic reviews for grey literature, we recommend that searches of article titles focus on the first 200 to 300 results. We conclude that whilst Google Scholar can find much grey literature and specific, known studies, it should not be used alone for systematic review searches. Rather, it forms a powerful addition to other traditional search methods. In addition, we advocate the use of tools to transparently document and catalogue GS search results to maintain high levels of transparency and the ability to be updated, critical to systematic reviews.

  12. The Role of Google Scholar in Evidence Reviews and Its Applicability to Grey Literature Searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaway, Neal Robert; Collins, Alexandra Mary; Coughlin, Deborah; Kirk, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Google Scholar (GS), a commonly used web-based academic search engine, catalogues between 2 and 100 million records of both academic and grey literature (articles not formally published by commercial academic publishers). Google Scholar collates results from across the internet and is free to use. As a result it has received considerable attention as a method for searching for literature, particularly in searches for grey literature, as required by systematic reviews. The reliance on GS as a standalone resource has been greatly debated, however, and its efficacy in grey literature searching has not yet been investigated. Using systematic review case studies from environmental science, we investigated the utility of GS in systematic reviews and in searches for grey literature. Our findings show that GS results contain moderate amounts of grey literature, with the majority found on average at page 80. We also found that, when searched for specifically, the majority of literature identified using Web of Science was also found using GS. However, our findings showed moderate/poor overlap in results when similar search strings were used in Web of Science and GS (10-67%), and that GS missed some important literature in five of six case studies. Furthermore, a general GS search failed to find any grey literature from a case study that involved manual searching of organisations' websites. If used in systematic reviews for grey literature, we recommend that searches of article titles focus on the first 200 to 300 results. We conclude that whilst Google Scholar can find much grey literature and specific, known studies, it should not be used alone for systematic review searches. Rather, it forms a powerful addition to other traditional search methods. In addition, we advocate the use of tools to transparently document and catalogue GS search results to maintain high levels of transparency and the ability to be updated, critical to systematic reviews.

  13. The Role of Google Scholar in Evidence Reviews and Its Applicability to Grey Literature Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaway, Neal Robert; Collins, Alexandra Mary; Coughlin, Deborah; Kirk, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Google Scholar (GS), a commonly used web-based academic search engine, catalogues between 2 and 100 million records of both academic and grey literature (articles not formally published by commercial academic publishers). Google Scholar collates results from across the internet and is free to use. As a result it has received considerable attention as a method for searching for literature, particularly in searches for grey literature, as required by systematic reviews. The reliance on GS as a standalone resource has been greatly debated, however, and its efficacy in grey literature searching has not yet been investigated. Using systematic review case studies from environmental science, we investigated the utility of GS in systematic reviews and in searches for grey literature. Our findings show that GS results contain moderate amounts of grey literature, with the majority found on average at page 80. We also found that, when searched for specifically, the majority of literature identified using Web of Science was also found using GS. However, our findings showed moderate/poor overlap in results when similar search strings were used in Web of Science and GS (10–67%), and that GS missed some important literature in five of six case studies. Furthermore, a general GS search failed to find any grey literature from a case study that involved manual searching of organisations’ websites. If used in systematic reviews for grey literature, we recommend that searches of article titles focus on the first 200 to 300 results. We conclude that whilst Google Scholar can find much grey literature and specific, known studies, it should not be used alone for systematic review searches. Rather, it forms a powerful addition to other traditional search methods. In addition, we advocate the use of tools to transparently document and catalogue GS search results to maintain high levels of transparency and the ability to be updated, critical to systematic reviews. PMID:26379270

  14. A review of the reporting of web searching to identify studies for Cochrane systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Simon

    2018-03-01

    The literature searches that are used to identify studies for inclusion in a systematic review should be comprehensively reported. This ensures that the literature searches are transparent and reproducible, which is important for assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a systematic review and re-running the literature searches when conducting an update review. Web searching using search engines and the websites of topically relevant organisations is sometimes used as a supplementary literature search method. Previous research has shown that the reporting of web searching in systematic reviews often lacks important details and is thus not transparent or reproducible. Useful details to report about web searching include the name of the search engine or website, the URL, the date searched, the search strategy, and the number of results. This study reviews the reporting of web searching to identify studies for Cochrane systematic reviews published in the 6-month period August 2016 to January 2017 (n = 423). Of these reviews, 61 reviews reported using web searching using a search engine or website as a literature search method. In the majority of reviews, the reporting of web searching was found to lack essential detail for ensuring transparency and reproducibility, such as the search terms. Recommendations are made on how to improve the reporting of web searching in Cochrane systematic reviews. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. The search for relevant outcome measures for cost-utility analysis of systemic family interventions in adolescents with substance use disorder and delinquent behavior: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schawo, S; Bouwmans, C; van der Schee, E; Hendriks, V; Brouwer, W; Hakkaart, L

    2017-09-19

    Systemic family interventions have shown to be effective in adolescents with substance use disorder and delinquent behavior. The interventions target interactions between the adolescent and involved systems (i.e. youth, family, peers, neighbors, school, work, and society). Next to effectiveness considerations, economic aspects have gained attention. However, conventional generic quality of life measures used in health economic evaluations may not be able to capture the broad effects of systemic interventions. This study aims to identify existing outcome measures, which capture the broad effects of systemic family interventions, and allow use in a health economic framework. We based our systematic review on clinical studies in the field. Our goal was to identify effectiveness studies of psychosocial interventions for adolescents with substance use disorder and delinquent behavior and to distill the instruments used in these studies to measure effects. Searched databases were PubMed, Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), Cochrane and Psychnet (PsycBOOKSc, PsycCRITIQUES, print). Identified instruments were ranked according to the number of systems covered (comprehensiveness). In addition, their use for health economic analyses was evaluated according to suitability characteristics such as brevity, accessibility, psychometric properties, etc. One thousand three hundred seventy-eight articles were found and screened for eligibility. Eighty articles were selected, 8 instruments were identified covering 5 or more systems. The systematic review identified instruments from the clinical field suitable to evaluate systemic family interventions in a health economic framework. None of them had preference-weights available. Hence, a next step could be to attach preference-weights to one of the identified instruments to allow health economic evaluations of systemic family interventions.

  16. Dengue disease surveillance: an updated systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Runge-Ranzinger, S; McCall, P J; Kroeger, A; Horstick, O

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To review the evidence for the application of tools for dengue outbreak prediction/detection and trend monitoring in passive and active disease surveillance systems in order to develop recommendations for endemic countries and identify important research needs. Methods This systematic literature review followed the protocol of a review from 2008, extending the systematic search from January 2007 to February 2013 on PubMed, EMBASE, CDSR, WHOLIS and Lilacs. Data reporting followed th...

  17. A systematic review of published literature describing factors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SOMEREC

    Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa. Abstract. Background: A summary of factors associated with recurrent tuberculosis (TB) in the African HIV-infected population is lacking. We performed a systematic review to address this. Methods: We performed a literature search ...

  18. The Imperative Of Literature Search For Research In Nigeria | Madu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper while advancing reasons for literature search described how the library can assist in literature search. It finally discussed the various approaches and levels of search especially on the web and the problems researchers are most likely to encounter. Keywords: Research, Literature Search, Nigeria. The Information ...

  19. EMDR beyond PTSD: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente-Gómez, Alicia; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Treen, Devi; Cedrón, Carlos; Colom, Francesc; Pérez, Víctor; Amann, Benedikt L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a psychotherapeutic approach that has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) through several randomized controlled trials (RCT). Solid evidence shows that traumatic events can contribute to the onset of severe mental disorders and can worsen their prognosis. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the most important findings from RCT conducted in the treatment of comorbid traumatic events in psychosis, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and chronic back pain. Methods: Using PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus, we conducted a systematic literature search of RCT studies published up to December 2016 that used EMDR therapy in the mentioned psychiatric conditions. Results: RCT are still scarce in these comorbid conditions but the available evidence suggests that EMDR therapy improves trauma-associated symptoms and has a minor effect on the primary disorders by reaching partial symptomatic improvement. Conclusions: EMDR therapy could be a useful psychotherapy to treat trauma-associated symptoms in patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Preliminary evidence also suggests that EMDR therapy might be useful to improve psychotic or affective symptoms and could be an add-on treatment in chronic pain conditions. PMID:29018388

  20. EMDR beyond PTSD: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Valiente-Gómez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR is a psychotherapeutic approach that has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD through several randomized controlled trials (RCT. Solid evidence shows that traumatic events can contribute to the onset of severe mental disorders and can worsen their prognosis. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the most important findings from RCT conducted in the treatment of comorbid traumatic events in psychosis, bipolar disorder, unipolar depression, anxiety disorders, substance use disorders, and chronic back pain.Methods: Using PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus, we conducted a systematic literature search of RCT studies published up to December 2016 that used EMDR therapy in the mentioned psychiatric conditions.Results: RCT are still scarce in these comorbid conditions but the available evidence suggests that EMDR therapy improves trauma-associated symptoms and has a minor effect on the primary disorders by reaching partial symptomatic improvement.Conclusions: EMDR therapy could be a useful psychotherapy to treat trauma-associated symptoms in patients with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Preliminary evidence also suggests that EMDR therapy might be useful to improve psychotic or affective symptoms and could be an add-on treatment in chronic pain conditions.

  1. Search strategies in systematic reviews in periodontology and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis M; Atieh, Momen A; Park, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    To perform an overview of literature search strategies in systematic reviews (SRs) published in periodontology and implant dentistry. Two electronic databases (PubMed and Cochrane Database of SRs) were searched, independently and in duplicate, for SRs with meta-analyses on interventions, with the last search performed on 11 November 2012. Manual searches of the reference lists of included SRs and 10 specialty dental journals were conducted. Methodological issues of the search strategies of included SRs were assessed with Cochrane collaboration guidelines and AMSTAR recommendations. The search strategies employed in Cochrane and paper-based SRs were compared. A total of 146 SRs with meta-analyses were included, including 19 Cochrane and 127 paper-based SRs. Some issues, such as "the use of keywords," were reported in most of the SRs (86%). Other issues, such as "search of grey literature" and "language restriction," were not fully reported (34% and 50% respectively). The quality of search strategy reporting in Cochrane SRs was better than that of paper-based SRs for seven of the eight criteria assessed. There is room for improving the quality of reporting of search strategies in SRs in periodontology and implant dentistry, particularly in SRs published in paper-based journals. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Software ecosystems – a systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Konstantinos; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    . However, there exists no systematic overview of the research done on software ecosystems from a software engineering perspective. We performed a systematic literature review of software ecosystem research, analyzing 90 papers on the subject taken from a gross collection of 420. Our main conclusions...

  3. Improving search filter development: a study of palliative care literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieman Jennifer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult to systematically search for literature relevant to palliative care in general medical journals. A previously developed search filter for use on OVID Medline validated using a gold standard set of references identified through hand searching, achieved an unacceptably low sensitivity (45.4%. Retrieving relevant literature is integral to support evidence based practice, and understanding the nature of the incorrectly excluded citations (false negatives using the filter may lead to improvement in the filter's performance. Methods The objectives were to describe the nature of subjects reflected in the false negative citations and to empirically improve the sensitivity of the search filter. A thematic analysis of MeSH terms by three independent reviewers was used to describe the subject coverage of the missed records. Using a frequency analysis of MeSH terms, those headings which could individually contribute at least 2.5% to sensitivity (occurring 19 or more times were added to the search filter. All previously run searches were rerun at the same time as the revised filter, and results compared. Results Thematic analysis of MeSH terms identified thirteen themes reflected in the missing records, none of them intrinsically palliative. The addition of six MeSH terms to the existing search filter (physician-patient relations, prognosis, quality of life, survival rate, treatment outcome and attitude to health led to an increase in sensitivity from 46.3% to 64.7%, offset by a decrease in precision from 72.6% to 21.9%. Conclusion The filter's sensitivity was successfully increased using frequency analysis of MeSH terms, offset by a decrease in precision. A thematic analysis of MeSH terms for the false negative citations confirmed the absence of any intrinsically palliative theme or term, suggesting that future improvements to search filters for palliative care literature will first depend on better identifying how

  4. Systematic review of the literature on simulation in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jamil

    2012-01-01

    Simulation-based learning is an educational intervention which creates an environment that is conducive to experiential learning. Despite the prevalence of research on the influence of simulation on nursing education, there is a dearth of literature on the effectiveness of simulation-based learning. This systematic review examines literature on simulation outcomes in nursing education from the years 2000-2010. The electronic databases reviewed for the systematic review of the literature included: CINAHL Plus, Medline, Health Source: Nursing/Academic Education, Google Scholar, and Digital Dissertations and Theses through ProQuest. The MeSH search terms included "simulation outcomes measurement" and "nursing education". Seventeen studies were included in the review of the literature. The literature was categorized into three themes; internal outcomes, external outcomes, and clinical evaluation. The available literature on simulation and nursing education provides evidence that that simulation is useful in creating a learning environment which contributes to knowledge, skills, safety, and confidence. This systematic review of the literature revealed a gap in the literature pertaining to the transfer of these outcomes to the clinical setting, and lays a foundation for further research on outcomes specific to simulation and nursing education.

  5. Sexuality and amputation : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Van Es, Corine G.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. To systematically examine the state of research on sexuality and amputees. Methods. A total of five publication databases were searched: Pubmed, Cinahl, Embase, Psychinfo and Recall. Results. A total of 11 eligible studies was found. The studies were characterised by a diversity of study

  6. Prevention of pressure ulcers : Systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Kavonen, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Treating a pressure ulcer takes lots of nursing personnel's time and is costly both in terms of human suffering and use of resources. The purpose of this study was to collect and assamble research data about the prevention of pressure ulcers. The study was done as a systematic literature review. With the results, the knowledge and know-how of pressure ulcers' prevention can be increased and updated. The results can be utilised by everyone working with pressure ulcers. The systematic ...

  7. The psychology of esports: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Bányai, F; Griffiths, MD; Király, O; Demetrovics, Z

    2018-01-01

    Recently, the skill involved in playing and mastering video games has led to the professionalization of the activity in the form of 'esports' (electronic sports). The aim of the present paper was to review the main topics of psychological interest about esports and then to examine the similarities of esports to professional and problem gambling. As a result of a systematic literature search, eight studies were identified that had investigated three topics: (i) the process of becoming an espor...

  8. How to perform a systematic search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie

    2013-01-01

    All medical practice and research must be evidence-based, as far as this is possible. With medical knowledge constantly growing, it has become necessary to possess a high level of information literacy to stay competent and professional. Furthermore, as patients can now search information...... on the Internet, clinicians must be able to respond to this type of information in a professional way, when needed. Here, the development of viable systematic search strategies for journal articles, books, book chapters and other sources, selection of appropriate databases, search tools and selection methods...... are described and illustrated with examples from rheumatology. The up-keep of skills over time, and the acquisition of localised information sources, are discussed....

  9. Social Work Literature Searching: Current Issues with Databases and Online Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Tony; Taylor, Brian; McColgan, Mary; McQuilkan, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance of a range of search facilities; and to illustrate the execution of a comprehensive literature search for qualitative evidence in social work. Context: Developments in literature search methods and comparisons of search facilities help facilitate access to the best available evidence for social workers.…

  10. Epidemiology of bruxism in adults: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manfredini, D.; Winocur, E.; Guarda-Nardini, L.; Paesani, D.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To perform a systematic review of the literature dealing with the prevalence of bruxism in adult populations. METHODS: A systematic search of the medical literature was performed to identify all peer-reviewed English-language papers dealing with the prevalence assessment of either awake or

  11. Interventions on frequent attenders in primary care. A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Frans Th. M.; Wittkampf, Karin A.; Schene, Aart H.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; van Weert, Henk C. P. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To analyse which interventions are effective in influencing morbidity, quality of life, and healthcare utilization of frequently attending patients (FAs) in primary care. Methods. A systematic literature search was performed for articles describing interventions on FAs in primary care

  12. Nurse faculty migration: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, D C; González-Jurado, M A; Beneit-Montesinos, J V

    2013-06-01

    To undertake a systematic review of English and Spanish literature relating to nurse faculty migration. A systematic review of both published literature, using CINAHL, EMBASE, ERIC and MEDLINE, and grey literature, using Google and Yahoo search engines, utilizing a defined search strategy with key terms, wild card strings and logical operators, was undertaken. An initial limitation of searching for material published in the last ten years was removed due to the poor yield of relevant papers. In total, 18 research-based studies were identified, retrieved and reviewed. Finally, the retrieved material was reviewed and augmented by a group of nurse faculty and migration experts, who offered comments and proposed additional grey literature. With increased globalization, the impact of mutual recognition agreements and associated modes of supply of services as well as those factors influencing clinical nurse migration was also considered. Studies on clinical nurse migration and general academic faculty provided some insights, but nursing faculty differ in a number of key ways and this needs to be considered when interpreting the results. Based on this systematic review, the paper concludes that nurse faculty migration is a neglected topic and one that warrants urgent investigation if health systems redesign and the associated scale-up of nurses are to be achieved. Particular gaps in knowledge relate to nurse faculty workforce planning, and understanding the dynamics and flows of faculty both across and within countries. It is unclear as to the extent to which our knowledge of push and pull factors relating to clinical nurse migration can be used in understanding nurse faculty migration. The current policy position of organizations such as the World Health Organization and individual governments to increase nursing numbers is incomplete without due consideration of faculty migration. © 2013 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2013 International Council of Nurses.

  13. Burnout in journalists: A systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine B. MacDonald

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to provide a concise, comprehensive, and systematic review of the quantitative literature relating to the experience of burnout in journalists of various specialties and mediums. The systematic review method adopted is that prescribed by Fink (2010, which contains three main elements: Sampling the literature, screening the literature, and extracting data. Results indicate that journalists most at risk of burnout are females who are younger, with fewer years of journalism experience, working in small circulation newspapers. Editors and reporters seem to experience higher levels of burnout than those in other roles, as do journalists in non-management positions. The thorough and structured process adopted in this review provides the ability to assert with some degree of certainty what areas within the burnout and journalism literature require further consideration. This review emphasises and problematises the large focus on male reporters in newspaper settings, settings that are becoming less significant over time. Studies have tended to focus on reporters, without providing a convincing a priori rationale. What is lacking is consideration of other role groups central to broadcast news, such as camera-operators. A range of methodological and theoretical issues and future areas of research are discussed.

  14. Finding "hard to find" literature on hard to find groups: A novel technique to search grey literature on refugees and asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Joanne; Buck, Kimberly; Shawyer, Frances

    2018-03-01

    There is a lack of information on how to execute effective searches of the grey literature on refugee and asylum seeker groups for inclusion in systematic reviews. High-quality government reports and other grey literature relevant to refugees may not always be identified in conventional literature searches. During the process of conducting a recent systematic review, we developed a novel strategy for systematically searching international refugee and asylum seeker-related grey literature. The approach targets governmental health departments and statistical agencies, who have considerable access to refugee and asylum seeker populations for research purposes but typically do not publish findings in academic forums. Compared to a conventional grey literature search strategy, our novel technique yielded an eightfold increase in relevant high-quality grey sources that provided valuable content in informing our review. Incorporating a search of the grey literature into systematic reviews of refugee and asylum seeker research is essential to providing a more complete view of the evidence. Our novel strategy offers a practical and feasible method of conducting systematic grey literature searches that may be adaptable to a range of research questions, contexts, and resource constraints. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Manual search approaches used by systematic reviewers in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassar, Matt; Atakpo, Paul; Kash, Melissa J

    2016-10-01

    Manual searches are supplemental approaches to database searches to identify additional primary studies for systematic reviews. The authors argue that these manual approaches, in particular hand-searching and perusing reference lists, are often considered the same yet lead to different outcomes. We conducted a PubMed search for systematic reviews in the top 10 dermatology journals (January 2006-January 2016). After screening, the final sample comprised 292 reviews. Statements related to manual searches were extracted from each review and categorized by the primary and secondary authors. Each statement was categorized as either "Search of Reference List," "Hand Search," "Both," or "Unclear." Of the 292 systematic reviews included in our sample, 143 reviews (48.97%) did not report a hand-search or scan of reference lists. One-hundred thirty-six reviews (46.58%) reported searches of reference lists, while 4 reviews (1.37%) reported systematic hand-searches. Three reviews (1.03%) reported use of both hand-searches and scanning reference lists. Six reviews (2.05%) were classified as unclear due to vague wording. Authors of systematic reviews published in dermatology journals in our study sample scanned reference lists more frequently than they conducted hand-searches, possibly contributing to biased search outcomes. We encourage systematic reviewers to routinely practice hand-searching in order to minimize bias.

  16. Reporting Quality of Search Methods in Systematic Reviews of HIV Behavioral Interventions (2000–2010): Are the Searches Clearly Explained, Systematic and Reproducible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Mary M.; DeLuca, Julia B.; Crepaz, Nicole; Lyles, Cynthia M.

    2018-01-01

    Systematic reviews are an essential tool for researchers, prevention providers and policy makers who want to remain current with the evidence in the field. Systematic review must adhere to strict standards, as the results can provide a more objective appraisal of evidence for making scientific decisions than traditional narrative reviews. An integral component of a systematic review is the development and execution of a comprehensive systematic search to collect available and relevant information. A number of reporting guidelines have been developed to ensure quality publications of systematic reviews. These guidelines provide the essential elements to include in the review process and report in the final publication for complete transparency. We identified the common elements of reporting guidelines and examined the reporting quality of search methods in HIV behavioral intervention literature. Consistent with the findings from previous evaluations of reporting search methods of systematic reviews in other fields, our review shows a lack of full and transparent reporting within systematic reviews even though a plethora of guidelines exist. This review underscores the need for promoting the completeness of and adherence to transparent systematic search reporting within systematic reviews. PMID:26052651

  17. Health economic analyses in medical nutrition: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walzer S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Walzer,1,2 Daniel Droeschel,1,3 Mark Nuijten,4 Hélène Chevrou-Séverac5 1MArS Market Access and Pricing Strategy GmbH, Weil am Rhein, Germany; 2State University Baden-Wuerttemberg, Loerrach, Germany; 3Riedlingen University, SRH FernHochschule, Riedlingen, Germany; 4Ars Accessus Medica BV, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 5Nestlé Health Science, Vevey, Switzerland Background: Medical nutrition is a specific nutrition category either covering specific dietary needs and/or nutrient deficiency in patients or feeding patients unable to eat normally. Medical nutrition is regulated by a specific bill in Europe and in the US, with specific legislation and guidelines, and is provided to patients with special nutritional needs and indications for nutrition support. Therefore, medical nutrition products are delivered by medical prescription and supervised by health care professionals. Although these products have existed for more than 2 decades, health economic evidence of medical nutrition interventions is scarce. This research assesses the current published health economic evidence for medical nutrition by performing a systematic literature review related to health economic analysis of medical nutrition. Methods: A systematic literature search was done using standard literature databases, including PubMed, the Health Technology Assessment Database, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database. Additionally, a free web-based search was conducted using the same search terms utilized in the systematic database search. The clinical background and basis of the analysis, health economic design, and results were extracted from the papers finally selected. The Drummond checklist was used to validate the quality of health economic modeling studies and the AMSTAR (A Measurement Tool to Assess Systematic Reviews checklist was used for published systematic reviews. Results: Fifty-three papers were identified and obtained via PubMed, or directly

  18. Yield impacting systematic defects search and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Xu, Qingxiu; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Xing; Ning, Jay; Cheng, Guojie; Chen, Shijie; Zhang, Gary; Vikram, Abhishek; Su, Bo

    2012-03-01

    Despite great effort before design tapeout, there are still some pattern related systematic defects showing up in production, which impact product yield. Through various check points in the production life cycle endeavor is made to detect these defective patterns. It is seen that apart from the known defective patterns, slight variations of polygon sizes and shapes in the known defective patterns also cause yield loss. This complexity is further compounded when interactions among multiple process layers causes the defect. Normally the exact pattern matching techniques cannot detect these variations of the defective patterns. With the currently existing tools in the fab it is a challenge to define the 'sensitive patterns', which are arbitrary variations in the known 'defective patterns'. A design based approach has been successfully experimented on product wafers to detect yield impacting defects that greatly reduces the TAT for hotspot analysis and also provides optimized care area definition to enable high sensitivity wafer inspection. A novel Rule based pattern search technique developed by Anchor Semiconductor has been used to find sensitive patterns in the full chip design. This technique allows GUI based pattern search rule generation like, edge move or edge-to-edge distance range, so that any variations of a particular sensitive pattern can be captured and flagged. Especially the pattern rules involving multiple process layers, like M1-V1-M2, can be defined easily using this technique. Apart from using this novel pattern search technique, design signatures are also extracted around the defect locations in the wafer and used in defect classification. This enhanced defect classification greatly helps in determining most critical defects among the total defect population. The effectiveness of this technique has been established through design to defect correlation and SEM verification. In this paper we will report details of the design based experiments that

  19. A student's guide to searching the literature using online databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Casey W.; Belyea, Dustin; Chabot, Michelle; Messina, Troy

    2012-02-01

    A method is described to empower students to efficiently perform general and specific literature searches using online resources [Miller et al., Am. J. Phys. 77, 1112 (2009)]. The method was tested on multiple groups, including undergraduate and graduate students with varying backgrounds in scientific literature searches. Students involved in this study showed marked improvement in their awareness of how and where to find scientific information. Repeated exposure to literature searching methods appears worthwhile, starting early in the undergraduate career, and even in graduate school orientation.

  20. Manual search approaches used by systematic reviewers in dermatology

    OpenAIRE

    Vassar, Matt; Atakpo, Paul; Kash, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Manual searches are supplemental approaches to database searches to identify additional primary studies for systematic reviews. The authors argue that these manual approaches, in particular hand-searching and perusing reference lists, are often considered the same yet lead to different outcomes. Methods: We conducted a PubMed search for systematic reviews in the top 10 dermatology journals (January 2006–January 2016). After screening, the final sample comprised 292 reviews. Sta...

  1. Relationship between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders: a systematic review of literature from 1998 to 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manfredini, D.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The present paper aims to systematically review the literature on the temporomandibular disorders (TMD)-bruxism relationship published from 1998 to 2008. Study design: A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database was performed to identify all studies on

  2. Is bruxism a risk factor for dental implants? A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manfredini, D.; Poggio, C.E.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the literature on the role of bruxism as a risk factor for the different complications on dental implant-supported rehabilitations. Material and Methods A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's Medline Database was performed to identify all

  3. Risk factors for aspiration pneumonia in frail older people: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarel-Wierink, C.D. van der; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the risks for aspiration pneumonia in frail older people and the contribution of bad oral health among the risk factors. DESIGN: Systematic literature review. SETTING: PubMed (Medline), Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched for

  4. [Aggression of Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia: a systematic literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiongni; Zhou, Jiansong

    2012-07-01

    To systematically review and analyze literature on episodes of aggression in psychiatric wards and to determine the coping and preventive strategies employed to deal with aggression of patients with schizophrenia. We used the key words such as "schizophrenia" and "aggression" to collect literature citations, which were published between July 1997 and November 2011, by searching databases such as the Chinese Journal Full-text Database (CJFD). The literature reports of aggression by patients with schizophrenia were surveyed by computer-assisted searches, scanning of reference lists, and manual search of relevant journals. We analyzed the reports of episodes of aggression in psychiatric wards. Prevalence of aggression in psychiatric wards was reported to range from 9.1% (95% CI: 6.3 to 11.9) to 49.6% (95% CI: 41.1 to 58.1), with most reports in the range of 20% to 40% (mean 28.0%). The aggressive behavior often occurred in special groups and typically bore a close relationship with the patient's personal qualities, social environment, or psychiatric symptoms. The aggressive behaviors can be attributed to a lack of standardized assessments and intervention instruments. There is a high risk of aggression in Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia, and it is urgent to establish the scientific, standardized, operational systems for assessing and treating the aggression of these patients.

  5. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Divoli

    Full Text Available When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  6. Testing Scientific Software: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanewala, Upulee; Bieman, James M

    2014-10-01

    Scientific software plays an important role in critical decision making, for example making weather predictions based on climate models, and computation of evidence for research publications. Recently, scientists have had to retract publications due to errors caused by software faults. Systematic testing can identify such faults in code. This study aims to identify specific challenges, proposed solutions, and unsolved problems faced when testing scientific software. We conducted a systematic literature survey to identify and analyze relevant literature. We identified 62 studies that provided relevant information about testing scientific software. We found that challenges faced when testing scientific software fall into two main categories: (1) testing challenges that occur due to characteristics of scientific software such as oracle problems and (2) testing challenges that occur due to cultural differences between scientists and the software engineering community such as viewing the code and the model that it implements as inseparable entities. In addition, we identified methods to potentially overcome these challenges and their limitations. Finally we describe unsolved challenges and how software engineering researchers and practitioners can help to overcome them. Scientific software presents special challenges for testing. Specifically, cultural differences between scientist developers and software engineers, along with the characteristics of the scientific software make testing more difficult. Existing techniques such as code clone detection can help to improve the testing process. Software engineers should consider special challenges posed by scientific software such as oracle problems when developing testing techniques.

  7. The influence of personality on computer programming: a summary of a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Karimi, Zahra; Wagner, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize the results of the systematic literature review we recently did on the influence of personality on computer programming (Karimi et al. 2014). In the SLR, we systematically searched online search resources and found 50 empirical and 4 theoretical studies with findings on the relations between personality characteristics and performance in computer programming. 28 empirical studies found an influence of personality on programming. We discussed that t...

  8. Searching the online biomedical literature from developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    These literature retrieval methods include the use of the popular. PubMed as well as internet search engines. Specific websites catering to developing countries' information and journals' websites are also highlighted. Key words: Research information, retrieval methods, internet, search engines, PubMed. INTRODUCTION.

  9. Acceptance and compliance with external hip protectors: A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Deville, W.L.J.M.; Bouter, L.M.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Hip fractures may be prevented by the use of external hip protectors, but compliance is often poor. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the determinants of compliance with hip protectors by systematically reviewing the literature. A literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase

  10. Acceptance and compliance with external hip protectors: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoor, N.M. van; Devillé, W.L.; Bouter, L.M.; Lips, P.

    2002-01-01

    Hip fractures may be prevented by the use of external hip protectors, but compliance is often poor. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the determinants of compliance with hip protectors by systematically reviewing the literature. A literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase

  11. Thick-film analysis: literature search and bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehman, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    A literature search was conducted to support development of in-house diagnostic testing of thick film materials for hybrid microcircuits. A background literature review covered thick film formulation, processing, structure, and performance. Important material properties and tests were identified and several test procedures were obtained. Several tests were selected for thick film diagnosis at Bendix Kansas City. 126 references

  12. Searching the online biomedical literature from developing countries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This commentary highlights popular research literature databases and the use of the internet to obtain valuable research information. These literature retrieval methods include the use of the popular PubMed as well as internet search engines. Specific websites catering to developing countries' information and journals' ...

  13. An Exercise to Coach Students on Literature Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Kate J.; Schaller, Chris P.; Jones, T. Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The ability to access chemical literature is an important skill for the developing chemist. Although the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John's University chemistry department had implemented a variety of individual exercises into the introductory course sequence to help students develop literature searching skills, second-year students still…

  14. Management and leadership competence in hospitals: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlainen, Vuokko; Kivinen, Tuula; Lammintakanen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this study is to describe the characteristics of management and leadership competence of health-care leaders and managers, especially in the hospital environment. Health-care leaders and managers in this study were both nursing and physician managers. Competence was assessed by evaluating the knowledge, skills, attitudes and abilities that enable management and leadership tasks. Design/methodology/approach - A systematic literature review was performed to find articles that identify and describe the characteristics of management and leadership competence. Searches of electronic databases were conducted using set criteria for article selection. Altogether, 13 papers underwent an inductive content analysis. Findings - The characteristics of management and leadership competence were categorized into the following groups: health-care-context-related, operational and general. Research limitations/implications - One limitation of the study is that only 13 articles were found in the literature regarding the characteristics of management and leadership competence. However, the search terms were relevant, and the search process was endorsed by an information specialist. The study findings imply the need to shift away from the individual approach to leadership and management competence. Management and leadership need to be assessed more frequently from a holistic perspective, and not merely on the basis of position in the organizational hierarchy or of profession in health care. Originality/value - The authors' evaluation of the characteristics of management and leadership competence without a concentrated profession-based approach is original.

  15. Systematic review of handoff mnemonics literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Leitzsch, Jessica; Little, Brian W

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of published English-language articles on handoffs is conducted (1987 to June 4, 2008). Forty-six articles describing 24 handoff mnemonics are identified by trained reviewers. The majority (82.6%) have been published in the last 3 years (2006-2008), and SBAR (Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation) is the most frequently cited mnemonic (69.6%). Of 7 handoff research articles, only 4 study mnemonics. All 4 of these studies have relatively small sample sizes (10-100) and lack validated instruments. Only 1 study has obtained IRB approval. Scientifically rigorous research studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of handoff mnemonics. These should be published in the peer-reviewed literature using the Standards for QUality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE) guidelines.

  16. Identifying Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Search Terminology: A Systematic Review of Health Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joseph G L; Ylioja, Thomas; Lackey, Mellanye

    2016-01-01

    Research on the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations can provide important information to address existing health inequalities. Finding existing research in LGBT health can prove challenging due to the plethora of terminology used. We sought to describe existing search strategies and to identify more comprehensive LGBT search terminology. We iteratively created a search string to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses about LGBT health and implemented it in Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases on May 28-29, 2015. We hand-searched the journal LGBT Health. Inclusion criteria were: systematic reviews and meta-analyses that addressed LGBT health, used systematic searching, and used independent coders for inclusion. The published search terminology in each record and search strings provided by authors on request were cross-referenced with our original search to identify additional terminology. Our search process identified 19 systematic reviews meeting inclusion criteria. The number of search terms used to identify LGBT-related records ranged from 1 to 31. From the included studies, we identified 46 new search terms related to LGBT health. We removed five search terms as inappropriate and added five search terms used in the field. The resulting search string included 82 terms. There is room to improve the quality of searching and reporting in LGBT health systematic reviews. Future work should attempt to enhance the positive predictive value of LGBT health searches. Our findings can assist LGBT health reviewers in capturing the diversity of LGBT terminology when searching.

  17. Vasculitis as an adverse event following immunization - Systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, Caterina; Trotta, Francesco; Felicetti, Patrizia; Alarcón, Graciela S; Santuccio, Carmela; Bachtiar, Novilia Sjafri; Brauchli Pernus, Yolanda; Chandler, Rebecca; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Hadden, Robert D M; Kucuku, Merita; Ozen, Seza; Pahud, Barbara; Top, Karina; Varricchio, Frederick; Wise, Robert P; Zanoni, Giovanna; Živković, Saša; Bonhoeffer, Jan

    2016-12-12

    Several types of vasculitis have been observed and reported in temporal association with the administration of various vaccines. A systematic review of current evidence is lacking. This systematic literature review aimed to assess available evidence and current reporting practice of vasculitides as adverse events following immunization (AEFI). We reviewed the literature from 1st January 1994 to 30th June 2014. This review comprises randomized controlled trials, observational studies, case series, case reports, reviews and comments regardless of vaccine and target population. The initial search resulted in the identification of 6656 articles. Of these, 157 articles were assessed for eligibility and 75 studies were considered for analysis, including 6 retrospective/observational studies, 2 randomized controlled trials, 7 reviews, 11 case series, 46 case reports and 3 comments. Most of the larger, higher quality studies found no causal association between vaccination and subsequent development of vasculitis, including several studies on Kawasaki disease and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (IgA vasculitis). Smaller case series reported a few cases of vasculitis following BCG and vaccines against influenza and hepatitis. Only 24% of the articles reported using a case definition of vasculitis. Existing literature does not allow establishing a causative link between vaccination and vasculitides. Further investigations were strengthened by the use of standardized case definitions and methods for data collection, analysis and presentation to improve data comparability and interpretation of vasculitis cases following immunization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. A comparison of searching the Cochrane library databases via CRD, Ovid and Wiley: implications for systematic searching and information services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Jenny; Jefferies, Jayne; Kendrick, Jenny; Nicholls, Dave; Boynton, Janette; Frankish, Ruth

    2014-03-01

    The Cochrane Library databases are available via different interfaces; evidence in the literature, together with anecdotal evidence, shows interfaces perform differently. To ensure the quality of searches, a study was undertaken to systematically explore the functionality of interfaces. To demonstrate differences in functionality when searching the same databases across different interfaces; to discuss the implications this may have on searching; and in a wider context, to suggest a 'best match' for comparable searching. Detailed cross-comparisons of a selection of search functions including MeSH terms, free text, proximity operators and truncation were undertaken in databases accessed via CRD, Wiley and Ovid. Up to three terms per function were selected and analysed. Differences were identified in the way searches for MeSH headings are executed, which fields are searched, how proximity operators perform, the word order searched and where terms are searched. This adds to a body of evidence demonstrating a lack of consistency in searching across different interfaces. A 'best match' for comparable searching is suggested. Differences between interfaces offering the same database content can have implications for the success of a search, on user education, and on database evaluation and purchasing decisions. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  19. Children Reading to Dogs: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Susannah Hall

    Full Text Available Despite growing interest in the value of human-animal interactions (HAI to human mental and physical health the quality of the evidence on which postulated benefits from animals to human psychological health are based is often unclear. To date there exist no systematic reviews on the effects of HAI in educational settings specifically focussing on the perceived benefits to children of reading to dogs. With rising popularity and implementation of these programmes in schools, it is essential that the evidence base exploring the pedagogic value of these initiatives is well documented.Using PRISMA guidelines we systematically investigated the literature reporting the pedagogic effects of reading to dogs. Because research in this area is in the early stages of scientific enquiry we adopted broad inclusion criteria, accepting all reports which discussed measurable effects related to the topic that were written in English. Multiple online databases were searched during January-March 2015; grey literature searches were also conducted. The search results which met the inclusion criteria were evaluated, and discussed, in relation to the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence; 27 papers were classified as Level 5, 13 as Level 4, 7 as Level 2c and 1 as Level 2b.The evidence suggests that reading to a dog may have a beneficial effect on a number of behavioural processes which contribute to a positive effect on the environment in which reading is practiced, leading to improved reading performance. However, the evidence base on which these inferences are made is of low quality. There is a clear need for the use of higher quality research methodologies and the inclusion of appropriate controls in order to draw causal inferences on whether or how reading to dogs may benefit children's reading practices. The mechanisms for any effect remain a matter of conjecture.

  20. Children Reading to Dogs: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sophie Susannah; Gee, Nancy R; Mills, Daniel Simon

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing interest in the value of human-animal interactions (HAI) to human mental and physical health the quality of the evidence on which postulated benefits from animals to human psychological health are based is often unclear. To date there exist no systematic reviews on the effects of HAI in educational settings specifically focussing on the perceived benefits to children of reading to dogs. With rising popularity and implementation of these programmes in schools, it is essential that the evidence base exploring the pedagogic value of these initiatives is well documented. Using PRISMA guidelines we systematically investigated the literature reporting the pedagogic effects of reading to dogs. Because research in this area is in the early stages of scientific enquiry we adopted broad inclusion criteria, accepting all reports which discussed measurable effects related to the topic that were written in English. Multiple online databases were searched during January-March 2015; grey literature searches were also conducted. The search results which met the inclusion criteria were evaluated, and discussed, in relation to the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence; 27 papers were classified as Level 5, 13 as Level 4, 7 as Level 2c and 1 as Level 2b. The evidence suggests that reading to a dog may have a beneficial effect on a number of behavioural processes which contribute to a positive effect on the environment in which reading is practiced, leading to improved reading performance. However, the evidence base on which these inferences are made is of low quality. There is a clear need for the use of higher quality research methodologies and the inclusion of appropriate controls in order to draw causal inferences on whether or how reading to dogs may benefit children's reading practices. The mechanisms for any effect remain a matter of conjecture.

  1. Children Reading to Dogs: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sophie Susannah; Gee, Nancy R.; Mills, Daniel Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite growing interest in the value of human-animal interactions (HAI) to human mental and physical health the quality of the evidence on which postulated benefits from animals to human psychological health are based is often unclear. To date there exist no systematic reviews on the effects of HAI in educational settings specifically focussing on the perceived benefits to children of reading to dogs. With rising popularity and implementation of these programmes in schools, it is essential that the evidence base exploring the pedagogic value of these initiatives is well documented. Methods Using PRISMA guidelines we systematically investigated the literature reporting the pedagogic effects of reading to dogs. Because research in this area is in the early stages of scientific enquiry we adopted broad inclusion criteria, accepting all reports which discussed measurable effects related to the topic that were written in English. Multiple online databases were searched during January-March 2015; grey literature searches were also conducted. The search results which met the inclusion criteria were evaluated, and discussed, in relation to the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine levels of evidence; 27 papers were classified as Level 5, 13 as Level 4, 7 as Level 2c and 1 as Level 2b. Conclusion The evidence suggests that reading to a dog may have a beneficial effect on a number of behavioural processes which contribute to a positive effect on the environment in which reading is practiced, leading to improved reading performance. However, the evidence base on which these inferences are made is of low quality. There is a clear need for the use of higher quality research methodologies and the inclusion of appropriate controls in order to draw causal inferences on whether or how reading to dogs may benefit children’s reading practices. The mechanisms for any effect remain a matter of conjecture. PMID:26901412

  2. An optimal search filter for retrieving systematic reviews and meta-analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Health-evidence.ca is an online registry of systematic reviews evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. Extensive searching of bibliographic databases is required to keep the registry up to date. However, search filters have been developed to assist in searching the extensive amount of published literature indexed. Search filters can be designed to find literature related to a certain subject (i.e. content-specific filter) or particular study designs (i.e. methodological filter). The objective of this paper is to describe the development and validation of the health-evidence.ca Systematic Review search filter and to compare its performance to other available systematic review filters. Methods This analysis of search filters was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. The performance of thirty-one search filters in total was assessed. A validation data set of 219 articles indexed between January 2004 and December 2005 was used to evaluate performance on sensitivity, specificity, precision and the number needed to read for each filter. Results Nineteen of 31 search filters were effective in retrieving a high level of relevant articles (sensitivity scores greater than 85%). The majority achieved a high degree of sensitivity at the expense of precision and yielded large result sets. The main advantage of the health-evidence.ca Systematic Review search filter in comparison to the other filters was that it maintained the same level of sensitivity while reducing the number of articles that needed to be screened. Conclusions The health-evidence.ca Systematic Review search filter is a useful tool for identifying published systematic reviews, with further screening to identify those evaluating the effectiveness of public health interventions. The filter that narrows the focus saves considerable time and resources during updates of this online resource, without sacrificing sensitivity. PMID:22512835

  3. Self-injury and externalizing pathology: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Gergely; Horvath, Lili Olga; Balazs, Judit

    2017-05-03

    During the last decade there is a growing scientific interest in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). The aim of the current paper was to review systematically the literature with a special focus on the associations between self-injurious behaviours and externalizing psychopathology. An additional aim was to review terminology and measurements of self-injurious behaviour and the connection between self-injurious behaviours and suicide in the included publications. A systematic literature search was conducted on 31st December 2016 in five databases (PubMed, OVID Medline, OVID PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science) with two categories of search terms (1. nonsuicidal self-injury, non-suicidal self-injury, NSSI, self-injurious behaviour, SIB, deliberate self-harm, DSH, self-injury; 2. externalizing disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD, conduct disorder, CD, oppositional defiant disorder, OD, ODD). Finally 35 papers were included. Eleven different terms were found for describing self-injurious behaviours and 20 methods for measuring it. NSSI has the clearest definition. All the examined externalizing psychopathologies had strong associations with self-injurious behaviours according to: higher prevalence rates in externalizing groups than in control groups, higher externalizing scores on the externalizing scales of questionnaires, higher symptom severity in self-injurious groups. Eight studies investigated the relationship between suicide and self-injurious behaviours and found high overlap between the two phenomena and similar risk factors. Based on the current findings the association between externalizing psychopathology and self-injurious behaviours has been proven by the scientific literature. Similarly to other reviews on self-injurious behaviours the confusion in terminology and methodology was noticed. NSSI is suggested for use as a distinct term. Further studies should investigate the role of comorbid conditions in NSSI, especially when internalizing

  4. Text mining for search term development in systematic reviewing: A discussion of some methods and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Claire; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Thomas, James

    2017-09-01

    Using text mining to aid the development of database search strings for topics described by diverse terminology has potential benefits for systematic reviews; however, methods and tools for accomplishing this are poorly covered in the research methods literature. We briefly review the literature on applications of text mining for search term development for systematic reviewing. We found that the tools can be used in 5 overarching ways: improving the precision of searches; identifying search terms to improve search sensitivity; aiding the translation of search strategies across databases; searching and screening within an integrated system; and developing objectively derived search strategies. Using a case study and selected examples, we then reflect on the utility of certain technologies (term frequency-inverse document frequency and Termine, term frequency, and clustering) in improving the precision and sensitivity of searches. Challenges in using these tools are discussed. The utility of these tools is influenced by the different capabilities of the tools, the way the tools are used, and the text that is analysed. Increased awareness of how the tools perform facilitates the further development of methods for their use in systematic reviews. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Personal utility in genomic testing: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Jennefer N; Turbitt, Erin; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2017-06-01

    Researchers and clinicians refer to outcomes of genomic testing that extend beyond clinical utility as 'personal utility'. No systematic delineation of personal utility exists, making it challenging to appreciate its scope. Identifying empirical elements of personal utility reported in the literature offers an inventory that can be subsequently ranked for its relative value by those who have undergone genomic testing. A systematic review was conducted of the peer-reviewed literature reporting non-health-related outcomes of genomic testing from 1 January 2003 to 5 August 2016. Inclusion criteria specified English language, date of publication, and presence of empirical evidence. Identified outcomes were iteratively coded into unique domains. The search returned 551 abstracts from which 31 studies met the inclusion criteria. Study populations and type of genomic testing varied. Coding resulted in 15 distinct elements of personal utility, organized into three domains related to personal outcomes: affective, cognitive, and behavioral; and one domain related to social outcomes. The domains of personal utility may inform pre-test counseling by helping patients anticipate potential value of test results beyond clinical utility. Identified elements may also inform investigations into the prevalence and importance of personal utility to future test users.

  6. Allergies and suicidal behaviors: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõlves, Kairi; Barker, Emma; De Leo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Allergies are among the most common chronic conditions. In addition to physical and social impacts, a number of studies have consistently linked allergies to poor psychological outcomes, including depression and anxiety. The aim of the present systematic literature review was to analyze the existing literature about the relationship between allergies and fatal and nonfatal suicidal behaviors. Data sources include articles retrieved from Scopus, PubMed, ProQuest, and Web of Knowledge. Search terms: "suicid* and (allerg* or hay fever or atop* or eczema or aeroallergen*)" in English-language peer-reviewed journals between 1990 and 2014. Original research articles that provide empiric evidence about the potential link between allergies and suicidal behaviors. The initial search identified a total of 769 articles with 17 original research articles that present empiric evidence. Nine articles analyzed the relationship between allergies and fatal suicidal behavior, and nine analyzed nonfatal suicidal behaviors (one article included both). There currently is little research into the relationship between allergies and suicidal behavior. The review was restricted to English-language articles published within the chosen time period; other limitations included the small number of articles that involve suicide mortality, and the fact that the majority of articles originated from the United States and Scandinavia. Analysis of the results indicates a link between allergies and suicidality, particularly suicide mortality; however, results for nonfatal suicidal behaviors are mixed. It is important that further research by using more rigorous study designs be carried out to lend strength to these findings.

  7. Anti-bullying interventions in schools: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge Luiz da; Oliveira, Wanderlei Abadio de; Mello, Flávia Carvalho Malta de; Andrade, Luciane Sá de; Bazon, Marina Rezende; Silva, Marta Angélica Iossi

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a systematic literature review addressing rigorously planned and assessed interventions intended to reduce school bullying. The search for papers was performed in four databases (Lilacs, Psycinfo, Scielo and Web of Science) and guided by the question: What are the interventions used to reduce bullying in schools? Only case-control studies specifically focusing on school bullying without a time frame were included. The methodological quality of investigations was assessed using the SIGN checklist. A total of 18 papers composed the corpus of analysis and all were considered to have high methodological quality. The interventions conducted in the revised studies were divided into four categories: multi-component or whole-school, social skills training, curricular, and computerized. The review synthesizes knowledge that can be used to contemplate practices and intervention programs in the education and health fields with a multidisciplinary nature.

  8. Opportunistic intestinal parasites in hemodialysis patients - a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solimar Almeida de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this systematic literature review was to identify the occurrence of opportunistic enteric parasites in chronic kidney patient undergoing hemodialysis. The review consisted on searching articles published on MEDLINE, LILACS, SciELO, and PubMed databases between 1991 and 2013. A total 178 articles were identified, ten of which were considered relevant for the present study. In the referred studies, the researchers demonstrated that immunosuppressed patients undergoing hemodialysis are potentially infected by opportunistic enteric agents. Further studies are needed on this topic, as there is a growing global concern with chronic kidney diseases and the potential for these patients contracting opportunistic diseases, which, inclusively, could contaminate hospital environments with opportunistic enteric protozoa. Descriptors: Renal Dialysis; Blastocystis hominis; Cryptosporidium; Cyclospora; Isospora.

  9. Treatment of holistic suffering in cancer: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Megan; Aldridge, Lynley; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian; Price, Melanie A; Webster, Fleur

    2015-12-01

    Holistic suffering is a debilitating problem for cancer patients. Although many treatments have been suggested for its alleviation, they have not been compared for effectiveness. This literature review seeks to identify what interventions are effective in treatment of holistic suffering of cancer patients. A systematic review was conducted to identify and evaluate studies of interventions for holistic suffering in adult cancer patients. Search terms were generated iteratively from the literature. MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and PsycINFO databases were searched for the years 1992-2015. Included studies were peer-reviewed, English language reports of either a controlled trial or a randomised controlled trial focusing on therapies aimed at relieving suffering in adult cancer patients. Articles were excluded if focused predominantly on spiritual or existential issues or concerns not leading to suffering. Studies were graded for quality using the QualSyst quantitative checklist. Levels of evidence were ascertained by completing the National Health and Medical Research Council criteria. Results are reported according to AMSTAR guidelines. The studies represented seven intervention types. Meaning-centred, hope-centred and stress-reduction interventions were found to be effective. Results of both psycho-educational and spiritual interventions in improving spiritual well-being were mixed. Supportive-expressive interventions - with the exception of forgiveness therapy - were not efficacious. There was little or no evidence for the efficacy of creative and healing arts and other assessed interventions such as animal therapy and haptotherapy. This systematic review found that spiritual well-being, meaning, hope and benefit finding can be positively impacted by a variety of treatment modalities. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Performing Systematic Literature Reviews with Novices: An Iterative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallée, Mathieu; Robillard, Pierre-N.; Mirsalari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Reviewers performing systematic literature reviews require understanding of the review process and of the knowledge domain. This paper presents an iterative approach for conducting systematic literature reviews that addresses the problems faced by reviewers who are novices in one or both levels of understanding. This approach is derived from…

  11. Workplace health promotion for older workers: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscia, Andrea; Moscato, Umberto; La Milia, Daniele Ignazio; Milovanovic, Sonja; Stojanovic, Jovana; Borghini, Alice; Collamati, Agnese; Ricciardi, Walter; Magnavita, Nicola

    2016-09-05

    Aging of the workforce is a growing problem. As workers age, their physical, physiological and psychosocial capabilities change. Keeping older workers healthy and productive is a key goal of European labor policy and health promotion is a key to achieve this result. Previous studies about workplace health promotion (WHP) programs are usually focused on the entire workforce or to a specific topic. Within the framework of the EU-CHAFEA ProHealth65+ project, this paper aims to systematically review the literature on WHP interventions specifically targeted to older workers (OWs). This systematic review was conducted by making a comprehensive search of MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS, The Cochrane Library, CINAHL and PsychINFO databases. Search terms included ageing (and synonyms), worker (and synonyms), intervention (and synonyms), and health (and synonyms). The search was limited to papers in English or Italian published between January, 1(st) 2000 and May, 31(st) 2015. Relevant references in the selected articles were also analyzed. Of the 299 articles initially identified as relating to the topic, 18 articles met the inclusion criteria. The type, methods and outcome of interventions in the WHP programs retrieved were heterogenous, as was the definition of the age at which a worker is considered to be 'older'. Most of the available studies had been conducted on small samples for a limited period of time. Our review shows that, although this issue is of great importance, studies addressing WHP actions for OWs are few and generally of poor quality. Current evidence fails to show that WHP programs improve the work ability, productivity or job retention of older workers. In addition, there is limited evidence that WHP programs are effective in improving lifestyles and concur to maintain the health and well-being of older workers. There is a need for future WHP programs to be well-designed so that the effectiveness and cost-benefit of workplace interventions can be

  12. Sham Surgery in Orthopedics: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of sham surgery in orthopedics by conducting a systematic review of literature. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All randomized controlled trials comparing surgery versus sham surgery in orthopedics were included. Data were extracted and methodological quality was assessed by two reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. Levels of scientific evidence, based on the direction of outcomes of the trials, were established following the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Hierarchy of Evidence (Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 1999). This review includes six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 277 subjects. All six studies were rated as very good on methodological quality. Heterogeneity across the studies, with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used, prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, demonstrated that sham surgery in orthopedics was as effective as actual surgery in reducing pain and improving disability. This review suggests that sham surgery has shown to be just as effective as actual surgery in reducing pain and disability; however, care should be taken to generalize findings because of the limited number of studies. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Product-related Environmental Performance Indicators: a systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issa, Isabela I.; Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; McAloone, Tim C.

    2013-01-01

    structured approach to support EPIs selection is still lacking. This paper presents the efforts made in order to identify, classify and systematize the existing EPIs based on the systematic literature review. From the review, 261 EPIs were identified, classified, and then systematized in a digital database...

  14. Clinical leadership and nursing explored: A literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, David; Stanley, Karen

    2017-10-27

    To explore what we know of the concept of clinical leadership and what the term means. Clues to the definition of clinical leadership, the attributes of effective and less effective clinical leaders, models of clinical leadership and the barriers that hinder clinical leadership development were explored. While nursing leadership and healthcare leadership are terms that have been evident in nursing and health industry literature for many decades, clinical leadership is a relatively new term and is may still be misunderstood. A search was undertaken of formal and informal literature using a library database and a range of search engines for the words "clinical leadership" and "clinical leadership in nursing." In each case, the full search parameters were employed with searches between 1974-2016. Full-text articles were requested, and English was the preferred language. In total, 3,259 publications were located through seven database search tools, although these included a large number of duplications. Following further informal searches and removing irrelevant material, 27 research or literature review focused papers were retained that included 17 qualitative studies, one quantitative study, one mixed method study, one Delphi study and two that compared other research studies. As well, five literature reviews were retained in the synthesis. The data synthesis resulted five categories: definitions of clinical leadership, characteristics most likely or least associated with clinical leadership, models applied to clinical leadership and limits to clinical leadership development. Clinical leaders are recognised for having their values and beliefs parallel their actions and interventions. They are found across the spectrum of health organisations, often at the highest level for clinical interaction, but not commonly at the highest management level in a ward or unit team and they are seen in all clinical environments. Clinical Leadership and an understanding on how

  15. Personal Health Records: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Information and communication technology (ICT) has transformed the health care field worldwide. One of the main drivers of this change is the electronic health record (EHR). However, there are still open issues and challenges because the EHR usually reflects the partial view of a health care provider without the ability for patients to control or interact with their data. Furthermore, with the growth of mobile and ubiquitous computing, the number of records regarding personal health is increasing exponentially. This movement has been characterized as the Internet of Things (IoT), including the widespread development of wearable computing technology and assorted types of health-related sensors. This leads to the need for an integrated method of storing health-related data, defined as the personal health record (PHR), which could be used by health care providers and patients. This approach could combine EHRs with data gathered from sensors or other wearable computing devices. This unified view of patients’ health could be shared with providers, who may not only use previous health-related records but also expand them with data resulting from their interactions. Another PHR advantage is that patients can interact with their health data, making decisions that may positively affect their health. Objective This work aimed to explore the recent literature related to PHRs by defining the taxonomy and identifying challenges and open questions. In addition, this study specifically sought to identify data types, standards, profiles, goals, methods, functions, and architecture with regard to PHRs. Methods The method to achieve these objectives consists of using the systematic literature review approach, which is guided by research questions using the population, intervention, comparison, outcome, and context (PICOC) criteria. Results As a result, we reviewed more than 5000 scientific studies published in the last 10 years, selected the most significant approaches

  16. Usefulness of systematic review search strategies in finding child health systematic reviews in MEDLINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boluyt, Nicole; Tjosvold, Lisa; Lefebvre, Carol; Klassen, Terry P.; Offringa, Martin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the sensitivity and precision of existing search strategies for retrieving child health systematic reviews in MEDLINE using PubMed. DESIGN: Filter (diagnostic) accuracy study. We identified existing search strategies for systematic reviews, combined them with a filter that

  17. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagerström Cecilia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more

  18. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Nadine; Boerma, Wienke Gw; Kringos, Dionne S; Bouman, Ans; Francke, Anneke L; Fagerström, Cecilia; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Cosetta; Devillé, Walter

    2011-08-30

    Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the state of home care in Europe requires the

  19. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the

  20. Immunomodulatory dietary polysaccharides: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Erika D

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large body of literature suggests that certain polysaccharides affect immune system function. Much of this literature, however, consists of in vitro studies or studies in which polysaccharides were injected. Their immunologic effects following oral administration is less clear. The purpose of this systematic review was to consolidate and evaluate the available data regarding the specific immunologic effects of dietary polysaccharides. Methods Studies were identified by conducting PubMed and Google Scholar electronic searches and through reviews of polysaccharide article bibliographies. Only articles published in English were included in this review. Two researchers reviewed data on study design, control, sample size, results, and nature of outcome measures. Subsequent searches were conducted to gather information about polysaccharide safety, structure and composition, and disposition. Results We found 62 publications reporting statistically significant effects of orally ingested glucans, pectins, heteroglycans, glucomannans, fucoidans, galactomannans, arabinogalactans and mixed polysaccharide products in rodents. Fifteen controlled human studies reported that oral glucans, arabinogalactans, heteroglycans, and fucoidans exerted significant effects. Although some studies investigated anti-inflammatory effects, most studies investigated the ability of oral polysaccharides to stimulate the immune system. These studies, as well as safety and toxicity studies, suggest that these polysaccharide products appear to be largely well-tolerated. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the oral polysaccharide literature is highly heterogenous and is not sufficient to support broad product structure/function generalizations. Numerous dietary polysaccharides, particularly glucans, appear to elicit diverse immunomodulatory effects in numerous animal tissues, including the blood, GI tract and spleen. Glucan extracts from the Trametes versicolor

  1. Searching and synthesising 'grey literature' and 'grey information' in public health: critical reflections on three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jean; Hillier-Brown, Frances C; Moore, Helen J; Lake, Amelia A; Araujo-Soares, Vera; White, Martin; Summerbell, Carolyn

    2016-09-29

    Grey literature includes a range of documents not controlled by commercial publishing organisations. This means that grey literature can be difficult to search and retrieve for evidence synthesis. Much knowledge and evidence in public health, and other fields, accumulates from innovation in practice. This knowledge may not even be of sufficient formality to meet the definition of grey literature. We term this knowledge 'grey information'. Grey information may be even harder to search for and retrieve than grey literature. On three previous occasions, we have attempted to systematically search for and synthesise public health grey literature and information-both to summarise the extent and nature of particular classes of interventions and to synthesise results of evaluations. Here, we briefly describe these three 'case studies' but focus on our post hoc critical reflections on searching for and synthesising grey literature and information garnered from our experiences of these case studies. We believe these reflections will be useful to future researchers working in this area. Issues discussed include search methods, searching efficiency, replicability of searches, data management, data extraction, assessing study 'quality', data synthesis, time and resources, and differentiating evidence synthesis from primary research. Information on applied public health research questions relating to the nature and range of public health interventions, as well as many evaluations of these interventions, may be predominantly, or only, held in grey literature and grey information. Evidence syntheses on these topics need, therefore, to embrace grey literature and information. Many typical systematic review methods for searching, appraising, managing, and synthesising the evidence base can be adapted for use with grey literature and information. Evidence synthesisers should carefully consider the opportunities and problems offered by including grey literature and information

  2. Identifying Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Search Terminology: A Systematic Review of Health Systematic Reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G L Lee

    Full Text Available Research on the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT populations can provide important information to address existing health inequalities. Finding existing research in LGBT health can prove challenging due to the plethora of terminology used. We sought to describe existing search strategies and to identify more comprehensive LGBT search terminology. We iteratively created a search string to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses about LGBT health and implemented it in Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, and PsycINFO databases on May 28-29, 2015. We hand-searched the journal LGBT Health. Inclusion criteria were: systematic reviews and meta-analyses that addressed LGBT health, used systematic searching, and used independent coders for inclusion. The published search terminology in each record and search strings provided by authors on request were cross-referenced with our original search to identify additional terminology. Our search process identified 19 systematic reviews meeting inclusion criteria. The number of search terms used to identify LGBT-related records ranged from 1 to 31. From the included studies, we identified 46 new search terms related to LGBT health. We removed five search terms as inappropriate and added five search terms used in the field. The resulting search string included 82 terms. There is room to improve the quality of searching and reporting in LGBT health systematic reviews. Future work should attempt to enhance the positive predictive value of LGBT health searches. Our findings can assist LGBT health reviewers in capturing the diversity of LGBT terminology when searching.

  3. Health effects of protein intake in healthy adults: A systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this systematic review is to assess the evidence behind the dietary requirement of protein and to assess the health effects of varying protein intake in healthy adults. The literature search covered the years 2000-2011. Prospective cohort, case-control, and intervention studies were i...

  4. Obesity Intervention Programs among Adolescents Using Social Cognitive Theory: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherniya, Mohammad; Taghipour, Ali; Sharma, Manoj; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Contento, Isobel R.; Keshavarz, Seyed Ali; Mostafavi Darani, Firoozeh; Safarian, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Social cognitive theory (SCT) is a well-known theory for designing nutrition education and physical activity programs for adolescents. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of intervention studies based on SCT in reducing or preventing overweight and obesity in adolescents. An electronic literature search in PubMed-Medline, Web of…

  5. The Clinical Aspects of Mirror Therapy in Rehabilitation: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothgangel, Andreas Stefan; Braun, Susy M.; Beurskens, Anna J.; Seitz, Rudiger J.; Wade, Derick T.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical aspects of mirror therapy (MT) interventions after stroke, phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome. A systematic literature search of the Cochrane Database of controlled trials, PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, PEDro, RehabTrials and Rehadat, was made by two…

  6. Mini-implants in orthodontics: A systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynders, Reint; Ronchi, Laura; Bipat, Shandra

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this article, we systematically reviewed the literature to quantify success and complications encountered with the use of mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage, and to analyze factors associated with success or failure. Methods: Computerized and manual searches were conducted up

  7. Nutrition and Adults with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities: Systematic Literature Review Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Kathleen; Traci, Meg Ann; Seekins, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 4.5 million Americans have an intellectual or developmental disability. Concern is increasing about these individuals' nutrition-related behavior and its implications for their health. This article reports on a systematic search of the current literature listed in the "PsycINFO" and "PubMed" databases related to nutritional status of…

  8. The importance of species name synonyms in literature searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    The synonyms of biological species names are shown to be an important component in comprehensive searches of electronic scientific literature databases but they are not well leveraged within the major literature databases examined. For accepted or valid species names in the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) which have synonyms in the system, and which are found in citations within PLoS, PMC, PubMed or Scopus, both the percentage of species for which citations will not be found if synonyms are not used, and the percentage increase in number of citations found by including synonyms are very often substantial. However, there is no correlation between the number of synonyms per species and the magnitude of the effect. Further, the number of citations found does not generally increase proportionally to the number of synonyms available. Users looking for literature on specific species across all of the resources investigated here are often missing large numbers of citations if they are not manually augmenting their searches with synonyms. Of course, missing citations can have serious consequences by effectively hiding critical information. Literature searches should include synonym relationships and a new web service in ITIS, with examples of how to apply it to this issue, was developed as a result of this study, and is here announced, to aide in this.

  9. The Importance of Species Name Synonyms in Literature Searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Gerald F

    2016-01-01

    The synonyms of biological species names are shown to be an important component in comprehensive searches of electronic scientific literature databases but they are not well leveraged within the major literature databases examined. For accepted or valid species names in the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) which have synonyms in the system, and which are found in citations within PLoS, PMC, PubMed or Scopus, both the percentage of species for which citations will not be found if synonyms are not used, and the percentage increase in number of citations found by including synonyms are very often substantial. However, there is no correlation between the number of synonyms per species and the magnitude of the effect. Further, the number of citations found does not generally increase proportionally to the number of synonyms available. Users looking for literature on specific species across all of the resources investigated here are often missing large numbers of citations if they are not manually augmenting their searches with synonyms. Of course, missing citations can have serious consequences by effectively hiding critical information. Literature searches should include synonym relationships and a new web service in ITIS, with examples of how to apply it to this issue, was developed as a result of this study, and is here announced, to aide in this.

  10. The Importance of Species Name Synonyms in Literature Searches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Guala

    Full Text Available The synonyms of biological species names are shown to be an important component in comprehensive searches of electronic scientific literature databases but they are not well leveraged within the major literature databases examined. For accepted or valid species names in the Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS which have synonyms in the system, and which are found in citations within PLoS, PMC, PubMed or Scopus, both the percentage of species for which citations will not be found if synonyms are not used, and the percentage increase in number of citations found by including synonyms are very often substantial. However, there is no correlation between the number of synonyms per species and the magnitude of the effect. Further, the number of citations found does not generally increase proportionally to the number of synonyms available. Users looking for literature on specific species across all of the resources investigated here are often missing large numbers of citations if they are not manually augmenting their searches with synonyms. Of course, missing citations can have serious consequences by effectively hiding critical information. Literature searches should include synonym relationships and a new web service in ITIS, with examples of how to apply it to this issue, was developed as a result of this study, and is here announced, to aide in this.

  11. Connecting Archaeological Data and Grey Literature via Semantic Cross Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Tudhope

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Differing terminology and database structure hinders meaningful cross search of excavation datasets. Matching free text grey literature reports with datasets poses yet more challenges. Conventional search techniques are unable to cross search between archaeological datasets and Web-based grey literature. Results are reported from two AHRC funded research projects that investigated the use of semantic techniques to link digital archive databases, vocabularies and associated grey literature. STAR (Semantic Technologies for Archaeological Resources was a collaboration between the University of Glamorgan, Hypermedia Research Unit and English Heritage (EH. The main outcome is a research Demonstrator (available online, which cross searches over excavation datasets from different database schemas, including Raunds Roman, Raunds Prehistoric, Museum of London, Silchester Roman and Stanwick sampling. The system additionally cross searches over an extract of excavation reports from the OASIS index of grey literature, operated by the Archaeology Data Service (ADS. A conceptual framework provided by the CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM integrates the different database structures and the metadata automatically generated from the OASIS reports by natural language processing techniques. The methods employed for extracting semantic RDF representations from the datasets and the information extraction from grey literature are described. The STELLAR project provides freely available tools to reduce the costs of mapping and extracting data to semantic search systems such as the Demonstrator and to linked data representation generally. Detailed use scenarios (and a screen capture video provide a basis for a discussion of key issues, including cost-benefits, ontology modelling, mapping, terminology control, semantic implementation and information extraction issues. The scenarios show that semantic interoperability can be achieved by mapping and extracting

  12. Labia Majora Augmentation: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Samer; Kechichian, Elio; Hersant, Barbara; Levan, Philippe; El Hachem, Lena; Noel, Warren; Nasr, Marwan

    2017-10-16

    Currently, there is no standardized approach for labia majora augmentation and controversies still exist regarding this subject. This systematic review aimed to assess the evidence in the literature regarding labia majora augmentation. On November 20, 2016, we conducted an online search of published articles in the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases. All articles describing labia majora augmentation were included in this review. Nine studies were selected for inclusion in the systematic review. Only 2 studies were prospective trials. The most commonly used technique was fat grafting with a total of 4 articles and 183 patients. The mean total injected fat volume ranged from 18 mL to 120 mL per session. Two articles described hyaluronic acid injection techniques. The total injected volume of hyaluronic acid ranged from 2 to 6 mL per session. Three articles used surgical techniques for labia majora augmentation. All included articles did not report any major or life-threatening complications. All techniques demonstrated high satisfaction rates. Labia majora augmentation appears to be a safe, efficient technique with a high satisfaction rate and no reported major complications. However, further randomized controlled trials are warranted. 4. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. Child language interventions in public health: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cesaro, Bruna Campos; Gurgel, Léia Gonçalves; Nunes, Gabriela Pisoni Canedo; Reppold, Caroline Tozzi

    2013-01-01

    Systematically review the literature on interventions in children's language in primary health care. One searched the electronic databases (January 1980 to March 2013) MEDLINE (accessed by PubMed), Scopus, Lilacs and Scielo. The search terms used were "child language", "primary health care", "randomized controlled trial" and "intervention studies" (in English, Portuguese and Spanish). There were included any randomized controlled trials that addressed the issues child language and primary health care. The analysis was based on the type of language intervention conducted in primary health care. Seven studies were included and used intervention strategies such as interactive video, guidance for parents and group therapy. Individuals of both genders were included in the seven studies. The age of the children participant in the samples of the articles included in this review ranged from zero to 11 years. These seven studies used approaches that included only parents, parents and children or just children. The mainly intervention in language on primary health care, used in randomized controlled trials, involved the use of interactional video. Several professionals, beyond speech and language therapist, been inserted in the language interventions on primary health care, demonstrating the importance of interdisciplinary work. None of the articles mentioned aspects related to hearing. There was scarcity of randomized controlled trials that address on language and public health, either in Brazil or internationally.

  14. Reviewing Literature in Bioethics Research: Increasing Rigour in Non-Systematic Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Rosalind

    2015-09-01

    The recent interest in systematic review methods in bioethics has highlighted the need for greater transparency in all literature review processes undertaken in bioethics projects. In this article, I articulate features of a good bioethics literature review that does not aim to be systematic, but rather to capture and analyse the key ideas relevant to a research question. I call this a critical interpretive literature review. I begin by sketching and comparing three different types of literature review conducted in bioethics scholarship. Then, drawing on Dixon-Wood's concept of critical interpretive synthesis, I put forward six features of a good critical interpretive literature review in bioethics: answering a research question, capturing the key ideas relevant to the research question, analysing the literature as a whole, generating theory, not excluding papers based on rigid quality assessment criteria, and reporting the search strategy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Sexting prevalence and correlates: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klettke, Bianca; Hallford, David J; Mellor, David J

    2014-02-01

    Despite considerable controversy and speculation regarding sexting behaviour and its associated risks, to date there has been no integration and analysis of empirical literature on this topic. To collect and synthesise findings of the prevalence of sexting, its correlates, and the context in which it occurs, a systematic search of databases was conducted. Thirty-one studies, reporting on sexting prevalence and a diverse range of related variables, met inclusion criteria. The estimated mean prevalence weighted by sample size was calculated, with trends indicating sexting is more prevalent amongst adults than adolescents, older age is predictive of sexting for adolescents but not adults, and more individuals report receiving sexts than sending them. The correlates of sexting behaviour were grouped in terms of demographic variables, sexual and sexual risk behaviours, attitudes towards sexting, perceived outcomes of sexting, motivations for sexting, mental health and well-being variables, and attachment dimensions. Findings are discussed in terms of the trends indicated by the data, which provided substantiation that sexting behaviour is associated with numerous behavioural, psychological, and social factors. Limitations of the current research literature and future directions are also presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Spiritually and Religiously Integrated Group Psychotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the research literature on spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy to answer the following three questions: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded. PMID:24288557

  17. Can electronic search engines optimize screening of search results in systematic reviews: an empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford Tammy J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most electronic search efforts directed at identifying primary studies for inclusion in systematic reviews rely on the optimal Boolean search features of search interfaces such as DIALOG® and Ovid™. Our objective is to test the ability of an Ultraseek® search engine to rank MEDLINE® records of the included studies of Cochrane reviews within the top half of all the records retrieved by the Boolean MEDLINE search used by the reviewers. Methods Collections were created using the MEDLINE bibliographic records of included and excluded studies listed in the review and all records retrieved by the MEDLINE search. Records were converted to individual HTML files. Collections of records were indexed and searched through a statistical search engine, Ultraseek, using review-specific search terms. Our data sources, systematic reviews published in the Cochrane library, were included if they reported using at least one phase of the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategy (HSSS, provided citations for both included and excluded studies and conducted a meta-analysis using a binary outcome measure. Reviews were selected if they yielded between 1000–6000 records when the MEDLINE search strategy was replicated. Results Nine Cochrane reviews were included. Included studies within the Cochrane reviews were found within the first 500 retrieved studies more often than would be expected by chance. Across all reviews, recall of included studies into the top 500 was 0.70. There was no statistically significant difference in ranking when comparing included studies with just the subset of excluded studies listed as excluded in the published review. Conclusion The relevance ranking provided by the search engine was better than expected by chance and shows promise for the preliminary evaluation of large results from Boolean searches. A statistical search engine does not appear to be able to make fine discriminations concerning the relevance of

  18. Can electronic search engines optimize screening of search results in systematic reviews: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Margaret; Barrowman, Nicholas J; Moher, David; Clifford, Tammy J; Platt, Robert W; Morrison, Andra; Klassen, Terry P; Zhang, Li

    2006-02-24

    Most electronic search efforts directed at identifying primary studies for inclusion in systematic reviews rely on the optimal Boolean search features of search interfaces such as DIALOG and Ovid. Our objective is to test the ability of an Ultraseek search engine to rank MEDLINE records of the included studies of Cochrane reviews within the top half of all the records retrieved by the Boolean MEDLINE search used by the reviewers. Collections were created using the MEDLINE bibliographic records of included and excluded studies listed in the review and all records retrieved by the MEDLINE search. Records were converted to individual HTML files. Collections of records were indexed and searched through a statistical search engine, Ultraseek, using review-specific search terms. Our data sources, systematic reviews published in the Cochrane library, were included if they reported using at least one phase of the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategy (HSSS), provided citations for both included and excluded studies and conducted a meta-analysis using a binary outcome measure. Reviews were selected if they yielded between 1000-6000 records when the MEDLINE search strategy was replicated. Nine Cochrane reviews were included. Included studies within the Cochrane reviews were found within the first 500 retrieved studies more often than would be expected by chance. Across all reviews, recall of included studies into the top 500 was 0.70. There was no statistically significant difference in ranking when comparing included studies with just the subset of excluded studies listed as excluded in the published review. The relevance ranking provided by the search engine was better than expected by chance and shows promise for the preliminary evaluation of large results from Boolean searches. A statistical search engine does not appear to be able to make fine discriminations concerning the relevance of bibliographic records that have been pre-screened by systematic reviewers.

  19. A Systematic Method for Search Term Selection in Systematic Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jenna; Davis, Jacqueline; Mazerolle, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    The wide variety of readily available electronic media grants anyone the freedom to retrieve published references from almost any area of research around the world. Despite this privilege, keeping up with primary research evidence is almost impossible because of the increase in professional publishing across disciplines. Systematic reviews are a…

  20. Zoonoses in Veterinary Students: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sánchez

    Full Text Available Veterinary students face diverse potential sources of zoonotic pathogens since the first years of their academic degree. Such sources include different animal species and pathologic materials which are used at university facilities as well as commercial clinics, farms and other external facilities.The present study utilizes a systematic review of the literature to identify zoonoses described in veterinary students.Web of Science and PubMed.Of the 1,254 titles produced by the bibliographic search, 62 were included in this review. Whereas 28 of these articles (45.2% described individual cases or outbreaks, the remaining 34 (54.8% reported serological results. The zoonotic etiological agents described were bacteria, in 39 studies (62.9%, parasites, in 12 works (19.4%, virus, in 9 studies (14.5% and fungi, in 2 (3.2% of the selected articles. The selected literature included references from 24 different countries and covered the time period of the last 55 years.The fact that common cases of disease or cases of little clinical importance without collective repercussions are not usually published in peer-reviewed journals limits the possibility to reach conclusions from a quantitative point of view. Furthermore, most of the selected works (66.1% refer to European or North American countries, and thus, the number of cases due to pathogens which could appear more frequently in non-occidental countries might be underestimated.The results of the present systematic review highlight the need of including training in zoonotic diseases since the first years of Veterinary Science degrees, especially focusing on biosecurity measures (hygienic measures and the utilization of the personal protective equipment, as a way of protecting students, and on monitoring programs, so as to adequately advise affected students or students suspicious of enduring zoonoses.

  1. Zoonoses in Veterinary Students: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Antonio; Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; Tatay-Dualde, Juan; Paterna, Ana; de la Fe, Christian; Gómez-Martín, Ángel; Corrales, Juan C; Contreras, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary students face diverse potential sources of zoonotic pathogens since the first years of their academic degree. Such sources include different animal species and pathologic materials which are used at university facilities as well as commercial clinics, farms and other external facilities. The present study utilizes a systematic review of the literature to identify zoonoses described in veterinary students. Web of Science and PubMed. Of the 1,254 titles produced by the bibliographic search, 62 were included in this review. Whereas 28 of these articles (45.2%) described individual cases or outbreaks, the remaining 34 (54.8%) reported serological results. The zoonotic etiological agents described were bacteria, in 39 studies (62.9%), parasites, in 12 works (19.4%), virus, in 9 studies (14.5%) and fungi, in 2 (3.2%) of the selected articles. The selected literature included references from 24 different countries and covered the time period of the last 55 years. The fact that common cases of disease or cases of little clinical importance without collective repercussions are not usually published in peer-reviewed journals limits the possibility to reach conclusions from a quantitative point of view. Furthermore, most of the selected works (66.1%) refer to European or North American countries, and thus, the number of cases due to pathogens which could appear more frequently in non-occidental countries might be underestimated. The results of the present systematic review highlight the need of including training in zoonotic diseases since the first years of Veterinary Science degrees, especially focusing on biosecurity measures (hygienic measures and the utilization of the personal protective equipment), as a way of protecting students, and on monitoring programs, so as to adequately advise affected students or students suspicious of enduring zoonoses.

  2. Ulnar hammer syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartija, Larisa; Cheung, Kevin; Kaur, Manraj; Coroneos, Christopher James; Thoma, Achilleas

    2013-11-01

    Ulnar hammer syndrome is an uncommon form of arterial insufficiency. Many treatments have been described, and debate continues about the best option. The goal of this systematic review was to determine whether ulnar hammer syndrome has an occupational association, to identify the most reliable diagnostic test, and to determine the best treatment modality. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and EMBASE. Data from articles meeting inclusion criteria were collected in duplicate. Methodological quality of studies was assessed using the Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies scale. Thirty studies were included in the systematic review. No randomized controlled trials were identified. There is low-quality evidence suggestive of an association between exposure to repetitive hand trauma and vibration and ulnar hammer syndrome. Various diagnostic investigations were used, but few were compared, making it difficult to determine the most reliable diagnostic test. Numerous nonoperative and operative treatments were reported. With nonoperative treatment, 12 percent had complete resolution and 70 percent had partial resolution of their symptoms. Of patients treated operatively, 42.5 percent had complete resolution and 42.5 percent had partial resolution of their symptoms. The heterogeneity in study design and outcome measures limits definitive conclusions about occupational association, best diagnostic test, and treatment for ulnar hammer syndrome. However, there is low-quality evidence that suggests that most patients with ulnar hammer syndrome will have partial relief of symptoms with nonoperative treatment, and operative treatment results in complete or partial resolution of symptoms in the majority of cases. Therapeutic, IV.

  3. Citation searching: a systematic review case study of multiple risk behaviour interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kath; Golder, Su; Rodriguez-Lopez, Rocio

    2014-06-03

    The value of citation searches as part of the systematic review process is currently unknown. While the major guides to conducting systematic reviews state that citation searching should be carried out in addition to searching bibliographic databases there are still few studies in the literature that support this view. Rather than using a predefined search strategy to retrieve studies, citation searching uses known relevant papers to identify further papers. We describe a case study about the effectiveness of using the citation sources Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Science and OVIDSP MEDLINE to identify records for inclusion in a systematic review.We used the 40 included studies identified by traditional database searches from one systematic review of interventions for multiple risk behaviours. We searched for each of the included studies in the four citation sources to retrieve the details of all papers that have cited these studies.We carried out two analyses; the first was to examine the overlap between the four citation sources to identify which citation tool was the most useful; the second was to investigate whether the citation searches identified any relevant records in addition to those retrieved by the original database searches. The highest number of citations was retrieved from Google Scholar (1680), followed by Scopus (1173), then Web of Science (1095) and lastly OVIDSP (213). To retrieve all the records identified by the citation tracking searching all four resources was required. Google Scholar identified the highest number of unique citations.The citation tracking identified 9 studies that met the review's inclusion criteria. Eight of these had already been identified by the traditional databases searches and identified in the screening process while the ninth was not available in any of the databases when the original searches were carried out. It would, however, have been identified by two of the database search strategies if searches had been

  4. Paramedic literature search filters: optimised for clinicians and academics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaussen, Alexander; Semple, William; Oteir, Alaa; Todd, Paula; Williams, Brett

    2017-10-11

    Search filters aid clinicians and academics to accurately locate literature. Despite this, there is no search filter or Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term pertaining to paramedics. Therefore, the aim of this study was to create two filters to meet to different needs of paramedic clinicians and academics. We created a gold standard from a reference set, which we measured against single terms and search filters. The words and phrases used stemmed from selective exclusion of terms from the previously published Prehospital Search Filter 2.0 as well as a Delphi session with an expert panel of paramedic researchers. Independent authors deemed articles paramedic-relevant or not following an agreed definition. We measured sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and number needed to read (NNR). We located 2102 articles of which 431 (20.5%) related to paramedics. The performance of single terms was on average of high specificity (97.1% (Standard Deviation 7.4%), but of poor sensitivity (12.0%, SD 18.7%). The NNR ranged from 1 to 8.6. The sensitivity-maximising search filter yielded 98.4% sensitivity, with a specificity of 74.3% and a NNR of 2. The specificity-maximising filter achieved 88.3% in specificity, which only lowered the sensitivity to 94.7%, and thus a NNR of 1.48. We have created the first two paramedic specific search filters, one optimised for sensitivity and one optimised for specificity. The sensitivity-maximising search filter yielded 98.4% sensitivity, and a NNR of 2. The specificity-maximising filter achieved 88.3% in specificity, which only lowered the sensitivity to 94.7%, and a NNR of 1.48. A paramedic MeSH term is needed.

  5. Should we search Chinese biomedical databases when performing systematic reviews?

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, J?r?mie F; Korevaar, Dani?l A; Wang, Junfeng; Spijker, Ren?; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Background Chinese biomedical databases contain a large number of publications available to systematic reviewers, but it is unclear whether they are used for synthesizing the available evidence. Methods We report a case of two systematic reviews on the accuracy of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis. In one of these, the authors did not search Chinese databases; in the other, they did. We additionally assessed the extent to which Cochrane reviewers have searc...

  6. Implementing Prehospital Evidence-Based Guidelines: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishe, Jennifer N; Crowe, Remle P; Cash, Rebecca E; Nudell, Nikiah G; Martin-Gill, Christian; Richards, Christopher T

    2018-01-19

    As prehospital research advances, more evidence-based guidelines (EBGs) are implemented into emergency medical services (EMS) practice. However, incomplete or suboptimal prehospital EBG implementation may hinder improvement in patient outcomes. To inform future efforts, this study's objective was to review existing evidence pertaining to prehospital EBG implementation methods. This study was a systematic literature review and evaluation following the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, and Google Advanced Search were searched without language or publication date filters for articles addressing prehospital EBG implementation. Conference proceedings, textbooks, and non-English articles were excluded. GRADE was applied to the remaining articles independently by three of five study investigators. Study characteristics and salient findings from the included articles are reported. The systematic literature review identified 1,367 articles, with 41 meeting inclusion criteria. Most articles described prehospital EBG implementation (n = 24, 59%), or implementation barriers (n = 13, 32%). Common study designs were statement documents (n = 12, 29%), retrospective cohort studies (n = 12, 29%), and cross-sectional studies (n = 9, 22%). Using GRADE, evidence quality was rated low (n = 18, 44%), or very low (n = 23, 56%). Salient findings from the articles included: (i) EBG adherence and patient outcomes depend upon successful implementation, (ii) published studies generally lack detailed implementation methods, (iii) EBG implementation takes longer than planned (mostly for EMS education), (iv) EMS systems' heterogeneity affects EBG implementation, and (v) multiple barriers limit successful implementation (e.g., financial constraints, equipment purchasing, coordination with hospitals, and regulatory agencies). This review found no direct evidence for best prehospital EBG implementation practices. There

  7. Speech and swallowing after surgical treatment of advanced oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreeft, Anne Marijn; Molen, Lisette van der; Hilgers, Frans J.; Balm, Alfons J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of this review is the evaluation of speech and swallowing function after surgical treatment for advanced oral and oropharyngeal carcinoma. A systematic literature search (1993-2009), yielding 1,220 hits. The predefined criteria for inclusion in this systematic review were oral or

  8. [Evidence-based medicine in surgical practice - locating clinical studies and systematic reviews by searching the Medline database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummich, K; Jensen, K; Obst, O; Seiler, C M; Diener, M K

    2014-12-01

    Every day approximately 75 clinical trials and 11 systematic reviews are published in the health-care intervention and medical field. Due to this growing number of publications it is a challenge for every practicing clinician to keep track with the latest research. The implementation of new and effective diagnostic and therapeutic interventions into daily clinical routine may thus be delayed. Conversely, ineffective or even harmful interventions might still be in use. Decision-making in evidence-based medicine (EBM) requires consideration of the most recent high quality evidence. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are regarded as the "gold standard" to prove the efficacy of surgical interventions in patient-oriented research. Systematic reviews combine results from RCTs by summarising single RCTs which answer a particular clinical question. Some basic knowledge in systematic literature searching is required and helpful for detecting relevant publications. This article shows various possibilities for locating clinical studies and systematic reviews in the database Medline on the basis of illustrative step-by-step instructions. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION. Depending on the aim and topic of the literature search, the time required for the task may vary. In routine practice, a systematic literature search is unrealistic in most cases. Clinicians in need of a quick update of current evidence on a certain clinical topic may make use of up-to-date systematic reviews. During a systematic literature search, different approaches and strategies might be necessary. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Should we search Chinese biomedical databases when performing systematic reviews?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jérémie F; Korevaar, Daniël A; Wang, Junfeng; Spijker, René; Bossuyt, Patrick M

    2015-03-06

    Chinese biomedical databases contain a large number of publications available to systematic reviewers, but it is unclear whether they are used for synthesizing the available evidence. We report a case of two systematic reviews on the accuracy of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis. In one of these, the authors did not search Chinese databases; in the other, they did. We additionally assessed the extent to which Cochrane reviewers have searched Chinese databases in a systematic overview of the Cochrane Library (inception to 2014). The two diagnostic reviews included a total of 269 unique studies, but only 4 studies were included in both reviews. The first review included five studies published in the Chinese language (out of 151) while the second included 114 (out of 118). The summary accuracy estimates from the two reviews were comparable. Only 243 of the published 8,680 Cochrane reviews (less than 3%) searched one or more of the five major Chinese databases. These Chinese databases index about 2,500 journals, of which less than 6% are also indexed in MEDLINE. All 243 Cochrane reviews evaluated an intervention, 179 (74%) had at least one author with a Chinese affiliation; 118 (49%) addressed a topic in complementary or alternative medicine. Although searching Chinese databases may lead to the identification of a large amount of additional clinical evidence, Cochrane reviewers have rarely included them in their search strategy. We encourage future initiatives to evaluate more systematically the relevance of searching Chinese databases, as well as collaborative efforts to allow better incorporation of Chinese resources in systematic reviews.

  10. Evaluating the quality of systematic reviews in the emergency medicine literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K D; Travers, A; Dorgan, M; Slater, L; Rowe, B H

    2001-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the scientific quality of systematic reviews published in 5 leading emergency medicine journals. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were electronically searched to identify published systematic reviews. Searches were only conducted in emergency medicine journals during the past 10 years; 4 of the journals were also hand searched. Potential reviews were assessed independently by 2 reviewers for inclusion. Data regarding methods were extracted from each review independently by 2 reviewers. All systematic reviews were retrieved and rated for quality by using the 10 questions from the overview quality assessment questionnaire. Twenty-nine reviews were identified from more than 100 citations. The overall scientific quality of the systematic reviews was low (mean score, 2.7; 95% confidence interval 2.1 to 3.2; maximum possible score, 7.0). Selection and publication biases were rarely addressed in this collection of reviews. For example, the search strategies were only identified in 9 (31%) reviews, whereas independent study selection (6 [21%]) and quality assessment of included studies (9 [31%]) were infrequently performed. Overall, the majority of reviews had extensive flaws, and only 3 (10%) had minimal flaws. The results of the study indicate that many of the systematic reviews published in the emergency medicine literature contain major flaws; reviews with poor methodology may limit the validity of reported results. Further efforts should be made to improve the design, reporting, and publication of systematic reviews in emergency medicine.

  11. PIE the search: searching PubMed literature for protein interaction information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun; Kwon, Dongseop; Shin, Soo-Yong; Wilbur, W John

    2012-02-15

    Finding protein-protein interaction (PPI) information from literature is challenging but an important issue. However, keyword search in PubMed(®) is often time consuming because it requires a series of actions that refine keywords and browse search results until it reaches a goal. Due to the rapid growth of biomedical literature, it has become more difficult for biologists and curators to locate PPI information quickly. Therefore, a tool for prioritizing PPI informative articles can be a useful assistant for finding this PPI-relevant information. PIE (Protein Interaction information Extraction) the search is a web service implementing a competition-winning approach utilizing word and syntactic analyses by machine learning techniques. For easy user access, PIE the search provides a PubMed-like search environment, but the output is the list of articles prioritized by PPI confidence scores. By obtaining PPI-related articles at high rank, researchers can more easily find the up-to-date PPI information, which cannot be found in manually curated PPI databases. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/IRET/PIE/.

  12. Factors affecting the diffusion of online end user literature searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, J S

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that affect diffusion of usage of online end user literature searching. Fifteen factors clustered into three attribute sets (innovation attributes, organizational attributes, and marketing attributes) were measured to study their effect on the diffusion of online searching within institutions. A random sample of sixty-seven academic health sciences centers was selected and then 1,335 library and informatics staff members at those institutions were surveyed by mail with electronic mail follow-up. Multiple regression analysis was performed. The survey yielded a 41% response rate with electronic mail follow-up being particularly effective. Two dependent variables, internal diffusion (spread of diffusion) and infusion (depth of diffusion), were measured. There was little correlation between them, indicating they measured different things. Fifteen independent variables clustered into three attribute sets were measured. The innovation attributes set was significant for both internal diffusion and infusion. Significant individual variables were visibility for internal diffusion and image enhancement effects (negative relation) as well as visibility for infusion (depth of diffusion). Organizational attributes were also significant predictors for both dependent variables. No individual variables were significant for internal diffusion. Communication, management support (negative relation), rewards, and existence of champions were significant for infusion. Marketing attributes were not significant predictors. Successful diffusion of online end user literature searching is dependent on the visibility of the systems, communication among, rewards to, and peers of possible users who promote use (champions). Personal image enhancement effects have a negative relation to infusion, possibly because the use of intermediaries is still seen as the more luxurious way to have searches done. Management support also has a negative relation to

  13. Computer Literacy Systematic Literature Review Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kegel, Roeland Hendrik,Pieter; Barth, Susanne; Klaassen, Randy; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    2017-01-01

    Although there have been many attempts to define the concept `computer literacy', no consensus has been reached: many variations of the concept exist within literature. The majority of papers does not explicitly define the concept at all, instead using an unjustified subset of elements related to

  14. How reliable are case formulations? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, Lucinda; Braham, Louise; das Nair, Roshan

    2015-09-01

    This systematic literature review investigated the inter-rater and test-retest reliability of case formulations. We considered the reliability of case formulations across a range of theoretical modalities and the general quality of the primary research studies. A systematic search of five electronic databases was conducted in addition to reference list trawling to find studies that assessed the reliability of case formulation. This yielded 18 studies for review. A methodological quality assessment tool was developed to assess the quality of studies, which informed interpretation of the findings. Results indicated inter-rater reliability mainly ranging from slight (.1-.4) to substantial (.81-1.0). Some studies highlighted that training and increased experience led to higher levels of agreement. In general, psychodynamic formulations appeared to generate somewhat increased levels of reliability than cognitive or behavioural formulations; however, these studies also included methods that may have served to inflate reliability, for example, pooling the scores of judges. Only one study investigated the test-retest reliability of case formulations yielding support for the stability of formulations over a 3-month period. Reliability of case formulations is varied across a range of theoretical modalities, but can be improved; however, further research is required to strengthen our conclusions. Clinical implications: The findings from the review evidence some support for case formulation being congruent with the scientist-practitioner approach. The reliability of case formulation is likely to be improved through training and clinical experience. Limitations: The broad inclusion criteria may have introduced heterogeneity into the sample, which may have affected the results. Studies reviewed were limited to peer-reviewed journal articles written in the English language, which may represent a source of publication and selection bias. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Natural disasters and suicidal behaviours: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõlves, Kairi; Kõlves, Keili E; De Leo, Diego

    2013-03-20

    Various consequences including suicidal behaviours can arise in the aftermath of natural disasters. The aim of the present review was to systematically analyse the existing literature on the potential impact of natural disasters on suicidal behaviours. A systematic search of English-language articles indexed in electronic databases was conducted. The current review covers 42 papers containing empirical analyses of the relationship between natural disasters and suicidal behaviours. In total, 19 papers analysed suicide mortality and 23 non-fatal suicidal behaviours. The effects of earthquakes on suicidal behaviours are the most frequently studied among natural disasters (n=20), followed by hurricanes (n=11). Further, there were four papers about tsunamis, three about floods, three about heat waves and drought, and one investigating the effects of multiple natural disasters. The studies show different directions in suicide mortality following natural disasters. Nevertheless, there seems to be a drop in non-fatal suicidal behaviours in the initial post-disaster period, which has been referred to as the 'honeymoon' phase. A delayed increase in suicidal behaviours has been reported in some studies. However, other factors increasing the risk of suicidal behaviours after natural disasters have been reported, such as previous and current mental health problems. Furthermore, contributing factors, such as economic conditions, should also be considered. The exclusion of non-English articles. In light of the various methodological limitations observed, there is a need for further studies using proper designs. Mental health and suicidal behaviours should continue to be monitored for several years after the disaster. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of oral healthcare education on knowledge, attitude and skills of care home nurses: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugt-Lustig, K.H. de; Vanobbergen, J.N.; Putten, G.J. van der; Visschere, L.M. De; Schols, J.M.; Baat, C. de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the literature on the effect of providing oral healthcare education to care home nurses on their oral healthcare knowledge and attitude and their oral hygiene care skills. METHODS: A literature search was obtained for relevant articles on oral healthcare

  17. Accuracy of diagnostic imaging modalities for peripheral post-traumatic osteomyelitis : a systematic review of the recent literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Govaert, Geertje A.; IJpma, Frank F.; McNally, Martin; McNally, Eugene; Reininga, Inge H.; Glaudemans, Andor W J M

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Post-traumatic osteomyelitis (PTO) is difficult to diagnose and there is no consensus on the best imaging strategy. The aim of this study is to present a systematic review of the recent literature on diagnostic imaging of PTO. Methods: A literature search of the EMBASE and PubMed databases of

  18. The Psychology of Esports: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, Fanni; Griffiths, Mark D; Király, Orsolya; Demetrovics, Zsolt

    2018-03-05

    Recently, the skill involved in playing and mastering video games has led to the professionalization of the activity in the form of 'esports' (electronic sports). The aim of the present paper was to review the main topics of psychological interest about esports and then to examine the similarities of esports to professional and problem gambling. As a result of a systematic literature search, eight studies were identified that had investigated three topics: (1) the process of becoming an esport player, (2) the characteristics of esport players such as mental skills and motivations, and (3) the motivations of esport spectators. These findings draw attention to the new research field of professional video game playing and provides some preliminary insight into the psychology of esports players. The paper also examines the similarities between esport players and professional gamblers (and more specifically poker players). It is suggested that future research should focus on esport players' psychological vulnerability because some studies have begun to investigate the difference between problematic and professional gambling and this might provide insights into whether the playing of esports could also be potentially problematic for some players.

  19. Homelessness among female veterans: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Thomas; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Dichter, Melissa E

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a systematic, critical review of the literature to assess and summarize existing research on homelessness among female veterans. They searched seven electronic databases (ERIC, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Services Abstracts, Social Science Citation Index, and Sociological Abstracts), websites of several government and research organizations, and reference lists of prior studies. They abstracted data on study design, funding source, and topic from studies meeting inclusion criteria and classified each study into one of the following categories: epidemiology, health and other services utilization, and interventions. The authors included both experimental and observational studies of interventions in the review and performed a narrative synthesis for each of the 26 studies identified. No studies were experimental, 20 were observational, and the remainder were either qualitative or descriptive. Of the 26 identified studies, 14 were epidemiologic, 7 focused on the health and additional service utilization, and 5 were intervention studies. Findings provided important baseline epidemiologic information about homelessness among female veterans and indicated that female veterans were at an increased risk of homelessness relative to their male veteran and female non-veteran counterparts. Additional research is needed to develop and implement effective, evidence-based programs to prevent and end homelessness among women veterans.

  20. Outcomes of eating disorders: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Nancy D; Lohr, Kathleen N; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2007-05-01

    The RTI International-University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Evidence-based Practice Center systematically reviewed evidence on factors associated with outcomes among individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED) and whether outcomes differed by sociodemographic characteristics. We searched electronic databases including MEDLINE and reviewed studies published from 1980 to September, 2005, in all languages against a priori inclusion/exclusion criteria and focused on eating, psychiatric or psychological, or biomarker outcomes. At followup, individuals with AN were more likely than comparisons to be depressed, have Asperger's syndrome and autism spectrum disorders, and suffer from anxiety disorders including obsessive-compulsive disorders. Mortality risk was significantly higher than what would be expected in the population and the risk of suicide was particularly pronounced. The only consistent factor across studies relating to worse BN outcomes was depression. A substantial proportion of individuals continue to suffer from eating disorders over time but BN was not associated with increased mortality risk. Data were insufficient to draw conclusions concerning factors associated with BED outcomes. Across disorders, little to no data were available to compare results based on sociodemographic characteristics. The strength of the bodies of literature was moderate for factors associated with AN and BN outcomes and weak for BED.

  1. National scientific literature on nursing ethics: a systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Nicéia D’Aquino Oliveira Teixeira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the most prevalent nursing ethical issues published in scientific Brazilian journals. Methods: A systematic literature review with the following inclusion criteria: (1 articles on Nursing Ethics written in Portuguese, English, French, and Spanish; (2 published in Brazilian journals; (3 in the period from January 1997 to February 2009. The search was carried out in four databases BDENF, LILACS, MEDLINE, and SCIELO. The key-words were ethics AND nursing. The selected studies were classified into categories. The content of the articles were analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse. The categories generated discourses by organizing the main excerpts from the abstracts of the selected studies, which are the “key expressions”. Results: A hundred and thirty three articles that met the inclusion criteria were classified into eight categories: 1. Nursing Care; 2. Dilemmas and Controversies; 3. Education; 4. Legal Aspects; 5. Research; 6. Management; 7. Values and Beliefs; 8. Perspectives and Health Policies. The category “Nursing Care” prevailed in 36% of the selected articles, and it was classified into six subcategories. “Dilemmas and Controversies” was the second most prevalent category (15%. Conclusion: The number of theoretical papers on ethical issues is high, but there is little research on the ethical experiences in nursing practice.

  2. [Child maltreatment in binge eating disorder: a systematic literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhr, Susanne; Dölemeyer, Ruth; Klinitzke, Grit; Steinig, Jana; Wagner, Birgit; Kersting, Annette

    2015-04-01

    This review is to provide a first overview about prevalences and associations of forms of child maltreatment in binge eating disorder (BED). Systematic literature search in PubMed and Web of Science in December 2013. Terms considered were "binge eating disorder" AND "child* maltreatment", "child* abuse", "child* sexual abuse", "child* emotional abuse", "child* physical abuse", "child* emotional neglect" as well as "child* physical neglect". Inclusion criteria were studies published between 1990 and 2013, publications in English or German, adult patients, studies that considered patients with full DSM criteria for BED, and studies that reported prevalences of forms of child maltreatment. Eight studies out of 366 met criteria. Child maltreatment rates in BED were more than two times higher than in representative samples, but they were similar to psychiatric comparisons. Up to 83 % of patients with BED reported at least one form of child maltreatment. There were associations to psychiatric comorbidity, but not to gender, obesity and specific features of the eating behaviour. Child maltreatment is very prevalent among BED. Its contribution to the development and the maintenance of BED is not understood yet. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The Effect of Prayer on Patients’ Health: Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Prado Simão

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest regarding prayer in healthcare. Prayer is an activity related to spirituality and religion. Positive outcomes have been identified regarding spirituality in health. This study aims to investigate the effects on patients’ health of using prayer. A systematic literature review was conducted in May 2015 and updated in November 2015. Electronic and international databases were searched and the inclusion criteria were based on PICOS: (Population patients of any age and any clinical situation, (Intervention all types of prayer, (Comparison ordinary care, (Outcomes any health change, (Study type randomized clinical trials. Neither timeframe nor limitation in language were considered. A total of 92 papers were identified and 12 were included in the review. Prayer was considered a positive factor in seven studies, and several positive effects of prayer on health were identified: reducing the anxiety of mothers of children with cancer; reducing the level of concern of the participants who believe in a solution to their problem; and providing for the improved physical functioning of patients who believe in prayer. Prayer is a non-pharmacological intervention and resource, and should be included in the nursing holistic care aimed at patients’ well-being.

  4. Conceptualisation of patient satisfaction: a systematic narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batbaatar, Enkhjargal; Dorjdagva, Javkhlanbayar; Luvsannyam, Ariunbat; Amenta, Pietro

    2015-09-01

    Patient satisfaction concept is widely measured due to its appropriateness to health service; however, evidence suggests that it is a poorly developed concept. This article is a first part of a two-part series of research with a goal to review a current conceptual framework of patient satisfaction and to bring the concept for further operationalisation procedures. The current article aimed to review a theoretical framework that helps the next article to review determinants of patient satisfaction for designing a measurement system. The study used a systematic review method, meta-narrative review, based on the RAMESES guideline with the phases of screening evidence, appraisal evidence, data extraction and synthesis. Patient satisfaction theoretical articles were searched on the two databases MEDLINE and CINAHL. Inclusion criteria were articles published between 1980 and 2014, and English language papers only. There were 36 articles selected for the synthesis. Results showed that most of the patient satisfaction theories and formulations are based on marketing theories and defined as how well health service fulfils patient expectations. However, review demonstrated that a relationship between expectation and satisfaction is unclear and the concept expectation itself is not distinctly theorised as well. Researchers brought satisfaction theories from other fields to the current healthcare literature without much adaptation. Thus, there is a need to attempt to define the patient satisfaction concept from other perspectives or to learn how patients evaluate the care rather than struggling to describe it by consumerist theories. © Royal Society for Public Health 2015.

  5. Science Mapping: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaomei Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a systematic review of the literature concerning major aspects of science mapping to serve two primary purposes: First, to demonstrate the use of a science mapping approach to perform the review so that researchers may apply the procedure to the review of a scientific domain of their own interest, and second, to identify major areas of research activities concerning science mapping, intellectual milestones in the development of key specialties, evolutionary stages of major specialties involved, and the dynamics of transitions from one specialty to another. Design/methodology/approach: We first introduce a theoretical framework of the evolution of a scientific specialty. Then we demonstrate a generic search strategy that can be used to construct a representative dataset of bibliographic records of a domain of research. Next, progressively synthesized co-citation networks are constructed and visualized to aid visual analytic studies of the domain’s structural and dynamic patterns and trends. Finally, trajectories of citations made by particular types of authors and articles are presented to illustrate the predictive potential of the analytic approach. Findings: The evolution of the science mapping research involves the development of a number of interrelated specialties. Four major specialties are discussed in detail in terms of four evolutionary stages: conceptualization, tool construction, application, and codification. Underlying connections between major specialties are also explored. The predictive analysis demonstrates citations trajectories of potentially transformative contributions. Research limitations: The systematic review is primarily guided by citation patterns in the dataset retrieved from the literature. The scope of the data is limited by the source of the retrieval, i.e. the Web of Science, and the composite query used. An iterative query refinement is possible if one would like to improve the data quality

  6. Guidelines for overcoming hospital managerial challenges: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crema M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Maria Crema, Chiara Verbano Department of Management and Engineering, University of Padova, Vicenza, Italy Purpose: The need to respond to accreditation institutes' and patients' requirements and to align health care results with increased medical knowledge is focusing greater attention on quality in health care. Different tools and techniques have been adopted to measure and manage quality, but clinical errors are still too numerous, suggesting that traditional quality improvement systems are unable to deal appropriately with hospital challenges. The purpose of this paper is to grasp the current tools, practices, and guidelines adopted in health care to improve quality and patient safety and create a base for future research on this young subject. Methods: A systematic literature review was carried out. A search of academic databases, including papers that focus not only on lean management, but also on clinical errors and risk reduction, yielded 47 papers. The general characteristics of the selected papers were analyzed, and a content analysis was conducted. Results: A variety of managerial techniques, tools, and practices are being adopted in health care, and traditional methodologies have to be integrated with the latest ones in order to reduce errors and ensure high quality and patient safety. As it has been demonstrated, these tools are useful not only for achieving efficiency objectives, but also for providing higher quality and patient safety. Critical indications and guidelines for successful implementation of new health managerial methodologies are provided and synthesized in an operative scheme useful for extending and deepening knowledge of these issues with further studies. Conclusion: This research contributes to introducing a new theme in health care literature regarding the development of successful projects with both clinical risk management and health lean management objectives, and should address solutions for improving health

  7. Epidemiology of diverticular disease -- systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tănase, I; Păun, S; Stoica, B; Negoi, I; Gaspar, B; Beuran, M

    2015-01-01

    Associated with the Western diet and life style,diverticular disease is affecting more and more developing countries worldwide. Recent studies show an increase in incidence of the disease at young age, that raises the risk of complications, along with major consequences for the patient but also for the healthcare system. Systematic review of the literature with US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health International PubMed Medline, using abstracts and articles available in PubMed Medline, Cochrane databases searching for ("Diverticulosis, Colonic epidemiology" [MeSH] OR"Diverticulosis, Colonic etiology" [MeSH] OR "Diverticulosis,Colonic genetics" [MeSH] OR "Diverticulosis, Colonic history" [MeSH]). Even from the rise of diverticular disease as a public healthcare problem, at the end of the previous century, it was associated with a diet rich in refined sugars, lacking vegetable fibres. The higher incidence in countries like U.S.A., Canada, United Kingdom and the northern states compared with its rare occurrence in the sub-Saharan African continent, strengthen the anterior assumptions. In regions like Asia, the disease pattern is characterized by are latively low incidence of colonic diverticular disease, with distribution of diverticula mainly on the right colon. The different incidence by sex and age show the possible existence of hormonal protective factors. Studies from countries with a rich ethnic diversity, bring into question the probable genetic predisposition to diverticular disease, fact backed-up by the few studies on twins and 1st degree relatives available in the literature. The rising incidence of colonic diverticular disease in Romania makes our country adhere the epidemiologic model existing in countries with a close socio-economic status.Although with a lower incidence than countries that have adopted a Western diet, Romania is likely to encounter a public health problem, if certain measures to identify and minimise the

  8. Dengue disease surveillance: an updated systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge-Ranzinger, S; McCall, P J; Kroeger, A; Horstick, O

    2014-09-01

    To review the evidence for the application of tools for dengue outbreak prediction/detection and trend monitoring in passive and active disease surveillance systems in order to develop recommendations for endemic countries and identify important research needs. This systematic literature review followed the protocol of a review from 2008, extending the systematic search from January 2007 to February 2013 on PubMed, EMBASE, CDSR, WHOLIS and Lilacs. Data reporting followed the PRISMA statement. The eligibility criteria comprised (i) population at risk of dengue, (ii) dengue disease surveillance, (iii) outcome of surveillance described and (iv) empirical data evaluated. The analysis classified studies based on the purpose of the surveillance programme. The main limitation of the review was expected publication bias. A total of 1116 papers were identified of which 36 articles were included in the review. Four cohort-based prospective studies calculated expansion factors demonstrating remarkable levels of underreporting in the surveillance systems. Several studies demonstrated that enhancement methods such as laboratory support, sentinel-based reporting and staff motivation contributed to improvements in dengue reporting. Additional improvements for passive surveillance systems are possible by incorporating simple data forms/entry/electronic-based reporting; defining clear system objectives; performing data analysis at the lowest possible level (e.g. district); seeking regular data feedback. Six studies showed that serotype changes were positively correlated with the number of reported cases or with dengue incidence, with lag times of up to 6 months. Three studies found that data on internet searches and event-based surveillance correlated well with the epidemic curve derived from surveillance data. Passive surveillance providing the baseline for outbreak alert should be strengthened and appropriate threshold levels for outbreak alerts investigated. Additional

  9. Critical Assessment of Search Strategies in Systematic Reviews in Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaylali, Ibrahim Ethem; Alaçam, Tayfun

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to perform an overview of literature search strategies in systematic reviews (SRs) published in 2 endodontic journals, Journal of Endodontics and International Endodontic Journal. A search was done by using the MEDLINE (PubMed interface) database to retrieve the articles published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2015. The last search was on January 10, 2016. All the SRs published in the 2 journals were retrieved and screened. Eligible SRs were assessed by using 11 questions about search strategies in the SRs that were adapted from 2 guidelines (ie, AMSTAR checklist and the Cochrane Handbook). A total of 83 SRs were retrieved by electronic search. Of these, 55 were from the Journal of Endodontics, and 28 were from the International Endodontic Journal. After screening, 2 SRs were excluded, and 81 SRs were included in the study. Some issues, such as search of grey literature and contact with study authors, were not fully reported (30% and 25%, respectively). On the other hand, some issues, such as the use of index terms and key words and search in at least 2 databases, were reported in most of the SRs (97% and 95%, respectively). The overall quality of the search strategy in both journals was 61%. No significant difference was found between the 2 journals in terms of evaluation criteria (P > .05). There exist areas for improving the quality of reporting of search strategies in SRs; for example, grey literature should be searched for unpublished studies, no language limitation should be applied to databases, and authors should make an attempt to contact the authors of included studies to obtain further relevant information. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Docear : An Academic Literature Suite for Searching, Organizing and Creating Academic Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Beel, Joeran; Gipp, Bela; Langer, Stefan; Genzmehr, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In this demonstration-paper we introduce Docear, an 'academic literature suite'. Docear offers to scientists what an office suite like Microsoft Office offers to office workers. While an office suite bundles various applications for office workers (word processing, spreadsheets, presentation software, etc.), Docear bundles several applications for scientists: academic search engine, PDF reader, reference manager, word processor, mind mapping module, and recommender system. Besides Docear's ge...

  11. 76 FR 13402 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for IRIS Assessments AGENCY... the literature search results and submit additional information to EPA. Request for Public Involvement... information to EPA. Literature searches are now available for cobalt (CAS No. 7440-48-4) and inorganic cobalt...

  12. 75 FR 76982 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for IRIS Assessments AGENCY... is invited to review the literature search results and submit additional information to EPA. Request... additional information to EPA. Literature searches are now available for acetaldehyde (CAS No. 75-07-0...

  13. 75 FR 25239 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches for IRIS Assessments AGENCY... literature search results and submit additional information to EPA. Request for Public Involvement in IRIS... ). The public is invited to review the literature search results and submit additional information to EPA...

  14. Understanding Monitoring Technologies for Adults With Pain: Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Iyubanit; Herskovic, Valeria; Gerea, Carmen; Fuentes, Carolina; Rossel, Pedro O; Marques, Maíra; Campos, Mauricio

    2017-10-27

    Monitoring of patients may decrease treatment costs and improve quality of care. Pain is the most common health problem that people seek help for in hospitals. Therefore, monitoring patients with pain may have significant impact in improving treatment. Several studies have studied factors affecting pain; however, no previous study has reviewed the contextual information that a monitoring system may capture to characterize a patient's situation. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review to (1) determine what types of technologies have been used to monitor adults with pain, and (2) construct a model of the context information that may be used to implement apps and devices aimed at monitoring adults with pain. A literature search (2005-2015) was conducted in electronic databases pertaining to medical and computer science literature (PubMed, Science Direct, ACM Digital Library, and IEEE Xplore) using a defined search string. Article selection was done through a process of removing duplicates, analyzing title and abstract, and then reviewing the full text of the article. In the final analysis, 87 articles were included and 53 of them (61%) used technologies to collect contextual information. A total of 49 types of context information were found and a five-dimension (activity, identity, wellness, environment, physiological) model of context information to monitor adults with pain was proposed, expanding on a previous model. Most technological interfaces for pain monitoring were wearable, possibly because they can be used in more realistic contexts. Few studies focused on older adults, creating a relevant avenue of research on how to create devices for users that may have impaired cognitive skills or low digital literacy. The design of monitoring devices and interfaces for adults with pain must deal with the challenge of selecting relevant contextual information to understand the user's situation, and not overburdening or inconveniencing users with

  15. Design and implementation of Metta, a metasearch engine for biomedical literature retrieval intended for systematic reviewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Lin, Can; Jia, Lifeng; Jiang, Yu; Cohen, Aaron M; Yu, Clement; Davis, John M; Adams, Clive E; McDonagh, Marian S; Meng, Weiyi

    2014-01-01

    Individuals and groups who write systematic reviews and meta-analyses in evidence-based medicine regularly carry out literature searches across multiple search engines linked to different bibliographic databases, and thus have an urgent need for a suitable metasearch engine to save time spent on repeated searches and to remove duplicate publications from initial consideration. Unlike general users who generally carry out searches to find a few highly relevant (or highly recent) articles, systematic reviewers seek to obtain a comprehensive set of articles on a given topic, satisfying specific criteria. This creates special requirements and challenges for metasearch engine design and implementation. We created a federated search tool that is connected to five databases: PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Retrieved bibliographic records were shown online; optionally, results could be de-duplicated and exported in both BibTex and XML format. The query interface was extensively modified in response to feedback from users within our team. Besides a general search track and one focused on human-related articles, we also added search tracks optimized to identify case reports and systematic reviews. Although users could modify preset search options, they were rarely if ever altered in practice. Up to several thousand retrieved records could be exported within a few minutes. De-duplication of records returned from multiple databases was carried out in a prioritized fashion that favored retaining citations returned from PubMed. Systematic reviewers are used to formulating complex queries using strategies and search tags that are specific for individual databases. Metta offers a different approach that may save substantial time but which requires modification of current search strategies and better indexing of randomized controlled trial articles. We envision Metta as one piece of a multi-tool pipeline that will assist

  16. Does prism adaptation affect visual search in spatial neglect patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wit, Liselotte; Ten Brink, Antonia F; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2018-03-01

    Prism adaptation (PA) is a widely used intervention for (visuo-)spatial neglect. PA-induced improvements can be assessed by visual search tasks. It remains unclear which outcome measures are the most sensitive for the effects of PA in neglect. In this review, we aimed to evaluate PA effects on visual search measures. A systematic literature search was completed regarding PA intervention studies focusing on patients with neglect using visual search tasks. Information about study content and effectiveness was extracted. Out of 403 identified studies, 30 met the inclusion criteria. The quality of the studies was evaluated: Rankings were moderate-to-high for 7, and low for 23 studies. As feature search was only performed by five studies, low-to-moderate ranking, we were limited in drawing firm conclusions about the PA effect on feature search. All moderate-to-high-ranking studies investigated cancellation by measuring only omissions or hits. These studies found an overall improvement after PA. Measuring perseverations and total task duration provides more specific information about visual search. The two (low ranking) studies that measured this found an improvement after PA on perseverations and duration (while accuracy improved for one study and remained the same for the other). This review suggests there is an overall effect of PA on visual search, although complex visual search tasks and specific visual search measures are lacking. Suggestions for search measures that give insight in subcomponents of visual search are provided for future studies, such as perseverations, search path intersections, search consistency and using a speed-accuracy trade-off. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Self-injury and externalizing pathology: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Meszaros, Gergely; Horvath, Lili Olga; Balazs, Judit

    2017-01-01

    Background During the last decade there is a growing scientific interest in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). The aim of the current paper was to review systematically the literature with a special focus on the associations between self-injurious behaviours and externalizing psychopathology. An additional aim was to review terminology and measurements of self-injurious behaviour and the connection between self-injurious behaviours and suicide in the included publications. Methods A systematic l...

  18. Compliance of systematic reviews articles in brain arteriovenous malformation with PRISMA statement guidelines: Review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhigbe, T; Zolnourian, A; Bulters, D

    2017-05-01

    The knowledge of reporting compliance of systematic reviews with PRISMA guidelines may assist in improving the quality of secondary research in brain AVM management and subsequently application to patient population and clinical practice. This may allow researchers and clinicians to be equipped to appraise existing literatures based on known deficit to look for or expect. The objective of this study was to assess the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analysis in the management of brain AVM. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses articles published in medical journals between 1st of May 2011 and 30th April 2016 (five-year period) were examined. Exclusion criteria were articles that were not systematic reviews and not meta-analyses, narrative literature reviews, historical literature reviews, animal studies, unpublished articles, commentaries and letter to the editor. Electronic database search performed through Medline PubMed on 20th September 2016. This systematic review examined seven systematic review articles on intracranial arteriovenous malformation compliance with PRISMA statement guidelines. The mean percentage of applicable PRISMA items across all studies was 74% (range 67-93%). Protocol registration and declaration, risk of bias and funding sources were the most poorly reported of the PRISMA items (14% each). A significant variance in the total percentages was evident between studies (67-93%). Systematic review reporting in medical literature is excessively variable and overall poor. As these papers are being published with increasing frequency, need to fully adhere to PRISMA statement guide for systematic review to ensure high-quality publications. Complete reporting of PRISMA items within systematic reviews in cerebral arteriovenous malformation enhance quality assessment, robust critical appraisal, better judgement and ultimately sound application to practice thereby improving research standards and patients care. Crown Copyright © 2017

  19. Searching ClinicalTrials.gov did not change the conclusions of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lisa M; Sharma, Ritu; Dy, Sydney M; Waldfogel, Julie M; Robinson, Karen A

    2017-10-01

    We assessed the effect of searching ClinicalTrials.gov on the conclusions of a systematic review. We conducted this case study concurrently with a systematic review. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov on March 9, 2016, to identify trial records eligible for inclusion in the review. Two independent reviewers screened ClinicalTrials.gov records. We compared conclusions and strength of evidence grade with and without ClinicalTrials.gov records for 31 comparisons and 2 outcomes. We identified 106 trials (53 in the peer-reviewed literature only, 23 in ClinicalTrials.gov only, and 30 in both sources). For one comparison, the addition of results identified through ClinicalTrials.gov reduced the pooled effect size. We found evidence of selective outcome reporting for two comparisons and suspected publication bias for another two comparisons. For all other comparisons, searching ClinicalTrials.gov did not change conclusions or the strength of evidence grading for the two outcomes. Our search of ClinicalTrials.gov bolstered suspicions of reporting biases but did not change either the conclusions or the strength of evidence grading. Further research is needed to determine the effect of searching ClinicalTrials.gov on the conclusions of systematic reviews in different topic areas and as the new rules for registration of trial results take effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fibrin Sealants in Dura Sealing: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felice Esposito

    Full Text Available Fibrin sealants are widely used in neurosurgery to seal the suture line, provide watertight closure, and prevent cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the current efficacy and safety literature of fibrin sealants in dura sealing and the prevention/treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.A comprehensive electronic literature search was run in the following databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Resister of Controlled Trials, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE. Titles and abstracts of potential articles of interest were reviewed independently by 3 of the authors.A total of 1006 database records and additional records were identified. After screening for duplicates and relevance, a total of 78 articles were assessed by the investigators for eligibility. Thirty-eight were excluded and the full-text of 40 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Seven of these included only safety data and were included in the safety assessment. The remaining 33 articles included findings from 32 studies that enrolled a total of 2935 patients who were exposed to fibrin sealant. Among these 33 studies there were only 3 randomized controlled trials, with the remaining being prospective cohort analysis, case controlled studies, prospective or retrospective case series. One randomized controlled trial, with 89 patients exposed to fibrin sealant, found a greater rate of intraoperative watertight dura closure in the fibrin sealant group than the control group (92.1% versus 38.0%, p0.05. Other clinical trials evaluated the effect of fibrin sealant in the postoperative prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. These were generally lower level evidence studies (ie, not prospective, randomized, controlled trials that were not designed or powered to demonstrate a significant advantage to fibrin sealant use. Two small case series studies evaluated the effect of fibrin sealants in

  1. How Healthy is the Behavior of Young Athletes? A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Diehl, Katharina; Thiel, Ansgar; Zipfel, Stephan; Mayer, Jochen; Litaker, David G.; Schneider, Sven

    2012-01-01

    Participation in sports during adolescence is considered a healthy behavior. The extent to which adolescent athletes engage in other healthful (or risky) behaviors is less clear, however. We conducted a systematic literature review following the PRISMA Statement to assess the frequency of risky behaviors among athletes in this age group. We searched the PubMed, PsycINFO and SCA Sociological Abstracts databases for observational studies published in English over the last twenty years on the fr...

  2. Current status of Helicobacter pylori resistance to tetracycline: a systematic review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez-Bulla, Paola; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C.; Mercado-Reyes, Marcela; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C.; Trespalacios-Rangel, Alba Alicia; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C.,; Avila-Coy, Jenny; Grupo de Enfermedades Infecciosas. Departamento de Microbiología. Facultad de Ciencias. Pontificia Universidad Javeriana. Bogotá, D.C.,; Otero-Regino, William; Unidad de Gastroenterología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori resistance to and the possible mutations that generate this worldwide resistance. Materials and methods. A systematic search for literature was performed in the databases Medline, Science Direct (Elsevier), Ovid, PubMed, Lilacsand MedicLatina using relevant key words. Data extraction was independent and checklists were prepared to assess the methodologicalquality of the studies. Analysis of information was done with RevMan 5®. Resu...

  3. Prevention of Incisional Hernias with Biological Mesh: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Muysoms, Filip E.; Jairam, An; López-Cano, Manuel; Śmietański, Maciej; Woeste, Guido; Kyle-Leinhase, Iris; Antoniou, Stavros A.; Köckerling, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    Background Prophylactic mesh-augmented reinforcement during closure of abdominal wall incisions has been proposed in patients with increased risk for development of incisional hernias (IHs). As part of the BioMesh consensus project, a systematic literature review has been performed to detect those studies where MAR was performed with a non-permanent absorbable mesh (biological or biosynthetic). Methods A computerized search was performed within 12 databases (Embase, Medline, Web-of...

  4. Prevention of Incisional Hernias with Biological MeshA Systematic Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    FILIP ETIENNE MUYSOMS; An Jairam; Manuel López-Cano; Maciej Śmietański; Maciej Śmietański; Guido Woeste; Iris Kyle-Leinhase; Stavros Athanasios Antoniou; Stavros Athanasios Antoniou; Ferdinand Köckerling

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prophylactic mesh augmented reinforcement during closure of abdominal wall incisions has been proposed in patients with increased risk for development of incisional hernias (IH). As part of the BioMesh consensus project, a systematic literature review has been performed to detect those studies where MAR was performed with a non-permanent absorbable mesh (biological or biosynthetic). Methods: A computerized search was performed within 12 databases (Embase, Medline, Web-of-Science,...

  5. A Systematic Literature Review of Agile Maturity Model Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan Henriques

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim/Purpose: A commonly implemented software process improvement framework is the capability maturity model integrated (CMMI. Existing literature indicates higher levels of CMMI maturity could result in a loss of agility due to its organizational focus. To maintain agility, research has focussed attention on agile maturity models. The objective of this paper is to find the common research themes and conclusions in agile maturity model research. Methodology: This research adopts a systematic approach to agile maturity model research, using Google Scholar, Science Direct, and IEEE Xplore as sources. In total 531 articles were initially found matching the search criteria, which was filtered to 39 articles by applying specific exclusion criteria. Contribution:: The article highlights the trends in agile maturity model research, specifically bringing to light the lack of research providing validation of such models. Findings: Two major themes emerge, being the coexistence of agile and CMMI and the development of agile principle based maturity models. The research trend indicates an increase in agile maturity model articles, particularly in the latter half of the last decade, with concentrations of research coinciding with version updates of CMMI. While there is general consensus around higher CMMI maturity levels being incompatible with true agility, there is evidence of the two coexisting when agile is introduced into already highly matured environments. Future Research:\tFuture research direction for this topic should include how to attain higher levels of CMMI maturity using only agile methods, how governance is addressed in agile environments, and whether existing agile maturity models relate to improved project success.

  6. Bisexuality and suicide: a systematic review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Lester, David; Forte, Alberto; Seretti, Maria Elena; Erbuto, Denise; Lamis, Dorian A; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Many studies of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth have demonstrated that individuals reporting a bisexual orientation have a particularly high risk of suicidal behavior and substance abuse. It has been also suggested that bisexual individuals (both men and women) have higher rates of depression and anxiety compared with homosexual and heterosexual groups. The aim of the present article was to determine whether or not an association between bisexuality and suicidal behavior exists and to analyze risk factors for suicidal behavior in bisexual individuals. The combined search strategies yielded a total of 339 records screened from PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge. Duplicate articles, articles that were not in English, and those that did not analyze bisexuality separately from homosexuality were excluded. A quality assessment was performed for each study included. A careful systematic review of the literature was conducted investigating the potential bisexuality-suicidal behavior link. A total of 77 articles from peer-reviewed journals were considered, and the most relevant (N=19) were selected for this review. Individuals reporting a bisexual orientation had an increased risk of suicide attempts and ideation compared with their homosexual and heterosexual peers. Risk factors included related victimization, peer judgments, and family rejection. Bisexual individuals also reported higher rates of mental illness and substance abuse. Bisexual individuals may experience more psychological distress and mental health problems than individuals who identify with a homosexual or heterosexual orientation. Clinicians should consider the potential for suicidal behaviors in bisexual individuals and be alert for increased mental health problems and poor social integration. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. Eating Disorders in Non-Dance Performing Artists: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsetaki, Marianna E; Easmon, Charlie

    2017-12-01

    Previous literature on dancers and athletes has shown a large impact of eating disorders (EDs) on these individuals, but there is limited research on EDs affecting non-dance performing artists (i.e., musicians, actors, etc.). This systematic review aimed to identify and evaluate the literature on EDs in non-dance performing artists. A systematic review of the literature was performed on 24 databases, using search terms related to EDs and non-dance performing artists. All results from the databases were systematically screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria. The initial search returned 86,383 total articles, which after screening and removal of duplicates and irrelevant papers yielded 129 results. After screening the 129 full-text results for eligibility, 10 studies met criteria for inclusion: 6 papers addressed EDs in musicians, and 4 papers addressed EDs in theatre performers. Most studies used questionnaires and body mass index (BMI) as diagnostic tools for EDs. Most were small-scale studies and participants were mostly students. Because of the studies' heterogeneity and varying quality, the results obtained were often contradictory and questionable. Although there has been a lot of literature in dancers, we found relatively few studies associating EDs with other performing artists, and most were inconsistent in their information.

  8. Physician leadership in e-health? A systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijser, Wouter Alexander; Smits, Jacco Gerardus Wilhelmus Leonardus; Penterman, Lisanne; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to systematically review the literature on roles of physicians in virtual teams (VTs) delivering healthcare for effective “physician e-leadership” (PeL) and implementation of e-health. Design/methodology/approach The analyzed studies were retrieved with explicit keywords and

  9. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Bouman, A.; Francke, A.L.; Fagerstrom, C.; Melchiorre, M.G.; Greco, C.; Devillé, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe

  10. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, N.; Boerma, W.G.W.; Kringos, D.S.; Bouman, A.; Francke, A.L.; Fagerström, C.; Melchiorre, M.G.; Greco, C.; Devillé, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in

  11. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genet, Nadine; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; Kringos, Dionne S.; Bouman, Ans; Francke, Anneke L.; Fagerström, Cecilia; Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella; Greco, Cosetta; Devillé, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the

  12. Spatial partitions systematize visual search and enhance target memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solman, Grayden J F; Kingstone, Alan

    2017-02-01

    Humans are remarkably capable of finding desired objects in the world, despite the scale and complexity of naturalistic environments. Broadly, this ability is supported by an interplay between exploratory search and guidance from episodic memory for previously observed target locations. Here we examined how the environment itself may influence this interplay. In particular, we examined how partitions in the environment-like buildings, rooms, and furniture-can impact memory during repeated search. We report that the presence of partitions in a display, independent of item configuration, reliably improves episodic memory for item locations. Repeated search through partitioned displays was faster overall and was characterized by more rapid ballistic orienting in later repetitions. Explicit recall was also both faster and more accurate when displays were partitioned. Finally, we found that search paths were more regular and systematic when displays were partitioned. Given the ubiquity of partitions in real-world environments, these results provide important insights into the mechanisms of naturalistic search and its relation to memory.

  13. 77 FR 20817 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... the literature search results and submit additional information to EPA. EPA recently added 1,2,3.../iris ). The public is invited to review the literature search results and submit additional information... and 1,3,5-TMB as some of the studies included in those searches also include data and information on 1...

  14. Novel citation-based search method for scientific literature: application to meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, A Cecile J W; Gwinn, M

    2015-10-13

    Finding eligible studies for meta-analysis and systematic reviews relies on keyword-based searching as the gold standard, despite its inefficiency. Searching based on direct citations is not sufficiently comprehensive. We propose a novel strategy that ranks articles on their degree of co-citation with one or more "known" articles before reviewing their eligibility. In two independent studies, we aimed to reproduce the results of literature searches for sets of published meta-analyses (n = 10 and n = 42). For each meta-analysis, we extracted co-citations for the randomly selected 'known' articles from the Web of Science database, counted their frequencies and screened all articles with a score above a selection threshold. In the second study, we extended the method by retrieving direct citations for all selected articles. In the first study, we retrieved 82% of the studies included in the meta-analyses while screening only 11% as many articles as were screened for the original publications. Articles that we missed were published in non-English languages, published before 1975, published very recently, or available only as conference abstracts. In the second study, we retrieved 79% of included studies while screening half the original number of articles. Citation searching appears to be an efficient and reasonably accurate method for finding articles similar to one or more articles of interest for meta-analysis and reviews.

  15. Systematizing Web Search through a Meta-Cognitive, Systems-Based, Information Structuring Model (McSIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhamdieh, Ayman H.; Harder, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a meta-cognitive, systems-based, information structuring model (McSIS) to systematize online information search behavior based on literature review of information-seeking models. The General Systems Theory's (GST) prepositions serve as its framework. Factors influencing information-seekers, such as the individual learning…

  16. A systematic scoping review of adherence to reporting guidelines in health care literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaan, Zainab; Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Kosa, Daisy; Borg Debono, Victoria; Dillenburg, Rejane; Zhang, Shiyuan; Fruci, Vincent; Dennis, Brittany; Bawor, Monica; Thabane, Lehana

    2013-01-01

    Reporting guidelines have been available for the past 17 years since the inception of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement in 1996. These guidelines were developed to improve the quality of reporting of studies in medical literature. Despite the widespread availability of these guidelines, the quality of reporting of medical literature remained suboptimal. In this study, we assess the current adherence practice to reporting guidelines; determine key factors associated with better adherence to these guidelines; and provide recommendations to enhance adherence to reporting guidelines for future studies. We undertook a systematic scoping review of systematic reviews of adherence to reporting guidelines across different clinical areas and study designs. We searched four electronic databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Embase, and Medline) from January 1996 to September 2012. Studies were included if they addressed adherence to one of the following guidelines: Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT), Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), Quality of Reporting of Meta-analysis (QUOROM), Transparent Reporting of Evaluations with Nonrandomized Designs (TREND), Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). A protocol for this study was devised. A literature search, data extraction, and quality assessment were performed independently by two authors in duplicate. This study reporting follows the PRISMA guidelines. Our search retrieved 5159 titles, of which 50 were eligible. Overall, 86.0% of studies reported suboptimal levels of adherence to reporting guidelines. Factors associated with better adherence included journal impact factor and endorsement of guidelines, publication date, funding source, multisite studies, pharmacological interventions and larger

  17. A Systematic Literature Review on ICTD Research by IS Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luthfi Ramadani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite a huge number of Information and Communications Technology for Development (ICTD research so far, little is known about the landscape of published articles in Information Systems (IS literature. This paper systematically reviews extant ICTD research published in the IS field from 1980-2016. The author systematically analyzed 192 articles published in A* and A-rank IS journals and explored which theoretical lenses, contexts, units of analysis, types of technology, and research methods dominate extant research in the field. As such, this present work provides a unique snapshot of the current research landscape that can help future ICTD field progress.

  18. Interactive media for parental education on managing children chronic condition: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annaim, Ali; Lassiter, Mia; Viera, Anthony J; Ferris, Maria

    2015-12-03

    Although some research has examined the use of games for the education of pediatric patients, the use of technology for parental education seems like an appropriate application as it has been a part of the popular culture for at least 30 years. The main objective of this systematic review is to examine the literature for research evaluating the use of interactive media in the education of parents of children with chronic conditions. We searched the MEDLINE, PSYCHINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane database of systematic reviews and EMBASE databases from 1986 to 2014 seeking original investigations on the use of interactive media and video games to educate parents of children with chronic conditions. Cohort studies, randomized control trials, and observational studies were included in our search of the literature. Two investigators reviewed abstracts and full texts as necessary. The quality of the studies was assessed using the GRADE guidelines. Overall trend in the results and the degree of certainty in the results were considered when assessing the body of literature pertaining to our focused questions. Our initial search identified 4367 papers, but only 12 fulfilled the criterion established for final analysis, with the majority of the studies having flaws that reduced their quality. These papers reported mostly positive results supporting the idea that parent education is possible through interactive media. We found limited evidence of the effectiveness of using serious games and or interactive media to educate parents of children with chronic conditions.

  19. Animal-Assisted Intervention for trauma: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Marguerite Elizabeth O'haire; Noémie Adeline Guérin; Noémie Adeline Guérin; Alison Claire Kirkham

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a long history of inclusion in psychiatric treatment. There has been a recent growth in the empirical study of this practice, known as Animal-Assisted Intervention (AAI). We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on AAI for trauma, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ten studies qualified for inclusion, including six peer-reviewed journal articles and four theses. Participants were predominantly survivors of child abuse, in addition to military vete...

  20. Animal-Assisted Intervention for trauma: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    O'Haire, Marguerite E.; Guérin, Noémie A.; Kirkham, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a long history of inclusion in psychiatric treatment. There has been a recent growth in the empirical study of this practice, known as Animal-Assisted Intervention (AAI). We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on AAI for trauma, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ten studies qualified for inclusion, including six peer-reviewed journal articles and four unpublished theses. Participants were predominantly survivors of child abuse, in addition to m...

  1. A Systematic Review of Urban Sustainability Assessment Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew Cohen

    2017-01-01

    As the world rapidly urbanizes, there is much focus on achieving sustainability outcomes within cities. Accomplishing this goal requires not only envisioning sustainable cities and implementing strategies, but it also demands assessing progress towards sustainable urban development. Despite a growing literature on sustainability assessment, there is room to further understand the application of sustainability assessment in urban contexts. This paper presents a systematic review of urban susta...

  2. The quantity, quality and characteristics of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian mentoring literature: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Bainbridge, Roxanne; Tsey, Komla; McCalman, Janya; Towle, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background Mentoring is a key predictor of empowerment and prospectively a game changer in the quest to improve health inequities. This systematic review reports on the state of evidence on mentoring for Indigenous Australians by identifying the quantity, nature, quality and characteristics of mentoring publications. Methods Thirteen databases were searched using specific search strings from 1983 - 2012. Grey literature was also canvassed. The resultant publications were mined to identify the...

  3. MOOCs: A Systematic Study of the Published Literature 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharindu Rekha Liyanagunawardena

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Massive open online courses (MOOCs are a recent addition to the range of online learning options. Since 2008, MOOCs have been run by a variety of public and elite universities, especially in North America. Many academics have taken interest in MOOCs recognising the potential to deliver education around the globe on an unprecedented scale; some of these academics are taking a research-oriented perspective and academic papers describing their research are starting to appear in the traditional media of peer reviewed publications. This paper presents a systematic review of the published MOOC literature (2008-2012: Forty-five peer reviewed papers are identified through journals, database searches, searching the Web, and chaining from known sources to form the base for this review. We believe this is the first effort to systematically review literature relating to MOOCs, a fairly recent but massively popular phenomenon with a global reach. The review categorises the literature into eight different areas of interest, introductory, concept, case studies, educational theory, technology, participant focussed, provider focussed, and other, while also providing quantitative analysis of publications according to publication type, year of publication, and contributors. Future research directions guided by gaps in the literature are explored.

  4. Pre-hospital management of mass casualty civilian shootings: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Conor D A; Lockey, David J; Rehn, Marius

    2016-11-08

    Mass casualty civilian shootings present an uncommon but recurring challenge to emergency services around the world and produce unique management demands. On the background of a rising threat of transnational terrorism worldwide, emergency response strategies are of critical importance. This study aims to systematically identify, describe and appraise the quality of indexed and non-indexed literature on the pre-hospital management of modern civilian mass shootings to guide future practice. Systematic literature searches of PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and Scopus were conducted in conjunction with simple searches of non-indexed databases; Web of Science, OpenDOAR and Evidence Search. The searches were last carried out on 20 April 2016 and only identified those papers published after the 1 January 1980. Included documents had to contain descriptions, discussions or experiences of the pre-hospital management of civilian mass shootings. From the 494 identified manuscripts, 73 were selected on abstract and title and after full text reading 47 were selected for inclusion in analysis. The search yielded reports of 17 mass shooting events, the majority from the USA with additions from France, Norway, the UK and Kenya. Between 1994 and 2015 the shooting of 1649 people with 578 deaths at 17 separate events are described. Quality appraisal demonstrated considerable heterogeneity in reporting and revealed limited data on mass shootings globally. Key themes were identified to improve future practice: tactical emergency medical support may harmonise inner cordon interventions, a need for inter-service education on effective haemorrhage control, the value of senior triage operators and the need for regular mass casualty incident simulation.

  5. Cone-beam computerized tomography imaging and analysis of the upper airway: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijarro-Martinez, R.; Swennen, G.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature concerning upper airway imaging and analysis using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was performed. A PubMed search (National Library of Medicine, NCBI; revised 9th January 2011) yielded 382 papers published between 1968 and 2010. The 382 full papers were

  6. Clinimetric properties of instruments to assess activities in patients with hand injury: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven-Stevens, L.A.W. van de; Munneke, M.; Terwee, C.B.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Linde, H. van der

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review of the literature to assess the clinimetric properties of instruments measuring limitations of activity. DATA SOURCES: The Medline, Cochrane Library, Picarta, Occupational Therapy-seeker, and CINAHL databases were searched for English or Dutch language

  7. Evaluation of hospital staff’s perceived quality of librarian-mediated literature searching services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra McKeown, MLIS

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the limitations of written communication in the context of librarian-mediated literature searching and suggest a multifaceted approach to quality improvement efforts.

  8. Auditory Workload Assessment. Volume II: Non-Copyrighted Literature Search Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rench, Michael

    2000-01-01

    In support of the US Army Research Laboratory, Human Research and Engineering Directorate, HSIAC, the Human Systems Information Analysis Center, conducted an extensive search of scientific literature...

  9. Systematic Literature Review Terhadap Evaluasi Perangkat Lunak Tentang Serious Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andhik Ampuh Yunanto

    2017-04-01

    Game is a software that is popular among children, adolescents, and adults. In addition, there are games that have a specific purpose other than as a medium of entertainment which called Serious Games. The amount of research on serious games can help developers in research, management, and software development in game. So it is necessary to Review the literature about the serious game so that information can be classified and categorized systematically. This study aims to provide an update by the Systematic Literature Review (SLR to the recent studies on the evaluation of serious games from 2015 until October 2016. The proposed SLR method has three stages of Review that is external, internal, and nine quality assessment (QA. The final results obtained in this study indicate there are 34 research on serious games. From the studies that were Reviewed also show that research on the evaluation of serious games have educational applications domain, the type of computer games, methods of evaluation questionnaires, evaluation of the quality of learning outcomes, evaluation procedures are simple, and the number of populations ranging from 1 to 50 people. The results that have been obtained SLR is expected to contribute and important information to the researcher or developer interested in the field of serious games. This research can also improve the quality of the serious game for education and counseling in community. Keywords: Serious game, Evaluation, Systematic Literature Review

  10. [Exercise in haemodyalisis patients: a literature systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Ortí, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Exercise as a therapeutic tool used in End-stage renal disease patients (ESRD) in hemodialysis (HD) is not routinately applied, as it occurs with cardiac or respiratory patients. Lack of awareness of research in this field may contribute to the current situation. Thus, the aims of this review are: 1) to systematically review the literature of exercise training on adult HD patients or patients at a pre-HD stage; 2) to show the evidence on the benefits of exercise for counteracting physiological, functional and psychological impairments found even in older ESRD patients; 3) to recommend requirements of future research in order to include exercise prescription in the HD patients treatment. The Data bases reviewed from 2005 to 2009 were: MEDLINE (Ovid), CINAHL (EBSCOHost), SportDicus (EBSCOHost), Academic Search Complete (EBSCOHost), Fuente Académica (EBSCOHost), MedicLatina (EBSCOHost), PEDro y PubMed. Additionally, references from identified articles, several reviews on ESRD and abstracts to Nephrology Congresses were also reviewed. Randomized Controlled Trials on aerobic, strength and combined programs for HD patients were selected. Data from the studies was compiled and Van Tulder criteria were used for methodological quality assessment. Metanalysis included 6 studies on aerobic exercise, 2 on strength exercise and 5 on combined exercise programs. 640 patients were included in 16 included studies. Effects on physical function, health related quality of life and other secondary measurements were summarized by the Standardized Mean Difference (SMD) Moderate evidence exists on positive effects of aerobic training on peak oxygen consumption at the graded exercise test (SMD 6.55; CI 95%: 4.31-8.78). There is high evidence on positive effects of strength training on health related quality of life (SMD 11.03; CI 95%: 5.63-16.43). Finally, moderate evidence exists on positive effects of combined exercise on peak oxygen consumption at the graded exercise test (SMD 5.57; CI

  11. The global pharmacy workforce: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Claire

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The importance of health workforce provision has gained significance and is now considered one of the most pressing issues worldwide, across all health professions. Against this background, the objectives of the work presented here were to systematically explore and identify contemporary issues surrounding expansion of the global pharmacy workforce in order to assist the International Pharmaceutical Federation working group on the workforce. International peer and non-peer-reviewed literature published between January 1998 and February 2008 was analysed. Articles were collated by performing searches of appropriate databases and reference lists of relevant articles; in addition, key informants were contacted. Information that met specific quality standards and pertained to the pharmacy workforce was extracted to matrices and assigned an evidence grade. Sixty-nine papers were identified for inclusion (48 peer reviewed and 21 non-peer-reviewed. Evaluation of evidence revealed the global pharmacy workforce to be composed of increasing numbers of females who were working fewer hours; this decreased their overall full-time equivalent contribution to the workforce, compared to male pharmacists. Distribution of pharmacists was uneven with respect to location (urban/rural, less-developed/more-developed countries and work sector (private/public. Graduates showed a preference for completing pre-registration training near where they studied as an undergraduate; this was of considerable importance to rural areas. Increases in the number of pharmacy student enrolments and pharmacy schools occurred alongside an expansion in the number and roles of pharmacy technicians. Increased international awareness and support existed for the certification, registration and regulation of pharmacy technicians and accreditation of training courses. The most common factors adding to the demand for pharmacists were increased feminization, clinical governance measures

  12. Kefir and Cancer: A Systematic Review of Literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafie, Nahid; Golpour Hamedani, Sahar; Ghiasvand, Reza; Miraghajani, Maryam

    2015-12-01

    Some studies have suggested chemopreventive effects of kefir, a fermented milk product, on carcinogenesis. The aim of this review study was to evaluate the scientific evidence for effects of kefir on cancer prevention and treatment. We systematically searched for all relevant studies published before June 2015, using PubMed, Google scholar, Cochrane and Science Direct, SID, MedLib and Srlst databases. Relevant studies were reviewed based on systematic review (PRISMA) guidelines. From a total of 2208 papers obtained at the initial database search, 11 publications including 7 in vitro and 4 experimental studies were eligible. In vitro studies on breast, colon, skin and gastric cancers and leukemia cell lines and experimental studies on different sarcomas consistently showed beneficial effects of kefir on cancer prevention and treatment. The results of this systematic review suggest that kefir may be associated with cancer prevention and it also has beneficial effects in cancer treatment. This protection may be associated with kefir bioactive components including peptides, polysaccharides and sphingolipids.

  13. Methods for systematic reviews of health economic evaluations: a systematic review, comparison, and synthesis of method literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Tim; Walgenbach, Maren; Antoine, Sunya-Lee; Pieper, Dawid; Eikermann, Michaela

    2014-10-01

    The quality of systematic reviews of health economic evaluations (SR-HE) is often limited because of methodological shortcomings. One reason for this poor quality is that there are no established standards for the preparation of SR-HE. The objective of this study is to compare existing methods and suggest best practices for the preparation of SR-HE. To identify the relevant methodological literature on SR-HE, a systematic literature search was performed in Embase, Medline, the National Health System Economic Evaluation Database, the Health Technology Assessment Database, and the Cochrane methodology register, and webpages of international health technology assessment agencies were searched. The study selection was performed independently by 2 reviewers. Data were extracted by one reviewer and verified by a second reviewer. On the basis of the overlaps in the recommendations for the methods of SR-HE in the included papers, suggestions for best practices for the preparation of SR-HE were developed. Nineteen relevant publications were identified. The recommendations within them often differed. However, for most process steps there was some overlap between recommendations for the methods of preparation. The overlaps were taken as basis on which to develop suggestions for the following process steps of preparation: defining the research question, developing eligibility criteria, conducting a literature search, selecting studies, assessing the methodological study quality, assessing transferability, and synthesizing data. The differences in the proposed recommendations are not always explainable by the focus on certain evaluation types, target audiences, or integration in the decision process. Currently, there seem to be no standard methods for the preparation of SR-HE. The suggestions presented here can contribute to the harmonization of methods for the preparation of SR-HE. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Status of Electricity Act, 2003: A systematic review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Shilpi; Dhingra, Tarun; Sengupta, Anirban

    2017-01-01

    The Electricity Act 2003 was a landmark Act which promised to remove the maladies which afflict the Indian Power Sector and that too at a time when the sector was ridden with problems. With concepts such as open access, multiple distribution licensees, wheeling of electricity etc, the said Act intended to encourage competition which in turn was meant bring a paradigm shift in the sector. The paper undertakes a systematic literature review to find the status of review of the promising Act. More than a decade has passed since its enactment and amendments are due with the legislative body of India but none of the literature reviewed gives a comprehensive view encompassing all the objectives of the Act. Moreover, these documents study either the probable impact or the impact on a particular segment only. It has important implications for the Power sector which highlights a significant gap in literature and provides a basis on which future research can be built upon. - Highlights: • Electricity Act 2003 is a landmark in Indian power sector reform. • Systematic literature review is done to find the status of review of the Act. • Status of Electricity Act 2003 not comprehensively reviewed. • Status of the act needs to be reviewed comprehensively through actual data.

  15. [Dentists and National Socialism. Systematic Literature Review and Research Questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanke, Enno; Krischel, Matthis; Gross, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the rich literature on Nazi medicine in general, the connection between dentists and National Socialism is less well documented. Neither the elites of the field from this era nor those excluded from the profession are catalogued in a systematic manner. The aims of this contribution are to assemble and review the relevant literature and show how German dentistry organizations have handled this chapter of their professional history. Trends in the literature since the 1980s are examined and it is pointed out, which areas have received some attention and which have not yet been addressed. Thus, this contribution will serve as both the basis and the starting point for new research into the field.

  16. Epigastric Hernia in Pregnancy: A Management Plan Based on a Systematic Review of Literature and a Case History

    OpenAIRE

    Debrah, Samuel A.; Okpala, Amalachukwu M.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic epigastric hernia is rare in pregnant women. A case history, management of which prompted a systematic review of the literature and proposed plan for treatment of such cases, is hereby presented. There is paucity of information on management of this condition in the standard literature as searches in Pubmed, Science Direct, Hinari, Medline, African Journal Online, Bioone as well as Cochrane library revealed. There are two schools of thought for the management of hernias in pregnan...

  17. Meta-epidemiologic analysis indicates that MEDLINE searches are sufficient for diagnostic test accuracy systematic reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enst, Wynanda A.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; Whiting, Penny; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Hooft, Lotty

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how the summary estimates in diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) systematic reviews are affected when searches are limited to MEDLINE. A systematic search was performed to identify DTA reviews that had conducted exhaustive searches and included a meta-analysis. Primary studies included in

  18. Literature Review from Search to Publication, Part 1: Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    “Research Tools” can be defined as vehicles that broadly facilitate research and related activities. “Research Tools” enable researchers to collect, organize, analyze, visualize and publicized research  outputs. Dr. Nader has collected over 700 tools that enable students to follow the correct path in research and to ultimately produce high-quality research outputs with more accuracy and efficiency. It is assembled as an interactive Web-based mind map, titled “Research Tools”, which is updated...

  19. Simulation Modelling in Healthcare: An Umbrella Review of Systematic Literature Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Syed; Thokala, Praveen; Brennan, Alan; Hughes, Ruby; Booth, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Numerous studies examine simulation modelling in healthcare. These studies present a bewildering array of simulation techniques and applications, making it challenging to characterise the literature. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the level of activity of simulation modelling in healthcare and the key themes. We performed an umbrella review of systematic literature reviews of simulation modelling in healthcare. Searches were conducted of academic databases (JSTOR, Scopus, PubMed, IEEE, SAGE, ACM, Wiley Online Library, ScienceDirect) and grey literature sources, enhanced by citation searches. The articles were included if they performed a systematic review of simulation modelling techniques in healthcare. After quality assessment of all included articles, data were extracted on numbers of studies included in each review, types of applications, techniques used for simulation modelling, data sources and simulation software. The search strategy yielded a total of 117 potential articles. Following sifting, 37 heterogeneous reviews were included. Most reviews achieved moderate quality rating on a modified AMSTAR (A Measurement Tool used to Assess systematic Reviews) checklist. All the review articles described the types of applications used for simulation modelling; 15 reviews described techniques used for simulation modelling; three reviews described data sources used for simulation modelling; and six reviews described software used for simulation modelling. The remaining reviews either did not report or did not provide enough detail for the data to be extracted. Simulation modelling techniques have been used for a wide range of applications in healthcare, with a variety of software tools and data sources. The number of reviews published in recent years suggest an increased interest in simulation modelling in healthcare.

  20. 77 FR 41784 - Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS); Announcement of Availability of Literature Searches...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... ). The public is invited to review the literature search results and submit additional information to EPA... results and submit additional information to EPA. A literature search is now available for benzo(a)pyrene... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [EPA-HQ-ORD-2012-0523; FRL-9697-4] Integrated Risk Information...

  1. Child and adolescent self-report symptom measurement in pediatric oncology research: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Laura C; McFatrich, Molly; Lucas, Nicole; Walker, Jennifer S; Withycombe, Janice S; Hinds, Pamela S; Sung, Lillian; Tomlinson, Deborah; Freyer, David R; Mack, Jennifer W; Baker, Justin N; Reeve, Bryce B

    2018-02-01

    Previous work in pediatric oncology has found that clinicians and parents tend to under-report the frequency and severity of treatment-related symptoms compared to child self-report. As such, there is a need to identify high-quality self-report instruments to be used in pediatric oncology research studies. This study's objective was to conduct a systematic literature review of existing English language instruments used to measure self-reported symptoms in children and adolescents undergoing cancer treatment. A comprehensive literature search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO to identify relevant articles published through November 10, 2016. Using pre-specified inclusion/exclusion criteria, six trained reviewers carefully screened abstracts and full-text articles for eligibility. There were 7738 non-duplicate articles identified in the literature search. Forty articles met our eligibility criteria, and within these articles, there were 38 self-report English symptom instruments. Most studies evaluated only cross-sectional psychometric properties, such as reliability or validity. Ten studies assessed an instrument's responsiveness or ability to detect changes in symptoms over time. Eight instruments met our criteria for use in future longitudinal pediatric oncology studies. This systematic review aids pediatric oncology researchers in identifying and selecting appropriate symptom measures with strong psychometric evidence for their studies. Enhancing the child's voice in pediatric oncology research studies allows us to better understand the impact of cancer and its treatment on the lives of children.

  2. Dexmedetomidine as a procedural sedative for percutaneous tracheotomy: case report and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, Jerrold L; Co, Michelle T; Reynolds, Steven C; Gunning, Derek J R

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the successful use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative for a percutaneous tracheotomy procedure and to systematically present the supporting literature. Materials and Methods. A Case report of our experience and systematic literature search. PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched without restriction using the key words dexmedetomidine, percutaneous tracheotomy, and tracheotomy procedure. All relevant published references were retrieved irrespective of their methodological quality. Results. In total, only 3 relevant references were found. These include one small placebo controlled randomized trial and 2 case reports. The randomized, placebo controlled trial enrolled patients already sedated on midazolam and included 64 total patients. The 2 other case reports both described the use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative. All of the cases reported the successful completion of the percutaneous tracheotomy without any major complication, but none reported the subjective patient experience. Conclusion. Based on the available published literature and our experience, we suggest that dexmedetomidine be considered for use as the primary procedural sedative for percutaneous tracheotomy procedure. Dexmedetomidine's ability to provide adequate sedation and amnesia, without blunting the respiratory drive and protective reflexes of the patient, may make it an optimal agent in specific cases.

  3. Dexmedetomidine as a Procedural Sedative for Percutaneous Tracheotomy: Case Report and Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrold L. Perrott

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe the successful use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative for a percutaneous tracheotomy procedure and to systematically present the supporting literature. Materials and Methods. A Case report of our experience and systematic literature search. PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched without restriction using the key words dexmedetomidine, percutaneous tracheotomy, and tracheotomy procedure. All relevant published references were retrieved irrespective of their methodological quality. Results. In total, only 3 relevant references were found. These include one small placebo controlled randomized trial and 2 case reports. The randomized, placebo controlled trial enrolled patients already sedated on midazolam and included 64 total patients. The 2 other case reports both described the use of dexmedetomidine as the primary procedural sedative. All of the cases reported the successful completion of the percutaneous tracheotomy without any major complication, but none reported the subjective patient experience. Conclusion. Based on the available published literature and our experience, we suggest that dexmedetomidine be considered for use as the primary procedural sedative for percutaneous tracheotomy procedure. Dexmedetomidine’s ability to provide adequate sedation and amnesia, without blunting the respiratory drive and protective reflexes of the patient, may make it an optimal agent in specific cases.

  4. Incidence, aetiology and prevention of musculoskeletal injuries in volleyball: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, O; Maas, M; Verhagen, E; Zwerver, J; Gouttebarge, V

    2017-07-01

    Currently, there is no overview of the incidence and (volleyball-specific) risk factors of musculoskeletal injuries among volleyball players, nor any insight into the effect of preventive measures on the incidence of injuries in volleyball. This study aimed to review systematically the scientific evidence on the incidence, prevalence, aetiology and preventive measures of volleyball injuries. To this end, a highly sensitive search strategy was built based on two groups of keywords (and their synonyms). Two electronic databases were searched, namely Medline (biomedical literature) via Pubmed, and SPORTDiscus (sports and sports medicine literature) via EBSCOhost. The results showed that ankle, knee and shoulder injuries are the most common injuries sustained while playing volleyball. Results are presented separately for acute and overuse injuries, as well as for contact and non-contact injuries. Measures to prevent musculoskeletal injuries, anterior knee injuries and ankle injuries were identified in the scientific literature. These preventive measures were found to have a significant effect on decreasing the occurrence of volleyball injuries (for instance on ankle injuries with a reduction from 0.9 to 0.5 injuries per 1000 player hours). Our systematic review showed that musculoskeletal injuries are common among volleyball players, while effective preventive measures remain scarce. Further epidemiological studies should focus on other specific injuries besides knee and ankle injuries, and should also report their prevalence and not only the incidence. Additionally, high-quality studies on the aetiology and prevention of shoulder injuries are lacking and should be a focus of future studies.

  5. Gender Dysphoria and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glidden, Derek; Bouman, Walter Pierre; Jones, Bethany A; Arcelus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing clinical recognition that a significant proportion of patients with gender dysphoria have concurrent autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The purpose of this review is to systematically appraise the current literature regarding the co-occurrence of gender dysphoria and ASD. A systematic literature search using Medline and PubMed, PsycINFO, and Embase was conducted from 1966 to July 2015. Fifty-eight articles were generated from the search. Nineteen of these publications met the inclusion criteria. The literature investigating ASD in children and adolescents with gender dysphoria showed a higher prevalence rate of ASD compared with the general population. There is a limited amount of research in adults. Only one study showed that adults attending services for gender dysphoria had increased ASD scores. Another study showed a larger proportion of adults with atypical gender identity and ASD. Although the research is limited, especially for adults, there is an increasing amount of evidence that suggests a co-occurrence between gender dysphoria and ASD. Further research is vital for educational and clinical purposes. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Systematic Literature Review on Ambush Marketing in Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piątkowska Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to outline and evaluate the existing scientific achievements regarding the phenomenon of ambush marketing in sport, mark the dominating problematic areas, and create a literature database for the purposes of further research. The systematic literature review was conducted in the following stages: planning and conducting the review, analysis, and description of the results. The preliminary analysis included a combined number of 21,176 studies published between 1984-2013 in journals, books, and other sources included in analyzed databases, chosen using a meta-keyword: ambush. Analysis of the subject literature on the phenomenon of ambush marketing in sport allows for the classification of the works into three dominating research areas: identification of ambush marketing phenomenon, identification of the influence of ambush marketing practices on consumers, and identification of counter-ambush strategies. This review indicates the need for secondary research in social sciences in a more systematic way and more rigorously than it was done until now.

  7. Text mining applications in psychiatry: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbe, Adeline; Grouin, Cyril; Zweigenbaum, Pierre; Falissard, Bruno

    2016-06-01

    The expansion of biomedical literature is creating the need for efficient tools to keep pace with increasing volumes of information. Text mining (TM) approaches are becoming essential to facilitate the automated extraction of useful biomedical information from unstructured text. We reviewed the applications of TM in psychiatry, and explored its advantages and limitations. A systematic review of the literature was carried out using the CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases. In this review, 1103 papers were screened, and 38 were included as applications of TM in psychiatric research. Using TM and content analysis, we identified four major areas of application: (1) Psychopathology (i.e. observational studies focusing on mental illnesses) (2) the Patient perspective (i.e. patients' thoughts and opinions), (3) Medical records (i.e. safety issues, quality of care and description of treatments), and (4) Medical literature (i.e. identification of new scientific information in the literature). The information sources were qualitative studies, Internet postings, medical records and biomedical literature. Our work demonstrates that TM can contribute to complex research tasks in psychiatry. We discuss the benefits, limits, and further applications of this tool in the future. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. First systematic deep search for high-z CO absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahony, Elizabeth; Sadler, Elaine; Morganti, Raffaella; Ekers, Ron; Curran, Steve; Allison, James Richard; Chow, Kate; Emonts, Bjorn

    2012-04-01

    Molecular gas plays an important role in the formation and evolution of galaxies and is thought to be a crucial link between the central Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) and the host galaxy. The most common way to study the properties of this cool, molecular gas is to look for Carbon monoxide (CO) emission. However, these studies are extremely expensive in telescope time. We propose to look for CO absorption against high redshift, bright millimetre sources selected from the Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) survey. This will be the first systematic study of CO absorption properties of a large sample (20 objects) of galaxies providing insight into the molecular gas properties of the host galaxy without the time-consuming nature of CO emission line searches.

  9. Randomised controlled trials of veterinary homeopathy: characterising the peer-reviewed research literature for systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, Robert T; Hacke, Daniela; Clausen, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    Systematic review of the research evidence in veterinary homeopathy has never previously been carried out. This paper presents the search methods, together with categorised lists of retrieved records, that enable us to identify the literature that is acceptable for future systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in veterinary homeopathy. All randomised and controlled trials of homeopathic intervention (prophylaxis and/or treatment of disease, in any species except man) were appraised according to pre-specified criteria. The following databases were systematically searched from their inception up to and including March 2011: AMED; Carstens-Stiftung Homeopathic Veterinary Clinical Research (HomVetCR) database; CINAHL; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; Embase; Hom-Inform; LILACS; PubMed; Science Citation Index; Scopus. One hundred and fifty records were retrieved; 38 satisfied the acceptance criteria (substantive report of a clinical treatment or prophylaxis trial in veterinary homeopathic medicine randomised and controlled and published in a peer-reviewed journal), and were thus eligible for future planned systematic review. Approximately half of the rejected records were theses. Seven species and 27 different species-specific medical conditions were represented in the 38 papers. Similar numbers of papers reported trials of treatment and prophylaxis (n=21 and n=17 respectively) and were controlled against placebo or other than placebo (n=18, n=20 respectively). Most research focused on non-individualised homeopathy (n=35 papers) compared with individualised homeopathy (n=3). The results provide a complete and clarified view of the RCT literature in veterinary homeopathy. We will systematically review the 38 substantive peer-reviewed journal articles under the main headings: treatment trials; prophylaxis trials. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Randomised controlled trials of homeopathy in humans: characterising the research journal literature for systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathie, Robert T; Hacke, Daniela; Clausen, Jürgen; Nicolai, Ton; Riley, David S; Fisher, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A new programme of systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in homeopathy will distinguish important attributes of RCT records, including: placebo controlled versus other-than-placebo (OTP) controlled; individualised versus non-individualised homeopathy; peer-reviewed (PR) versus non peer-reviewed (NPR) sources. (a) To outline the methods used to search and categorise the RCT literature; (b) to report details of the records retrieved; (c) to compare our retrieved records with those reported in two previous systematic reviews (Linde et al., 1997; Shang et al., 2005). Ten major electronic databases were searched for records published up to the end of 2011. A record was accepted for subsequent systematic review if it was a substantive report of a clinical trial of homeopathic treatment or prophylaxis in humans, randomised and controlled, and published in a PR or NPR journal. 489 records were potentially eligible: 226 were rejected as non-journal, minor or repeat publications, or lacking randomisation and/or controls and/or a 'homeopathic' intervention; 263 (164 PR, 99 NPR) were acceptable for systematic review. The 263 accepted records comprised 217 (137 PR, 80 NPR) placebo-controlled RCTs, of which 121 were included by, 66 were published after, and 30 were potentially eligible for, but not listed by, Linde or Shang. The 137 PR records of placebo-controlled RCTs comprise 41 on individualised homeopathy and 96 on non-individualised homeopathy. Our findings clarify the RCT literature in homeopathy. The 263 accepted journal papers will be the basis for our forthcoming programme of systematic reviews. Copyright © 2012 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical and research searching on the wild side: exploring the veterinary literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpi, Kristine M.; Stringer, Elizabeth; DeVoe, Ryan S.; Stoskopf, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Zoological medicine furthers the health and well-being of captive and free-ranging wild animals. Effective information retrieval of the zoological medicine literature demands searching multiple databases, conference proceedings, and organization websites using a wide variety of keywords and controlled vocabulary. Veterinarians, residents, students, and the librarians who serve them must have patience for multiple search iterations to capture the majority of the available knowledge. The complexities of thorough literature searches are more difficult for nondomestic animal clinical cases and research reviews as demonstrated by three search requests involving poisonous snakes, a gorilla, and spiders. Expanding and better disseminating the knowledgebase of zoological medicine will make veterinary searching easier. PMID:19626142

  12. Evidence-based practice: extending the search to find material for the systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Helmer, Diane; Savoie, Isabelle; Green, Carolyn; Kazanjian, Arminée

    2001-01-01

    Background: Cochrane-style systematic reviews increasingly require the participation of librarians. Guidelines on the appropriate search strategy to use for systematic reviews have been proposed. However, research evidence supporting these recommendations is limited.

  13. Literature systematic review on the ophthalmological side effects of interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Interferons alpha and beta have been used worldwide for a few decades, altering the natural history of several severe diseases including hepatitis C, cancer and immune-mediated conditions such as multiple sclerosis. The adverse events profile of interferons is well established, but only isolated reports of ophthalmological complications of interferon therapy have been published. The objective of this study was to carry out a literature systematic review on the subject, bringing to light the need for careful ophthalmological monitoring of patients undergoing interferon treatment. Nearly 500 cases of ophthalmological complications related to interferon have been reported. The most frequent findings were soft exudates, hemorrhages and retina ischemia.

  14. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR TROJAN PLANETS IN THE KEPLER DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, Markus, E-mail: janson@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    Trojans are circumstellar bodies that reside in characteristic 1:1 orbital resonances with planets. While all the trojans in our solar system are small ({approx}<100 km), stable planet-size trojans may exist in extrasolar planetary systems, and the Kepler telescope constitutes a formidable tool to search for them. Here we report on a systematic search for extrasolar trojan companions to 2244 known Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs), with epicyclic orbital characteristics similar to those of the Jovian trojan families. No convincing trojan candidates are found, despite a typical sensitivity down to Earth-size objects. This fact, however, cannot be used to stringently exclude the existence of trojans in this size range, since stable trojans need not necessarily share the same orbital plane as the planet, and thus may not transit. Following this reasoning, we note that if Earth-sized trojans exist at all, they are almost certainly both present and in principle detectable in the full set of Kepler data, although a very substantial computational effort would be required to detect them. Additionally, we also note that some of the existing KOIs could in principle be trojans themselves, with a primary planet orbiting outside of the transiting plane. A few examples are given for which this is a readily testable scenario.

  15. Genetic Factors in Tendon Injury: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Natalie H; Stepanyan, Hayk; Gallo, Robert A; Dhawan, Aman

    2017-08-01

    Tendon injury such as tendinopathy or rupture is common and has multiple etiologies, including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The genetic influence on susceptibility to tendon injury is not well understood. To analyze the published literature regarding genetic factors associated with tendon injury. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 3. A systematic review of published literature was performed in concordance with the Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines to identify current evidence for genetic predisposition to tendon injury. PubMed, Ovid, and ScienceDirect databases were searched. Studies were included for review if they specifically addressed genetic factors and tendon injuries in humans. Reviews, animal studies, or studies evaluating the influence of posttranscription factors and modifications (eg, proteins) were excluded. Overall, 460 studies were available for initial review. After application of inclusion and exclusion criteria, 11 articles were ultimately included for qualitative synthesis. Upon screening of references of these 11 articles, an additional 15 studies were included in the final review, for a total of 26 studies. The genetic factors with the strongest evidence of association with tendon injury were those involving type V collagen A1, tenascin-C, matrix metalloproteinase-3, and estrogen-related receptor beta. The published literature is limited to relatively homogenous populations, with only level 3 and level 4 data. Additional research is needed to make further conclusions about the genetic factors involved in tendon injury.

  16. Protocol: a systematic review of studies developing and/or evaluating search strategies to identify prognosis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corp, Nadia; Jordan, Joanne L; Hayden, Jill A; Irvin, Emma; Parker, Robin; Smith, Andrea; van der Windt, Danielle A

    2017-04-20

    Prognosis research is on the rise, its importance recognised because chronic health conditions and diseases are increasingly common and costly. Prognosis systematic reviews are needed to collate and synthesise these research findings, especially to help inform effective clinical decision-making and healthcare policy. A detailed, comprehensive search strategy is central to any systematic review. However, within prognosis research, this is challenging due to poor reporting and inconsistent use of available indexing terms in electronic databases. Whilst many published search filters exist for finding clinical trials, this is not the case for prognosis studies. This systematic review aims to identify and compare existing methodological filters developed and evaluated to identify prognosis studies of any of the three main types: overall prognosis, prognostic factors, and prognostic [risk prediction] models. Primary studies reporting the development and/or evaluation of methodological search filters to retrieve any type of prognosis study will be included in this systematic review. Multiple electronic bibliographic databases will be searched, grey literature will be sought from relevant organisations and websites, experts will be contacted, and citation tracking of key papers and reference list checking of all included papers will be undertaken. Titles will be screened by one person, and abstracts and full articles will be reviewed for inclusion independently by two reviewers. Data extraction and quality assessment will also be undertaken independently by two reviewers with disagreements resolved by discussion or by a third reviewer if necessary. Filters' characteristics and performance metrics reported in the included studies will be extracted and tabulated. To enable comparisons, filters will be grouped according to database, platform, type of prognosis study, and type of filter for which it was intended. This systematic review will identify all existing validated

  17. Reverse Knowledge Transfer in Multinational Companies: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Secches Kogut

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The mainstream literature has focused on knowledge transfers from parent companies to subsidiaries, while paying less attention to knowledge created at the subsidiary level. But there is a growing trend to knowledge co-creation, and the responsibility of knowledge creation has shifted from headquarters to the corporation as a whole and its subsidiaries. Using a thorough systematic review over a 15-year period in top tier journals, this thematic analysis finds interesting literature gaps to be filled and proposes a theoretical framework that conceptualizes the reverse knowledge transfer as a complex process; moreover, we offer a detailed view on the phenomenon of reverse knowledge transfer, seeking to contribute to a better understanding of it and providing a basis to assist corporate managers in global strategic planning and knowledge management and scholars in future academic research in the field.

  18. Dengue data and surveillance in Tanzania: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Tara; Samuel, Moody; Maoz, Dorit; Runge-Ranzinger, Silvia; Boyce, Ross; Toledo, Joao; Velayudhan, Raman; Horstick, Olaf

    2017-08-01

    Although there is evidence that dengue virus is circulating in Tanzania, the country lacks a dengue surveillance system. Consequently, the true estimate of dengue seroprevalence, as well as the incidence in the population, the frequency and magnitude of outbreaks is unknown. This study therefore sought to systematically review available dengue data from Tanzania. The systematic review was conducted and reported using the PRISMA tool. Five databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, WHOLIS and Google Scholar) were searched for articles using various keywords on the illness, data and geographical location. Identified articles were assessed for inclusion based on predefined eligibility criteria. Data were extracted from included articles, analysed and reported. Based on the 10 seroprevalence studies in defined populations with estimates of acute confirmed infections that were included in the review, the estimated seroprevalence of past dengue infection in Tanzania ranged from 50.6% in a health facility-based study to 11% in a population-based study. Acute confirmed infections of dengue were estimated to be as high as 38.2% of suspected cases. Only one study reported on an outbreak. It is evident that dengue needs to become part of regular disease surveillance in Tanzania. Control measures need to be instituted with a focus on building human resource capacity and integrating dengue control measures in ongoing health programmes, for both preventive and curative interventions. Systematic reviews are valuable in assessing health issues when surveillance data are not available. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Literature Review of Indexing and Searching Techniques Implementation in Educational Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Guemmat, Kamal; Ouahabi, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze the searching and indexing techniques of educational search engines' implementation while treating future challenges. Educational search engines could greatly help in the effectiveness of e-learning if used correctly. However, these engines have several gaps which influence the performance of e-learning…

  20. Automated Literature Searches for Longitudinal Tracking of Cancer Research Training Program Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Luz A; Desmond, Renee A; Brooks, C Michael; Waterbor, John W

    2016-10-12

    A key outcome measure of cancer research training programs is the number of cancer-related peer-reviewed publications after training. Because program graduates do not routinely report their publications, staff must periodically conduct electronic literature searches on each graduate. The purpose of this study is to compare findings of an innovative computer-based automated search program versus repeated manual literature searches to identify post-training peer-reviewed publications. In late 2014, manual searches for publications by former R25 students identified 232 cancer-related articles published by 112 of 543 program graduates. In 2016, a research assistant was instructed in performing Scopus literature searches for comparison with individual PubMed searches on our 543 program graduates. Through 2014, Scopus found 304 cancer publications, 220 of that had been retrieved manually plus an additional 84 papers. However, Scopus missed 12 publications found manually. Together, both methods found 316 publications. The automated method found 96.2 % of the 316 publications while individual searches found only 73.4 %. An automated search method such as using the Scopus database is a key tool for conducting comprehensive literature searches, but it must be supplemented with periodic manual searches to find the initial publications of program graduates. A time-saving feature of Scopus is the periodic automatic alerts of new publications. Although a training period is needed and initial costs can be high, an automated search method is worthwhile due to its high sensitivity and efficiency in the long term.

  1. Caring in Correctional Nursing: A Systematic Search and Narrative Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Kirnvir; Hirst, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses are the primary healthcare providers for offenders in correctional facilities. The way in which correctional nurses care for offenders can be difficult in this context. Following a systematic review and narrative synthesis of literature regarding how correctional nurses show caring for offenders three themes emerged: the struggle of custody and caring (conflicting ethical and philosophical ideologies, correctional priorities that override nursing priorities, safety and security), the need to be nonjudgmental (judgmental attitudes can impact care; focus on health not the crime), and the importance of boundaries. Implications for practice focus on recommendations to promote caring in correctional nursing; the outcome of which will potentially enhance quality of care for offenders and improve working environments for nurses.

  2. How to search for and use 'grey literature' in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, Jane; Hardicre, Jayne; Devitt, Patric

    An ever-growing amount of grey literature is available to nurses, including oral presentations, personal communication, leaflets, newspapers and magazines, unpublished research, internal reports and minutes of meetings. It can be an invaluable research resource.

  3. Searching for evidence or approval? A commentary on database search in systematic reviews and alternative information retrieval methodologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delaney, Aogán; Tamás, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recognition that database search alone is inadequate even within the health sciences, it appears that reviewers in fields that have adopted systematic review are choosing to rely primarily, or only, on database search for information retrieval. This commentary reminds readers of factors that

  4. The attitude of health care professionals towards accreditation: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alkhenizan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accreditation is usually a voluntary program, in which authorized external peer reviewers evaluate the compliance of a health care organization with pre-established performance standards. The aim of this study was to systematically review the literature of the attitude of health care professionals towards professional accreditation. A systematic search of four databases including Medline, Embase, Healthstar, and Cinhal presented seventeen studies that had evaluated the attitudes of health care professionals towards accreditation. Health care professionals had a skeptical attitude towards accreditation. Owners of hospitals indicated that accreditation had the potential of being used as a marketing tool. Health care professionals viewed accreditation programs as bureaucratic and demanding. There was consistent concern, especially in developing countries, about the cost of accreditation programs and their impact on the quality of health care services.

  5. Novel citation-based search method for scientific literature: application to meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, A.C.J.W.; Gwinn, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Finding eligible studies for meta-analysis and systematic reviews relies on keyword-based searching as the gold standard, despite its inefficiency. Searching based on direct citations is not sufficiently comprehensive. We propose a novel strategy that ranks articles on their degree of

  6. Suicide among immigrants in Europe—a systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spallek, Jacob; Reeske, Anna; Nørredam, Marie Louise

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concerns about increased suicide risk among immigrants to European countries have been raised. We review the scientific literature on differences in suicide among immigrants compared with the majority populations in Europe's major immigration countries. METHODS: We searched the databa......BACKGROUND: Concerns about increased suicide risk among immigrants to European countries have been raised. We review the scientific literature on differences in suicide among immigrants compared with the majority populations in Europe's major immigration countries. METHODS: We searched...... the databases PubMed and PsycINFO for peer-reviewed epidemiological studies published in 1990-2011, which compared suicide risks of adult immigrant groups with the risks of the majority population in European countries. Hits were screened by two researchers. RESULTS:: We included 24 studies in the review....... No generalizable pattern of suicide among immigrants was found. Immigrants from countries in which suicide risks are particularly high, i.e. countries in Northern and Eastern Europe, experienced higher suicide rates relative to groups without migration background. Gender and age differences were observed. Young...

  7. Barriers to Electronic Health Record Adoption: a Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; Kristof, Caitlin; Jones, Beau; Mitchell, Erica; Martinez, Angelica

    2016-12-01

    Federal efforts and local initiatives to increase adoption and use of electronic health records (EHRs) continue, particularly since the enactment of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Roughly one in four hospitals not adopted even a basic EHR system. A review of the barriers may help in understanding the factors deterring certain healthcare organizations from implementation. We wanted to assemble an updated and comprehensive list of adoption barriers of EHR systems in the United States. Authors searched CINAHL, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar, and accepted only articles relevant to our primary objective. Reviewers independently assessed the works highlighted by our search and selected several for review. Through multiple consensus meetings, authors tapered articles to a final selection most germane to the topic (n = 27). Each article was thoroughly examined by multiple authors in order to achieve greater validity. Authors identified 39 barriers to EHR adoption within the literature selected for the review. These barriers appeared 125 times in the literature; the most frequently mentioned barriers were regarding cost, technical concerns, technical support, and resistance to change. Despite federal and local incentives, the initial cost of adopting an EHR is a common existing barrier. The other most commonly mentioned barriers include technical support, technical concerns, and maintenance/ongoing costs. Policy makers should consider incentives that continue to reduce implementation cost, possibly aimed more directly at organizations that are known to have lower adoption rates, such as small hospitals in rural areas.

  8. Online strategies to facilitate health-related knowledge transfer: a systematic search and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Katie; McNeil, Heather; McLeod, Jordache; Prorok, Jeanette C; Stolee, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Health interventions and practices often lag behind the available research, and the need for timely translation of new health knowledge into practice is becoming increasingly important. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic search and review of the literature on online knowledge translation techniques that foster the interaction between various stakeholders and assist in the sharing of ideas and knowledge within the health field. The search strategy included all published literature in the English language since January 2003 and used the medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (cinahl), embase and Inspec databases. The results of the review indicate that online strategies are diverse, yet all are applicable in facilitating online health-related knowledge translation. The method of knowledge sharing ranged from use of wikis, discussion forums, blogs, and social media to data/knowledge management tools, virtual communities of practice and conferencing technology - all of which can encourage online health communication and knowledge translation. Online technologies are a key facilitator of health-related knowledge translation. This review of online strategies to facilitate health-related knowledge translation can inform the development and improvement of future strategies to expedite the translation of research to practice. © 2013 Health Libraries Group of CILIP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Systematic Protein Prioritization for Targeted Proteomics Studies through Literature Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Lee, Tsung-Lu; Wang, Chi-Shiang; Chen, Yu-Ju; Ré, Christopher; Kou, Samuel C; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Kohane, Isaac S; Snyder, Michael

    2018-03-05

    There are more than 3.7 million published articles on the biological functions or disease implications of proteins, constituting an important resource of proteomics knowledge. However, it is difficult to summarize the millions of proteomics findings in the literature manually and quantify their relevance to the biology and diseases of interest. In this study, we developed a fully-automated bioinformatics framework to identify and prioritize proteins associated with any biological entity. We used the 22 targeted areas of the Biology/Disease-driven (B/D)-Human Proteome Project (HPP) as examples, prioritized the relevant proteins through their Protein Universal Reference Publication-Originated Search Engine (PURPOSE) scores, validated the relevance of the score by comparing the protein prioritization results with a curated database, computed the scores of proteins across the topics of B/D-HPP, and characterized the top proteins in the common model organisms. We further extended the bioinformatics workflow to identify the relevant proteins in all organ systems and human diseases and deployed a cloud-based tool to prioritize proteins related to any custom search terms in real time. Our tool can facilitate the prioritization of proteins for any organ system or disease of interest and can contribute to the development of targeted proteomic studies for precision medicine. Our cloud-based real-time search tool is freely available for academic and non-profit use at http://rebrand.ly/proteinpurpose.

  10. Methods for estimating the burden of antimicrobial resistance: a systematic literature review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichola R. Naylor

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimates of the burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR are needed to ascertain AMR impact, to evaluate interventions, and to allocate resources efficiently. Recent studies have estimated health, cost, and economic burden relating to AMR, with outcomes of interest ranging from drug-bug resistance impact on mortality in a hospital setting to total economic impact of AMR on the global economy. However, recent collation of this information has been largely informal, with no formal quality assessment of the current evidence base (e.g. with predefined checklists. This review therefore aims to establish what perspectives and resulting methodologies have been used in establishing the burden of AMR, whilst also ascertaining the quality of these studies. Methods The literature review will identify relevant literature using a systematic review methodology. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and EconLit will be searched utilising a predefined search string. Grey literature will be identified by searching within a predefined list of organisational websites. Independent screening of retrievals will be performed in a two-stage process (abstracts and full texts, utilising a pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data will be extracted into a data extraction table and descriptive examination will be performed. Study quality will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scales and the Philips checklists where appropriate. A narrative synthesis of the results will be presented. Discussion This review will provide an overview of previous health, cost and economic definitions of burden and the resultant impact of these different definitions on the burden of AMR estimated. The review will also explore the methods that have been used to calculate this burden and discuss resulting study quality. This review can therefore act as a guide to methods for future research in this area. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42016037510

  11. Learning Empathy Through Simulation: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearman, Margaret; Palermo, Claire; Allen, Louise M; Williams, Brett

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is increasingly used as an educational methodology for teaching empathy to preservice health professional students. This systematic review aimed to determine if and how simulation, including games, simulated patients, and role-play, might develop empathy and empathetic behaviors in learners. Eleven databases or clearing houses including MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychInfo, and ERIC were searched for all articles published from any date until May 2014, using terms relating to (i) preservice health professional students, (ii) simulation, and (iii) empathy. Twenty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria, including 9 randomized controlled trials. A narrative synthesis suggests that simulation may be an appropriate method to teach empathy to preservice health professional students and identifies the value of the learner taking the role of the patient.

  12. Defining patient-centred care in dentistry? A systematic review of the dental literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambler, S; Delgado, M; Asimakopoulou, K

    2016-10-21

    Objective This paper presents the results of a systematic review, designed to explore how patient-centred care (PCC) is defined in the dental literature.Method An electronic search of MEDLINE (1946-2012), Embase (1980-2012) PsycINFO (1806-2012), the Cochrane Library and non-peer reviewed literature was conducted using a standardised search protocol. Definitions of patient centred care were identified and scored on two criteria to evaluate quality of definition and quality/type of evidence.Results Of the 28 papers included in the review the majority provided definitions of PCC synonymous with good quality general care (holistic, humanitarian). Only three mentioned the provision of information and the tools to facilitate informed choice. Less than a third of the papers included in this review were based on empirical evidence, and of those that were, only one was an RCT study.Conclusion The evidence suggests that the concept of PCC is neither clearly understood nor empirically and systematically assessed in dental settings. Whilst most authors seem to suggest that PCC is about delivering care that is humane, involving good communication and shared decision-making, there is no work assessing these concepts empirically or relating them to practical outcomes.

  13. Behavioral functionality of mobile apps in health interventions: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Hannah E; Lister, Cameron; West, Joshua H; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2015-02-26

    Several thousand mobile phone apps are available to download to mobile phones for health and fitness. Mobile phones may provide a unique means of administering health interventions to populations. The purpose of this systematic review was to systematically search and describe the literature on mobile apps used in health behavior interventions, describe the behavioral features and focus of health apps, and to evaluate the potential of apps to disseminate health behavior interventions. We conducted a review of the literature in September 2014 using key search terms in several relevant scientific journal databases. Only English articles pertaining to health interventions using mobile phone apps were included in the final sample. The 24 studies identified for this review were primarily feasibility and pilot studies of mobile apps with small sample sizes. All studies were informed by behavioral theories or strategies, with self-monitoring as the most common construct. Acceptability of mobile phone apps was high among mobile phone users. The lack of large sample studies using mobile phone apps may signal a need for additional studies on the potential use of mobile apps to assist individuals in changing their health behaviors. Of these studies, there is early evidence that apps are well received by users. Based on available research, mobile apps may be considered a feasible and acceptable means of administering health interventions, but a greater number of studies and more rigorous research and evaluations are needed to determine efficacy and establish evidence for best practices.

  14. Cardiovascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Literature Review in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Espinosa-Serna, Juan Sebastián; Herrera-Díaz, Catalina; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major predictor of poor prognosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. There is an increasing interest to identify “nontraditional” risk factors for this condition. Latin Americans (LA) are considered as a minority subpopulation and ethnically different due to admixture characteristics. To date, there are no systematic reviews of the literature published in LA and the Caribbean about CVD in RA patients. Methods. The systematic literature review was done by two blinded reviewers who independently assessed studies for eligibility. The search was completed through PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Virtual Health Library scientific databases. Results. The search retrieved 10,083 potential studies. A total of 16 articles concerning cardiovascular risk factors and measurement of any cardiovascular outcome in LA were included. The prevalence of CVD in LA patients with RA was 35.3%. Non-traditional risk factors associated to CVD in this population were HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles, rheumatoid factor, markers of chronic inflammation, long duration of RA, steroids, familial autoimmunity, and thrombogenic factors. Conclusions. There is limited data about CVD and RA in LA. We propose to evaluate cardiovascular risk factors comprehensively in the Latin RA patient and to generate specific public health policies in order to diminish morbi-mortality rates. PMID:23193471

  15. Triage for Patients with Spinal Complaints: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Claire; Wiles, Louise; Bernhardsson, Susanne; Grimmer, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a systematic overview of the past decade of literature on processes of triage for patients with spinal pain, outcomes measured and markers of effectiveness. A systematic search of the literature with narrative synthesis of findings was conducted. Studies in English language of any design concerning spinal triage programmes for adults with acute or chronic spinal complaints were considered for inclusion. Electronic database searches were conducted in OVID, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing, Scopus and Web of Science. Additional references were sourced through pearling reference lists, and expert input. Findings were synthesized descriptively. Of 216 potentially relevant records, 21 papers (20 studies) were included. There was little commonality in triage activities/programmes and outcomes, although physiotherapists were common members of triage programmes. Positive outcomes were reported most commonly for wait times, with several studies also reporting high levels of patient and physician satisfaction. Outcomes such as surgical conversion rates and selection accuracy were less clear. Spinal triage programmes have the potential to improve efficiency of care for outpatients with spinal complaints. The evidence gaps in health outcomes, service models and cost effectiveness should be addressed by more robust prospective research designs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Literature in Focus: "Axions: Theory, Cosmology, and Experimental Searches"

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Axions are peculiar hypothetical particles that could both solve the CP problem of quantum chromodynamics and at the same time account for the dark matter of the universe. Based on a series of lectures by world experts in this field held at CERN, this volume provides a pedagogical introduction to the theory, cosmology and astrophysics of these fascinating particles and gives an up-to-date account of the status and prospect of ongoing and planned experimental searches. Learners and practitioners of astroparticle physics will find in this book both a concise introduction and a current reference work to a showcase topic that connects the "inner space" of the elementary particle world with the "outer space" of the universe at large. The book will be presented by Markus Kuster. "Axions: Theory, Cosmology, and Experimental Searches", edited by M. Kuster (Technische Universität Darmstadt), G. Raffelt (Max-Planck-Institu...

  17. Serotonin Syndrome in Tapentadol Literature: Systematic Review of Original Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressler, Laura E; Hammond, Drayton A; Painter, Jacob T

    The potential association between serotonin syndrome and tapentadol is not well described in the literature. This study aimed to review the literature and identify methodological issues that could lead to inaccurately reported rates of serotonin syndrome associated with tapentadol use. A systematic review of English articles using MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Scopus was performed. Additional studies were identified by cross-referencing article bibliographies. Original research that examined the safety of tapentadol in patients with nonconfounding indications were examined. In total, 22 studies met inclusion criteria. There were 13 randomized clinical trials, 7 open-label trials, and 2 observational studies. All studies either did not mention whether serotonergic medication use was prohibited or disallowed use. Frequently reported adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, vomiting, and somnolence. No studies reported serotonin syndrome development. No included trials differentiated between the development of adverse events in patients taking serotonergic drugs and those who were not. This differentiation is necessary to evaluate the increased risk of adverse events in patients prescribed tapentadol concomitantly with other serotonergic medications. Therefore, the current tapentadol literature has important limitations that prevent the adequate characterization of the potential association between tapentadol and serotonin syndrome.

  18. Antihistamines and birth defects: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Suzanne M; Ailes, Elizabeth C; Rai, Ramona P; Anderson, Jaynia A; Honein, Margaret A

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 10 - 15% of women reportedly take an antihistamine during pregnancy for the relief of nausea and vomiting, allergy and asthma symptoms, or indigestion. Antihistamines include histamine H1-receptor and H2-receptor antagonists. This is a systematic evaluation of the peer-reviewed epidemiologic literature published through February 2014 on the association between prenatal exposure to antihistamines and birth defects. Papers addressing histamine H1- or H2-receptor antagonists are included. Papers addressing pyridoxine plus doxylamine (Bendectin in the United States, Debendox in the United Kingdom, Diclectin in Canada, Lenotan and Merbental in other countries) prior to the year 2001 were excluded post hoc because of several previously published meta-analyses and commentaries on this medication. The literature on the safety of antihistamine use during pregnancy with respect to birth defects is generally reassuring though the positive findings from a few large studies warrant corroboration in other populations. The findings in the literature are considered in light of three critical methodological issues: i) selection of appropriate study population; ii) ascertainment of antihistamine exposures; and iii) ascertainment of birth defect outcomes. Selected antihistamines have been very well studied (e.g., loratadine); others, especially H2-receptor antagonists, require additional study before an assessment of safety with respect to birth defect risk could be made.

  19. The comparative recall of Google Scholar versus PubMed in identical searches for biomedical systematic reviews: a review of searches used in systematic reviews.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Bramer (Wichor); D. Giustini (Dean); B.M. Kramer (Bianca Mr); P.F. Anderson

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe usefulness of Google Scholar (GS) as a bibliographic database for biomedical systematic review (SR) searching is a subject of current interest and debate in research circles. Recent research has suggested GS might even be used alone in SR searching. This assertion is challenged here

  20. Co-victims of Homicide: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Jennifer; Gordon, Ronit

    2015-10-01

    This systematic literature review examines the effects of homicide on surviving family members, the "co-victims" or "survivors" of homicide. A content analysis was conducted on 40 articles identified through a search of the literature. The research samples were predominately located in the United States, but included two U.K. samples, one Jamaican sample, and one sample from Israel. All articles were written in English. Three themes were identified. Nineteen articles explored the psychological, academic, social, occupational, and familial effects of homicide. Thirteen articles considered survivors' grieving process and how it was altered by experiences with the criminal justice system as well as coping strategies used by survivors to deal with their grief. Eight articles explored treatment interventions available to help surviving family members deal with their grief. Key findings from the articles, limitations of the current research, and implications for future research, policy, and practice are included. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Management of Frailty at Individual Level - Clinical Management: Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veninšek, Gregor; Gabrovec, Branko

    2018-06-01

    To deliver quality management of a frail individual, a clinician should understand the concept of frailty, be aware of its epidemiology and be able to screen for frailty and assess it when it is present, and, finally, to recommend successful interventions. A systematic literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, Cinahl and UpToDate. The criterion in selecting the literature was that articles were published in the period from 2002 to 2017. From 67432 initial hits, 27 publications were selected. Useful interventions to address frailty are supplementation of vitamin D, proper nutrition, multicomponent training, home-based physiotherapy and comprehensive geriatric assessment, particularly when performed in geriatric wards. Comprehensive geriatric assessment is an effective way to decrease frailty status especially when performed in geriatric wards. Multicomponent physical training and multidimensional interventions (physical training, nutrition, vitamin D supplementation and cognitive training) are effective measures to reduce frailty.

  2. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in former elite athletes: a systematic overview of the recent literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Inklaar, Han; Backx, Frank; Kerkhoffs, Gino

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the recent scientific literature to explore the prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) in former elite athletes from team and individual sports. A systematic review of observational studies was conducted. Based on three categories of keywords (and synonyms), a sensitive search strategy was built in order to search MEDLINE and SPORTDiscus from 2000 to 2014. The data from included studies presenting a prevalence rate of OA as an outcome measure were extracted using a standardised extraction form, and their methodological quality was described. Fifteen studies were identified through our search strategy, studies being rather heterogeneous with regard to their study population and to the definition and assessment of OA. Hip OA ranged from 2 to 60%, and knee OA from 16 to 95%. Prevalence rates of general, lower limbs or hip/knee OA ranged from 1 to 59%. Prevalence of neck, back, shoulder and ankle OA was reported only in single studies (16, 18, 33 and 3%, respectively). This study showed that prevalence of OA, especially in their lower limbs, seems to be high among former elite athletes from team and individual sports compared to the general population and other occupational sectors.

  3. Searching for Bill and Jane: Electronic Full-Text Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Julie; Kassabian, Vibiana

    1998-01-01

    Examines electronic full-text literature available on the World Wide Web and on CD-ROM. Discusses authors and genres, electronic texts, and fees. Highlights Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and nature writing. Provides a bibliography of Web guides, specialized Shakespeare pages, and pages dealing with the Shakespeare authorship debate and secondary…

  4. Self-weighing in weight management: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yaguang; Klem, Mary Lou; Sereika, Susan M; Danford, Cynthia A; Ewing, Linda J; Burke, Lora E

    2015-02-01

    Regular self-weighing, which in this article is defined as weighing oneself regularly over a period of time (e.g., daily, weekly), is recommended as a weight loss strategy. However, the published literature lacks a review of the recent evidence provided by prospective, longitudinal studies. Moreover, no paper has reviewed the psychological effects of self-weighing. Therefore, the objective is to review the literature related to longitudinal associations between self-weighing and weight change as well as the psychological outcomes. Electronic literature searches in PubMed, Ovid PsycINFO, and Ebscohost CINAHL were conducted. Keywords included overweight, obesity, self-weighing, etc. Inclusion criteria included trials that were published in the past 25 years in English; participants were adults seeking weight loss treatment; results were based on longitudinal data. The results (N=17 studies) revealed that regular self-weighing was associated with more weight loss and not with adverse psychological outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety). Findings demonstrated that the effect sizes of association between self-weighing and weight change varied across studies and also that the reported frequency of self-weighing varied across studies. The findings from prospective, longitudinal studies provide evidence that regular self-weighing has been associated with weight loss and not with negative psychological outcomes. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  5. A Systematic Literature Review of Technologies for Suicidal Behavior Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Martín, Manuel A; Muñoz-Sánchez, Juan Luis; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Castillo-Sánchez, Gema; Hamrioui, Sofiane; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel

    2018-03-05

    Suicide is the second cause of death in young people. The use of technologies as tools facilitates the detection of individuals at risk of suicide thus allowing early intervention and efficacy. Suicide can be prevented in many cases. Technology can help people at risk of suicide and their families. It could prevent situations of risk of suicide with the technological evolution that is increasing. This work is a systematic review of research papers published in the last ten years on technology for suicide prevention. In September 2017, the consultation was carried out in the scientific databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. A general search was conducted with the terms "prevention" AND "suicide" AND "technology. More specific searches included technologies such as "Web", "mobile", "social networks", and others terms related to technologies. The number of articles found following the methodology proposed was 90, but only 30 are focused on the objective of this work. Most of them were Web technologies (51.61%), mobile solutions (22.58%), social networks (12.90%), machine learning (3.23%) and other technologies (9.68%). According to the results obtained, although there are technological solutions that help the prevention of suicide, much remains to be done in this field. Collaboration among technologists, psychiatrists, patients, and family members is key to advancing the development of new technology-based solutions that can help save lives.

  6. Effective implementation of research into practice: an overview of systematic reviews of the health literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Alec

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gap between research findings and clinical practice is well documented and a range of interventions has been developed to increase the implementation of research into clinical practice. Findings A review of systematic reviews of the effectiveness of interventions designed to increase the use of research in clinical practice. A search for relevant systematic reviews was conducted of Medline and the Cochrane Database of Reviews 1998-2009. 13 systematic reviews containing 313 primary studies were included. Four strategy types are identified: audit and feedback; computerised decision support; opinion leaders; and multifaceted interventions. Nine of the reviews reported on multifaceted interventions. This review highlights the small effects of single interventions such as audit and feedback, computerised decision support and opinion leaders. Systematic reviews of multifaceted interventions claim an improvement in effectiveness over single interventions, with effect sizes ranging from small to moderate. This review found that a number of published systematic reviews fail to state whether the recommended practice change is based on the best available research evidence. Conclusions This overview of systematic reviews updates the body of knowledge relating to the effectiveness of key mechanisms for improving clinical practice and service development. Multifaceted interventions are more likely to improve practice than single interventions such as audit and feedback. This review identified a small literature focusing explicitly on getting research evidence into clinical practice. It emphasizes the importance of ensuring that primary studies and systematic reviews are precise about the extent to which the reported interventions focus on changing practice based on research evidence (as opposed to other information codified in guidelines and education materials.

  7. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE RELATING TO CAPTIVE GREAT APE MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Victoria J; Grindlay, Douglas; Redrobe, Sharon; Cobb, Malcolm; White, Kate

    2016-09-01

    Wild bonobos (Pan paniscus), chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, Pongo abelii) are threatened with extinction. In order to help maintain a self-sustaining zoo population, clinicians require a sound understanding of the diseases with which they might be presented. To provide an up-to-date perspective on great ape morbidity and mortality, a systematic review of the zoological and veterinary literature of great apes from 1990 to 2014 was conducted. This is the first review of the great ape literature published since 1990 and the first-ever systematic literature review of great ape morbidity and mortality. The following databases were searched for relevant articles: CAB Abstracts, Web of Science Core Collection, BIOSIS Citation Index, BIOSIS Previews, Current Contents Connect, Data Citation Index, Derwent Innovations Index, MEDLINE, SciELO Citation Index, and Zoological Record. A total of 189 articles reporting on the causes of morbidity and mortality among captive great apes were selected and divided into comparative morbidity-mortality studies and case reports-series or single-disease prevalence studies. The content and main findings of the morbidity-mortality studies were reviewed and the main limitations identified. The case reports-case series and single-disease prevalence studies were categorized and coded according to taxa, etiology, and body system. Subsequent analysis allowed the amount of literature coverage afforded to each category to be calculated and the main diseases and disorders reported within the literature to be identified. This review concludes that reports of idiopathic and infectious diseases along with disorders of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal body systems were particularly prominent within the great ape literature during 1990-2014. However, recent and accurate prevalence figures are lacking and there are flaws in those reviews that do exist. There is

  8. Studies on forensic nursing in Brazil: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira de Paiva, M H; Pinheiro Lages, L; Cavalcanti de Medeiros, Z

    2017-06-01

    To identify and synthesize the national and international literature on forensic nursing in Brazil. Forensic nursing is a new specialty to the nursing practice in Brazil, being recognized by the Federal Nursing Council of Brazil in 2011. In 2016, the first forensic nursing specialization programme was authorized in the country. The implementation of forensic nursing specialty in Brazil marks new possibilities for the nursing practice, making it possible for nurses to develop additional skills to intervene in various situations under the Brazilian Unified Healthcare System. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the keyword 'Forensic nursing' in combination with 'Brazil'. LILACS, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Science databases were searched. Studies were also retrieved from the grey literature. Once literature had been identified, a thematic analysis was undertaken in order to extract themes, which were: establishment of the forensic nursing specialty and its contributions to Brazil and its practical implications. Eight manuscripts and 20 studies from the grey literature were included in the final review. Most studies (54%) were literature reviews that indicated forensic nursing as an emerging specialty in Brazil, addressing educational, instructional, communicative or contextual aspects of the specialty in the country. In the nursing profession in Brazil, few studies exist on forensic nursing and those are limited to short communications. Although most studies address the definition of forensic nursing, others present its implications in various situations such as intimate partner violence, domestic violence, sexual abuse and elder mistreatment. Despite the study limitations, it provides evidence that forensic nursing has been silently implemented in the country with the need for more evidence-based studies to support its constitution as a specialty in Brazil. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Fast-fashion: systematic literature review and research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Juliana Silva Solino

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The fast-fashion (FF is considered an approach and phenomenon of global influence that suit the requirements of a constantly changing and demanding market, since it is a business model resulting of a mixture of fast manufacturing, flexibility, low cost and agile retail approaches. Within this context, this research by a systematic literature review seeks to answer how the FF has been addressed in scientific studies published until the year 2013. Through the review, a total of 82 texts was analysed, among them articles, dissertations and theses. The research method employed is characterized as descriptive, regarding the objectives, and as qualitative and quantitative, on the approach. After conducting the classification of the material, it was possible to understand the state-of-the-art, and thus set a holistic concept and the appropriate term for the FF. As well as propose a research agenda with new approaches for future studies within the relevant topic.

  10. Animal-Assisted Intervention for trauma: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marguerite Elizabeth O'haire

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Animals have a long history of inclusion in psychiatric treatment. There has been a recent growth in the empirical study of this practice, known as Animal-Assisted Intervention (AAI. We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on AAI for trauma, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Ten studies qualified for inclusion, including six peer-reviewed journal articles and four theses. Participants were predominantly survivors of child abuse, in addition to military veterans. The presentation of AAI was highly variable across the studies. The most common animal species were dogs and horses. The most prevalent outcomes were reduced depression, PTSD symptoms, and anxiety. There was a low level of methodological rigor in most studies, indicating the preliminary nature of this area of investigation. We conclude that AAI may provide promise as a complementary treatment option for trauma, but that further research is essential to establish feasibility, efficacy, and manualizable protocols.

  11. Animal-Assisted Intervention for trauma: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Haire, Marguerite E; Guérin, Noémie A; Kirkham, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Animals have a long history of inclusion in psychiatric treatment. There has been a recent growth in the empirical study of this practice, known as Animal-Assisted Intervention (AAI). We conducted a systematic review of the empirical literature on AAI for trauma, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ten studies qualified for inclusion, including six peer-reviewed journal articles and four unpublished theses. Participants were predominantly survivors of child abuse, in addition to military veterans. The presentation of AAI was highly variable across the studies. The most common animal species were dogs and horses. The most prevalent outcomes were reduced depression, PTSD symptoms, and anxiety. There was a low level of methodological rigor in most studies, indicating the preliminary nature of this area of investigation. We conclude that AAI may provide promise as a complementary treatment option for trauma, but that further research is essential to establish feasibility, efficacy, and manualizable protocols.

  12. Scrutinizing Systematic Literature Review Process in Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Stapic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Performing the Systematic Literature Review (SLR in the turbulent field of Software Engineering (SE brings different obstacles and uncertainties. The commonly used guidelines for performing the SLR in this field are adapted from health sciences and presented by Kitchenham and Charters in 2007. This paper follows the Kitchenham’s three-phases-review-process and fulfils it with the findings, observations and recommendations from other influential authors in the field. The process of SLR is observed from the perspective of appliance in the field of SE and supplemented by the important precautious measures that should be undertaken by the authors performing it. Thus, this paper aims to present the state-of-the-art in performing the SLR in SE

  13. Knowledge management in health: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Elyrose Sousa Brito; Nagliate, Patricia; Furlan, Claudia Elisangela Bis; Rocha, Kerson; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge has been used as a resource for intelligent and effective action planning in organizations. Interest in research on knowledge management processes has intensified in different areas. A systematic literature review was accomplished, based on the question: what are the contributions of Brazilian and international journal publications on knowledge management in health? The sample totaled 32 items that complied with the inclusion criteria. The results showed that 78% of journals that published on the theme are international, 77% of researchers work in higher education and 65% have a Ph.D. The texts gave rise to five thematic categories, mainly: development of knowledge management systems in health (37.5%), discussion of knowledge management application in health (28.1%) and nurses' function in knowledge management (18.7%).

  14. Landslide Susceptibility Statistical Methods: A Critical and Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihir, Monika; Malamud, Bruce; Rossi, Mauro; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Landslide susceptibility assessment, the subject of this systematic review, is aimed at understanding the spatial probability of slope failures under a set of geomorphological and environmental conditions. It is estimated that about 375 landslides that occur globally each year are fatal, with around 4600 people killed per year. Past studies have brought out the increasing cost of landslide damages which primarily can be attributed to human occupation and increased human activities in the vulnerable environments. Many scientists, to evaluate and reduce landslide risk, have made an effort to efficiently map landslide susceptibility using different statistical methods. In this paper, we do a critical and systematic landslide susceptibility literature review, in terms of the different statistical methods used. For each of a broad set of studies reviewed we note: (i) study geography region and areal extent, (ii) landslide types, (iii) inventory type and temporal period covered, (iv) mapping technique (v) thematic variables used (vi) statistical models, (vii) assessment of model skill, (viii) uncertainty assessment methods, (ix) validation methods. We then pulled out broad trends within our review of landslide susceptibility, particularly regarding the statistical methods. We found that the most common statistical methods used in the study of landslide susceptibility include logistic regression, artificial neural network, discriminant analysis and weight of evidence. Although most of the studies we reviewed assessed the model skill, very few assessed model uncertainty. In terms of geographic extent, the largest number of landslide susceptibility zonations were in Turkey, Korea, Spain, Italy and Malaysia. However, there are also many landslides and fatalities in other localities, particularly India, China, Philippines, Nepal and Indonesia, Guatemala, and Pakistan, where there are much fewer landslide susceptibility studies available in the peer-review literature. This

  15. Local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients undergoing oral surgery: a systematized literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main local hemostatic measures to control postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic database Medline (PubMed without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were studies involving maintenance of the anticoagulant therapy, prospective studies, retrospective studies, randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical studies, comparative studies, multicentric studies or case-control studies. Studies discontinuing anticoagulant therapy, case reports, literature reviews, in vitro studies, animal experiments and articles written in language not compatible with the search strategy adopted in this work were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles that met the adopted eligibility criteria were selected, enrolling 3891 subjects under anticoagulant therapy. A total of 171 cases of hemorrhage was observed. Tranexamic acid was the main local hemostatic measure used to controlling of postoperative bleeding. CONCLUSION: The local hemostatic measures proved to be effective according to previously published studies. Nevertheless, further clinical studies should be conducted to confirm this effectiveness.

  16. The Impact of Environmental Design on Teamwork and Communication in Healthcare Facilities: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaveis, Arsalan; Hamilton, D Kirk; Pati, Debajyoti

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the current knowledge about the impact of healthcare facility design on teamwork and communication by exploring the relevant literature. Teamwork and communication are behavioral factors that are impacted by physical design. However, the effects of environmental factors on teamwork and communication have not been investigated extensively in healthcare design literature. There are no published systematic reviews on the current topic. Searches were conducted in PubMed and Google Scholar databases in addition to targeted design journals including Health Environmental Research & Design, Environment and Behavior, Environmental Psychology, and Applied Ergonomics. Inclusion criteria were (a) full-text English language articles related to teamwork and communication and (b) involving any healthcare built environment and space design published in peer-reviewed journals between 1984 and 2017. Studies were extracted using defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the first phase, 26 of the 195 articles most relevant to teamwork and 19 studies of the 147 were identified and reviewed to understand the impact of communication in healthcare facilities. The literature regarding the impact of built environment on teamwork and communication were reviewed and explored in detail. Eighteen studies were selected and succinctly summarized as the final product of this review. Environmental design, which involves nurses, support staff, and physicians, is one of the critical factors that promotes the efficiency of teamwork and collaborative communication. Layout design, visibility, and accessibility levels are the most cited aspects of design which can affect the level of communication and teamwork in healthcare facilities.

  17. Intellectual capital in the healthcare sector: a systematic review and critique of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jenna M; Brown, Adalsteinn; Baker, G Ross

    2015-12-15

    Variations in the performance of healthcare organizations may be partly explained by differing "stocks" of intellectual capital (IC), and differing approaches and capacities for leveraging IC. This study synthesizes what is currently known about the conceptualization, management and measurement of IC in healthcare through a review of the literature. Peer-reviewed papers on IC in healthcare published between 1990 and 2014 were identified through searches of five databases using the following key terms: intellectual capital/assets, knowledge capital/assets/resources, and intangible assets/resources. Articles deemed relevant for inclusion underwent systematic data extraction to identify overarching themes and were assessed for their methodological quality. Thirty-seven papers were included in the review. The primary research method used was cross-sectional questionnaires focused on hospital managers' perceptions of IC, followed by semi-structured interviews and analysis of administrative data. Empirical studies suggest that IC is linked to subjective process and performance indicators in healthcare organizations. Although the literature on IC in healthcare is growing, it is not advanced. In this paper, we identify and examine the conceptual, theoretical and methodological limitations of the literature. The concept and framework of IC offer a means to study the value of intangible resources in healthcare organizations, how to manage systematically these resources together, and their mutually enhancing interactions on performance. We offer several recommendations for future research.

  18. Definition of "persistent vomiting" in current medical literature: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Mostafa Ebraheem; Elshafay, Abdelrahman; Kansakar, Aswin Ratna; Mehyar, Ghaleb Muhammad; Dang, Nguyen Phan Hoang; Mattar, Omar Mohamed; Iqtadar, Somia; Mostafa, Mostafa Reda; Hai, Vu Ngoc; Vu, Tran Le-Huy; Ghazy, Ahmed Abdelmotaleb; Kaboub, Fatima; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Hirayama, Kenji

    2017-11-01

    Persistent vomiting is mentioned as a symptom of a large variety of systemic disorders. It is commonly used interchangeably with chronic, recurrent, or intractable vomiting and widely used as a warning sign of severe illness in dengue infection. However, it has been poorly defined in the medical literature. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review a definition of persistent vomiting in the medical literature. A systematic search was done through; PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, VHL, WHO-GHL, Grey Literature Report, POPLINE, and SIGLE for the last 10 years. Consensus on the definition was considered to be reached if at least 50% of studies described the same definition using the Delphi consensus technique. Of 2362 abstracts reviewed, 15 studies were selected based on the inclusion criteria. Three studies used the same definition. Another 2 studies defined it as vomiting of all foods and fluid in 24 hours. Three studies defined persistent vomiting in the units of days or weeks. Four studies used the number of episodes: ≥2 episodes 15 minutes apart, >3 episodes in 12 hours, and >3 episodes within 24 hours. No consensus for the definition was found among authors. This is a point of concern that needs to be addressed by further studies.

  19. The chiropractic care of patients with cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Joel; Alcantara, Joey D; Alcantara, Junjoe

    2012-12-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide and accounted for 7.4 million deaths in 2004. By 2030, deaths from cancer have been estimated at 12 million with 30% being preventable. Complementary and alternative medicine remains popular among cancer patients; particularly with chiropractic services. However, the nature of the chiropractic clinical encounter and its reported benefits remains to be fully investigated. Towards these efforts, we begin with a systematic review of the literature on the chiropractic care of patients with cancer. The following electronic databases were searched: MANTIS [1965-2010]; Index to Chiropractic Literature [1984-2010]; Pubmed [1966-2010]; Medline [1965-2010] EMBASE [1974-2010], AMED [1975-2010], CINAHL Plus [1965-2010], Alt-Health Watch [1965-2010] and PsychINFO [1965-2010]. Key words used were "cancer" and "neoplasm" in Boolean combination with "chiropractic." Primary investigation/reports in peer-reviewed English journals involving chiropractic care were reviewed. Our review revealed 60 case reports, 2 case series, 21 commentaries, 2 survey studies, and 2 literature reviews. The case reports were diagnostic with commentaries highlighting the importance of recognizing the patient presenting with NMS complaints due to an underlying neoplasm. The chiropractic clinical encounter prior to cancer diagnosis and subsequent medical referral is poorly characterized in the literature. Patients with cancer seek the care of chiropractors. The literature does not reflect or describe the totality of the chiropractic clinical encounter. We encourage further research in this field.

  20. Methods of tick removal: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coleman Nikki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background An increase in tick borne diseases in Australia has seen an interest in appropriate removal of ticks (order Ixodida in order to prevent anaphylaxis, allergy and transmission of tick borne diseases. Aims A systematic review of peer-reviewed literature to determine what method of tick removal should be promoted in terms of preventing future health complications. Methods Thematic synthesis was used in two stages: – tick removal studies conducted on animals and humans were examined and the conclusions from all of these studies were compared, in order to ascertain the best tick removal method in relation to prevention of future medical problems (including tick bite allergy and transmission of infection. Conclusion This systematic review documents the best method of tick removal based on scientific and medical studies between 1985 and 2016. It concludes that the best method is to remove the tick as soon as possible after it is detected, using either fine-tipped tweezers or a reputable commercially produced tick removal tool to pull the tick away from the site of attachment. Some methods of removal, such as applying chemicals like petroleum jelly, alcohol, or nail polish to the tick, have been discredited. Other methods of removal, such as freezing, while promising, have not yet been scientifically validated

  1. [The practice of systematic reviews. II. Searching and selection of studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assendelft, W J; van Tulder, M W; Scholten, R J

    1999-01-01

    Structured searching and selection of studies is an important component of a systematic review. It is recommended to record the various steps in a protocol in advance. The thoroughness of the searching and selection will partially depend on the available resources, like manpower and funds. A search...... may selectively not be published, results are only partially presented in the publication, studies are selectively included in reference lists, and reviewers themselves may make systematic errors in the selection process....

  2. Thread-Lift Sutures: Still in the Lift? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülbitti, Haydar Aslan; Colebunders, Britt; Pirayesh, Ali; Bertossi, Dario; van der Lei, Berend

    2018-03-01

    In 2006, Villa et al. published a review article concerning the use of thread-lift sutures and concluded that the technique was still in its infancy but had great potential to become a useful and effective procedure for nonsurgical lifting of sagged facial tissues. As 11 years have passed, the authors now performed again a systematic review to determine the real scientific current state of the art on the use of thread-lift sutures. A systematic review was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines using the PubMed database and using the Medical Subject Headings search term "Rhytidoplasty." "Rhytidoplasty" and the following entry terms were included by this Medical Subject Headings term: "facelift," "facelifts," "face Lift," "Face Lifts," "Lift," "Face," "Lifts," "Platysmotomy," "Platysmotomies," "Rhytidectomy," "Rhytidectomies," "Platysmaplasty," "and "Platysmaplasties." The Medical Subject Headings term "Rhytidoplasty" was combined with the following search terms: "Barbed suture," "Thread lift," "APTOS," "Suture suspension," "Percutaneous," and "Silhouette suture." RefWorks was used to filter duplicates. Three of the authors (H.A.G., B.C., and B.L.) performed the search independently. The initial search with all search terms resulted in 188 articles. After filtering the duplicates and the articles about open procedures, a total of 41 articles remained. Of these, the review articles, case reports, and letters to the editor were subsequently excluded, as were reports dealing with nonbarbed sutures, such as Vicryl and Prolene with Gore-Tex. This resulted in a total of 12 articles, seven additional articles since the five articles reviewed by Villa et al. The authors' review demonstrated that, within the past decade, little or no substantial evidence has been added to the peer-reviewed literature to support or sustain the promising statement about thread-lift sutures as made by Villa et al. in 2006 in terms of

  3. A systematic review of glomerular hyperfiltration assessment and definition in the medical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachat, Francois; Combescure, Christophe; Cauderay, Michel; Girardin, Eric; Chehade, Hassib

    2015-03-06

    Evaluation of glomerular hyperfiltration (GH) is difficult; the variable reported definitions impede comparisons between studies. A clear and universal definition of GH would help in comparing results of trials aimed at reducing GH. This study assessed how GH is measured and defined in the literature. Three databases (Embase, MEDLINE, CINAHL) were systematically searched using the terms "hyperfiltration" or "glomerular hyperfiltration". All studies reporting a GH threshold or studying the effect of a high GFR in a continuous manner against another outcome of interest were included. The literature search was performed from November 2012 to February 2013 and updated in August 2014. From 2013 retrieved studies, 405 studies were included. Threshold use to define GH was reported in 55.6% of studies. Of these, 88.4% used a single threshold and 11.6% used numerous thresholds adapted to participant sex or age. In 29.8% of the studies, the choice of a GH threshold was not based on a control group or literature references. After 2004, the use of GH threshold use increased (Psex-matched control group should be used to define a GH threshold. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  4. Investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews: a methodologic review of guidance in the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnier Joel J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is some consensus on methods for investigating statistical and methodological heterogeneity, little attention has been paid to clinical aspects of heterogeneity. The objective of this study is to summarize and collate suggested methods for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Methods We searched databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CONSORT, to December 2010 and reference lists and contacted experts to identify resources providing suggestions for investigating clinical heterogeneity between controlled clinical trials included in systematic reviews. We extracted recommendations, assessed resources for risk of bias, and collated the recommendations. Results One hundred and one resources were collected, including narrative reviews, methodological reviews, statistical methods papers, and textbooks. These resources generally had a low risk of bias, but there was minimal consensus among them. Resources suggested that planned investigations of clinical heterogeneity should be made explicit in the protocol of the review; clinical experts should be included on the review team; a set of clinical covariates should be chosen considering variables from the participant level, intervention level, outcome level, research setting, or others unique to the research question; covariates should have a clear scientific rationale; there should be a sufficient number of trials per covariate; and results of any such investigations should be interpreted with caution. Conclusions Though the consensus was minimal, there were many recommendations in the literature for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Formal recommendations for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews of controlled trials are required.

  5. Investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews: a methodologic review of guidance in the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnier, Joel J; Moher, David; Boon, Heather; Beyene, Joseph; Bombardier, Claire

    2012-07-30

    While there is some consensus on methods for investigating statistical and methodological heterogeneity, little attention has been paid to clinical aspects of heterogeneity. The objective of this study is to summarize and collate suggested methods for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. We searched databases (Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and CONSORT, to December 2010) and reference lists and contacted experts to identify resources providing suggestions for investigating clinical heterogeneity between controlled clinical trials included in systematic reviews. We extracted recommendations, assessed resources for risk of bias, and collated the recommendations. One hundred and one resources were collected, including narrative reviews, methodological reviews, statistical methods papers, and textbooks. These resources generally had a low risk of bias, but there was minimal consensus among them. Resources suggested that planned investigations of clinical heterogeneity should be made explicit in the protocol of the review; clinical experts should be included on the review team; a set of clinical covariates should be chosen considering variables from the participant level, intervention level, outcome level, research setting, or others unique to the research question; covariates should have a clear scientific rationale; there should be a sufficient number of trials per covariate; and results of any such investigations should be interpreted with caution. Though the consensus was minimal, there were many recommendations in the literature for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews. Formal recommendations for investigating clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews of controlled trials are required.

  6. Suggested Guidelines for Conducting Music Therapy Literature Reviews & an Introduction to Systematic Reviews in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Bonde, Lars Ole; Rickson, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the kinds of literature reviews found in music therapy writings and offers ideas for authors preparing literature reviews related to their clinical practice and research. It includes a description of systematic review and lists samples of literature reviews and systematic...... reviews conducted in music therapy....

  7. What to call spinal cord damage not due to trauma? Implications for literature searching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Peter W; Delafosse, Veronica

    2012-03-01

    To illustrate the importance of multiple search terms and databases when searching publications on spinal cord damage not due to trauma. To develop comprehensive search filter for this subject, compare the results for 2000-2009 with the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and Emtree term 'spinal cord diseases' and determine changes in the number of articles over this period. Literature searches and search filter development. Australia. Titles and abstracts searched in MEDLINE and EMBASE (2000-2009) for articles involving humans using search terms 'non-traumatic spinal cord injury' and 'nontraumatic spinal cord injury' (concise search). Develop comprehensive search filter for 'spinal cord damage not due to trauma' and compare the results with the MeSH term 'spinal cord diseases.' Annual publications (2000-2009) identified in MEDLINE and EMBASE literature searches. Concise search identified 35 articles published during 2000-2009. More publications were identified using the term 'nontraumatic spinal cord injury' (n = 20) than 'non-traumatic spinal cord injury' (n = 16). Publications increased for both terms 'spinal cord diseases' (2000 = 279; 2009 = 415) and 'spinal cord damage not due to trauma' identified by the comprehensive search filter (2000 = 1251; 2009 = 1921). Concise searches using terms 'non-traumatic spinal cord injury' and 'nontraumatic spinal cord injury' fail to identify relevant articles unless combinations of terms and databases are used. These are inadequate search terms for a comprehensive search. Further research is needed to validate our comprehensive search filter. An international consensus process is required to establish an agreed term for 'spinal cord damage not due to trauma.'

  8. An Analysis of Literature Searching Anxiety in Evidence-Based Medicine Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chin Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM is hurtling towards a cornerstone in lifelong learning for healthcare personnel worldwide. This study aims to evaluate the literature searching anxiety in graduate students in practicing EBM. Method The study participants were 48 graduate students who enrolled the EBM course at aMedical Universityin central Taiwan. Student’s t-test, Pearson correlation and multivariate regression, interviewing are used to evaluate the students’ literature searching anxiety of EBM course. The questionnaire is Literature Searching Anxiety Rating Scale -LSARS. Results The sources of anxiety are uncertainty of database selection, literatures evaluation and selection, technical assistance request, computer programs use, English and EBM education programs were disclosed. The class performance is negatively related to LSARS score, however, the correlation is statistically insignificant with the adjustment of gender, degree program, age category and experience of publication. Conclusion This study helps in understanding the causes and the extent of anxiety in order to work on a better teaching program planning to improve user’s searching skills and the capability of utilization the information; At the same time, provide friendly-user facilities of evidence searching. In short, we need to upgrade the learner’s searching 45 skills and reduce theanxiety. We also need to stress on the auxiliary teaching program for those with the prevalent and profoundanxiety during literature searching.

  9. SciRide Finder: a citation-based paradigm in biomedical literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volanakis, Adam; Krawczyk, Konrad

    2018-04-18

    There are more than 26 million peer-reviewed biomedical research items according to Medline/PubMed. This breadth of information is indicative of the progress in biomedical sciences on one hand, but an overload for scientists performing literature searches on the other. A major portion of scientific literature search is to find statements, numbers and protocols that can be cited to build an evidence-based narrative for a new manuscript. Because science builds on prior knowledge, such information has likely been written out and cited in an older manuscript. Thus, Cited Statements, pieces of text from scientific literature supported by citing other peer-reviewed publications, carry significant amount of condensed information on prior art. Based on this principle, we propose a literature search service, SciRide Finder (finder.sciride.org), which constrains the search corpus to such Cited Statements only. We demonstrate that Cited Statements can carry different information to this found in titles/abstracts and full text, giving access to alternative literature search results than traditional search engines. We further show how presenting search results as a list of Cited Statements allows researchers to easily find information to build an evidence-based narrative for their own manuscripts.

  10. Literature search on risks related to ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Anoma, G.; Bijaoui, A.; Gauron, C.

    2013-09-01

    The authors propose a selection of information sources regarding risks related to ionizing radiations. They present knowledge bases which can be found on different Internet sites belonging to different bodies and agencies (IRSN, CEA, INRS, SFRP, CNRS, Radioprotection Cirkus, EDF) and in different books. They present information sources dealing with radionuclides which can be found in French and international Internet sites and in books, information sources concerning different professional activities and sectors (ASN, IRSN, INRS, medical-professional sheets proposed by the CISME, sheets proposed by the Labour Ministry and other bodies). It presents information sources dealing with radiological incidents, accidents and emergencies, dealing with radioactive wastes, with the legal European and French framework. Some additional tools of general or more detailed information are indicated (CIPR, IAEA, UNSCAR, IRPA, IRSN, SFRP, CEA, CEPN, Radiation Cirkus, books). Ways to get an updated search are indicated for different databases, as well as some practical services

  11. Searching for evidence-based geriatrics: Tips and tools for finding evidence in the medical literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, B. C.; van de Glind, E. M. M.; Hooft, L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Information to treat geriatric patients evidence-based is hard to find. Recently, a sensitive and a specific search filter to improve searching for literature relevant to geriatric medicine were developed in a research setting. The aim of this study is to determine whether these

  12. MOMFER: A Search Engine of Thompson's Motif-Index of Folk Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.B.; van der Meulen, Marten; Meder, Theo; van den Bosch, Antal

    2015-01-01

    More than fifty years after the first edition of Thompson's seminal Motif-Indexof Folk Literature, we present an online search engine tailored to fully disclose the index digitally. This search engine, called MOMFER, greatly enhances the searchability of the Motif-Index and provides exciting new

  13. How to perform a comprehensive search for FDG-PET literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijnhout, G. S.; Hooft, L.; van Tulder, M. W.; Devillé, W. L.; Teule, G. J.; Hoekstra, O. S.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, a comprehensive, unbiassed search strategy for identifying literature on fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in Medline, Embase and Current Contents was developed, with specific search strategies for each database, using MeSH terms as well as free

  14. Managing the Grey Literature of a Discipline through Collaboration: AgEcon Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Julia; Letnes, Louise

    2005-01-01

    AgEcon Search, http://www.agecon.lib.umn.edu, is an important and ground-breaking example of an alternative method of delivering current research results to many potential users. AgEcon Search, through a distributed model, collects and disseminates the grey literature of the fields of agricultural and resource economics. The development of this…

  15. [The practice of systematic reviews. II. Searching and selection of studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Assendelft, W J; van Tulder, M W; Scholten, R J; Bouter, L M

    1999-01-01

    Structured searching and selection of studies is an important component of a systematic review. It is recommended to record the various steps in a protocol in advance. The thoroughness of the searching and selection will partially depend on the available resources, like manpower and funds. A search

  16. A Systematic Review of Urban Sustainability Assessment Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Cohen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available As the world rapidly urbanizes, there is much focus on achieving sustainability outcomes within cities. Accomplishing this goal requires not only envisioning sustainable cities and implementing strategies, but it also demands assessing progress towards sustainable urban development. Despite a growing literature on sustainability assessment, there is room to further understand the application of sustainability assessment in urban contexts. This paper presents a systematic review of urban sustainability assessment literature to (1 identify the most common methods used for urban sustainability assessment, (2 identify the most common framings for urban sustainability assessment, and (3 identify the most common categories for organizing indicators that measure urban sustainability. This research finds that urban sustainability assessment in general lacks a unifying framing and that it could be better aligned with common sustainability principles. The paper provides recommendations for future urban sustainability assessment research, including the employment of mixed-methods research among other strategies. In closing, this research offers a generic framework around which to structure urban sustainability assessment and within which to assign indicators for measuring progress towards sustainable urban development.

  17. Adult-Perpetrated Animal Abuse: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleyne, Emma; Parfitt, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Adults perpetrate the majority of animal abuse incidents yet clinicians are left with very little evidence base to advance/enhance their practice. The purpose of this systematic review is to synthesize and evaluate the current literature on adult-perpetrated animal abuse and to identify the etiological factors related to this type of offending. Twenty-three studies met the specific inclusion criteria but most importantly, they examined the characteristics of adult perpetrators of animal abuse. The findings from this review were demarcated by sample type: (1) Participants were the perpetrators of the animal abuse or held offense-supportive attitudes and (2) participants were victims of intimate partner violence reporting incidents of animal abuse perpetrated by their partner. From the perpetrator perspective, there were key developmental (i.e., maladaptive parenting strategies), behavioral (such as varied offending behaviors), and psychological (e.g., callousness, empathy deficits) factors highlighted in the literature. Finally, in the context of intimate partner violence, findings indicated that perpetrators abuse animals to control, coerce, intimidate, and/or manipulate their victims (this effect is moderated by the victims' emotional attachment to their pet). This review inherently underlines treatment targets that could achieve greater clinical gains, but we also conclude that more empirical and theoretical work is needed in order to set an agenda that prioritizes future research and effective practice.

  18. The Prosthetic Influence and Biomechanics on Peri-Implant Strain: a Systematic Literature Review of Finite Element Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Maminskas, Julius; Puisys, Algirdas; Kuoppala, Ritva; Raustia, Aune; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To systematically review risks of mechanical impact on peri-implant strain and prosthetic influence on stability across finite element studies. Material and Methods An online literature search was performed on MEDLINE and EMBASE databases published between 2011 and 2016. Following keywords tiered screening and selection of the title, abstract and full-text were performed. Studies of finite element analysis (FEA) were considered for inclusion that were written in English an...

  19. Maturity Models in Supply Chain Sustainability: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Correia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic literature review of supply chain maturity models with sustainability concerns is presented. The objective is to give insights into methodological issues related to maturity models, namely the research objectives; the research methods used to develop, validate and test them; the scope; and the main characteristics associated with their design. The literature review was performed based on journal articles and conference papers from 2000 to 2015 using the SCOPUS, Emerald Insight, EBSCO and Web of Science databases. Most of the analysed papers have as main objective the development of maturity models and their validation. The case study is the methodology that is most widely used by researchers to develop and validate maturity models. From the sustainability perspective, the scope of the analysed maturity models is the Triple Bottom Line (TBL and environmental dimension, focusing on a specific process (eco-design and new product development and without a broad SC perspective. The dominant characteristics associated with the design of the maturity models are the maturity grids and a continuous representation. In addition, results do not allow identifying a trend for a specific number of maturity levels. The comprehensive review, analysis, and synthesis of the maturity model literature represent an important contribution to the organization of this research area, making possible to clarify some confusion that exists about concepts, approaches and components of maturity models in sustainability. Various aspects associated with the maturity models (i.e., research objectives, research methods, scope and characteristics of the design of models are explored to contribute to the evolution and significance of this multidimensional area.

  20. Manned space flight nuclear system safety. Volume 7: Literature review. Part 1: Literature search and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A review of the literature used in conducting the manned space flight nuclear system safety study is presented. The objectives of the presentation are to identify and evaluate for potential application to study the existing related literature and to provide the information required to include the related literature in the NASA Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute. More than 15,000 documents were evaluated and identification forms were prepared for 850 reports.

  1. Indirect (herd) protection, following pneumococcal conjugated vaccines introduction: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaban, Gal; Ben-Shimol, Shalom

    2017-05-19

    Pneumococcal diseases are major causes of morbidity among adults, especially those over 50years of age. While pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV's) impact on pneumococcal disease rates among children is well established, the extent of its impact on adult pneumococcal related illness remains unclear. The aim of this systematic literature review was to describe the impact of PCV introduction to childhood national immunization programs worldwide on PCV-naive adult population. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database. The search was limited to articles written in English and published between January 2000 and February 2016. Studies evaluating pneumococcal disease rates in individuals over 5years of age were included. Independent extraction of articles was performed by the two authors. Search terms included: Pneumococcal conjugated vaccine, herd, indirect, adults, and pneumonia. Forty-nine articles meeting the selection criteria were identified, 39 regarding invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, one on meningitis only), 8 regarding pneumonia, and 2 on both IPD and pneumonia. The majority of reports were from the US, UK and Canada. Considerable variability in the data sources, quality and completeness was observed. While most studies reported either statistically significant reduction or insignificant changes in IPD and pneumonia disease rates in adults following PCV nationwide implementation, few studies reported statistically significant increase in pneumococcal disease rates, these were mainly from countries with low PCV coverage rates and/or inadequate surveillance. Invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia rates among the adult population decreased in most countries following PCV introduction into the NIP. This indirect effect on older population seems to be dependent on PCV coverage rates and time from PCV nationwide implementation. Adults >65years old seem to benefit the most from PCV introduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Measuring the outcome of biomedical research: a systematic literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédérique Thonon

    Full Text Available There is an increasing need to evaluate the production and impact of medical research produced by institutions. Many indicators exist, yet we do not have enough information about their relevance. The objective of this systematic review was (1 to identify all the indicators that could be used to measure the output and outcome of medical research carried out in institutions and (2 enlist their methodology, use, positive and negative points.We have searched 3 databases (Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science using the following keywords: [Research outcome* OR research output* OR bibliometric* OR scientometric* OR scientific production] AND [indicator* OR index* OR evaluation OR metrics]. We included articles presenting, discussing or evaluating indicators measuring the scientific production of an institution. The search was conducted by two independent authors using a standardised data extraction form. For each indicator we extracted its definition, calculation, its rationale and its positive and negative points. In order to reduce bias, data extraction and analysis was performed by two independent authors.We included 76 articles. A total of 57 indicators were identified. We have classified those indicators into 6 categories: 9 indicators of research activity, 24 indicators of scientific production and impact, 5 indicators of collaboration, 7 indicators of industrial production, 4 indicators of dissemination, 8 indicators of health service impact. The most widely discussed and described is the h-index with 31 articles discussing it.The majority of indicators found are bibliometric indicators of scientific production and impact. Several indicators have been developed to improve the h-index. This indicator has also inspired the creation of two indicators to measure industrial production and collaboration. Several articles propose indicators measuring research impact without detailing a methodology for calculating them. Many bibliometric indicators identified

  3. Phototherapy in atopic dermatitis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ferriols, A; Aranegui, B; Pujol-Montcusí, J A; Martín-Gorgojo, A; Campos-Domínguez, M; Feltes, R A; Gilaberte, Y; Echeverría-García, B; Alvarez-Pérez, A; García-Doval, I

    2015-06-01

    Phototherapy is a treatment option for atopic dermatitis recommended by several guidelines. To perform a systematic review of the efficacy of different modalities of phototherapy and photochemotherapy in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. We considered all randomized clinical trials (RCTs) performed in patients with atopic dermatitis, and accepted all outcome measures. Articles were identified via an online search of the MEDLINE (via Ovid) and Embase databases and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. We also searched for clinical trials registered in Current Controlled Trials and in the World Health Organization's International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Twenty-one RCTs (961 patients) were included in the qualitative analysis. Two of the trials included children and adolescents (32 patients). The efficacy of narrow-band UV-B and UV-A1 phototherapy was similar for the different outcome measures contemplated. Two RCTs assessed the efficacy of psoralen plus UV-A therapy (PUVA). No serious adverse events were described. In general, the publications reviewed were characterized by a high risk of bias and poor reporting of methodology and results. There is evidence for the use of narrow-band UV-B and UV-A1 phototherapy in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Evidence supporting the use of PUVA in atopic dermatitis is scarce and there is little information on the use of phototherapy in childhood. For the purpose of future studies, it would be advisable to use comparable criteria and scales for the evaluation of disease severity and patients, to standardize radiation methods, and to establish a minimum follow-up time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors related to sleep bruxism in children: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroflorio, Tommaso; Bargellini, Andrea; Rossini, Gabriele; Cugliari, Giovanni; Rainoldi, Alberto; Deregibus, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article was to systematically review the literature to identify papers dealing with risk factors associated with sleep bruxism (SB) in children. A systematic search was carried out based on the following databases: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trial Register and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, LILACs, SciELO. Studies investigating risk factors related to SB after multiple regression analysis and bruxism symptoms assessed with clinical diagnosis or specific questionnaires were searched. Six out of the 4546 initially identified studies were selected. This review was conducted according to the guidelines from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, with reporting in agreement to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Among the six analyzed articles, one randomized clinical trial (RCT) suggested the increase of SB in heavily exposed patients to second hand smoke (SHS) (OR=4.5, CI=2.2-9.4), two cross-sectional studies suggested neuroticism as determinant factor for the development of sleep bruxism (OR=1.9, CI=1.3-2.6), among children and three case-control studies suggested that children with sleep disturbances were more likely to have SB (OR=3.3, CI=1.6-6.6). Parafunctional behaviours (OR=2.3, CI=1.2-4.3) had a moderate association. SHS and sleep disturbances presented the strongest association with SB. The most recurrent source of bias was the lack of blinding procedures. Furthermore, the use of reliable SB diagnostic procedures should be recommended to increase the quality of future studies. The evidence emerged from the considered studies was clinically relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Outcome measures in acute gout: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Zhong, Cathy S; Grainger, Rebecca; Khanna, Dinesh; Khanna, Puja P; Singh, Jasvinder A; McQueen, Fiona M; Taylor, William J

    2014-03-01

    Five core domains have been endorsed by Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) for acute gout: pain, joint swelling, joint tenderness, patient global assessment, and activity limitation. We evaluated instruments for these domains according to the OMERACT filter: truth, feasibility, and discrimination. A systematic search strategy for instruments used to measure the acute gout core domains was formulated. For each method, articles were assessed by 2 reviewers to summarize information according to the specific components of the OMERACT filter. Seventy-seven articles and abstracts met the inclusion criteria. Pain was most frequently reported (76 studies, 20 instruments). The pain instruments used most often were 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) and 5-point Likert scale. Both methods have high feasibility, face and content validity, and within- and between-group discrimination. Four-point Likert scales assessing index joint swelling and tenderness have been used in numerous acute gout studies; these instruments are feasible, with high face and content validity, and show within- and between-group discrimination. Five-point Patient Global Assessment of Response to Treatment (PGART) scales are feasible and valid, and show within- and between-group discrimination. Measures of activity limitations were infrequently reported, and insufficient data were available to make definite assessments of the instruments for this domain. Many different instruments have been used to assess the acute gout core domains. Pain VAS and 5-point Likert scales, 4-point Likert scales of index joint swelling and tenderness and 5-point PGART instruments meet the criteria for the OMERACT filter.

  6. Fish Intake and Venous Thromboembolism: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Diet plays an important role in modulating the risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. Several lines of evidence attest that consumption of fish and its compounds, especially omega-3 fatty acids, may be effective to decrease the cardiovascular risk. Since the pathogenesis of arterial and venous thrombosis share some common aspects, we performed a systematic review of published clinical studies that investigated the association between fish intake and venous thrombosis. An electronic search was carried out in Medline, Scopus, and ISI Web of Science using the key words "fish" OR "seafood" AND "venous thromboembolism" OR "deep vein thrombosis" OR "pulmonary embolism", with no language or date restriction. Overall, 6 studies (5 prospective and 1 case-control) were finally identified. In only 1 small case-control study, a larger intake of total fish was found to be negatively associated with the risk of venous thromboembolism. No association was found in 4 large prospective studies, whereas a positive association was observed in the remaining. No substantial difference was also noticed between intake of fatty or lean fish. Taken together, the current epidemiological evidence does not support the existence of a significant effect of total fish consumption on the risk of venous thromboembolism. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Medical student experience in surgery influences their career choices: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dominic C; Salciccioli, Justin D; Walton, Sarah-Jane; Pitkin, Joan; Shalhoub, Joseph; Malietzis, George

    2015-01-01

    Student experiences during surgical rotations may dictate interest in future surgical careers. The objective of this study was to systematically examine the effect of surgical experience (SE) on student attitudes toward surgical careers and also to identify variables influencing the educational value of SE. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted by 2 independent researchers searching Medline, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses recommendations. Studies assessing SE during the students' surgical rotations were identified. The quality of the included studies was assessed using a validated quality index. Factors affecting student surgical rotation experience and perceptions of surgical careers were recorded. Overall, 204 studies were identified; 20 unique studies met the inclusion criteria with a median cohort size of 169 (interquartile range: 107-262) respondents. Most were cross-sectional surveys (n = 16/20) and administered to clinical students (n = 16/20). All studies investigating the effect of SE on career choices (n = 8) found that positive experiences during the surgical placement were associated with an increased interest in surgical careers. The operating theater experience was identified as a defining feature of overall SE. Involvement in operative procedures, a welcoming environment, and avoidance of syncopal events positively influenced the SE, particularly in those who actively sought educational opportunities. Study limitations included single-center and single-year cohort designs (70%) with the use of nonvalidated research tools (95%). A systematic review of the literature highlights a number of factors associated with a positive surgical rotation, which may lead to more students deciding to pursue a career in surgery. Understanding the factors that contribute to these decisions through multicenter studies using validated research

  8. Smell and taste in palliative care: a systematic analysis of literature.

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    Heckel, Maria; Stiel, Stephanie; Ostgathe, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Little is known on the role of the senses smell and taste in end-of-life care. The presented systematic literature analysis investigates the significance of smell and taste in palliative care. The online databases PubMed, CINAHL, MEDLINE, Deutsche Nationalbibliothek and British National Library were searched for English and German literature published between 1970 and April 2013 containing any kind of original data on the impact of smell and taste in patients in a palliative care situation. All retrieved publications were screened for relevance and full text was obtained for all articles identified as relevant. We integrated 13 papers for further analysis (explorative surveys 5, clinical trials 3, case studies 2, qualitative study 1, brief report 1, clinical report 1). Prevalence of smell and taste alterations in palliative care ranges between 60 and 86%. Existing literature reflects the significance of smells and tastes in palliative care setting in two main streams--smell and taste alterations as symptoms and malodorous wounds. Prevalence of smell and taste alterations in palliative care is high. However, in palliative care literature concepts for the assessment and fostering of subjective significance of smell and taste and the individual impact of significant smells and tastes are predominantly neglected. Available instruments should be characterized, validated and adapted for the use for palliative care patients.

  9. Randomized Clinical Trials on Acupuncture in Korean Literature: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Cheol Kong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to summarize randomized clinical trials (RCTs assessing the effectiveness of acupuncture as published in Korean literature. Systematic searches were conducted on eight Korean medical databases. Manual searches were also conducted through eight major Korean medical journals. The methodological quality was assessed using a Jadad score. Studies evaluating needle acupuncture or auricular acupuncture (AA with or without electrical stimulation were considered if they were sham or placebo-controlled or controlled against a comparative intervention. We also excluded acupuncture as an adjuvant to other treatments and other forms of acupuncture were excluded. Seven hundred and nine possibly relevant studies were identified and 10 RCTs were included. The methodological quality of the trials was generally poor. Manual acupuncture was compared to placebo acupuncture in four studies of patients with chronic low back pain, shoulder pain, premenstrual syndrome and allergic rhinitis. Three studies tested AA (two trials and electroacupuncture (one trial against no treatment, while three trials compared acupuncture with other active therapeutic controls. The methodological limitations of the included trials make their contribution to the current clinical evidence of acupuncture somewhat limited. The trial for premenstrual syndrome, shoulder pain and chronic low back pain added a limited contribution among those included RCTs. However, well-designed RCTs of acupuncture with a rigorous methodology are in progress or have been completed in Korea and will contribute to establish or contribute to the current progress of research in this field.

  10. Prognostic value of epicardial fat volume measurements by computed tomography: a systematic review of the literature

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    Spearman, James V.; Krazinski, Aleksander W. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Renker, Matthias [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Giessen University, Department of Internal Medicine I, Cardiology/Angiology, Giessen (Germany); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Charleston, SC (United States); Herbert, Teri L. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Library Science and Informatics, Charleston, SC (United States); De Cecco, Carlo N. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Rome ' Sapienza' - Polo Pontino, Department of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology, Latina (Italy); Nietert, Paul J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Public Health Sciences, Charleston, SC (United States); Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    To perform a systematic review of the growing body of literature evaluating the prognostic value of epicardial fat volume (EFV) quantified by cross-sectional imaging. Two independent reviewers performed systematic searches on both PubMed and Scopus using search terms developed with a medical librarian. Peer-reviewed articles were selected based on the inclusion of outcome data, utilization of epicardial fat volume and sufficient reporting for analysis. A total of 411 studies were evaluated with nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria. In all, the studies evaluated 10,252 patients. All nine studies were based on CT measurements. Seven studies evaluated the prognostic value of EFV unadjusted for calcium score, and six of these studies found a significant association between EFV and clinical outcomes. Seven studies evaluated the incremental value of EFV beyond calcium scoring, and six of these studies found a significant association. The majority of studies suggest that EFV quantification is significantly associated with clinical outcomes and provides incremental prognostic value over coronary artery calcium scoring. Future research should use a binary cutoff of 125 mL for evaluation of EFV to provide consistency with other research. (orig.)

  11. Prognostic value of epicardial fat volume measurements by computed tomography: a systematic review of the literature

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    Spearman, James V.; Krazinski, Aleksander W.; Renker, Matthias; Schoepf, U.J.; Herbert, Teri L.; De Cecco, Carlo N.; Nietert, Paul J.; Meinel, Felix G.

    2015-01-01

    To perform a systematic review of the growing body of literature evaluating the prognostic value of epicardial fat volume (EFV) quantified by cross-sectional imaging. Two independent reviewers performed systematic searches on both PubMed and Scopus using search terms developed with a medical librarian. Peer-reviewed articles were selected based on the inclusion of outcome data, utilization of epicardial fat volume and sufficient reporting for analysis. A total of 411 studies were evaluated with nine studies meeting the inclusion criteria. In all, the studies evaluated 10,252 patients. All nine studies were based on CT measurements. Seven studies evaluated the prognostic value of EFV unadjusted for calcium score, and six of these studies found a significant association between EFV and clinical outcomes. Seven studies evaluated the incremental value of EFV beyond calcium scoring, and six of these studies found a significant association. The majority of studies suggest that EFV quantification is significantly associated with clinical outcomes and provides incremental prognostic value over coronary artery calcium scoring. Future research should use a binary cutoff of 125 mL for evaluation of EFV to provide consistency with other research. (orig.)

  12. Effects of Acupuncture on Anxiety in Infertile Women: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Hassanzadeh Bashtian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Stress and anxiety due to waiting for treatment results and uncertainty of treatment success are common problems in infertile women. Acupuncture has been suggested as an effective strategy to relieve anxiety. This study aimed to review the available evidence on the effects of acupuncture on anxiety in infertile women. Methods: This systematic review was conducted via searching in databases such as MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO, as well as clinical trial registries and reference lists of the retrieved articles. Selected articles included the studies published since the initiation of each database until March 2015. All randomized controlled trials regarding the effects of acupuncture on the anxiety of infertile women were reviewed in this study. Moreover, methodological qualities of the selected studies were examined based on the checklist of Oxford Center for Evidence-Based Medicine by two independent investigators. Results: Literature search yielded 193 relevant titles and abstracts, which were narrowed down to four randomized controlled trials involving 595 women.The majority of the reviewed articles showed that use of acupuncture could decrease anxiety in infertile women. Conclusion: According to the results of this systematic review, acupuncture is an effective technique in controlling the anxiety of infertile women. However, it is recommended that future studies with more appropriate design and methodology be conducted in this regard.

  13. User involvement in structured violence risk management within forensic mental health facilities -- a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidhammer, Gunnar; Fluttert, Frans A J; Bjørkly, Stål

    2014-10-01

    To examine empirical literature on user involvement in collaboration between patients and nurses. The scope of the review was limited to structured violence risk management interventions in forensic mental health settings. Violence in forensic mental health settings represents a significant problem for patients and staff. Structured violence risk management interventions in forensic mental health have been reported to ignore patient participation, despite the growing attention on user involvement in clinical practice. A systematic review. Searches were conducted in six databases: the Cochrane Systematic Reviews, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ProQuest, ScienceDirect and PsycINFO. Papers were assessed according to a predetermined set of inclusion and exclusion criteria. After searches of the reference lists of retrieved articles were conducted, only three papers met the inclusion criteria. This review has shown that empirical research on the topic of risk management interventions in which patients are involved is scarce. There is barely any research evidence of the clinical effect of user involvement approaches on violence risk management in forensic mental health practice. Therefore, we suggest that clinicians may learn from positive experiences concerning user involvement in general psychiatry and carefully adapt and test them out in the forensic treatment context. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Methods for estimating the burden of antimicrobial resistance: a systematic literature review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Nichola R; Silva, Sachin; Kulasabanathan, Kavian; Atun, Rifat; Zhu, Nina; Knight, Gwenan M; Robotham, Julie

    2016-11-08

    Estimates of the burden of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) are needed to ascertain AMR impact, to evaluate interventions, and to allocate resources efficiently. Recent studies have estimated health, cost, and economic burden relating to AMR, with outcomes of interest ranging from drug-bug resistance impact on mortality in a hospital setting to total economic impact of AMR on the global economy. However, recent collation of this information has been largely informal, with no formal quality assessment of the current evidence base (e.g. with predefined checklists). This review therefore aims to establish what perspectives and resulting methodologies have been used in establishing the burden of AMR, whilst also ascertaining the quality of these studies. The literature review will identify relevant literature using a systematic review methodology. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus and EconLit will be searched utilising a predefined search string. Grey literature will be identified by searching within a predefined list of organisational websites. Independent screening of retrievals will be performed in a two-stage process (abstracts and full texts), utilising a pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data will be extracted into a data extraction table and descriptive examination will be performed. Study quality will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scales and the Philips checklists where appropriate. A narrative synthesis of the results will be presented. This review will provide an overview of previous health, cost and economic definitions of burden and the resultant impact of these different definitions on the burden of AMR estimated. The review will also explore the methods that have been used to calculate this burden and discuss resulting study quality. This review can therefore act as a guide to methods for future research in this area. PROSPERO CRD42016037510.

  15. [Efficiency indicators to assess the organ donation and transplantation process: systematic review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Marina Martins; Araujo, Claudia Affonso; de Aguiar Roza, Bartira; Schirmer, Janine

    2016-08-01

    To search the literature and identify indicators used to monitor and control the organ donation and transplantation process and to group these indicators into categories. In November 2014, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in the following databases: Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS), EBSCO, Emerald, Proquest, Science Direct, and Web of Science. The following search terms (and the corresponding terms in Brazilian Portuguese) were employed: "efficiency," "indicators," "organ donation," "tissue and organ procurement," and "organ transplantation." Of the 344 articles retrieved, 23 original articles published between 1992 and 2013 were selected and reviewed for analysis of efficiency indicators. The review revealed 117 efficiency indicators, which were grouped according to similarity of content and divided into three categories: 1) 71 indicators related to organ donation, covering mortality statistics, communication of brain death, clinical status of donors and exclusion of donors for medical reasons, attitude of families, confirmation of donations, and extraction of organs and tissues; 2) 22 indicators related to organ transplantation, covering the surgical procedure per se and post-transplantation follow-up; and 3) 24 indicators related to the demand for organs and the resources of hospitals involved in the process. Even if organ transplantation is a recent phenomenon, the high number of efficiency indicators described in the literature suggests that scholars interested in this field have been searching for ways to measure performance. However, there is little standardization of the indicators used. Also, most indicators focus on the donation step, suggesting gaps in the measurement of efficiency at others points in the process. Additional indicators are needed to monitor important stages, such as organ distribution (for example, organ loss indicators) and post-transplantation aspects (for example, survival and quality of life).

  16. A systematic literature review of undergraduate clinical placements in underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Paul E S; McLachlan, John C; Illing, Jan C

    2013-10-01

    The delivery of undergraduate clinical education in underserved areas is increasing in various contexts across the world in response to local workforce needs. A collective understanding of the impact of these placements is lacking. Previous reviews have often taken a positivist approach by only looking at outcome measures. This review addresses the question: What are the strengths and weaknesses for medical students and supervisors of community placements in underserved areas? A systematic literature review was carried out by database searching, citation searching, pearl growing, reference list checking and use of own literature. The databases included MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science and ERIC. The search terms used were combinations and variations of four key concepts exploring general practitioner (GP) primary care, medical students, placements and location characteristics. The papers were analysed using a textual narrative synthesis. The initial search identified 4923 results. After the removal of duplicates and the screening of titles and abstracts, 185 met the inclusion criteria. These full articles were obtained and assessed for their relevance to the research question; 54 were then included in the final review. Four main categories were identified: student performance, student perceptions, career pathways and supervisor experiences. This review reflects the emergent qualitative data as well as the quantitative data used to assess initiatives. Underserved area placements have produced many beneficial implications for students, supervisors and the community. There is a growing amount of evidence regarding rural, underserved areas, but little in relation to inner city, deprived areas, and none in the UK. © John Wiley & Sons Ltd 2013.

  17. Systematic literature review: xerostomia in advanced cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchanale, Sarika; Adkinson, Lucy; Daniel, Sunitha; Fleming, Michelle; Oxberry, Stephen G

    2015-03-01

    Dry mouth (xerostomia) is one of the commonest symptoms in cancer patients and can adversely affect quality of life. The aim of this review was to determine the effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions in treating xerostomia in adult advanced cancer patients. The literature search was performed in February 2014 using databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, BNI and Cochrane library. The search was carried out using standard MeSH terms and was limited to adult population and English language. Studies investigating xerostomia secondary to head and neck cancer treatment and autoimmune disease were excluded. Titles and abstracts were screened and reviewed for eligibility. Only studies involving primary research were included in the analysis. Six studies met the eligibility criteria for review: three randomized controlled trials and three prospective studies. The quality assessment and reporting was performed using PRISMA, Jadad and STROBE. These studies compared acupuncture, pilocarpine, Saliva Orthana and chewing gum with each other or with placebo. All interventions were considered effective in treating xerostomia. However, effectiveness versus placebo could not be demonstrated for Saliva Orthana. Meta-analysis could not be performed due to heterogeneity of the study type and intervention. Limited published data exists reporting the effectiveness of measures in the treatment of xerostomia in cancer patients. Based on primary research of low quality, firm conclusions cannot be drawn. However, pilocarpine, artificial saliva, chewing gum and acupuncture can be tried based on the available data. This highlights the explicit need to improve our evidence base. Properly constructed randomized controlled trials demonstrating effectiveness of pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions for dry mouth are required.

  18. Physician leadership in e-health? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijser, Wouter; Smits, Jacco; Penterman, Lisanne; Wilderom, Celeste

    2016-07-04

    Purpose This paper aims to systematically review the literature on roles of physicians in virtual teams (VTs) delivering healthcare for effective "physician e-leadership" (PeL) and implementation of e-health. Design/methodology/approach The analyzed studies were retrieved with explicit keywords and criteria, including snowball sampling. They were synthesized with existing theoretical models on VT research, healthcare team competencies and medical leadership. Findings Six domains for further PeL inquiry are delineated: resources, task processes, socio-emotional processes, leadership in VTs, virtual physician-patient relationship and change management. We show that, to date, PeL studies on socio-technical dynamics and their consequences on e-health are found underrepresented in the health literature; i.e. no single empirical, theoretic or conceptual study with a focus on PeL in virtual healthcare work was identified. Research limitations/implications E-health practices could benefit from organization-behavioral type of research for discerning effective physicians' roles and inter-professional relations and their (so far) seemingly modest but potent impact on e-health developments. Practical implications Although best practices in e-health care have already been identified, this paper shows that physicians' roles in e-health initiatives have not yet received any in-depth study. This raises questions such as are physicians not yet sufficiently involved in e-health? If so, what (dis)advantages may this have for current e-health investments and how can they best become involved in (leading) e-health applications' design and implementation in the field? Originality/value If effective medical leadership is being deployed, e-health effectiveness may be enhanced; this new proposition needs urgent empirical scrutiny.

  19. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on chronic liver disease: systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooman Mosannen Mozaffari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is long known that vitamin D deficiency was common in patients with liver disease, but little is known on the therapeutic effects of vitamin D, especially in patients with chronic liver disease. In this study, we aimed to systematically review the literatures and study the evidences in which the effects of vitamin D supplementation had been investigated on the severity of chronic liver disease or liver cirrhosis.Methods: A systematic literature search was performed by using the following key terms “vitamin D supplementation” and “chronic liver disease” in the PubMed, Scopus and Google scholar to find relevant articles. After collecting the eligible documents, data were extracted and described based on the purpose of this review.Result: Of total 196 articles found, only 7 relevant documents with 518 studied patients were included. The results of this study showed that the levels of 25(OH D were considerably lower in patients with chronic liver disease. Findings showed that vitamin D supplementation can rise up the mean serum level of 25(OH D in patients with severe vitamin D deficiency, especially patients with liver cirrhosis.Conclusion:The results of this review showed that vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of liver disease and may have prognostic value in the assessment of liver disease. Also, it was shown that vitamin D supplementation may be helpful for the treatment of liver disease at least in certain groups of patients.

  20. Psychometric Properties of Questionnaires on Functional Health Status in Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Speyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Questionnaires on Functional Health Status (FHS are part of the assessment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. Objective. To conduct a systematic review of the literature on the psychometric properties of English-language FHS questionnaires in adults with oropharyngeal dysphagia. Methods. A systematic search was performed using the electronic databases Pubmed and Embase. The psychometric properties of the questionnaires were determined based on the COSMIN taxonomy of measurement properties and definitions for health-related patient-reported outcomes and the COSMIN checklist using preset psychometric criteria. Results. Three questionnaires were included: the Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10, the Swallowing Outcome after Laryngectomy (SOAL, and the Self-report Symptom Inventory. The Sydney Swallow Questionnaire (SSQ proved to be identical to the Modified Self-report Symptom Inventory. All FHS questionnaires obtained poor overall methodological quality scores for most measurement properties. Conclusions. The retrieved FHS questionnaires need psychometric reevaluation; if the overall methodological quality shows satisfactory improvement on most measurement properties, the use of the questionnaires in daily clinic and research can be justified. However, in case of insufficient validity and/or reliability scores, new FHS questionnaires need to be developed using and reporting on preestablished psychometric criteria as recommended in literature.

  1. Oral leukoplakia treatment with the carbon dioxide laser: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogedas-Vegara, Alfonso; Hueto-Madrid, Juan-Antonio; Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Bescós-Atín, Coro

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the literature to evaluate treatment of oral leukoplakia with the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser. A comprehensive search of studies published between 1981 and 2015 and listed in the PubMed (National Library of Medicine, NCBI) database yielded 378 articles which were screened in detail. Relevant studies were selected according to predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 33 articles met the final inclusion criteria and were analysed in detail in accordance with the PRISMA-P statement. These full-text papers were classified as synopses (n = 7), recurrence and malignant transformation studies (n = 17), comparative studies between CO2 laser and cold knife surgery (n = 3) and studies evaluating the efficacy of CO2, Nd:YAG and KTP lasers. According to the literature the CO2 laser is the workhorse of oral leukoplakia treatment due to its effectiveness and low associated morbidity. However, randomized clinical trials are needed to compare CO2 laser with other lasers. The results of our systematic review showed that there is no consensus regarding the factors involved in higher recurrence and malignization rates, so further studies are needed. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Metastases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A systematic review of literature and a new functional concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannistrà, Marco; Ruggiero, Michele; Zullo, Alessandra; Serafini, Simone; Grande, Raffaele; Nardo, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer, especially Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, is still associated with a high mortality and morbidity for affected patients notwithstanding considerable progresses in diagnosis and both surgical pharmacological therapy. Despite metastases from colorectal, gastric and neuroendocrine primary tumor and their treatment are widely reported, the literature has been rarely investigated the impact of localization and numbers of pancreatic metastases. This study performed a systematic analysis of the most recent scientific literature on the natural history of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma focusing attention on the role that the "M" parameter has on a possible prognostic stratification of these patients. PubMed and Science Direct databases were searched for relevant articles on these issue. Initial database searches yielded 7231 studies from PubMed and 29101 from Science Direct. We evaluated 1031 eligible full text articles. An updated insight into the world of Pancreatic Tumors might help physicians in better evaluating mechanisms of metastases, patients selection and survival and in programming appropriate interventions to modify the worst outcomes of advanced disease. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Omalizumab for the Treatment of Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria: Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonacci, Alessandro; Billeci, Lucia; Pioggia, Giovanni; Navarra, Michele; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2017-04-01

    Omalizumab is recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody to immunoglobulin E. Guidelines for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria (also known as chronic spontaneous urticaria) recommend the use of omalizumab as third-line therapy in addition to high doses of histamine receptor type 1 (H 1 ) antihistamines when they are unsuccessful as first- and second-line therapy. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify studies that evaluated the efficacy of omalizumab for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria, in both controlled and real-world settings, to assess its potential role as a preferred therapy. The PubMed, ScienceDirect, LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature), and Google Scholar databases were searched between January 1, 2000, and November 21, 2016. The search was limited to articles published in peer-reviewed journals in the English language, and 29 studies were included in this review. Omalizumab 300 mg administered every 4 weeks appears to be the most effective and safe dosage, with a rapid response time, for the treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria, with few minor adverse effects, and appears to be safe in the offspring of pregnant patients who received the drug. However, as published studies of omalizumab are sparse, future studies are warranted. When findings are confirmed in larger studies, due to its efficacy, safety, and increased benefit/cost ratio, omalizumab could become the preferred method of treatment for chronic idiopathic urticaria in patients unresponsive to H 1 antihistamines. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  4. Diagnostic criteria and treatment of discogenic pain: a systematic review of recent clinical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Khalid M; Cohen, Steven P; Walega, David R; Benzon, Honorio T

    2013-11-01

    Pain innate to intervertebral disc, often referred to as discogenic pain, is suspected by some authors to be the major source of chronic low back and neck pain. Current management of suspected discogenic pain lacks standardized diagnosis, treatment, and terminology. In an attempt to determine whether patterns existed that may facilitate standardization of care, we sought to analyze the terminologies used and the various modes of diagnosis and treatment of suspected discogenic pain. A systematic review of the recent literature. A Medline search was performed using the terms degenerative disc disease, discogenic pain, internal disc disruption while using the limits of human studies, English language, and clinical trials, for the last 10 years. The search led to a total of 149 distinct citations, of which 53 articles, where the intervertebral disc itself was considered the principal source of patient's pain and was the main target of the treatment, were retained for further analysis. The results of this review confirm and help quantify the significant differences that existed in the terminology and all the areas of diagnosis and treatment of presumed discogenic pain. Our findings show that suspected discogenic pain, despite its extensive affirmation in the literature and enormous resources regularly devoted to it, currently lacks clear diagnostic criteria and uniform treatment or terminology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Is the smile line a valid parameter for esthetic evaluation? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passia, Nicole; Blatz, Markus; Strub, Jörg Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The "smile line" is commonly used as a parameter to evaluate and categorize a person's smile. This systematic literature review assessed the existing evidence on the validity and universal applicability of this parameter. The latter was evaluated based on studies on smile perception by orthodontists, general clinicians, and laypeople. A review of the literature published between October 1973 and January 2010 was conducted with the electronic database Pubmed and the search terms "smile," "smile line," "smile arc," and "smile design." The search yielded 309 articles, of which nine studies were included based on the selection criteria. The selected studies typically correlate the smile line with the position of the upper lip during a smile while, on average, 75 to 100% of the maxillary anterior teeth are exposed. A virtual line that connects the incisal edges of the maxillary anterior teeth commonly follows the upper border of the lower lip. Average and parallel smile lines are most common, influenced by the age and gender of a person. Orthodontists, general clinicians, and laypeople have similar preferences and rate average smile lines as most attractive. The smile line is a valid tool to assess the esthetic appearance of a smile. It can be applied universally as clinicians and laypersons perceive and judge it similarly.

  6. Oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery in breast cancer treatment Systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis G.

    2016-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery (OPBS) is a rapidly emerging field. Various oncoplastic techniques have been proposed and are increasingly adopted to facilitate breast conservation and preserve breast aesthetics. This systematic review seeks to assess the oncological and cosmetic outcomes of OPBS. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, for articles published up to July 31th, 2015. Relevant studies were identified using computerized bibliographic searches of MEDLINE database. The keywords that were used in various combinations were: "Oncoplastic surgery", "oncological results", "cosmetic results", "cosmesis", "immediate reconstruction" and "breast conserving surgery". A total of 106 articles were identified for potential inclusion and reviewed in detail. No randomized controlled trials were identified. This study was initially designed to identify and review after a strict selection process, published articles with the highest level of evidence on OPBS. Systematic reviews and metanalyses were not included in this systematic review for methodological reasons. Ten prospective studies fulfilled strict inclusion criteria and were included. Local relapse using OPBS did not exceed 7%. Tumor free margins were retrieved in 86% of cases. Good cosmetic results were obtained in 86% of patients. Most studies showed significant weaknesses, including absence of robust design and methodological limitations, influencing negatively generalizability. This systematic review proves that current evidence supporting efficacy of OPBS in based on poorly designed and underpowered studies. Further studies and particularly RCTs, are required to assess oncological safety and cosmetic results of OPBS, reporting evidence on long-term oncological results, cosmetic outcomes and survival rates of patients treated with this technique. Oncoplastic surgery, Oncological results, Cosmetic results, Cosmesis, Immediate reconstruction

  7. Effectiveness of alcohol media literacy programmes: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chloe S; Hindmarsh, Chloe S; Jones, Sandra C; Kervin, Lisa

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol media literacy is an emerging field that aims to address the link between exposure to alcohol advertising and subsequent expectancies and behaviours for children and adolescents. The design, rigour and results of alcohol media literacy programmes vary considerably, resulting in a number of unanswered questions about effectiveness. To provide insight into some of these questions, a systematic literature review of alcohol media literacy studies was conducted. The review was guided by the following research question: What considerations are needed to develop an effective school-based alcohol media literacy programme? On the basis of a critical synthesis of 10 interventions (published in the period 1997 to May 2014), our findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the descriptive, methodological and outcome characteristics of this small body of significant research. The review provides considerations for future alcohol media literacy programmes, including the need for an interactive pedagogical approach within the naturalistic school setting, implementation fidelity and a holistic approach to programme evaluation, a means for maintaining relevance, consideration of gender differences, relevance for an international audience and use of follow-up and longitudinal data. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Knowledge discovery in cardiology: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, I; Idri, A; Fernandez-Aleman, J L

    2017-01-01

    Data mining (DM) provides the methodology and technology needed to transform huge amounts of data into useful information for decision making. It is a powerful process employed to extract knowledge and discover new patterns embedded in large data sets. Data mining has been increasingly used in medicine, particularly in cardiology. In fact, DM applications can greatly benefit all those involved in cardiology, such as patients, cardiologists and nurses. The purpose of this paper is to review papers concerning the application of DM techniques in cardiology so as to summarize and analyze evidence regarding: (1) the DM techniques most frequently used in cardiology; (2) the performance of DM models in cardiology; (3) comparisons of the performance of different DM models in cardiology. We performed a systematic literature review of empirical studies on the application of DM techniques in cardiology published in the period between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2015. A total of 149 articles published between 2000 and 2015 were selected, studied and analyzed according to the following criteria: DM techniques and performance of the approaches developed. The results obtained showed that a significant number of the studies selected used classification and prediction techniques when developing DM models. Neural networks, decision trees and support vector machines were identified as being the techniques most frequently employed when developing DM models in cardiology. Moreover, neural networks and support vector machines achieved the highest accuracy rates and were proved to be more efficient than other techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lean leadership attributes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aij, Kjeld Harald; Teunissen, Maurits

    2017-10-09

    Purpose Emphasis on quality and reducing costs has led many health-care organizations to reconfigure their management, process, and quality control infrastructures. Many are lean, a management philosophy with roots in manufacturing industries that emphasizes elimination of waste. Successful lean implementation requires systemic change and strong leadership. Despite the importance of leadership to successful lean implementation, few researchers have probed the question of ideal leadership attributes to achieve lean thinking in health care. The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into applicable attributes for lean leaders in health care. Design/methodology/approach The authors systematically reviewed the literature on principles of leadership and, using Dombrowski and Mielke's (2013) conceptual model of lean leadership, developed a parallel theoretical model for lean leadership in health care. Findings This work contributes to the development of a new framework for describing leadership attributes within lean management of health care. Originality/value The summary of attributes can provide a model for health-care leaders to apply lean in their organizations.

  10. Brief Mindfulness Practices for Healthcare Providers - A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Heather; Goyal, Anupama; Hamati, Mary C; Mann, Jason; Saint, Sanjay; Chopra, Vineet

    2017-10-01

    Mindfulness practice, where an individual maintains openness, patience, and acceptance while focusing attention on a situation in a nonjudgmental way, can improve symptoms of anxiety, burnout, and depression. The practice is relevant for health care providers; however, the time commitment is a barrier to practice. For this reason, brief mindfulness interventions (eg, ≤ 4 hours) are being introduced. We systematically reviewed the literature from inception to January 2017 about the effects of brief mindfulness interventions on provider well-being and behavior. Studies that tested a brief mindfulness intervention with hospital providers and measured change in well-being (eg, stress) or behavior (eg, tasks of attention or reduction of clinical or diagnostic errors) were selected for narrative synthesis. Fourteen studies met inclusion criteria; 7 were randomized controlled trials. Nine of 14 studies reported positive changes in levels of stress, anxiety, mindfulness, resiliency, and burnout symptoms. No studies found an effect on provider behavior. Brief mindfulness interventions may be effective in improving provider well-being; however, larger studies are needed to assess an impact on clinical care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Food and Beverage Marketing to Latinos: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeigbe, Rebecca T; Baldwin, Shannon; Gallion, Kip; Grier, Sonya; Ramirez, Amelie G

    2015-10-01

    Obesity rates among U.S. adults and children have increased over the past two decades and, although signs of stabilization and decline among certain age groups and geographies are being reported, the prevalence of obesity among Latino adults and children remain high. The Latino population is growing in parallel to these obesity rates and marketers realize they cannot ignore this growing, high-spending, media-consuming segment. Studies examining food and beverage marketing strategies tend to discuss minority groups in general but do not account for racial and ethnic differences, reducing our ability to explain existing inequities. This article aimed to identify the food and beverage marketing strategies used to influence food environments for Latinos versus non-Latinos. A systematic literature review and analysis, guided by an established marketing conceptual framework, determined that the food and beverage marketing environment for Latinos is less likely to promote healthy eating and more likely to encourage consumption of low-nutrient, calorie-dense foods and beverages. This analysis also determined that Latinos' food environment and the placement of food retail stores appears to influence their body mass index; however, placement of these stores cannot be generalized, as geographical differences exist. While food and beverage marketing is only one of many sources of influence on food and beverage consumption, these findings reinforce the notion that Latinos are at a disadvantage when it comes to exposure of healthy lifestyle messaging and health-promoting food environments. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  12. Urinothorax: Case report and systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Casallas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinothorax, the presence of urine in the pleural space, is a rare cause of pleural effusion, usually associated with obstructive uropathy, or urinary trauma. We present the case of a 3 year-old boy and a systematic review of the literature of the 44 cases encountered. After resection of a Wilm's tumour in the right kidney our patient presented acute respiratory distress associated with radiographically confirmed pleural effusion. With the initial diagnosis of pneumonia or malignant pleural effusion, a closed thoracotomy was performed. The liquid obtained suggested urine, which was confirmed by the laboratory. Cystoscopy with retrograde pyelography detected a fistula on the posterior wall of the right kidney. The report of cases worldwide is low, probably due to its low incidence but also to underdiagnosis. Respiratory symptoms are not always present and urological symptoms usually predominate. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and is confirmed by the main biochemical marker: The ratio >1 .0 pleural fluid creatinine and creatinine serum.

  13. Autonomic Wireless Sensor Networks: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. T. Portocarrero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic computing (AC is a promising approach to meet basic requirements in the design of wireless sensor networks (WSNs, and its principles can be applied to efficiently manage nodes operation and optimize network resources. Middleware for WSNs supports the implementation and basic operation of such networks. In this systematic literature review (SLR we aim to provide an overview of existing WSN middleware systems that address autonomic properties. The main goal is to identify which development approaches of AC are used for designing WSN middleware system, which allow the self-management of WSN. Another goal is finding out which interactions and behavior can be automated in WSN components. We drew the following main conclusions from the SLR results: (i the selected studies address WSN concerns according to the self-* properties of AC, namely, self-configuration, self-healing, self-optimization, and self-protection; (ii the selected studies use different approaches for managing the dynamic behavior of middleware systems for WSN, such as policy-based reasoning, context-based reasoning, feedback control loops, mobile agents, model transformations, and code generation. Finally, we identified a lack of comprehensive system architecture designs that support the autonomy of sensor networking.

  14. Women's reasons for choosing abortion method: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Charlotte; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Hauskov Graungaard, Anette

    2017-07-01

    We aim to describe and classify reasons behind women's choice between medical and surgical abortion. A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed and PsycINFO in October 2015. The subjects were women in early pregnancy opting for abortion at clinics or hospitals in high-income countries. We extracted women's reasons for choice of abortion method and analysed these qualitatively, looking at main reasons for choosing either medical or surgical abortion. Reasons for choice of method were classified to five main groups: technical nature of the intervention, fear of complications, fear of surgery or anaesthesia, timing and sedation. Reasons for selecting medical abortion were often based on the perception of the method being 'more natural' and the wish to have abortion in one's home in addition to fear of complications. Women who opted for surgical abortion appreciated the quicker process, viewed it as the safer option, and wished to avoid pain and excess bleeding. Reasons were often based on emotional reactions, previous experiences and a lack of knowledge about the procedures. Some topics such as pain or excess bleeding received little attention. Overall the quality of the studies was low, most studies were published more than 10 years ago, and the generalisability of the findings was poor. Women did not base their choice of abortion method only on rational information from professionals but also on emotions and especially fears. Support techniques for a more informed choice are needed. Recent high-quality studies in this area are lacking.

  15. Does Preceptorship improve confidence and competence in Newly Qualified Nurses: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Carole; Bliss, Julie; Poole, Karen

    2018-01-01

    A systematic literature review to assess whether preceptorship improves confidence and competence in Newly Qualified Nurses. Preceptorship was introduced into nursing in the United Kingdom in 1991 with the original aim to improve competence and confidence. This systematic review was undertaken to review the evidence of the impact of preceptorship on confidence and competence of nurses in their first year post qualifying. A comprehensive search of The British Nursing Index, CINAHL, Embase, Medline, PsycInfo, PyscArticles, Campbell Collaboration; Cochrane, HMIC, ERIC, ASSIA, Web of Science, Scopus, Scopus Conference, Web of Science Conferences; NHS Evidence, OpenGrey, National Technical, NINR, Opendoar, SSRN, Kings College London and the RCN was conducted. A PRISMA structured systematic review was carried out, 14 papers 4 mixed methods, 8 qualitative, 1 scoping review and 1 service development, published between 1996 and 2013 were critically reviewed, and data extracted using thematic analysis. Four themes were identified from a thematic analysis: measurement, knowledge and experience, support, and structure. While one-to-one preceptorship does influence confidence and competence, Preceptorship Programmes has greater impact than the individual preceptor. Due to limited empirical research there is no concrete evidence that Preceptorship has a direct impact on confidence or competence. Further research into team preceptorship/choice of preceptors and what impacts on Newly Qualified Nurses confidence and competence is required. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Pharmacological Treatment of Apathy in Parkinson's Disease: a Systematic Review of the Literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguín Lew, Jorge Carlos; Caamaño Jaraba, Jessica; Gómez Alzate, Alejandra; Hidalgo López, Catalina; Marino Mondragón, Daniel Felipe; Restrepo Moreno, Sebastián; Rico Abella, Liz Evelin

    2017-10-01

    Apathy, defined as a deficit for initiating and maintaining action, is a symptom affecting patients with diverse psychiatric and neuropsychiatric diseases, including dementia, sequelae of traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia, depression, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apathy negatively affects function and quality of life of PD patients, and it is an important cause of caregiver's distress. The pharmacological treatment of apathy in PD is the focus of this systematic review. A comprehensive search and systematic selection was performed in different databases of original research papers on the treatment of apathy in PD. The results were then consolidated, and a critical analysis was made of the research papers. The results are then discussed according to the methodological standards for systematic reviews of the literature. A total of 11 studies were included. Although some studies showed efficacy, all of them had important methodological limitations that hampered the interpretation of results. The results of the examined studies cannot be considered as evidence for guiding clinical decisions. So far, no evidence-based recommendations can be offered for the treatment of apathy in PD. More studies with better methodological quality are needed. It is a potentially fruitful area for research and one badly needed by both PD patients and their caregivers. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. [Utilization of tacit knowledge by maternal healthcare providers: a systematic mapping of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Espinosa, Emmanuel; Becerril Montekio, Víctor; Alcalde Rabanal, Jacqueline; García Bello, Luis

    2016-01-01

    The search for efficient answers to strengthen maternal health care has included various sources of evidence for decision making. In this article, we present a systematic mapping of the scientific literature on the use of tacit knowledge in relation to maternal healthcare. A systematic mapping was conducted of scientific articles published in Spanish and English between 1971 and 2014 following the recommendations of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Of 793 articles, 30 met the inclusion criteria; 60% were from high-income countries and 66.7% were focused on health professionals. We identified a predominance of qualitative methodologies (62%). Four categories regarding the use of tacit knowledge were generated: proposals to improve the organization of the maternal care system (30%) and to improve the care provided to women during the continuum of pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum (26.7%), determination of health workers' perception and skill levels (26.7%) and the interactions between tacit and explicit knowledge in clinical decision making (16.7%). This mapping shows that tacit knowledge is an emerging, innovative and versatile research approach used primarily in high-income countries and that includes interesting possibilities for its use as evidence to improve maternal healthcare, particularly in middle- and low-income countries, where it needs to be strengthened. Copyright © 2015 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Suicide among immigrants in Europe--a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Jacob; Reeske, Anna; Norredam, Marie; Nielsen, Signe Smith; Lehnhardt, Jessica; Razum, Oliver

    2015-02-01

    Concerns about increased suicide risk among immigrants to European countries have been raised. We review the scientific literature on differences in suicide among immigrants compared with the majority populations in Europe's major immigration countries. We searched the databases PubMed and PsycINFO for peer-reviewed epidemiological studies published in 1990-2011, which compared suicide risks of adult immigrant groups with the risks of the majority population in European countries. Hits were screened by two researchers. We included 24 studies in the review. No generalizable pattern of suicide among immigrants was found. Immigrants from countries in which suicide risks are particularly high, i.e. countries in Northern and Eastern Europe, experienced higher suicide rates relative to groups without migration background. Gender and age differences were observed. Young female immigrants from Turkey, East Africa and South Asia are a risk group. Immigrants 'bring along' their suicide risk, at least for the initial period they spend in the immigration country. Health-care planners and providers need to be aware of this 'imported risks'. However, most immigrant groups do not have an increased suicide risk relative to the local-born population; some may even experience substantially lower risks. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  19. Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy for intractable tremor: A systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Allison M.; Glover, Janis; Chiang, Veronica L.S.; Gerrard, Jason; Yu, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Tremor markedly reduces quality of life and causes a significant psychological burden for patients who are severely affected by this movement disorder. Pharmacologic and surgical treatments for tremor exist, but for patients who have failed medical therapy and are not surgical candidates, stereotactic radiosurgery is the only available treatment option. Of available stereotactic radiosurgical techniques for intractable tremor, the authors chose to evaluate the safety and efficacy of gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgical thalamotomy. In order to qualitatively synthesize available data a systematic review was conducted by searching MEDLINE (OvidSP 1946–January Week 1 2014) and Embase (OvidSP 1974–2014 January). The search strategy was not limited by study design or language of publication. All searches were conducted on January 7, 2014. Treatment efficacy, adverse outcomes, and patient deaths were reviewed and tabulated. Complications appeared months to years post procedure and most commonly consisted of mild contralateral numbness and transient hemiparesis. Rarely, more severe complications were reported, including dysphagia and death. Though no data from randomized controlled trials are available, our analysis of the literature indicates that unilateral gamma knife thalamotomy using doses from 130 to 150 Gy appears safe and well tolerated

  20. Should we search Chinese biomedical databases when performing systematic reviews?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Jérémie F.; Korevaar, Daniël A.; Wang, Junfeng; Spijker, René; Bossuyt, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Chinese biomedical databases contain a large number of publications available to systematic reviewers, but it is unclear whether they are used for synthesizing the available evidence. We report a case of two systematic reviews on the accuracy of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide for diagnosing

  1. Consequences of Exposure to Domestic Violence for Children: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelio Moura Lourenco

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic review of the literature on the consequences of exposure to domestic violence – DV for children. The period 2005-2011 was searched in Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, Web of Science, Dialnet, Redalyc, Google Scholar and PsycInfo, using the following descriptors: intimate partner violence , domestic violence , violence descriptors ( physical , sexual, psychological , and child , exposure or witness . The author, country, methodology, journal and the consequences of exposure to DV were considered. 122 articles were selected. The United States and Brazil accounted for 78.7% of the publications, with children being the main victims (51.6%. The major impacts upon children´s health were posttraumatic stress and insecurity (75.8%.

  2. Noise measurement in NICUs and incubators with newborns: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Maria de Fátima Hasek; Di Piero, Karina Chamma; Ramos, Eloane Gonçalves; Souza, Márcio Nogueira de; Dutra, Maria Virgínia P

    2011-01-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the methodological quality of studies measuring noise in neonatal intensive care units. A manual and also electronic search in the Medline, Scielo, Lilacs, BDENF, WHOLIS, BDTD, Science Direct, NCBI and Scirus databases resulted in 40 studies that met the criterion "measuring noise in neonatal units and/or incubators". Experts in neonatology and acoustics validated the critical analysis instrument, which obtained a mean = 7.9 (SD=1.3). The inter-observer reliability in 18 articles resulted in an Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.89 (CI 0.75-0.95). The quality indicators were 50% better in those studies that measured noise only in the unit's environment and associated measuring strategies to the physical area. The results showed great methodological variability, which hindered comparability and raised the probability of bias. The conditions required to ensure internal and external validity were observed in few studies.

  3. State of the Art of Short Dental Implants: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neldam, Camilla Albeck; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2012-01-01

    of this study was systematically to evaluate publications concerning short dental implants defined as an implant with a length of =8 mm installed in the maxilla or in the mandible with special reference to implant type, survival rate, location of implant site, and observation time. Materials and Methods......: A Medline and a hand search were conducted to identify studies concerning short dental implants of length =8 mm published between 1992 and October 2009. The articles included in this study report data on implant length =8 mm, implant surface, registered region of installment, observation time, single tooth......Background: Short implants (=8 mm) are manufactured for use in atrophic regions of the jaws. As implant length in many studies has been proven to play a major role in implant survival it is indicated to evaluate survival of short implants in the present literature. Purpose: The purpose...

  4. Systematic literature review of hospital medication administration errors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Ahmed; Dhillon, Soraya; Peters, Mark J; Ghaleb, Maisoon

    2015-01-01

    Medication administration is the last step in the medication process. It can act as a safety net to prevent unintended harm to patients if detected. However, medication administration errors (MAEs) during this process have been documented and thought to be preventable. In pediatric medicine, doses are usually administered based on the child's weight or body surface area. This in turn increases the risk of drug miscalculations and therefore MAEs. The aim of this review is to report MAEs occurring in pediatric inpatients. Twelve bibliographic databases were searched for studies published between January 2000 and February 2015 using "medication administration errors", "hospital", and "children" related terminologies. Handsearching of relevant publications was also carried out. A second reviewer screened articles for eligibility and quality in accordance with the inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 44 studies were systematically reviewed. MAEs were generally defined as a deviation of dose given from that prescribed; this included omitted doses and administration at the wrong time. Hospital MAEs in children accounted for a mean of 50% of all reported medication error reports (n=12,588). It was also identified in a mean of 29% of doses observed (n=8,894). The most prevalent type of MAEs related to preparation, infusion rate, dose, and time. This review has identified five types of interventions to reduce hospital MAEs in children: barcode medicine administration, electronic prescribing, education, use of smart pumps, and standard concentration. This review has identified a wide variation in the prevalence of hospital MAEs in children. This is attributed to the definition and method used to investigate MAEs. The review also illustrated the complexity and multifaceted nature of MAEs. Therefore, there is a need to develop a set of safety measures to tackle these errors in pediatric practice.

  5. Doctors discussing religion and spirituality: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Megan; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Discussion of religion and/or spirituality in the medical consultation is desired by patients and known to be beneficial. However, it is infrequent. We aimed to identify why this is so. We set out to answer the following research questions: Do doctors report that they ask their patients about religion and/or spirituality and how do they do it? According to doctors, how often do patients raise the issue of religion and/or spirituality in consultation and how do doctors respond when they do? What are the known facilitators and barriers to doctors asking their patients about religion and/or spirituality? A mixed qualitative/quantitative review was conducted to identify studies exploring the physician's perspective on discussion of religion and/or spirituality in the medical consultation. We searched nine databases from inception to January 2015 for original research papers reporting doctors' views on discussion of religion and/or spirituality in medical consultations. Papers were assessed for quality using QualSyst and results were reported using a measurement tool to assess systematic review guidelines. Overall, 61 eligible papers were identified, comprising over 20,044 physician reports. Religion and spirituality are discussed infrequently by physicians although frequency increases with terminal illness. Many physicians prefer chaplain referral to discussing religion and/or spirituality with patients themselves. Such discussions are facilitated by prior training and increased physician religiosity and spirituality. Insufficient time and training were the most frequently reported barriers. This review found that physician enquiry into the religion and/or spirituality of patients is inconsistent in frequency and nature and that in order to meet patient needs, barriers to discussion need to be overcome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Disability identity development: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forber-Pratt, Anjali J; Lyew, Dominique A; Mueller, Carlyn; Samples, Leah B

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize existing empirical research on disability identity development. This review is organized to present the demographics of participants and types of disabilities represented in the existing data, measures of disability identity development and theoretical models of disability identity development. Electronic databases (EBSCO, PsycINFO, ERIC, and Sociological Abstracts) were searched for all peer reviewed empirical studies published between 1980 and 2017. Articles were excluded if they were theoretical and/or did not include participants with disabilities, or focused on a disability-specific community identity rather than general disability identity. Empirical articles (N = 41) were included in the final review. An overwhelming majority (75.6%) were qualitative in nature, with only 22% of the articles reviewed being quantitative and only 1 that utilized a mixed methods design. The results suggest that disability identity can be considered a unique phenomenon that shapes persons' ways of seeing themselves, their bodies, and their way of interacting with the world. Disability identity development has the potential to become an important factor in developing effective interventions and/or therapies. Identity development is a fundamentally social process, and identities are formed through mirroring, modeling, and recognition through available identity resources, and so it is imperative that able-bodied professionals (i.e., rehabilitation professionals, therapists, teachers and caregivers) working with individuals with disabilities become aware of this developmental process to be able to better support individuals along this journey. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Does malalignment affect revision rate in total knee replacements: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Mohammed; Barlow, Tim; Ahmed, Imran; Dunbar, Mark; McCulloch, Peter; Griffin, Damian

    2015-01-01

    To ensure implant durability following Modern total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, one long held principle in condylar total knee arthroplasty is positioning the components in alignment with the mechanical axis and restoring the overall limb alignment to 180° ± 3°. However, this view has been challenged recently. Given the high number of TKR performed, clarity on this integral aspect of the procedure is necessary. To investigate the association between malalignment following primary TKR and revision rates. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using a computerised literature search of Medline, CINHAL, and EMBASE to identify English-language studies published from 2000 through to 2014. Studies with adequate information on the correlation between malalignment and revision rate with a minimum follow-up of 6 months were considered for inclusion. A study protocol, including the detailed search strategy was published on the PROSPERO database for systematic reviews. From an initial 2107 citations, eight studies, with variable methodological qualities, were eligible for inclusion. Collectively, nine parameters of alignment were studied, and 20 assessments were made between an alignment parameter and revision rate. Four out of eight studies demonstrated an association between a malalignment parameter and increased revision rates. In the coronal plane, only three studies assessed the mechanical axis. None of these studies found an association with revision rates, whereas four of the five studies investigating the anatomical axis found an association between malalignment and increased revision rate. This study demonstrates the effect of malalignment on revision rates is likely to be modest. Interestingly, studies that used mechanical alignment in the coronal plane demonstrated no association with revision rates. This questions the premise of patient specific instrumentation devices based on the mechanically aligned knee when considering revision as the

  8. Ethical challenges when using coercion in mental healthcare: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Marit Helene; Gjerberg, Elisabeth; Husum, Tonje Lossius; Pedersen, Reidar

    2018-02-01

    To better understand the kinds of ethical challenges that emerge when using coercion in mental healthcare, and the importance of these ethical challenges, this article presents a systematic review of scientific literature. A systematic search in the databases MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Cinahl, Sociological Abstracts and Web of Knowledge was carried out. The search terms derived from the population, intervention, comparison/setting and outcome. A total of 22 studies were included. Ethical considerations: The review is conducted according to the Vancouver Protocol. There are few studies that study ethical challenges when using coercion in an explicit way. However, promoting the patient's best interest is the most important justification for coercion. Patient autonomy is a fundamental challenge facing any use of coercion, and some kind of autonomy infringement is a key aspect of the concept of coercion. The concepts of coercion and autonomy and the relations between them are very complex. When coercion is used, a primary ethical challenge is to assess the balance between promoting good (beneficence) and inflicting harm (maleficence). In the included studies, findings explicitly related to justice are few. Some studies focus on moral distress experienced by the healthcare professionals using coercion. There is a lack of literature explicitly addressing ethical challenges related to the use of coercion in mental healthcare. It is essential for healthcare personnel to develop a strong awareness of which ethical challenges they face in connection with the use of coercion, as well as challenges related to justice. How to address ethical challenges in ways that prevent illegitimate paternalism and strengthen beneficent treatment and care and trust in connection with the use of coercion is a 'clinical must'. By developing a more refined and rich language describing ethical challenges, clinicians may be better equipped to prevent coercion and the accompanying moral distress.

  9. Computational methods for corpus callosum segmentation on MRI: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cover, G S; Herrera, W G; Bento, M P; Appenzeller, S; Rittner, L

    2018-02-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is the largest white matter structure in the brain and has a significant role in central nervous system diseases. Its volume correlates with the severity and/or extent of neurodegenerative disease. Even though the CC's role has been extensively studied over the last decades, and different algorithms and methods have been published regarding CC segmentation and parcellation, no reviews or surveys covering such developments have been reported so far. To bridge this gap, this paper presents a systematic literature review of computational methods focusing on CC segmentation and parcellation acquired on magnetic resonance imaging. IEEExplore, PubMed, EBSCO Host, and Scopus database were searched with the following search terms: ((Segmentation OR Parcellation) AND (Corpus Callosum) AND (DTI OR MRI OR Diffusion Tensor Imag* OR Diffusion Tractography OR Magnetic Resonance Imag*)), resulting in 802 publications. Two reviewers independently evaluated all articles and 36 studies were selected through the systematic literature review process. This work reviewed four main segmentation methods groups: model-based, region-based, thresholding, and machine learning; 32 different validity metrics were reported. Even though model-based techniques are the most recurrently used for the segmentation task (13 articles), machine learning approaches achieved better outcomes of 95% when analyzing mean values for segmentation and classification metrics results. Moreover, CC segmentation is better established in T 1 -weighted images, having more methods implemented and also being tested in larger datasets, compared with diffusion tensor images. The analyzed computational methods used to perform CC segmentation on magnetic resonance imaging have not yet overcome all presented challenges owing to metrics variability and lack of traceable materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Searching for evidence or approval? A commentary on database search in systematic reviews and alternative information retrieval methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Aogán; Tamás, Peter A

    2018-03-01

    Despite recognition that database search alone is inadequate even within the health sciences, it appears that reviewers in fields that have adopted systematic review are choosing to rely primarily, or only, on database search for information retrieval. This commentary reminds readers of factors that call into question the appropriateness of default reliance on database searches particularly as systematic review is adapted for use in new and lower consensus fields. It then discusses alternative methods for information retrieval that require development, formalisation, and evaluation. Our goals are to encourage reviewers to reflect critically and transparently on their choice of information retrieval methods and to encourage investment in research on alternatives. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A systematic scoping review of adherence to reporting guidelines in health care literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaan Z

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Zainab Samaan,1–3 Lawrence Mbuagbaw,2 Daisy Kosa,2,4 Victoria Borg Debono,2,5 Rejane Dillenburg,6 Shiyuan Zhang2, Vincent Fruci,7 Brittany Dennis,2 Monica Bawor,8 Lehana Thabane2,5,91Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, 3Population Genomics Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, 4Department of Nephrology, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, 5Department of Anesthesia, McMaster University, Hamilton, 6Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, 7Michael G DeGroote School of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, 8McMaster Integrative Neuroscience Discovery and Study (MiNDS Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, 9Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, Hamilton, ON, CanadaBackground: Reporting guidelines have been available for the past 17 years since the inception of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement in 1996. These guidelines were developed to improve the quality of reporting of studies in medical literature. Despite the widespread availability of these guidelines, the quality of reporting of medical literature remained suboptimal. In this study, we assess the current adherence practice to reporting guidelines; determine key factors associated with better adherence to these guidelines; and provide recommendations to enhance adherence to reporting guidelines for future studies.Methods: We undertook a systematic scoping review of systematic reviews of adherence to reporting guidelines across different clinical areas and study designs. We searched four electronic databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Web of Science, Embase, and Medline from January 1996 to September 2012. Studies were included if they addressed adherence to one of the following guidelines: Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic

  12. A Guide to the Systematic Literature Review Methodology in Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durach, Christian F.; Wieland, Andreas; Kembro, Joakim

    methodological developments in the application systematic literature reviews in supply chain management. It analyzes what approaches researchers in supply chain management have taken to follow the requirements of a systematic review, identifies issues in the approaches and provides authors, reviewers and editors...... with suggestions to better craft, disseminate, evaluate and select systematic literature reviews in supply chain management. This paper applies a systematic literature review approach to identify and analyze 31 articles published in core supply chain journals. It is the first research to map these developments......, since three seminal methodology papers on systematic reviews in management research have been published between 2003-2009. This research shows that there is still a need for more transparency in the approaches taken. Systematic literature reviews have a high potential to advance the field...

  13. A multidisciplinary systematic literature review on frailty: Overview of the methodology used by the Canadian Initiative on Frailty and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergman Howard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past two decades, there has been a substantial growth in the body of literature on frailty in older persons. However, there is no consensus on its definition or the criteria used to identify frailty. In response to this lack of consensus, the Canadian Initiative on Frailty and Aging carried out a set of systematic reviews of the literature in ten areas of frailty research: biological basis; social basis; prevalence; risk factors; impact; identification; prevention and management; environment and technology; health services; health and social policy. This paper describes the methodology that was developed for the systematic reviews. Methods A Central Coordination Group (CCG was responsible for developing the methodology. This involved the development of search strategies and keywords, article selection processes, quality assessment tools, and guidelines for the synthesis of results. Each review was conducted by two experts in the content area, with the assistance of methodologists and statisticians from the CCG. Results Conducting a series of systematic literature reviews involving a range of disciplines on a concept that does not have a universally accepted definition posed several conceptual and methodological challenges. The most important conceptual challenge was determining what would qualify as literature on frailty. The methodological challenges arose from our goal of structuring a consistent methodology for reviewing literature from diverse fields of research. At the outset, certain methodological guidelines were deemed essential to ensure the validity of all the reviews. Nevertheless, it was equally important to permit flexibility in the application of the proposed methodology to capture the essence of frailty research within the given fields. Conclusion The results of these reviews allowed us to establish the status of current knowledge on frailty and promote collaboration between disciplines. Conducting

  14. Textpresso Central: a customizable platform for searching, text mining, viewing, and curating biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H-M; Van Auken, K M; Li, Y; Sternberg, P W

    2018-03-09

    The biomedical literature continues to grow at a rapid pace, making the challenge of knowledge retrieval and extraction ever greater. Tools that provide a means to search and mine the full text of literature thus represent an important way by which the efficiency of these processes can be improved. We describe the next generation of the Textpresso information retrieval system, Textpresso Central (TPC). TPC builds on the strengths of the original system by expanding the full text corpus to include the PubMed Central Open Access Subset (PMC OA), as well as the WormBase C. elegans bibliography. In addition, TPC allows users to create a customized corpus by uploading and processing documents of their choosing. TPC is UIMA compliant, to facilitate compatibility with external processing modules, and takes advantage of Lucene indexing and search technology for efficient handling of millions of full text documents. Like Textpresso, TPC searches can be performed using keywords and/or categories (semantically related groups of terms), but to provide better context for interpreting and validating queries, search results may now be viewed as highlighted passages in the context of full text. To facilitate biocuration efforts, TPC also allows users to select text spans from the full text and annotate them, create customized curation forms for any data type, and send resulting annotations to external curation databases. As an example of such a curation form, we describe integration of TPC with the Noctua curation tool developed by the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium. Textpresso Central is an online literature search and curation platform that enables biocurators and biomedical researchers to search and mine the full text of literature by integrating keyword and category searches with viewing search results in the context of the full text. It also allows users to create customized curation interfaces, use those interfaces to make annotations linked to supporting evidence statements

  15. Scaling up depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA): a systematic literature review illustrating the AIDED model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Leslie; Taylor, Lauren; Pallas, Sarah Wood; Cherlin, Emily; Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2013-08-02

    Use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), often known by the brand name Depo-Provera, has increased globally, particularly in multiple low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). As a reproductive health technology that has scaled up in diverse contexts, DMPA is an exemplar product innovation with which to illustrate the utility of the AIDED model for scaling up family health innovations. We conducted a systematic review of the enabling factors and barriers to scaling up DMPA use in LMICs. We searched 11 electronic databases for academic literature published through January 2013 (n = 284 articles), and grey literature from major health organizations. We applied exclusion criteria to identify relevant articles from peer-reviewed (n = 10) and grey literature (n = 9), extracting data on scale up of DMPA in 13 countries. We then mapped the resulting factors to the five AIDED model components: ASSESS, INNOVATE, DEVELOP, ENGAGE, and DEVOLVE. The final sample of sources included studies representing variation in geographies and methodologies. We identified 15 enabling factors and 10 barriers to dissemination, diffusion, scale up, and/or sustainability of DMPA use. The greatest number of factors were mapped to the ASSESS, DEVELOP, and ENGAGE components. Findings offer early empirical support for the AIDED model, and provide insights into scale up of DMPA that may be relevant for other family planning product innovations.

  16. [Inefficacy of self-regulation of alcohol advertisements: a systematic review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Alan; Pinsky, Ilana

    2011-06-01

    The most recent scientific literature indicates that alcohol advertising influences behavior, particularly early and higher alcohol consumption by children and adolescents. From a public health perspective, alcohol advertising should be restricted. In many countries, as well as in Brazil, limits to alcohol advertising are established by industry self-regulation (e.g. controlled by the advertising community itself). We examined in this review all articles on the subject of industry self-regulation of alcohol advertising published in the international literature. A systematic literature review was conducted on articles investigating the effectiveness of self-regulation of alcohol advertisings. The search was conducted in Medline, SciELO, Camy and Google Scholar, between the years of 1991 and 2010. In addition, the "snowball" technique for the indication of the main authors on the subject was employed. From the articles found, 11 focused on the subject discussed here. The set of articles obtained indicates that industry self-regulation of alcohol advertising does not show evidence of efficacy. In other words, such a regulation does not prevent, for instance, alcohol advertising directed at children and adolescents. Further measures should be considered for the control and the broadcast of alcohol advertising, such as independent monitoring, legal control.

  17. Which positive factors determine the GP satisfaction in clinical practice? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, B; Bastiaens, H; Le Reste, J Y; Lingner, H; Hoffman, R D; Czachowski, S; Assenova, R; Koskela, T H; Klemenc-Ketis, Z; Nabbe, P; Sowinska, A; Montier, T; Peremans, L

    2016-09-13

    Looking at what makes General Practitioners (GPs) happy in their profession, may be important in increasing the GP workforce in the future. The European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN) created a research team (eight national groups) in order to clarify the factors involved in GP job satisfaction throughout Europe. The first step of this study was a literature review to explore how the satisfaction of GPs had been studied before. The research question was "Which factors are related to GP satisfaction in Clinical Practice?" Systematic literature review according to the PRISMA statement. The databases searched were Pubmed, Embase and Cochrane. All articles were identified, screened and included by two separate research teams, according to inclusion or exclusion criteria. Then, a qualitative appraisal was undertaken. Next, a thematic analysis process was undertaken to capture any issue relevant to the research question. The number of records screened was 458. One hundred four were eligible. Finally, 17 articles were included. The data revealed 13 subthemes, which were grouped into three major themes for GP satisfaction. First there were general profession-related themes, applicable to many professions. A second group of issues related specifically to a GP setting. Finally, a third group was related to professional life and personal issues. A number of factors leading to GP job satisfaction, exist in literature They should be used by policy makers within Europe to increase the GP workforce. The research team needs to undertake qualitative studies to confirm or enhance those results.

  18. Systematic Literature Review of the Epidemiology of Nongenetic Forms of Hypogonadism in Adult Males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Zarotsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study summarizes the literature on the prevalence, incidence, and proportion of patients receiving treatment for male hypogonadism and a systematic literature search was performed for articles published in the last 20 years. Of the 97 studies identified, 96 examined the prevalence, 2 examined the incidence, and 4 examined the proportion of males with hypogonadism patients receiving treatment. Based on studies conducted in Europe and USA, the prevalence of hypogonadism in the general population ranged from 2.1% to 12.8% of middle-aged to older men, with an estimated incidence of 12 new cases per 1,000 person-years. Prevalence was higher among patients with comorbid conditions, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. Approximately 10–12% of men with hypogonadism were receiving testosterone treatment. This literature review suggests that there is potentially a significant burden of hypogonadism in the general population. Burden seems to increase with age and in the presence of certain disease conditions. Data suggests that many hypogonadal men who may benefit from testosterone replacement are not receiving treatment. This may be the result of underdiagnosis of the disease, lack of awareness by patients or physicians, irregularities surrounding the diagnostic criteria, and deficiency of long-term safety studies.

  19. The collateral venous system in late pregnancy: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Aimee; Stone, Peter; Mirjalili, S Ali

    2017-11-01

    Recent literature has reported an association between maternal supine sleep position and stillbirth during late pregnancy. In this position the gravid uterus almost completely obstructs the inferior vena cava. A small number of women experience supine hypotension, thought to be due in part to inadequate collateral venous circulation. The aim of this paper is to review the literature describing the anatomy of the collateral venous system and in particular the azygos system, the abdominal portion of which has not been well studied. A systematic review was conducted using the electronic databases: Medline, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Relevant anatomical and radiological literature concerning the azygos system in particular was reviewed. The search was limited to adult human studies only. The collateral venous system can be divided into superficial, intermediate and deep systems. The azygos system in particular provides immediate collateral venous circulation in the event of acute inferior vena caval obstruction. The abdominal portion of this pathway, including the ascending lumbar vein, has not been well studied and there are certain variations that can render it ineffective. In conclusion, the collateral venous system provides an alternative route for blood to flow back to the systemic circulation when acute occlusion of the inferior vena cava occurs in the supine position during late pregnancy. However, certain anatomical variations can render this pathway ineffective, and this could have implications for the development of supine hypotension and stillbirth in late pregnancy. Clin. Anat. 30:1087-1095, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Solitary splenic metastasis from nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a case report and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Pietro; Brunetti, Francesco; Bequignon, Emilie; Landi, Filippo; Lizzi, Vincenzo; Esposito, Francesco; Charpy, Cecile; Calderaro, Julien; Azoulay, Daniel; de'Angelis, Nicola

    2016-07-15

    Solitary splenic metastases are a rare occurrence, and the nasopharyngeal carcinoma represents one of the most uncommon primary sources. The present study aimed to describe a rare case of a solitary single splenic metastasis from nasopharyngeal carcinoma and to assess the number of cases of isolated nasopharyngeal carcinoma metastases to the spleen reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 56-year-old man with a history of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and complete remission after chemo-radiotherapy. Three months after complete remission, positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan revealed a hypermetabolic splenic lesion without increased metabolic activity in other areas. After laparoscopic splenectomy, the pathology report confirmed a single splenic metastasis from undifferentiated carcinoma of the nasopharyngeal type. The postoperative period was uneventful. We also performed a systematic review of the literature using MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases. All articles reporting cases of splenic metastases from nasopharyngeal carcinoma, with or without histologic confirmation, were evaluated. The literature search yielded 15 relevant articles, which were very heterogeneous in their aims and methods and described only 25 cases of splenic metastases from nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The present review shows that solitary splenic metastases from nasopharyngeal carcinoma are a rare event, but it should be considered in patients presenting with splenic lesions at imaging and a history of primary or recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma. No evidence supports a negative impact of splenectomy in patients with solitary splenic metastasis from nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  1. Rural definition of health: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessert, Charles; Waring, Stephen; Bailey-Davis, Lisa; Conway, Pat; Roberts, Melissa; VanWormer, Jeffrey

    2015-04-14

    The advent of patient-centered care challenges policy makers, health care administrators, clinicians, and patient advocates to understand the factors that contribute to effective patient activation. Improved understanding of how patients think about and define their health is needed to more effectively "activate" patients, and to nurture and support patients' efforts to improve their health. Researchers have intimated for over 25 years that rural populations approach health in a distinct fashion that may differ from their non-rural counterparts. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to assess the extent and strength of evidence for rural definition of health. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they were published in English, reported on original research and presented findings or commentary relevant to rural definition of health, were published over the last 40 years, and were based on observations of rural U.S., Canadian, or Australian populations. Two reviewers were assigned to each selected article and blinded to the other reviewer's comments. For discordant reviews, a third blinded review was performed. Of the 125 published articles identified from the literature, 34 included commentary or findings relevant to a rural definition of health. Of these studies, 6 included an urban comparison group. Few studies compared rural and urban definitions of health directly. Findings relevant to rural definition of health covered a broad range; however, good health was commonly characterized as being able to work, reciprocate in social relationships, and maintain independence. This review largely confirmed many general characteristics on rural views of health, but also documented the extensive methodological limitations, both in terms of quantity and quality, of studies that empirically compare rural vs. urban samples. Most notably, the evidence base in this area is weakened by the frequent absence of parallel comparison groups and standardized assessment

  2. Systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses: part 6 of a series on evaluation of scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressing, Meike; Blettner, Maria; Klug, Stefanie J

    2009-07-01

    Because of the rising number of scientific publications, it is important to have a means of jointly summarizing and assessing different studies on a single topic. Systematic literature reviews, meta-analyses of published data, and meta-analyses of individual data (pooled reanalyses) are now being published with increasing frequency. We here describe the essential features of these methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. This article is based on a selective literature search. The different types of review and meta-analysis are described, the methods used in each are outlined so that they can be evaluated, and a checklist is given for the assessment of reviews and meta-analyses of scientific articles. Systematic literature reviews provide an overview of the state of research on a given topic and enable an assessment of the quality of individual studies. They also allow the results of different studies to be evaluated together when these are inconsistent. Meta-analyses additionally allow calculation of pooled estimates of an effect. The different types of review and meta-analysis are discussed with examples from the literature on one particular topic. Systematic literature reviews and meta-analyses enable the research findings and treatment effects obtained in different individual studies to be summed up and evaluated.

  3. Touchless interaction with software in interventional radiology and surgery: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, André; Hensen, Bennet; Wacker, Frank; Hansen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we systematically examine the current state of research of systems that focus on touchless human-computer interaction in operating rooms and interventional radiology suites. We further discuss the drawbacks of current solutions and underline promising technologies for future development. A systematic literature search of scientific papers that deal with touchless control of medical software in the immediate environment of the operation room and interventional radiology suite was performed. This includes methods for touchless gesture interaction, voice control and eye tracking. Fifty-five research papers were identified and analyzed in detail including 33 journal publications. Most of the identified literature (62 %) deals with the control of medical image viewers. The others present interaction techniques for laparoscopic assistance (13 %), telerobotic assistance and operating room control (9 % each) as well as for robotic operating room assistance and intraoperative registration (3.5 % each). Only 8 systems (14.5 %) were tested in a real clinical environment, and 7 (12.7 %) were not evaluated at all. In the last 10 years, many advancements have led to robust touchless interaction approaches. However, only a few have been systematically evaluated in real operating room settings. Further research is required to cope with current limitations of touchless software interfaces in clinical environments. The main challenges for future research are the improvement and evaluation of usability and intuitiveness of touchless human-computer interaction and the full integration into productive systems as well as the reduction of necessary interaction steps and further development of hands-free interaction.

  4. Omalizumab for atopic dermatitis: case series and a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jesper Grønlund; Agner, Tove; Sand, Carsten; Thomsen, Simon Francis

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the high-affinity Fc receptor of IgE, registered for the treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria and severe allergic asthma. We present a case series of nine patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) treated off-label with omalizumab and a systematic review of the existing literature. Patients were selected consecutively from a tertiary dermatological referral center during a 5-year period. All patients were treated with omalizumab at a starting dose of 300 mg subcutaneously every 4 weeks. Systematic literature searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrials.gov to identify any study (case reports, case series, and controlled trials) evaluating the effect of treatment with omalizumab in AD. Based on physicians' assessment, 50% of our patients had a good or excellent response to treatment with omalizumab; a further 12.5% had a moderate response, while 37.5% experienced no response or deterioration of symptoms during treatment. Treatment was generally well tolerated. Twenty-six studies with a median of four patients each (range 1-21), comprising 174 patients, were included in the systematic review. Summed over all studies, a total of 129 patients (74.1%) experienced a beneficial effect of treatment ranging from little to complete response. Omalizumab appears to be a safe and well tolerated, however expensive, treatment with some clinical benefit in patients with severe recalcitrant AD. Recommendation for use in clinical practice awaits evidence from larger randomized controlled trials. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  5. The methodological quality of systematic reviews published in high-impact nursing journals: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölkki, Tarja; Kanste, Outi; Kääriäinen, Maria; Elo, Satu; Kyngäs, Helvi

    2014-02-01

    To analyse systematic review articles published in the top 10 nursing journals to determine the quality of the methods employed within them. Systematic review is defined as a scientific research method that synthesises high-quality scientific knowledge on a given topic. The number of such reviews in nursing science has increased dramatically during recent years, but their methodological quality has not previously been assessed. A review of the literature using a narrative approach. Ranked impact factor scores for nursing journals were obtained from the Journal Citation Report database of the Institute of Scientific Information (ISI Web of Knowledge). All issues from the years 2009 and 2010 of the top 10 ranked journals were included. CINAHL and MEDLINE databases were searched to locate studies using the search terms 'systematic review' and 'systematic literature review'. A total of 39 eligible studies were identified. Their methodological quality was evaluated through the specific criteria of quality assessment, description of synthesis and strengths and weaknesses reported in the included studies. Most of the eligible systematic reviews included several different designs or types of quantitative study. The majority included a quality assessment, and a total of 17 different criteria were identified. The method of synthesis was mentioned in about half of the reviews, the most common being narrative synthesis. The weaknesses of reviews were discussed, while strengths were rarely highlighted. The methodological quality of the systematic reviews examined varied considerably, although they were all published in nursing journals with a high-impact factor. Despite the fact that systematic reviews are considered the most robust source of research evidence, they vary in methodological quality. This point is important to consider in clinical practice when applying the results to patient care. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Substandard and counterfeit medicines: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzaini, Tariq; Choonara, Imti; Sammons, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the evidence available of poor-quality (counterfeit and substandard) medicines in the literature. Design Systematic review. Data sources Databases used were EMBASE, MEDLINE, PubMed and the International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, including articles published till January 2013. Eligibility criteria Prevalence studies containing original data. WHO definitions (1992) used for counterfeit and substandard medicines. Study appraisal and synthesis Two reviewers independently scored study methodology against recommendations from the MEDQUARG Checklist. Studies were classified according to the World Bank classification of countries by income. Data extraction Data extracted: place of study; type of drugs sampled; sample size; percentage of substandard/counterfeit medicines; formulations included; origin of the drugs; chemical analysis and stated issues of counterfeit/substandard medicines. Results 44 prevalence studies were identified, 15 had good methodological quality. They were conducted in 25 different countries; the majority were in low-income countries (11) and/or lower middle-income countries (10). The median prevalence of substandard/counterfeit medicines was 28.5% (range 11–48%). Only two studies differentiated between substandard and counterfeit medicines. Prevalence data were limited to antimicrobial drugs (all 15 studies). 13 studies involved antimalarials, 6 antibiotics and 2 other medications. The majority of studies (93%) contained samples with inadequate amounts of active ingredients. The prevalence of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials was significantly higher when purchased from unlicensed outlets (pcounterfeit medicines. Most studies assessed only a single therapeutic class of antimicrobials. Conclusions The prevalence of poor-quality antimicrobial medicines is widespread throughout Africa and Asia in lower income countries and lower middle-income countries . The main problem identified was inadequate amounts of the active

  7. Mefloquine safety and tolerability in pregnancy: a systematic literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Control of malaria in pregnant women is still a major challenge as it constitutes an important cause of maternal and neonatal mortality. Mefloquine (MQ) has been used for malaria chemoprophylaxis in non-immune travellers for several decades and it constitutes a potential candidate for intermittent preventive treatment in pregnant women (IPTp). Methods The safety of MQ, including its safety in pregnancy, is controversial and a continuing subject of debate. Published studies which evaluated the use of MQ for malaria prevention or treatment in pregnant women and which reported data on drug tolerability and/or pregnancy outcomes have been reviewed systematically. Results Eighteen articles fitted the inclusion criteria, only one study was double-blind and placebo controlled. No differences were found in the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women exposed to MQ compared to those exposed to other anti-malarials or to the general population. MQ combined with artesunate seems to be better tolerated than standard quinine therapy for treatment of non-severe falciparum malaria, but a MQ loading dose (10 mg/kg) is associated with more dizziness compared with placebo. When used for IPTp, MQ (15 mg/kg) may have more side effects than sulphadoxine- pyrimethamine. Conclusions In the published literature there are no indications that MQ use during pregnancy carries an increased risk for the foetus. Ideally, the use of MQ to prevent malaria should be based on a risk-benefit analysis of adverse effects against the risk of acquiring the infection. For this purpose double-blinded randomized controlled trials in African pregnant women are much needed. PMID:24581338

  8. Economic evaluation of dental sealants: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlotan, Marvellous; Chen, Bradley; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Chen, Annie; Fan, Victoria Y

    2018-02-01

    To systematically review the literature on economic evaluations of dental sealants and examine the costs and effectiveness of caries prevention using sealants. Of 21 full-text articles examined, a total of 13 were included in this study. These studies are grouped by the type of intervention as follows: (i) sealants compared with no sealants; (ii) sealants compared with other forms of caries prevention; (iii) resin-based sealants compared with glass-ionomer sealants; (iv) different sealing strategies in primary teeth; (v) different sealing strategies in permanent teeth; and (vi) sealants based on school- or clinic-based setting of delivery. All currency is reported in constant 2010 US$. Cost-effectiveness analyses differed due to varying study designs, assumptions, sealant delivery settings, outcomes, caries risk assessment and study durations. Findings varied on the cost-effectiveness of sealants compared with other caries-preventive strategies. Under the assumption of equal caries risk, always sealing primary molars appeared to be the most effective strategy, whereas risk-based sealing was the optimal strategy with differing caries risk. Studies that assessed sealing strategies in permanent teeth reported that risk-based sealing was more cost-effective than not sealing, but they differed on the cost-effectiveness of risk-based seal compared with non-risk-based seal. Sealants delivered in school settings had mixed results on costs but were as equally effective as sealants delivered in private practices. The cost-effectiveness of sealants is dependent on the conditions of delivery. The list of cost-effectiveness ratios for each intervention can support policy makers to estimate expected returns on their investments in dental sealants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Anterior cruciate ligament tibial footprint anatomy: systematic review of the 21st century literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Michael D; Piefer, Jason W; Lubowitz, James H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review current arthroscopic and related literature and to characterize the anatomic centrum of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tibial footprint. On January 31, 2011, 2 independent reviewers performed a Medline search using the terms "anterior cruciate ligament" or "ACL," "tibia" or "tibial," and "anatomy" or "footprint." We included anatomic, cadaveric, and radiographic studies of adult, human, ACL tibial anatomy. Studies not published in the English language, studies published before January 1, 2000, and review articles were excluded. References of included articles were also searched according to our inclusion/exclusion criteria. Included studies were subjectively synthesized, to define the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint. The Medline search produced 1,224 articles. After application of our inclusion and exclusion criteria and additional search of article references, 19 articles were included and systematically reviewed. With regard to arthroscopically relevant landmarks, (1) in the anterior-to-posterior plane, the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint as a whole is 15 mm anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), the anatomic centrum of the anteromedial bundle is 20 mm anterior to the PCL, and the anatomic centrum of the posterolateral bundle is 11 mm anterior to the PCL and (2) in the medial-to-lateral (ML) plane, the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint as a whole is two-fifths the ML width of the interspinous distance, the anatomic centrum of the anteromedial bundle is one-half the ML width of the interspinous distance, and the anatomic centrum of the posterolateral bundle is one-fourth the ML width of the interspinous distance. Our results show that the anatomic centrum of the ACL tibial footprint is 15 mm anterior to the PCL and two-fifths the ML width of the interspinous distance. This systematic review of basic science studies may have clinical relevance for surgeons

  10. Methods for Documenting Systematic Review Searches: A Discussion of Common Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Tamara; Mann, Mala; Stansfield, Claire; Cooper, Chris; Sampson, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As standardized reporting requirements for systematic reviews are being adopted more widely, review authors are under greater pressure to accurately record their search process. With careful planning, documentation to fulfill the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses requirements can become a valuable…

  11. Prediction of placebo responses: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjoern eHoring

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Predicting who responds to placebo treatment – and under which circumstances – has been a question of interest and investigation for generations. However, the literature is disparate and inconclusive. This review aims to identify publications that provide high quality data on the topic of placebo response (PR prediction. Methods: To identify studies concerned with PR prediction, independent searches were performed in an expert database (for all symptom modalities and in PubMed (for pain only. Articles were selected when a they assessed putative predictors prior to placebo treatment and b an adequate control group was included when the association of predictors and PRs were analyzed. Results: Twenty-one studies were identified, most with pain as dependent variable. Most predictors of PRs were psychological constructs related to actions, expected outcomes and the emotional valence attached to these events (goal-seeking, self-efficacy/-esteem, locus of control, optimism. Other predictors involved behavioural control (desire for control, eating restraint, personality variables (fun seeking, sensation seeking, neuroticism, biological markers (sex, a single nucleotide polymorphism related to dopamine metabolism. Finally, suggestibility and beliefs in expectation biases, body consciousness and baseline symptom severity were found to be predictive. Conclusions: While results are heterogeneous, some congruence of predictors can be identified. PRs mainly appear to be moderated by expectations of how the symptom might change after treatment, or the expectation of how symptom repetition can be coped with. It is suggested to include the listed constructs in future research. Furthermore, a closer look at variables moderating symptom change in control groups seems warranted.

  12. Expert searching in health librarianship: a literature review to identify international issues and Australian concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, Kaye

    2012-03-01

    The traditional role of health librarians as expert searchers is under challenge. The purpose of this review is to establish health librarians' views, practices and educational processes on expert searching. The search strategy was developed in LISTA and then customised for ten other databases: ALISA, PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Web of Science, CINAHL, ERIC, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and Google Scholar. The search terms were (expert search* OR expert retriev* OR mediated search* OR information retriev*) AND librar*. The searches, completed in December 2010 and repeated in May 2011, were limited to English language publications from 2000 to 2011 (unless seminal works). Expert searching remains a key role for health librarians, especially for those supporting systematic reviews or employed as clinical librarians answering clinical questions. Although clients tend to be satisfied with searches carried out for them, improvements are required to effectively position the profession. Evidence-based guidelines, adherence to transparent standards, review of entry-level education requirements and a commitment to accredited, rigorous, ongoing professional development will ensure best practice. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  13. Community-Effectiveness of Temephos for Dengue Vector Control: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyanna George

    Full Text Available The application of the organophosphate larvicide temephos to water storage containers is one of the most commonly employed dengue vector control methods. This systematic literature review is to the knowledge of the authors the first that aims to assess the community-effectiveness of temephos in controlling both vectors and dengue transmission when delivered either as a single intervention or in combination with other interventions. A comprehensive literature search of 6 databases was performed (PubMed, WHOLIS, GIFT, CDSR, EMBASE, Wiley, grey literature and cross references were also screened for relevant studies. Data were extracted and methodological quality of the studies was assessed independently by two reviewers. 27 studies were included in this systematic review (11 single intervention studies and 16 combined intervention studies. All 11 single intervention studies showed consistently that using temephos led to a reduction in entomological indices. Although 11 of the 16 combined intervention studies showed that temephos application together with other chemical vector control methods also reduced entomological indices, this was either not sustained over time or-as in the five remaining studies--failed to reduce the immature stages. The community-effectiveness of temephos was found to be dependent on factors such as quality of delivery, water turnover rate, type of water, and environmental factors such as organic debris, temperature and exposure to sunlight. Timing of temephos deployment and its need for reapplication, along with behavioural factors such as the reluctance of its application to drinking water, and operational aspects such as cost, supplies, time and labour were further limitations identified in this review. In conclusion, when applied as a single intervention, temephos was found to be effective at suppressing entomological indices, however, the same effect has not been observed when temephos was applied in combination with

  14. Minors and euthanasia: a systematic review of argument-based ethics literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuman, Giulia; Gastmans, Chris

    2017-07-01

    Euthanasia was first legalised in the Netherlands in 2002, followed by similar legislation in Belgium the same year. Since the beginning, however, only the Netherlands included the possibility for minors older than 12 years to request euthanasia. In 2014, the Belgian Act legalising euthanasia was amended to include requests by minors who possess the capacity of discernment. This amendment sparked great debate, and raised difficult ethical questions about when and how a minor can be deemed competent. We conducted a systematic review of argument-based literature on euthanasia in minors. The search process followed PRISMA guidelines. Thirteen publications were included. The four-principle approach of medical ethics was used to organise the ethical arguments underlying this debate. The justification for allowing euthanasia in minors is buttressed mostly by the principles of beneficence and respect for autonomy. Somewhat paradoxically, both principles are also used in the literature to argue against the extension of legislation to minors. Opponents of euthanasia generally rely on the principle of non-maleficence. The present analysis reveals that the debate surrounding euthanasia in minors is at an early stage. In order to allow a more in-depth ethical discussion, we suggest enriching the four-principle approach by including a care-ethics approach. What is Known: • The Netherlands and Belgium are the only two countries in the world with euthanasia legislation making it possible for minors to receive euthanasia. • This legislation provoked great debate globally, with ethical arguments for and against this legislation. What is New: • A systematic description of the ethical concepts and arguments grounding the debate on euthanasia in minors, as reported in the argument-based ethics literature. • A need has been identified to enrich the debate with a care-ethics approach to avoid oversimplifying the ethical decision-making process.

  15. Health Benefits of Digital Videogames for Older Adults: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amanda K; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Maneeratana, Vasana; Chaney, Beth H; Bernhardt, Jay M

    2012-12-01

    This article is a systematic review conducted of the research literature on digital videogames played by older adults and health outcomes associated with game play. Findings from each study meeting the inclusion criteria were analyzed and summarized into emergent themes to determine the impact of digital games in promoting healthy behaviors among older adults. A systematic review of the research literature was conducted through multiple academic databases for works, published between the years 2000 and 2011, looking at digital videogame interventions with adults 65 years of age and older. Multiple combinations of search terms and Boolean operators relevant to digital videogames and older adults were queried. A criteria matrix was created to code and evaluate studies. Thirteen studies met specific criteria for inclusion and were analyzed in the final review. Significant mental, physical, and social health factors, type of digital game platform, study design, and measurements are among emergent themes summarized from the reviewed research literature. Significant mental health outcomes of digital game interventions were found in the majority of the reviewed studies, followed by physical and lastly social health outcomes in older adults. A majority of the studies revealed significant positive effects on health outcomes associated with digital videogame play among older adults. With current advancements in technology, including advanced motion sensing, digital game platforms have significant potential for positive health impact among older populations. More robust and rigorous research designs are needed to increase validity and reliability of results and establish stronger causal relationships on the health benefits of digital videogame play for older adults.

  16. Is bruxism a risk factor for dental implants? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Poggio, Carlo E; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2014-06-01

    To systematically review the literature on the role of bruxism as a risk factor for the different complications on dental implant-supported rehabilitations. A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's Medline Database was performed to identify all peer-reviewed papers in the English literature assessing the role of bruxism, as diagnosed with any other diagnostic approach (i.e., clinical assessment, questionnaires, interviews, polysomnography, and electromyography), as a risk factor for biological (i.e., implant failure, implant mobility, and marginal bone loss) or mechanical (i.e., complications or failures of either prefabricated components or laboratory-fabricated suprastructures) complications on dental implant-supported rehabilitations. The selected articles were reviewed according to a structured summary of the articles in relation to four main issues, viz., "P" - patients/problem/population, "I" - intervention, "C" - comparison, and "O" - outcome. A total of 21 papers were included in the review and split into those assessing biological complications (n = 14) and those reporting mechanical complications (n = 7). In general, the specificity of the literature for bruxism diagnosis and for the study of the bruxism's effects on dental implants was low. From a biological viewpoint, bruxism was not related with implant failures in six papers, while results from the remaining eight studies did not allow drawing conclusions. As for mechanical complications, four of the seven studies yielded a positive relationship with bruxism. Bruxism is unlikely to be a risk factor for biological complications around dental implants, while there are some suggestions that it may be a risk factor for mechanical complications. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Searching MEDLINE for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health literature: questionable sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladek, Ruth M; Tieman, Jennifer J; Tyndall, Jess; Phillips, Paddy A

    2013-06-01

    The extent to which existing and future research can impact on reducing health disparities relates not only to the evidence available, but the ability to find that evidence. Our objective is to quantify experts' literature searching effectiveness with respect to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's health. Nine journals were dual reviewed, and a 'gold standard' set of relevant articles was identified. Health librarians (n = 25) completed a standardised searching task using OVID MEDLINE, and results were compared with the gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity and precision rates were calculated. The gold standard comprised 136 of 1469 (9.3%) records from nine journals. Searches achieved a mean sensitivity of 53.2% (median = 64.7%, range 0.0-93.4%), specificity of 97.4% (median = 99.4%, range 52.6-100%) and precision of 83.3% (median = 91.0%, range 16.7-100%). Self-estimates of search sensitivity (post hoc) were significantly higher than observed (M = 78.9%, t = 4.812, P MEDLINE. A search filter may improve searching effectiveness for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health literature. Assessment of health librarians' searching competencies warrants further professional debate and consideration. © 2013 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2013 Health Libraries Group.

  18. Biological substantiation of antipsychotic-associated pneumonia: Systematic literature review and computational analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Janet; Calabró, Marco; Garcia-Serna, Ricard; Ferrajolo, Carmen; Crisafulli, Concetta; Mestres, Jordi; Trifirò', Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Antipsychotic (AP) safety has been widely investigated. However, mechanisms underlying AP-associated pneumonia are not well-defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the known mechanisms of AP-associated pneumonia through a systematic literature review, confirm these mechanisms using an independent data source on drug targets and attempt to identify novel AP drug targets potentially linked to pneumonia. A search was conducted in Medline and Web of Science to identify studies exploring the association between pneumonia and antipsychotic use, from which information on hypothesized mechanism of action was extracted. All studies had to be in English and had to concern AP use as an intervention in persons of any age and for any indication, provided that the outcome was pneumonia. Information on the study design, population, exposure, outcome, risk estimate and mechanism of action was tabulated. Public repositories of pharmacology and drug safety data were used to identify the receptor binding profile and AP safety events. Cytoscape was then used to map biological pathways that could link AP targets and off-targets to pneumonia. The literature search yielded 200 articles; 41 were included in the review. Thirty studies reported a hypothesized mechanism of action, most commonly activation/inhibition of cholinergic, histaminergic and dopaminergic receptors. In vitro pharmacology data confirmed receptor affinities identified in the literature review. Two targets, thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) and platelet activating factor receptor (PTAFR) were found to be novel AP target receptors potentially associated with pneumonia. Biological pathways constructed using Cytoscape identified plausible biological links potentially leading to pneumonia downstream of TBXA2R and PTAFR. Innovative approaches for biological substantiation of drug-adverse event associations may strengthen evidence on drug safety profiles and help to tailor pharmacological therapies to patient risk

  19. Nonoperative treatment for femoroacetabular impingement: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Peter D H; Fernandez, Miguel; Griffin, Damian R; Foster, Nadine E

    2013-05-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has been identified as a common cause of hip pain in young adults. However, it is not known whether an effective nonoperative treatment exists and whether there is any evidence to support such a treatment. The purpose of this review is to establish whether nonoperative treatments exist for FAI in the published literature and whether there is any evidence to support their use. TYPE: A systematic review. LITERACY SURVEY: PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Library databases were searched by using the following terms: femoroacetabular impingement, femoro-acetabular impingement, and hip impingement. The search was limited to English only but with no time constraints. The review was undertaken at 2 academic institutions within the United Kingdom; any article that described or provided evidence that related to a nonoperative treatment for FAI was included. Fifty-three articles met our criteria, of which, 48 were review and/or discussion based. Five articles summarized primary experiments that described or evaluated nonoperative treatment, of which, 3 reported favorable outcomes. Many review and/or discussion articles (31 [65%]) indicated that a trial of conservative care was appropriate. Activity modification was most frequently recommended (39 [81%]), and nearly half promoted physical therapy as a treatment (23 [48%]). The review literature appears to promote initial nonoperative treatment for FAI. Although the available literature with experimental data is limited, there is a suggestion that physical therapy and activity modification confer some benefit to patients. Nonoperative treatment regimens, particularly physical therapy, need to be evaluated more extensively and rigorously, preferably against operative care, to determine the true clinical effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Biological substantiation of antipsychotic-associated pneumonia: Systematic literature review and computational analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Antipsychotic (AP) safety has been widely investigated. However, mechanisms underlying AP-associated pneumonia are not well-defined. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the known mechanisms of AP-associated pneumonia through a systematic literature review, confirm these mechanisms using an independent data source on drug targets and attempt to identify novel AP drug targets potentially linked to pneumonia. Methods A search was conducted in Medline and Web of Science to identify studies exploring the association between pneumonia and antipsychotic use, from which information on hypothesized mechanism of action was extracted. All studies had to be in English and had to concern AP use as an intervention in persons of any age and for any indication, provided that the outcome was pneumonia. Information on the study design, population, exposure, outcome, risk estimate and mechanism of action was tabulated. Public repositories of pharmacology and drug safety data were used to identify the receptor binding profile and AP safety events. Cytoscape was then used to map biological pathways that could link AP targets and off-targets to pneumonia. Results The literature search yielded 200 articles; 41 were included in the review. Thirty studies reported a hypothesized mechanism of action, most commonly activation/inhibition of cholinergic, histaminergic and dopaminergic receptors. In vitro pharmacology data confirmed receptor affinities identified in the literature review. Two targets, thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) and platelet activating factor receptor (PTAFR) were found to be novel AP target receptors potentially associated with pneumonia. Biological pathways constructed using Cytoscape identified plausible biological links potentially leading to pneumonia downstream of TBXA2R and PTAFR. Conclusion Innovative approaches for biological substantiation of drug-adverse event associations may strengthen evidence on drug safety profiles and help to tailor

  1. Sleep bruxism and related risk factors in adults: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castroflorio, Tommaso; Bargellini, Andrea; Rossini, Gabriele; Cugliari, Giovanni; Deregibus, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this article was to systematically review the literature to assess the relationship between risk factors and sleep bruxism (SB) in adults (age ≥18 years). A systematic search of the following databases was carried out: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trial Register and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, LILACs and SciELO. Nine out of the 4583 initially identified articles were selected. This review was conducted according to the guidelines from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, with reporting in agreement to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guidelines. Among the nine analyzed articles, associations between SB and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) (OR=6.6, CI=1.4-30.9) was found in one randomized clinical trial (RCT). Four cross-sectional studies suggested history of SB during childhood (OR=8.1 CI=5.4-12-2), age (OR=3.1, CI=2.3-4.1) and chronic migraine (OR=3.8, C.I=1.8-7.8) as determinant factors for the development of SB. In one case-control study, patients with genetic polymorphisms were more likely to present SB (OR=4.3, CI=1.6-11.3). Smoking (OR=2.8, CI=2.2-3.5) and alcohol intake (OR=1.9, CI=1.2-2.8) showed moderate association in two case-control studies. History of SB during childhood, gastro-esophageal reflux disease and genetic polymorphisms seem to be important risk factors associated to SB in adults. Dry mouth on awakening seems to be a protective factor. Association does not infer with causality. Even if the evidence emerged from the considered studies was clinically relevant, further studies are requested to better understand the biological mechanisms behind the described associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Methods to perform systematic reviews of patient preferences: a literature survey

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Tsung; Enkh-Amgalan, Nomin; Zorigt, Ganchimeg

    2017-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews are a commonly used research design in the medical field to synthesize study findings. At present—although several systematic reviews of patient preference studies are published—there is no clear guidance available for researchers to conduct this type of systematic review. The aim of our study was to learn the most current practice of conducting these systematic reviews by conducting a survey of the literature regarding reviews of quantitative patient preference ...

  3. Systematic literature review of hospital medication administration errors in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Ameer,1 Soraya Dhillon,1 Mark J Peters,2 Maisoon Ghaleb11Department of Pharmacy, School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, UK; 2Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK Objective: Medication administration is the last step in the medication process. It can act as a safety net to prevent unintended harm to patients if detected. However, medication administration errors (MAEs during this process have been documented and thought to be preventable. In pediatric medicine, doses are usually administered based on the child's weight or body surface area. This in turn increases the risk of drug miscalculations and therefore MAEs. The aim of this review is to report MAEs occurring in pediatric inpatients. Methods: Twelve bibliographic databases were searched for studies published between January 2000 and February 2015 using “medication administration errors”, “hospital”, and “children” related terminologies. Handsearching of relevant publications was also carried out. A second reviewer screened articles for eligibility and quality in accordance with the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Key findings: A total of 44 studies were systematically reviewed. MAEs were generally defined as a deviation of dose given from that prescribed; this included omitted doses and administration at the wrong time. Hospital MAEs in children accounted for a mean of 50% of all reported medication error reports (n=12,588. It was also identified in a mean of 29% of doses observed (n=8,894. The most prevalent type of MAEs related to preparation, infusion rate, dose, and time. This review has identified five types of interventions to reduce hospital MAEs in children: barcode medicine administration, electronic prescribing, education, use of smart pumps, and standard concentration. Conclusion: This review has identified a wide variation in the prevalence of hospital MAEs in children. This is attributed to

  4. The use of psychiatry-focused simulation in undergraduate nursing education: A systematic search and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandyk, Amanda D; Lalonde, Michelle; Merali, Sabrina; Wright, Erica; Bajnok, Irmajean; Davies, Barbara

    2018-04-01

    Evidence on the use of simulation to teach psychiatry and mental health (including addiction) content is emerging, yet no summary of the implementation processes or associated outcomes exists. The aim of this study was to systematically search and review empirical literature on the use of psychiatry-focused simulation in undergraduate nursing education. Objectives were to (i) assess the methodological quality of existing evidence on the use of simulation to teach mental health content to undergraduate nursing students, (ii) describe the operationalization of the simulations, and (iii) summarize the associated quantitative and qualitative outcomes. We conducted online database (MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, CINAHL, PsycINFO from January 2004 to October 2015) and grey literature searches. Thirty-two simulation studies were identified describing and evaluating six types of simulations (standardized patients, audio simulations, high-fidelity simulators, virtual world, multimodal, and tabletop). Overall, 2724 participants were included in the studies. Studies reflected a limited number of intervention designs, and outcomes were evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods incorporating a variety of tools. Results indicated that simulation was effective in reducing student anxiety and improving their knowledge, empathy, communication, and confidence. The summarized qualitative findings all supported the benefit of simulation; however, more research is needed to assess the comparative effectiveness of the types of simulations. Recommendations from the findings include the development of guidelines for educators to deliver each simulation component (briefing, active simulation, debriefing). Finally, consensus around appropriate training of facilitators is needed, as is consistent and agreed upon simulation terminology. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Effects of physiotherapy in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromer, T.O.; Tautenhahn, U.G.; Bie, R.A. de; Staal, J.B.; Bastiaenen, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To critically summarize the effectiveness of physio-therapy in patients presenting clinical signs of shoulder impingement syndrome. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials were searched electronically and manually from 1966 to December 2007. Study quality was

  6. Complications of mandibular distraction osteogenesis for developmental deformities: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlinden, C.R.A.; van de Vijfeijken, S.E.C.M.; Tuinzing, D.B.; Jansma, E.P.; Becking, A.G.; Swennen, G.R.J.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic review of English and non-English articles on the complications of mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) for patients with developmental deformities was performed, in accordance with the PRISMA statement. Search terms expressing distraction osteogenesis were used in 'AND'

  7. A systematic review of the literature on self-management interventions and discussion of their potential relevance for people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aantjes, C.J.; Rameran, L; Bunders-Aelen, J.G.F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study systematically reviews the literature on self-management interventions provided by health care teams, community partners, patients and families and discusses the potential relevance of these interventions for people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We searched

  8. Associations between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals : A systematic review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Dewi; de Brouwer, Brigitte J M; Kaljouw, Marian J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the literature on relationships between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals. Data sources: The search was performed in Medline (PubMed), Cochrane, Embase, and CINAHL. Review methods: Included were

  9. Associations between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals: a systematic review of literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, D.; Brouwer, B.J.M. de; Kaljouw, M.J.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the literature on relationships between characteristics of the nurse work environment and five nurse-sensitive patient outcomes in hospitals. DATA SOURCES: The search was performed in Medline (PubMed), Cochrane, Embase, and CINAHL. REVIEW METHODS: Included were

  10. Limited evidence for the effect of sodium fluoride on deterioration of hearing loss in patients with otosclerosis: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hentschel, M.A.; Huizinga, P.; van der Velden, D.L.; Wegner, I.; Bittermann, A.J.N.; van der Heijden, G.J.M.; Grolman, W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the protective effect of sodium fluoride on the deterioration of hearing loss in adult patients with otosclerosis. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL. STUDY SELECTION: A systematic literature search was conducted. Studies reporting original study

  11. Impact of EMG-triggered neuromuscular stimulation of the wrist and finger extensors of the paretic hand after stroke: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meilink, A.; Hemmen, B.; Seelen, H.A.; Kwakkel, G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether EMG-triggered neuromuscular electrical stimulation (EMG-NMES) applied to the extensor muscles of the forearm improves hand function after stroke. Design: Systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Methods: A computer-aided literature search up to June 2006

  12. Search filters for finding prognostic and diagnostic prediction studies in Medline to enhance systematic reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert-Jan Geersing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interest in prognostic reviews is increasing, but to properly review existing evidence an accurate search filer for finding prediction research is needed. The aim of this paper was to validate and update two previously introduced search filters for finding prediction research in Medline: the Ingui filter and the Haynes Broad filter. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on a hand search of 6 general journals in 2008 we constructed two sets of papers. Set 1 consisted of prediction research papers (n = 71, and set 2 consisted of the remaining papers (n = 1133. Both search filters were validated in two ways, using diagnostic accuracy measures as performance measures. First, we compared studies in set 1 (reference with studies retrieved by the search strategies as applied in Medline. Second, we compared studies from 4 published systematic reviews (reference with studies retrieved by the search filter as applied in Medline. Next--using word frequency methods--we constructed an additional search string for finding prediction research. Both search filters were good in identifying clinical prediction models: sensitivity ranged from 0.94 to 1.0 using our hand search as reference, and 0.78 to 0.89 using the systematic reviews as reference. This latter performance measure even increased to around 0.95 (range 0.90 to 0.97 when either search filter was combined with the additional string that we developed. Retrieval rate of explorative prediction research was poor, both using our hand search or our systematic review as reference, and even combined with our additional search string: sensitivity ranged from 0.44 to 0.85. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Explorative prediction research is difficult to find in Medline, using any of the currently available search filters. Yet, application of either the Ingui filter or the Haynes broad filter results in a very low number missed clinical prediction model studies.

  13. Search filters for finding prognostic and diagnostic prediction studies in Medline to enhance systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geersing, Geert-Jan; Bouwmeester, Walter; Zuithoff, Peter; Spijker, Rene; Leeflang, Mariska; Moons, Karel G M; Moons, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The interest in prognostic reviews is increasing, but to properly review existing evidence an accurate search filer for finding prediction research is needed. The aim of this paper was to validate and update two previously introduced search filters for finding prediction research in Medline: the Ingui filter and the Haynes Broad filter. Based on a hand search of 6 general journals in 2008 we constructed two sets of papers. Set 1 consisted of prediction research papers (n = 71), and set 2 consisted of the remaining papers (n = 1133). Both search filters were validated in two ways, using diagnostic accuracy measures as performance measures. First, we compared studies in set 1 (reference) with studies retrieved by the search strategies as applied in Medline. Second, we compared studies from 4 published systematic reviews (reference) with studies retrieved by the search filter as applied in Medline. Next--using word frequency methods--we constructed an additional search string for finding prediction research. Both search filters were good in identifying clinical prediction models: sensitivity ranged from 0.94 to 1.0 using our hand search as reference, and 0.78 to 0.89 using the systematic reviews as reference. This latter performance measure even increased to around 0.95 (range 0.90 to 0.97) when either search filter was combined with the additional string that we developed. Retrieval rate of explorative prediction research was poor, both using our hand search or our systematic review as reference, and even combined with our additional search string: sensitivity ranged from 0.44 to 0.85. Explorative prediction research is difficult to find in Medline, using any of the currently available search filters. Yet, application of either the Ingui filter or the Haynes broad filter results in a very low number missed clinical prediction model studies.

  14. Searching for religion and mental health studies required health, social science, and grey literature databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Judy M; Cottrell, David J; Mir, Ghazala

    2014-07-01

    To determine the optimal databases to search for studies of faith-sensitive interventions for treating depression. We examined 23 health, social science, religious, and grey literature databases searched for an evidence synthesis. Databases were prioritized by yield of (1) search results, (2) potentially relevant references identified during screening, (3) included references contained in the synthesis, and (4) included references that were available in the database. We assessed the impact of databases beyond MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO by their ability to supply studies identifying new themes and issues. We identified pragmatic workload factors that influence database selection. PsycINFO was the best performing database within all priority lists. ArabPsyNet, CINAHL, Dissertations and Theses, EMBASE, Global Health, Health Management Information Consortium, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts were essential for our searches to retrieve the included references. Citation tracking activities and the personal library of one of the research teams made significant contributions of unique, relevant references. Religion studies databases (Am Theo Lib Assoc, FRANCIS) did not provide unique, relevant references. Literature searches for reviews and evidence syntheses of religion and health studies should include social science, grey literature, non-Western databases, personal libraries, and citation tracking activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Literatura chicana: Vida en busca de forma (Chicano Literature: Life in Search of Form).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Tomas

    The Chicano culture is searching for appropriate expression in art forms and literature. The Chicano novel and essay, often written in English, seem directed toward the North American public. The short story is the most varied in viewpoint and most versatile in form. Poetry captures the Chicano sensitivity. It is almost impossible to note the…

  16. Imipenem resistance of Pseudomonas in pneumonia: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Marya D; Chen, Joyce; Mody, Samir H; Ramsey, Andrew M; Shorr, Andrew F

    2010-08-26

    Pneumonia, and particularly nosocomial (NP) and ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAP), results in high morbidity and costs. NPs in particular are likely to be caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), ~20% of which in observational studies are resistant to imipenem. We sought to identify the burden of PA imipenem resistance in pneumonia. We conducted a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials (RCT) of imipenem treatment for pneumonia published in English between 1993 and 2008. We extracted study, population and treatment characteristics, and proportions caused by PA. Endpoints of interest were: PA resistance to initial antimicrobial treatment, clinical success, microbiologic eradication and on-treatment emergence of resistance of PA. Of the 46 studies identified, 20 (N = 4,310) included patients with pneumonia (imipenem 1,667, PA 251; comparator 1,661, PA 270). Seven were double blind, and 7 included US data. Comparator arms included a β-lactam (17, [penicillin 6, carbapenem 4, cephalosporin 7, monobactam 1]), aminoglycoside 2, vancomycin 1, and a fluoroquinolone 5; 5 employed double coverage. Thirteen focused exclusively on pneumonia and 7 included pneumonia and other diagnoses. Initial resistance was present in 14.6% (range 4.2-24.0%) of PA isolates in imipenem and 2.5% (range 0.0-7.4%) in comparator groups. Pooled clinical success rates for PA were 45.2% (range 0.0-72.0%) for imipenem and 74.9% (range 0.0-100.0%) for comparator regimens. Microbiologic eradication was achieved in 47.6% (range 0.0%-100.0%) of isolates in the imipenem and 52.8% (range 0.0%-100.0%) in the comparator groups. Resistance emerged in 38.7% (range 5.6-77.8%) PA isolates in imipenem and 21.9% (range 4.8-56.5%) in comparator groups. In the 15 years of RCTs of imipenem for pneumonia, PA imipenem resistance rates are high, and PA clinical success and microbiologic eradication rates are directionally lower for imipenem than for comparators. Conversely, initial and treatment

  17. Air Pollution and Otitis Media in Children: A Systematic Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowatte, Gayan; Tham, Rachel; Perret, Jennifer L; Bloom, Michael S; Dong, Guanghui; Waidyatillake, Nilakshi; Bui, Dinh; Morgan, Geoffrey G; Jalaludin, Bin; Lodge, Caroline J; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2018-02-03

    Young children are particularly vulnerable to otitis media (OM) which globally affects over 80% of children below the age of 3 years. Although there is convincing evidence for an association between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and OM in children, the relationship with ambient air pollution is not clear. We aimed to systematically review the literature on the relationship between ambient air pollution exposure and OM in children. A systematic search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases. Of 934 references identified, 24 articles were included. There is an increasing body of evidence supporting an association between higher ambient air pollution exposure and a higher risk of OM in children. While NO₂ showed the most consistent association with OM, other specific pollutants showed inconsistent associations. Studies were mainly conducted in high/middle income countries with limited evidence from low-income countries. Although there was a general consensus that higher air pollution exposure is associated with a greater prevalence of OM, the evidence for associations with specific pollutants is inconsistent. More well-designed studies on associations between specific air pollutants as risk factors for OM are warranted, especially in low income countries with high air pollution levels.

  18. Air Pollution and Otitis Media in Children: A Systematic Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Rachel; Perret, Jennifer L.; Bloom, Michael S.; Dong, Guanghui; Waidyatillake, Nilakshi; Bui, Dinh; Morgan, Geoffrey G.; Jalaludin, Bin; Lodge, Caroline J.

    2018-01-01

    Young children are particularly vulnerable to otitis media (OM) which globally affects over 80% of children below the age of 3 years. Although there is convincing evidence for an association between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and OM in children, the relationship with ambient air pollution is not clear. We aimed to systematically review the literature on the relationship between ambient air pollution exposure and OM in children. A systematic search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases. Of 934 references identified, 24 articles were included. There is an increasing body of evidence supporting an association between higher ambient air pollution exposure and a higher risk of OM in children. While NO2 showed the most consistent association with OM, other specific pollutants showed inconsistent associations. Studies were mainly conducted in high/middle income countries with limited evidence from low-income countries. Although there was a general consensus that higher air pollution exposure is associated with a greater prevalence of OM, the evidence for associations with specific pollutants is inconsistent. More well-designed studies on associations between specific air pollutants as risk factors for OM are warranted, especially in low income countries with high air pollution levels. PMID:29401661

  19. Quality of reporting in oncology studies: A systematic analysis of literature reviews and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, Romain; Bourmaud, Aurélie; Oriol, Mathieu; Tinquaut, Fabien; Méry, Benoîte; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Vallard, Alexis; Fournel, Pierre; Magné, Nicolas; Chauvin, Franck

    2017-04-01

    The present review gives an overview of systematic reviews published in peer reviewed Journals analysing quality of reporting in oncology studies. PUBMED and Cochrane library were searched to identify systematic reviews assessing quality of reporting for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies (OBS). Recommendations and primary endpoints used to assess the quality of reporting were described. Intrinsic quality of reporting was analyzed using an Overall Quality Score for literature Reviews (OQSR). Main evaluation themes were overall quality of reporting (20/58) and reporting of Health-Related Quality Of Life (HRQOL) in RCTs (7/58). Reporting recommendations used were not detailed in 56.9% of reviews. Insufficient reporting for the methodological description (randomization, blinding details, and allocation concealment) and the rationale for using specific measure of HRQOL were highlighted. OQSR was significantly higher for reviews published between 2010 and 2014 (after the PRISMA Publication), as compared to those published between 1996-2009 (median OQSR 10 (10-11) versus median OQSR 9 (6-10) respectively, p=0.0053). Intrinsic quality of reporting is satisfactory and has been improved in the last years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Do patients want doctors to talk about spirituality? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Megan; Butow, Phyllis; Olver, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic literature review was to ascertain the patient perspective regarding the role of the doctor in the discussion of spirituality. We conducted a systematic search in ten databases from inception to January 2015. Eligible papers reported on original research including patient reports of discussion of spirituality in a medical consultation. Papers were separated into qualitative and quantitative for the purposes of analysis and quality appraisal with QualSyst. Papers were merged for the final synthesis. 54 studies comprising 12,327 patients were included. In the majority of studies over half the sample thought it was appropriate for the doctor to enquire about spiritual needs in at least some circumstances (range 2.1-100%, median 70.5%), but patient preferences were not straightforward. While a majority of patients express interest in discussion of religion and spirituality in medical consultations, there is a mismatch in perception between patients and doctors regarding what constitutes this discussion and therefore whether it has taken place. This review demonstrated that many patients have a strong interest in discussing spirituality in the medical consultation. Doctors should endeavor to identify which patients would welcome such conversations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Heart rate variability and the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Melanie I; Tulppo, Mikko P; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Petrella, Robert J

    2014-11-01

    A number of cross-sectional studies have examined associations between heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome, but differences in study populations, data collection and analysis methodologies make synthesis difficult. The purpose of this study was to systematically review published primary research examining associations between heart rate variability and metabolic syndrome or its individual risk factors. A systematic literature search of PubMed and EMBASE was conducted to identify relevant articles published from January 1999 to December 2012. Studies were included if they examined associations between heart rate variability analysed by standard protocols and metabolic syndrome risk factors according to published definitions. All papers were scored with a modified Downs and Black instrument, and data were extracted. Fourteen studies were included. Heart rate variability generally was reduced in women with metabolic syndrome compared to those without, while results in men were inconsistent. Time and frequency domain heart rate variability parameters were associated with individual metabolic syndrome risk factors, though sex differences exist. Only two studies considered nonlinear and Poincaré plot heart rate variability parameters, which were reduced in metabolic syndrome. Heart rate variability is altered differently in men and women with metabolic syndrome. Future studies should follow consistent heart rate variability analysis protocols and metabolic syndrome definitions and include more comprehensive analyses to investigate potential mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Challenges to driver licensing participation for Aboriginal people in Australia: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Patricia; Clapham, Kathleen; Hunter, Kate; Treacy, Rebekah; Ivers, Rebecca

    2016-08-31

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in transport-related morbidity and mortality. Low rates of licensure in Aboriginal communities and households have been identified as a contributor to high rates of unlicensed driving. There is increasing recognition that Aboriginal people experience challenges and adversity in attaining a licence. This systematic review aims to identify the barriers to licence participation among Aboriginal people in Australia. A systematic search of electronic databases and purposive sampling of grey literature was conducted, two authors independently assessed publications for eligibility for inclusion. Twelve publications were included in this review, of which there were 11 reporting primary research (qualitative and mixed methods) and a practitioner report. Barriers identified were categorised as individual and family barriers or systemic barriers relating to the justice system, graduated driver licensing (GDL) and service provision. A model is presented that depicts the barriers within a cycle of licensing adversity. There is an endemic lack of licensing access for Aboriginal people that relates to financial hardship, unmet cultural needs and an inequitable system. This review recommends targeting change at the systemic level, including a review of proof of identification and fines enforcement policy, diversionary programs and increased provision for people experiencing financial hardship. This review positions licensing within the context of barriers to social inclusion that Aboriginal people frequently encounter. Equitable access to licensing urgently requires policy reform and service provision that is inclusive, responsive to the cultural needs of Aboriginal people and accessible to regional and remote communities.

  3. Air Pollution and Otitis Media in Children: A Systematic Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayan Bowatte

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Young children are particularly vulnerable to otitis media (OM which globally affects over 80% of children below the age of 3 years. Although there is convincing evidence for an association between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and OM in children, the relationship with ambient air pollution is not clear. We aimed to systematically review the literature on the relationship between ambient air pollution exposure and OM in children. A systematic search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE databases. Of 934 references identified, 24 articles were included. There is an increasing body of evidence supporting an association between higher ambient air pollution exposure and a higher risk of OM in children. While NO2 showed the most consistent association with OM, other specific pollutants showed inconsistent associations. Studies were mainly conducted in high/middle income countries with limited evidence from low-income countries. Although there was a general consensus that higher air pollution exposure is associated with a greater prevalence of OM, the evidence for associations with specific pollutants is inconsistent. More well-designed studies on associations between specific air pollutants as risk factors for OM are warranted, especially in low income countries with high air pollution levels.

  4. Collaborative work as a didactic strategy for teaching/learning programming: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Revelo-Sanchez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of Collaborative Work into programming courses has been identified as a potential strategy that could maximize student participation and have a positive impact on learning. In the consulted sources, no study has been found to collect and analyze the results of research on this subject using a systematic method. To try to fill this gap, a systematic literature review was conducted with the aim of summarizing the studies on the use of Collaborative Work as a didactic strategy for teaching/learning programming. Initially, through a search in four (4 databases of scientific publications, 95 studies published in the last five (5 years were obtained. After careful analysis of each one of them, only 40 were found to meet the review requirements. This analysis resulted in the synthesis of eleven (11 Collaborative Learning Techniques (CLT that implement such strategy. Subsequently, they were grouped into 19 common names of strategies found in the documents, i.e. the collaborative strategies or techniques associated with each study. The review also showed a significant amount of contributions from the research community that constitute an important basis for future work. This demonstrates that Collaborative Work is increasingly consolidated as a valid and relevant didactic strategy, not only in programming teaching/learning, but also in other areas of knowledge including computer science.

  5. Pinch and Elbow Extension Restoration in People With Tetraplegia: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamou, Cynthia; Shah, Nirav R.; DiPonio, Lisa; Curtin, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We conducted a systematic review of the literature to summarize the available data on reconstructive surgeries involving pinch reconstruction and elbow extension restoration in people with tetraplegia. Methods English-language and French-language articles and abstracts published between 1966 and February 2007, identified through MEDLINE and EMBASE searches, bibliography review, and expert consultation, were reviewed for original reports of outcomes with pinch reconstruction and elbow extension restoration in tetraplegic patients after a spinal cord injury. Two reviewers independently extracted data on patient characteristics, surgical methods, and patient outcomes. Results Our search identified 765 articles, of which 37 met eligibility criteria (one article contained information on both elbow and pinch procedures). Results from 377 pinch reconstructions in 23 studies and 201 elbow extension restorations in 14 studies were summarized. The mean Medical Research Council score for elbow extension went from 0 to 3.3 after reconstruction. The overall mean postoperative strength measured after surgery for pinch reconstruction was 2 kg. Conclusions More than 500 patients having these procedures experienced a clinically important improvement for both procedures—one restoring elbow extension, and the other, pinch strength. Upper-limb surgeries markedly improved the hand function of people with tetraplegia. Type of study/level of evidence Therapeutic IV. PMID:19345872

  6. A systematic review of the literature on cystodistension in bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Louise E; Dyer, James E; Haq, Ahsanul; Ockrim, Jeremy; Greenwell, Tamsin J

    2018-02-01

    There is significant variability in technique for cystodistension and an international discrepancy in the role in its treatment of bladder pain syndrome (BPS). The authors evaluate the evidence base for the use of cystodistension for BPS with particular reference to patient-related outcomes. In accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis statement, a prospective search and evaluation protocol was prepared and registered with the PROSPERO database (ID CRD42017053710). A review of the literature was performed using the search terms cystodistension and hydrodistension of the bladder using the PubMed database on 6 October 2016. A total of 59 papers were reviewed, but only 17 studies contained original data available for analysis from 1975 to 2016. Ten studies evaluated the outcome of cystodistension in a single arm design or used cystodistension as the control for evaluating adjunctive treatments. Seven studies evaluated cystodistension in combination with other agents or therapies. The best symptomatic responses reported a subjective improvement in 56% of men with moderate to severe prostatitis and 57% in patients with "inflammatory cystitis" respectively. There were no studies that employed a validated outcome measure, neither a questionnaire nor an analogue scale, to assess the effect of cystodistension alone. Cystodistension is increasingly popular, despite a weak evidence base by current standards. The quality of available evidence falls below the level that would be expected of a new intervention. This review highlights the need for cystodistension to be further investigated with randomised control trials.

  7. Preferences of cancer patients regarding communication of bad news: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Maiko; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2009-04-01

    Most physicians regard the communication of bad news to be a difficult issue in clinical oncology practice. The optimal manner of communicating bad news to patients so that physicians can create maximal understanding in patients and facilitate their psychological adjustment is unknown. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to clarify available knowledge on patient preferences regarding the communication of bad news and associated factors. A comprehensive computer search of databases (MEDLINE and PsychINFO) and a manual search identified 24 studies. The above issue has been discussed mainly in Western countries. Most studies used different measures to obtain information on patient preferences and have provided mostly descriptive evidence. The findings in this review suggest that patient preferences with regard to the communication of bad news by physicians consist of four components: setting, manner of communicating bad news, what and how much information is provided and emotional support, and that patients' preferences are associated with demographic factors. Younger patients, female patients and more highly educated patients consistently expressed a desire to receive as much detailed information as possible and to receive emotional support. Asian patients were shown to prefer that relatives be present when receiving bad news more than Westerners do and to prefer to discuss their life expectancy less than Westerners. Physicians need to recognize these preferences to help patients understand.

  8. Allied health assistants and what they do: A systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucylynn Lizarondo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Lucylynn Lizarondo1, Saravana Kumar1, Lisa Hyde2, Dawn Skidmore21International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide; 2South Australian Health Allied and Scientific Health Office, Adelaide, AustraliaObjective: Allied health assistants (AHAs are an emerging group in allied health practice with the potential to improve quality of care and safety of patients. This systematic review summarizes the evidence regarding the roles and responsibilities of AHAs and describes the benefits and barriers to utilizing AHAs in current health care settings.Methods: A systematic process of literature searching was undertaken. A search strategy which included a range of electronic databases was searched using key terms. Studies which examined the roles and responsibilities of AHAs (across all allied health disciplines were included in the review. Only publications written in the English language were considered, with no restriction on publication date. Two reviewers independently assessed eligibility of the articles. Data extraction was performed by the same reviewers. A narrative summary of findings was presented.Results: Of the initial 415 papers, 10 studies were included in the review. The majority of papers reported roles performed by general health care assistants or rehabilitation assistants who work in multiple settings or are not specifically affiliated to a health discipline. All ­current AHAs duties have elements of direct patient care and indirect support via clerical and ­administrative or housekeeping tasks. Benefits from the introduction of the AHA role in health care include improved clinical outcomes, increased patient satisfaction, higher-level services, and more “free” time for allied health professionals to concentrate on patients with complex needs. ­Barriers to the use of AHAs are related to blurred role boundaries, which raises issues associated with professional status and

  9. Assessing the Economics of Dengue: Results from a Systematic Review of the Literature and Expert Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constenla, Dagna; Garcia, Cristina; Lefcourt, Noah

    2015-11-01

    The economics of dengue is complex and multifaceted. We performed a systematic review of the literature to provide a critical overview of the issues related to dengue economics research and to form a background with which to address the question of cost. Three literature databases were searched [PubMed, Embase and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS)], covering a period from 1980 to 2013, to identify papers meeting preset inclusion criteria. Studies were reviewed for methodological quality on the basis of a quality checklist developed for this purpose. An expert survey was designed to identify priority areas in dengue economics research and to identify gaps between the methodology and actual practice. Survey responses were combined with the literature review findings to determine stakeholder priorities in dengue economics research. The review identified over 700 papers. Forty-two of these papers met the selection criteria. The studies that were reviewed presented results from 32 dengue-endemic countries, underscoring the importance of dengue as a global public health problem. Cost analyses were the most common, with 21 papers, followed by nine cost-effectiveness analyses and seven cost-of-illness studies, indicating a relatively strong mix of methodologies. Dengue annual overall costs (in 2010 values) ranged from US$13.5 million (in Nicaragua) to $56 million (in Malaysia), showing cost variations across countries. Little consistency exists in the way costs were estimated and dengue interventions evaluated, making generalizations around costs difficult. The current evidence suggests that dengue costs are substantial because of the cost of hospital care and lost earnings. Further research in this area will broaden our understanding of the true economic impact of dengue.

  10. International clinical placements for Australian undergraduate nursing students: A systematic thematic synthesis of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Fetherston, Catherine M; Medigovich, Kristina

    2015-10-01

    International clinical placements provide undergraduate nursing students with the opportunity to experience or practice nursing care in diverse countries, settings, and cultures. This systematic review aims to ascertain the current knowledge on international clinical placements offered by undergraduate nursing programs in Australia. It seeks to explore three questions: (1) How have previous experiences of nursing students' international clinical placements been described? (2) How have participants and stakeholders determined if the placement has been successful? And (3) What benefits or challenges have been identified by stakeholders as a result of participating in international clinical placements? A systematic thematic synthesis was undertaken. A search of electronic databases including CINAHL, Proquest Central, Scopus, PubMed, and Health Collection was undertaken between September and October 2014. Key terms including 'international clinical placement', 'study abroad', 'international exchange', 'nursing', and 'Australia' were used to identify articles that appeared in peer-reviewed English language journals and that explored international clinical placements offered to undergraduate nursing students by Australian universities. Eight studies were identified that meet the inclusion criteria, and through thematic analysis, five key themes were identified including developing cultural awareness and competence, providing a global perspective on health care, translation of theory to practice, growing personally through reflection, and overcoming apprehension to successfully meet the challenge. A comparison search of literature from Canada and the United Kingdom revealed that similar themes occurred internationally. Although personal successes were identified by students undertaking international clinical placement, further research is required to identify all stakeholder experiences including those of the educators, the educational institutions, and travel providers

  11. What motivates medical students to select medical studies: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sonu; Angeli, Federica; Dhirar, Nonita; Singla, Neetu; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2018-01-17

    There is a significant shortage of health workers across and within countries. It is of utmost importance to determine the factors that motivate students to opt for medical studies. The objective of this study is to group and review all the studies that investigated the motivational factors that underpin students' selection of medical study in recent years. The literature search was carried out by two researchers independently in PubMed, Google Scholar, Wiley and IndMED databases for articles published from year 2006 till 2016. A total of 38 combinations of MeSH words were used for search purpose. Studies related to medical students and interns have been included. The application of inclusion and exclusion criteria and PRISMA guidelines for reporting systematic review led to the final selection of 24 articles. The majority of the studies (n = 16; 66.6%) were from high-income countries followed by an equal number from upper-middle and lower-middle income countries (n = 4,16.7%). None of the studies were from low-income countries. All of the studies were cross-sectional in nature. The main motivating factors that emerged were scientific (interest in science / medicine, social interest and academia, flexible work hours and work independence), societal (prestige, job security, financial security) and humanitarian (serving the poor and under priviledged) in high-, upper-middle and lower-middle income countries, respectively. The findings were comparable to Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory of motivation. This systematic review identifies the motivational factors influencing students to join medical studies in different parts of the globe. These factors vary per country depending on the level of income. This study offers cues to policy makers and educators to formulate policy in order to tackle the shortage of health workers, i.e. medical doctors. However, more research is needed to translate health policy into concrete and effective measures.

  12. What value is the CINAHL database when searching for systematic reviews of qualitative studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kath; Golder, Su; Lewis-Light, Kate

    2015-06-26

    The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) is generally thought to be a good source to search when conducting a review of qualitative evidence. Case studies have suggested that using CINAHL could be essential for reviews of qualitative studies covering topics in the nursing field, but it is unclear whether this can be extended more generally to reviews of qualitative studies in other topic areas. We carried out a retrospective analysis of a sample of systematic reviews of qualitative studies to investigate CINAHL's potential contribution to identifying the evidence. In particular, we planned to identify the percentage of included studies available in CINAHL and the percentage of the included studies unique to the CINAHL database. After screening 58 qualitative systematic reviews identified from the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), we created a sample set of 43 reviews covering a range of topics including patient experience of both illnesses and interventions. For all 43 reviews (21 %) in our sample, we found that some of the included studies were available in CINAHL. For nine of these reviews, all the studies that had been included in the final synthesis were available in the CINAHL database, so it could have been possible to identify all the included studies using just this one database, while for an additional 21 reviews (49 %), 80 % or more of the included studies were available in CINAHL. Consequently, for a total of 30 reviews, or 70 % of our sample, 80 % or more of the studies could be identified using CINAHL alone. 11 reviews, where we were able to recheck all the databases used by the original review authors, had included a study that was uniquely identified from the CINAHL database. The median % of unique studies was 9.09%; while the range had a lowest value of 5.0% to the highest value of 33.0%. [corrected]. Assuming a rigorous search strategy was used and the records sought were accurately indexed, we could

  13. Living with Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Qualitative Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Laura E; Coward, Stephanie; Lorenzetti, Diane L; MacKean, Gail; Clement, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims . The lived experience of HCV has not been well documented in the literature. The aim of this systematic review was to understand the experiences of living with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Methods . Five databases were searched from inception until January 19, 2015. Studies were included if they focused on adults diagnosed with HCV; reported experience living with HCV; and described original research. Results . 46 studies were included. Studies found that participants had reduced quality of life due to physical symptoms. Due to physical symptoms and discrimination, many participants switched to part-time work or quit their jobs. Many individuals reported negative experiences with the healthcare system; themes of feeling unsupported, not having adequate information, and not feeling involved in decisions were reported. Stigma significantly impacted those living with HCV. Conclusions . Published literature indicates that those with HCV often feel stigmatized and unsupported in their care, relationships, and work environments, while simultaneously coping with physical and psychological symptoms. This synthesis points to areas where greater education, compassion, and patient-centered healthcare could improve the experience of people living with HCV.

  14. Living with Hepatitis C Virus: A Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis of Qualitative Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Dowsett

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The lived experience of HCV has not been well documented in the literature. The aim of this systematic review was to understand the experiences of living with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV. Methods. Five databases were searched from inception until January 19, 2015. Studies were included if they focused on adults diagnosed with HCV; reported experience living with HCV; and described original research. Results. 46 studies were included. Studies found that participants had reduced quality of life due to physical symptoms. Due to physical symptoms and discrimination, many participants switched to part-time work or quit their jobs. Many individuals reported negative experiences with the healthcare system; themes of feeling unsupported, not having adequate information, and not feeling involved in decisions were reported. Stigma significantly impacted those living with HCV. Conclusions. Published literature indicates that those with HCV often feel stigmatized and unsupported in their care, relationships, and work environments, while simultaneously coping with physical and psychological symptoms. This synthesis points to areas where greater education, compassion, and patient-centered healthcare could improve the experience of people living with HCV.

  15. Injuries in judo: a systematic literature review including suggestions for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocecco, Elena; Ruedl, Gerhard; Stankovic, Nemanja; Sterkowicz, Stanislaw; Del Vecchio, Fabricio Boscolo; Gutiérrez-García, Carlos; Rousseau, Romain; Wolf, Mirjam; Kopp, Martin; Miarka, Bianca; Menz, Verena; Krüsmann, Philipp; Calmet, Michel; Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Burtscher, Martin

    2013-12-01

    There is limited knowledge on epidemiological injury data in judo. To systematically review scientific literature on the frequency and characteristics of injuries in judo. The available literature up to June 2013 was searched for prospective as well as retrospective studies on injuries in judo. Data extraction and presentation focused on the incidence rate, injury risk, types, location and causes of injuries. During the Olympic Games in 2008 and 2012, an average injury risk of about 11-12% has been observed. Sprains, strains and contusions, usually of the knee, shoulder and fingers, were the most frequently reported injuries, whereas being thrown was the most common injury mechanism. Severe injuries were quite rare and usually affected the brain and spine, whereas chronic injuries typically affected the finger joints, lower back and ears. The most common types of injuries in young judo athletes were contusions/abrasions, fractures and sprains/strains. Sex-differences data on judo injuries were mostly inconsistent. Some studies suggested a relationship between nutrition, hydration and/or weight cycling and judo injuries. Also, psychological factors may increase the risk of judo injuries. The present review provides the latest knowledge on the frequency and characteristics of injuries in judo. Comprehensive knowledge about the risk of injury during sport activity and related risk factors represents an essential basis to develop effective strategies for injury prevention. Thus, the introduction of an ongoing injury surveillance system in judo is of utmost importance.

  16. Intravenous immunoglobulins for refractory status epilepticus, part I: A scoping systematic review of the adult literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, F A; Matuszczak, M; Teitelbaum, J; Kazina, C J; Gillman, L M

    2017-02-01

    Our goal was to perform a scoping systematic review of the literature on the use of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) for refractory status epilepticus (RSE) in adults. Articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Healthstar, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, clinicaltrials.gov (inception to May 2016), reference lists of relevant articles, and gray literature were searched. The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and GRADE methodology by two independent reviewers. Twenty-four original articles were identified. A total of 33 adult patients were described as receiving IVIG for RSE. Seizure reduction/control with IVIG occurred in 15 of the 33 patients (45.4%), with 1 (3.0%) and 14 (42.4%) displaying partial and complete responses respectively. No adverse events were recorded. Oxford level 4, GRADE D evidence exists to suggest an unclear impact of IVIG therapy in adult RSE. Routine use of IVIG in adult RSE cannot be recommended at this time. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Core stability exercises for low back pain in athletes: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Kent J; Bruno, Paul; Sajko, Sandy; Hayden, Jill A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the evidence for the effectiveness of core stability exercises for treating athletes with low back pain (LBP). We searched several databases (Medline, AMED, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and EMBASE). Our eligibility criteria consisted of articles published in a peer-reviewed journal in English, using any prospective clinical study design, where athletes with nonspecific LBP were treated with core stability exercises in at least 1 study arm, and back pain intensity and/or disability were used as outcome measures. All included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool, whereas non-RCT studies were assessed for quality using the Downs and Black checklist. Five studies including 151 participants met the inclusion criteria, including 2 RCTs. The quality of the literature on this topic was deemed to be low overall, with only 1 non-RCT having a moderate quality score, and 1 RCT having a lower risk of bias. Four studies reported statistically significant decreases in back pain intensity in their core stability intervention group. The quantity and quality of literature on the use of core stability exercises for treating LBP in athletes is low. The existing evidence has been conducted on small and heterogeneous study populations using interventions that vary drastically with only mixed results and short-term follow-up. This precludes the formulation of strong conclusions, and additional high quality research is clearly needed.

  18. 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in pregnancy: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Laura G; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2011-07-01

    To summarize the literature regarding 2009 H1N1 influenza A during pregnancy, we conducted a systematic literature review using a PubMed search and other strategies. Studies were included if they reported 2009 H1N1 influenza in pregnant women as original data. In all, 2153 abstracts were reviewed, and a total of 120 studies were included. Data were extracted regarding number of cases, additional risk factors for influenza-associated complications, treatment, and maternal and pregnancy outcomes. Authors were contacted to determine the extent of overlap when it was suspected. Pregnancy was associated with increased risk of hospital and intensive care unit admission and of death. Pregnant women who received delayed treatment with neuraminidase inhibitors or who had additional risk factors were more likely to develop severe disease. Preterm and emergency cesarean deliveries were frequently reported. These results reinforce the importance of early identification and treatment of suspected influenza in this high-risk population. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Training of nurses in point-of-care testing: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liikanen, Eeva; Lehto, Liisa

    2013-08-01

    To review and describe the training of nurses in point-of care testing. Point-of-care tests are usually carried out by nurses. They are used in many healthcare units. Through training, nurses are able to improve their competence in performing point-of-care testing. Systematic review. A literature search of electronic data was undertaken in autumn 2011 using CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Medline (Ovid) and Scopus databases. From the available literature, six specific initiatives were analysed. The studies were performed on three continents and in five healthcare settings. The three interventions were related to glucose point-of-care testing. The training approaches involved seven aspects. The interventions were diverse, broad and multifaceted, but they appeared to be successful. The strength of the interventions lay in the involvement of laboratory staff. Quantitative synthesis of the data was not undertaken because of different designs for the studies. Training can improve nurses' competence, and many methods are available. There are very few studies of training nurses in point-of-care testing, although in-depth descriptions of interventions in different settings would be valuable. Nurses can be trained using a variety of methods in different healthcare settings. To save resources, especially in large hospitals and sparsely populated areas, distance learning is worth considering. However if training is delivered with the support of laboratory professionals, nurses subsequently perform good-quality point-of-care testing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Exploring social dimensions of municipal solid waste management around the globe - A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Hipel, Keith W

    2016-10-01

    Currently, municipal solid waste (MSW) is experiencing a massive increase in both the amount and composition throughout the world. Effective and efficient MSW management has been widely accepted as an emergent factor for future social development, which requires not only technical innovation, but also the involvement of all stakeholders as well as social, economic, and psychological components. On account of this reality, there is an urgent need for research related to the social dimensions of MSW management. In this paper, a systematic literature review was carried out to characterize and critically evaluate the published literature on the social dimensions of MSW management from 1980 to 2014 in terms of vulnerability, public participation, public attitude and behavior, and policy. A keyword search was first performed by using the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science, which retrieves 1843 documents. After removing the papers that were not closely related to the topic, 200 articles were retained for an in-depth review. In each category, major research issues and observations were summarized, and important insights were obtained. Besides compiling a related list of key references, the analysis results indicate that the global distribution of social dimensions reports on MSW management is inequitable and the research on the social dimensions of MSW management is insufficient, which may attract increased research interest and attention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Victims of Terrorist Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz García-Vera, María; Sanz, Jesús; Gutiérrez, Sara

    2016-08-01

    This article was aimed at systematically reviewing the literature on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among victims of terrorist attacks. Electronic and hand searches of the literature identified 35 studies addressing PTSD prevalence based on validated diagnostic interviews. Overall, in the year after terrorist attacks, 33% to 39% of direct victims developed PTSD, whereas the percentage of indirect victims with PTSD was lower (4% in the affected community, 5%-6% among emergency, rescue, and recovery workers, and 17%-29% among relatives and friends of the injured or killed victims), but nonetheless above the prevalence in the general population. With the passing of time, a significant reduction of PTSD can be expected in the affected community and in the emergency and rescue personnel, but not in the injured victims, in the relatives and friends of the injured or killed victims, and in nontraditional, more vulnerable disaster workers. The implications of these results for the psychological treatment of terrorism victims are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. [Surgical treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism: a systematic review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnabosco, Felipe Ferraz; Tavares, Marcos Roberto; Montenegro, Fábio Luiz de Menezes

    2014-07-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) has a high prevalence in renal patients. Secondary HPT results from disturbances in mineral homeostasis, particularly calcium, which stimulates the parathyroid glands, increasing the secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Prolonged stimulation can lead to autonomy in parathyroid function. Initial treatment is clinical, but parathyroidectomy (PTx) may be required. PTx can be subtotal or total followed or not followed by parathyroid tissue autograft. We compared the indications and results of these strategies as shown in the literature through a systematic literature review on surgical treatment of secondary HPT presented in MedLine and LILACS from January 2008 to March 2014. The search terms were: hyperparathyroidism; secondary hyperparathyroidism; parathyroidectomy and parathyroid glands, restricted to research only in humans, articles available in electronic media, published in Portuguese, Spanish, English or French. We selected 49 articles. Subtotal and total PTx followed by parathyroid tissue autograft were the most used techniques, without consensus on the most effective surgical procedure, although there was a preference for the latter. The choice depends on surgeon's experience. There was consensus on the need to identify all parathyroid glands and cryopreservation of parathyroid tissue whenever possible to graft if hypoparathyroidism arise. Imaging studies may be useful, especially in recurrences. Alternative treatments of secondary HPT, both interventional and conservative, require further study.

  3. Diagnostic test systematic reviews: bibliographic search filters ("Clinical Queries") for diagnostic accuracy studies perform well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Monika; Wilczynski, Nancy L; McKibbon, Ann K; Garg, Amit X; Haynes, R Brian

    2009-09-01

    Systematic reviews of health care topics are valuable summaries of all pertinent studies on focused questions. However, finding all relevant primary studies for systematic reviews remains challenging. To determine the performance of the Clinical Queries sensitive search filter for diagnostic accuracy studies for retrieving studies for systematic reviews. We compared the yield of the sensitive Clinical Queries diagnosis search filter for MEDLINE and EMBASE to retrieve studies in diagnostic accuracy systematic reviews reported in ACP Journal Club in 2006. Twelve of 22 diagnostic accuracy reviews (452 included studies) met the inclusion criteria. After excluding 11 studies not in MEDLINE or EMBASE, 95% of articles (417 of 441) were captured by the sensitive Clinical Queries diagnosis search filter (MEDLINE and EMBASE combined). Of 24 studies not retrieved by the filter, 22 were not diagnostic accuracy studies. Reanalysis of the Clinical Queries filter without these 22 nondiagnosis articles increased its performance to 99% (417 of 419). We found no substantive impact of the two articles missed by the Clinical Queries filter on the conclusions of the systematic reviews in which they were cited. The sensitive Clinical Queries diagnostic search filter captured 99% of articles and 100% of substantive articles indexed in MEDLINE and EMBASE in diagnostic accuracy systematic reviews.

  4. Simple elbow dislocations: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Haan (Jeroen); N.W.L. Schep (Niels); P. Patka (Peter); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To identify if functional treatment is the best available treatment for simple elbow dislocations. Search strategy: Electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Selection criteria: Studies were eligible for inclusion if

  5. Medication errors in the Middle East countries: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulami, Zayed; Conroy, Sharon; Choonara, Imti

    2013-04-01

    Medication errors are a significant global concern and can cause serious medical consequences for patients. Little is known about medication errors in Middle Eastern countries. The objectives of this systematic review were to review studies of the incidence and types of medication errors in Middle Eastern countries and to identify the main contributory factors involved. A systematic review of the literature related to medication errors in Middle Eastern countries was conducted in October 2011 using the following databases: Embase, Medline, Pubmed, the British Nursing Index and the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature. The search strategy included all ages and languages. Inclusion criteria were that the studies assessed or discussed the incidence of medication errors and contributory factors to medication errors during the medication treatment process in adults or in children. Forty-five studies from 10 of the 15 Middle Eastern countries met the inclusion criteria. Nine (20 %) studies focused on medication errors in paediatric patients. Twenty-one focused on prescribing errors, 11 measured administration errors, 12 were interventional studies and one assessed transcribing errors. Dispensing and documentation errors were inadequately evaluated. Error rates varied from 7.1 % to 90.5 % for prescribing and from 9.4 % to 80 % for administration. The most common types of prescribing errors reported were incorrect dose (with an incidence rate from 0.15 % to 34.8 % of prescriptions), wrong frequency and wrong strength. Computerised physician rder entry and clinical pharmacist input were the main interventions evaluated. Poor knowledge of medicines was identified as a contributory factor for errors by both doctors (prescribers) and nurses (when administering drugs). Most studies did not assess the clinical severity of the medication errors. Studies related to medication errors in the Middle Eastern countries were relatively few in number and of poor quality

  6. The effect of pacifier sucking on orofacial structures: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Karin Michèle; Kugler, Remo; Nalabothu, Prasad; Bosch, Carles; Verna, Carlalberta

    2018-03-13

    Non-nutritive sucking habits may adversely affect the orofacial complex. This systematic literature review aimed to find scientific evidence on the effect of pacifier sucking on orofacial structures. A search on MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Web of Science databases was conducted to find all pertinent articles published from inception until February 2018, based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The quality of the studies was evaluated using the risk of bias judgements in non-randomized studies of interventions (ROBINS-I). Among the 2288 articles found, 17 articles met the selection criteria: seven prospective cohort studies, nine cross-sectional studies, and one randomized clinical trial. Using ROBINS-I, 12 studies were evaluated to have a serious overall risk of bias and five, a moderate one. These studies claimed a strong association between a pacifier sucking habit and the presence of an anterior open bite and posterior crossbite. Functional/orthodontic pacifiers were shown to cause significantly less open bites than the conventional ones. High level of evidence of the effect of sucking habits on orofacial structures is missing. The available studies show severe or moderate risk of bias; hence, the findings in the literature need to be very carefully evaluated. There is moderate evidence that the use of pacifier is associated with anterior open bite and posterior crossbite, thus affecting the harmonious development of orofacial structures. Functional/orthodontic pacifiers reduce the prevalence of open bite when compared to the conventional ones, but evidence is needed concerning the effects on posterior crossbite. Well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to further analyze the effects of functional/orthodontic and conventional pacifiers on orofacial structures.

  7. Three year experience with the cochlear BAHA attract implant: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis A. Dimitriadis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone conduction devices are widely used and indicated in cases of conductive, mixed or single sided deafness where conventional hearing aids are not indicated or tolerated. Percutaneous bone-conduction devices gave satisfactory hearing outcomes but were frequently complicated by soft tissue reactions. Transcutaneous bone conduction devices were developed in order to address some of the issues related to the skin-penetrating abutment. The aim of this article is to present a systematic review of the indications, surgical technique and audiological, clinical and functional outcomes of the BAHA Attract device reported so far. Methods A systematic computer-based literature search was performed on the PubMed database as well as Scopus, Cochrane and Google Scholar. Out of 497 articles, 10 studies and 89 reported cases were finally included in our review. Results The vast majority of implanted patients were satisfied with the aesthetics of the device scoring highly at the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, Glasgow Benefit Inventory and Client Oriented Scale of Improvement. Overall, hearing outcomes, tested by various means including speech in noise, free field hearing testing and word discrimination scores showed a significant improvement. Complications included seroma or haematoma formation, numbness around the area of the flap, swelling and detachment of the sound processor from the external magnet. Conclusions The functional and audiological results presented so far in the literature have been satisfactory and the complication rate is low compared to the skin penetrating Bone Conduction Devices. Further robust trials will be needed to study the long-term outcomes and any adverse effects.

  8. Does back and neck pain become more common as you get older? A systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fejer René

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally believed that the prevalence of back pain increases with age and as the proportion of elderly will keep rising we may be facing serious public health concerns in the future. Aim The aim of this systematic literature review is to establish whether back pain (i.e. neck, mid-back and/or low back pain becomes increasingly common in the older population, specifically to study 1 whether there is a significant increase in the prevalence of back pain after middle age, and 2 whether there is a significant gradually increasing prevalence of back pain with continued old age. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in Pubmed on articles in English, published between January 2000 and July 2011. Non-clinical studies from the developed countries with prevalence estimates on elderly people (60+ on any type of self-reported back pain and on different age groups with adequate sample sizes were included in the review. The included articles were extracted for information by two independent reviewers. Results A total of 12 articles were included covering the entire spine. Neck pain was studied nine times, low back pain eight times, back pain three times, upper back two times and neck/shoulders once. All studies showed no significant increase of back pain with age, neither when passing from middle age (i.e. 45+ years of age into the sixties, nor later in life. In contrast, most studies reported a decline for the oldest group. Conclusions Back pain is no more common in the elderly population (>60 years when compared to the middle age population. Back pain does not increase with increasing age, but seems to decline in the oldest people.

  9. How economic recessions and unemployment affect illegal drug use: A systematic realist literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Hummel, Karin; de Goeij, Moniek C M; de Vries, Hein; Kaner, Eileen; Lemmens, Paul

    2017-06-01

    Economic recessions may influence illegal drug use via different mechanisms, for example increased use due to more psychological distress or decreased use due to lower incomes and purchasing power. This paper reviews the literature on how economic recessions and unemployment affect the use of illegal drugs among adults. We conducted a systematic realist literature review, which is an explanatory method that aims to understand underlying mechanisms that connect an event to an outcome in a specific context. A systematic search was performed in EconLit, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, SocIndex, and Web of Science for studies examining mechanisms explaining how recessions or unemployment affect illegal drug use. We synthesized 28 studies published between 1990 and 2015. Most evidence (17 studies) was found for the counter-cyclical mechanism that recessions and unemployment increase psychological distress, which increases drug use. Mainly supportive evidence for this mechanism was found in several high quality studies, in different contexts, and in a diverse number of countries and samples. In contrast, decreased income did not seem to decrease drug use (10 studies). Little evidence was available on the non-working time mechanism (4 studies) and the social exclusion mechanism (5 studies). Most of the studies that did examine these latter mechanisms confirmed the hypothesized counter-cyclical associations. The current evidence is in line with the hypothesis that drug use increases in times of recession because unemployment increases psychological distress which increases drug use. During times of recession, psychological support for those who lost their job and are vulnerable to drug use (relapse) is likely to be important. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lean interventions in healthcare: do they actually work? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraros, John; Lemstra, Mark; Nwankwo, Chijioke

    2016-04-01

    Lean is a widely used quality improvement methodology initially developed and used in the automotive and manufacturing industries but recently expanded to the healthcare sector. This systematic literature review seeks to independently assess the effect of Lean or Lean interventions on worker and patient satisfaction, health and process outcomes, and financial costs. We conducted a systematic literature review of Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Web of Science, ABI/Inform, ERIC, EMBASE and SCOPUS. Peer reviewed articles were included if they examined a Lean intervention and included quantitative data. Methodological quality was assessed using validated critical appraisal checklists. Publically available data collected by the Saskatchewan Health Quality Council and the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses were also analysed and reported separately. Data on design, methods, interventions and key outcomes were extracted and collated. Our electronic search identified 22 articles that passed methodological quality review. Among the accepted studies, 4 were exclusively concerned with health outcomes, 3 included both health and process outcomes and 15 included process outcomes. Our study found that Lean interventions have: (i) no statistically significant association with patient satisfaction and health outcomes; (ii) a negative association with financial costs and worker satisfaction and (iii) potential, yet inconsistent, benefits on process outcomes like patient flow and safety. While some may strongly believe that Lean interventions lead to quality improvements in healthcare, the evidence to date simply does not support this claim. More rigorous, higher quality and better conducted scientific research is required to definitively ascertain the impact and effectiveness of Lean in healthcare settings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care.

  11. Health issues of female foreign domestic workers: a systematic review of the scientific and gray literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Rahul; Arambepola, Chandima; Tarun, Samiksha; de Silva, Vijitha; Kishore, Jugal; Østbye, Truls

    2013-01-01

    Although the number of female foreign domestic workers (FDWs) is increasing worldwide, little is known about their health issues. To systematically review the literature on health issues of female FDWs to ascertain the problems studied, identify limitations, and suggest future research and policy implications. A systematic database (PubMed, EBSCO Host, and Google Scholar) and bibliographic search identified the English-language scientific and gray literature published during 1990-2012 addressing health issues of female FDWs living with the family of the employer, using qualitative and/or quantitative research methods. Studies in which female FDWs constituted less than half of the participants were excluded. The health issues studied and identified were adverse work conditions and associated health problems (such as physical, verbal, and sexual abuse at the workplace, caregiving tasks associated with musculoskeletal strain, and chemical exposure associated with respiratory difficulty), mental health (psychotic, neurotic, and mood disorders), infectious diseases (most of the studies were on intestinal parasitic infections), and health knowledge/attitudes/practices (most of the studies were in context of sexual and reproductive health). Most of the studies were medical record reviews or questionnaire-based surveys utilizing convenience sampling or qualitative interviews/focus group discussions. Female FDWs face numerous health problems. Studies on representative, possibly longitudinal, samples of female FDWs focusing on specific health conditions are needed to better understand the epidemiology of such conditions. Concerted efforts through the governments of both labor-sending and host countries are required to improve the health, work conditions, and safety of this vulnerable group of women.

  12. Three year experience with the cochlear BAHA attract implant: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Panagiotis A; Farr, Matthew R; Allam, Ahmed; Ray, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Bone conduction devices are widely used and indicated in cases of conductive, mixed or single sided deafness where conventional hearing aids are not indicated or tolerated. Percutaneous bone-conduction devices gave satisfactory hearing outcomes but were frequently complicated by soft tissue reactions. Transcutaneous bone conduction devices were developed in order to address some of the issues related to the skin-penetrating abutment. The aim of this article is to present a systematic review of the indications, surgical technique and audiological, clinical and functional outcomes of the BAHA Attract device reported so far. A systematic computer-based literature search was performed on the PubMed database as well as Scopus, Cochrane and Google Scholar. Out of 497 articles, 10 studies and 89 reported cases were finally included in our review. The vast majority of implanted patients were satisfied with the aesthetics of the device scoring highly at the Abbreviated Profile of Hearing Aid Benefit, Glasgow Benefit Inventory and Client Oriented Scale of Improvement. Overall, hearing outcomes, tested by various means including speech in noise, free field hearing testing and word discrimination scores showed a significant improvement. Complications included seroma or haematoma formation, numbness around the area of the flap, swelling and detachment of the sound processor from the external magnet. The functional and audiological results presented so far in the literature have been satisfactory and the complication rate is low compared to the skin penetrating Bone Conduction Devices. Further robust trials will be needed to study the long-term outcomes and any adverse effects.

  13. Removal of Hardware After Syndesmotic Screw Fixation: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Kempland C; Hofmann, Kurt J; Velasco, Brian T; Kwon, John Y

    2017-06-01

    While trans-syndesmotic fixation with metal screws is considered the gold standard in treating syndesmotic injuries, controversy exists regarding the need and timing of postoperative screw removal. Formal recommendations have not been well established in the literature and clinical practice is highly variable in this regard. The purpose of this systematic review is to critically examine the most recent literature regarding syndesmotic screw removal in order to provide surgeons an evidence-based approach to management of these injuries. The Cochrane Library and PubMed Medline databases were explored using search terms for syndesmosis and screw removal between October 1, 2010 and June 1, 2016. A total of 9 studies (1 randomized controlled trial and 8 retrospective cohort studies) were found that described the outcomes of either retained or removed syndesmotic screws. Overall, there was no difference in functional, clinical or radiographic outcomes in patients who had their syndesmotic screw removed. There was a higher likelihood of recurrent syndesmotic diastasis when screws were removed between 6 and 8 weeks. There was a higher rate of postoperative infections when syndesmotic screws were removed without administering preoperative antibiotics. Removal of syndesmotic screws is advisable mainly in cases of patient complaints related to the other implanted perimalleolar hardware or malreduction of the syndesmosis after at least 8 weeks postoperatively. Broken or loose screws should not be removed routinely unless causing symptoms. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended on removal. Radiographs should be routinely obtained immediately prior to removal and formal discussions should be had with patients prior to surgery to discuss management options if a broken screw is unexpectedly encountered intraoperatively. Radiographs and/or computed tomography imaging should be obtained after syndesmotic screw removal when indicated for known syndesmotic malreduction. Level IV

  14. Ginseng for health care: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials in Korean literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiae Choi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This systematic review was performed to summarise randomised clinical trials (RCTs assessing the efficacy and safety of ginseng in the Korean literature. METHOD: The study involved systematic searches conducted in eight Korean Medical databases. The methodological quality of all of the included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. We included all RCTs on any type of ginseng compared to placebo, active treatment or no treatment in healthy individuals or patients regardless of conditions. RESULTS: In total, 1415 potentially relevant studies were identified, and 30 randomised clinical trials were included. Nine RCTs assessed the effects of ginseng on exercise capacity, cognitive performance, somatic symptoms, quality of life, and sleeping in healthy persons. Six RCTs tested ginseng compared with placebo for erectile dysfunction, while another four studies evaluated the effects of ginseng against no treatment for gastric and colon cancer. Two RCTs compared the effect of red ginseng on diabetes mellitus with no treatment or placebo, and the other nine RCTs assessed the effects of ginseng compared with placebo or no treatment on various conditions. The methodological caveats of the included trials make their contribution to the current clinical evidence of ginseng somewhat limited. However, the 20 newly added trials (66.7% of the 30 trials may provide useful information for future trials. Ginseng appears to be generally safe, and no serious adverse effects have been reported. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical effects of ginseng have been tested in a wide range of conditions in Korea. Although the quality of RCTs published in the Korean literature was generally poor, this review is useful for researchers to access studies that were originally published in languages that they would otherwise be unable to read and due to the paucity of evidence on this subject.

  15. Brazilian academic search filter: application to the scientific literature on physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Valero, Javier; Ferreira, Marcos Santos; Castiel, Luis David; Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Guilam, Maria Cristina Rodrigues

    2010-10-01

    To develop a search filter in order to retrieve scientific publications on physical activity from Brazilian academic institutions. The academic search filter consisted of the descriptor "exercise" associated through the term AND, to the names of the respective academic institutions, which were connected by the term OR. The MEDLINE search was performed with PubMed on 11/16/2008. The institutions were selected according to the classification from the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) for interuniversity agreements. A total of 407 references were retrieved, corresponding to about 0.9% of all articles about physical activity and 0.5% of the Brazilian academic publications indexed in MEDLINE on the search date. When compared with the manual search undertaken, the search filter (descriptor + institutional filter) showed a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 100%. The institutional search filter showed high sensitivity and specificity, and is applicable to other areas of knowledge in health sciences. It is desirable that every Brazilian academic institution establish its "standard name/brand" in order to efficiently retrieve their scientific literature.

  16. Epidemiology of bruxism in adults: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Daniele; Winocur, Ephraim; Guarda-Nardini, Luca; Paesani, Daniel; Lobbezoo, Frank

    2013-01-01

    To perform a systematic review of the literature dealing with the prevalence of bruxism in adult populations. A systematic search of the medical literature was performed to identify all peer-reviewed English-language papers dealing with the prevalence assessment of either awake or sleep bruxism at the general population level by the adoption of questionnaires, clinical assessments, and polysomnographic (PSG) or electromyographic (EMG) recordings. Quality assessment of the reviewed papers was performed according to the Methodological evaluation of Observational REsearch (MORE) checklist, which enables the identification of flaws in the external and internal validity. Cut-off criteria for an acceptable external validity were established to select studies for the discussion of prevalence data. For each included study, the sample features, diagnostic strategy, and prevalence of bruxism in relation to age, sex, and circadian rhythm, if available, were recorded. Thirty-five publications were included in the review. Several methodological problems limited the external validity of findings in most studies, and prevalence data extraction was performed only on seven papers. Of those, only one paper had a flaw less external validity, whilst internal validity was low in all the selected papers due to their self-reported bruxism diagnosis alone, mainly based on only one or two questionnaire items. No epidemiologic data were available from studies adopting other diagnostic strategies (eg, PSG, EMG). Generically identified "bruxism" was assessed in two studies reporting an 8% to 31.4% prevalence, awake bruxism was investigated in two studies describing a 22.1% to 31% prevalence, and prevalence of sleep bruxism was found to be more consistent across the three studies investigating the report of "frequent" bruxism (12.8% ± 3.1%). Bruxism activities were found to be unrelated to sex, and a decrease with age was described in elderly people. The present systematic review described

  17. Central sensitization in urogynecological chronic pelvic pain: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Serap; Hermans, Linda; Willems, Tine; Roussel, Nathalie; Meeus, Mira

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a complex pain syndrome. Since its pathogenesis is still poorly understood and structural alterations in pain related brain regions may be present, there is a greater acceptance that sensitization of the central nervous system (CNS) plays an important role in the development and maintenance of chronicity. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the scientific evidence regarding central sensitization (CS) in female patients with urogynecological CPP. Systematic review of the literature. A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and Web of Science using different keyword combinations related to urogynecological CPP and central sensitization. Full text clinical reports addressing CS in adult women with urogynecological CPP were included and assessed for methodological quality by 2 independent reviewers. After screening for the eligibility, a total of 29 full-text articles with low to good methodological quality were retained. All studies were observational, 27 of which were case-control and 2 of which were cohorts. Sensitivity of the CNS was investigated by using a variety of methods. Although different central mechanisms seem to be involved in pain processing, the present evidence suggests hyperexcitability of the CNS in patients with urogynecological CPP. Altered brain morphology and function, generalized hyperalgesia to different type of stimuli, overactive bottom-up nociceptive mechanisms, and autonomic dysregulation were established in patients with urogynecological CPP. Nevertheless, diffuse noxious inhibitory control seemed normal, and therefore the contribution of an impaired endogenous pain inhibition mechanism to CPP requires further study. The same goes for the contribution of psychological factors. The level of evidence of retained studies is low due to the observational study designs and a wide range of diagnoses and assessment methods. Although the majority of the literature provides evidence for

  18. How Well Is Quality Improvement Described in the Perioperative Care Literature? A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emma L.; Lees, Nicholas; Martin, Graham; Dixon-Woods, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Quality improvement (QI) approaches are widely used across health care, but how well they are reported in the academic literature is not clear. A systematic review was conducted to assess the completeness of reporting of QI interventions and techniques in the field of perioperative care. Methods Searches were conducted using Medline, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organization of Care database, and PubMed. Two independent reviewers used the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist, which identifies 12 features of interventions that studies should describe (for example, How: the interventions were delivered [e.g., face to face, internet]), When and how much: duration, dose, intensity), to assign scores for each included article. Articles were also scored against a small number of additional criteria relevant to QI. Results The search identified 16,103 abstracts from databases and 19 from other sources. Following review, full-text was obtained for 223 articles, 100 of which met the criteria for inclusion. Completeness of reporting of QI in the perioperative care literature was variable. Only one article was judged fully complete against the 11 TIDieR items used. The mean TIDieR score across the 100 included articles was 6.31 (of a maximum 11). More than a third (35%) of the articles scored 5 or lower. Particularly problematic was reporting of fidelity (absent in 74% of articles) and whether any modifications were made to the intervention (absent in 73% of articles). Conclusions The standard of reporting of quality interventions and QI techniques in surgery is often suboptimal, making it difficult to determine whether an intervention can be replicated and used to deliver a positive effect in another setting. This suggests a need to explore how reporting practices could be improved. PMID:27066922

  19. A systematic literature review of open source software quality assessment models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewumi, Adewole; Misra, Sanjay; Omoregbe, Nicholas; Crawford, Broderick; Soto, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Many open source software (OSS) quality assessment models are proposed and available in the literature. However, there is little or no adoption of these models in practice. In order to guide the formulation of newer models so they can be acceptable by practitioners, there is need for clear discrimination of the existing models based on their specific properties. Based on this, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic literature review to investigate the properties of the existing OSS quality assessment models by classifying them with respect to their quality characteristics, the methodology they use for assessment, and their domain of application so as to guide the formulation and development of newer models. Searches in IEEE Xplore, ACM, Science Direct, Springer and Google Search is performed so as to retrieve all relevant primary studies in this regard. Journal and conference papers between the year 2003 and 2015 were considered since the first known OSS quality model emerged in 2003. A total of 19 OSS quality assessment model papers were selected. To select these models we have developed assessment criteria to evaluate the quality of the existing studies. Quality assessment models are classified into five categories based on the quality characteristics they possess namely: single-attribute, rounded category, community-only attribute, non-community attribute as well as the non-quality in use models. Our study reflects that software selection based on hierarchical structures is found to be the most popular selection method in the existing OSS quality assessment models. Furthermore, we found that majority (47%) of the existing models do not specify any domain of application. In conclusion, our study will be a valuable contribution to the community and helps the quality assessment model developers in formulating newer models and also to the practitioners (software evaluators) in selecting suitable OSS in the midst of alternatives.

  20. Life-threatening complications after ureteroscopy for urinary stones: survey and systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cindolo, Luca; Castellan, Pietro; Primiceri, Giulia; Hoznek, Andras; Cracco, Cecilia M; Scoffone, Cesare M; Galfano, Antonio; Petralia, Giovanni; DE Angelis, Michele; Annino, Filippo; Malacasa, Emilio; Cormio, Luigi; Acquati, Pietro; DE Lorenzis, Elisa; Maugeri, Orazio; Arena, Giuseppe; Celia, Antonio; Giusti, Guido; Schips, Luigi

    2017-10-01

    Retrograde ureteroscopy (URS) has become a common procedure for the management of urinary stones. Although its efficacy and safety are well known, the literature about major complications is still poor. This study highlighted some cases of life-threatening complications after semi-rigid ureteroscopy (s-URS) or flexible ureteroscopy (f-URS). Experienced endourologists (more than 75 cases/year in the last 3 years) we enrolled, and a survey was performed asking to review their series and report the cases encumbered by major complications (Clavien-Dindo IIIb-IV grade). A literature search was also conducted in the Medline (PubMed) and Cochrane Libraries databases in July, 2016 to identify all studies reporting the presence of major complications in patients underwent URS procedures. A PubMed search was performed using the following key words in combination: "kidney injury," "ureteroscopy," "nephrectomy," "life-threatening," "urinary stones," "complications." Eleven urologists reported on 12 major complications (4 after s-URS, 8 after f-URS). Eight patients developed a kidney injury, 1 an arteriovenous fistula, 2 a ureter avulsion and 1 acute sepsis. Six patients underwent open nephrectomy, two surgical repair, one open pyeloplasty, one coil artery embolization and two superselective artery embolization. Guidelines and clinical practice give useful recommendations about intraoperative safety and prevention of life-threatening events. The careful postoperative observation and the surgical active treatment of this complications play a key role in reducing morbidity, kidney loss and mortality. This study encourages a strict and active care of patients, supports a routine reporting of complications, and highlights the need for systematic use of standardized classification systems.

  1. A Systematic Literature Review of Faculty Development for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; Cole, S. Catherine; Zarestky, Jill

    2018-01-01

    Although ample literature exists regarding the effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities, there is a gap in the literature synthesizing its outcomes. This review, using a predetermined review protocol, analyzed 22 publications on FD for teacher educators using Kirkpatrick's training evaluation taxonomy. We found that North American…

  2. Implementing electronic health records in hospitals : a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, A.; Versluis, Arie; Vos, J.F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The literature on implementing Electronic Health Records (EHR) in hospitals is very diverse. The objective of this study is to create an overview of the existing literature on EHR implementation in hospitals and to identify generally applicable findings and lessons for implementers.

  3. Influence of the breathing pattern on the learning process: a systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Genef Caroline Andrade; Dos Santos, Isadora Diniz; Santos, Ana Claudia Nascimento; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; César, Carla Patrícia Hernandez Alves Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Mouth breathing leads to negative consequences on quality of life, especially in school-age children. To determine whether the breathing pattern influences children's learning process. This systematic review was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) instructions, with no restrictions regarding the year of publication and language, created based on the clinical question formulation according to the Problem/Patient/Population, Intervention/Indicator, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) strategy: "Is the mouth-breathing child more likely to have learning disabilities when compared to nasal breathers?" in the SciELO, PubMed, LILACS, and Scopus electronic databases. Google Scholar was used to search the gray literature. The keywords "learning," "mouth breathing," and their equivalent terms in Portuguese were used in an integrated manner. The studies included in the review were observational, conducted with schoolchildren aged 7-11 years. Afterwards, the studies were evaluated regarding their methodological quality. The research was performed by two eligible reviewers. A total of 357 records were obtained, of which 43 records were duplicate. After applying the eligibility criteria, ten articles were included in the research scope. Half of the studies used a control group and otorhinolaryngological assessment, whereas a minority used validated (20%) and sample calculation protocols (10%). The evaluation procedures were varied. Overall, 80% of the articles showed a higher incidence of learning disabilities among mouth breathers. This systematic review has shown that mouth breathers are more likely to have learning difficulties than nasal breathers. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Influence of the breathing pattern on the learning process: a systematic review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genef Caroline Andrade Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Mouth breathing leads to negative consequences on quality of life, especially in school-age children. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the breathing pattern influences children's learning process. METHODS: This systematic review was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA instructions, with no restrictions regarding the year of publication and language, created based on the clinical question formulation according to the Problem/Patient/Population, Intervention/Indicator, Comparison, Outcome (PICO strategy: "Is the mouth-breathing child more likely to have learning disabilities when compared to nasal breathers?" in the SciELO, PubMed, LILACS, and Scopus electronic databases. Google Scholar was used to search the gray literature. The keywords "learning," "mouth breathing," and their equivalent terms in Portuguese were used in an integrated manner. The studies included in the review were observational, conducted with schoolchildren aged 7-11 years. Afterwards, the studies were evaluated regarding their methodological quality. The research was performed by two eligible reviewers. RESULTS: A total of 357 records were obtained, of which 43 records were duplicate. After applying the eligibility criteria, ten articles were included in the research scope. Half of the studies used a control group and otorhinolaryngological assessment, whereas a minority used validated (20% and sample calculation protocols (10%. The evaluation procedures were varied. Overall, 80% of the articles showed a higher incidence of learning disabilities among mouth breathers. CONCLUSION: This systematic review has shown that mouth breathers are more likely to have learning difficulties than nasal breathers.

  5. Outcome of conservative and surgical treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutges, J P H J; Kempen, D H; van Dijk, M; Oner, F C

    2016-04-01

    Spondylodiscitis is a spinal infection affecting primarily the intervertebral disk and the adjacent vertebral bodies. Currently many aspects of the treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis are still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to review the currently available literature systematically to determine the outcome of patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis for conservative and surgical treatment strategies. A systematic electronic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Collaboration, and Web of Science regarding the treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis was performed. Included articles were assessed on risk of bias according the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and the quality of evidence and strength of recommendation was evaluated according the GRADE approach. 25 studies were included. Five studies had a high or moderate quality of evidence. One RCT suggest that 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment of pyogenic spondylodiscitis results in a similar outcome when compared to longer treatment duration. However, microorganism-specific studies suggest that at least 8 weeks of treatment is required for S. aureus and 8 weeks of Daptomycin for MRSA. The articles that described the outcome of surgical treatment strategies show that a large variety of surgical techniques can successfully treat spondylodiscitis. No additional long-term beneficial effect of surgical treatment could be shown in the studies comparing surgical versus antibiotic only treatment. There is a strong level of recommendation for 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment in pyogenic spondylodiscitis although this has only been shown by one recent RCT. If surgical treatment is indicated, it has been suggested by two prospective studies with strong level of recommendation that an isolated anterior approach could result in a better clinical outcome.

  6. Sleep bruxism in adolescents: a systematic literature review of related risk factors.

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    Castroflorio, Tommaso; Bargellini, Andrea; Rossini, Gabriele; Cugliari, Giovanni; Deregibus, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    Multiple risk factors have been associated to sleep bruxism (SB). Nevertheless, there are still many unsolved issues concerning the etiology of SB that have consequences on the clinical management strategies. Systematically review the literature to assess the relationship between risk factors and SB symptoms in adolescents (age 11-19 years). PubMed, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trial Register and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, LILACs, and SciELO were searched to identify all peer-reviewed articles potentially relevant to the review. The risk of bias was assessed according to the guidelines from the Cochrane handbook for systematic reviews of interventions, with reporting in agreement to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines. Four out of the 4546 initially identified articles were selected. According to the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation assessment (GRADE), the magnitude of agreement was almost perfect for all checklist items. Sleep disturbances, and snoring in particular, headache, jaw muscle fatigue, and tooth wear seem to be associated to SB in adolescents from 11 to 19 years old. Despite the large interest of the scientific community in the field of oral parafunctions, only four articles met the eligibility criteria. Furthermore only associations and not definite cause-effect relationships were highlighted in the selected articles. Sleep disturbances presented the strongest association with SB while very few occlusal features had a moderate association. As a common sense the investigation of sleep respiratory disorders could be of great help in the management of SB in adolescents. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A systematic literature review on first aid provided by laypeople to trauma victims.

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    Tannvik, T D; Bakke, H K; Wisborg, T

    2012-11-01

    Death from trauma is a significant and international problem. Outcome for patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrests is significantly improved by early cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The usefulness of first aid given by laypeople in trauma is less well established. The aim of this study was to review the existing literature on first aid provided by laypeople to trauma victims and to establish how often first aid is provided, if it is performed correctly, and its impact on outcome. A systematic review was carried out, according to preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis (PRISMA) guidelines, of all studies involving first aid provided by laypeople to trauma victims. Cochrane, Embase, Medline, Pubmed, and Google Scholar databases were systematically searched. Ten eligible articles were identified involving a total of 5836 victims. Eight studies were related to patient outcome, while two studies were simulation based. The proportion of patients who received first aid ranged from 10.7% to 65%. Incorrect first aid was given in up to 83.7% of cases. Airway handling and haemorrhage control were particular areas of concern. One study from Iraq investigated survival and reported a 5.8% reduction in mortality. Two retrospective autopsy-based studies estimated that correct first aid could have reduced mortality by 1.8-4.5%. There is limited evidence regarding first aid provided by laypeople to trauma victims. Due to great heterogeneity in the studies, firm conclusions can not be drawn. However, the results show a potential mortality reduction if first aid is administered to trauma victims. Further research is necessary to establish this. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  8. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Experience from a tertiary care center and systematic review of Indian literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadda, Vijay; Tiwari, Pawan; Madan, Karan; Mohan, Anant; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Bharti, Sachidanand Jee; Kumar, Vinod; Garg, Rakesh; Trikha, Anjan; Jain, Deepali; Arava, Sudheer; Khilnani, Gopi C; Guleria, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disorder characterized by deposition of lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli, with a variable clinical course. Here, we report an experience of management of PAP at our center. A systematic review of previously reported cases from India is also included in the article. Materials and Methods: This study included patients with primary PAP managed at our center from 2009 to 2015. Diagnosis of primary PAP was based on histopathologic diagnosis on bronchoalveolar lavage or transbronchial lung biopsy and absence of causes of secondary PAP. For systematic review of Indian publications, the literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases using the terms “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis'” or “alveolar proteinosis” and “India” or “Indian.” Results: During the above-specified period, five patients with diagnosis of PAP were admitted at our center. Median age of patients was 32 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30.5–59); 80% were female. Mean duration (± standard deviation) of symptoms was 6.2 (±1.79) months. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibodies were elevated in 4 out of 5 patients (80%). For management, whole lung lavage (WLL) was done for four patients with median volume of 32.5 (IQR 18–74) L per patient. All the patients showed significant symptomatic as well as improvement in physiological parameters. Subcutaneous GM-CSF and ambroxol were given to 3 patients and 1 patient, respectively. The median follow-up of all patients was 18 (IQR 5–44) months. A systematic review of all Indian studies of PAP revealed thirty publications. Conclusions: WLL is the most common, effective, and safe therapy in patients with PAP. GM-CSF administration is an efficacious treatment for patients with incomplete response after WLL. PMID:27890991

  9. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: Experience from a tertiary care center and systematic review of Indian literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Hadda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP is a rare disorder characterized by deposition of lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli, with a variable clinical course. Here, we report an experience of management of PAP at our center. A systematic review of previously reported cases from India is also included in the article. Materials and Methods: This study included patients with primary PAP managed at our center from 2009 to 2015. Diagnosis of primary PAP was based on histopathologic diagnosis on bronchoalveolar lavage or transbronchial lung biopsy and absence of causes of secondary PAP. For systematic review of Indian publications, the literature search was performed using PubMed and EMBASE databases using the terms “pulmonary alveolar proteinosis'” or “alveolar proteinosis” and “India” or “Indian.” Results: During the above-specified period, five patients with diagnosis of PAP were admitted at our center. Median age of patients was 32 years (interquartile range [IQR] 30.5–59; 80% were female. Mean duration (± standard deviation of symptoms was 6.2 (±1.79 months. Anti-granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF antibodies were elevated in 4 out of 5 patients (80%. For management, whole lung lavage (WLL was done for four patients with median volume of 32.5 (IQR 18–74 L per patient. All the patients showed significant symptomatic as well as improvement in physiological parameters. Subcutaneous GM-CSF and ambroxol were given to 3 patients and 1 patient, respectively. The median follow-up of all patients was 18 (IQR 5–44 months. A systematic review of all Indian studies of PAP revealed thirty publications. Conclusions: WLL is the most common, effective, and safe therapy in patients with PAP. GM-CSF administration is an efficacious treatment for patients with incomplete response after WLL.

  10. Insertion torque and orthodontic mini-implants: a systematic review of the artificial bone literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ronchi, Laura; Ladu, Luisa; Van Etten-Jamaludin, Faridi; Bipat, Shandra

    2013-11-01

    This article systematically reviewed the literature to (1) identify variables that were associated with maximum insertion torque values during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants into artificial bone, (2) quantify such associations and (3) assess adverse effects of this procedure. Computerized and manual searches were conducted up to 24 February 2012. Selection criteria included studies that (1) recorded maximum insertion torque during the insertion of orthodontic mini-implants into artificial bone, (2) used sample sizes of five screws or more, (3) assessed maximum insertion torque with electronic torque sensors, and (4) used orthodontic mini-implants with a diameter smaller than 2.5 mm. ASTM Standards F543-07(ε1) and F1839-08(ε1) and the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews were used as guidelines for this systematic review. Quality assessments were rated according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. A total of 23 studies were selected, many of which were multiple publications of the same study. Many domains in the risk of bias assessments were scored as "high" or "unclear" risk of bias. A wide variety of implant, test block, and insertion procedure-related associations with maximum insertion torque were recorded. The quality of most outcomes was classified as "moderate." Outcomes could not be combined in a meta-analysis because of high risk of bias, poor standardization, high heterogeneity, or inconsistency in direction of outcomes within or between studies. Adverse effects were only assessed in one study. Future studies should control publication bias, consult existing standards for conducting torque tests, and focus on transparent reporting.

  11. PubMed and beyond: a survey of web tools for searching biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed the modern advances of high-throughput technology and rapid growth of research capacity in producing large-scale biological data, both of which were concomitant with an exponential growth of biomedical literature. This wealth of scholarly knowledge is of significant importance for researchers in making scientific discoveries and healthcare professionals in managing health-related matters. However, the acquisition of such information is becoming increasingly difficult due to its large volume and rapid growth. In response, the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is continuously making changes to its PubMed Web service for improvement. Meanwhile, different entities have devoted themselves to developing Web tools for helping users quickly and efficiently search and retrieve relevant publications. These practices, together with maturity in the field of text mining, have led to an increase in the number and quality of various Web tools that provide comparable literature search service to PubMed. In this study, we review 28 such tools, highlight their respective innovations, compare them to the PubMed system and one another, and discuss directions for future development. Furthermore, we have built a website dedicated to tracking existing systems and future advances in the field of biomedical literature search. Taken together, our work serves information seekers in choosing tools for their needs and service providers and developers in keeping current in the field. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Lu/search.

  12. Pediatric primary Sjögren syndrome presenting with bilateral ranulas: A case report and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Casey; Aldape, Mark A; King, Ericka

    2017-10-01

    Primary Sjögren syndrome is uncommon in children, and the standard clinical criteria used in diagnosis of adult Sjögren syndrome will miss many children with the disease. Floor of mouth ranulas have not been described in Sjögren syndrome. This study aims to describe a novel presentation of juvenile primary Sjögren syndrome, and to present a comprehensive systematic review of the literature regarding the presentation and diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome in children. Ovid MEDLINE. A MEDLINE literature search was performed using the following search terms: primary, Sjögren, disease, and children. Results were limited to human subjects and articles written in English between 1981 and 2014. Applicable articles were reviewed and qualitatively summarized. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines (PRIMA). Initial MEDLINE search yielded 146 articles, 80 of which were excluded as not clinically pertaining to Sjögren syndrome. An additional 25 were excluded due to lack of pediatric-specific data. Systematic review of the literature revealed no reports of ranula in association with Sjögren syndrome. 6 papers were manually included from review of reference lists of included articles. Our review indicated that recurrent parotitis is the most commonly reported presenting symptom in children, followed by ocular and oral symptoms, musculoskeletal, and renal symptoms. Compared to adults, children are less likely to present with dry eyes and mouth. All studies were retrospective chart reviews, case series or case reports. This is the first report of a child presenting with floor of mouth ranulas in association with Sjögren syndrome. While recurrent parotitis is the most common presentation in children, other salivary gland and extra-salivary manifestations may be seen, and the clinician must maintain a high index of suspicion for underlying Sjögren syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Systematic Reviewers in Clinical Neurology Do Not Routinely Search Clinical Trials Registries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Marcus Sinnett

    Full Text Available We examined the use of clinical trials registries in published systematic reviews and meta-analyses from clinical neurology. A review of publications between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2014 from five neuroscience journals (Annals of Neurology, Brain, Lancet Neurology, Neurology, and The Neuroscientist was performed to identify eligible systematic reviews. The systematic reviews comprising the final sample were independently appraised to determine if clinical trials registries had been included as part of the search process. Studies acknowledging the use of a trials registry were further examined to determine whether trial data had been incorporated into the analysis. The initial search yielded 194 studies, of which 78 systematic reviews met the selection criteria. Of those, five acknowledged the use of a specific clinical trials registry: four reviewed unpublished trial data and two incorporated unpublished trial data into their results. Based on our sample of systematic reviews, there was no increase in the use of trials registries in systematic review searches over time. Few systematic reviews published in clinical neurology journals included data from relevant clinical trials registries.

  14. [The practice of systematic reviews. II. Searching and selection of studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assendelft, W J; van Tulder, M W; Scholten, R J; Bouter, L M

    1999-03-27

    Structured searching and selection of studies is an important component of a systematic review. It is recommended to record the various steps in a protocol in advance. The thoroughness of the searching and selection will partially depend on the available resources, like manpower and funds. A search action should be based on an unequivocally formulated research or clinical question, that is operationalized into clear inclusion and exclusion criteria. The actual start of a search strategy is a search in preferably multiple databases like Medline and EMBASE-Excerpta Medica. Additional search actions can be performed in trial registers and printed indexes and by correspondence with experts and hand searching of journals. Storage of the search results in a bibliographic database is recommended. Various methodological problems may play a role in searching and selecting studies for a review: studies may selectively not be published, results are only partially presented in the publication, studies are selectively included in reference lists, and reviewers themselves may make systematic errors in the selection process.

  15. Stem cell injections in knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Haiko Imfl; Winters, Marinus; Haisma, Hidde J; Koenis, Martinus Jj; Tol, Johannes L; Moen, Maarten H

    2017-08-01

    Stem cell injection for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is an emerging new therapy, and we aimed to review its evidence of efficacy. Systematic review. Criteria for eligibility were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCT on the efficacy of stem cell injections in KOA. All references were checked for missed articles. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, PEDro and SPORTDiscus were searched. A grey literature search was performed. No restrictions were imposed to our search strategy. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Descriptive synthesis was performed using the levels of evidence according to the Oxford Levels of Evidence. Five RCTs and one non-RCT were found. Bone-marrow-derived stem cells, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells and peripheral blood stem cells were used. All trials were at high risk of bias, resulting in level-3 evidence. All five RCTs reported superior efficacy for patient-reported outcomes (Visual Analogue Scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index, Tegner, Lysolm, International Knee Documentation Committee, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Lequesne) compared with controls at final follow-up (range 24-48 months). Superior radiological outcomes were found favouring stem cell injection. Superior histological outcomes and/or improved arthroscopically scored healing rates were reported in two trials. No serious adverse events were reported. Six trials with high risk of bias showed level-3 or level-4 evidence in favour of stem cell injections in KOA. In the absence of high-level evidence, we do not recommend stem cell therapy for KOA. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Is cultural change associated with eating disorders? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doris, Eli; Shekriladze, Ia; Javakhishvili, Nino; Jones, Roshan; Treasure, Janet; Tchanturia, Kate

    2015-06-01

    There is debate as to whether the development of an eating disorder (ED) may be triggered by acculturation to Western culture. While there is evidence to suggest that acculturation to Western culture is associated with risk of having an ED, these findings are limited, vary significantly, and are sometimes conflicting. To review the literature and empirical data on the association between ED symptoms and acculturation in the context of Western culture. A systematic search of peer-reviewed publications using a combination of the keywords "Culture", "Acculturation" and "Eating disorders" was first performed in August 2014 and updated in February 2015 with the following databases: PubMed and SCOPUS. Reference lists were also hand searched. In total, the search provided more than 50 studies. Following screening (as stated in the PRISMA guidelines) of the titles and abstracts by inclusion and exclusion criteria and quality assessment of the full text, 25 studies were identified to be appropriate for the review. Articles were examined in relation to the findings, as well as the ED and acculturation measures used. Eleven studies suggested considerable association between ED and culture change/acculturation. Six studies suggested little or no association between ED and culture change/acculturation. Eight studies did not primarily examine association, yet generated valuable insight. While there was relative consistency across studies in terms of the ED measures selected, measures of acculturation varied significantly. The majority of the evidence reviewed here suggests that there is a substantial association between culture change and ED psychopathology. However, both greater and lesser acculturation have been identified as risk factors for the development of an ED, and this varies depending on the group studied as well as how acculturation and culture change are conceptualized and measured. Further research is warranted to form cross-culturally acceptable definitions and

  17. BEST: Next-Generation Biomedical Entity Search Tool for Knowledge Discovery from Biomedical Literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunwon Lee

    Full Text Available As the volume of publications rapidly increases, searching for relevant information from the literature becomes more challenging. To complement standard search engines such as PubMed, it is desirable to have an advanced search tool that directly returns relevant biomedical entities such as targets, drugs, and mutations rather than a long list of articles. Some existing tools submit a query to PubMed and process retrieved abstracts to extract information at query time, resulting in a slow response time and limited coverage of only a fraction of the PubMed corpus. Other tools preprocess the PubMed corpus to speed up the response time; however, they are not constantly updated, and thus produce outdated results. Further, most existing tools cannot process sophisticated queries such as searches for mutations that co-occur with query terms in the literature. To address these problems, we introduce BEST, a biomedical entity