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Sample records for system inflammation neurodegeneration

  1. Systemic Inflammation and the Brain: novel roles of genetic, molecular, and environmental cues as drivers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman eSankowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The nervous and immune systems have evolved in parallel from the early bilaterians, in which innate immunity and a central nervous system coexisted for the first time, to jawed vertebrates and the appearance of adaptive immunity. The central nervous system (CNS feeds from, and integrates efferent signals in response to, somatic and autonomic sensory information. The CNS receives input also from the periphery about inflammation and infection. Cytokines, chemokines, damage-associated soluble mediators of systemic inflammation can also gain access to the CNS via blood flow. In response to systemic inflammation, those soluble mediators can access directly through the circumventricular organs, as well as open the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The resulting translocation of inflammatory mediators can interfere with neuronal and glial well-being, leading to a break of balance in brain homeostasis. This in turn results in cognitive and behavioral manifestations commonly present during acute infections -including anorexia, malaise, depression, and decreased physical activity- collectively known as the sickness behavior (SB. While SB manifestations are transient and self-limited, under states of persistent systemic inflammatory response the cognitive and behavioral changes can become permanent. For example, cognitive decline is almost universal in sepsis survivors, and a common finding in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we review recent genetic evidence suggesting an association between neurodegenerative disorders and persistent immune activation; clinical and experimental evidence indicating previously unidentified immune-mediated pathways of neurodegeneration; and novel immunomodulatory targets and their potential relevance for neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Exacerbation of CNS inflammation and neurodegeneration by systemic LPS treatment is independent of circulating IL-1 beta and IL-6

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Carol L

    2011-05-17

    Abstract Background Chronic neurodegeneration comprises an inflammatory response but its contribution to the progression of disease remains unclear. We have previously shown that microglial cells are primed by chronic neurodegeneration, induced by the ME7 strain of prion disease, to synthesize limited pro-inflammatory cytokines but to produce exaggerated responses to subsequent systemic inflammatory insults. The consequences of this primed response include exaggerated hypothermic and sickness behavioural responses, acute neuronal death and accelerated progression of disease. Here we investigated whether inhibition of systemic cytokine synthesis using the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone-21-phosphate was sufficient to block any or all of these responses. Methods ME7 animals, at 18-19 weeks post-inoculation, were challenged with LPS (500 μg\\/kg) in the presence or absence of dexamethasone-21-phosphate (2 mg\\/kg) and effects on core-body temperature and systemic and CNS cytokine production and apoptosis were examined. Results LPS induced hypothermia and decreased exploratory activity. Dexamethasone-21-phosphate prevented this hypothermia, markedly suppressed systemic IL-1β and IL-6 secretion but did not prevent decreased exploration. Furthermore, robust transcription of cytokine mRNA occurred in the hippocampus of both ME7 and NBH (normal brain homogenate) control animals despite the effective blocking of systemic cytokine synthesis. Microglia primed by neurodegeneration were not blocked from the robust synthesis of IL-1β protein and endothelial COX-2 was also robustly synthesized. We injected biotinylated LPS at 100 μg\\/kg and even at this lower dose this could be detected in blood plasma. Apoptosis was acutely induced by LPS, despite the inhibition of the systemic cytokine response. Conclusions These data suggest that LPS can directly activate the brain endothelium even at relatively low doses, obviating the need for systemic cytokine stimulation to

  3. The relation between inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frischer, J.M.; Bramow, S.; Dal-Bianco, A.

    2009-01-01

    Some recent studies suggest that in progressive multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration may occur independently from inflammation. The aim of our study was to analyse the interdependence of inflammation, neurodegeneration and disease progression in various multiple sclerosis stages in relation...... disease or brain lesions. We found that pronounced inflammation in the brain is not only present in acute and relapsing multiple sclerosis but also in the secondary and primary progressive disease. T- and B-cell infiltrates correlated with the activity of demyelinating lesions, while plasma cell...... infiltrates were most pronounced in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) and even persisted, when T- and B-cell infiltrates declined to levels seen in age matched controls. A highly significant association between inflammation...

  4. Metallothionein reduces central nervous system inflammation, neurodegeneration, and cell death following kainic acid-induced epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Florit, Sergi; Giralt, Mercedes

    2005-01-01

    We examined metallothionein (MT)-induced neuroprotection during kainic acid (KA)-induced excitotoxicity by studying transgenic mice with MT-I overexpression (TgMT mice). KA induces epileptic seizures and hippocampal excitotoxicity, followed by inflammation and delayed brain damage. We show for th...

  5. Interaction of Synuclein and Inflammation in Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    amyloid, oxLDL, and prions are examples of proteins that cause neurodegeneration when they accumulate and are modified in the extracellular...D. The pathology roadmap in Parkinson disease. Prion 7(1):85-91, (2013). Maroteaux L, Campanelli JT and Scheller RH. Synuclein: a neuron-specific

  6. Impact of aging immune system on neurodegeneration and potential immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Yang; Ruan, Linhui; Zhu, Linnan; Jin, Kunlin; Zhuge, Qichuan; Su, Dong-Ming; Zhao, Yong

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between the nervous and immune systems during aging is an area of avid interest, but many aspects remain unclear. This is due, not only to the complexity of the aging process, but also to a mutual dependency and reciprocal causation of alterations and diseases between both the nervous and immune systems. Aging of the brain drives whole body systemic aging, including aging-related changes of the immune system. In turn, the immune system aging, particularly immunosenescence and T cell aging initiated by thymic involution that are sources of chronic inflammation in the elderly (termed inflammaging), potentially induces brain aging and memory loss in a reciprocal manner. Therefore, immunotherapeutics including modulation of inflammation, vaccination, cellular immune therapies and "protective autoimmunity" provide promising approaches to rejuvenate neuroinflammatory disorders and repair brain injury. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries linking the aging immune system with the development of neurodegeneration. Additionally, we discuss potential rejuvenation strategies, focusing aimed at targeting the aging immune system in an effort to prevent acute brain injury and chronic neurodegeneration during aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Shifting imaging targets in multiple sclerosis: From inflammation to neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vigeveno, R.M.; Wiebenga, O.T.; Wattjes, M.P.; Geurts, J.J.G.; Barkhof, F.

    2012-01-01

    Classically multiple sclerosis (MS) has been regarded as an auto-immune disease of the white matter in the central nervous system leading to severe disability over the course of several decades. Current therapeutic strategies in MS are mostly based on either immune suppression or immune modulation.

  8. The Role of Microglia in Diabetic Retinopathy: Inflammation, Microvasculature Defects and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christine; Schmidt, Mirko H H

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which appears in one third of all diabetic patients and is a prominent cause of vision loss. First discovered as a microvascular disease, intensive research in the field identified inflammation and neurodegeneration to be part of diabetic retinopathy. Microglia, the resident monocytes of the retina, are activated due to a complex interplay between the different cell types of the retina and diverse pathological pathways. The trigger for developing diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, accompanied by leukostasis and vascular leakages. Transcriptional changes in activated microglia, mediated via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways, results in release of various pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, caspases and glutamate. Activated microglia additionally increased proliferation and migration. Among other consequences, these changes in microglia severely affected retinal neurons, causing increased apoptosis and subsequent thinning of the nerve fiber layer, resulting in visual loss. New potential therapeutics need to interfere with these diabetic complications even before changes in the retina are diagnosed, to prevent neuronal apoptosis and blindness in patients.

  9. The Role of Microglia in Diabetic Retinopathy: Inflammation, Microvasculature Defects and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Christine

    2018-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus, which appears in one third of all diabetic patients and is a prominent cause of vision loss. First discovered as a microvascular disease, intensive research in the field identified inflammation and neurodegeneration to be part of diabetic retinopathy. Microglia, the resident monocytes of the retina, are activated due to a complex interplay between the different cell types of the retina and diverse pathological pathways. The trigger for developing diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-induced hyperglycemia, accompanied by leukostasis and vascular leakages. Transcriptional changes in activated microglia, mediated via the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways, results in release of various pro-inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, caspases and glutamate. Activated microglia additionally increased proliferation and migration. Among other consequences, these changes in microglia severely affected retinal neurons, causing increased apoptosis and subsequent thinning of the nerve fiber layer, resulting in visual loss. New potential therapeutics need to interfere with these diabetic complications even before changes in the retina are diagnosed, to prevent neuronal apoptosis and blindness in patients. PMID:29301251

  10. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Neuropathogenesis: A Model for HIV-Induced CNS Inflammation and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Rick B; Hudson, Lola

    2017-03-06

    Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV), similar to its human analog human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), enters the central nervous system (CNS) soon after infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. The ensuing inflammation and damage give rise to varying degrees of cognitive decline collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Because of the similarities to HIV infection and disease, FIV has provided a useful model for both in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS infection, inflammation and pathology. This mini review summarizes insights gained from studies of early infection, immune cell trafficking, inflammation and the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis. Advances in our understanding of these processes have contributed to the development of therapeutic interventions designed to protect neurons and regulate inflammatory activity.

  11. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Neuropathogenesis: A Model for HIV-Induced CNS Inflammation and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Rick B.; Hudson, Lola

    2017-01-01

    Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV), similar to its human analog human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), enters the central nervous system (CNS) soon after infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. The ensuing inflammation and damage give rise to varying degrees of cognitive decline collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Because of the similarities to HIV infection and disease, FIV has provided a useful model for both in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS infection, inflammation and pathology. This mini review summarizes insights gained from studies of early infection, immune cell trafficking, inflammation and the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis. Advances in our understanding of these processes have contributed to the development of therapeutic interventions designed to protect neurons and regulate inflammatory activity. PMID:29056673

  12. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Neuropathogenesis: A Model for HIV-Induced CNS Inflammation and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick B. Meeker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Feline Immunodeficiency virus (FIV, similar to its human analog human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, enters the central nervous system (CNS soon after infection and establishes a protected viral reservoir. The ensuing inflammation and damage give rise to varying degrees of cognitive decline collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. Because of the similarities to HIV infection and disease, FIV has provided a useful model for both in vitro and in vivo studies of CNS infection, inflammation and pathology. This mini review summarizes insights gained from studies of early infection, immune cell trafficking, inflammation and the mechanisms of neuropathogenesis. Advances in our understanding of these processes have contributed to the development of therapeutic interventions designed to protect neurons and regulate inflammatory activity.

  13. Metallothionein prevents neurodegeneration and central nervous system cell death after treatment with gliotoxin 6-aminonicotinamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Quintana, Albert; Carrasco, Javier

    2004-01-01

    Transgenic expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the CNS under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) gene promoter (GFAP-IL6 mice) induces significant inflammation and neurodegeneration but also affords neuroprotection against acute traumatic brain injury. This neuroprotection...

  14. Concurrent multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: where inflammation and neurodegeneration meet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Grace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The concurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is exceedingly rare and the pathological features have not been examined extensively. Here we describe the key pathological features of a 40 year old man with pathologically confirmed concurrent MS and ALS. This is the most pathologically illustrative case of coincident MS and ALS demonstrating inflammatory and neurodegenerative features characteristic of each disease, and is the first to exhibit the presence of TDP-43 inclusions in this clinical entity. The intricate relationship between neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in these diseases is discussed.

  15. Implanted neural electrodes cause chronic, local inflammation that is correlated with local neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, George C.; Rees, Howard D.; Levey, Allan I.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-10-01

    Prosthetic devices that are controlled by intracortical electrodes recording one's 'thoughts' are a reality today, and no longer merely in the realm of science fiction. However, widespread clinical use of implanted electrodes is hampered by a lack of reliability in chronic recordings, independent of the type of electrodes used. One major hypothesis has been that astroglial scar electrically impedes the electrodes. However, there is a temporal discrepancy between stabilization of scar's electrical properties and recording failure with recording failure lagging by 1 month. In this study, we test a possible explanation for this discrepancy: the hypothesis that chronic inflammation, due to the persistent presence of the electrode, causes a local neurodegenerative state in the immediate vicinity of the electrode. Through modulation of chronic inflammation via stab wound, electrode geometry and age-matched control, we found that after 16 weeks, animals with an increased level of chronic inflammation were associated with increased neuronal and dendritic, but not axonal, loss. We observed increased neuronal and dendritic loss 16 weeks after implantation compared to 8 weeks after implantation, suggesting that the local neurodegenerative state is progressive. After 16 weeks, we observed axonal pathology in the form of hyperphosphorylation of the protein tau in the immediate vicinity of the microelectrodes (as observed in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies). The results of this study suggest that a local, late onset neurodegenerative disease-like state surrounds the chronic electrodes and is a potential cause for chronic recording failure. These results also inform strategies to enhance our capability to attain reliable long-term recordings from implantable electrodes in the CNS.

  16. Alzheimer's disease and metabolic syndrome: A link from oxidative stress and inflammation to neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Gutierrez, Eduardo; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Treviño, Samuel; Espinosa, Blanca; Chavez, Raúl; Rojas, Karla; Flores, Gonzalo; Díaz, Alfonso; Guevara, Jorge

    2017-06-26

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality among the aging population. AD diagnosis is made post-mortem, and the two pathologic hallmarks, particularly evident in the end stages of the illness, are amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, there is no curative treatment for AD. Additionally, there is a strong relation between oxidative stress, metabolic syndrome, and AD. The high levels of circulating lipids and glucose imbalances amplify lipid peroxidation that gradually diminishes the antioxidant systems, causing high levels of oxidative metabolism that affects cell structure, leading to neuronal damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that AD is closely related to a dysfunction of both insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in the brain, leading to an insulin-resistant brain state. Four drugs are currently used for this pathology: Three FDA-approved cholinesterase inhibitors and one NMDA receptor antagonist. However, wide varieties of antioxidants are promissory to delay or prevent the symptoms of AD and may help in treating the disease. Therefore, therapeutic efforts to achieve attenuation of oxidative stress could be beneficial in AD treatment, attenuating Aβ-induced neurotoxicity and improve neurological outcomes in AD. The term inflammaging characterizes a widely accepted paradigm that aging is accompanied by a low-grade chronic up-regulation of certain pro-inflammatory responses in the absence of overt infection, and is a highly significant risk factor for both morbidity and mortality in the elderly. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Innate Immunity and Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labzin, Larisa I; Heneka, Michael T; Latz, Eicke

    2018-01-29

    The innate immune system plays diverse roles in health and disease. It represents the first line of defense against infection and is involved in tissue repair, wound healing, and clearance of apoptotic cells and cellular debris. Excessive or nonresolving innate immune activation can lead to systemic or local inflammatory complications and cause or contribute to the development of inflammatory diseases. In the brain, microglia represent the key innate immune cells, which are involved in brain development, brain maturation, and homeostasis. Impaired microglial function, either through aberrant activation or decreased functionality, can occur during aging and during neurodegeneration, and the resulting inflammation is thought to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the influence of innate immunity on neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease.

  18. Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as cardiovascular risk factors and their association with dietary intakes in children from rural Cofimvaba, Eastern Cape, South Africa.

  19. Neurodegeneration in drop-dead mutant drosophila melanogaster is associated with the respiratory system but not with Hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Lynn Sansone

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene drop-dead (drd cause diverse phenotypes in adult Drosophila melanogaster including early lethality, neurodegeneration, tracheal defects, gut dysfunction, reduced body mass, and female sterility. Despite the identification of the drd gene itself, the causes of early lethality and neurodegeneration in the mutant flies remain unknown. To determine the pattern of drd expression associated with the neurodegenerative phenotype, knockdown of drd with various Gal4 drivers was performed. Early adult lethality and neurodegeneration were observed upon knockdown of drd in the tracheal system with two independent insertions of the breathless-Gal4 driver and upon knockdown in the tracheal system and elsewhere with the DJ717-Gal4 driver. Surprisingly, rescue of drd expression exclusively in the tracheae in otherwise mutant flies rescued the neurodegenerative phenotype but not adult lethality. Gut dysfunction, as measured by defecation rate, was not rescued in these flies, and gut function appeared normal upon tracheal-specific knockdown of drd. Finally, the hypothesis that tracheal dysfunction in drd mutants results in hypoxia was tested. Hypoxia-sensitive reporter transgenes (LDH-Gal4 and LDH-LacZ were placed on a drd mutant background, but enhanced expression of these reporters was not observed. In addition, manipulation of drd expression in the tracheae did not affect expression of the hypoxia-induced genes LDH, tango, and similar. Overall, these results indicate that there are at least two causes of adult lethality in drd mutants, that gut dysfunction and neurodegeneration are independent phenotypes, and that neurodegeneration is associated with tracheal expression of drd but not with hypoxia.

  20. Enteric neurodegeneration in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, M; Cowen, T; Koch, T R

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this article is to review the clinical presentation and neurobiology of degeneration of the enteric nervous system with emphasis on human data where available. Constipation, incontinence and evacuation disorders are frequently encountered in the ageing population. Healthy lower gastrointestinal function is essential for successful ageing as it is critical to maintaining independence and autonomy to pursue further activity. One clinical expression of enteric neurodegeneration is constipation. However, the aetiology may be multifactorial as disturbances of epithelial, muscle or neural function may all result from neurodegeneration. There is evidence of loss of excitatory (e.g. cholinergic) enteric neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal, whereas inhibitory (including nitrergic) neurons appear unaffected. Understanding neurodegeneration in the enteric nervous system is key to developing treatments to reverse it. Neurotrophins have been shown to accelerate colonic transit and relieve constipation in the medium term; they are also implicated in maintenance programmes in adult enteric neurons through a role in antioxidant defence. However, their effects in ageing colon require further study. There is evidence that 5-HT(2) and 5-HT(4) mechanisms are involved in development, maintenance and survival of enteric neurons. Further research is needed to understand and potentially reverse enteric neurodegeneration.

  1. lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Lipid profile, hyperglycaemia, systemic inflammation and anthropometry as cardiovascular risk factors and their association with dietary .... Training included sessions on ethical and general research philosophies applicable to ... the training sessions whereby the fieldworkers had to interview and complete multiple 24-hour.

  2. Exercise alleviates depression related systemic inflammation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sion, however our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in COPD patients to alleviate depression related systemic inflammation is incomplete ... bidities (i.e. cardiovascular disease risk factors and glyce- mic control). A prospective ..... T, Ross R. An exercise intervention without weight loss. African Health Sciences ...

  3. Exercise alleviates depression related systemic inflammation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the changes in depression related systemic inflammation of aerobic exercise training in COPD patients in Jeddah area. Material and methods: Eighty patients with moderate severity of COPD participated in this study and were divided into two groups; the first group received ...

  4. DNA damage in nasal and brain tissues of canines exposed to air pollutants is associated with evidence of chronic brain inflammation and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Maronpot, Robert R; Torres-Jardon, Ricardo; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Schoonhoven, Robert; Acuña-Ayala, Hilda; Villarreal-Calderón, Anna; Nakamura, Jun; Fernando, Reshan; Reed, William; Azzarelli, Biagio; Swenberg, James A

    2003-01-01

    Acute, subchronic, or chronic exposures to particulate matter (PM) and pollutant gases affect people in urban areas and those exposed to fires, disasters, and wars. Respiratory tract inflammation, production of mediators of inflammation capable of reaching the brain, systemic circulation of PM, and disruption of the nasal respiratory and olfactory barriers are likely in these populations. DNA damage is crucial in aging and in age-associated diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. We evaluated apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in nasal and brain genomic DNA, and explored by immunohistochemistry the expression of nuclear factor NFkappaB p65, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX2), metallothionein I and II, apolipoprotein E, amyloid precursor protein (APP), and beta-amyloid(1-42) in healthy dogs naturally exposed to urban pollution in Mexico City. Nickel (Ni) and vanadium (V) were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Forty mongrel dogs, ages 7 days-10 years were studied (14 controls from Tlaxcala and 26 exposed to urban pollution in South West Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC)). Nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium were found to be early pollutant targets. Olfactory bulb and hippocampal AP sites were significantly higher in exposed than in control age matched animals. Ni and V were present in a gradient from olfactory mucosa > olfactory bulb > frontal cortex. Exposed dogs had (a) nuclear neuronal NFkappaB p65, (b) endothelial, glial and neuronal iNOS, (c) endothelial and glial COX2, (d) ApoE in neuronal, glial and vascular cells, and (e) APP and beta amyloid(1-42) in neurons, diffuse plaques (the earliest at age 11 months), and in subarachnoid blood vessels. Increased AP sites and the inflammatory and stress protein brain responses were early and significant in dogs exposed to urban pollution. Oil combustion PM-associated metals Ni and V were detected in the brain. There was an acceleration of Alzheimer

  5. Sarcopenia correlates with systemic inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Min Kwang; Cho, Eun Na; Chang, Joon; Ahn, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Jung

    2017-01-01

    Muscle wasting and chronic inflammation are predominant features of patients with COPD. Systemic inflammation is associated with an accelerated decline in lung function. In this study, the prevalence of sarcopenia and the relationships between sarcopenia and systemic inflammations in patients with stable COPD were investigated. In a cross-sectional design, muscle strength and muscle mass were measured by handgrip strength (HGS) and bioelectrical impedance analysis in 80 patients with stable COPD. Patients (≥40 years old) diagnosed with COPD were recruited from outpatient clinics, and then COPD stages were classified. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of both low muscle strength (by HGS) and low muscle mass (skeletal muscle mass index [SMMI]). Levels of circulating inflammatory biomarkers (IL-6 and high-sensitivity TNFα [hsTNFα]) were measured. Sarcopenia was prevalent in 20 (25%) patients. Patients with sarcopenia were older, had lower body mass index, and a higher percentage of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they had significantly higher modified Medical Research Council scores and lower 6-minute walk distance than those without sarcopenia. HGS was significantly correlated with age, modified Medical Research Council score, and COPD Assessment Test scores. Both HGS and SMMI had associations with IL-6 and hsTNFα (HGS, r =-0.35, P =0.002; SMMI, r =-0.246, P =0.044) level. In multivariate analysis, old age, lower body mass index, presence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and higher hsTNFα levels were significant determinants for sarcopenia in patients with stable COPD. Sarcopenia is very common in patients with stable COPD, and is associated with more severe dyspnea-scale scores and lower exercise tolerance. Systemic inflammation could be an important contributor to sarcopenia in the stable COPD population.

  6. Binge Alcohol Exposure Transiently Changes the Endocannabinoid System: A Potential Target to Prevent Alcohol-Induced Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liput, Daniel J; Pauly, James R; Stinchcomb, Audra L; Nixon, Kimberly

    2017-11-29

    Excessive alcohol consumption leads to neurodegeneration, which contributes to cognitive decline that is associated with alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the development of AUDs, but little is known about how the neurotoxic effects of alcohol impact the endocannabinoid system. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of neurotoxic, binge-like alcohol exposure on components of the endocannabinoid system and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs), and then evaluated the efficacy of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibition on attenuating alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Male rats were administered alcohol according to a binge model, which resulted in a transient decrease in [³H]-CP-55,940 binding in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus following two days, but not four days, of treatment. Furthermore, binge alcohol treatment did not change the tissue content of the three NAEs quantified, including the endocannabinoid and anandamide. In a separate study, the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 was administered to rats during alcohol treatment and neuroprotection was assessed by FluoroJade B (FJB) staining. The administration of URB597 during binge treatment did not significantly reduce FJB+ cells in the entorhinal cortex or hippocampus, however, a follow up "target engagement" study found that NAE augmentation by URB597 was impaired in alcohol intoxicated rats. Thus, potential alcohol induced alterations in URB597 pharmacodynamics may have contributed to the lack of neuroprotection by FAAH inhibition.

  7. Binge Alcohol Exposure Transiently Changes the Endocannabinoid System: A Potential Target to Prevent Alcohol-Induced Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Liput

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive alcohol consumption leads to neurodegeneration, which contributes to cognitive decline that is associated with alcohol use disorders (AUDs. The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the development of AUDs, but little is known about how the neurotoxic effects of alcohol impact the endocannabinoid system. Therefore, the current study investigated the effects of neurotoxic, binge-like alcohol exposure on components of the endocannabinoid system and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs, and then evaluated the efficacy of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH inhibition on attenuating alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Male rats were administered alcohol according to a binge model, which resulted in a transient decrease in [3H]-CP-55,940 binding in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus following two days, but not four days, of treatment. Furthermore, binge alcohol treatment did not change the tissue content of the three NAEs quantified, including the endocannabinoid and anandamide. In a separate study, the FAAH inhibitor, URB597 was administered to rats during alcohol treatment and neuroprotection was assessed by FluoroJade B (FJB staining. The administration of URB597 during binge treatment did not significantly reduce FJB+ cells in the entorhinal cortex or hippocampus, however, a follow up “target engagement” study found that NAE augmentation by URB597 was impaired in alcohol intoxicated rats. Thus, potential alcohol induced alterations in URB597 pharmacodynamics may have contributed to the lack of neuroprotection by FAAH inhibition.

  8. Low-grade systemic inflammation in overweight children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M; Bouter, L M; McQuillan, G M; Wener, M H; Harris, T B

    OBJECTIVE: Human adipose tissue expresses and releases the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6, potentially inducing low-grade systemic inflammation in persons with excess body fat. To limit potential confounding by inflammation-related diseases and subclinical cardiovascular disease, we tested

  9. Neuronal and epithelial cell rescue resolves chronic systemic inflammation in the lipid storage disorder Niemann-Pick C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Manuel E; Klein, Andrés D; Hong, Jennifer; Dimbil, Ubah J; Scott, Matthew P

    2012-07-01

    Chronic systemic inflammation is thought to be a major contributor to metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases. Since inflammatory components are shared among different disorders, targeting inflammation is an attractive option for mitigating disease. To test the significance of inflammation in the lipid storage disorder (LSD) Niemann-Pick C (NPC), we deleted the macrophage inflammatory gene Mip1a/Ccl3 from NPC diseased mice. Deletion of Ccl3 had been reported to delay neuronal loss in Sandhoff LSD mice by inhibiting macrophage infiltration. For NPC mice, in contrast, deleting Ccl3 did not retard neurodegeneration and worsened the clinical outcome. Depletion of visceral tissue macrophages also did not alter central nervous system (CNS) pathology and instead increased liver injury, suggesting a limited macrophage infiltration response into the CNS and a beneficial role of macrophage activity in visceral tissue. Prevention of neuron loss or liver injury, even at late stages in the disease, was achieved through specific rescue of NPC disease in neurons or in liver epithelial cells, respectively. Local epithelial cell correction was also sufficient to reduce the macrophage-associated pathology in lung tissue. These results demonstrate that elevated inflammation and macrophage activity does not necessarily contribute to neurodegeneration and tissue injury, and LSD defects in immune cells may not preclude an appropriate inflammatory response. We conclude that inflammation remains secondary to neuronal and epithelial cell dysfunction and does not irreversibly contribute to the pathogenic cascade in NPC disease. Without further exploration of possible beneficial roles of inflammatory mediators, targeting inflammation may not be therapeutically effective at ameliorating disease severity.

  10. PROGRESSION VARIANTS OF CHRONIC SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Y. Gusev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Fourteen groups of patients have been investigated and divided into 2 classes. The first class included the following cohorts of patients: relatively healthy persons, age 18 to 55 yrs (n = 50; elderly persons 60 yrs old, as well as senior persons (n = 22; persons with chronic adnexitis, women in their 1st trimester of pregnancy (n = 16; climacteric syndrome (n = 16; autoimmune thyroiditis (n = 29. The second class of patients included following cohorts: elderly persons with chronic cardiac insufficiency (CCI II-III stage (n=49; valvular cardiac disease (rheumatism, n = 15; psoriatic arthritis (n = 12; reactive arthritis (n = 17; antiphospholipid syndrome, a sub-group in the 1st trimester of pregnancy (n = 5; systemic lupus erythematosus (n=49; decompensated atherosclerosis of femoral artery (n = 38; end-stage renal disease (n = 42. Plasma cytokines (TNFαα, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, acute-phase C-reactive protein (CRP, cortisol, troponin I, myoglobin, D-dimers, interleukin-2 soluble receptor (IL-2sR, and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP were determined in all the patients, by means of immune chemiluminescent technique (Immulite; Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics, USA. The integral indices of systemic inflammatory reaction (SIR have been calculated, i.e., a Reactivity Coefficient (RC and a Reactivity Level (RL. In the patients belonging to Class 1 cohorts, an absence of chronic systemic inflammation features was revealed, despite of some signs of systemic inflammatory response. Meanwhile, a majority of Class 2 patients have shown the signs of chronic systemic inflammation stage I to III.

  11. "TRP inflammation" relationship in cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Kiriko; Inoue, Ryuji

    2016-05-01

    Despite considerable advances in the research and treatment, the precise relationship between inflammation and cardiovascular (CV) disease remains incompletely understood. Therefore, understanding the immunoinflammatory processes underlying the initiation, progression, and exacerbation of many cardiovascular diseases is of prime importance. The innate immune system has an ancient origin and is well conserved across species. Its activation occurs in response to pathogens or tissue injury. Recent studies suggest that altered ionic balance, and production of noxious gaseous mediators link to immune and inflammatory responses with altered ion channel expression and function. Among plausible candidates for this are transient receptor potential (TRP) channels that function as polymodal sensors and scaffolding proteins involved in many physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we will first focus on the relevance of TRP channel to both exogenous and endogenous factors related to innate immune response and transcription factors related to sustained inflammatory status. The emerging role of inflammasome to regulate innate immunity and its possible connection to TRP channels will also be discussed. Secondly, we will discuss about the linkage of TRP channels to inflammatory CV diseases, from a viewpoint of inflammation in a general sense which is not restricted to the innate immunity. These knowledge may serve to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of various inflammatory CV diseases and their novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. Chronic systemic inflammation originating from epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluçkan, Özge; Wagner, Erwin F

    2017-02-01

    Chronic systemic inflammation (CSI) has recently been identified as a major contributor to common diseases ranging from cancer to metabolic disorders and neurologic alterations. In the last decade, we and others have generated genetically engineered mouse models for inflammatory diseases, which enable studying the molecular mechanisms of CSI. Recently, organ cross-talk induced by CSI under homeostatic and pathological conditions has begun to be appreciated. In this review, we will revisit whole organism physiology in relation to CSI originating from epithelial tissues, such as the skin and gut. Furthermore, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding the mechanisms, the specific immune cells and molecules responsible for inducing the most common comorbidities, such as cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurological complications, as well as bone loss, in heterogeneous diseases like psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. As it would be impossible to discuss all comorbidities of these diseases as well as all epithelial tissues, we present an overview with a special emphasis on our recent findings linking skin inflammation to bone loss. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Fluorescent light induces neurodegeneration in the rodent nigrostriatal system but near infrared LED light does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Stefania; Vitale, Flora; Viaggi, Cristina; di Marco, Stefano; Aloisi, Gabriella; Fasciani, Irene; Pardini, Carla; Pietrantoni, Ilaria; Di Paolo, Mattia; Riccitelli, Serena; Maccarone, Rita; Mattei, Claudia; Capannolo, Marta; Rossi, Mario; Capozzo, Annamaria; Corsini, Giovanni U; Scarnati, Eugenio; Lozzi, Luca; Vaglini, Francesca; Maggio, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous artificial light exposure on the mouse substantia nigra (SN). A three month exposure of C57Bl/6J mice to white fluorescent light induced a 30% reduction in dopamine (DA) neurons in SN compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease of DA and its metabolites in the striatum. After six months of exposure, neurodegeneration progressed slightly, but the level of DA returned to the basal level, while the metabolites increased with respect to the control. Three month exposure to near infrared LED light (∼710nm) did not alter DA neurons in SN, nor did it decrease DA and its metabolites in the striatum. Furthermore mesencephalic cell viability, as tested by [ 3 H]DA uptake, did not change. Finally, we observed that 710nm LED light, locally conveyed in the rat SN, could modulate the firing activity of extracellular-recorded DA neurons. These data suggest that light can be detrimental or beneficial to DA neurons in SN, depending on the source and wavelength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nicotine administration and withdrawal affect survival in systemic inflammation models

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner, Alexandre A.; Oliveira, Daniela L.; Roberts, Jennifer L.; Petersen, Scott R.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.

    2008-01-01

    How different regimens of nicotine administration and withdrawal affect systemic inflammation is largely unknown. We studied the effects of chronic and acute nicotine administration and of nicotine withdrawal on the outcome of aseptic and septic systemic inflammation. Male C57BL/6 mice were implanted with subcutaneous osmotic pumps (to deliver nicotine) and intrabrain telemetry probes (to measure temperature). Aseptic inflammation was induced by lipopolysaccharide (40 mg/kg ip); sepsis was in...

  15. Acute brain inflammation and oxidative damage are related to long-term cognitive deficits and markers of neurodegeneration in sepsis-survivor rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, Mágada T; Pasquali, Matheus; Miguel, Samantha P; Dos Santos, João Paulo A; Vuolo, Francieli; Comim, Clarissa M; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Quevedo, João; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2014-02-01

    Survivors from sepsis present long-term cognitive deficits and some of these alterations resemble the pathophysiological mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases. For this reason, we analyzed beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and synaptophysin levels in the brain of rats that survived from sepsis and their relation to cognitive dysfunction and to acute brain inflammation. Sepsis was induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture, and 30 days after surgery, the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were isolated just after cognitive evaluation by the inhibitory avoidance test. The immunocontent of Aβ and synaptophysin were analyzed by Western blot analysis. Aβ increased and synaptophysin decreased in septic animals both in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex concurrent with the presence of cognitive deficits. Prefrontal levels of synaptophysin correlated to the performance in the inhibitory avoidance. Two different treatments known to decrease brain inflammation and oxidative stress when administered at the acute phase of sepsis decreased Aβ levels both in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, increased synaptophysin levels only in the prefrontal cortex, and improved cognitive deficit in sepsis-survivor animals. In conclusion, we demonstrated that brain from sepsis-survivor animals presented an increase in Aβ content and a decrease in synaptophysin levels and cognitive impairment. These alterations can be prevented by treatments aimed to decrease acute brain inflammation and oxidative stress.

  16. The Immune System in Tissue Environments Regaining Homeostasis after Injury: Is "Inflammation" Always Inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Onkar P; Lichtnekert, Julia; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a response to infections or tissue injuries. Inflammation was once defined by clinical signs, later by the presence of leukocytes, and nowadays by expression of "proinflammatory" cytokines and chemokines. But leukocytes and cytokines often have rather anti-inflammatory, proregenerative, and homeostatic effects. Is there a need to redefine "inflammation"? In this review, we discuss the functions of "inflammatory" mediators/regulators of the innate immune system that determine tissue environments to fulfill the need of the tissue while regaining homeostasis after injury.

  17. Evaluation of classification systems for nonspecific idiopathic orbital inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Ward R.; van 't Hullenaar, Fleur C.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Kalmann, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    To systematically analyze existing classification systems for idiopathic orbital inflammation (IOI) and propose and test a new best practice classification system. A systematic literature search was conducted to find all studies that described and applied a classification system for IOI.

  18. Comorbidity, systemic inflammation and outcomes in the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Joy; Edwards, Lisa D; Agustí, Alvar

    2013-01-01

    Comorbidities, are common in COPD, have been associated with poor outcomes and are thought to relate to systemic inflammation. To investigate comorbidities in relation to systemic inflammation and outcomes we recorded comorbidities in a well characterized cohort (ECLIPSE study) for 2164 clinically...

  19. Metals and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Miah, Mahfuzur Rahman; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain–Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and Wilson’s disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration. PMID:27006759

  20. A systems biology approach to study systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Wu, Chia-Chou

    2014-01-01

    Systemic inflammation needs a precise control on the sequence and magnitude of occurring events. The high throughput data on the host-pathogen interactions gives us an opportunity to have a glimpse on the systemic inflammation. In this article, a dynamic Candida albicans-zebrafish interactive infectious network is built as an example to demonstrate how systems biology approach can be used to study systematic inflammation. In particular, based on microarray data of C. albicans and zebrafish during infection, the hyphal growth, zebrafish, and host-pathogen intercellular PPI networks were combined to form an integrated infectious PPI network that helps us understand the systematic mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of C. albicans and the immune response of the host. The signaling pathways for morphogenesis and hyphal growth of C. albicans were 2 significant interactions found in the intercellular PPI network. Two cellular networks were also developed corresponding to the different infection stages (adhesion and invasion), and then compared with each other to identify proteins to gain more insight into the pathogenic role of hyphal development in the C. albicans infection process. Important defense-related proteins in zebrafish were predicted using the same approach. This integrated network consisting of intercellular invasion and cellular defense processes during infection can improve medical therapies and facilitate development of new antifungal drugs.

  1. Lamin-B in systemic inflammation, tissue homeostasis, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-01-01

    Gradual loss of tissue function (or homeostasis) is a natural process of aging and is believed to cause many age-associated diseases. In human epidemiology studies, the low-grade and chronic systemic inflammation in elderly has been correlated with the development of aging related pathologies. Although it is suspected that tissue decline is related to systemic inflammation, the cause and consequence of these aging phenomena are poorly understood. By studying the Drosophila fat body and gut, we have uncovered a mechanism by which lamin-B loss in the fat body upon aging induces age-associated systemic inflammation. This chronic inflammation results in the repression of gut local immune response, which in turn leads to the over-proliferation and mis-differentiation of the intestinal stem cells, thereby resulting in gut hyperplasia. Here we discuss the implications and remaining questions in light of our published findings and new observations.

  2. The stress system in depression and neurodegeneration: Focus on the human hypothalamus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, A.-M.; Meynen, G.; Swaab, D.F.

    2008-01-01

    The stress response is mediated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system. Activity of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) forms the basis of the activity of the HPA-axis. The CRH neurons induce adrenocorticotropin (ACTH)

  3. The stress system in depression and neurodegeneration: focus on the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, A-M; Meynen, G; Swaab, D F

    2008-03-01

    The stress response is mediated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system. Activity of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) forms the basis of the activity of the HPA-axis. The CRH neurons induce adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) release from the pituitary, which subsequently causes cortisol release from the adrenal cortex. The CRH neurons co-express vasopressin (AVP) which potentiates the CRH effects. CRH neurons project not only to the median eminence but also into brain areas where they, e.g., regulate the adrenal innervation of the autonomic system and affect mood. The hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system is also involved in stress response. It releases AVP from the PVN and the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and oxytocin (OXT) from the PVN via the neurohypophysis into the bloodstream. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the hypothalamic clock, is responsible for the rhythmic changes of the stress system. Both centrally released CRH and increased levels of cortisol contribute to the signs and symptoms of depression. Symptoms of depression can be induced in experimental animals by intracerebroventricular injection of CRH. Depression is also a frequent side effect of glucocorticoid treatment and of the symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. The AVP neurons in the hypothalamic PVN and SON are also activated in depression, which contributes to the increased release of ACTH from the pituitary. Increased levels of circulating AVP are also associated with the risk for suicide. The prevalence, incidence and morbidity risk for depression are higher in females than in males and fluctuations in sex hormone levels are considered to be involved in the etiology. About 40% of the activated CRH neurons in mood disorders co-express nuclear estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha in the PVN, while estrogen-responsive elements have been found in the CRH gene promoter region, and estrogens stimulate CRH production. An androgen

  4. Human endotoxemia as a model of systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K.S.; Krogh-Madsen, R.; Taudorf, S.

    2008-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a pathogenetic component in a vast number of acute and chronic diseases such as sepsis, trauma, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, all of which are associated with a substantial morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular mechanisms...... and physiological significance of the systemic inflammatory response are still not fully understood. The human endotoxin model, an in vivo model of systemic inflammation in which lipopolysaccharide is injected or infused intravenously in healthy volunteers, may be helpful in unravelling these issues. The present...

  5. Intestinal parasites : associations with intestinal and systemic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavala, Gerardo A; García, Olga P; Camacho, Mariela; Ronquillo, Dolores; Campos-Ponce, Maiza; Doak, Colleen; Polman, Katja; Rosado, Jorge L

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Evaluate associations between intestinal parasitic infection with intestinal and systemic inflammatory markers in school-aged children with high rates of obesity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Plasma concentrations of CRP, leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were measured as systemic inflammation markers and

  6. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...... (MS) and post-traumatic inflammation. We provide evidence that chemokines play a role in amplifying the inflammatory reaction in EAE (and, probably, MS). In the context of neural trauma, chemokines appear to be primary stimuli for leukocyte recruitment. Strikingly, expression of monocyte...... that produce aggregates of simultaneous stimuli. These characteristics, in turn, mirror the expression patterns of the endogenous genes: MCP-1 is expressed under a variety of circumstances, while IP-10 appears primarily during immune-mediated processes that feature exposure of resident neuroglia to high levels...

  7. Melatonin reduces changes to small intestinal microvasculature during systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansink, Maren Oude; Patyk, Vivien; de Groot, Herbert; Effenberger-Neidnicht, Katharina

    2017-05-01

    Systemic inflammation is known to impair the microcirculation in intestine and other organs as a result of multifactorial events. Here, we show that melatonin selectively reduces changes to the small intestinal microvasculature during systemic inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was infused at a rate of 0.5 mg/kg × h to induce systemic inflammation in male Wistar rats. Melatonin (single dose: 3 mg/kg × 15 min) was intravenously administered before as well as 120 and 240 min after the beginning of the LPS infusion. Systemic parameters were determined in regular intervals. Small intestine, liver, and kidney were histologically (structure of the microvessels, intravascular blood accumulation, and hemorrhages) and immunohistochemically (mast cells, granulocytes, and macrophages) analyzed. Continuous infusion of LPS resulted in dilated microvessels with intravascular blood accumulation (congestion) in liver and small intestine, the latter being particularly pronounced. Blood vessel walls remained intact, there were no hemorrhages. Melatonin significantly reduced these changes to the microvasculature in small intestine, but not in liver. It further reduced mast cell and granulocytes count in small intestine enhanced by LPS. However, except for the systemic blood pressure, melatonin neither improved LPS-dependent changes to systemic parameters nor mortality. Changes to the microvasculature during systemic inflammation are most pronounced in small intestine. Melatonin selectively diminishes these changes to small intestinal microvasculature, probably by reducing the local immune cells recruitment. However, changes to the small intestine are not decisive for the survival. We assume that the therapeutic benefit of melatonin is more likely in local intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Meconium aspiration syndrome: a role for fetal systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Kyung A; Kim, Eun Na; Korzeniewski, Steven J; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in term infants. Meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) occurs in approximately 1 of every 7 pregnancies, but only 5% of neonates exposed to MSAF develop MAS. Why some infants exposed to meconium develop MAS while others do not is a fundamental question. Patients with MSAF have a higher frequency of intraamniotic inflammation/infection than those with clear fluid. We propose that fetal systemic inflammation is a risk factor for the development of MAS in patients with MSAF. We sought to investigate whether intraamniotic inflammation and funisitis, the histopathologic landmark of a fetal inflammatory response, predispose to MAS. A prospective cohort study was conducted from 1995 through 2009. Amniotic fluid (AF) samples (n = 1281) were collected at the time of cesarean delivery from women who delivered singleton newborns at term (gestational age ≥38 weeks). Intraamniotic inflammation was diagnosed if the AF concentration of matrix metalloproteinase-8 was >23 ng/mL. Funisitis was diagnosed by histologic examination if inflammation was present in the umbilical cord. The prevalence of MSAF was 9.2% (118/1281), and 10.2% (12/118) of neonates exposed to MSAF developed MAS. There were no significant differences in the median gestational age or umbilical cord arterial pH at birth between neonates who developed MAS and those who did not (each P > .1). Mothers whose newborns developed MAS had a higher median of AF matrix metalloproteinase-8 (456.8 vs 157.2 ng/mL, P < .05). Newborns exposed to intraamniotic inflammation had a higher rate of MAS than those who were not exposed to intraamniotic inflammation [13.0% (10/77) vs 0% (0/32), P = .03], as did those exposed to funisitis [31.3% (5/16) vs 7.3% (6/82); relative risk, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-12.3]. Among the 89 newborns for whom both AF and placental histology were available, MAS was more common in patients with both intraamniotic

  9. The endocannabinoid system: an emerging key player in inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, R.F.; Meijerink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to illustrate the expanding view of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in relation to its roles in inflammation. Recent findings: According to the formal classification, the ECS consists of two cannabinoid receptors, their endogenous fatty acid-derived

  10. Systemic inflammation decreases pain threshold in humans in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeij, M. de; Eijk, L.T.G.J. van; Vanelderen, P.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Vissers, K.C.P.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Kox, M.; Scheffer, G.J.; Pickkers, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperalgesia is a well recognized hallmark of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have been suggested to be mainly responsible, but human data are scarce. Changes in pain threshold during systemic inflammation evoked by human endotoxemia, were evaluated with three quantitative sensory

  11. Ethylene, an early marker of systemic inflammation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, L.M.; Bogaart, G. van den; Kox, M.; Dingjan, I.; Neerincx, A.H.; Bendix, M.B.; Beest, M.T.; Harren, F.J.M; Risby, T.; Pickkers, P.; Marczin, N.; Cristescu, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene is a major plant hormone mediating developmental processes and stress responses to stimuli such as infection. We show here that ethylene is also produced during systemic inflammation in humans and is released in exhaled breath. Traces of ethylene were detected by laser spectroscopy both in

  12. Systemic inflammation and lung function: A longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancox, Robert J; Gray, Andrew R; Sears, Malcolm R; Poulton, Richie

    2016-02-01

    Systemic inflammation is associated with impaired lung function in healthy adults as well as in patients with lung disease. The mechanism for this association is unknown and it is unclear if systemic inflammation leads to impaired lung function or if poor lung function leads to inflammation. We explored the temporal associations between blood C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and white blood cells, and lung function in young adults. Spirometry, plethysmography, and diffusion capacity were measured in a population-based cohort at ages 32 and 38 years. High-sensitivity CRP, fibrinogen, and white blood cells were measured at the same ages. Higher levels of CRP and, to a lesser extent, fibrinogen were associated with lower lung volumes in cross-sectional analyses at both ages 32 and 38 years. Higher CRP and fibrinogen at age 32 were associated with higher FEV1 and FEV1/FVC at age 38, but not other measures of lung function. Lower lung volumes (total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume) but not airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC) at age 32 were associated with higher CRP at age 38. Associations between age 32 lung function and fibrinogen at follow-up were weaker, but consistent. There were no longitudinal associations between white blood cells and lung function. We found no evidence that systemic inflammation causes a decline in lung function. However, lower lung volumes were associated with higher CRP and fibrinogen at follow-up indicating that pulmonary restriction may be a risk factor for systemic inflammation. The mechanism for this association remains unclear. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  14. Systems Approaches to Modeling Chronic Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Boning; Choudhary, Sanjeev; Wood, Thomas G.; Carmical, Joseph R.; Boldogh, Istvan; Mitra, Sankar; Minna, John D.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2013-01-01

    The respiratory mucosa is a major coordinator of the inflammatory response in chronic airway diseases, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Signals produced by the chronic inflammatory process induce epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) that dramatically alters the epithelial cell phenotype. The effects of EMT on epigenetic reprogramming and the activation of transcriptional networks are known, its effects on the innate inflammatory response are underexplored. We used a multiplex gene expression profiling platform to investigate the perturbations of the innate pathways induced by TGFβ in a primary airway epithelial cell model of EMT. EMT had dramatic effects on the induction of the innate pathway and the coupling interval of the canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways. Simulation experiments demonstrate that rapid, coordinated cap-independent translation of TRAF-1 and NF-κB2 is required to reduce the noncanonical pathway coupling interval. Experiments using amantadine confirmed the prediction that TRAF-1 and NF-κB2/p100 production is mediated by an IRES-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that the epigenetic changes produced by EMT induce dynamic state changes of the innate signaling pathway. Further applications of systems approaches will provide understanding of this complex phenotype through deterministic modeling and multidimensional (genomic and proteomic) profiling. PMID:24228254

  15. The prokineticin system: an interface between neural inflammation and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Silvia; Sacerdote, Paola; Panerai, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    Prokineticins (PK) 1 and 2 belong to a new family of chemokines capable to interact with two different G coupled receptors: Prokineticin receptor (PKR)1 and 2. Both prokineticins and their receptors are widely distributed in different tissues and regulate several biological functions. In particular, a role of the PK system in inflammation and nociception has been established. PKRs are expressed in regions of the nervous system associated with pain and in primary sensitive neurons they colocalize with transient potential receptor vanilloid-TRPV1 providing an anatomical interaction in nociceptor sensitization. Moreover, PKs are strongly upregulated in immune and glial cells and sustain a proinflammatory loop in inflamed tissues. Recent evidences indicate that the block of the PK system represents a promising strategy to contrast inflammation and pain.

  16. Acute and subacute IL-1β administrations differentially modulate neuroimmune and neurotrophic systems: possible implications for neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cai; Zhang, Ye; Dong, Yilong

    2013-05-07

    In Alzheimer's disease, stroke and brain injuries, activated microglia can release proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β. These cytokines may change astrocyte and neurotrophin functions, which influences neuronal survival and induces apoptosis. However, the interaction between neuroinflammation and neurotrophin functions in different brain conditions is unknown. The present study hypothesized that acute and subacute elevated IL-1β differentially modulates glial and neurotrophin functions, which are related to their role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. Rats were i.c.v. injected with saline or IL-1β for 1 or 8 days and tested in a radial maze. mRNA and protein expressions of glial cell markers, neurotrophins, neurotrophin receptors, β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were measured in the hippocampus. When compared to controls, memory deficits were found 4 days after IL-1 administrations, however the deficits were attenuated by IL-1 receptor antagonist (RA). Subacute IL-1 administrations increased expressions of APP, microglial active marker CD11b, and p75 neurotrophin receptor, and the concentration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β, but decreased expressions of astrocyte active marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrK B. By contrast, up-regulations of NGF, BDNF and TrK B expressions were found after acute IL-1 administration, which are associated with the increase in both glial marker expressions and IL-10 concentrations. However, TrK A was down-regulated by acute and up-regulated by subacute IL-1 administrations. Subacute IL-1-induced changes in the glial activities, cytokine concentrations and expressions of BDNF and p75 were reversed by IL-1RA treatment. These results indicate that acute and subacute IL-1 administrations induce different changes toward neuroprotection after acute IL-1 administrations but

  17. Toll-like receptors in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2009-01-01

    with neurodegeneration. Accompanying roles for infection and inflammation, involvement in clinical neurodegenerative disorders, and heterogeneity of glial response are discussed. A "strength of signal" hypothesis is advanced in an attempt to reconcile evolutionarily selected and therefore likely beneficial effects......Innate pattern recognition receptors are implicated in first-line defense against pathogens but also participate in maintenance of tissue homeostasis and response to injury. This chapter reviews the role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in neuronal and glial responses that are associated...

  18. Systemic inflammation worsens outcomes in emergency surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Robert D; Hoth, J Jason; Miller, Preston R; Meredith, J Wayne; Chang, Michael C

    2012-05-01

    Acute care surgeons are uniquely aware of the importance of systemic inflammatory response and its influence on postoperative outcomes; concepts like damage control have evolved from this experience. For surgeons whose practice is mostly elective, the significance of such systemic inflammation may be underappreciated. This study sought to determine the influence of preoperative systemic inflammation on postoperative outcome in patients requiring emergent colon surgery. Emergent colorectal operations were identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2008 dataset. Four groups were defined by the presence and magnitude of the inflammatory response before operation: no inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), sepsis, or severe sepsis/septic shock. Thirty-day survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 3,305 patients were identified. Thirty-day survival was significantly different (p emergency surgical patients. In SIRS or sepsis patients, operations surgical intervention and suggest a potential role for damage control operations in emergency general surgery. II, prognostic study.

  19. Moderate glucose supply reduces hemolysis during systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Jägers J; Brauckmann S; Kirsch M; Effenberger-Neidnicht K

    2018-01-01

    Johannes Jägers,1 Stephan Brauckmann,2 Michael Kirsch,1 Katharina Effenberger-Neidnicht1,3 1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany Background: Systemic inflammation alters energy metabolism. A sufficient glucose level, however, is most important for erythrocytes, since erythrocy...

  20. Moderate glucose supply reduces hemolysis during systemic inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Jägers,Johannes; Brauckmann,Stephan; Kirsch,Michael; Effenberger-Neidnicht,Katharina

    2018-01-01

    Johannes Jägers,1 Stephan Brauckmann,2 Michael Kirsch,1 Katharina Effenberger-Neidnicht1,3 1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany Background: Systemic inflammation alters energy metabolism. A sufficient glucose level, however, is most important for erythrocytes, since eryth...

  1. Systemic Th17/IL-17A response appears prior to hippocampal neurodegeneration in rats exposed to low doses of ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solleiro-Villavicencio, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2017-06-03

    Exposure to low doses of O 3 leads to a state of oxidative stress. Some studies show that oxidative stress can modulate both the CNS and systemic inflammation, which are important factors in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). This study aims to evaluate changes in the frequency of Th17-like cells (CD3 + CD4 + IL-17A + ), the concentration of IL-17A in peripheral blood, and hippocampal immunoreactivity to IL-17A in rats exposed to low doses of O 3 . One hundred eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 6 groups (n=18) receiving the following treatments: control (O 3 free) or O 3 exposure (0.25ppm, 4hours daily) over 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. Twelve animals from each group were decapitated and a peripheral blood sample was taken to isolate plasma and mononuclear cells. Plasma IL-17A was quantified using LUMINEX, while Th17-like cells were counted using flow cytometry. The remaining 6 rats were deeply anaesthetised and underwent transcardial perfusion for immunohistological study of the hippocampus. Results show that exposure to O 3 over 7 days resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of Th17-like cells and levels of IL-17A in peripheral blood. However, levels of Th17/IL-17A in peripheral blood were lower at day 15 of exposure. We also observed increased IL-17A in the hippocampus beginning at 30 days of exposure. These results indicate that O 3 induces a short-term, systemic Th17-like/IL-17A effect and an increase of IL-17A in the hippocampal tissue during the chronic neurodegenerative process. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization and differentiation of equine experimental local and early systemic inflammation by expression responses of inflammation-related genes in peripheral blood leukocytes

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    Vinther, Anne Mette L; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    , the aim of this study was to investigate the innate peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) immune response to local inflammation in horses, and to compare this response with the PBL immune response during the early phase of acute systemic inflammation. Expression of 22 selected inflammation-related genes......Local inflammation may progress into systemic inflammation. To increase our understanding of the basic immunological processes during transition of equine local inflammation into a systemic state, investigation into the equine systemic immune response to local inflammation is warranted. Therefore...... in horses initiated an innate transcriptional response in PBLs, which differed from the transcriptional response during the early phase of systemic inflammation. This study may provide new insights into the immunobiology of PBLs during the transition of local inflammation into a systemic state....

  3. Moderate glucose supply reduces hemolysis during systemic inflammation

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    Jägers J

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Jägers,1 Stephan Brauckmann,2 Michael Kirsch,1 Katharina Effenberger-Neidnicht1,3 1Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Clinic for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany Background: Systemic inflammation alters energy metabolism. A sufficient glucose level, however, is most important for erythrocytes, since erythrocytes rely on glucose as sole source of energy. Damage to erythrocytes leads to hemolysis. Both disorders of glucose metabolism and hemolysis are associated with an increased risk of death. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of intravenous glucose on hemolysis during systemic inflammation.Materials and methods: Systemic inflammation was accomplished in male Wistar rats by continuous lipopolysaccharide (LPS infusion (1 mg LPS/kg and h, 300 min. Sham control group rats received Ringer’s solution. Glucose was supplied moderately (70 mg glucose/kg and h or excessively (210 mg glucose/kg and h during systemic inflammation. Vital parameters (eg, systemic blood pressure as well as blood and plasma parameters (eg, concentrations of glucose, lactate and cell-free hemoglobin, and activity of lactate dehydrogenase were measured hourly. Clot formation was analyzed by thromboelastometry.Results: Continuous infusion of LPS led to a so-called post-aggression syndrome with disturbed electrolyte homeostasis (hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia, and hypernatremia, changes in hemodynamics (tachycardia and hypertension, and a catabolic metabolism (early hyperglycemia, late hypoglycemia, and lactate formation. It induced severe tissue injury (significant increases in plasma concentrations of transaminases and lactate dehydrogenase, alterations in blood coagulation (disturbed clot formation, and massive hemolysis. Both moderate and excessive glucose supply reduced LPS

  4. Systemic inflammation predicts all-cause mortality: a glasgow inflammation outcome study.

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    Michael J Proctor

    Full Text Available Markers of the systemic inflammatory response, including C-reactive protein and albumin (combined to form the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score, as well as neutrophil, lymphocyte and platelet counts have been shown to be prognostic of survival in patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to examine the prognostic relationship between these markers of the systemic inflammatory response and all-cause, cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular mortality in a large incidentally sampled cohort.Patients (n = 160 481 who had an incidental blood sample taken between 2000 and 2008 were studied for the prognostic value of C-reactive protein (>10mg/l, albumin (>35mg/l, neutrophil (>7.5×109/l lymphocyte and platelet counts. Also, patients (n = 52 091 sampled following the introduction of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (>3mg/l measurements were studied. A combination of these markers, to make cumulative inflammation-based scores, were investigated.In all patients (n = 160 481 C-reactive protein (>10mg/l (HR 2.71, p35mg/l (HR 3.68, p3mg/l (n = 52 091. A combination of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (>3mg/l, albumin and neutrophil count predicted all-cause (HR 7.37, p<0.001, AUC 0.723, cancer (HR 9.32, p<0.001, AUC 0.731, cardiovascular (HR 4.03, p<0.001, AUC 0.650 and cerebrovascular (HR 3.10, p<0.001, AUC 0.623 mortality.The results of the present study showed that an inflammation-based prognostic score, combining high sensitivity C-reactive protein, albumin and neutrophil count is prognostic of all-cause mortality.

  5. Pulmonary Extracellular Vesicles as Mediators of Local and Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, Casper J E; Eklund, Anders; Grunewald, Johan; Gabrielsson, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Cells of the airways are constantly exposed to environmental hazards including cigarette smoke, irritants, pathogens, and mechanical insults. Maintaining barrier integrity is vital, and mounting responses to threats depends on intercellular communication. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, are major signal mediators between cells, shuttling cargo in health and disease. Depending on the state of the originating cells, EVs are capable of inducing proinflammatory effects including antigen presentation, cellular migration, apoptosis induction, and inflammatory cytokine release. Cells of the airways release EVs, which can be found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. EVs of the airways can support inflammation in the lung, but may also exit into the circulation and carry a cocktail of pro-inflammatory molecules to recipient cells in distant organs. In this review, we discuss the possibility that EVs originating from the airways contribute to dissemination of inflammation in both lung disorders and systemic inflammatory conditions.

  6. Pulmonary Extracellular Vesicles as Mediators of Local and Systemic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Gabrielsson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the airways are constantly exposed to environmental hazards including cigarette smoke, irritants, pathogens, and mechanical insults. Maintaining barrier integrity is vital, and mounting responses to threats depends on intercellular communication. Extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes and microvesicles, are major signal mediators between cells, shuttling cargo in health and disease. Depending on the state of the originating cells, EVs are capable of inducing proinflammatory effects including antigen presentation, cellular migration, apoptosis induction, and inflammatory cytokine release. Cells of the airways release EVs, which can be found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. EVs of the airways can support inflammation in the lung, but may also exit into the circulation and carry a cocktail of pro-inflammatory molecules to recipient cells in distant organs. In this review, we discuss the possibility that EVs originating from the airways contribute to dissemination of inflammation in both lung disorders and systemic inflammatory conditions.

  7. Longitudinal effects of systemic inflammation markers on periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pink, Christiane; Kocher, Thomas; Meisel, Peter; Dörr, Marcus; Markus, Marcello R P; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Grotevendt, Anne; Nauck, Matthias; Holtfreter, Birte

    2015-11-01

    Systemic low-grade inflammation represents a central hallmark of chronic diseases and has been proposed as the underlying mechanism linking factors like obesity or diabetes with periodontitis. However, the impact of inflammatory markers on periodontitis has not yet been investigated. The study population comprised 1784 subjects from the Study of Health in Pomerania with complete 11-year follow-up. Fibrinogen and white blood cell (WBC) counts were measured as markers of inflammation. Periodontitis was assessed by probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL) and the CDC/AAP case definition. Multilevel regression analyses revealed significant coefficients for the impact of both inflammation markers on the percentage of sites with PD/CAL ≥ 3 mm. Increases in fibrinogen about 1 g/l were associated with 3.0% and 2.7% more sites with PD/CAL ≥ 3 mm respectively. Consistent associations were found using mean values of PD/CAL but not using missing teeth or caries. Regarding the CDC/AAP case definition, 11-year changes in fibrinogen and WBC counts were significantly associated with ≥1 category progression (OR: 1.36 and 1.11). Fibrinogen levels and WBC counts showed consistent long-term associations with PD, CAL and the CDC/AAP case definition. Results indicate that systemic low-grade inflammation might indeed represent one possible pathway for effects of obesity, diabetes or other chronic inflammatory conditions on periodontitis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. alpha-MSH in systemic inflammation. Central and peripheral actions.

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    Catania, A; Delgado, R; Airaghi, L; Cutuli, M; Garofalo, L; Carlin, A; Demitri, M T; Lipton, J M

    1999-10-20

    Until recently, inflammation was believed to arise from events taking place exclusively in the periphery. However, it is now clear that central neurogenic influences can either enhance or modulate peripheral inflammation. Therefore, it should be possible to improve treatment of inflammation by use of antiinflammatory agents that reduce peripheral host responses and inhibit proinflammatory signals in the central nervous system (CNS). One such strategy could be based on alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH). Increases in circulating TNF-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), induced by intraperitoneal administration of endotoxin in mice, were modulated by central injection of a small concentration of alpha-MSH. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and iNOS mRNA in lungs and liver were likewise modulated by central alpha-MSH. Increase in lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was significantly less in lungs of mice treated with central alpha-MSH. Proinflammatory agents induced by endotoxin were significantly greater after blockade of central alpha-MSH. The results suggest that antiinflammatory influences of neural origin that are triggered by alpha-MSH could be used to treat systemic inflammation. In addition to its central influences, alpha-MSH has inhibitory effects on peripheral host cells, in which it reduces release of proinflammatory mediators. alpha-MSH reduces chemotaxis of human neutrophils and production of TNF-alpha, neopterin, and NO by monocytes. In research on septic patients, alpha-MSH inhibited release of TNF-alpha, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in whole blood samples in vitro. Combined central and peripheral influences can be beneficial in treatment of sepsis.

  9. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

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    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  10. Curcumin and resveratrol rescue cortical-hippocampal system from chronic fluoride-induced neurodegeneration and enhance memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chhavi; Suhalka, Pooja; Bhatnagar, Maheep

    2018-04-13

    The aim of this study was: (1) to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol and curcumin on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase activity in neuronal cell in subregions of mice brain, (2) to evaluate the effects on antioxidant status and (3) to evaluate the protective effects of phytochemicals on learning and memory following fluoride exposure. Young mice (one month old, body weight (BW) 30 ± 5 mg) were provided with 120 ppm sodium fluoride dissolved in drinking water. They were given curcumin (30 mg/kg BW) or resveratrol (30 mg/kg BW) orally once in a day up to 30 days. Effects of resveratrol and curcumin on spatial learning and memory were studied using Morris water maze and classic maze test. Effects on brain antioxidants' (lactose dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species) status were also studied in vitro. Histochemistry was done to assess the effect of treatments on nitric oxide neurotransmitter. Our study showed that in fluoride-treated animals, the number of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase positive neurons, intracellular Ca 2+ , reactive oxygen species level, LDH and malondialdehyde concentration increased significantly. Interestingly, after treatment with curcumin or resveratrol, a significant decrease in the number of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase positive neurons and antioxidant status was observed. This decrease was more considerable in resveratrol-treated group. Our study indicates that both antioxidants, curcumin and resveratrol, are useful in reducing neurodegeneration in selective areas of cornus ammonis 1 (CA1), CA3, dentate gyrus (DG) and the cortex of mice brain and in recuperating the loss of memory and learning caused due to fluoride exposure.

  11. Systemic inflammation decreases pain threshold in humans in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Moniek; van Eijk, Lucas T; Vanelderen, Pascal; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H; Vissers, Kris C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Kox, Matthijs; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Pickkers, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hyperalgesia is a well recognized hallmark of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have been suggested to be mainly responsible, but human data are scarce. Changes in pain threshold during systemic inflammation evoked by human endotoxemia, were evaluated with three quantitative sensory testing methods. Pressure pain thresholds, electrical pain thresholds and tolerance to the cold pressor test were measured before and 2 hours after the intravenous administration of 2 ng/kg purified E. coli endotoxin in 27 healthy volunteers. Another 20 subjects not exposed to endotoxemia served as controls. Endotoxemia led to a rise in body temperature and inflammatory symptom scores and a rise in plasma TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1RA. During endotoxemia, pressure pain thresholds and electrical pain thresholds were reduced with 20 ± 4 % and 13 ± 3 %, respectively. In controls only a minor decrease in pressure pain thresholds (7 ± 3 %) and no change in electrical pain thresholds occurred. Endotoxin-treated subjects experienced more pain during the cold pressor test, and fewer subjects were able to complete the cold pressor test measurement, while in controls the cold pressor test results were not altered. Peak levels and area under curves of each individual cytokine did not correlate to a change in pain threshold measured by one of the applied quantitative sensory testing techniques. In conclusion, this study shows that systemic inflammation elicited by the administration of endotoxin to humans, results in lowering of the pain threshold measured by 3 quantitative sensory testing techniques. The current work provides additional evidence that systemic inflammation is accompanied by changes in pain perception.

  12. Systemic inflammation in COPD in relation to smoking status

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    Serapinas Danielius

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims Smoking is the main risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD that has been recently defined as a systemic pulmonary inflammatory disease. However, the impact of smoking itself on systemic inflammation in COPD patients has not yet been well established. The aim of our study was to investigate the association between inflammatory markers and smoking status. Materials and methods We compared 202 current smokers, 61 ex-smokers and 57 never-smokers, all COPD patients. Assessments included medical history, spirometry, alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT genotyping, serum AAT, C-reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor (sTNFR-1 and sTNFR-2 concentrations. Results AAT and CRP concentrations in smokers (1.75 ± 0.51 g/L and 14.4 [9.5-20.5] mg/L and ex-smokers (1.69 ± 0.43 g/L and 12.3 [8.7-16.3] mg/L were higher than in never-smokers (1.49 ± 0.38 g/L and 5.1 [2.5-8.7] mg/L; p Conclusions Our data confirm that smoking is associated with increased levels of AAT, CRP, and sTNFR-1 in COPD patients, an array of systemic inflammation markers that continue to be active even after smoking cessation.

  13. Pathogenic Inflammation and Its Therapeutic Targeting in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Timothy A.; Tsantikos, Evelyn; Hibbs, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, lupus) is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues, including skin, kidneys, and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B- and T-lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as belimumab which targets the B-cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B-cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and review the known

  14. Pathogenic inflammation and its therapeutic targeting in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Andrew Gottschalk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, lupus is a highly complex and heterogeneous autoimmune disease that most often afflicts women in their child-bearing years. It is characterized by circulating self-reactive antibodies that deposit in tissues including skin, kidneys and brain, and the ensuing inflammatory response can lead to irreparable tissue damage. Over many years, clinical trials in SLE have focused on agents that control B and T lymphocyte activation, and, with the single exception of an agent known as Belimumab which targets the B cell survival factor BAFF, they have been disappointing. At present, standard therapy for SLE with mild disease is the agent hydroxychloroquine. During disease flares, steroids are often used, while the more severe manifestations with major organ involvement warrant potent, broad-spectrum immuno-suppression with cyclophosphamide or mycophenolate. Current treatments have severe and dose-limiting toxicities and thus a more specific therapy targeting a causative factor or signaling pathway would be greatly beneficial in SLE treatment. Moreover, the ability to control inflammation alongside B cell activation may be a superior approach for disease control. There has been a recent focus on the innate immune system and associated inflammation, which has uncovered key players in driving the pathogenesis of SLE. Delineating some of these intricate inflammatory mechanisms has been possible with studies using spontaneous mouse mutants and genetically engineered mice. These strains, to varying degrees, exhibit hallmarks of the human disease and therefore have been utilized to model human SLE and to test new drugs. Developing a better understanding of the initiation and perpetuation of disease in SLE may uncover suitable novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we discuss the involvement of inflammation in SLE disease pathogenesis, with a focus on several key proinflammatory cytokines and myeloid growth factors, and

  15. Systemic inflammation and COPD: the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Robert E; Wilk, Jemma B; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Keaney, John F; Lipinska, Izabella; O'Connor, George T; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm for the pathogenesis of COPD includes an ultimately maladaptive local inflammatory response to environmental stimuli. We examined the hypothesis that systemic inflammatory biomarkers are associated with impaired lung function, particularly among those with extensive cigarette smoking. Using data from the Framingham Heart Study, we examined cross-sectional associations of systemic inflammatory biomarkers (CD40 ligand [CD40L], intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1, interleukin [IL]-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, P-selectin, and myeloperoxidase, in addition to C-reactive protein) to impaired lung function. IL-6 was consistently associated with impaired lung function; a 1-SD higher concentration of IL-6 was associated with a 41-mL lower FEV(1) (95% confidence interval [CI], - 61 to - 20) and a borderline 15% higher odds of COPD (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.34). Additionally, P-selectin was associated with lower FEV(1) levels; after adjusting for the other biomarkers, a 1-SD higher concentration of P-selectin predicted an FEV(1) that was on average 19 mL lower (95% CI, - 37 to 0). Including the biomarkers individually as sole exposures in the models generally strengthened the impaired lung function/biomarker association; the relations of ICAM-1 to FEV(1), and ICAM and CD40L to COPD became significant. The observed associations did not vary significantly with smoking history, except that the association between CD40L and COPD appeared greater in individuals with more extensive smoking histories. Among participants in the Framingham Heart Study, systemic inflammation was associated with lower levels of pulmonary function. Further research into the role of systemic inflammation in the development of pulmonary dysfunction is merited.

  16. Inflammation and its resolution and the musculoskeletal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Gallo

    2017-07-01

    The translational potential of this article: Understanding the mechanisms of inflammation and its resolution is therefore critical for the development of effective regenerative, and therapeutic strategies in orthopaedics.

  17. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation and depression and fatigue in moderate clinically stable COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-shair, Khaled; Kolsum, Umme; Dockry, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    COPD is an inflammatory disease with major co-morbidities. It has recently been suggested that depression may be the result of systemic inflammation. We aimed to explore the association between systemic inflammation and symptoms of depression and fatigue in patients with mainly moderate and clini......COPD is an inflammatory disease with major co-morbidities. It has recently been suggested that depression may be the result of systemic inflammation. We aimed to explore the association between systemic inflammation and symptoms of depression and fatigue in patients with mainly moderate...

  18. The relationship between inflammation and the coagulation system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Goda; Schultz, Marcus J.; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation and coagulation play pivotal roles in host defence. As phylogenetically old responses, there is extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in enabling an adequate immune response against potentially injurious stimuli. Immune cells are important in the initiation of

  19. Systemic Inflammation and Evidence of a Cardio-splenic Axis in Patients with Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Kasper F; Gormsen, Lars C; Vendelbo, Mikkel H

    2017-01-01

    The spleen is thought to play a role in atherosclerosis-associated immunity and cardiovascular research has indicated the existence of a cardio-splenic axis. The aim of this study was to assess splenic 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake as a measure of systemic inflammation in patients with untreated...... inflammation. These results support the existence of systemic inflammation in patients with psoriasis, and provide the rationale for a mechanistic link between psoriasis-driven inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidity through a spleen-atherosclerotic axis....

  20. Inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, S.; Puentes, F.; Baker, D.; van der Valk, P.

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegeneration, the slow and progressive dysfunction and loss of neurons and axons in the central nervous system, is the primary pathological feature of acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, neurotropic viral infections, stroke,

  1. Neurodegeneration med jernakkumulation i hjernen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Maria; Hansen, Lars Kjærsgaard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) is a heterogeneous group of syndromes. Whereas NBIA1 (panto-thenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration) has been known since 1922, some of the other diseases in the NBIA group have just been known for a few years. We present the case of a 16......-year-old man who recently was diagnosed with NBIA4. He had had neurodegenerative symptoms since he was eight years old. The typical MRI findings in the basal ganglia were important in diagnosing NBIA. Furthermore gait analysis and specific genetic testing were performed....

  2. Attenuation and scatter correction in I-123 FP-CIT SPECT do not affect the clinical diagnosis of dopaminergic system neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Miho; Abe, Koichiro; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Momose, Mitsuru; Fukushima, Kenji; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Sakai, Shuji

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of different reconstruction factors in N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-I-123 iodophenyl)nortropane (I-123 FP-CIT) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images for the diagnosis of dopaminergic system neurodegeneration (DSND).Seventy-three patients (38 females, 35 males) suspected of DSND were included in this study. The patients were divided into 3 groups on the basis of their final clinical diagnoses; patients with Parkinson disease (group 1, n = 36), patients with other DSND (group 2, n = 19), patients without DSND (group 3, n = 18). FP-CIT accumulation in the striata was evaluated visually and semiquantitatively. SPECT images were classified visually as normal or abnormal based on the previous report. For semiquantitative analysis, we used DaTView software (Aze Corporation), and specific binding ratios (SBR) and asymmetry indices (AI) were calculated. Visual and semiquantitative evaluations for different reconstruction factors were compared among the 3 groups.In the visual evaluation, there were no differences among DSND diagnostic capabilities of attenuation and scatter correction by computed tomography attenuation correction scatter correction, computed tomography attenuation correction, Chang attenuation correction, and non-attenuation and -scatter correction. In the semiquantitative evaluation, receiver operating characteristic analysis of SBR and AI for clinical DSND diagnostic ability (group 1+2 vs 3) showed no significant difference among the reconstruction factors by multiple comparisons.Although the values of SBR and AI were changed and image quality could be improved when attenuation correction and/or scatter correction were applied, the clinical impact of these reconstruction factors for the diagnosis of DSND was negligible.

  3. The association between subgingival periodontal pathogens and systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Lewis; Patterson, Christopher C; Cullen, Kathy M; Stevenson, Kathryn A; Lundy, Fionnuala T; Kee, Frank; Linden, Gerard J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate associations between periodontal disease pathogens and levels of systemic inflammation measured by C-reactive protein (CRP). A representative sample of dentate 60-70-year-old men in Northern Ireland had a comprehensive periodontal examination. Men taking statins were excluded. Subgingival plaque samples were analysed by quantitative real time PCR to identify the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia. High-sensitivity CRP (mg/l) was measured from fasting blood samples. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed using log-transformed CRP concentration as the dependent variable, with the presence of each periodontal pathogen as predictor variables, with adjustment for various potential confounders. A total of 518 men (mean age 63.6 SD 3.0 years) were included in the analysis. Multiple regression analysis showed that body mass index (p < 0.001), current smoking (p < 0.01), the detectable presence of P. gingivalis (p < 0.01) and hypertension (p = 0.01), were independently associated with an increased CRP. The detectable presence of P. gingivalis was associated with a 20% (95% confidence interval 4-35%) increase in CRP (mg/l) after adjustment for all other predictor variables. In these 60-70-year-old dentate men, the presence of P. gingivalis in subgingival plaque was significantly associated with a raised level of C-reactive protein. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. STAT3 in the systemic inflammation of cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmers, Teresa A; Fishel, Melissa L; Bonetto, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Weight loss is diagnostic of cachexia, a debilitating syndrome contributing mightily to morbidity and mortality in cancer. Most research has probed mechanisms leading to muscle atrophy and adipose wasting in cachexia; however cachexia is a truly systemic phenomenon. Presence of the tumor elicits an inflammatory response and profound metabolic derangements involving not only muscle and fat, but also the hypothalamus, liver, heart, blood, spleen and likely other organs. This global response is orchestrated in part through circulating cytokines that rise in conditions of cachexia. Exogenous Interleukin-6 (IL6) and related cytokines can induce most cachexia symptomatology, including muscle and fat wasting, the acute phase response and anemia, while IL-6 inhibition reduces muscle loss in cancer. Although mechanistic studies are ongoing, certain of these cachexia phenotypes have been causally linked to the cytokine-activated transcription factor, STAT3, including skeletal muscle wasting, cardiac dysfunction and hypothalamic inflammation. Correlative studies implicate STAT3 in fat wasting and the acute phase response in cancer cachexia. Parallel data in non-cancer models and disease states suggest both pathological and protective functions for STAT3 in other organs during cachexia. STAT3 also contributes to cancer cachexia through enhancing tumorigenesis, metastasis and immune suppression, particularly in tumors associated with high prevalence of cachexia. This review examines the evidence linking STAT3 to multi-organ manifestations of cachexia and the potential and perils for targeting STAT3 to reduce cachexia and prolong survival in cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Leptin and ghrelin: Sewing metabolism onto neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Candia, Paola; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2017-12-15

    Life expectancy has considerably increased over the last decades. The negative consequence of this augmented longevity has been a dramatic increase of age-related chronic neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and multiple sclerosis. Epidemiology is telling us there exists a strong correlation between the neuronal loss characterizing these disorders and metabolic dysfunction. This review aims at presenting the evidence supporting the existence of a molecular system linking metabolism with neurodegeneration, with a specific focus on the role of two hormones with a key role in the regulatory cross talk between metabolic imbalance and the damage of nervous system: leptin and ghrelin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Amorphous silica nanoparticles impair vascular homeostasis and induce systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemmar A

    2014-06-01

    , thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase, were not affected by SiNPs. The in vitro exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to SiNPs showed a reduced cellular viability, and more potency was seen with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs caused a decrease in endothelium-dependent relaxation of isolated small mesenteric arteries. We conclude that amorphous SiNPs cause systemic inflammation and coagulation events, and alter vascular reactivity. Overall, the effects observed with 50 nm SiNPs were more pronounced than those with 500 nm SiNPs. These findings provide new insight into the deleterious effect of amorphous SiNPs on vascular homeostasis. Keywords: amorphous silica nanoparticles, thrombosis, toxicity, systemic inflammation

  7. Initiation and propagation of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haass, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the molecular and pathological bases of neurodegeneration, there have been few successes in the clinic and a number of fundamental questions remain unanswered. Is this skepticism misplaced, or do the words of Sir Isaac Newton hold true, that "what we know is a drop, what we don't know is an ocean"?

  8. Neurodegeneration in the diabetic eye

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Bandello, F

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR), one of the leading causes of preventable blindness, has been considered a microcirculatory disease of the retina. However, there is emerging evidence to suggest that retinal neurodegeneration is an early event in the pathogenesis of DR, which participates in the develop...

  9. Blocking neurogenic inflammation for the treatment of acute disorders of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kate Marie; Turner, Renée Jade; Vink, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Classical inflammation is a well-characterized secondary response to many acute disorders of the central nervous system. However, in recent years, the role of neurogenic inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases has gained increasing attention, with a particular focus on its effects on modulation of the blood-brain barrier BBB. The neuropeptide substance P has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability following acute injury to the brain and is associated with marked cerebral edema. Its release has also been shown to modulate classical inflammation. Accordingly, blocking substance P NK1 receptors may provide a novel alternative treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of neurogenic inflammation in the central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of substance P and neurogenic inflammation in acute injury to the central nervous system following traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and meningitis.

  10. Blocking Neurogenic Inflammation for the Treatment of Acute Disorders of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Marie Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical inflammation is a well-characterized secondary response to many acute disorders of the central nervous system. However, in recent years, the role of neurogenic inflammation in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases has gained increasing attention, with a particular focus on its effects on modulation of the blood-brain barrier BBB. The neuropeptide substance P has been shown to increase blood-brain barrier permeability following acute injury to the brain and is associated with marked cerebral edema. Its release has also been shown to modulate classical inflammation. Accordingly, blocking substance P NK1 receptors may provide a novel alternative treatment to ameliorate the deleterious effects of neurogenic inflammation in the central nervous system. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the role of substance P and neurogenic inflammation in acute injury to the central nervous system following traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, stroke, and meningitis.

  11. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer's disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may be

  12. Intestinal Dysbiosis, Barrier Dysfunction, and Bacterial Translocation Account for CKD-Related Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kirstin; Kesper, Marie Sophie; Marschner, Julian A; Konrad, Lukas; Ryu, Mi; Kumar Vr, Santhosh; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Mulay, Shrikant R; Romoli, Simone; Demleitner, Jana; Schiller, Patrick; Dietrich, Alexander; Müller, Susanna; Gross, Oliver; Ruscheweyh, Hans-Joachim; Huson, Daniel H; Stecher, Bärbel; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    CKD associates with systemic inflammation, but the underlying cause is unknown. Here, we investigated the involvement of intestinal microbiota. We report that collagen type 4 α3-deficient mice with Alport syndrome-related progressive CKD displayed systemic inflammation, including increased plasma levels of pentraxin-2 and activated antigen-presenting cells, CD4 and CD8 T cells, and Th17- or IFNγ-producing T cells in the spleen as well as regulatory T cell suppression. CKD-related systemic inflammation in these mice associated with intestinal dysbiosis of proteobacterial blooms, translocation of living bacteria across the intestinal barrier into the liver, and increased serum levels of bacterial endotoxin. Uremia did not affect secretory IgA release into the ileum lumen or mucosal leukocyte subsets. To test for causation between dysbiosis and systemic inflammation in CKD, we eradicated facultative anaerobic microbiota with antibiotics. This eradication prevented bacterial translocation, significantly reduced serum endotoxin levels, and fully reversed all markers of systemic inflammation to the level of nonuremic controls. Therefore, we conclude that uremia associates with intestinal dysbiosis, intestinal barrier dysfunction, and bacterial translocation, which trigger the state of persistent systemic inflammation in CKD. Uremic dysbiosis and intestinal barrier dysfunction may be novel therapeutic targets for intervention to suppress CKD-related systemic inflammation and its consequences. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. Brain morphology links systemic inflammation to cognitive function in midlife adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsland, Anna L; Gianaros, Peter J; Kuan, Dora C-H; Sheu, Lei K; Krajina, Katarina; Manuck, Stephen B

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is linked to cognitive decline in midlife, but the neural basis for this link is unclear. One possibility is that inflammation associates with adverse changes in brain morphology, which accelerates cognitive aging and later dementia risk. Clear evidence is lacking, however, regarding whether inflammation relates to cognition in midlife via changes in brain morphology. Accordingly, the current study examines whether associations of inflammation with cognitive function are mediated by variation in cortical gray matter volume among midlife adults. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP), relatively stable markers of peripheral systemic inflammation, were assessed in 408 community volunteers aged 30-54 years. All participants underwent structural neuroimaging to assess global and regional brain morphology and completed neuropsychological tests sensitive to early changes in cognitive function. Measurements of brain morphology (regional tissue volumes and cortical thickness and surface area) were derived using Freesurfer. Higher peripheral inflammation was associated with poorer spatial reasoning, short term memory, verbal proficiency, learning and memory, and executive function, as well as lower cortical gray and white matter volumes, hippocampal volume and cortical surface area. Mediation models with age, sex and intracranial volume as covariates showed cortical gray matter volume to partially mediate the association of inflammation with cognitive performance. Exploratory analyses of body mass suggested that adiposity may be a source of the inflammation linking brain morphology to cognition. Inflammation and adiposity might relate to cognitive decline via influences on brain morphology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Areca nut chewing and systemic inflammation: evidence of a common pathway for systemic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafique Kashif

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Areca nut, the seed of fruit of an oriental palm, known as Areca catechu, is commonly chewed in many countries. Diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, oropharyngeal and oesophageal cancers have been associated with areca nut chewing and the mechanism by which areca nut chewing increases the risk of systemic diseases remains elusive. We hypothesize that systemic inflammation may be elevated among areca nut users, which is linked with many systemic diseases. Therefore, this present study was conducted to examine the systemic inflammation among areca nut chewers and healthy controls. Methods This was an observational cross sectional study carried out on areca nut chewers and healthy individuals in Karachi, Pakistan. Participants were selected from a region of the city by invitation request sent from door to door. Information was collected regarding the socio-demographic profile and the pattern of use, and a blood sample was obtained to measure the level of C-reactive protein (CRP. We carried out multiple logistic regressions to investigate the association between socio-demographic profile, areca nut chewing and CRP levels. Results We carried out final analysis on 1112 individuals of which 556 were areca nut chewers and 556 were the age, gender and area matched controls. Areca nut chewers had a significantly higher proportion of men (15.1%, n = 84 who had an elevated CRP (>10 mg/dl as compared to controls (5.2%, n = 29. Multivariate analyses showed that areca nut chewers had significantly higher odds of an elevated CRP (OR = 3.23, 95% CI 2.08-5.02, p value Conclusions Areca nut chewing has a significant association with systemic inflammation. Further work is required to confirm that systemic inflammation is the main pathway by which areca nut use increases the risk of systemic diseases.

  15. The Role of Environmental Exposures in Neurodegeneration and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jason R.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegeneration describes the loss of neuronal structure and function. Numerous neurodegenerative diseases are associated with neurodegeneration. Many are rare and stem from purely genetic causes. However, the prevalence of major neurodegenerative diseases is increasing with improvements in treating major diseases such as cancers and cardiovascular diseases, resulting in an aging population. The neurological consequences of neurodegeneration in patients can have devastating effects on mental and physical functioning. The causes of most cases of prevalent neurodegenerative diseases are unknown. The role of neurotoxicant exposures in neurodegenerative disease has long been suspected, with much effort devoted to identifying causative agents. However, causative factors for a significant number of cases have yet to be identified. In this review, the role of environmental neurotoxicant exposures on neurodegeneration in selected major neurodegenerative diseases is discussed. Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were chosen because of available data on environmental influences. The special sensitivity the nervous system exhibits to toxicant exposure and unifying mechanisms of neurodegeneration are explored. PMID:21914720

  16. Regulation of hippocampal neurogenesis by systemic factors including stress, glucocorticoids, sleep, and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, P.J.; Oomen, C.; van Dam, A.-M.; Czéh, B.; Gage, F.H.; Kempermann, G.; Song, H.

    2008-01-01

    This review summarizes and discusses the regulation of adult neurogenesis and hippocampal cellular plasticity by systemic factors. We focus on the role of stress, glucocorticoids, and related factors such as sleep deprivation and inflammation.

  17. Probing neurodegeneration and aging: A PET approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanBrocklin, H.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging has received wide application to the study of the aging brain and its diseases, most notably Parkinson`s Disease (PD) and Alzheimer`s Disease (AD). Basic neurological processes such as blood flow and glucose metabolism have been most often measured. Radioligands developed for specific neurochemical systems have amplified the flow and metabolism studies by more precisely defining the changes associated with degenerative processes. Our present research focuses on two additional applications of radiopharmaceutical development and PET imaging - (1) investigating the fundamental mechanisms of neurodegeneration and aging, and (2) assessing novel therapeutic intervention for PD with PET imaging. We have synthesized fluorine-18 labeled analogs of rotenone, a natural product that possesses high affinity to Complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and evaluated their potential to study changes in neuronal mitochondrial density and function. A large body evidence points to mitochondrial dysfunction as a key factor in aging and neurodegeneration. We are also currently evaluating the use of genetically transfected cells to treat PD. Primates are being imaged with [{sup 18}F]flouro-m-L-tyrosine before and after MPTP Parkinsonian type lesioning and following implantation of genetically altered cells capable of secreting tyrosine hydroxylase into the lesioned area. The ability to develop and apply PET probes has significantly enhanced the understanding of normal, aging, and degenerative processes of the brain.

  18. The Immune System in Tissue Environments Regaining Homeostasis after Injury: Is “Inflammation” Always Inflammation?

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, Onkar P.; Lichtnekert, Julia; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a response to infections or tissue injuries. Inflammation was once defined by clinical signs, later by the presence of leukocytes, and nowadays by expression of “proinflammatory” cytokines and chemokines. But leukocytes and cytokines often have rather anti-inflammatory, proregenerative, and homeostatic effects. Is there a need to redefine “inflammation”? In this review, we discuss the functions of “inflammatory” mediators/regulators of the innate immune system that determine t...

  19. Estrogens, Neuroinflammation, and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Alessandro; Vegeto, Elisabetta; Poletti, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory activation of microglia is a hallmark of several disorders of the central nervous system. In addition to protecting the brain against inflammatory insults, microglia are neuroprotective and play a significant role in maintaining neuronal connectivity, but the prolongation of an inflammatory status may limit the beneficial functions of these immune cells. The finding that estrogen receptors are present in monocyte-derived cells and that estrogens prevent and control the inflammatory response raise the question of the role that this sex steroid plays in the manifestation and progression of pathologies that have a clear sex difference in prevalence, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The present review aims to provide a critical review of the current literature on the actions of estrogen in microglia and on the involvement of estrogen receptors in the manifestation of selected neurological disorders. This current understanding highlights a research area that should be expanded to identify appropriate replacement therapies to slow the progression of such diseases. PMID:27196727

  20. Regulation of diet-induced adipose tissue and systemic inflammation by salicylates and pioglitazone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Sunny Kim

    Full Text Available It is increasingly accepted that chronic inflammation participates in obesity-induced insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. Salicylates and thiazolidinediones (TZDs both have anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperglycemic properties. The present study compared the effects of these drugs on obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue (AT and AT macrophages (ATMs, as well as the metabolic and immunological phenotypes of the animal models. Both drugs improved high fat diet (HFD-induced insulin resistance. However, salicylates did not affect AT and ATM inflammation, whereas Pioglitazone improved these parameters. Interestingly, HFD and the drug treatments all modulated systemic inflammation as assessed by changes in circulating immune cell numbers and activation states. HFD increased the numbers of circulating white blood cells, neutrophils, and a pro-inflammatory monocyte subpopulation (Ly6C(hi, whereas salicylates and Pioglitazone normalized these cell numbers. The drug treatments also decreased circulating lymphocyte numbers. These data suggest that obesity induces systemic inflammation by regulating circulating immune cell phenotypes and that anti-diabetic interventions suppress systemic inflammation by normalizing circulating immune phenotypes.

  1. [Systemic inflammation among stable ex smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales S, Arturo; Dreyse D, Jorge; Díaz P, Orlando; Saldías P, Fernando; Carrasco, Marcela; Lisboa B, Carmen

    2010-08-01

    Low grade systemic inflammation is commonly observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To evaluate the extent of systemic inflammation in a group of ex-smokers with COPD in stable condition and its relation with pulmonary function and clinical manifestations. We studied 104 ex-smokers aged 69 ± 8 years (62 males) with mild to very severe COPD and 52 healthy non-smoker subjects aged 66 ± 11 years (13 males) as control group. High sensitivity serum C reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL6), fibrinogen (F) and neutrophil count (Nc) were measured. Forced expiratory volume in the first minute (FEV1), inspiratory capacity (IC), arterial blood gases, six minutes walking test, dyspnea and body mass index (BMI) were measured, calculating the BODE index. Health status was assessed using the Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), the chronic respiratory questionnaire (CRQ), registering the number of acute exacerbations (AE) during the previous year and inhaled steroids use. Systemic inflammation was considered present when levels of CRP or IL6 were above the percentile 95 of controls (7.98 mg/L and 3.42 pg/ml, respectively). COPD patients had significantly higher CRP and IL6 levels than controls. Their F and Nc levels were within normal limits. Systemic inflammation was present in 56 patients, which had similar disease severity and frequency of inhaled steroid use, compared with patients without inflammation. Patients with systemic inflammation had more AE in the previous year; lower inspiratory capacity, greater dyspnea during the six minutes walk test and worse SGRQ and CRQ scores. Low-grade systemic inflammation was found in 56 of 104 ex-smokers with COPD. This group showed a greater degree of lung hyperinflation, dyspnea on exercise and poor quality of life.

  2. Targeting local vascular and systemic consequences of inflammation on vascular and cardiac valve calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénaut, Lucie; Sanchez-Nino, Maria Dolores; Aldamiz-Echevarría Castillo, Gonzalo; Sanz, Ana B; Ortiz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac valve calcification and vascular calcification (VC) are associated with cardiovascular mortality in the general population and in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD, diabetes mellitus, and atherosclerosis are among the causes of systemic inflammation that are associated with VC. This review collates clinical and experimental evidence that inflammation accelerates VC progression. Specifically, we review the actions of key pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation-related transcription factors on VC, and the role played by senescence. Inflammatory cytokines, such as the TNF superfamily and IL-6 superfamily, and inflammation-related transcription factor NF-κB promote calcification in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, valvular interstitial cells, or experimental animal models through direct effects, but also indirectly by decreasing circulating Fetuin A or Klotho levels. Experimental evidence suggests a causal link between inflammation and VC that would change the clinical approach to prevention and treatment of VC. However, the molecular basis remains unclear and little is known about VC in humans treated with drugs targeting inflammatory cytokines. The effect of biologicals targeting TNF-α, RANKL, IL-6, and other inflammatory mediators on VC, in addition to the impact of dietary phosphate in patients with chronic systemic inflammation, requires study.

  3. Liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system for significant inflammation related to chronic hepatitis B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Zhu Hong

    Full Text Available Liver biopsy is indispensable because liver stiffness measurement alone cannot provide information on intrahepatic inflammation. However, the presence of fibrosis highly correlates with inflammation. We constructed a noninvasive model to determine significant inflammation in chronic hepatitis B patients by using liver stiffness measurement and serum markers.The training set included chronic hepatitis B patients (n = 327, and the validation set included 106 patients; liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored, and serum markers were investigated. All patients underwent liver stiffness measurement.An inflammation activity scoring system for significant inflammation was constructed. In the training set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.964, 91.9%, and 90.8% in the HBeAg(+ patients and 0.978, 85.0%, and 94.0% in the HBeAg(- patients, respectively. In the validation set, the area under the curve, sensitivity, and specificity of the fibrosis-based activity score were 0.971, 90.5%, and 92.5% in the HBeAg(+ patients and 0.977, 95.2%, and 95.8% in the HBeAg(- patients. The liver stiffness measurement-based activity score was comparable to that of the fibrosis-based activity score in both HBeAg(+ and HBeAg(- patients for recognizing significant inflammation (G ≥3.Significant inflammation can be accurately predicted by this novel method. The liver stiffness measurement-based scoring system can be used without the aid of computers and provides a noninvasive alternative for the prediction of chronic hepatitis B-related significant inflammation.

  4. Little evidence of systemic and adipose tissue inflammation in overweight individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne M Redman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Context. The effect of weight loss by diet alone or diet in conjunction with exercise on low grade inflammation in non-obese (overweight individuals is not known.Objective. Test the hypothesis that 24 weeks of moderate CR (25% by diet only or with aerobic exercise would reduce markers of systemic inflammation and attenuate inflammation gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Design. Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Institutional Research Center. Participants. Thirty-five overweight (BMI:27.8±0.7kg/m2 but otherwise healthy participants (16M/19F completed the study. Intervention. Participants were randomized to either calorie restriction (CR: 25% reduction in energy intake, n=12, caloric restriction+exercise (CR+EX: 12.5% reduction in energy intake+12.5% increase in exercise energy expenditure, n=12 or control (healthy weight-maintenance diet, n=11 for 6 months. Main outcome measures. Fasting serum markers of inflammation (Leptin, hsCRP, IL-6, TNF-α and inflammation-related genes (CD68, IL-6, TNF-α, MIF, MCP-1, Adiponectin, PAI-1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Results. CR and CR+EX lost similar amounts of body weight (-10±1%, fat mass (-24±3%, visceral fat (-27±3% and had increased insulin sensitivity (CR:40±20%, CR+EX:66±22%. Leptin was significantly decreased from baseline (P<0.001 in both groups however TNF-α and IL-6 were not changed. hsCRP was decreased in CR+EX. There was no change in the expression of genes involved in macrophage infiltration (CD68, MIF, MCP-1, PAI-1 or inflammation (IL-6, TNF-, adiponectin in either CR or CR+EX. Conclusion. A 10% weight loss with a 25% CR diet alone or with exercise did not impact markers of systemic inflammation or the expression of inflammation-related adipose genes in overweight individuals.

  5. Physical Activity to Reduce Systemic Inflammation Associated With Chronic Pain and Obesity: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Carole A; Johnson, Mark I

    2016-04-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic pain and obesity has significant health and cost implications for economies in the developed and developing world. Evidence suggests that there is a positive correlation between obesity and chronic pain and the link between them is thought to be systemic inflammation. The aim of this narrative review was to explore the physiological links between chronic musculoskeletal pain and obesity and to consider the potential role of regular physical activity in providing a means of managing obesity-related chronic pain. Systemic inflammation, mechanical overload, and autonomic dysfunction are associated with increased prevalence and severity of chronic pain in individuals with obesity. It has been proposed, therefore, that interventions that target systemic inflammation could help to reduce chronic pain in obese individuals. Reduction in abdominal fat has been shown to alleviate pain and reduce the systemic markers of inflammation that contribute to chronic pain. Interventions that include exercise prescription have been shown to reduce both abdominal fat and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, exercise is also known to reduce pain perception and improve mental health and quality of life that also improves pain outcomes. However, adherence to formal exercise prescription is poor and therefore exercise programmes should be tailored to the interests, needs, and abilities of individuals to reduce attrition.

  6. Systemic inflammation alters satellite glial cell function and structure. A possible contribution to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, E; Procacci, P; Conte, V; Hanani, M

    2014-08-22

    Local peripheral injury activates satellite glial cells (SGCs) in sensory ganglia, which may contribute to chronic pain. We hypothesized that systemic inflammation affects sensory ganglia like local injury. We induced systemic inflammation in mice by injecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally, and characterized SGCs and neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), using dye injection, calcium imaging, electron microscopy (EM), immunohistochemistry, and electrical recordings. Several days post-LPS, SGCs were activated, and dye coupling among SGCs increased 3-4.5-fold. EM showed abnormal growth of SGC processes and the formation of new gap junctions. Sensitivity of SGCs to ATP increased twofold, and neuronal excitability was augmented. Blocking gap junctions reduced pain behavior in LPS-treated mice. Thus, changes in DRG due to systemic inflammation are similar to those due to local injury, which may explain the pain in sickness behavior and in other systemic diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effects of exercise on hypothalamic neurodegeneration of Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Khoa; Laing, Brenton Thomas; Landry, Taylor; Bunner, Wyatt; Mersaud, Naderi; Matsubara, Tomoko; Li, Peixin; Yuan, Yuan; Lu, Qun; Huang, Hu

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the central nervous system. In this study, we characterized and examined the early metabolic changes in the triple transgenic mouse AD model (3xtg-AD), and their relationship with the hypothalamus, a key regulator of metabolism in the central nervous system. We observed that the 3xtg-AD model exhibited significantly higher oxygen consumption as well as food intake before reported amyloid plaque formation, indicating that metabolic abnormalities occurred at early onset in the 3xtg-AD model compared with their counterparts. Analysis of gene expression in the hypothalamus indicated increased mRNA expression of inflammation- and apoptosis-related genes, as well as decreased gene expression of Agouti-related protein (AgRP) and Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) at 12 weeks of age. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and NPY-expressing neurons decreased at 24 weeks in the 3xtg-AD model. Four weeks of voluntary exercise were sufficient to reverse the gene expression of inflammation and apoptotic markers in the hypothalamus, six weeks of exercise improved glucose metabolism, moreover, 8 weeks of voluntary exercise training attenuated apoptosis and augmented POMC and NPY-expressing neuronal populations in the hypothalamus compared to the control group. Our results indicated that early onset of metabolic abnormalities may contribute to the pathology of AD, which is associated with increased inflammation as well as decreased neuronal population and key neuropeptides in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, early intervention by voluntary exercise normalized hypothalamic inflammation and neurodegeneration as well as glucose metabolism in the 3xtg-AD model. The data, taken as a whole, suggests a hypothalamic-mediated mechanism where exercise prevents the progression of dementia and of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:29293568

  8. The effects of exercise on hypothalamic neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoa Do

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the central nervous system. In this study, we characterized and examined the early metabolic changes in the triple transgenic mouse AD model (3xtg-AD, and their relationship with the hypothalamus, a key regulator of metabolism in the central nervous system. We observed that the 3xtg-AD model exhibited significantly higher oxygen consumption as well as food intake before reported amyloid plaque formation, indicating that metabolic abnormalities occurred at early onset in the 3xtg-AD model compared with their counterparts. Analysis of gene expression in the hypothalamus indicated increased mRNA expression of inflammation- and apoptosis-related genes, as well as decreased gene expression of Agouti-related protein (AgRP and Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R at 12 weeks of age. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and NPY-expressing neurons decreased at 24 weeks in the 3xtg-AD model. Four weeks of voluntary exercise were sufficient to reverse the gene expression of inflammation and apoptotic markers in the hypothalamus, six weeks of exercise improved glucose metabolism, moreover, 8 weeks of voluntary exercise training attenuated apoptosis and augmented POMC and NPY-expressing neuronal populations in the hypothalamus compared to the control group. Our results indicated that early onset of metabolic abnormalities may contribute to the pathology of AD, which is associated with increased inflammation as well as decreased neuronal population and key neuropeptides in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, early intervention by voluntary exercise normalized hypothalamic inflammation and neurodegeneration as well as glucose metabolism in the 3xtg-AD model. The data, taken as a whole, suggests a hypothalamic-mediated mechanism where exercise prevents the progression of dementia and of Alzheimer's disease.

  9. The effects of exercise on hypothalamic neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Khoa; Laing, Brenton Thomas; Landry, Taylor; Bunner, Wyatt; Mersaud, Naderi; Matsubara, Tomoko; Li, Peixin; Yuan, Yuan; Lu, Qun; Huang, Hu

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the central nervous system. In this study, we characterized and examined the early metabolic changes in the triple transgenic mouse AD model (3xtg-AD), and their relationship with the hypothalamus, a key regulator of metabolism in the central nervous system. We observed that the 3xtg-AD model exhibited significantly higher oxygen consumption as well as food intake before reported amyloid plaque formation, indicating that metabolic abnormalities occurred at early onset in the 3xtg-AD model compared with their counterparts. Analysis of gene expression in the hypothalamus indicated increased mRNA expression of inflammation- and apoptosis-related genes, as well as decreased gene expression of Agouti-related protein (AgRP) and Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) at 12 weeks of age. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and NPY-expressing neurons decreased at 24 weeks in the 3xtg-AD model. Four weeks of voluntary exercise were sufficient to reverse the gene expression of inflammation and apoptotic markers in the hypothalamus, six weeks of exercise improved glucose metabolism, moreover, 8 weeks of voluntary exercise training attenuated apoptosis and augmented POMC and NPY-expressing neuronal populations in the hypothalamus compared to the control group. Our results indicated that early onset of metabolic abnormalities may contribute to the pathology of AD, which is associated with increased inflammation as well as decreased neuronal population and key neuropeptides in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, early intervention by voluntary exercise normalized hypothalamic inflammation and neurodegeneration as well as glucose metabolism in the 3xtg-AD model. The data, taken as a whole, suggests a hypothalamic-mediated mechanism where exercise prevents the progression of dementia and of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Insights into Mechanisms of Chronic Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail B. Diack

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD, and prion diseases are characterised by the accumulation of abnormal conformers of a host encoded protein in the central nervous system. The process leading to neurodegeneration is still poorly defined and thus development of early intervention strategies is challenging. Unique amongst these diseases are Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases, which have the ability to transmit between individuals. The infectious nature of these diseases has permitted in vivo and in vitro modelling of the time course of the disease process in a highly reproducible manner, thus early events can be defined. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the cell-to-cell spread of protein aggregates by a “prion-like mechanism” is common among the protein misfolding diseases. Thus, the TSE models may provide insights into disease mechanisms and testable hypotheses for disease intervention, applicable to a number of these chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Structural neurodegeneration correlates with early diabetic retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Hansen, Rasmus Søgaard; Peto, Tunde

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine differences in structural and functional neurodegenerative measurements between patients with no and early diabetic retinopathy (DR). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, we examined 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In 7-field fundus photographs acquired...... with Topcon TRC-NW6S, a single, certified grader determined the presence of DR according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) scale. Retinal neurodegeneration was evaluated by Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and by a RETI-scan multifocal...... electroretinography (mf-ERG) system in rings 1-6. RESULTS: Median age and duration of diabetes were 63.6 and 10 years, respectively, and 46% were men. Median HbA1c was 50 mmol/mol (6.7%), and ETDRS levels were 10 (41.7%, n = 43), 20 (35.0%, n = 36), and 35 (23.3%, n = 24). The duration of diabetes increased...

  13. Impact of weight loss on markers of systemic inflammation in obese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Weight loss studies were conducted in children without asthma have demonstrated a reduction in systemic inflammation. However, the impact of weight loss in the obese paediatric population with asthma has not been investigated. Objective: To measure the effects of weight loss on markers of systemic ...

  14. Inhibition of systemic inflammation by central action of the neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte- stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado Hernàndez, R; Demitri, M T; Carlin, A; Meazza, C; Villa, P; Ghezzi, P; Lipton, J M; Catania, A

    1999-01-01

    The neuropeptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) reduces fever and acute inflammation in the skin when administered centrally. The aim of the present research was to determine whether central alpha-MSH can also reduce signs of systemic inflammation in mice with endotoxemia. Increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and nitric oxide, induced by intraperitoneal administration of endotoxin, were modulated by central injection of a small concentration of alpha-MSH. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and iNOS mRNA in lungs and liver were likewise modulated by central alpha-MSH. Lung myeloperoxidase activity, a marker of neutrophil infiltration, was increased in endotoxemic mice; the increase was significantly less in lungs of mice treated with central alpha-MSH. Intraperitoneal administration of the small dose of alpha-MSH that was effective centrally did not alter any of the markers of inflammation. In experiments using immunoneutralization of central alpha-MSH, we tested the idea that endogenous peptide induced within the brain during systemic inflammation modulates host responses to endotoxic challenge in peripheral tissues. The data showed that proinflammatory agents induced by endotoxin in the circulation, lungs, and liver were significantly greater after blockade of central alpha-MSH. The results suggest that anti-inflammatory influences of neural origin that are triggered by alpha-MSH could be used to treat systemic inflammation.

  15. Turning down the thermostat: Modulating the endocannabinoid system in ocular inflammation and pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thomas Toguri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS has emerged as an important regulator of both physiological and pathological processes. Notably, this endogenous system plays a key role in the modulation of pain and inflammation in a number of tissues. The components of the ECS, including endocannabinoids, their cognate enzymes and cannabinoid receptors, are localized in the eye, and evidence indicates that ECS modulation plays a role in ocular disease states. Of these diseases, ocular inflammation presents a significant medical problem, given that current clinical treatments can be ineffective or are associated with intolerable side-effects. Furthermore, a prominent comorbidity of ocular inflammation is pain, including neuropathic pain, for which therapeutic options remain limited. Recent evidence supports the use of drugs targeting the ECS for the treatment of ocular inflammation and pain in animal models; however, the potential for therapeutic use of cannabinoid drugs in the eye has not been thoroughly investigated at this time. This review will highlight evidence from experimental studies identifying components of the ocular ECS and discuss the functional role of the ECS during different ocular inflammatory disease states, including uveitis and corneal keratitis. Candidate ECS targeted therapies will be discussed, drawing on experimental results obtained from both ocular and non-ocular tissue(s, together with their potential application for the treatment of ocular inflammation and pain.

  16. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  17. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F; Foster, Jane A; Macri, Joseph; Potter, Murray; Huang, Xiaxing; Malinowski, Paul; Jackson, Wendy; Blennerhassett, Patricia; Neufeld, Karen A; Lu, Jun; Khan, Waliul I; Corthesy-Theulaz, Irene; Cherbut, Christine; Bergonzelli, Gabriela E; Collins, Stephen M

    2010-12-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies have associated gastrointestinal inflammation and infection with altered behavior. We investigated whether chronic gut inflammation alters behavior and brain biochemistry and examined underlying mechanisms. AKR mice were infected with the noninvasive parasite Trichuris muris and given etanercept, budesonide, or specific probiotics. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy was performed in a subgroup of mice before infection. Gastrointestinal inflammation was assessed by histology and quantification of myeloperoxidase activity. Serum proteins were measured by proteomic analysis, circulating cytokines were measured by fluorescence activated cell sorting array, and serum tryptophan and kynurenine were measured by liquid chromatography. Behavior was assessed using light/dark preference and step-down tests. In situ hybridization was used to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the brain. T muris caused mild to moderate colonic inflammation and anxiety-like behavior that was associated with decreased hippocampal BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA). Circulating tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, as well as the kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, were increased. Proteomic analysis showed altered levels of several proteins related to inflammation and neural function. Administration of etanercept, and to a lesser degree of budesonide, normalized behavior, reduced cytokine and kynurenine levels, but did not influence BDNF expression. The probiotic Bifidobacterium longum normalized behavior and BDNF mRNA but did not affect cytokine or kynurenine levels. Anxiety-like behavior was present in infected mice after vagotomy. Chronic gastrointestinal inflammation induces anxiety-like behavior and alters central nervous system biochemistry, which can be normalized by inflammation-dependent and -independent mechanisms, neither of which requires the integrity of the vagus nerve. Copyright © 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc

  18. Cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentially modulated innate immunity and glucose metabolism during late systemic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bushansingh Baurhoo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Salmonella causes acute systemic inflammation by using its virulence factors to invade the intestinal epithelium. But, prolonged inflammation may provoke severe body catabolism and immunological diseases. Salmonella has become more life-threatening due to emergence of multiple-antibiotic resistant strains. Mannose-rich oligosaccharides (MOS from cells walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown to bind mannose-specific lectin of Gram-negative bacteria including Salmonella, and prevent their adherence to intestinal epithelial cells. However, whether MOS may potentially mitigate systemic inflammation is not investigated yet. Moreover, molecular events underlying innate immune responses and metabolic activities during late inflammation, in presence or absence of MOS, are unknown. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a Salmonella LPS-induced systemic inflammation chicken model and microarray analysis, we investigated the effects of MOS and virginiamycin (VIRG, a sub-therapeutic antibiotic on innate immunity and glucose metabolism during late inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that MOS and VIRG modulated innate immunity and metabolic genes differently. Innate immune responses were principally mediated by intestinal IL-3, but not TNF-α, IL-1 or IL-6, whereas glucose mobilization occurred through intestinal gluconeogenesis only. MOS inherently induced IL-3 expression in control hosts. Consequent to LPS challenge, IL-3 induction in VIRG hosts but not differentially expressed in MOS hosts revealed that MOS counteracted LPS's detrimental inflammatory effects. Metabolic pathways are built to elucidate the mechanisms by which VIRG host's higher energy requirements were met: including gene up-regulations for intestinal gluconeogenesis (PEPCK and liver glycolysis (ENO2, and intriguingly liver fatty acid synthesis through ATP citrate synthase (CS down-regulation and ATP citrate lyase (ACLY and malic enzyme (ME up-regulations. However, MOS host

  19. The cardiopulmonary continuum systemic inflammation as 'common soil' of heart and lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukena, Christian; Mahfoud, Felix; Kindermann, Michael; Kindermann, Ingrid; Bals, Robert; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Boehm, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD), chronic heart failure (CHF) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) occur commonly in the presence of each other and are associated with similar systemic inflammatory reactions. Inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. C-reactive

  20. Neutrophil activation and nucleosomes as markers of systemic inflammation in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: effects of eculizumab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijnen, S.T. van; Wouters, D.; Mierlo, G.J. van; Muus, P.; Zeerleder, S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated hemolysis and a high risk of life-threatening venous and arterial thrombosis. Uncontrolled complement activation and the release of cell-free heme may result in systemic inflammation, neutrophil activation,

  1. Neutrophil activation and nucleosomes as markers of systemic inflammation in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: effects of eculizumab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bijnen, S. T. A.; Wouters, D.; van Mierlo, G. J.; Muus, P.; Zeerleder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by complement-mediated hemolysis and a high risk of life-threatening venous and arterial thrombosis. Uncontrolled complement activation and the release of cell-free heme may result in systemic inflammation, neutrophil activation, and the

  2. Persistent systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agustí, Alvar; Edwards, Lisa D; Rennard, Stephen I

    2012-01-01

    Because chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous condition, the identification of specific clinical phenotypes is key to developing more effective therapies. To explore if the persistence of systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD we assessed...

  3. Trait hostility is associated with systemic inflammation in married couples: An actor-partner analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, T.W.; Uchino, B.N.; Bosch, J.A.; Kent, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    Trait anger and hostility predict the development of coronary heart disease, and systemic inflammation may partly mediate this association. In a sample of 94 middle-aged and older married couples, we replicate research showing a within individuals (i.e., actor effect) association of trait hostility

  4. Systemic inflammation in acute intermittent porphyria: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storjord, E; Dahl, J A; Landsem, A; Fure, H; Ludviksen, J K; Goldbeck-Wood, S; Karlsen, B O; Berg, K S; Mollnes, T E; W Nielsen, E; Brekke, O-L

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to examine whether acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is associated with systemic inflammation and whether the inflammation correlates with disease activity. A case-control study with 50 AIP cases and age-, sex- and place of residence-matched controls was performed. Plasma cytokines, insulin and C-peptide were analysed after an overnight fast using multiplex assay. Long pentraxin-3 (PTX3) and complement activation products (C3bc and TCC) were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Urine porphobilinogen ratio (U-PBG, µmol/mmol creatinine), haematological and biochemical tests were performed using routine methods. Questionnaires were used to register AIP symptoms, medication and other diseases. All 27 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors investigated were increased significantly in symptomatic AIP cases compared with controls (P inflammation. Decreased C-peptide levels in symptomatic AIP cases indicate that reduced insulin release is associated with enhanced disease activity and reduced kidney function. © 2016 British Society for Immunology.

  5. Periodontitis: from microbial immune subversion to systemic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a dysbiotic inflammatory disease with an adverse impact on systemic health. Recent studies have provided insights into the emergence and persistence of dysbiotic oral microbial communities, which can mediate inflammatory pathology at local as well as distant sites. This Review discusses mechanisms of microbial immune subversion that tip the balance from homeostasis to disease in oral or extraoral sites. PMID:25534621

  6. Innate immune responses in central nervous system inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finsen, Bente; Owens, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    In autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), innate glial cell responses play a key role in determining the outcome of leukocyte infiltration. Access of leukocytes is controlled via complex interactions with glial components of the blood-brain barrier that include angiotensin II...

  7. Periodontitis: from microbial immune subversion to systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a dysbiotic inflammatory disease with an adverse impact on systemic health. Recent studies have provided insights into the emergence and persistence of dysbiotic oral microbial communities that can mediate inflammatory pathology at local as well as distant sites. This Review discusses the mechanisms of microbial immune subversion that tip the balance from homeostasis to disease in oral or extra-oral sites.

  8. Leukocyte count, systemic inflammation, and health status in older adults: a narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chmielewski Piotr

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that elevated leukocyte count within the normal range can predict cardiovascular and total mortality in older adults. These findings are remarkable because this simple and common laboratory test is included in routine medical check-ups. It is well known that chronic systemic inflammation (inflammaging is one of the hallmarks of aging and an important component of obesity-associated insulin resistance that can lead to type 2 diabetes and other health problems in both overweight individuals and elderly people. To understand the molecular mechanisms linking increased systemic inflammation with aging-associated diseases and elevated leukocyte counts in the elderly is to unravel the multiplicity of molecular factors and mechanisms involved in chronic low-grade systemic inflammation, the gradual accumulation of random molecular damage, age-related diseases, and the process of leukopoiesis. There are several possible mechanisms through which chronic low-grade systemic inflammation is associated with both higher leukocyte count and a greater risk of aging-associated conditions in older adults. For example, the IL-6 centric model predicts that this biomediator is involved in chronic systemic inflammation and leukopoiesis, thereby suggesting that elevated leukocyte count is a signal of poor health in older adults. Alternatively, an increase in neutrophil and monocyte counts can be a direct cause of cardiovascular events in the elderly. Interestingly, some authors assert that the predictive ability of elevated leukocyte counts with regard to cardiovascular and allcause mortality among older adults surpass the predictive value of total cholesterol. This review reports the recent findings on the links between elevated but normal leukocyte counts and the increased risks of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality. The possible molecular mechanisms linking higher but normal leukocyte counts with increased

  9. Intraluminal Flagellin Differentially Contributes to Gut Dysbiosis and Systemic Inflammation following Burn Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan Grimes

    Full Text Available Burn injury is associated with a loss of gut barrier function, resulting in systemic dissemination of gut-derived bacteria and their products. The bacterial protein and TLR5 agonist, flagellin, induces non-specific innate immune responses. Because we detected flagellin in the serum of burn patients, we investigated whether gut-derived flagellin was a primary or secondary contributor to intestinal dysfunction and systemic inflammation following burn injury. The apical surface of polarized human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs, Caco-2BBe, were exposed to 50 or 500 ng of purified flagellin and 1 x 105 of an intestinal E. coli (EC isolate as follows: 1 flagellin added 30 min prior to EC, 2 flagellin and EC added simultaneously, or 3 EC added 30 min prior to flagellin. Our results showed that luminal flagellin and EC modulated each other's biological actions, which influenced their ability to induce basolateral secretion of inflammatory cytokines and subsequent translocation of bacteria and their products. A low dose of flagellin accompanied by an enteric EC in the lumen, tempered inflammation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. However, higher doses of flagellin acted synergistically with EC to induce both intestinal and systemic inflammation that compromised barrier integrity, increasing systemic inflammation following burn injury, a process we have termed flagellemia. In a murine model of burn injury we found that oral gavage of flagellin (1 μg/mouse significantly affected the gut microbiome after burn injury. In these mice, flagellin disseminated out of the intestine into the serum and to distal organs (mesenteric lymph nodes and lungs where it induced secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 and CXCL1/KC (mouse equivalent of human IL-8 at 24 and 48h post-burn. Our results illustrated that gut-derived flagellin alone or accompanied by a non-pathogenic enteric EC strain can function as an initiator of luminal and systemic

  10. Systemic Inflammation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Association with Muscle Function and Nutritional Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Escobar Cedillo, Rosa Elena

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may be related to loss of muscle function or to obesity. It is unknown if circulating proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-α) levels are associated with muscle function. The purpose was to evaluate whether an association exists between systemic inflammation with muscle function and nutritional status in DMD patients. In 66 DMD patients without corticosteroid treatment, the following were evaluated in serum: cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin, and creatine kinase (CK). Muscle function was evaluated using Vignos Scale. Patients with better muscle function had the highest concentration of CK, IL-1, and TNF-α compared with less muscle function. No differences in IL-6 and adiponectin concentration were identified among groups with different levels of muscle function. Also, no differences were observed in the concentration of cytokines among groups with different nutritional status levels (underweight, normal weight, and overweight/obese). However, CRP and leptin were increased in the obese group compared with normal and underweight subjects. Systemic inflammation is increased in patients with better muscle function and decreases in DMD patients with poorer muscle function; nevertheless, systemic inflammation is similar among different levels of nutritional status in DMD patients. PMID:26380303

  11. Systemic Inflammation in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: Association with Muscle Function and Nutritional Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana del Rocío Cruz-Guzmán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation described in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD may be related to loss of muscle function or to obesity. It is unknown if circulating proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1, and TNF-α levels are associated with muscle function. The purpose was to evaluate whether an association exists between systemic inflammation with muscle function and nutritional status in DMD patients. In 66 DMD patients without corticosteroid treatment, the following were evaluated in serum: cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP, leptin, adiponectin, and creatine kinase (CK. Muscle function was evaluated using Vignos Scale. Patients with better muscle function had the highest concentration of CK, IL-1, and TNF-α compared with less muscle function. No differences in IL-6 and adiponectin concentration were identified among groups with different levels of muscle function. Also, no differences were observed in the concentration of cytokines among groups with different nutritional status levels (underweight, normal weight, and overweight/obese. However, CRP and leptin were increased in the obese group compared with normal and underweight subjects. Systemic inflammation is increased in patients with better muscle function and decreases in DMD patients with poorer muscle function; nevertheless, systemic inflammation is similar among different levels of nutritional status in DMD patients.

  12. Early age exposure to moisture damage and systemic inflammation at the age of 6 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvonen, A M; Tischer, C; Kirjavainen, P V; Roponen, M; Hyvärinen, A; Illi, S; Mustonen, K; Pfefferle, P I; Renz, H; Remes, S; Schaub, B; von Mutius, E; Pekkanen, J

    2018-05-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown that exposure to indoor moisture damage and mold may be associated with subclinical inflammation. Our aim was to determine whether early age exposure to moisture damage or mold is prospectively associated with subclinical systemic inflammation or with immune responsiveness in later childhood. Home inspections were performed in children's homes in the first year of life. At age 6 years, subclinical systemic inflammation was measured by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and blood leukocytes and immune responsiveness by ex vivo production of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in whole blood cultures without stimulation or after 24 hours stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin (PI), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or peptidoglycan (PPG) in 251-270 children. Moisture damage in child's main living areas in infancy was not significantly associated with elevated levels of CRP or leukocytes at 6 years. In contrast, there was some suggestion for an effect on immune responsiveness, as moisture damage with visible mold was positively associated with LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α and minor moisture damage was inversely associated with PI-stimulated IL-1β. While early life exposure to mold damage may have some influence on later immune responsiveness, it does not seem to increase subclinical systemic inflammation in later life. © 2018 National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mechanism of Neurodegeneration Following Viral Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maheshwari, Radha

    2001-01-01

    The long term goal of this proposal is to delineate the mechanism(s) for neurodegeneration and neuropathogenesis following infection with a neurovirulent virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE...

  14. Elevated leukocyte count as a harbinger of systemic inflammation, disease progression, and poor prognosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Piotr Paweł; Strzelec, Bartłomiej

    2017-10-24

    Total leukocyte count increases significantly in response to infection, trauma, inflammation, and certain diseases. Factors affecting leukocyte count in healthy adults include sex, hormonal milieu, genetic inheritance, stress level, diet, nutrition, and lifestyle (e.g. tobacco-induced inflammatory changes, chronic psychological stress, etc.). To date, numerous studies have reported that high but normal leukocyte counts at baseline predict increased cardiovascular and noncardiovascular mortality in older adults. Recent findings suggest that elevated leukocyte count within the normal range, but especially neutrophil and monocyte counts, may be a harbinger of increased systemic inflammation and subclinical disease. Moreover, elderly people who tend to have high but normal leukocyte counts are at greater risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some other age-related conditions, and they also have increased all-cause mortality. These results indicate that strong and reliable inflammatory markers, such as leukocyte count, may reflect the rate of ageing and therefore can predict long-term survival in the elderly. Remarkably, leukocyte count correlates positively with genuine markers of systemic inflammation like C-reactive protein and interleukin 6. Interestingly, some authors conclude that leukocyte counts have a stronger prognostic ability with regard to total and cardiovascular mortality than total cholesterol or low-density lipoproteins. The fact that these inflammatory markers are clinically useful predictors of long-term survival in the elderly is quite remarkable as these blood parameters are included in routine medical check-ups. Therefore, they can be used as simple and reliable morphological indicators of chronic systemic inflammation, disease progression, and poor prognosis, especially among individuals who are likely to develop age-related conditions. Nevertheless, the pathomechanism that links elevated but normal leukocyte counts to increased

  15. Effect of caffeine, caffeic acid and their various combinations on enzymes of cholinergic, monoaminergic and purinergic systems critical to neurodegeneration in rat brain-In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akomolafe, S F; Akinyemi, A J; Ogunsuyi, O B; Oyeleye, S I; Oboh, G; Adeoyo, O O; Allismith, Y R

    2017-09-01

    Caffeine and caffeic acid are two bioactive compounds that are present in plant foods and are major constituent of coffee, cocoa, tea, cola drinks and chocolate. Although not structurally related, caffeine and caffeic acid has been reported to elicit neuroprotective properties. However, their different proportional distribution in food sources and possible effect of such interactions are not often taken into consideration. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of caffeine, caffeic acid and their various combinations on activities of some enzymes [acetylcholinesterase (AChE), monoamine oxidase (MAO) ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPase), ecto-5 1 -nucleotidase (E-NTDase) and Na + /K + ATPase relevant to neurodegeneration in vitro in rat brain. The stock concentration of caffeine and caffiec acid and their various proportional combinations were prepared and their interactions with the activities of these enzymes were assessed (in vitro) in different brain structures. The Fe 2+ and Cu 2+ chelating abilities of the samples were also investigated. The results revealed that caffeine, caffeic acid and their various combinations exhibited inhibitory effect on activities of AChE, MAO, E-NTPase and E-NTDase, but stimulatory effect on Na + /K + ATPase activity. The combinations also exhibited Fe 2+ and Cu 2+ chelating abilities. Considering the various combinations, a higher caffeine to caffeic acid ratio produced significantly highest enzyme modulatory effects; these were significantly lower to the effect of caffeine alone but significantly higher than the effect of caffeic acid alone. These findings may provide new insight into the effect of proportional combination of these bioactive compounds as obtained in many foods especially with respect to their neuroprotective effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Role of the endocannabinoid system in the neuroendocrine responses to inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laurentiis, Andrea; Araujo, Hugo A; Rettori, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    A few years ago the endocannabinoid system has been recognized as a major neuromodulatory system whose main functions are to exert and maintain the body homeostasis. Several different endocannabinoids are synthesized in a broad class of cell types, including those in the brain and the immune system; they bind to cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors, having profound effects on a variety of behavioral, neuroendocrine and autonomic functions. The coordinated neural, immune, behavioral and endocrine responses to inflammation are orchestrated to provide an important defense against infections and help homeostasis restoration in the body. These responses are executed and controlled mainly by the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. Also, the hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal system is essential for survival and plays a role recovering the homeostasis under a variety of stress conditions, including inflammation and infection. Since the endocannabinoid system components are present at sites involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis regulation, several studies were performed in order to investigate the endocannabinoid-mediated neurotransmitters and hormones secretion under physiological and pathological conditions. In the present review we focused on the endocannabinoids actions on the neuroendocrine response to inflammation and infection. We provide a detailed overview of the current understanding of the role of the endocannabinoid system in the recovering of homeostasis as well as potential pharmacological therapies based on the manipulation of endocannabinoid system components that could provide novel treatments for a wide range of disorders.

  17. An increase in exhaled CO concentration in systemic inflammation/sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimatsu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Toru; Matsusaki, Takashi; Hayashi, Masao; Matsumi, Jyunya; Shimizu, Hiroko; Matsumi, Masaki; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Despite recent progress in Critical Care Medicine, sepsis is still a major medical problem with a high rate of mortality and morbidity especially in intensive care units. Oxidative stress induced by inflammation associated with sepsis causes degradation of heme protein, increases microsomal free heme content, promotes further oxidative stress and results in cellular and organ damage. Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme for heme breakdown. HO-1 breaks down heme to yield CO, iron and biliverdin. Measurement of CO in exhaled air may potentially be useful in monitoring changes in HO enzyme activity in vivo, which might reflect the degree of inflammation or oxidative stress in patients with systemic inflammation. The increased exhaled CO concentrations were observed after anesthesia/surgery, in critically ill patients and also in systemic inflammation/sepsis. Some reports also showed that exhaled CO concentration is related to mortality. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether increased endogenous CO production may predict a patient's morbidity and mortality. Techniques for monitoring CO are continuously being refined and this technique may find its way into the office of clinicians.

  18. Systemic low-grade inflammation in post-traumatic stress disorder: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speer K

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Kathryn Speer,1 Dominic Upton,2 Stuart Semple,1,3 Andrew McKune1–4 1Discipline of Sport and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 3Research Institute for Sport and Exercise, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia; 4Discipline of Biokinetics, Exercise and Leisure Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban, South Africa Abstract: Studies examining post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD have either emphasized a relationship between PTSD and a systemically pro-inflammatory state or identified a link between PTSD and chronic disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for a relationship between individuals with PTSD and systemic low-grade inflammation that has been proposed to underlie chronic disease development in this population. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature (January 2006 to April 2017 in accordance with the PRISMA statement in the following four databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and SPORTDiscus with Full Text. The search strategy was limited to articles published in peer-reviewed journals and to human studies. Nine studies measuring systemic inflammation and discussing its role in chronic disease development were selected for inclusion in this review. The association between markers of systemic inflammation and PTSD was evaluated by the measurement of a variety of systemic inflammatory markers including acute-phase proteins, complement proteins, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, natural killer cells, and white blood cells. In general, systemic inflammatory biomarkers were elevated across the studies in the PTSD groups. There is evidence that PTSD is underpinned by the presence of a systemic low-grade inflammatory state. This inflammation may be the mechanism associated with increased risk for chronic disease in the PTSD population. From

  19. Distinct patterns of leukocyte recruitment in the pulmonary microvasculature in response to local and systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhi; Roller, Jonas; Slotta, Jan E; Zhang, Su; Luo, Lingtao; Rahman, Milladur; Syk, Ingvar; Menger, Michael D; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2013-02-15

    The mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment in the pulmonary microvasculature in response to local and systemic inflammation remain elusive. Male C57BL/6 mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intrapulmonary (intratracheally, it) or systemically (intravenously, iv) for 1-18 h. Leukocyte responses in lung were analyzed by use of intravital fluorescence microscopy. Plasma and lung levels of CXC chemokines as well as Mac-1 and F-actin expression in leukocytes and bronchoalveolar leukocytes were quantified. Venular leukocyte rolling was markedly increased in response to local LPS but only marginally after systemic LPS. Leukocyte adhesion in venules was enhanced in both groups although adhesion was higher in mice receiving LPS intratracheally compared with LPS intravenously. Systemic LPS caused more leukocytes trapping in capillaries compared with local LPS. The ratio of adherent leukocytes in venules compared with capillaries was higher in response to local LPS, suggesting that leukocytes were more prone to accumulate in venules in local inflammation and in capillaries in systemic inflammation. Systemic LPS triggered higher F-actin formation and Mac-1 expression in leukocytes compared with local LPS. Local and systemic LPS caused similar increases in CXC chemokines in the lung whereas intravenous endotoxin provoked higher levels of CXC chemokines in the circulation. Interestingly, intratracheal LPS increased recruitment of leukocytes in the alveolar space whereas intravenous LPS was ineffective in promoting leukocyte accumulation in the bronchoalveolar space. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that pulmonary microvascular recruitment of leukocytes differs in local and systemic inflammation, which might be related to premature activation and stiffening of circulating leukocytes in endotoxemia.

  20. Genetic models for CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Wekerle, H; Antel, J

    2001-01-01

    The use of transgenic technology to over-express or prevent expression of genes encoding molecules related to inflammation has allowed direct examination of their role in experimental disease. This article reviews transgenic and knockout models of CNS demyelinating disease, focusing primarily...... on the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis, as well as conditions in which an inflammatory response makes a secondary contribution to tissue injury or repair, such as neurodegeneration, ischemia and trauma....

  1. Risk factors of systemic inflammation response syndrome after endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery in the modified Valdivia position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroki; Usui, Kimitsugu; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Kawahara, Takashi; Terao, Hideyuki; Fujikawa, Atsushi; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Yao, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2016-08-01

    To identify risk factors of developing systemic inflammation response syndrome after endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery in the modified Valdivia position for renal stone treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 370 consecutive patients who underwent endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery procedures in the modified Valdivia position to treat renal stones. Antibiotic therapy based on preoperative urine cultures was administered to all patients from induction of anesthesia until at least postoperative day 3. Postoperative systemic inflammation response syndrome was diagnosed if the patient met two or more systemic inflammation response syndrome criteria. A multivariate logistic regression model with backward selection was used to evaluate the relationships between the incidence of systemic inflammation response syndrome after endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery and other clinical factors. Of the 370 patients, 61 patients (16.5%) were diagnosed with systemic inflammation response syndrome after endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery. Significant differences were found between the non-systemic inflammation response syndrome and systemic inflammation response syndrome groups with regard to female sex (29.8% vs 44.3%, P = 0.027), history of febrile urinary tract infection (16.5% vs 32.8%, P = 0.015) and number of involved calyces (2.68 vs 4.1, P systemic inflammation response syndrome: the number of involved calyces (P = 0.017), stone surface area (P = 0.021) and history of febrile urinary tract infection (P = 0.005). The number of involved calyces larger than four, stone surface area >500 mm(2) and a history of febrile urinary tract infection independently predicted the development of systemic inflammation response syndrome after endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery. This is the first study to identify the independent predictors of systemic inflammation response syndrome after endoscopic combined intrarenal surgery in the modified Valdivia position. © 2016 The

  2. Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla contribute to neurogenic hypertension induced by systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Kay LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to systemic inflammation, neuroinflammation in the brain, which enhances sympathetic drive, plays a significant role in cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM that augments sympathetic outflow to blood vessels is involved in neural mechanism of hypertension. We investigated whether neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in RVLM contribute to hypertension following chronic systemic inflammation. Methods In normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats, systemic inflammation was induced by infusion of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS into the peritoneal cavity via an osmotic minipump. Systemic arterial pressure and heart rate were measured under conscious conditions by the non-invasive tail-cuff method. The level of the inflammatory markers in plasma or RVLM was analyzed by ELISA. Protein expression was evaluated by Western blot or immunohistochemistry. Tissue level of superoxide anion (O2·- in RVLM was determined using the oxidation-sensitive fluorescent probe dihydroethidium. Pharmacological agents were delivered either via infusion into the cisterna magna with an osmotic minipump or microinjection bilaterally into RVLM. Results Intraperitoneal infusion of LPS (1.2 mg/kg/day for 14 days promoted sustained hypertension and induced a significant increase in plasma level of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, or interleukin-1β (IL-1β. This LPS-induced systemic inflammation was accompanied by activation of microglia, augmentation of IL-1β, IL-6, or TNF-α protein expression, and O2·- production in RVLM, all of which were blunted by intracisternal infusion of a cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, NS398; an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline; or a cytokine synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline. Neuroinflammation in RVLM was also associated with a COX-2-dependent downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and an

  3. Mechanisms of neurodegeneration and axonal dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Manuel A; Schattling, Benjamin; Fugger, Lars

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequent chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS, and imposes major burdens on young lives. Great progress has been made in understanding and moderating the acute inflammatory components of MS, but the pathophysiological mechanisms of the concomitant neurodegeneration--which causes irreversible disability--are still not understood. Chronic inflammatory processes that continuously disturb neuroaxonal homeostasis drive neurodegeneration, so the clinical outcome probably depends on the balance of stressor load (inflammation) and any remaining capacity for neuronal self-protection. Hence, suitable drugs that promote the latter state are sorely needed. With the aim of identifying potential novel therapeutic targets in MS, we review research on the pathological mechanisms of neuroaxonal dysfunction and injury, such as altered ion channel activity, and the endogenous neuroprotective pathways that counteract oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. We focus on mechanisms inherent to neurons and their axons, which are separable from those acting on inflammatory responses and might, therefore, represent bona fide neuroprotective drug targets with the capability to halt MS progression.

  4. Defective Bone Repair in C57Bl6 Mice With Acute Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrends, D A; Hui, D; Gao, C; Awlia, A; Al-Saran, Y; Li, A; Henderson, J E; Martineau, P A

    2017-03-01

    Bone repair is initiated with a local inflammatory response to injury. The presence of systemic inflammation impairs bone healing and often leads to malunion, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly defined. Our research objective was to use a mouse model of cortical bone repair to determine the effect of systemic inflammation on cells in the bone healing microenvironment. QUESTION/PURPOSES: (1) Does systemic inflammation, induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration affect the quantity and quality of regenerating bone in primary bone healing? (2) Does systemic inflammation alter vascularization and the number or activity of inflammatory cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts in the bone healing microenvironment? Cortical defects were drilled in the femoral diaphysis of female and male C57BL/6 mice aged 5 to 9 months that were treated with daily systemic injections of LPS or physiologic saline as control for 7 days. Mice were euthanized at 1 week (Control, n = 7; LPS, n = 8), 2 weeks (Control, n = 7; LPS, n = 8), and 6 weeks (Control, n = 9; LPS, n = 8) after surgery. The quantity (bone volume per tissue volume [BV/TV]) and microarchitecture (trabecular separation and thickness, porosity) of bone in the defect were quantified with time using microCT. The presence or activity of vascular endothelial cells (CD34), macrophages (F4/80), osteoblasts (alkaline phosphatase [ALP]), and osteoclasts (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase [TRAP]) were evaluated using histochemical analyses. Only one of eight defects was bridged completely 6 weeks after surgery in LPS-injected mouse bones compared with seven of nine defects in the control mouse bones (odds ratio [OR], 0.04; 95% CI, 0.003-0.560; p = 0.007). The decrease in cortical bone in LPS-treated mice was reflected in reduced BV/TV (21% ± 4% vs 39% ± 10%; p inflammation reduced the amount and impaired the quality of bone regenerated in mouse femurs. The effects were associated with impaired revascularization

  5. Systemic Central Nervous System (CNS)-targeted Delivery of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) Reduces Neurodegeneration and Increases Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Brian; Potkar, Rewati; Metcalf, Jeff; Thrin, Ivy; Adame, Anthony; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-22

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant protein transmitters in the central nervous system with roles in a variety of biological functions including: food intake, cardiovascular regulation, cognition, seizure activity, circadian rhythms, and neurogenesis. Reduced NPY and NPY receptor expression is associated with numerous neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether replacement of NPY could ameliorate some of the neurodegenerative and behavioral pathology associated with AD, we generated a lentiviral vector expressing NPY fused to a brain transport peptide (apoB) for widespread CNS delivery in an APP-transgenic (tg) mouse model of AD. The recombinant NPY-apoB effectively reversed neurodegenerative pathology and behavioral deficits although it had no effect on accumulation of Aβ. The subgranular zone of the hippocampus showed a significant increase in proliferation of neural precursor cells without further differentiation into neurons. The neuroprotective and neurogenic effects of NPY-apoB appeared to involve signaling via ERK and Akt through the NPY R1 and NPY R2 receptors. Thus, widespread CNS-targeted delivery of NPY appears to be effective at reversing the neuronal and glial pathology associated with Aβ accumulation while also increasing NPC proliferation. Overall, increased delivery of NPY to the CNS for AD might be an effective therapy especially if combined with an anti-Aβ therapeutic. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Commensal Microbiota Are Required for Systemic Inflammation Triggered by Necrotic Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Young

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between dendritic cells (DCs and commensal microflora in shaping systemic immune responses is not well understood. Here, we report that mice deficient for the Fas-associated death domain in DCs developed systemic inflammation associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines and increased myeloid and B cells. These mice exhibited reduced DCs in gut-associated lymphoid tissues due to RIP3-dependent necroptosis, whereas DC functions remained intact. Induction of systemic inflammation required DC necroptosis and commensal microbiota signals that activated MyD88-dependent pathways in other cell types. Systemic inflammation was abrogated with the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics or complete, but not DC-specific, deletion of MyD88. Thus, we have identified a previously unappreciated role for commensal microbiota in priming immune cells for inflammatory responses against necrotic cells. These studies demonstrate the impact intestinal microflora have on the immune system and their role in eliciting proper immune responses to harmful stimuli.

  7. Increased adiposity, dysregulated glucose metabolism and systemic inflammation in Galectin-3 KO mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Pang

    Full Text Available Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased production of Galectin-3 (Gal-3, a protein that modulates inflammation and clearance of glucose adducts. We used Lean and Diet-induced Obese (DIO WT and Gal-3 KO mice to investigate the role of Gal-3 in modulation of adiposity, glucose metabolism and inflammation. Deficiency of Gal-3 lead to age-dependent development of excess adiposity and systemic inflammation, as indicated by elevated production of acute-phase proteins, number of circulating pro-inflammatory Ly6C(high monocytes and development of neutrophilia, microcytic anemia and thrombocytosis in 20-week-old Lean and DIO male Gal-3 KO mice. This was associated with impaired fasting glucose, heightened response to a glucose tolerance test and reduced adipose tissue expression of adiponectin, Gal-12, ATGL and PPARγ, in the presence of maintained insulin sensitivity and hepatic expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in 20-week-old Gal-3 KO mice compared to their diet-matched WT controls. Expression of PGC-1α and FGF-21 in the liver of Lean Gal-3 KO mice was comparable to that observed in DIO animals. Impaired fasting glucose and altered responsiveness to a glucose load preceded development of excess adiposity and systemic inflammation, as demonstrated in 12-week-old Gal-3 KO mice. Finally, a role for the microflora in mediating the fasting hyperglycemia, but not the excessive response to a glucose load, of 12-week-old Gal-3 KO mice was demonstrated by administration of antibiotics. In conclusion, Gal-3 is an important modulator of glucose metabolism, adiposity and inflammation.

  8. LPS-induced systemic inflammation is more severe in P2Y12 null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverani, Elisabetta; Rico, Mario C.; Yaratha, Laxmikausthubha; Tsygankov, Alexander Y.; Kilpatrick, Laurie E.; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2014-01-01

    Thienopyridines are a class of antiplatelet drugs that are metabolized in the liver to several metabolites, of which only one active metabolite can irreversibly antagonize the platelet P2Y12 receptor. Possible effects of these drugs and the role of activated platelets in inflammatory responses have also been investigated in a variety of animal models, demonstrating that thienopyridines could alter inflammation. However, it is not clear whether it is caused only by the P2Y12 antagonism or whether off-target effects of other metabolites also intervene. To address this question, we investigated P2Y12 KO mice during a LPS-induced model of systemic inflammation, and we treated these KO mice with a thienopyridine drug (clopidogrel). Contrary to the reported effects of clopidogrel, numbers of circulating WBCs and plasma levels of cytokines were increased in LPS-exposed KO mice compared with WT in this inflammation model. Moreover, both spleen and bone marrow show an increase in cell content, suggesting a role for P2Y12 in regulation of bone marrow and spleen cellular composition. Finally, the injury was more severe in the lungs of KO mice compared with WT. Interestingly, clopidogrel treatments also exerted protective effects in KO mice, suggesting off-target effects for this drug. In conclusion, the P2Y12 receptor plays an important role during LPS-induced inflammation, and this signaling pathway may be involved in regulating cell content in spleen and bone marrow during LPS systemic inflammation. Furthermore, clopidogrel may have effects that are independent of P2Y12 receptor blockade. PMID:24142066

  9. Astrocytic Pathological Calcium Homeostasis and Impaired Vesicle Trafficking in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Vardjan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the central nervous system (CNS consists of highly heterogeneous populations of neurones and glial cells, clustered into diverse anatomical regions with specific functions, there are some conditions, including alertness, awareness and attention that require simultaneous, coordinated and spatially homogeneous activity within a large area of the brain. During such events, the brain, representing only about two percent of body mass, but consuming one fifth of body glucose at rest, needs additional energy to be produced. How simultaneous energy procurement in a relatively extended area of the brain takes place is poorly understood. This mechanism is likely to be impaired in neurodegeneration, for example in Alzheimer’s disease, the hallmark of which is brain hypometabolism. Astrocytes, the main neural cell type producing and storing glycogen, a form of energy in the brain, also hold the key to metabolic and homeostatic support in the central nervous system and are impaired in neurodegeneration, contributing to the slow decline of excitation-energy coupling in the brain. Many mechanisms are affected, including cell-to-cell signalling. An important question is how changes in cellular signalling, a process taking place in a rather short time domain, contribute to the neurodegeneration that develops over decades. In this review we focus initially on the slow dynamics of Alzheimer’s disease, and on the activity of locus coeruleus, a brainstem nucleus involved in arousal. Subsequently, we overview much faster processes of vesicle traffic and cytosolic calcium dynamics, both of which shape the signalling landscape of astrocyte-neurone communication in health and neurodegeneration.

  10. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas W.S. Davies

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson’s disease.

  11. Tryptophan, Neurodegeneration and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nicholas W.S.; Guillemin, Gilles; Brew, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    This review presents an up-to-date assessment of the role of the tryptophan metabolic and catabolic pathways in neurodegenerative disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. The kynurenine pathway and the effects of each of its enzymes and products are reviewed. The differential expression of the kynurenine pathway in cells within the brain, including inflammatory cells, is explored given the increasing recognition of the importance of inflammation in neurodegenerative disease. An overview of common mechanisms of neurodegeneration is presented before a review and discussion of the evidence for a pathogenetic role of the kynurenine pathway in Alzheimer’s disease, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, Huntington’s disease, motor neurone disease, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22084594

  12. Sleep duration, insomnia, and markers of systemic inflammation: Results from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prather, A.A.; Vogelzangs, N.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation has emerged as a potential pathway linking depressive and anxiety disorders with disease risk. Short and long sleep duration, as well as insomnia, are common among psychiatric populations and have previously been related to increased inflammation. The aim of the present study

  13. Persistent systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD: a novel phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvar Agustí

    Full Text Available Because chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a heterogeneous condition, the identification of specific clinical phenotypes is key to developing more effective therapies. To explore if the persistence of systemic inflammation is associated with poor clinical outcomes in COPD we assessed patients recruited to the well-characterized ECLIPSE cohort (NCT00292552.Six inflammatory biomarkers in peripheral blood (white blood cells (WBC count and CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and TNF-α levels were quantified in 1,755 COPD patients, 297 smokers with normal spirometry and 202 non-smoker controls that were followed-up for three years. We found that, at baseline, 30% of COPD patients did not show evidence of systemic inflammation whereas 16% had persistent systemic inflammation. Even though pulmonary abnormalities were similar in these two groups, persistently inflamed patients during follow-up had significantly increased all-cause mortality (13% vs. 2%, p<0.001 and exacerbation frequency (1.5 (1.5 vs. 0.9 (1.1 per year, p<0.001 compared to non-inflamed ones. As a descriptive study our results show associations but do not prove causality. Besides this, the inflammatory response is complex and we studied only a limited panel of biomarkers, albeit they are those investigated by the majority of previous studies and are often and easily measured in clinical practice.Overall, these results identify a novel systemic inflammatory COPD phenotype that may be the target of specific research and treatment.

  14. Systemic Inflammation in C57BL/6J Mice Receiving Dietary Aluminum Sulfate; Up-Regulation of the Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines IL-6 and TNFα, C-Reactive Protein (CRP) and miRNA-146a in Blood Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, A I; Jaber, V; Zhao, Y; Lukiw, W J

    2017-01-01

    A number of experimental investigations utilizing different murine species have previously reported: (i) that standard mouse-diets supplemented with physiologically realistic amounts of neurotoxic metal salts substantially induce pro-inflammatory signaling in a number of murine tissues; (ii) that these diet-stimulated changes may contribute to a systemic inflammation (SI), a potential precursor to neurodegenerative events in both the central and the peripheral nervous system (CNS, PNS); and (iii) that these events may ultimately contribute to a chronic and progressive inflammatory neurodegeneration, such as that which is observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. In these experiments we assayed for markers of SI in the blood serum of C57BL/6J mice after 0, 1, 3 and 5 months of exposure to a standard mouse diet that included aluminum-sulfate in the food and drinking water, compared to age-matched controls receiving magnesium-sulfate or no additions. The data indicate that the SI markers that include the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), the acute phase reactive protein C-reactive protein (CRP) production and a triad of pro-inflammatory microRNAs (miRNA-9, miRNA-125b and miRNA-146a) all increase in the serum after aluminum-sulfate exposure. For the first time these results suggest that ad libitum exposure to aluminum-sulfate at physiologically realistic concentrations, as would be found in the human diet over the long term, may predispose to SI and the potential development of chronic, progressive, inflammatory neurodegeneration with downstream pathogenic consequences.

  15. Relationship between systemic inflammation and delayed-type hypersensitivity response to Candida antigen in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt D Pence

    Full Text Available Research has shown that aging is associated with increased systemic inflammation as well as a reduction in the strength of immune responses. However, little evidence exists linking the decrease in cell-mediated immunity in older adults with other health parameters. We sought to examine the relationship between cell-mediated immunity as measured in vivo by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response to candida antigen and demographic and physiological variables in older (65-80 y.o. adults. Candida antigen response was not related to gender or obesity, or to a number of other physiological variables including fitness and body composition. However, positive responders had significantly lower serum C-reactive protein levels (CRP, p4.75 mg•L(-1. Therefore, positive responses to candida antigen in older adults appears to be related to lower levels of systemic inflammation.

  16. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Twenty to thirty percent of testicular cancer (TC) survivors have elevated serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH) with or without corresponding low testosterone levels (Leydig cell dysfunction) during clinical follow-up for TC. However, it remains to be clarified if this subgroup...... of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig...... cell function during follow-up were eligible for participation in the study. Markers of systemic inflammation and prevalence of MetS were compared between TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and the control group. RESULTS: Of 158 included TC survivors, 28 (18%) had uncompensated Leydig cell...

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea: overlaps in pathophysiology, systemic inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders in clinical practice, and cardiovascular diseases represent a major comorbidity in each disorder. The two disorders coexist (overlap syndrome) in approximately 1% of adults but asymptomatic lower airway obstruction together with sleep-disordered breathing is more prevalent. Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has similar prevalence in COPD as the general population, and vice versa, factors such as body mass index and smoking influence relationships. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation develops in COPD, independent of apnea\\/hypopnea, and is more severe in the overlap syndrome, thus predisposing to pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, upper airway flow limitation contributes to nocturnal desaturation in COPD without apnea\\/hypopnea. Evidence of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, involving C-reactive protein and IL-6, in addition to nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent pathways involving tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8, provides insight into potential basic interactions between both disorders. Furthermore, oxidative stress develops in each disorder, in addition to activation and\\/or dysfunction of circulating leukocytes. These findings are clinically relevant because systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and the cell\\/molecular pathways involved are similar to those identified in COPD and sleep apnea. However, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea is not proven, and thus, studies of patients with the overlap syndrome should provide insight into the mechanisms of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  18. Systemic Interleukin-4 Administration after Spinal Cord Injury Modulates Inflammation and Promotes Neuroprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Rui; Monteiro, Susana; Lopes, José P.; Barradas, Pedro; Vasconcelos, Natália L.; Gomes, Eduardo D.; Assunção-Silva, Rita C.; Teixeira, Fábio G.; Morais, Mónica; Sousa, Nuno; Salgado, António J.; Silva, Nuno A.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes dramatic disability and dysfunction in the motor, sensory and autonomic systems. The severe inflammatory reaction that occurs after SCI is strongly associated with further tissue damage. As such, immunomodulatory strategies have been developed, aimed at reducing inflammation, but also at shaping the immune response in order to protect, repair and promote regeneration of spared neural tissue. One of those promising strategies is the intraspinal adminis...

  19. Exercise alleviates depression related systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; Al-Jiffri, Osama H

    2016-12-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent co-morbidity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) which was shown to be associated with a worse course of disease, including reduced quality of life and increased symptoms burden, healthcare use, and even mortality. It has been speculated that systemic inflammation may play a role in the presence of depression. Currently, physical activity is an important lifestyle factor that has the potential to modify inflammatory cytokines and depression, however our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in COPD patients to alleviate depression related systemic inflammation is incomplete and has prompted our interest to identify the type and intensities of effective exercise. The aim of this study was to measure the changes in depression related systemic inflammation of aerobic exercise training in COPD patients in Jeddah area. Eighty patients with moderate severity of COPD participated in this study and were divided into two groups; the first group received aerobic exercise, whereas the second group received no exercise training for 12 weeks. The mean values of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores were significantly decreased in in group (A) after treatments, but the changes in group (B) were not significant .Also, there were significant differences between mean levels of the investigated parameters in group (A) and group (B) at the end of the study. Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment policy to improve depression related to systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  20. Tetrastarch sustains pulmonary microvascular perfusion and gas exchange during systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckel, Kai; Winkelmann, Bjoern; Strunden, Mike S; Basedow, Annika; Schuster, Anke; Schumacher, Udo; Kiefmann, Rainer; Reuter, Daniel A; Goetz, Alwin E

    2012-02-01

    According to Fick's law of diffusion, gas exchange depends on the size and thickness of the blood perfused alveolocapillary membrane. Impairment of either one is tenuous. No data are available concerning the impact of hydroxyethyl starches and saline on pulmonary microperfusion and gas exchange during systemic inflammation. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study. University research laboratory. Thirty-two anesthetized rabbits assigned to four groups (n = 8). Except for the control group, systemic inflammation was induced by lipopolysaccharide. Fluid resuscitation was performed with saline alone or in conjunction with tetrastarch or pentastarch. Pulmonary microcirculation was analyzed at 0 hr and 2 hrs using intravital microscopy. Thickness of the alveolocapillary membrane was measured using electron microscopy. Macrohemodynamics were stable in all groups. In pulmonary arterioles, lipopolysaccharide reduced the erythrocyte velocity and impeded the microvascular decrease of the hematocrit in the saline and pentastarch group. In contrast, infusion of tetrastarch normalized these perfusion parameters. In capillaries, lipopolysaccharide decreased the functional capillary segment density and the capillary perfusion index, which was prevented by both starches. However, compared with saline and pentastarch, treatment with tetrastarch prevented the lipopolysaccharide-induced reduction of the capillary erythrocyte flux and inversely reduced the erythrocyte capillary transit time. Thickening of alveolocapillary septae after lipopolysaccharide application was solely observed in the saline and pentastarch group. In contrast to pentastarch and saline, the application of tetrastarch prevented the lipopolysaccharide-induced increase of the alveoloarterial oxygen difference. Tetrastarch sustains pulmonary gas exchange during experimental systemic inflammation more effectively than saline and pentastarch by protecting the diffusion distance and the size of the

  1. Ethanol-Induced Neurodegeneration and Glial Activation in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Saito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol induces neurodegeneration in the developing brain, which may partially explain the long-lasting adverse effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD. While animal models of FASD show that ethanol-induced neurodegeneration is associated with glial activation, the relationship between glial activation and neurodegeneration has not been clarified. This review focuses on the roles of activated microglia and astrocytes in neurodegeneration triggered by ethanol in rodents during the early postnatal period (equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy. Previous literature indicates that acute binge-like ethanol exposure in postnatal day 7 (P7 mice induces apoptotic neurodegeneration, transient activation of microglia resulting in phagocytosis of degenerating neurons, and a prolonged increase in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. In our present study, systemic administration of a moderate dose of lipopolysaccharides, which causes glial activation, attenuates ethanol-induced neurodegeneration. These studies suggest that activation of microglia and astrocytes by acute ethanol in the neonatal brain may provide neuroprotection. However, repeated or chronic ethanol can induce significant proinflammatory glial reaction and neurotoxicity. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether acute or sustained glial activation caused by ethanol exposure in the developing brain can affect long-lasting cellular and behavioral abnormalities observed in the adult brain.

  2. Adipocytes properties and crosstalk with immune system in obesity-related inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurizi, Giulia; Della Guardia, Lucio; Maurizi, Angela; Poloni, Antonella

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a condition likely associated with several dysmetabolic conditions or worsening of cardiovascular and other chronic disturbances. A key role in this mechanism seem to be played by the onset of low-grade systemic inflammation, highlighting the importance of the interplay between adipocytes and immune system cells. Adipocytes express a complex and highly adaptive biological profile being capable to selectively activate different metabolic pathways in order to respond to environmental stimuli. It has been demonstrated how adipocytes, under appropriate stimulation, can easily differentiate and de-differentiate thereby converting themselves into different phenotypes according to metabolic necessities. Although underlying mechanisms are not fully understood, growing in adipocyte size and the inability of storing triglycerides under overfeeding conditions seem to be crucial for the switching to a dysfunctional metabolic profile, which is characterized by inflammatory and apoptotic pathways activation, and by the shifting to pro-inflammatory adipokines secretion. In obesity, changes in adipokines secretion along with adipocyte deregulation and fatty acids release into circulation contribute to maintain immune cells activation as well as their infiltration into regulatory organs. Over the well-established role of macrophages, recent findings suggest the involvement of new classes of immune cells such as T regulatory lymphocytes and neutrophils in the development inflammation and multi systemic worsening. Deeply understanding the pathways of adipocyte regulation and the de-differentiation process could be extremely useful for developing novel strategies aimed at curbing obesity-related inflammation and related metabolic disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pain perception in healthy volunteers: effect of repeated exposure to experimental systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe T; Werner, Mads U; Mehlsen, Jesper; Kehlet, Henrik; Møller, Kirsten

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two separate trial days, with or without a nicotine patch applied 10 h previously. Pain perception at baseline, and 2 and 6 h after LPS was assessed by pressure algometry and tonic heat stimulation at an increasing temperature (45-48℃) during both trials. Compared with baseline, pain pressure threshold was reduced 2 and 6 h after LPS, while heat pain perception was accentuated at all testing temperatures after 2 but not 6 h. The magnitude of changes in pain perception did not correlate to cytokine release. No effect of transdermal nicotine or training status was observed. In conclusion, LPS administration in healthy human volunteers leads to reduction in pain pressure threshold and an increase in pain perception to heat stimuli, supporting a relationship between acute systemic inflammation and pain perception. © The Author(s) 2016.

  4. Dynamic expression of leukocyte innate immune genes in whole blood from horses with lipopolysaccharide-induced acute systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Anne Mette L.; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In horses, insights into the innate immune processes in acute systemic inflammation are limited even though these processes may be highly important for future diagnostic and therapeutic advances in high-mortality disease conditions as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS...... expressions in blood leukocytes during equine acute LPS-induced systemic inflammation thoroughly characterized a highly regulated and dynamic innate immune response. These results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of equine systemic inflammation.......) and sepsis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the expression of 31 selected blood leukocyte immune genes in an equine model of acute systemic inflammation to identify significantly regulated genes and to describe their expression dynamics during a 24-h experimental period. Systemic...

  5. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  6. Protection against fine particle-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Lei; Liu, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chih-Yu; Pai, Victor J; Kang, Jing X

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter, such as through air pollution, has been linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases. However, few measures have been taken to reduce the health risks associated with fine particle exposure. The identification of safe and effective methods to protect against fine particle exposure-related damage is urgently needed. We used synthetic, non-toxic, fluorescent fine particles to investigate the physical distribution of inhaled fine particles and their effects on pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice. Tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids were elevated via dietary supplementation or the fat-1 transgenic mouse model. Markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed. We discovered that fine particulate matter not only accumulates in the lungs but can also penetrate the pulmonary barrier and travel into other organs, including the brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and testis. These particles induced both pulmonary and systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We also show that elevating tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids was effective in reducing fine particle-induced inflammation, whether as a preventive method (prior to exposure) or as an intervention (after exposure). These results advance our understanding of how fine particles contribute to disease development and suggest that increasing tissue omega-3 levels may be a promising nutritional means for reducing the risk of diseases induced by particle exposure. Our findings demonstrate that elevating tissue omega-3 levels can prevent and treat fine particle-induced health problems and thereby present an immediate, practical solution for reducing the disease burden of air pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stress and Systemic Inflammation: Yin-Yang Dynamics in Health and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Studies in psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) would provide better insights into the "whole mind-body system." Systems biology models of the complex adaptive systems (CASs), such as a conceptual framework of "Yin-Yang dynamics," may be helpful for identifying systems-based biomarkers and targets for more effective prevention and treatment. The disturbances in the Yin-Yang dynamical balance may result in stress, inflammation, and various disorders including insomnia, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, skin disorders, and cancer. At the molecular and cellular levels, the imbalances in the cytokine pathways, mitochondria networks, redox systems, and various signaling pathways may contribute to systemic inflammation. In the nervous system, Yin and Yang may represent the dynamical associations between the progressive and regressive processes in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. In response to the damages to the heart, the Yin-Yang dynamical balance between proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine networks is crucial. The studies of cancer have revealed the importance of the Yin-Yang dynamics in the tumoricidal and tumorigenic activities of the immune system. Stress-induced neuroimmune imbalances are also essential in chronic skin disorders including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. With the integrative framework, the restoration of the Yin-Yang dynamics can become the objective of dynamical systems medicine.

  8. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Froukje J; Fuentes, Susana; de Jonge, Charlotte; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Erbil, Runi; Greve, Jan Willem; Buurman, Wim A; de Vos, Willem M; Rensen, Sander S

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. Fecal microbiota composition of 28 subjects (BMI 18.6-60.3 kg m(-2) ) was analyzed by a phylogenetic profiling microarray. Fecal calprotectin and plasma C-reactive protein levels were determined to evaluate intestinal and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HbA1c , and plasma levels of transaminases and lipids were analyzed. Gastroduodenal, small intestinal, and colonic permeability were assessed by a multisaccharide test. Based on microbiota composition, the study population segregated into two clusters with predominantly obese (15/19) or exclusively nonobese (9/9) subjects. Whereas intestinal permeability did not differ between clusters, the obese cluster showed reduced bacterial diversity, a decreased Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio, and an increased abundance of potential proinflammatory Proteobacteria. Interestingly, fecal calprotectin was only detectable in subjects within the obese microbiota cluster (n = 8/19, P = 0.02). Plasma C-reactive protein was also increased in these subjects (P = 0.0005), and correlated with the Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio (rs = -0.41, P = 0.03). Intestinal microbiota alterations in obese subjects are associated with local and systemic inflammation, suggesting that the obesity-related microbiota composition has a proinflammatory effect. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  9. Activation of Endocannabinoid System Is Associated with Persistent Inflammation in Human Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestrich, Christopher; Duerr, Georg D; Heinemann, Jan C; Meertz, Anne; Probst, Chris; Roell, Wilhelm; Schiller, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Bindila, Laura; Lutz, Beat; Welz, Armin; Dewald, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Human aortic aneurysms have been associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. Since the endocannabinoid system modulates inflammation and tissue remodeling, we investigated its components in human aortic aneurysms. We obtained anterior aortic wall samples from patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm or coronary artery disease as controls. Histological and molecular analysis (RT-qPCR) was performed, and endocannabinoid concentration was determined using LC-MRM. Patient characteristics were comparable between the groups except for a higher incidence of arterial hypertension and diabetes in the control group. mRNA level of cannabinoid receptors was significantly higher in aneurysms than in controls. Concentration of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol was significantly higher, while the second endocannabinoid anandamide and its metabolite arachidonic acid and palmitoylethanolamide were significantly lower in aneurysms. Histology revealed persistent infiltration of newly recruited leukocytes and significantly higher mononuclear cell density in adventitia of the aneurysms. Proinflammatory environment in aneurysms was shown by significant upregulation of M-CSF and PPARγ but associated with downregulation of chemokines. We found comparable collagen-stained area between the groups, significantly decreased mRNA level of CTGF, osteopontin-1, and MMP-2, and increased TIMP-4 expression in aneurysms. Our data provides evidence for endocannabinoid system activation in human aortic aneurysms, associated with persistent low-level inflammation and vascular remodeling.

  10. Shaofu Zhuyu decoction ameliorates obesity-mediated hepatic steatosis and systemic inflammation by regulating metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonju Hong

    Full Text Available Shaofu Zhuyu decoction (SFZYD, also known as Sobokchugeo-tang, a classical prescription drug in traditional East Asian medicine, has been used to treat blood stasis syndrome (BSS. Hepatic steatosis is the result of excess caloric intake, and its pathogenesis involves internal retention of phlegm and dampness, blood stasis, and liver Qi stagnation. To evaluate the effects of treatment with SFZYD on obesity-induced inflammation and hepatic steatosis, we fed male C57BL/6N mice a high fat diet (HFD for 8 weeks and then treated them with SFZYD by oral gavage for an additional 4 weeks. The results of histological and biochemical examinations indicated that SFZYD treatment ameliorates systemic inflammation and hepatic steatosis. A partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA scores plot of serum metabolites showed that HFD mice began to produce metabolites similar to those of normal chow (NC mice after SFZYD administration. We noted significant alterations in the levels of twenty-seven metabolites, alterations indicating that SFZYD regulates the TCA cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway and aromatic amino acid metabolism. Increases in the levels of TCA cycle intermediate metabolites, such as 2-oxoglutaric acid, isocitric acid, and malic acid, in the serum of obese mice were significantly reversed after SFZYD treatment. In addition to inducing changes in the above metabolites, treatment with SFZYD also recovered the expression of genes related to hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction, including Ucp2, Cpt1α, and Ppargc1α, as well as the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation, without affecting glucose uptake or insulin signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that treatment with SFZYD ameliorated obesity-induced systemic inflammation and hepatic steatosis by regulating inflammatory cytokine and adipokine levels in the circulation and various tissues. Moreover, treatment with SFZYD also reversed alterations in the

  11. A high quality diet is associated with reduced systemic inflammation in middle-aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Joana Alves; Wirfält, Elisabet; Drake, Isabel; Gullberg, Bo; Hedblad, Bo; Persson, Margaretha; Engström, Gunnar; Nilsson, Jan; Schiopu, Alexandru; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Björkbacka, Harry

    2015-01-01

    To examine if overall diet quality is associated with cellular and soluble biomarkers of systemic inflammation in middle-aged individuals. A group of 667 individuals, aged 63-68 years, selected from the cardiovascular arm of the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort, participated in this study. Baseline examinations consisted of an extensive socio-demographic questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, blood sampling and detailed dietary data. Mononuclear leukocytes frozen at baseline were thawed and analysed with flow cytometry to quantify monocyte subsets based on CD14 and CD16 expression. Plasma cytokines were measured using multiplexed immune assays. A diet quality index consisting of six components (saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish and shellfish, dietary fibre, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose) was constructed to measure adherence to the Swedish Nutrition Recommendations/Dietary Guidelines. General linear models were used to investigate associations between index scores and several biomarkers of inflammation. A higher percentage of women reported adherence to the nutritional recommendations and had better overall diet quality than men. Participants with higher diet quality were more likely to have a healthier lifestyle. The levels of high-sensitive CRP, S100A8/A9, TNF-α, white blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes and CD14(+)CD16(++) were lower in participants with higher index scores. The associations remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders. In this cross-sectional study, we found that a high diet quality is associated with lower systemic inflammation. As the incidence of cardiovascular disease and cancer is directly correlated with the levels of inflammation, our findings might indicate a protective role of high-quality diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Is Systemic Inflammation Associated With Elevated PSA Serum Levels In Patients Submitted Chronic Hemodialysis?

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    Gilmar Pereira Silva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgroundː whereas that systemic inflammation (SI affects 40–60% of patients on hemodialysis (HD is characterized by serum C-reactive protein (CRP level elevation or proinflammatory interleukin production or both. We evaluated the association between SI and total (tPSA and free PSA (fPSA in patients on HD with tPSA 6 months. Patients were excluded if they had local infections or SI. Hs-CRP was measured using turbidimetry, and tPSA and fPSA levels using immunochemoluminescence. Overall, 27 patients had inflammation (hs-CRP >5 mg/L and 33 had no inflammation (hs-CRP was ≤5 mg/L. In the control group, hs-CRP was ≤ 1 mg/L. Resultsː there was no significant difference in mean levels among groups 3 and 4 for age (p=0,058, tPSA (p=0,74 and fPSA (p=0,30. The SI did not promote differences between groups 1, 2 and 4 for the levels of tPSA (0,71 ± 0,18  vs   0,67 ± 0,15  vs  0,67 ± 0,11; p=0,69 and fPSA (0,34  ±  0,01  vs  0,34  ±  0,01  vs   0,35  ±  0,01, p= 0,59 . As well as maintained no correlation with tPSA and fPSA (p>0,05. Conclusionː The systemic inflammation in hemodialytic patients without clinically detectable cancer (PSA<4ng/ml is no associated with changes fractions of tPSA and fPSA.

  13. Effects of flaxseed consumption on systemic inflammation and serum lipid profile in hemodialysis patients with lipid abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalatbari Soltani, Saman; Jamaluddin, Rosita; Tabibi, Hadi; Mohd Yusof, Barakatun Nisak; Atabak, Shahnaz; Loh, Su-Peng; Rahmani, Leila

    2013-04-01

    Inflammation and lipid abnormalities are two important risk factors for cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of flaxseed consumption on systemic inflammation and serum lipid profile in HD patients with lipid abnormalities. This was an unblinded, randomized clinical trial. Thirty HD patients with dyslipidemia (triglyceride >200 mg/dL and/or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) consumption improves lipid abnormalities and reduces systemic inflammation in HD patients with lipid abnormalities. © 2012 The Authors. Hemodialysis International © 2012 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  14. Role of microRNAs in the immune system, inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisch, Jennifer; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Nguyen, Hang Thi Thu

    2013-05-28

    MicroRNAs, a key class of gene expression regulators, have emerged as crucial players in various biological processes such as cellular proliferation and differentiation, development and apoptosis. In addition, microRNAs are coming to light as crucial regulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, and their abnormal expression and/or function in the immune system have been linked to multiple human diseases including inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, and cancers. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of microRNAs with a focus on their role and mode of action in regulating the immune system during inflammation and carcinogenesis.

  15. AGE and their receptor RAGE in systemic autoimmune diseases : An inflammation propagating factor contributing to accelerated atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nienhuis, Hans L. A.; Westra, Johanna; Smit, Andries J.; Limburg, Pieter C.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases are associated with inflammation, and oxidative stress favouring the formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGE), able to modulate cellular functions by activation of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE). As RAGE expression is increased in an

  16. Comparison of serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein as diagnostic markers of systemic inflammation in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michelle Brønniche; Langhorn, Rebecca; Goddard, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic performance of canine serum amyloid A (SAA) was compared with that of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the detection of systemic inflammation in dogs. Sera from 500 dogs were retrospectively included in the study. C-reactive protein and SAA were measured using validated automated assays....... The overlap performance, clinical decision limits, overall diagnostic performance, correlations, and agreement in the clinical classification between these 2 diagnostic markers were compared. Significantly higher concentrations of both proteins were detected in dogs with systemic inflammation (SAA range: 48.......75 to > 2700 mg/L; CRP range: 0.4 to 907.4 mg/L) compared to dogs without systemic inflammation (SAA range: 1.06 to 56.4 mg/L; CRP range: 0.07 to 24.7 mg/L). Both proteins were shown to be sensitive and specific markers of systemic inflammation in dogs. Significant correlations and excellent diagnostic...

  17. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation: an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, Suzanna; Versloot, Christian J.; Voskuijl, Wieger; van Vliet, Sara J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Zhang, Ling; Richardson, Susan; Bourdon, Céline; Netea, Mihai G.; Berkley, James A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Bandsma, Robert Hj

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their associations with mortality in

  18. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation : an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, Suzanna; Versloot, Christian J.; Voskuijl, Wieger; van Vliet, Sara J.; Di Giovanni, Valeria; Zhang, Ling; Richardson, Susan; Bourdon, Celine; Netea, Mihai G.; Berkley, James A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Bandsma, Robert H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. Objective: We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their

  19. Mortality in children with complicated severe acute malnutrition is related to intestinal and systemic inflammation: an observational cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attia, S.; Versloot, C.J.; Voskuijl, W.; Vliet, S.J. van; Giovanni, V. Di; Zhang, L.; Richardson, S.; Bourdon, C.; Netea, M.G.; Berkley, J.A.; Rheenen, P.F. van; Bandsma, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diarrhea affects a large proportion of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM). However, its etiology and clinical consequences remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: We investigated diarrhea, enteropathogens, and systemic and intestinal inflammation for their interrelation and their

  20. Inflammation and coagulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2010-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of sepsis, inflammation and coagulation play a pivotal role. Increasing evidence points to an extensive cross-talk between these two systems, whereby inflammation leads to activation of coagulation, and coagulation also considerably affects inflammatory activity. Molecular

  1. A hepatic protein, fetuin-A, occupies a protective role in lethal systemic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A liver-derived protein, fetuin-A, was first purified from calf fetal serum in 1944, but its potential role in lethal systemic inflammation was previously unknown. This study aims to delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression during lethal systemic inflammation (LSI, and investigated whether alterations of fetuin-A levels affect animal survival, and influence systemic accumulation of a late mediator, HMGB1.LSI was induced by endotoxemia or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP in fetuin-A knock-out or wild-type mice, and animal survival rates were compared. Murine peritoneal macrophages were challenged with exogenous (endotoxin or endogenous (IFN-γ stimuli in the absence or presence of fetuin-A, and HMGB1 expression and release was assessed. Circulating fetuin-A levels were decreased in a time-dependent manner, starting between 26 h, reaching a nadir around 24-48 h, and returning towards base-line approximately 72 h post onset of endotoxemia or sepsis. These dynamic changes were mirrored by an early cytokine IFN-γ-mediated inhibition (up to 50-70% of hepatic fetuin-A expression. Disruption of fetuin-A expression rendered animals more susceptible to LSI, whereas supplementation of fetuin-A (20-100 mg/kg dose-dependently increased animal survival rates. The protection was associated with a significant reduction in systemic HMGB1 accumulation in vivo, and parallel inhibition of IFN-γ- or LPS-induced HMGB1 release in vitro.These experimental data suggest that fetuin-A is protective against lethal systemic inflammation partly by inhibiting active HMGB1 release.

  2. Distinct inflammatory mediator patterns characterize infectious and sterile systemic inflammation in febrile neutropenic hematology patients.

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    Christine Wennerås

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Invasive infections and sterile tissue damage can both give rise to systemic inflammation with fever and production of inflammatory mediators. This makes it difficult to diagnose infections in patients who are already inflamed, e.g. due to cell and tissue damage. For example, fever in patients with hematological malignancies may depend on infection, lysis of malignant cells, and/or chemotherapy-induced mucosal damage. We hypothesized that it would be possible to distinguish patterns of inflammatory mediators characterizing infectious and non-infectious causes of inflammation, respectively. Analysis of a broad range of parameters using a multivariate method of pattern recognition was done for this purpose. METHODS: In this prospective study, febrile (>38°C neutropenic patients (n = 42 with hematologic malignancies were classified as having or not having a microbiologically defined infection by an infectious disease specialist. In parallel, blood was analyzed for 116 biomarkers, and 23 clinical variables were recorded for each patient. Using O-PLS (orthogonal projection to latent structures, a model was constructed based on these 139 variables that could separate the infected from the non-infected patients. Non-discriminatory variables were discarded until a final model was reached. Finally, the capacity of this model to accurately classify a validation set of febrile neutropenic patients (n = 10 as infected or non-infected was tested. RESULTS: A model that could segregate infected from non-infected patients was achieved based on discrete differences in the levels of 40 variables. These variables included acute phase proteins, cytokines, measures of coagulation, metabolism, organ stress and iron turn-over. The model correctly identified the infectious status of nine out of ten subsequently recruited febrile neutropenic hematology patients. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to separate patients with infectious inflammation from those

  3. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with airflow limitation, muscle weakness and systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Galal Daabis

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in clinically stable COPD patients and is particularly related to the severity of the airway obstruction. Systemic inflammation is present in stable COPD patients and its intensity is related to the severity of the underlying disease and it predisposes to skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. However, we failed to find a significant association between hypogonadism and muscle weakness or systemic inflammation.

  4. The risk of incident type 2 diabetes in a Korean metabolically healthy obese population: the role of systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Min Jung; Kang, Yu Mi; Jang, Jung Eun; Leem, Jaechan; Hwang, Jenie Yoonoo; Kim, Eun Hee; Park, Joong-Yeol; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Woo Je

    2015-03-01

    This study sought to investigate whether the metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype is associated with an increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes in a Korean population and, if so, whether systemic inflammation affects this risk in MHO individuals. The study population comprised 36 135 Koreans without type 2 diabetes. Participants were stratified by body mass index (cutoff value, 25.0 kg/m(2)) and metabolic health state (assessed using Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria). High-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was used as a surrogate marker of systemic inflammation. Subjects were classified into low (ie, hsCRP systemic inflammation groups. During a median followup of 36.5 months (range, 4.8-81.7 mo), 635 of the 36 135 individuals (1.8%) developed type 2 diabetes. The MHO group had a significantly higher risk of incident type 2 diabetes (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-2.11) than the metabolically healthy nonobese (MHNO) group. However, the risk of the MHO group varied according to the degree of systemic inflammation. Compared with the MHNO/low systemic inflammation group, the risk of type 2 diabetes in the MHO/low systemic inflammation group was not significantly elevated (multivariate-adjusted HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 0.77-3.34). However, the MHO/high systemic inflammation group had an elevated risk of incident type 2 diabetes (multivariate-adjusted HR, 3.73; 95% CI 2.36-5.88). MHO subjects show a substantially higher risk of incident type 2 diabetes than MHNO subjects. The level of systemic inflammation partially explains this increased risk.

  5. Skin condition and its relationship to systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majewski S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Sebastian Majewski,1,2 Anna Pietrzak,3 Damian Tworek,4 Karolina Szewczyk,5 Anna Kumor-Kisielewska,1 Zofia Kurmanowska,5 Paweł Górski,1,2 Anna Zalewska-Janowska,3,* Wojciech Jerzy Piotrowski1,2,* 1Department of Pneumology and Allergy, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 2Healthy Ageing Research Centre (HARC, Lodz, Poland; 3Department of Psychodermatology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 4Department of General and Oncological Pulmonology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 5Department of Molecular Bases of Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The systemic (extrapulmonary effects and comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD contribute substantially to its burden. The supposed link between COPD and its systemic effects on distal organs could be due to the low-grade systemic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the systemic inflammation may influence the skin condition in COPD patients. Materials and methods: Forty patients with confirmed diagnosis of COPD and a control group consisting of 30 healthy smokers and 20 healthy never-smokers were studied. Transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum hydration, skin sebum content, melanin index, erythema index, and skin temperature were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at the volar forearm of all participants using a multifunctional skin physiology monitor. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, were measured in serum using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: There were significant differences between COPD patients and healthy never-smokers in skin temperature, melanin index, sebum content, and hydration level (P<0.05, but not for transepidermal water loss and erythema index. No significant

  6. Systemic inflammation as a predictor of clinical outcomes after lower extremity angioplasty/stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSart, Kenneth; O'Malley, Kerri; Schmit, Bradley; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Moldawer, Lyle; Baker, Henry; Berceli, Scott; Nelson, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The activation state of the systemic inflammatory milieu has been proposed as a critical regulator of vascular repair after injury. We evaluated the early inflammatory response after endovascular intervention for symptomatic peripheral arterial disease to determine its association with clinical success or failure. Blood samples were obtained from 14 patients undergoing lower extremity angioplasty/stenting and analyzed using high-throughput gene arrays, multiplex serum protein analyses, and flow cytometry. Time-dependent plasma protein and monocyte phenotype analyses demonstrated endovascular revascularization had a modest influence on the overall activation state of the systemic inflammatory system, with baseline variability exceeding the perturbations induced by the intervention. In contrast, specific time-dependent changes in the monocyte genome are evident in the initial 28 days, predominately in those genes associated with leukocyte extravasation. Investigating the relationship between inflammation and the 1-year success or failure of the intervention showed no single plasma protein was correlated with outcome, but a more comprehensive cluster analysis revealed a clear pattern of protein expression that was closely related to the clinical phenotype. Corresponding examination of the monocyte genome identified a gene subset at 1 day postprocedure that was predictive of clinical outcome, with most of these genes active in cell-cycle signaling. Although the global influence of angioplasty/stenting on systemic inflammation was modest, circulating cytokine and monocyte genome analyses support a pattern of early inflammation that is associated with ultimate intervention success vs failure. Molecular profiles incorporating genes involved in monocyte cell-cycle progression and homing, or proinflammatory cytokines, or both, offer the most promise for the development of class prediction tools for clinical application. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Maternal systemic or cord blood inflammation is associated with birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, A L; Pedersen, S H; Urassa, M; Michael, D; Andreasen, A; Todd, J; Kinung'hi, S M; Changalucha, J; McDermid, J M

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is associated with chronic systemic inflammation, with or without antiretroviral therapy. Consequences for foetal growth are not understood, particularly in settings where multiple maternal infections and malnutrition are common. The study was designed to examine maternal systemic circulating and umbilical cord blood cytokine concentrations in relation to birth anthropometry in a Tanzanian prospective cohort. A 9-plex panel of maternal plasma cytokines in HIV-positive (n = 44) and HIV-negative (n = 70) mothers and the same cytokines in umbilical cord blood collected at delivery was assayed. Linear regression modelled associations between maternal or cord blood cytokines and birth anthropometry. Health indicators (haemoglobin, mid-upper-arm circumference, body mass index) in HIV-positive mothers without considerable immunosuppression did not differ from HIV-negative women. Despite this, HIV-exposed infants had lower birthweight and length. Subgroup analyses indicated that HIV management using HAART was associated with lower plasma TNF-α, as were longer durations of any antiretroviral therapy (≥2 months). Greater maternal plasma TNF-α was associated with earlier delivery (-1.7 weeks, P = 0.039) and lower birthweights (-287 g; P = 0.020), while greater umbilical cord TNF-α (-1.43 cm; P = 0.036) and IL-12p70 (-2.4 cm; P = 0.008) were associated with shorter birth length. Birthweight was inversely associated with cord IL-12p70 (-723 g; P = 0.001) and IFN-γ (-482 g, P = 0.007). Maternal cytokines during pregnancy did not correlate with umbilical cord cytokines at delivery. Systemic inflammation identified in maternal plasma or umbilical cord blood was associated with poorer birth anthropometrics in HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants. Controlling maternal and/or foetal systemic inflammation may improve birth anthropometry. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A systems biology approach to construct the gene regulatory network of systemic inflammation via microarray and databases mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Chung-Yu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is a hallmark of many human diseases. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying systemic inflammation has long been an important topic in basic and clinical research. When primary pathogenetic events remains unclear due to its immense complexity, construction and analysis of the gene regulatory network of inflammation at times becomes the best way to understand the detrimental effects of disease. However, it is difficult to recognize and evaluate relevant biological processes from the huge quantities of experimental data. It is hence appealing to find an algorithm which can generate a gene regulatory network of systemic inflammation from high-throughput genomic studies of human diseases. Such network will be essential for us to extract valuable information from the complex and chaotic network under diseased conditions. Results In this study, we construct a gene regulatory network of inflammation using data extracted from the Ensembl and JASPAR databases. We also integrate and apply a number of systematic algorithms like cross correlation threshold, maximum likelihood estimation method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC on time-lapsed microarray data to refine the genome-wide transcriptional regulatory network in response to bacterial endotoxins in the context of dynamic activated genes, which are regulated by transcription factors (TFs such as NF-κB. This systematic approach is used to investigate the stochastic interaction represented by the dynamic leukocyte gene expression profiles of human subject exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (bacterial endotoxin. Based on the kinetic parameters of the dynamic gene regulatory network, we identify important properties (such as susceptibility to infection of the immune system, which may be useful for translational research. Finally, robustness of the inflammatory gene network is also inferred by analyzing the hubs and "weak ties" structures of the gene network

  9. Systems engineering medicine: engineering the inflammation response to infectious and traumatic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert S; Clermont, Gilles

    2010-07-06

    The complexity of the systemic inflammatory response and the lack of a treatment breakthrough in the treatment of pathogenic infection demand that advanced tools be brought to bear in the treatment of severe sepsis and trauma. Systems medicine, the translational science counterpart to basic science's systems biology, is the interface at which these tools may be constructed. Rapid initial strides in improving sepsis treatment are possible through the use of phenomenological modelling and optimization tools for process understanding and device design. Higher impact, and more generalizable, treatment designs are based on mechanistic understanding developed through the use of physiologically based models, characterization of population variability, and the use of control-theoretic systems engineering concepts. In this review we introduce acute inflammation and sepsis as an example of just one area that is currently underserved by the systems medicine community, and, therefore, an area in which contributions of all types can be made.

  10. A pharma perspective on the systems medicine and pharmacology of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz-Beneytez, Julio; Schnizler, Katrin; Eissing, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Biological systems are complex and comprehend multiple scales of organisation. Hence, holistic approaches are necessary to capture the behaviour of these entities from the molecular and cellular to the whole organism level. This also applies to the understanding and treatment of different diseases. Traditional systems biology has been successful in describing different biological phenomena at the cellular level, but it still lacks of a holistic description of the multi-scale interactions within the body. The importance of the physiological context is of particular interest in inflammation. Regulatory agencies have urged the scientific community to increase the translational power of bio-medical research and it has been recognised that modelling and simulation could be a path to follow. Interestingly, in pharma R&D, modelling and simulation has been employed since a long time ago. Systems pharmacology, and particularly physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models, serve as a suitable framework to integrate the available and emerging knowledge at different levels of the drug development process. Systems medicine and pharmacology of inflammation will potentially benefit from this framework in order to better understand inflammatory diseases and to help to transfer the vast knowledge on the molecular and cellular level into a more physiological context. Ultimately, this may lead to reliable predictions of clinical outcomes such as disease progression or treatment efficacy, contributing thereby to a better care of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Systemic and vascular inflammation in an in-vitro model of central obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Arti; Misto, Alessandra; Vozzi, Federico; Magliaro, Chiara; Mattei, Giorgio; Marescotti, Maria Cristina; Avogaro, Angelo; Iori, Elisabetta

    2018-01-01

    Metabolic disorders due to over-nutrition are a major global health problem, often associated with obesity and related morbidities. Obesity is peculiar to humans, as it is associated with lifestyle and diet, and so difficult to reproduce in animal models. Here we describe a model of human central adiposity based on a 3-tissue system consisting of a series of interconnected fluidic modules. Given the causal link between obesity and systemic inflammation, we focused primarily on pro-inflammatory markers, examining the similarities and differences between the 3-tissue model and evidence from human studies in the literature. When challenged with high levels of adiposity, the in-vitro system manifests cardiovascular stress through expression of E-selectin and von Willebrand factor as well as systemic inflammation (expressing IL-6 and MCP-1) as observed in humans. Interestingly, most of the responses are dependent on the synergic interaction between adiposity and the presence of multiple tissue types. The set-up has the potential to reduce animal experiments in obesity research and may help unravel specific cellular mechanisms which underlie tissue response to nutritional overload.

  12. Dietary factors and biomarkers of systemic inflammation in older people: the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corley, Janie; Kyle, Janet A M; Starr, John M; McNeill, Geraldine; Deary, Ian J

    2015-10-14

    Epidemiological studies have reported inverse associations between various single healthy diet indices and lower levels of systemic inflammation, but rarely are they examined in the same sample. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential relationships between biomarkers of systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) and overall foods (dietary patterns), single foods (fruits and vegetables), and specific nutritive (antioxidants) and non-nutritive (flavonoids) food components in the same narrow-age cohort of older adults. The dietary intake of 792 participants aged 70 years from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 was assessed using a 168-item FFQ. Models were adjusted for age, sex, childhood cognitive ability, lifestyle factors and history of disease. Using logistic regression analyses, CRP (normal v. elevated) was favourably associated (at Pfruit intake (unstandardised β = (0·100, OR 0·91, 95 % CI 0·82, 0·99), including flavonoid-rich apples (unstandardised β = (0·456, OR 0·63, 95 % CI 0·439, 0·946). Using linear regression analyses, fibrinogen (continuous) was inversely associated (at Pfruit intake (standardised β = (0·083), and combined fruit and vegetable intake (standardised β = (0·084). We observed no association between food components (antioxidant nutrients or specific flavonoid subclasses) and inflammatory markers. In the present cross-sectional study, nutrient-dense dietary patterns were associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation in older people. The results are consistent with dietary guidelines that promote a balanced diet based on a variety of plant-based foods.

  13. The tryptophan/kynurenine pathway, systemic inflammation, and long-term outcome after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Laura V; Minović, Isidor; Franssen, Casper F M; van Faassen, Martijn; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F; Berger, Stefan P; Navis, Gerjan; Kema, Ido P; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2017-08-01

    Tryptophan is metabolized along the kynurenine pathway, initially to kynurenine, and subsequently to cytotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine. There is increasing interest in this pathway because of its proinflammatory nature, and drugs interfering in it have received increasing attention. We aimed to investigate whether serum and urinary parameters of the tryptophan/kynurenine pathway, and particularly cytotoxic 3-hydroxykynurenine, are associated with systemic inflammation and long-term outcome in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Data were collected in outpatient RTR with a functioning graft for >1 yr. Tryptophan, kynurenine, and 3-hydroxykynurenine in serum and urine were measured using LC-MS/MS. A total of 561 RTR (age: 51 ± 12 yr; 56% male) were included at a median of 6.0 (2.6-11.6) yr posttransplantation. Baseline median serum tryptophan was 40.0 (34.5-46.0) µmol/l, serum kynurenine was 1.8 (1.4-2.2) µmol/l, and serum 3-hydroxykynurenine was 42.2 (31.0-61.7) nmol/l. Serum kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine were strongly associated with parameters of systemic inflammation. During follow-up for 7.0 (6.2-7.5) yr, 51 RTR (9%) developed graft failure and 120 RTR (21%) died. Both serum kynurenine and 3-hydroxykynurenine were independently associated with graft failure [HR 1.72 (1.23-2.41), P = 0.002; and HR 2.03 (1.42-2.90), P tryptophan/kynurenine pathway parameters were not associated with outcome. Of tryptophan metabolites, serum 3-hydroxykynurenine is cross-sectionally most strongly and consistently associated with systemic inflammation and prospectively with adverse long-term outcome after kidney transplantation. Serum 3-hydroxykynurenine may be an interesting biomarker and target for the evaluation of drugs interfering in the tryptophan/kynurenine pathway. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Humoral Dysregulation Associated with Increased Systemic Inflammation among Injection Heroin Users.

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    Michael S Piepenbrink

    Full Text Available Injection drug use is a growing major public health concern. Injection drug users (IDUs have a higher incidence of co-morbidities including HIV, Hepatitis, and other infections. An effective humoral response is critical for optimal homeostasis and protection from infection; however, the impact of injection heroin use on humoral immunity is poorly understood. We hypothesized that IDUs have altered B cell and antibody profiles.A comprehensive systems biology-based cross-sectional assessment of 130 peripheral blood B cell flow cytometry- and plasma- based features was performed on HIV-/Hepatitis C-, active heroin IDUs who participated in a syringe exchange program (n = 19 and healthy control subjects (n = 19. The IDU group had substantial polydrug use, with 89% reporting cocaine injection within the preceding month. IDUs exhibited a significant, 2-fold increase in total B cells compared to healthy subjects, which was associated with increased activated B cell subsets. Although plasma total IgG titers were similar between groups, IDUs had significantly higher IgG3 and IgG4, suggestive of chronic B cell activation. Total IgM was also increased in IDUs, as well as HIV Envelope-specific IgM, suggestive of increased HIV exposure. IDUs exhibited numerous features suggestive of systemic inflammation, including significantly increased plasma sCD40L, TNF-α, TGF-α, IL-8, and ceramide metabolites. Machine learning multivariate analysis distilled a set of 10 features that classified samples based on group with absolute accuracy.These results demonstrate broad alterations in the steady-state humoral profile of IDUs that are associated with increased systemic inflammation. Such dysregulation may impact the ability of IDUs to generate optimal responses to vaccination and infection, or lead to increased risk for inflammation-related co-morbidities, and should be considered when developing immune-based interventions for this growing population.

  15. Leydig cell dysfunction, systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in long-term testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandak, M; Jørgensen, N; Juul, A; Lauritsen, J; Oturai, P S; Mortensen, J; Hojman, P; Helge, J W; Daugaard, G

    2017-10-01

    Twenty to thirty percent of testicular cancer (TC) survivors have elevated serum levels of luteinising hormone (LH) with or without corresponding low testosterone levels (Leydig cell dysfunction) during clinical follow-up for TC. However, it remains to be clarified if this subgroup of TC survivors has an increased long-term risk of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome (MetS) when compared with TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and a control group of TC survivors with normal Leydig cell function during follow-up were eligible for participation in the study. Markers of systemic inflammation and prevalence of MetS were compared between TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction and the control group. Of 158 included TC survivors, 28 (18%) had uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction, 59 (37%) had compensated Leydig cell dysfunction and 71 (45%) had normal Leydig cell function during follow-up. MetS and markers of systemic inflammation were evaluated at a median follow-up of 9.7 years (interquartile range 4.1-17.1) after TC treatment. The prevalence of MetS was significantly lower among patients with compensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up (12% versus 27%, p = 0.04), whereas there was no difference between TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction and controls (33% versus 27%, p = 0.5). Apart from high-sensitivity C-reactive protein which was higher in TC survivors with uncompensated Leydig cell dysfunction during follow-up, there was no evidence of increased systemic inflammation in patients with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated with MetS, whereas there was no association between LH and MetS. We did not find evidence that TC survivors with Leydig cell dysfunction during clinical follow-up had increased long-term risk of MetS. Total testosterone at follow-up was significantly associated

  16. Noninvasive scoring system for significant inflammation related to chronic hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mei-Zhu; Ye, Linglong; Jin, Li-Xin; Ren, Yan-Dan; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Ru-Mian; Fang, Kuangnan; Pan, Jin-Shui

    2017-03-01

    Although a liver stiffness measurement-based model can precisely predict significant intrahepatic inflammation, transient elastography is not commonly available in a primary care center. Additionally, high body mass index and bilirubinemia have notable effects on the accuracy of transient elastography. The present study aimed to create a noninvasive scoring system for the prediction of intrahepatic inflammatory activity related to chronic hepatitis B, without the aid of transient elastography. A total of 396 patients with chronic hepatitis B were enrolled in the present study. Liver biopsies were performed, liver histology was scored using the Scheuer scoring system, and serum markers and liver function were investigated. Inflammatory activity scoring models were constructed for both hepatitis B envelope antigen (+) and hepatitis B envelope antigen (-) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and area under the curve were 86.00%, 84.80%, 62.32%, 95.39%, and 0.9219, respectively, in the hepatitis B envelope antigen (+) group and 91.89%, 89.86%, 70.83%, 97.64%, and 0.9691, respectively, in the hepatitis B envelope antigen (-) group. Significant inflammation related to chronic hepatitis B can be predicted with satisfactory accuracy by using our logistic regression-based scoring system.

  17. Endotoxemia, immune response to periodontal pathogens, and systemic inflammation associate with incident cardiovascular disease events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pussinen, Pirkko J; Tuomisto, Karolina; Jousilahti, Pekka; Havulinna, Aki S; Sundvall, Jouko; Salomaa, Veikko

    2007-06-01

    In periodontitis, overgrowth of gram-negative bacteria may cause endotoxemia and systemic inflammation leading to cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We investigated in a prospective study the associations of serum endotoxin, antibodies to periodontal pathogens, and inflammation markers with the risk of incident CVD. The FINRISK 1992 cohort of 6051 individuals was followed up for 10 years. We examined 185 incident CVD events and a control cohort of 320 individuals using a prospective case-cohort design. High antibody response to periodontal pathogens independently predicted incident CVD events with hazard ratios (HR, quartile 4 versus quartiles 1 to 3, 95% CI) of 1.87 (1.13 to 3.08). The subjects with a high antibody response and high CRP or interleukin (IL)-6 had multivariate-adjusted HRs of 3.01 (1.27 to 7.09) and 3.11 (1.42 to 6.83) compared with low-responders, respectively. The corresponding HRs for high endotoxin concentration were 1.82 (1.22 to 2.73, alone), 3.92 (1.99 to 7.74, with CRP), 3.54 (1.78 to 7.03, with IL-6), and 2.26 (1.13 to 4.52, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha) after adjusting for age and gender. These associations were abolished after adjusting for serum lipids. High endotoxin/HDL ratio, however, had a multivariate-adjusted HR of 1.92 (1.19 to 3.08) for CVD events. Our results suggest that the exposure to periodontal pathogens or endotoxin induces systemic inflammation leading to increased risk for CVD.

  18. Repeated exposure to systemic inflammation and risk of new depressive symptoms among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J A; Kivimäki, M; Bullmore, E T; Steptoe, A; Carvalho, L A

    2017-08-15

    Evidence on systemic inflammation as a risk factor for future depression is inconsistent, possibly due to a lack of regard for persistency of exposure. We examined whether being inflamed on multiple occasions increases risk of new depressive symptoms using prospective data from a population-based sample of adults aged 50 years or older (the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing). Participants with less than four of eight depressive symptoms in 2004/05 and 2008/09 based on the Eight-item Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale were analysed. The number of occasions with C-reactive protein ⩾3 mg l -1 over the same initial assessments (1 vs 0 occasion, and 2 vs 0 occasions) was examined in relation to change in depressive symptoms between 2008/09 and 2012/13 and odds of developing depressive symptomology (having more than or equal to four of eight symptoms) in 2012/13. In multivariable-adjusted regression models (n=2068), participants who were inflamed on 1 vs 0 occasion showed no increase in depressive symptoms nor raised odds of developing depressive symptomology; those inflamed on 2 vs 0 occasions showed a 0.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs)=-0.07, 0.28) symptom increase and 1.60 (95% CI=1.00, 2.55) times higher odds. In further analyses, 2 vs 0 occasions of inflammation were associated with increased odds of developing depressive symptoms among women (odds ratio (OR)=2.75, 95% CI=1.53, 4.95), but not among men (OR=0.70, 95% CI=0.29, 1.68); P-for-sex interaction=0.035. In this cohort study of older adults, repeated but not transient exposure to systemic inflammation was associated with increased risk of future depressive symptoms among women; this subgroup finding requires confirmation of validity.

  19. Cholesterol crystals piercing the arterial plaque and intima trigger local and systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abela, George S

    2010-01-01

    The response to arterial wall injury is an inflammatory process, which over time becomes integral to the development of atherosclerosis and subsequent plaque instability. However, the underlying injurious agent, critical to this process, has not received much attention. In this review, a model of plaque rupture is hypothesized with two stages of inflammatory activity. In stage I (cholesterol crystal-induced cell injury and apoptosis), intracellular cholesterol crystals induce foam cell apoptosis, setting up a vicious cycle by signaling more macrophages, resulting in accumulation of extra cellular lipids. This local inflammation eventually leads to the formation of a semi-liquid, lipid-rich necrotic core of a vulnerable plaque. In stage II (cholesterol crystal-induced arterial wall injury), the saturated lipid core is now primed for crystallization, which can manifest as a clinical syndrome with a systemic inflammation response. Cholesterol crystallization is the trigger that causes core expansion, leading to intimal injury. We recently demonstrated that when cholesterol crystallizes from a liquid to a solid state, it undergoes volume expansion, which can tear the plaque cap. This observation of cholesterol crystals perforating the cap and intimal surface was made in the plaques of patients who died with acute coronary syndrome. We have also demonstrated that several agents (ie, statins, aspirin, and ethanol) can dissolve cholesterol crystals and may be exerting their immediate benefits by this direct mechanism. Also, because recent studies have demonstrated that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein may be a reliable marker in selecting patients for statin therapy, it could reflect the presence of intimal injury by cholesterol crystals. This was demonstrated in an atherosclerotic rabbit model. Therefore, we propose that cholesterol crystallization could help explain in part both local and systemic inflammation associated with atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2010

  20. Differences in systemic inflammation between cigarette and biomass smoke-induced COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golpe R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rafael Golpe,1 Irene Martín-Robles,1 Pilar Sanjuán-López,1 Luis Pérez-de-Llano,1 Carlos González-Juanatey,2 José L López-Campos,3,4 Elena Arellano-Orden4 1Respiratory Medicine Service, 2Cardiology Service, University Hospital Lucus Augusti, Lugo, 3Medical-Surgical Unit of Respiratory Diseases, University Hospital Virgen del Rocío, Sevilla, 4Center for Biomedical Research in Respiratory Diseases Network, Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain Background and objective: It is known that biomarkers of systemic inflammation are raised in COPD caused by tobacco (T-COPD compared with healthy controls, but there is less information on the inflammatory status of subjects with COPD caused by biomass smoke (B-COPD. In addition, the possible (if any differences in inflammation between both types of the disease are still not well known. The aim of this study was to assess the inflammatory profile in B-COPD and T-COPD.Methods: A total of 20 subjects (15 men and five women with T-COPD were matched one to one for sex, age and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 to 20 B-COPD patients. In all, 20 sex-matched healthy subjects with normal lung function without smoking history or biomass exposure were included as controls. The following biomarkers were measured: exhaled nitric oxide, serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-5, IL-13, periostin, surfactant protein-P, TNF-α, IgE, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. Complete blood count was also obtained.Results: The age of the subjects was 70.2±7.9 years and FEV1% was 56.2%±14.6%. Most inflammatory biomarkers were higher in both types of COPD than in healthy controls. IL-6, IL-8 and IL-5 were significantly higher in T-COPD than in B-COPD, without other significant differences.Conclusion: Both types of COPD are associated with high levels of systemic inflammation biomarkers. T-COPD patients have a higher systemic inflammatory status than the patients with B-COPD. Keywords: biomass smoke

  1. Systemic Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: May Adipose Tissue Play a Role? Review of the Literature and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzena Tkacova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Low-grade systemic inflammation is considered a hallmark of COPD that potentially links COPD to increased rate of systemic manifestations of the disease. Obesity with/without the metabolic syndrome and cachexia represent two poles of metabolic abnormalities that may relate to systemic inflammation. On one hand systemic inflammatory syndrome likely reflects inflammation in the lungs, i.e. results from lung-to plasma spillover of inflammatory mediators. On the other hand, obesity-related hypoxia results in local inflammatory response within adipose tissue per se, and may contribute to elevations in circulatory mediators by spillover from the adipose tissue to the systemic compartment. The extent to which systemic hypoxia contributes to the adipose tissue inflammation remains unknown. We assume that in patients with COPD and concurrent obesity at least three factors play a role in the systemic inflammatory syndrome: the severity of pulmonary impairment, the degree of obesity-related adipose tissue hypoxia, and the severity of systemic hypoxia due to reduced pulmonary functions. The present review summarizes the epidemiological and clinical evidence linking COPD to obesity, the role of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ, and the role of hypoxia in adipose tissue inflammation.

  2. Combined effects of aging and inflammation on renin-angiotensin system mediate mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic changes in cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Tyesha N; Marx, Ruth; Powell, Laura; Rucker, Jasma; Bedja, Djahida; Heacock, Elisa; Smith, Barbara J; Foster, D Brian; Kass, David; O'Rourke, Brian; Walston, Jeremy D; Abadir, Peter M

    2015-05-20

    Although the effects of aging and inflammation on the health of the cardiac muscle are well documented, the combined effects of aging and chronic inflammation on cardiac muscle are largely unknown. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been linked independently to both aging and inflammation, but is understudied in the context of their collective effect. Thus, we investigated localized cardiac angiotensin II type I and type II receptors (AT(1)R, AT(2)R), downstream effectors, and phenotypic outcomes using mouse models of the combination of aging and inflammation and compared it to a model of aging and a model of inflammation. We show molecular distinction in the combined effect of aging and inflammation as compared to each independently. The combination maintained an increased AT(1)R:AT(2)R and expression of Nox2 and exhibited the lowest activity of antioxidants. Despite signaling pathway differences, the combined effect shared phenotypic similarities with aging including oxidative damage, fibrosis, and hypertrophy. These phenotypic similarities have dubbed inflammatory conditions as premature aging, but they are, in fact, molecularly distinct. Moreover, treatment with an AT(1)R blocker, losartan, selectively reversed the signaling changes and ameliorated adverse phenotypic effects in the combination of aging and inflammation as well as each independently.

  3. Chromosome 13 dementia syndromes as models of neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiso, J.; Revesz, T.; Holton, J.

    2001-01-01

    Two hereditary conditions, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with amyloid deposition in the central nervous system and neurodegeneration. The two amyloid proteins, ABri and ADan, are degradation products of the same precursor molecule BriPP bearing....... These issues argue for the primary importance of the amyloid deposits in the mechanism(s) of neuronal cell loss. We propose FBD and FDD, the chromosome 13 dementia syndromes, as models to study the molecular basis of neurofibrillary degeneration, cell death and amyloid formation in the brain....

  4. Cognitive ability in early adulthood is associated with systemic inflammation in middle age: the Vietnam experience study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Anna C; Batty, G David; van Zanten, Jet J C S Veldhuijzen

    2011-01-01

    , and place of service were extracted from enlistment files. Smoking behaviour, alcohol consumption, basic socio-demographics, and whether participants suffered from a physician diagnosed chronic disease were determined by telephone interview in middle-age in 1985. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, cholesterol...... erythrocyte sedimentation rate in middle age, ß=-.09. Thus, it would appear that not only does systemic inflammation influence cognition, but also that poor cognitive ability earlier in life is associated with inflammation in middle-age....

  5. Repulsive Guidance Molecule-a Is Involved in Th17-Cell-Induced Neurodegeneration in Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Tanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, demyelination, and neurodegeneration in the CNS. Although it is important to prevent neurodegeneration for alleviating neurological disability, the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration remains largely unknown. Here, we report that repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa, known to regulate axonal growth, is associated with neurodegeneration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a mouse model of MS. RGMa is highly expressed in interleukin-17-producing CD4+ T cells (Th17 cells. We induced EAE by adoptive transfer of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-specific Th17 cells and then inhibited RGMa with a neutralizing antibody. Inhibition of RGMa improves EAE scores and reduces neuronal degeneration without altering immune or glial responses. Th17 cells induce cultured cortical neuron death through RGMa-neogenin and Akt dephosphorylation. Our results demonstrate that RGMa is involved in Th17-cell-mediated neurodegeneration and that RGMa-specific antibody may have a therapeutic effect in MS.

  6. IL10 Released by a New Inflammation-regulated Lentiviral System Efficiently Attenuates Zymosan-induced Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaulet, Guillermo; Alfranca, Arántzazu; Torrente, María; Escolano, Amelia; López-Fontal, Raquel; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Redondo, Juan M; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Administration of anti-inflammatory cytokines is a common therapeutic strategy in chronic inflammatory diseases. Gene therapy is an efficient method for delivering therapeutic molecules to target cells. Expression of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin (ESEL), which is expressed in the early stages of inflammation, is controlled by proinflammatory cytokines, making its promoter a good candidate for the design of inflammation-regulated gene therapy vectors. This study describes an ESEL promoter (ESELp)-based lentiviral vector (LV) that drives localized transgene expression during inflammation. Mouse matrigel plug assays with ESELp-transduced endothelial cells showed that systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration selectively induces ESELp-controlled luciferase expression in vivo. Inflammation-specific induction was confirmed in a mouse model of arthritis, showing that this LV is repeatedly induced early in acute inflammation episodes and is downregulated during remission. Moreover, the local acute inflammatory response in this animal model was efficiently blocked by expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL10) driven by our LV system. This inflammation-regulated expression system has potential application in the design of new strategies for the local treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22760540

  7. Myocyte TLR4 enhances enteric and systemic inflammation driving late murine endotoxic ileus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Bettina M.; Shapiro, Richard A.; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Hackam, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Myocytes are nonhemopoietic in origin and functionally essential in generating gastrointestinal motility. In endotoxemia, a rapid-onset nonhemopoietic mechanism potently triggers early ileus in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent manner. Moreover, synergistically with hemopoietic cells, nonhemopoietic cells escalate late ileus via an IL-6 receptor-dependent inflammation-driven pathway. We therefore specifically investigated the role of myocytes in TLR4-triggered inflammation and ileus. TLR4+/+, TLR4−/−, bmTLR4+/+/TLR4−/− chimera, SM22-Cre−/−TLR4flox/flox, and selective myocyte TLR4-deficient (SM22-Cre+/−TLR4flox/flox) mice were injected intraperitoneally with purified lipopolysaccharide. SM22-driven Cre recombinase activity was selectively detected in cardiac, gastrointestinal, skeletal, and vascular myocytes, of small-sized vessels in a two-color fluorescent Cre reporter mouse. In contrast to nonhemopoietic TLR4 deficiency, deletion of myocyte TLR4 signaling prevented neither endotoxin-induced suppression of spontaneous jejunal contractility in vitro nor early ileus in vivo at 6 h. Circulating plasma colony-stimulating factor 3 was greatly elevated during endotoxemia, independent of myocyte TLR4 signaling or time. TLR4 activation of myocytes contributed significantly to an early enteric IL-6 mRNA induction and systemic IL-6 release, as well as to a late increase in circulating chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and IL-17. Consequently, inhibition of myocyte TLR4 signaling allowed functional recovery of motility by preventing inflammation-driven late ileus at 24 h. Direct TLR4 activation of myocytes is not responsible for nonhemopoietic-mediated early ileus. However, myocytes are proinflammatory cells that potently drive enteric and systemic inflammation, subsequently fueling late mediator-triggered ileus. Specifically, the myocyte TLR4-dependent inflammatory signature of elevated

  8. Relation between clinical and anthropometric data and systemic inflammation in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertseva Т.А.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, much attention is devoted to systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between clinical and anthropometric data with systemic inflammation in stable COPD patients. According to the study CRP levels were raised in 44% of patients (7.9 [7,1-10,9. Serum CRP was significantly higher in stable COPD patients than in control subjects (p=0.04. CRP correlated well with the pack/years index(p = 0,032 and disease duration (p=0,01. It wasn’t established link between CRP levels and height, weight, stage, disease category. CRP level affected the frequency of exacerbations (r=0,50; p=0,01. Patients with high CRP level had significantly more exacerbations in the past year (p=0.01. Patients who received any type of therapy for a long period of time had lower CRP levels, than patients who did not reseive any therapy.

  9. CELECOXIB ATTENUATES SYSTEMIC LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BRAIN INFLAMMATION AND WHITE MATTER INJURY IN THE NEONATAL RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAN, L.-W.; KAIZAKI, A.; TIEN, L.-T.; PANG, Y.; TANAKA, S.; NUMAZAWA, S.; BHATT, A. J.; CAI, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain is associated with inflammatory processes. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can be induced by inflammatory stimuli, such as cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 may be considered as the target for anti-inflammation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, can reduce systemic LPS-induced brain inflammation and brain damage. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2 mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) of Sprague-Dawley rat pups and celecoxib (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered i.p. 5 min after LPS injection. The body weight and wire hanging maneuver test were performed 24 hr after the LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined after these tests. Systemic LPS exposure resulted in an impairment of behavioral performance and acute brain injury, as indicated by apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes (OLs) and loss of OL immunoreactivity in the neonatal rat brain. Treatments with celecoxib significantly reduced systemic LPS-induced neurobehavioral disturbance and brain damage. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated systemic LPS-induced increments in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes, concentrations of IL-1β and TNFα, and protein levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAPK in the neonatal rat brain. The protection of celecoxib was also associated with a reduction of systemic LPS-induced COX-2+ cells which were double labeled with GFAP+ (astrocyte) cells. The overall results suggest that celecoxib was capable of attenuating the brain injury and neurobehavioral disturbance induced by systemic LPS exposure, and the protective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:23485816

  10. Childhood bullying involvement predicts low-grade systemic inflammation into adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William E.; Wolke, Dieter; Lereya, Suzet Tanya; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol; Costello, E. Jane

    2014-01-01

    Bullying is a common childhood experience that involves repeated mistreatment to improve or maintain one’s status. Victims display long-term social, psychological, and health consequences, whereas bullies display minimal ill effects. The aim of this study is to test how this adverse social experience is biologically embedded to affect short- or long-term levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of low-grade systemic inflammation. The prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (n = 1,420), with up to nine waves of data per subject, was used, covering childhood/adolescence (ages 9–16) and young adulthood (ages 19 and 21). Structured interviews were used to assess bullying involvement and relevant covariates at all childhood/adolescent observations. Blood spots were collected at each observation and assayed for CRP levels. During childhood and adolescence, the number of waves at which the child was bullied predicted increasing levels of CRP. Although CRP levels rose for all participants from childhood into adulthood, being bullied predicted greater increases in CRP levels, whereas bullying others predicted lower increases in CRP compared with those uninvolved in bullying. This pattern was robust, controlling for body mass index, substance use, physical and mental health status, and exposures to other childhood psychosocial adversities. A child’s role in bullying may serve as either a risk or a protective factor for adult low-grade inflammation, independent of other factors. Inflammation is a physiological response that mediates the effects of both social adversity and dominance on decreases in health. PMID:24821813

  11. Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: carlos.leite@pucrs.br [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina: Ciências Médicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90035-003 (Brazil); Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Biociências, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Farmácia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Rosemberg, Denis Broock [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Ambientais, Universidade Comunitária da Região de Chapecó, Chapecó, CEP 89809-000 (Brazil); and others

    2013-11-01

    The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 μM of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE{sub 2} occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence

  12. Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira; Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes; Rosemberg, Denis Broock

    2013-01-01

    The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 μM of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE 2 . Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE 2 occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence of

  13. The topograpy of demyelination and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Lukas; Hametner, Simon; Höftberger, Romana; Bagnato, Francesca; Grabner, Günther; Trattnig, Siegfried; Pfeifenbring, Sabine; Brück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease with primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In our study we analysed demyelination and neurodegeneration in a large series of multiple sclerosis brains and provide a map that displays the frequency of different brain areas to be affected by these processes. Demyelination in the cerebral cortex was related to inflammatory infiltrates in the meninges, which was pronounced in invaginations of the brain surface (sulci) and possibly promoted by low flow of the cerebrospinal fluid in these areas. Focal demyelinated lesions in the white matter occurred at sites with high venous density and additionally accumulated in watershed areas of low arterial blood supply. Two different patterns of neurodegeneration in the cortex were identified: oxidative injury of cortical neurons and retrograde neurodegeneration due to axonal injury in the white matter. While oxidative injury was related to the inflammatory process in the meninges and pronounced in actively demyelinating cortical lesions, retrograde degeneration was mainly related to demyelinated lesions and axonal loss in the white matter. Our data show that accumulation of lesions and neurodegeneration in the multiple sclerosis brain does not affect all brain regions equally and provides the pathological basis for the selection of brain areas for monitoring regional injury and atrophy development in future magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:26912645

  14. Interaction of the endocrine system with inflammation: a function of energy and volume regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H

    2014-02-13

    During acute systemic infectious disease, precisely regulated release of energy-rich substrates (glucose, free fatty acids, and amino acids) and auxiliary elements such as calcium/phosphorus from storage sites (fat tissue, muscle, liver, and bone) are highly important because these factors are needed by an energy-consuming immune system in a situation with little or no food/water intake (sickness behavior). This positively selected program for short-lived infectious diseases is similarly applied during chronic inflammatory diseases. This review presents the interaction of hormones and inflammation by focusing on energy storage/expenditure and volume regulation. Energy storage hormones are represented by insulin (glucose/lipid storage and growth-related processes), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) (muscle and bone growth), androgens (muscle and bone growth), vitamin D (bone growth), and osteocalcin (bone growth, support of insulin, and testosterone). Energy expenditure hormones are represented by cortisol (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides/muscle protein, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), noradrenaline/adrenaline (breakdown of liver glycogen/adipose tissue triglycerides, and gluconeogenesis; water retention), growth hormone (glucogenic, lipolytic; has also growth-related aspects; water retention), thyroid gland hormones (increase metabolic effects of adrenaline/noradrenaline), and angiotensin II (induce insulin resistance and retain water). In chronic inflammatory diseases, a preponderance of energy expenditure pathways is switched on, leading to typical hormonal changes such as insulin/IGF-1 resistance, hypoandrogenemia, hypovitaminosis D, mild hypercortisolemia, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Though necessary during acute inflammation in the context of systemic infection or trauma, these long-standing changes contribute to increased mortality in chronic

  15. Systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) predicts prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Litao; Yu, Shulin; Zhuang, Liping; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yehua; Lin, Junhua; Meng, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The systemic inflammation response index (SIRI) is a useful tool for predicting prognosis in some types of cancer. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the efficacy of SIRI in predicting overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients following local or systemic therapy. A cutoff value of 1.05 was identified for SIRI using ROC analysis in a training patient cohort. In the validation cohort, survival analysis revealed that median overall survival was longer in HCC patients with SIRI scores SIRI was associated with overall survival and was more predictive of overall survival that the AFP level or Child-Pugh score. However, SIRI and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage were equally effective for predicting survival. In addition, HCC patients with BCLC stage C had higher SIRI scores and poorer overall survival. SIRI also correlated with liver function parameters. Thus SIRI may be a convenient, low cost and reliable tumor marker for predicting prognosis in HCC patients. PMID:28430597

  16. A systems model for immune cell interactions unravels the mechanism of inflammation in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najl V Valeyev

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is characterized by altered cytokine levels produced by cell populations in a highly interdependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of an inflammatory reaction, we have developed a mathematical model for immune cell interactions via the specific, dose-dependent cytokine production rates of cell populations. The model describes the criteria required for normal and pathological immune system responses and suggests that alterations in the cytokine production rates can lead to various stable levels which manifest themselves in different disease phenotypes. The model predicts that pairs of interacting immune cell populations can maintain homeostatic and elevated extracellular cytokine concentration levels, enabling them to operate as an immune system switch. The concept described here is developed in the context of psoriasis, an immune-mediated disease, but it can also offer mechanistic insights into other inflammatory pathologies as it explains how interactions between immune cell populations can lead to disease phenotypes.

  17. Systemic Inflammation and Lung Function Impairment in Morbidly Obese Subjects with the Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid van Huisstede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity and asthma are associated. There is a relationship between lung function impairment and the metabolic syndrome. Whether this relationship also exists in the morbidly obese patients is still unknown. Hypothesis. Low-grade systemic inflammation associated with the metabolic syndrome causes inflammation in the lungs and, hence, lung function impairment. Methods. This is cross-sectional study of morbidly obese patients undergoing preoperative screening for bariatric surgery. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to the revised NCEP-ATP III criteria. Results. A total of 452 patients were included. Patients with the metabolic syndrome (n=293 had significantly higher blood monocyte (mean 5.3 versus 4.9, P=0.044 and eosinophil percentages (median 1.0 versus 0.8, P=0.002, while the total leukocyte count did not differ between the groups. The FEV1/FVC ratio was significantly lower in patients with the metabolic syndrome (76.7% versus 78.2%, P=0.032. Blood eosinophils were associated with FEV1/FVC ratio (adj. B −0.113, P=0.018. Conclusion. Although the difference in FEV1/FVC ratio between the groups is relatively small, in this cross-sectional study, and its clinical relevance may be limited, these data indicate that the presence of the metabolic syndrome may influence lung function impairment, through the induction of relative eosinophilia.

  18. Increased blood-brain barrier vulnerability to systemic inflammation in an Alzheimer disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Ikimura, Kazuko; Nishino, Hirohito; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2013-08-01

    Behavioral and psychological problems are often observed in patients with dementia such as that associated with Alzheimer disease, and these noncognitive symptoms place an extremely heavy burden on the family and caregivers. Although it is well know that these symptoms often are triggered by infection of peripheral organs, the underlying mechanisms for these pathological conditions are still unclear. In this study, using an Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein (APP)-transgenic mouse, we analyzed behavioral changes and brain inflammatory response induced by peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide. Application of a unique in vivo microdialysis system revealed that the increase in brain inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-6) level was significantly higher in APP-Tg than in wild-type mice after peripheral lipopolysaccharide injection, which was associated with more severe sickness behaviors. The blood-brain barrier became more permeable in APP-Tg mice during peripherally evoked inflammation, suggesting the increased vulnerability of the blood-brain barrier to inflammation in this animal model of Alzheimer's disease. These findings might provide insight into the pathogenesis of noncognitive symptoms in dementia and a basis to develop new therapeutic treatments for them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Periostin - A Novel Systemic Biomarker for Eosinophilic Airway Inflammation: A Case Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emprm, Viswanathan; Rajanandh, M G; Nageswari, A D

    2016-02-01

    Chronic airway inflammation and remodelling are fundamental features of asthma. The molecular phenotypes in asthma are Th2 high and Th2 low. Serum periostin is a biomarker which aid in understanding Th2 high eosinophilic asthma. The present study aimed to identify whether or not serum periostin is a systemic biomarker for eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthmatics. The study was designed as a prospective, case control study. Patients who presented with consistent symptoms of asthma and confirmed by spirometry with reversibility were the cases. The controls were healthy subjects who had no history of lung disease with normal lung function. The sputum and blood samples were collected from both the groups. Sputum eosinophils, Absolute Eosinophil Counts (AEC) and serum periostin levels were compared between the groups. The study comprised of 101 participants in which 30 were controls and 71 were cases. In the study group, mean post FEV1 was 64.45. There was a positive correlation of sputum eosinophils with severity of obstruction. The ROC curve analysis showed the cut-off value of 24.556 for serum periostin with the p-value of limitation in asthmatic patients with a Th2 high eosinophilic phenotype when compared to AEC and sputum eosinophils.

  20. Effects of exposure to ambient ultrafine particles on respiratory health and systemic inflammation in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Sam; Mazaheri, Mandana; Salimi, Farhad; Ezz, Wafaa Nabil; Yeganeh, Bijan; Low-Choy, Samantha; Walker, Katy; Mengersen, Kerrie; Marks, Guy B; Morawska, Lidia

    2018-03-04

    It is known that ultrafine particles (UFP, particles smaller than 0.1 μm) can penetrate deep into the lungs and potentially have adverse health effects. However, epidemiological data on the health effects of UFP is limited. Therefore, our objective was to test the hypothesis that exposure to UFPs is associated with respiratory health status and systemic inflammation among children aged 8 to 11 years. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 655 children (43.3% male) attending 25 primary (elementary) schools in the Brisbane Metropolitan Area, Australia. Ultrafine particle number concentration (PNC) was measured at each school and modelled at homes using Land Use Regression to derive exposure estimates. Health outcomes were respiratory symptoms and diagnoses, measured by parent-completed questionnaire, spirometric lung function, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), and serum C reactive protein (CRP). Exposure-response models, adjusted for potential personal and environmental confounders measured at the individual, home and school level, were fitted using Bayesian methods. PNC was not independently associated with respiratory symptoms, asthma diagnosis or spirometric lung function. However, PNC was positively associated with an increase in CRP (1.188-fold change per 1000 UFP cm -3 day/day (95% credible interval 1.077 to 1.299)) and an increase in FeNO among atopic participants (1.054 fold change per 1000 UFP cm -3 day/day (95% CrI 1.005 to 1.106)). UFPs do not affect respiratory health outcomes in children but do have systemic effects, detected here in the form of a positive association with a biomarker for systemic inflammation. This is consistent with the known propensity of UFPs to penetrate deep into the lung and circulatory system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Systemic inflammation as a novel QT-prolonging risk factor in patients with torsades de pointes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Bertolozzi, Iacopo; Morozzi, Gabriella; Lorenzini, Sauro; Simpatico, Antonella; Selvi, Enrico; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; Finizola, Francesco; Vanni, Francesca; Lazaro, Deana; Aromolaran, Ademuyiwa; El Sherif, Nabil; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo

    2017-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates systemic inflammation as a new potential cause of acquired long QT syndrome (LQTS), via cytokine-mediated changes in cardiomyocyte ion channels. Torsade de pointes (TdP) is a life-threatening polymorphic ventricular tachycardia occurring in patients with LQTS, usually when multiple QT-prolonging factors are simultaneously present. Since classical risk factors cannot fully explain TdP events in a number of patients, we hypothesised that systemic inflammation may represent a currently overlooked risk factor contributing to TdP development in the general population. Forty consecutive patients who experienced TdP (TdP cohort) were consecutively enrolled and circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-1 (IL-1)) were compared with patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA), comorbidity or healthy controls. An additional 46 patients with different inflammatory conditions (acute infections, n=31; immune-mediated diseases, n=12; others, n=3) and elevated CRP (inflammatory cohort) were prospectively enrolled, and corrected QT (QTc) and cytokine levels were measured during active disease and after a CRP decrease of >75% subsequent to therapy. In the TdP cohort, 80% of patients showed elevated CRP levels (median: ~3 mg/dL), with a definite inflammatory disease identifiable in 18/40 cases (acute infections, n=12; immune-mediated diseases, n=5; others, n=1). In these subjects, IL-6, but not TNFα and IL-1, was ~15-20 times higher than in controls, and comparable to RA patients. In the inflammatory cohort, where QTc prolongation was common (mean values: 456.6±30.9 ms), CRP reduction was associated with IL-6 level decrease and significant QTc shortening (-22.3 ms). The data are first to show that systemic inflammation via elevated IL-6 levels may represent a novel QT-prolonging risk factor contributing to TdP occurrence in the presence

  2. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation and depression and fatigue in moderate clinically stable COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Dave

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction COPD is an inflammatory disease with major co-morbidities. It has recently been suggested that depression may be the result of systemic inflammation. We aimed to explore the association between systemic inflammation and symptoms of depression and fatigue in patients with mainly moderate and clinically stable COPD using a range of inflammatory biomarkers, 2 depression and 2 fatigue scales. Method We assessed 120 patients with moderate COPD (FEV1% 52, men 62%, age 66. Depression was assessed using the BASDEC and CES-D scales. Fatigue was assessed using the Manchester COPD-fatigue scale (MCFS and the Borg scale before and after 6MWT. We measured systemic TNF-α, CRP, TNF-α-R1, TNF-α-R2 and IL-6. Results A multivariate linear model of all biomarkers showed that TNF-α only had a positive correlation with BASDEC depression score (p = 0.007. TNF-α remained positively correlated with depression (p = 0.024 after further adjusting for TNF-α-R1, TNF-α-R2, 6MWD, FEV1%, and pack-years. Even after adding the MCFS score, body mass and body composition to the model TNF-α was still associated with the BASDEC score (p = 0.044. Furthermore, patients with higher TNF-α level (> 3 pg/ml, n = 7 had higher mean CES-D depression score than the rest of the sample (p = 0.03. Borg fatigue score at baseline were weakly correlated with TNF-α and CRP, and with TNF-α only after 6MWT. Patients with higher TNF-α had more fatigue after 6MWD (p = 0.054. Conclusion This study indicates a possible association between TNF-α and two frequent and major co-morbidities in COPD; i.e., depression and fatigue.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome as a Factor Affecting Systemic Inflammation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinsztajn, R; Przybyłowski, T; Maskey-Warzęchowska, M; Paplińska-Goryca, M; Nejman-Gryz, P; Karwat, K; Chazan, R

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease which may be associated with other comorbidities. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in COPD patients and to assess its impact on systemic inflammation and lung function. MS was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Polish Forum for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases. The study group consisted of 267 patients with stable COPD in all stages of severity. All patients underwent spirometry with bronchial reversibility testing and 6 min walk test (6MWT). The following blood tests were evaluated: lipid profile, glucose and C-reactive protein as well as serum concentration of IL-6, leptin, adiponectin, and endothelin. MS was diagnosed in 93 patients (35.8%). No differences were observed in the incidence of MS in relation to airflow limitation severity (mild; moderate; severe and very severe: 38.9; 36.3; 35.2 and 25.0%, respectively). FEV 1 (% predicted), FVC (% predicted), 6MWT distance (6MWD), age, and the number of pack-years were similar in patients with and without MS. MS was more frequent in males than females (38.7 vs. 28.4%, p > 0.05). Serum concentrations of IL-6, endothelin, leptin, and CRP were higher in the MS group, contrary to adiponectin concentration which was lower (p < 0.01). MS was more frequent in male COPD patients, but there were no differences in its frequency between patients with different severity of airflow limitation. We conclude that MS, as a comorbidity, occurs in all COPD stages and affects systemic inflammation. MS incidence does not depend on COPD severity.

  4. Systemic Interleukin-4 Administration after Spinal Cord Injury Modulates Inflammation and Promotes Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Lima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI causes dramatic disability and dysfunction in the motor, sensory and autonomic systems. The severe inflammatory reaction that occurs after SCI is strongly associated with further tissue damage. As such, immunomodulatory strategies have been developed, aimed at reducing inflammation, but also at shaping the immune response in order to protect, repair and promote regeneration of spared neural tissue. One of those promising strategies is the intraspinal administration of the cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4 that was shown to promote a phenotype on specific immune cells associated with neuroprotection and repair. In this work, we evaluated if a systemic delivery of IL-4 for a 7-days period was also capable of promoting neuroprotection after SCI by analyzing different neural cells populations and motor recovery. IL-4 treatment promoted an elevation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the serum both at 24 h and 7 days after injury. Locally, treatment with IL-4 led to a reduction on cells expressing markers associated with inflammation, CD11b/c and iNOS. Importantly, IL-4 treatment increased the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and NeuN, and the oligodendrocyte marker O4, suggesting a neuroprotective effect. Moreover, 100% of the animals treated with IL-4 were able to recover weight support against only 33% of saline treated animals. Overall, these results show that systemic administration of IL-4 positively impacts different aspects of spinal cord injury, creating a more favorable environment for recovery to take place.

  5. The Role of Microglia in Retinal Neurodegeneration: Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson, and Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Ramirez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the central nervous system (CNS, act as neuropathology sensors and are neuroprotective under physiological conditions. Microglia react to injury and degeneration with immune-phenotypic and morphological changes, proliferation, migration, and inflammatory cytokine production. An uncontrolled microglial response secondary to sustained CNS damage can put neuronal survival at risk due to excessive inflammation. A neuroinflammatory response is considered among the etiological factors of the major aged-related neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS, and microglial cells are key players in these neurodegenerative lesions. The retina is an extension of the brain and therefore the inflammatory response in the brain can occur in the retina. The brain and retina are affected in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and glaucoma. AD is an age-related neurodegeneration of the CNS characterized by neuronal and synaptic loss in the cerebral cortex, resulting in cognitive deficit and dementia. The extracellular deposits of beta-amyloid (Aβ and intraneuronal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau are the hallmarks of this disease. These deposits are also found in the retina and optic nerve. PD is a neurodegenerative locomotor disorder with the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. This is accompanied by Lewy body inclusion composed of α-synuclein (α-syn aggregates. PD also involves retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration. Glaucoma is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease of the optic nerve, characterized by retinal ganglion cell loss. In this pathology, deposition of Aβ, synuclein, and pTau has also been detected in retina. These neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathogenic mechanism, the neuroinflammation, in which microglia play an important role. Microglial activation has been reported in AD, PD, and

  6. The nature of catecholamine-containing neurons in the enteric nervous system in relationship with organogenesis, normal human anatomy and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, G; Ryskalin, L; Busceti, C L; Biagioni, F; Fornai, F

    2017-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is provided with extrinsic and intrinsic innervation. The extrinsic innervation includes the classic vagal parasympathetic and sympathetic components, with afferent sensitive and efferent secretomotor fibers. The intrinsic innervations is represented by the enteric nervous system (ENS), which is recognized as a complex neural network controlling a variety of cell populations, including smooth muscle cells, mucosal secretory cells, endocrine cells, microvasculature, immune and inflammatory cells. This is finalized to regulate gastrointestinal secretion, absorption and motility. In particular, this network is organized in several plexuses each one providing quite autonomous control of gastrointestinal functions (hence the definition of "second brain"). The similarity between ENS and CNS is further substantiated by the presence of local sensitive pseudo- unipolar ganglionic neurons with both peripheral and central branching which terminate in the enteric wall. A large variety of neurons and neurotransmitters takes part in the ENS. However, the nature of these neurons and their role in the regulation of gastrointestinal functions is debatable. In particular, the available literature reporting the specific nature of catecholamine- containing neurons provides conflicting evidence. This is critical both for understanding the specific role of each catecholamine in the gut and, mostly, to characterize specifically the enteric neuropathology occurring in a variety of diseases. An emphasis is posed on neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, which is associated with the loss of catecholamine neurons. In this respect, the recognition of the nature of such neurons within the ENS would contribute to elucidate the pathological mechanisms which produce both CNS and ENS degeneration and to achieve more effective therapeutic approaches. Despite a great emphasis is posed on the role of noradrenaline to regulate enteric activities only a few

  7. Reg proteins and their roles in inflammation and cancer of the human digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Wang, Jingyu; Wang, Hao; Lai, Maode

    2013-01-01

    The regenerating gene (Reg) family is a group of small molecules that includes four members found in various species, although only three are found in human tissues. Their expression is stimulated by certain growth factors or cytokines. The Reg family plays different roles in proliferation, migration, and anti-apoptosis through activating different signaling pathways. Their dysexpression is closely associated with a number of human conditions and diseases such as inflammation and cancer, especially in the human digestive system. Clinically, upregulation of Reg proteins is usually demonstrated in histological sections and sera from cancer patients. Therefore, Reg proteins can predict the progression and prognosis of cancers, especially those of the digestive tract, and can also act as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets.

  8. Persistent systemic inflammation and symptoms of depression among patients with COPD in the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, D. J. A.; Mullerova, H.; Agusti, A.

    2014-01-01

    follow-up between COPD patients with persistent systemic inflammation (PSI) and never inflamed patients (NI) in the ECLIPSE cohort. Methods: The ECLIPSE study included 2164 COPD patients. Parameters assessed at baseline and at 36 months follow-up included: demographics, clinical characteristics.......98). At 36 months follow-up, CES-D scores were comparable in PSI and NI patients (12.2 (9.3) vs. 10.5 (9.0) points, p = 0.08) as were their temporal changes (0.5 (8.3) vs. 1.3 (7.9) points, p = 0.30). Conclusion: The ECLIPSE study does not support a strong relationship between PSI and symptoms of depression...

  9. Nutrition, brain aging, and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    The onset of age-related neurodegenerative diseases superimposed on a declining nervous system could enhance the motor and cognitive behavioral deficits that normally occur in senescence. It is likely that, in cases of severe deficits in memory or motor function, hospitalization and/or custodial car...

  10. Nutrition disorder and systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirić, Zorica; Stanković, Ivana; Pejčić, Tatjana; Ristić, Lidija; Rančić, Milan; Radović, Milan; Nastasijević-Borovec, Desa

    2013-08-01

    To detect nutrition disorders (underweight and obesity) in patients with chronic obstructive disease (COPD) and presence of systemic inflammation by determination of inflammatory mediators serum values C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and leptin. The examination involved 85 patients with COPD. Nutrition categories were defined by body mass index (BMI). Fat free mass (FFM) was evaluated by mid upper-arm circumference (MUAC) and fat mass (FM) by tricipital skin-fold thickness (TFS). Values of TNF-α and leptin were measured by standardized ELISA kits and, CRP by latex turbidimetry. There were 14 (16.5%) underweight patients, 28 (32.9%) normal, 28 (32.9%) pre-obese and 15 (17.6%) obese. Values of MUAC and TSF were significantly different among the nutrition categories (p=0.000). The lowest MUAC and TSF values were in the underweight, and the highest in the obese. There was no significant difference of CRP and TNF-α among nutrition categories. Leptin of the underweight and normal nutrition was significantly different from leptin of the pre-obese and obese (p=0.000). The highest CRP and the lowest TNF-α and leptin were in the underweight patients. The obese had the lowest CRP (although increased as compared to normal values) and the highest leptin, while the pre-obese had the highest TNF-α. Two basic nutrition disorders (underweight and obesity) were manifested in COPD patients. The inflammatory profile differs between underweight COPD patients and obese. Probably that happens due to systemic inflammation, and in part due to dysfunction of adipose tissue.

  11. Single and Combined Exposure to Zinc- and Copper-Containing Welding Fumes Lead to Asymptomatic Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markert, Agnieszka; Baumann, Ralf; Gerhards, Benjamin; Gube, Monika; Kossack, Veronika; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Recently, it has been shown that exposure to welding fumes containing both zinc and copper leads to asymptomatic systemic inflammation in humans as shown by an increase of blood C-reactive protein. In the present study, it was investigated which metal is responsible for this effect. Fifteen healthy male subjects were exposed under controlled conditions to welding fumes containing either zinc, or copper, or copper and zinc. For each exposure blood C-reactive protein increased. Copper- and zinc-containing welding fumes are able to induce systemic inflammation.

  12. High-fat diet feeding differentially affects the development of inflammation in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot-Legris, Owein; Masquelier, Julien; Everard, Amandine; Cani, Patrice D; Alhouayek, Mireille; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2016-08-26

    Obesity and its associated disorders are becoming a major health issue in many countries. The resulting low-grade inflammation not only affects the periphery but also the central nervous system. We set out to study, in a time-dependent manner, the effects of a high-fat diet on different regions of the central nervous system with regard to the inflammatory tone. We used a diet-induced obesity model and compared at several time-points (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 16 weeks) a group of mice fed a high-fat diet with its respective control group fed a standard diet. We also performed a large-scale analysis of lipids in the central nervous system using HPLC-MS, and we then tested the lipids of interest on a primary co-culture of astrocytes and microglial cells. We measured an increase in the inflammatory tone in the cerebellum at the different time-points. However, at week 16, we evidenced that the inflammatory tone displayed significant differences in two different regions of the central nervous system, specifically an increase in the cerebellum and no modification in the cortex for high-fat diet mice when compared with chow-fed mice. Our results clearly suggest region-dependent as well as time-dependent adaptations of the central nervous system to the high-fat diet. The differences in inflammatory tone between the two regions considered seem to involve astrocytes but not microglial cells. Furthermore, a large-scale lipid screening coupled to ex vivo testing enabled us to identify three classes of lipids-phosphatidylinositols, phosphatidylethanolamines, and lysophosphatidylcholines-as well as palmitoylethanolamide, as potentially responsible for the difference in inflammatory tone. This study demonstrates that the inflammatory tone induced by a high-fat diet does not similarly affect distinct regions of the central nervous system. Moreover, the lipids identified and tested ex vivo showed interesting anti-inflammatory properties and could be further studied to better characterize

  13. Systemic and airway inflammation and the presence of emphysema in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Mazioti, Argyro; Kiropoulos, Theodoros; Tsilioni, Irini; Koutsokera, Angela; Tanou, Kalliopi; Nikoulis, Dimitrios J; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Zakynthinos, Epameinondas; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of HRCT-confirmed emphysema on biomarkers evaluating airway and systemic inflammation in COPD patients. Forty-nine consecutive male COPD outpatients with stable COPD were divided in two groups according to the presence or absence of emphysema on HRCT. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests, plus assessment of exercise capacity, body composition and quality of life. Biomarkers were measured in serum (CRP, interleukin-6, TNF-alpha, leptin, adiponectin, osteocalcin, insulin growth factor-1, and systemic oxidative stress), in plasma (fibrinogen and VEGF) and in whole blood (B-type natriuretic peptide). TNF-alpha, 8-isoprostane and pH were additionally measured in exhaled breath condensate. Patients with emphysema had more severe lung function impairment, lower body-mass index and fat-free mass index, and poorer quality of life. Additionally, they presented increased systemic oxidative stress and plasma fibrinogen and lower BNP compared to patients without emphysema. After proper adjustment for disease severity, all differences remained with the exceptions of body-mass index, fat-free mass index and BNP. COPD patients with HRCT-confirmed emphysema present increased systemic oxidative stress and fibrinogen, suggesting that they may be more prone to the systemic consequences of COPD compared to patients without emphysema.

  14. Time-dependent effects of prognostic biomarkers of systemic inflammation in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wayne B; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Yuan; Robertson, Dale K; Akbashev, Mikhail Y; Lingerfelt, Brian M; Kucuk, Omer; Carthon, Bradley C; Gillespie, Theresa W; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Master, Viraj A

    2017-06-01

    The goal of this study was to examine time-dependent effects of prognostic biomarkers of systemic inflammation in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Retrospective chart reviews were conducted at the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and the Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center with authorization from the Emory University Institutional Review Board and the Veterans Administration Research and Development Committee. Inclusion criteria included age ⩾18 years, treatment with targeted therapy for clear cell or non-clear cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma and concomitant assessment of C-reactive protein and albumin levels on ⩾3 occasions that were ⩾10 days apart. Discovery, expansion, and external validation cohorts were identified. Established prognostic variables were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Intensity of systemic inflammation was assessed at all time points with C-reactive protein and albumin as prognostic covariates for overall survival in an extended Cox regression model. Intensity of systemic inflammation was assessed on 3186 occasions in 181 patients. Risk status changed in 131 patients (72%). The hazard ratio for overall survival was 21.41 (95% confidence interval = 8.26-55.50) with a type 3 p value of inflammation were compared to all other time points. The bias-corrected c-statistic was 0.839 (0.773-0.905) and 0.818 (0.691-0.946), respectively. Terminal disease progression with severe systemic inflammation was detected in 87% of the 90 patients who died. In conclusion, time-dependent effects are a prominent feature of intensity of systemic inflammation, a powerful prognostic biomarker for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

  15. Effect of chronic continual- and intermittent hypoxia-induced systemic inflammation on the cardiovascular system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Mei; Yao, Dan; Cai, Xue-Ding; Ding, Cheng; Lin, Qian-Ding; Wang, Liang-Xing; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has been recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Present study aimed to investigate the role of NF-κB-dependent inflammation pathways in pathophysiological responses of cardiovascular system in OSAS. Thirty male specific pathogen-free (SPF) Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to normoxia (N) group, continual hypoxia (CH) group, and intermittent hypoxia (IH) group (n = 10) and were exposed to N (21% O2), CH (8% O2), or IH (6-11% O2 for 10 s and 21% O2 for 80 s in every 90 s) for 8 h/day for 35 days. The hemodynamic and pathomorphologic effects of IH and CH exposure were investigated as well as the expression of NF-κB-dependent inflammation factors. Chronic IH or CH significantly increased mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) in rats, while no significant changes occurred in mean carotid arterial pressure (mCAP). The ratio of right ventricle (RV) to left ventricle (LV) + septum (S) was significantly increased by both IH and CH, suggesting RV hypertrophy was induced by IH or CH. Elastic fiber staining showed an irregular pattern of elastic fiber distribution after hypoxia, and aortic tunica media thickness was increased. Both chronic IH and CH upregulated the expressions of transcription factor NF-κB and related pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. The current study expands our understanding that both IH and CH could activate the expression of NF-κB and related inflammatory factors as well as cause pathophysiologic damage to the cardiovascular system in OSAS. All these results provide further support to an emerging hypothesis that activation of NF-κB-dependent inflammation may play a central role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular dysfunction in OSAS.

  16. [Impact of vaccination on the course of bronchial and systemic inflammation in patients with COPD and CHD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, G L; Antonov, V N

    To investigate the effect of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) on the clinical and functional manifestations of systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and coronary heart disease (CHD). The protocol included 36 patients with COPD and 36 patients with COPD concurrent with CHD. The number of COPD exacerbations, hospital admissions, pneumonia cases, degree of dyspnea, and functional indicators were analyzed. The levels of markers for inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and procalcitonin (PCT), were investigated. A year after vaccination, the COPD group showed decreases in the level of CRP, fibrinogen, and PCT by 11, 6, and 2%, respectively; the COPD + CHD group did by 12, 24, and 19%. PCT levels demonstrated the closest correlation with clinical and functional parameters; the other indicators showed moderate (CRP) and low (fibrinogen) correlations. PCV-13 vaccination can reduce systemic inflammation just a year later.

  17. Transthyretin knockout mice display decreased susceptibility to AMPA-induced neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunes, Ana Filipa; Montero, Maria; Franquinho, Filipa

    2009-01-01

    -induced neurodegeneration. We also suggest that increased NPY levels in TTR KO mice are not associated with increased cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus or subventricular zone. In summary, the alleged neuroprotective role of TTR in the nervous system should be regarded with caution and should not be generalized to all...

  18. Low-grade systemic inflammation: a partial mediator of the relationship between diabetes and lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, Jonathan; Trouiller, Philippe; Hulo, Sébastien; Chérot-Kornobis, Natalie; Ciuchete, Alina; Edmé, Jean-Louis; Matran, Régis; Amouyel, Philippe; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Dauchet, Luc

    2018-01-01

    An association has been consistently found between diabetes mellitus and decreased lung function. We evaluated to what extent low-grade inflammation (as measured by the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP]) could explain this relationship. A sample of 1878 middle-aged adults from the cross-sectional Enquête Littoral Souffle Air Biologie Environnement survey without self-reported pulmonary and atherosclerosis disease was included. A mediation analysis was performed to assess and quantify the hs-CRP level as a mediator of the relationship between diabetes and lung function. Diabetes was associated with higher hs-CRP level (+22.9%, 95% confidence interval = [5.1, 43.6]). The hs-CRP (>4 vs. ≤1 mg/L) was associated with lower percentage predicted values for the forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) (-4% [-6.1, -1.9]) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (-4.4% [-6.5, -2.3]). Diabetes was associated with FEV1 (-3.5% [-5.8, -1.3]) and FVC (-3.6% [-5.9, -1.3]). The proportion of the effect that is mediated by hs-CRP was 12% [2.4, 37] and 13% [3.7, 39.4] for FEV1 and FVC, respectively. Our results suggest that low-grade systemic inflammation could only explain a small part of the relationship between diabetes and lung function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles Highlight Early Involvement of the Choroid Plexus in Central Nervous System Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Millward

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation during multiple sclerosis involves immune cell infiltration and disruption of the BBB (blood–brain barrier. Both processes can be visualized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging, in multiple sclerosis patients and in the animal model EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We previously showed that VSOPs (very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles reveal CNS (central nervous system lesions in EAE which are not detectable by conventional contrast agents in MRI. We hypothesized that VSOP may help detect early, subtle inflammatory events that would otherwise remain imperceptible. To investigate the capacity of VSOP to reveal early events in CNS inflammation, we induced EAE in SJL mice using encephalitogenic T-cells, and administered VSOP prior to onset of clinical symptoms. In parallel, we administered VSOP to mice at peak disease, and to unmanipulated controls. We examined the distribution of VSOP in the CNS by MRI and histology. Prior to disease onset, in asymptomatic mice, VSOP accumulated in the choroid plexus and in spinal cord meninges in the absence of overt inflammation. However, VSOP was undetectable in the CNS of non-immunized control mice. At peak disease, VSOP was broadly distributed; we observed particles in perivascular inflammatory lesions with apparently preserved glia limitans. Moreover, at peak disease, VSOP was prominent in the choroid plexus and was seen in elongated endothelial structures, co-localized with phagocytes, and diffusely disseminated in the parenchyma, suggesting multiple entry mechanisms of VSOP into the CNS. Thus, using VSOP we were able to discriminate between inflammatory events occurring in established EAE and, importantly, we identified CNS alterations that appear to precede immune cell infiltration and clinical onset.

  20. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation in farmers with musculoskeletal disorders; a plasma proteomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Bijar; Carlsson, Anders; Holmberg, Sara; Thelin, Anders; Tagesson, Christer

    2016-05-10

    Farmers have an increased risk for musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) such as osteoarthritis of the hip, low back pain, and neck and upper limb complaints. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Work-related exposures and inflammatory responses might be involved. Our objective was to identify plasma proteins that differentiated farmers with MSD from rural referents. Plasma samples from 13 farmers with MSD and rural referents were included in the investigation. Gel based proteomics was used for protein analysis and proteins that differed significantly between the groups were identified by mass spectrometry. In total, 15 proteins differed significantly between the groups. The levels of leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein, haptoglobin, complement factor B, serotransferrin, one isoform of kininogen, one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin, and two isoforms of hemopexin were higher in farmers with MSD than in referents. On the other hand, the levels of alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, alpha-1B-glycoprotein, vitamin D- binding protein, apolipoprotein A1, antithrombin, one isoform of kininogen, and one isoform of alpha-1-antitrypsin were lower in farmers than in referents. Many of the identified proteins are known to be involved in inflammation. Farmers with MSD had altered plasma levels of protein biomarkers compared to the referents, indicating that farmers with MSD may be subject to a more systemic inflammation. It is possible that the identified differences of proteins may give clues to the biochemical changes occurring during the development and progression of MSD in farmers, and that one or several of these protein biomarkers might eventually be used to identify and prevent work-related MSD.

  1. Family Member Deaths in Childhood Predict Systemic Inflammation in Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Maria C; Hatch, Daniel J; Munger, Ronald G; Smith, Ken R

    2017-01-01

    Biological and epidemiological evidence has linked early-life psychosocial stress with late-life health, with inflammation as a potential mechanism. We report here the association between familial death in childhood and adulthood and increased levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation. The Cache County Memory Study is a prospective study of persons initially aged 65 and older in 1995. In 2002, there were 1,955 persons in the study with data on CRP (42.3 percent male, mean [SD] age = 81.2 [5.8] years), linked with objective data on family member deaths. Using logistic regression, high (> 10 mg/L) versus low (≤ 10 mg/L) CRP was regressed on cumulative parental, sibling, spouse, and offspring deaths during childhood and during early adulthood, adjusted for family size in each period (percentage family depletion; PFD). Findings revealed PFD during childhood to be significantly associated with CRP (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [1.01, 1.04]). Individuals with two or more family deaths were 79 percent more likely to have elevated CRP than those with zero family deaths (OR = 1.79, 95% CI [1.07, 2.99]). Early adulthood PFD was not related to CRP. This study demonstrates a link between significant psychosocial stress in early life and immune-inflammatory functioning in late life, and suggests a mechanism explaining the link between early-life adversity and late-life health.

  2. Exercise as a mean to control low-grade systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathur, Neha; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2008-01-01

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs), which include cardiovascular disease, some cancers, for example, colon cancer, breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes, are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. It has now become clear that low-grade chronic inflammation is a key player in the pathogenesis...... CNCDs associated with low-grade inflammation....

  3. Treatment of autoimmune inflammation by a TLR7 ligand regulating the innate immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Hayashi

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptors (TLR have been advocated as attractive therapeutic targets because TLR signaling plays dual roles in initiating adaptive immune responses and perpetuating inflammation. Paradoxically, repeated stimulation of bone marrow mononuclear cells with a synthetic TLR7 ligand 9-benzyl-8-hydroxy-2-(2-methoxyethoxy adenine (called 1V136 leads to subsequent TLR hyporesponsiveness. Further studies on the mechanism of action of this pharmacologic agent demonstrated that the TLR7 ligand treatment depressed dendritic cell activation, but did not directly affect T cell function. To verify this mechanism, we utilized experimental allergic encephalitis (EAE as an in vivo T cell dependent autoimmune model. Drug treated SJL/J mice immunized with proteolipid protein (PLP(139-151 peptide had attenuated disease severity, reduced accumulation of mononuclear cells in the central nervous system (CNS, and limited demyelination, without any apparent systemic toxicity. Splenic T cells from treated mice produced less cytokines upon antigenic rechallenge. In the spinal cords of 1V136-treated EAE mice, the expression of chemoattractants was also reduced, suggesting innate immune cell hyposensitization in the CNS. Indeed, systemic 1V136 did penetrate the CNS. These experiments indicated that repeated doses of a TLR7 ligand may desensitize dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, leading to diminished T cell responses. This treatment strategy might be a new modality to treat T cell mediated autoimmune diseases.

  4. The plasma contact system, a protease cascade at the nexus of inflammation, coagulation and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Henri; Heikaus, Laura; Long, Andy T; Naudin, Clément; Schlüter, Hartmut; Renné, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The contact system is a potent procoagulant and proinflammatory plasma protease cascade that is initiated by binding ("contact")-induced, auto-activation of factor XII zymogen. Formed active serine protease FXIIa then cleaves plasma prekallikrein to kallikrein that in turn liberates the mediator bradykinin from its precursor high molecular weight kininogen. Bradykinin induces inflammation with implications for host defense and innate immunity. FXIIa also triggers the intrinsic pathway of coagulation that has been shown to critically contribute to thrombosis. Vice versa, FXII deficiency impairs thrombosis in animal models without inducing abnormal excessive bleeding. Recent work has established the FXIIa-driven contact system as promising target for anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs. This review focuses on the biochemistry of the contact system, its regulation by endogenous and exogenous inhibitors, and roles in disease states. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis as a Regulatory Event in Pathophysiology edited by Stefan Rose-John. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fine mapping of gene regions regulating neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Swanberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Damage to nerve cells and axons leading to neurodegeneration is a characteristic feature of many neurological diseases. The degree of genetic influence on susceptibility to axotomy-induced neuronal death has so far been unknown. We have examined two gene regions, Vra1 and Vra2, previously linked to nerve cell loss after ventral root avulsion in a rat F2 intercross between the DA and PVG inbred rat strains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we use two generations (G8 and G10 cohorts of an advanced intercross line between DA and PVG(av1 to reproduce linkage to Vra1 and to fine-map this region. By isolating the effect from Vra1 in congenic strains, we demonstrate that Vra1 significantly regulates the loss of motoneurons after avulsion. The regulatory effect mediated by Vra1 thus resides in a congenic fragment of 9 megabases. Furthermore, we have used the advanced intercross lines to give more support to Vra2, originally detected as a suggestive QTL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrated here show that naturally occurring allelic variations affect susceptibility to axotomy-induced nerve cell death. Vra1 and Vra2 represent the first quantitative trait loci regulating this phenotype that are characterized and fine mapped in an advanced intercross line. In addition, congenic strains provide experimental evidence for the Vra1 effect on the extent of injury-induced neurodegeneration. Identification of the underlying genetic variations will increase our understanding of the regulation and mechanisms of neurodegeneration.

  6. Role of MicroRNAs in Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System-Mediated Cardiovascular Inflammation and Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricica Pacurari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression either by inhibiting translation or protein degradation. Recent studies indicate that microRNAs play a role in cardiovascular disease and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system- (RAAS- mediated cardiovascular inflammation, either as mediators or being targeted by RAAS pharmacological inhibitors. The exact role(s of microRNAs in RAAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling is/are still in early stage of investigation. However, few microRNAs have been shown to play a role in RAAS signaling, particularly miR-155, miR-146a/b, miR-132/122, and miR-483-3p. Identification of specific microRNAs and their targets and elucidating microRNA-regulated mechanisms associated RAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling might lead to the development of novel pharmacological strategies to target RAAS-mediated vascular pathologies. This paper reviews microRNAs role in inflammatory factors mediating cardiovascular inflammation and RAAS genes and the effect of RAAS pharmacological inhibition on microRNAs and the resolution of RAAS-mediated cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling. Also, this paper discusses the advances on microRNAs-based therapeutic approaches that may be important in targeting RAAS signaling.

  7. Air Pollution from Road Traffic and Systemic Inflammation in Adults : A Cross-Sectional Analysis in the European ESCAPE Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanki, Timo; Hampel, Regina; Tiittanen, Pekka; Andrich, Silke; Beelen, Rob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483100X; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Dratva, Julia; De Faire, Ulf; Fuks, Kateryna B; Hoffmann, Barbara; Imboden, Medea; Jousilahti, Pekka; Koenig, Wolfgang; Mahabadi, Amir A; Künzli, Nino; Pedersen, Nancy L; Penell, Johanna; Pershagen, Göran; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Schindler, Christian; Sugiri, Dorothea; Swart, Wim J R; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Turunen, Anu W; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Wolf, Kathrin; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Peters, Annette

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to particulate matter air pollution (PM) has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. OBJECTIVES: In this study we evaluated whether annual exposure to ambient air pollution is associated with systemic inflammation, which is hypothesized to be an intermediate step to

  8. The use of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to detect proteins in saliva from horses with and without systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Adler, Ditte Marie Top; Bundgaard, Louise

    2014-01-01

    , and alpha1-acid glycoprotein. The study is the first to describe detection of inflammatory proteins in horse saliva. The proteins detected were similar to those described in saliva from cattle, small ruminants and pigs. Detection of APPs in horses with systemic inflammation suggests that saliva may be used...... for non-invasive disease monitoring in horses as in humans, pigs and dogs...

  9. HMGB1 and Histones Play a Significant Role in Inducing Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Dysfunctions in Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP starts as a local inflammation of pancreatic tissue that induces the development of multiple extrapancreatic organs dysfunction; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Ischemia-reperfusion, circulating inflammatory cytokines, and possible bile cytokines significantly contribute to gut mucosal injury and intestinal bacterial translocation (BT during SAP. Circulating HMGB1 level is significantly increased in SAP patients and HMGB1 is an important factor that mediates (at least partly gut BT during SAP. Gut BT plays a critical role in triggering/inducing systemic inflammation/sepsis in critical illness, and profound systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS during SAP, and systemic inflammation with multiorgan dysfunction is the cause of death in experimental SAP. Therefore, HMGB1 is an important factor that links gut BT and systemic inflammation. Furthermore, HMGB1 significantly contributes to multiple organ injuries. The SAP patients also have significantly increased circulating histones and cell-free DNAs levels, which can reflect the disease severity and contribute to multiple organ injuries in SAP. Hepatic Kupffer cells (KCs are the predominant source of circulating inflammatory cytokines in SAP, and new evidence indicates that hepatocyte is another important source of circulating HMGB1 in SAP; therefore, treating the liver injury is important in SAP.

  10. HIV Infection and Compromised Mucosal Immunity: Oral Manifestations and Systemic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Samantha E; Elahi, Shokrollah

    2017-01-01

    Mucosal surfaces account for the vast majority of HIV transmission. In adults, HIV transmission occurs mainly by vaginal and rectal routes but rarely via oral route. By contrast, pediatric HIV infections could be as the result of oral route by breastfeeding. As such mucosal surfaces play a crucial role in HIV acquisition, and spread of the virus depends on its ability to cross a mucosal barrier. HIV selectively infects, depletes, and/or dysregulates multiple arms of the human immune system particularly at the mucosal sites and causes substantial irreversible damage to the mucosal barriers. This leads to microbial products translocation and subsequently hyper-immune activation. Although introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has led to significant reduction in morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients, viral replication persists. As a result, antigen presence and immune activation are linked to "inflammaging" that attributes to a pro-inflammatory environment and the accelerated aging process in HIV patients. HIV infection is also associated with the prevalence of oral mucosal infections and dysregulation of oral microbiota, both of which may compromise the oral mucosal immunity of HIV-infected individuals. In addition, impaired oral immunity in HIV infection may predispose the patients to periodontal diseases that are associated with systemic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The purpose of this review is to examine existing evidence regarding the role of innate and cellular components of the oral cavity in HIV infection and how HIV infection may drive systemic hyper-immune activation in these patients. We will also discuss current knowledge on HIV oral transmission, HIV immunosenescence in relation to the oral mucosal alterations during the course of HIV infection and periodontal disease. Finally, we discuss oral manifestations associated with HIV infection and how HIV infection and ART influence the oral microbiome. Therefore

  11. Urinary free light chains may help to identify infection in patients with elevated systemic inflammation due to rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramlage, Carsten P; Froelich, Britta; Wallbach, Manuel; Minguet, Joan; Grupp, Clemens; Deutsch, Cornelia; Bramlage, Peter; Müller, Gerhard A; Koziolek, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The risk of infection in patients with rheumatic diseases is elevated, but a clear marker to differentiate the cause of the systemic inflammation is missing. We assessed the ability urinary immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs) to indicate the presence of infection in patients with rheumatic disease. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with rheumatic disease attending the Georg-August University Hospital in Goettingen, Germany, from January 2011 to December 2013. Subjects were included if they had urine levels of κ and λ FLCs available. A reference group of patients without autoimmune disease, but with documented infection, was constructed. A total of 1500 patients had their urinary FLCs quantified during the study period. Of the 382 patients with rheumatic disease, 172 (45%) displayed no systemic inflammation, 162 (42%) had inflammation due to the underlying disease activity, and 48 (13%) had inflammation due to a confirmed infection. Urinary FLC concentrations were much higher in patients with rheumatic diseases and infection (κ 68.8 ± 81.8 mg/L, λ 31.4 ± 53.5 mg/L) compared to those with inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity (κ 22.7 ± 26.3 mg/L, λ 8.1 ± 9.1 mg/L, κ p infection, with a sensitivity of 63% and specificity of 84%. Urinary λ FLCs gave similar values, with a sensitivity of 65% and specificity of 81%. FLCs may be useful for distinguishing inflammation due to rheumatic disease activity from that due to the additional presence of infection. The ability to quantify these proteins in urine provides a simple alternative to the use of blood.

  12. Thiamine Deficiency and Neurodegeneration: the Interplay Among Oxidative Stress, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dexiang; Ke, Zunji; Luo, Jia

    2017-09-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient and indispensable for normal growth and development of the organism due to its multilateral participation in key biochemical and physiological processes. Humans must obtain thiamine from their diet since it is synthesized only in bacteria, fungi, and plants. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can result from inadequate intake, increased requirement, excessive deletion, and chronic alcohol consumption. TD affects multiple organ systems, including the cardiovascular, muscular, gastrointestinal, and central and peripheral nervous systems. In the brain, TD causes a cascade of events including mild impairment of oxidative metabolism, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration, which are commonly observed in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Thiamine metabolites may serve as promising biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases, and thiamine supplementations exhibit therapeutic potential for patients of some neurodegenerative diseases. Experimental TD has been used to model aging-related neurodegenerative diseases. However, to date, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying TD-induced neurodegeneration are not clear. Recent research evidence indicates that TD causes oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and autophagy in the brain, which are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress, ER stress, and autophagy in TD-mediated neurodegeneration. We propose that it is the interplay of oxidative stress, ER stress, and autophagy that contributes to TD-mediated neurodegeneration.

  13. Modeling and imaging cardiac sympathetic neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joers, Valerie; Emborg, Marina E

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is currently recognized as a multisystem disorder affecting several components of the central and peripheral nervous system. This new understanding of PD helps explain the complexity of the patients’ symptoms while challenges researchers to identify new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Cardiac neurodegeneration and dysautonomia affect PD patients and are associated with orthostatic hypotension, fatigue, and abnormal control of electrical heart activity. They can seriously impact daily life of PD patients, as these symptoms do not respond to classical anti-parkinsonian medications and can be worsened by them. New diagnostic tools and therapies aiming to prevent cardiac neurodegeneration and dysautonomia are needed. In this manuscript we critically review the relationship between the cardiovascular and nervous system in normal and PD conditions, current animal models of cardiac dysautonomia and the application of molecular imaging methods to visualize cardiac neurodegeneration. Our goal is to highlight current progress in the development of tools to understand cardiac neurodegeneration and dysautonomia and monitor the effects of novel therapies aiming for global neuroprotection. PMID:24753981

  14. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: common driver of pulmonary cachexia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceelen, Judith J M; Langen, Ramon C J; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a putative role of systemic inflammation as a driver of pulmonary cachexia induced by either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or nonsmall cell lung cancer is reviewed. Gaps in current translational research approaches are discussed and alternative strategies are proposed to provide new insights. Activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system has generally been considered a cause of pulmonary cachexia, but current animal models lack specificity and evidence is lacking in nonsmall cell lung cancer and conflicting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Recent studies have shown activation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in both nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Myonuclear loss, as a consequence of increased apoptotic events in myofibers, has been suggested in cancer-cachexia-associated muscle atrophy. Plasma transfer on myotube cultures can be used to detect early inflammatory signals in patients and presence of atrophy-inducing activity within the circulation. Comparative clinical research between nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in different disease stages is useful to unravel disease-specific versus common denominators of pulmonary cachexia.

  15. Systemic and pulmonary inflammation is independent of skeletal muscle changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker BL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bethan L Barker,1 Susan McKenna,1 Vijay Mistry,1 Mitesh Pancholi,1 Hemu Patel,2 Koirobi Haldar,3 Michael R Barer,3 Ian D Pavord,4 Michael C Steiner,1 Christopher E Brightling,1 Mona Bafadhel4 1Institute for Lung Health, NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; 2Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, United Kingdom; 3Department of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; 4Respiratory Medicine Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Oxford, United Kingdom Background: Nutritional depletion is an important manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which has been related to systemic inflammation. It remains unclear to what degree airway inflammation contributes to the presence or progression of nutritional depletion. Objectives: To determine whether airway inflammation and lung bacterial colonization are related to nutritional status or predict progressive weight loss and muscle atrophy in patients with COPD. Methods: Body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, indices of airway inflammation, and bacterial colonization were measured in 234 COPD patients. Systemic inflammation was assessed from serum C reactive protein (CRP and circulating total and differential leukocyte counts. Nutritional depletion was defined as a body mass index (BMI less than 21 kg/m2 and/or fat-free mass index (FFMI less than 15 or 17 kg/m2 in women and men, respectively. FFMI was calculated as the fat-free mass (FFM corrected for body surface area. Measurements were repeated in 94 patients after a median 16-month follow-up. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationships of weight change and FFM change with indices of bacterial colonization and airway and systemic inflammation

  16. Endotoxemia is related to systemic inflammation and atherosclerosis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Cheuk-Chun; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Chow, Kai-Ming; Lai, Ka-Bik; Chung, Kwok-Yi; Leung, Chi-Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2008-03-01

    Systemic inflammatory state is a hallmark of peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, but its etiology remains obscure. Because circulating microbial products are an important cause of systemic immune activation in other conditions such as HIV infection, it was hypothesized that endotoxemia is a cause of systemic inflammatory state and atherosclerosis in PD patients. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels in 30 consecutive new PD patients were measured. The result was compared with serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level, peritoneal transport status, history of pre-existing cardiovascular diseases, and carotid intima media thickness (IMT) by Doppler ultrasound. Among the 30 PD patients, there were 17 men. The average age was 53.7 +/- 15.1 yr. The average endotoxin concentration of PD patients was 0.44 +/- 0.18 EU/ml, which was significantly higher than that of patients with chronic kidney disease secondary to Ig-A nephropathy (IgAN) (0.035 +/- 0.009 EU/ml, P LPS concentration had a significant correlation with serum CRP (r = 0.415, P = 0.025) and serum albumin level (r = -0.394, P = 0.034). In contrast, plasma LPS level did not correlate with Charlson's Comorbidity Index, peritoneal transport characteristics, or nutritional indices. Patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) had higher plasma LPS level than those without CVD (0.53 +/- 0.19 versus 0.36 +/- 0.16 EU/ml, P = 0.016). Plasma LPS level correlated with carotid IMT (r = 0.438, P = 0.016). It was found that endotoxemia was probably common in PD patients, and the degree of circulating endotoxemia might be related to the severity of systemic inflammation and features of atherosclerosis. This result suggests that endotoxemia may have a contributory role to the systemic inflammatory state and accelerated atherosclerosis in PD patients.

  17. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation and vagotomy on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model in rats.

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    Matthijs Kox

    Full Text Available Pulmonary inflammation contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury. Sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammation (first hit may be potentiated by mechanical ventilation (MV, second hit. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various animal models through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. We determined the effects of vagotomy (VGX and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were i.v. administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently underwent VGX, VNS or a sham operation. 1 hour following LPS, MV with low (8 mL/kg or moderate (15 mL/kg tidal volumes was initiated, or animals were left breathing spontaneously (SP. After 4 hours of MV or SP, rats were sacrificed. Cytokine and blood gas analysis was performed. MV with 15, but not 8 mL/kg, potentiated the LPS-induced pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokine response (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to LPS-SP, but did not affect systemic inflammation or impair oxygenation. VGX enhanced the LPS-induced pulmonary, but not systemic pro-inflammatory cytokine response in spontaneously breathing, but not in MV animals (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to SHAM, and resulted in decreased pO(2 (p<0.05 compared to sham-operated animals. VNS did not affect any of the studied parameters in both SP and MV animals. In conclusion, MV with moderate tidal volumes potentiates the pulmonary inflammatory response elicited by systemic LPS administration. No beneficial effects of vagus nerve stimulation performed following LPS administration were found. These results questions the clinical applicability of stimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in systemically inflamed patients admitted to the ICU where MV is initiated.

  18. The concept of psoriasis as a systemic inflammation: implications for disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, K

    2012-03-01

    Psoriasis is a systemic, immune-mediated disorder, characterized by inflammatory skin and joint manifestations. A range of co-morbidities is associated with psoriasis, including metabolic diseases, such as diabetes, and psychological disorders. Although the systemic nature of psoriasis often remains unrecognized, the inflammatory processes involved may be associated with the development of co-morbidities, which, themselves, have a significant impact on the patient's health and quality of life. The relative risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke are increased in patients with psoriasis compared with the general population. These are especially seen in younger patients with more severe disease, and are believed to contribute to the 3- to 4-year reduction in life expectancy among patients with severe psoriasis. The recent results of large studies indicate that the increased cardiovascular (CV) risk is at least partially attributable to psoriasis and independent of the presence of metabolic co-morbidities. The possible interplay between psoriasis and CV disease is complex. Metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes have overlapping genetic predispositions with psoriasis. Both conditions are likely to also interact at a functional level because obesity and the up-regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators in psoriasis appear to influence adipocyte homoeostasis, inducing non-professional immune functions. This may perpetuate psoriatic inflammation, displaying similarities to the immunopathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Finally, the disturbed adipokine profile and inflammation associated with psoriasis enhances insulin resistance, causing subsequent endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and eventual coronary events. The differential contribution of psoriasis and uncontrolled classical CV risk factors to the increased CV risk seen in psoriasis patients is not clear. Successful treatment with methotrexate appears to lower the rates of MI in patients with

  19. Cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells are associated with immune senescence, but not with systemic inflammation, in people living with HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe; Brændstrup, Peter; Pedersen, Karin Kaereby

    2018-01-01

    In people living with HIV (PLWHIV), coinfection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been associated with inflammation, immunological ageing, and increased risk of severe non-AIDS related comorbidity. The effect of CMV-specific immune responses on systemic inflammation, immune activation and T-cell sen......In people living with HIV (PLWHIV), coinfection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) has been associated with inflammation, immunological ageing, and increased risk of severe non-AIDS related comorbidity. The effect of CMV-specific immune responses on systemic inflammation, immune activation and T...

  20. MicroRNAs mediating CNS inflammation: Small regulators with powerful potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Aloi, Macarena S; Garden, Gwenn A

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (~22 nucleotides) that fine-tune protein expression by either silencing mRNA translation or directly targeting gene transcripts for degradation. In the central nervous system (CNS), neuroinflammation plays a critical role in brain injury and neurodegeneration. Increasing evidence supports the involvement of miRNAs as key regulators of neuroinflammation. Altered expression or function of particular miRNAs has been identified in various CNS pathological conditions, including neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and autoimmune diseases. Several miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role in the microglia-mediated inflammatory response including miR-155 and miR-146a. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field of miRNAs associated with CNS inflammation, including our studies of unique inflammatory pathways involving miR-155 and miR-146a. We discuss how specific miRNAs influence microglia activation states in response to inflammatory stimuli, and describe the potential of miRNAs as both biomarkers of inflammation and therapeutic tools for the modulation of microglia behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  2. Systemic Inflammation: Methodological Approaches to Identification of the Common Pathological Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotova, N. V.; Chereshnev, V. A.; Gusev, E. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We defined Systemic inflammation (SI) as a “typical, multi-syndrome, phase-specific pathological process, developing from systemic damage and characterized by the total inflammatory reactivity of endotheliocytes, plasma and blood cell factors, connective tissue and, at the final stage, by microcirculatory disorders in vital organs and tissues.” The goal of the work: to determine methodological approaches and particular methodical solutions for the problem of identification of SI as a common pathological process. SI can be defined by the presence in plasma of systemic proinflammatory cell stress products—cytokines and other inflammatory mediators, and also by the complexity of other processes signs. We have developed 2 scales: 1) The Reactivity Level scale (RL)–from 0 to 5 points: 0-normal level; RL-5 confirms systemic nature of inflammatory mediator release, and RL- 2–4 defines different degrees of event probability. 2) The SI scale, considering additional criteria along with RL, addresses more integral criteria of SI: the presence of ≥ 5 points according to the SI scale proves the high probability of SI developing. To calculate the RL scale, concentrations of 4 cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α) and C-reactive protein in plasma were examined. Additional criteria of the SI scale were the following: D-dimers>500ng/ml, cortisol>1380 or pathologies. In 190 cases (of 422) there were signs of SI (lethality 38.4%, n-73). In only 5 of 78 cases, lethality was not confirmed by the presence of SI. SI was registered in 100% of cases with septic shock (n-31). There were not significant differences between AU-ROC of CR, SI scale and SOFA to predict death in patients with sepsis and trauma. PMID:27153324

  3. SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION IMPAIRS ATTENTION AND COGNITIVE FLEXIBILITY BUT NOT ASSOCIATIVE LEARNING IN AGED RATS: Possible Implications for Delirium

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    Deborah J Culley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Delirium is a common and morbid condition in elderly hospitalized patients. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood but inflammation has been implicated based on a clinical association with systemic infection and surgery and preclinical data showing that systemic inflammation adversely affects hippocampus-dependent memory. However, clinical manifestations and imaging studies point to abnormalities not in the hippocampus but in cortical circuits. We therefore tested the hypothesis that systemic inflammation impairs prefrontal cortex function by assessing attention and executive function in aged animals. Aged (24-month-old Fischer-344 rats received a single intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 50 ug/kg or saline and were tested on the attentional shifting task (AST, an index of integrity of the prefrontal cortex, on days 1-3 post-injection. Plasma and frontal cortex concentrations of the cytokine TNFα and the chemokine CCL2 were measured by ELISA in separate groups of identically treated, age-matched rats. LPS selectively impaired reversal learning and attentional shifts without affecting discrimination learning in the AST, indicating a deficit in attention and cognitive flexibility but not learning globally. LPS increased plasma TNFα and CCL2 acutely but this resolved within 24-48 h. TNFα in the frontal cortex did not change whereas CCL2 increased nearly 3-fold 2 h after LPS but normalized by the time behavioral testing started 24 h later. Together, our data indicate that systemic inflammation selectively impairs attention and executive function in aged rodents and that the cognitive deficit is independent of concurrent changes in frontal cortical TNFα and CCL2. Because inattention is a prominent feature of clinical delirium, our data support a role for inflammation in the pathogenesis of this clinical syndrome and suggest this animal model could be useful for studying that relationship further.

  4. Human intestinal microbiota composition is associated with local and systemic inflammation in obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdam, F.J.; Fuentes Enriquez de Salamanca, S.; Jonge, de C.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Erbil, R.; Greve, J.W.; Buurman, W.A.; Vos, de W.M.; Rensen, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Intestinal microbiota have been suggested to contribute to the development of obesity, but the mechanism remains elusive. The relationship between microbiota composition, intestinal permeability, and inflammation in nonobese and obese subjects was investigated. DESIGN AND METHODS: Fecal

  5. Immune system, cell senescence, aging and longevity--inflamm-aging reappraised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvioli, Stefano; Monti, Daniela; Lanzarini, Catia; Conte, Maria; Pirazzini, Chiara; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Garagnani, Paolo; Giuliani, Cristina; Fontanesi, Elisa; Ostan, Rita; Bucci, Laura; Sevini, Federica; Yani, Stella Lukas; Barbieri, Annalaura; Lomartire, Laura; Borelli, Vincenzo; Vianello, Dario; Bellavista, Elena; Martucci, Morena; Cevenini, Elisa; Pini, Elisa; Scurti, Maria; Biondi, Fiammetta; Santoro, Aurelia; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Inflamm-aging, that is the age-associated inflammatory status, is considered one of the most striking consequences of immunosenescence, as it is believed to be linked to the majority of age-associated diseases sharing an inflammatory basis. Nevertheless, evidence is emerging that inflamm-aging is at least in part independent from immunological stimuli. Moreover, centenarians who avoided or delayed major inflammatory diseases display markers of inflammation. In this paper we proposed a reappraisal of the concept of inflamm-aging, suggesting that its pathological effects can be independent from the total amount of pro-inflammatory mediators, but they would be rather associated with the anatomical district and type of cells where they are produced and where they primarily act.

  6. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found...

  7. Increased leptin/leptin receptor pathway affects systemic and airway inflammation in COPD former smokers

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    Bruno A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Andreina Bruno1, Marinella Alessi2, Simona Soresi2, Anna Bonanno1, Loredana Riccobono1, Angela Marina Montalbano1, Giusy Daniela Albano1, Mark Gjomarkaj1, Mirella Profita11Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology, Italian National Research Council, Palermo, Italy; 2Dipartimento Biomedico di Biomedicina Interna e Specialistica, University Palermo, ItalyBackground: Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by adipose tissue, regulates food intake and energy expenditure. It is involved in inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and its deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to the infection. The leptin receptor is expressed in the lung and in the neutrophils.Methods: We measured the levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a and soluble form of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1 in sputum and plasma from 27 smoker and former smoker patients with stable COPD using ELISA methods. Further we analyzed leptin and its receptor expression in sputum cells from 16 COPD patients using immunocytochemistry.Results: In plasma of COPD patients, leptin was inversely correlated with TNF-a and positively correlated with the patient weight, whereas the levels of sICAM-1 were positively correlated with TNF-a. In sputum of COPD patients leptin levels were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vitality capacity. Additionally, increased levels of sputum leptin and TNF-a were observed in COPD former smokers rather than smokers. Further the expression of leptin receptor in sputum neutrophils was significantly higher in COPD former smokers than in smokers, and the expression of leptin and its receptor was positively correlated in neutrophils of COPD former smokers.Conclusion: Our findings suggest a role of leptin in the local and systemic inflammation of COPD and, taking into account the involvement of neutrophils in this inflammatory disease, describe a novel aspect of the leptin

  8. Lower stress system activity and higher peripheral inflammation in competitive ballroom dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Christiane; Strahler, Jana; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Rohleder, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Although regular physical exercise is beneficial for health, competitive ballroom dancers anecdotally report increased disease susceptibility. This study aims to uncover possible biological mechanisms and pathways that may lead to higher disease susceptibility in a population of otherwise healthy young athletes. Experienced ballroom dancers and healthy controls provided blood and saliva samples in order to assess diurnal cortisol and alpha-amylase (sAA) output as well as inflammatory parameters interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP). We found diurnal cortisol and sAA output to be significantly lower in dancers. Additionally, higher levels in IL-6 but not in CRP were shown in dancers. Dancers described themselves as being more anxious and reported more physical health complaints. Competitive ballroom dancers show evidence for hypoactivity in stress systems and peripheral inflammation along with more self-reported physical complaints. Therefore, competitive ballroom dancing represents a chronic stressor that can lead to important functional consequences. It remains to be investigated whether these alterations are causally related to health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. PPARγ and the Innate Immune System Mediate the Resolution of Inflammation

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    Amanda Croasdell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of inflammation is an active and dynamic process, mediated in large part by the innate immune system. Resolution represents not only an increase in anti-inflammatory actions, but also a paradigm shift in immune cell function to restore homeostasis. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has long been studied for its anti-inflammatory actions, but an emerging body of literature is investigating the role of PPARγ and its ligands (including thiazolidinediones, prostaglandins, and oleanolic acids in all phases of resolution. PPARγ can shift production from pro- to anti-inflammatory mediators by neutrophils, platelets, and macrophages. PPARγ and its ligands further modulate platelet and neutrophil function, decreasing trafficking, promoting neutrophil apoptosis, and preventing platelet-leukocyte interactions. PPARγ alters macrophage trafficking, increases efferocytosis and phagocytosis, and promotes alternative M2 macrophage activation. There are also roles for this receptor in the adaptive immune response, particularly regarding B cells. These effects contribute towards the attenuation of multiple disease states, including COPD, colitis, Alzheimer’s disease, and obesity in animal models. Finally, novel specialized proresolving mediators—eicosanoids with critical roles in resolution—may act through PPARγ modulation to promote resolution, providing another exciting area of therapeutic potential for this receptor.

  10. HTLV-1 bZIP factor induces T-cell lymphoma and systemic inflammation in vivo.

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    Yorifumi Satou

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is the causal agent of a neoplastic disease of CD4+ T cells, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL, and inflammatory diseases including HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, dermatitis, and inflammatory lung diseases. ATL cells, which constitutively express CD25, resemble CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T(reg. Approximately 60% of ATL cases indeed harbor leukemic cells that express FoxP3, a key transcription factor for T(reg cells. HTLV-1 encodes an antisense transcript, HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ, which is expressed in all ATL cases. In this study, we show that transgenic expression of HBZ in CD4+ T cells induced T-cell lymphomas and systemic inflammation in mice, resembling diseases observed in HTLV-1 infected individuals. In HBZ-transgenic mice, CD4+Foxp3+ T(reg cells and effector/memory CD4+ T cells increased in vivo. As a mechanism of increased T(reg cells, HBZ expression directly induced Foxp3 gene transcription in T cells. The increased CD4+Foxp3+ T(reg cells in HBZ transgenic mice were functionally impaired while their proliferation was enhanced. HBZ could physically interact with Foxp3 and NFAT, thereby impairing the suppressive function of T(reg cells. Thus, the expression of HBZ in CD4+ T cells is a key mechanism of HTLV-1-induced neoplastic and inflammatory diseases.

  11. Altered Striatocerebellar Metabolism and Systemic Inflammation in Parkinson’s Disease

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    Chiun-Chieh Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is the most second common neurodegenerative movement disorder. Neuroinflammation due to systemic inflammation and elevated oxidative stress is considered a major factor promoting the pathogenesis of PD, but the relationship of structural brain imaging parameters to clinical inflammatory markers has not been well studied. Our aim was to evaluate the association of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS measures with inflammatory markers. Blood samples were collected from 33 patients with newly diagnosed PD and 30 healthy volunteers. MRS data including levels of N-acetylaspartate (NAA, creatine (Cre, and choline (Cho were measured in the bilateral basal ganglia and cerebellum. Inflammatory markers included plasma nuclear DNA, plasma mitochondrial DNA, and apoptotic leukocyte levels. The Cho/Cre ratio in the dominant basal ganglion, the dominant basal ganglia to cerebellum ratios of two MRS parameters NAA/Cre and Cho/Cre, and levels of nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA, and apoptotic leukocytes were significantly different between PD patients and normal healthy volunteers. Significant positive correlations were noted between MRS measures and inflammatory marker levels. In conclusion, patients with PD seem to have abnormal levels of inflammatory markers in the peripheral circulation and deficits in MRS measures in the dominant basal ganglion and cerebellum.

  12. Important roles of P2Y receptors in the inflammation and cancer of digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Han-Xing; Hu, Jian-Hong; Xie, Rei; Yang, Shi-Ming; Dong, Hui

    2016-05-10

    Purinergic signaling is important for many biological processes in humans. Purinoceptors P2Y are widely distributed in human digestive system and different subtypes of P2Y receptors mediate different physiological functions from metabolism, proliferation, differentiation to apoptosis etc. The P2Y receptors are essential in many gastrointestinal functions and also involve in the occurrence of some digestive diseases. Since different subtypes of P2Y receptors are present on the same cell of digestive organs, varying subtypes of P2Y receptors may have opposite or synergetic functions on the same cell. Recently, growing lines of evidence strongly suggest the involvement of P2Y receptors in the pathogenesis of several digestive diseases. In this review, we will focus on their important roles in the development of digestive inflammation and cancer. We anticipate that as the special subtypes of P2Y receptors are studied in depth, specific modulators for them will have good potentials to become promising new drugs to treat human digestive diseases in the near future.

  13. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori does not provoke major systemic inflammation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Fröhlich, M

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), in particular infection with virulent strains producing the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, may increase the risk of coronary heart disease by generation of a persistent low-grade inflammatory stimulus. We...... assessed the relation between serological markers of H. pylori infection and various markers of systemic inflammation in a population-based sample of 1834 men and women aged 18-88. A total of 39.3% of the sample had a positive IgG response, and among these a slight majority was CagA positive. Infection...... with H. pylori was unrelated to C-reactive protein and the leukocyte count, regardless of CagA status. There was an inverse relation between H. pylori infection and serum albumin. The adjusted OR (95% CI) of an albumin level in the bottom versus the top third were 2.2 (1.5-3.1) and 2.0 (1...

  14. Role of Renin-Angiotensin System and Oxidative Stress on Vascular Inflammation in Insulin Resistence Model

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    N. F. Renna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 This study aims to demonstrate the causal involvement of renin angiotensin system (RAS and oxidative stress (OS on vascular inflammation in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MS achieved by fructose administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats (FFHR during 12 weeks. (2 Chronic treatment with candesartan (C (10 mg/kg per day for the last 6 weeks or 4OH-Tempol (T (10−3 mmol/L in drinking water for the last 6 weeks reversed the increment in metabolic variables and systolic blood pressure. In addition, chronic C treatment reverted cardiovascular remodeling but not T. (3 Furthermore, chronic treatment with C was able to completely reverse the expression of NF-κB and VCAM-1, but T only reduced the expression. C reduced the expression of proatherogenic cytokines as CINC2, CINC3, VEGF, Leptin, TNF-alpha, and MCP-1 and also significantly reduced MIP-3, beta-NGF, and INF-gamma in vascular tissue in this experimental model. T was not able to substantially modify the expression of these cytokines. (4 The data suggest the involvement of RAS in the expression of inflammatory proteins at different vascular levels, allowing the creation of a microenvironment suitable for the creation, perpetuation, growth, and destabilization of vascular injury.

  15. Metals and Neurodegeneration [version 1; referees: 3 approved

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    Pan Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain–Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and Wilson’s disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration.

  16. Genetic research advance on neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation

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    Xiao-jun HUANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by abnormal accumulation of iron in central nervous system. Common clinical symptoms in NBIA include different types of dyskinesia, pyramidal tract involvement, cerebellar ataxia, peripheral neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, cognitive impairment and visual dysfunction. So far, 10 genes have been identified as the causative gene for NBIA subtypes, which are PANK2, COASY, PLA2G6, C19orf12, FA2H, WDR45, ATP13A2, FTL, CP and DCAF17. The pathogenesis of NBIA involves mitochondrial involvement, oxidative stress damage, lipid metabolism and autophagy. Furthermore, NBIA may share the same pathogenetic mechanism with some other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD, frontotemporal dementia (FTD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.07.004

  17. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failure in Trauma and Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0376 TITLE: Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic Inflammation to Organ Failgure in Trauma...COVERED 22 Sep 2016 - 21 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Trauma, extensive burns, bacterial infections, and acute pancreatitis (AP) are common

  19. Role for sumoylation in systemic inflammation and immune homeostasis in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Paddibhatla

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To counter systemic risk of infection by parasitic wasps, Drosophila larvae activate humoral immunity in the fat body and mount a robust cellular response resulting in encapsulation of the wasp egg. Innate immune reactions are tightly regulated and are resolved within hours. To understand the mechanisms underlying activation and resolution of the egg encapsulation response and examine if failure of the latter develops into systemic inflammatory disease, we correlated parasitic wasp-induced changes in the Drosophila larva with systemic chronic conditions in sumoylation-deficient mutants. We have previously reported that loss of either Cactus, the Drosophila (IκB protein or Ubc9, the SUMO-conjugating enzyme, leads to constitutive activation of the humoral and cellular pathways, hematopoietic overproliferation and tumorogenesis. Here we report that parasite infection simultaneously activates NF-κB-dependent transcription of Spätzle processing enzyme (SPE and cactus. Endogenous Spätzle protein (the Toll ligand is expressed in immune cells and excessive SPE or Spätzle is pro-inflammatory. Consistent with this function, loss of Spz suppresses Ubc9⁻ defects. In contrast to the pro-inflammatory roles of SPE and Spätzle, Cactus and Ubc9 exert an anti-inflammatory effect. We show that Ubc9 maintains steady state levels of Cactus protein. In a series of immuno-genetic experiments, we demonstrate the existence of a robust bidirectional interaction between blood cells and the fat body and propose that wasp infection activates Toll signaling in both compartments via extracellular activation of Spätzle. Within each organ, the IκB/Ubc9-dependent inhibitory feedback resolves immune signaling and restores homeostasis. The loss of this feedback leads to chronic inflammation. Our studies not only provide an integrated framework for understanding the molecular basis of the evolutionary arms race between insect hosts and their parasites, but also offer

  20. A Comparison of Systemic Inflammation-Based Prognostic Scores in Patients on Regular Hemodialysis

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    Akihiko Kato

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Systemic inflammation-based prognostic scores have prognostic power in patients with cancer, independently of tumor stage and site. Although inflammatory status is associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD patients, it remains to be determined as to whether these composite scores are useful in predicting clinical outcomes. Methods: We calculated the 6 prognostic scores [Glasgow prognostic score (GPS, modified GPS (mGPS, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR, platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR, prognostic index (PI and prognostic nutritional index (PNI], which have been established as a useful scoring system in cancer patients. We enrolled 339 patients on regular HD (age: 64 ± 13 years; time on HD: 129 ± 114 months; males/females = 253/85 and followed them for 42 months. The area under the receiver-operating characteristics curve was used to determine which scoring system was more predictive of mortality. Results: Elevated GPS, mGPS, NLR, PLR, PI and PNI were all associated with total mortality, independent of covariates. If GPS was raised, mGPS, NLR, PLR and PI were also predictive of all-cause mortality and/or hospitalization. GPS and PNI were associated with poor nutritional status. Using overall mortality as an endpoint, the area under the curve (AUC was significant for a GPS of 0.701 (95% CI: 0.637-0.765; p Conclusion: GPS, based on serum albumin and highly sensitive C-reactive protein, has the most prognostic power for mortality prediction among the prognostic scores in HD patients. However, as the determination of serum albumin reflects mortality similarly to GPS, other composite combinations are needed to provide additional clinical utility beyond that of albumin alone in HD patients.

  1. Histological Architecture Underlying Brain-Immune Cell-Cell Interactions and the Cerebral Response to Systemic Inflammation.

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    Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Hasegawa-Ishii, Sanae

    2017-01-01

    Although the brain is now known to actively interact with the immune system under non-inflammatory conditions, the site of cell-cell interactions between brain parenchymal cells and immune cells has been an open question until recently. Studies by our and other groups have indicated that brain structures such as the leptomeninges, choroid plexus stroma and epithelium, attachments of choroid plexus, vascular endothelial cells, cells of the perivascular space, circumventricular organs, and astrocytic endfeet construct the histological architecture that provides a location for intercellular interactions between bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage cells and brain parenchymal cells under non-inflammatory conditions. This architecture also functions as the interface between the brain and the immune system, through which systemic inflammation-induced molecular events can be relayed to the brain parenchyma at early stages of systemic inflammation during which the blood-brain barrier is relatively preserved. Although brain microglia are well known to be activated by systemic inflammation, the mechanism by which systemic inflammatory challenge and microglial activation are connected has not been well documented. Perturbed brain-immune interaction underlies a wide variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders including ischemic brain injury, status epilepticus, repeated social defeat, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Proinflammatory status associated with cytokine imbalance is involved in autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia, and depression. In this article, we propose a mechanism connecting systemic inflammation, brain-immune interface cells, and brain parenchymal cells and discuss the relevance of basic studies of the mechanism to neurological disorders with a special emphasis on sepsis-associated encephalopathy and preterm brain injury.

  2. Neuro-oncology family caregivers are at risk for systemic inflammation.

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    Sherwood, Paula R; Price, Thomas J; Weimer, Jason; Ren, Dianxu; Donovan, Heidi S; Given, Charles W; Given, Barbara A; Schulz, Richard; Prince, Jennifer; Bender, Catherine; Boele, Florien W; Marsland, Anna L

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged periods of family caregiving can induce stress levels that may negatively influence caregiver health. However, the physiologic effect of psychological distress in oncology family caregivers has received little attention. Therefore we aimed to determine longitudinal profiles of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1ra) in neuro-oncology caregivers and identify associations between psychological distress and cytokine levels. Depressive symptoms, anxiety, caregiver burden and blood were collected from 108 adult caregivers at adult patients' diagnosis, 4-, 8-, and 12-months. Trajectory analyses of log transformed cytokine levels were performed. Multiple logistic regression analyses evaluated the impact of psychological distress on cytokine levels. For both cytokines, two distinct populations were identified, neither of which changed over time. High IL-1ra was associated with male caregivers with anxiety (OR = 1.7; 95 %CI 1.06-2.83) and obese caregivers (BMI = 40) who felt burdened due to disrupted schedules (OR = 1.3; 95 %CI 1.02-1.77). Conversely, caregivers with a healthy weight (BMI = 25) who felt burdened due to disrupted schedules were less likely to have high IL-1ra (OR = 0.71; 95 %CI 0.54-0.92). Caregivers ≤30 years old with lower self-esteem from caregiving were 1.16 times (95 %CI 1.04-1.30) more likely to have high IL-6. Analysis demonstrated groups of family caregivers with high and low levels of systemic inflammation and these levels did not change longitudinally over the care trajectory. Poor physical health in family caregivers may have a negative impact on the burden placed on the healthcare system in general and on the well-being of neuro-oncology patients in particular.

  3. Effect of incremental exercise on airway and systemic inflammation in patients with COPD.

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    Davidson, Warren J; Verity, Wendy S; Traves, Suzanne L; Leigh, Richard; Ford, Gordon T; Eves, Neil D

    2012-06-01

    Airway and systemic inflammation are features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and there is growing interest in clarifying the inflammatory processes. Strenuous exercise induces an intensified systemic inflammatory response in patients with COPD, but no study has investigated the airway inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses to exercise. Twenty steroid-naïve, ex-smokers with diagnosed COPD (forced expired volume in 1 s = 66 ± 12%) underwent baseline collection of venous blood and induced sputum followed by an incremental exercise test to symptom limitation 48 h later. Additional venous blood samples were collected following exercise at 0, 2, and 24 h, while induced sputum was collected 2 and 24 h after exercise. Sputum and blood samples were analyzed for differential cell count, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes (serum only), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (CCL5), and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (serum only). There was an increase in the number of sputum eosinophils (cells/gram, P = 0.012) and a reduction in sputum IL-6 (P = 0.01) 24 h postexercise. Sputum IL-8 and CCL5 were also persistently decreased after exercise (P = 0.0098 and P = 0.0012, respectively), but sputum IL-10 did not change. There was a decrease in serum eosinophils 2 h after exercise (P = 0.0014) and a reduction in serum CCL5 immediately following and 2 h postexercise (P < 0.0001). Both serum eosinophils and CCL5 returned to baseline levels within 24 h. An acute bout of exercise resulted in a significant increase in the number of sputum eosinophils, which may be mediated by serum CCL5. However, there was also a reduction in sputum proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting some anti-inflammatory effect of exercise in the lungs of steroid-naïve patients with COPD.

  4. Mitochondrial genetic background modifies the relationship between traffic-related air pollution exposure and systemic biomarkers of inflammation.

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    Sharine Wittkopp

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Human mitochondrial haplogroups are linked to differences in ROS production and oxidative-stress induced inflammation that may influence disease pathogenesis, including coronary artery disease (CAD. We previously showed that traffic-related air pollutants were associated with biomarkers of systemic inflammation in a cohort panel of subjects with CAD in the Los Angeles air basin.We tested whether air pollutant exposure-associated inflammation was stronger in mitochondrial haplogroup H than U (high versus low ROS production in this panel (38 subjects and 417 observations.Inflammation biomarkers were measured weekly in each subject (≤ 12 weeks, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 soluble receptor and tumor necrosis factor-soluble receptor II. We determined haplogroup by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Air pollutants included nitrogen oxides (NOx, carbon monoxide (CO, organic carbon, elemental and black carbon (EC, BC; and particulate matter mass, three size fractions (<0.25 µm, 0.25-2.5 µm, and 2.5-10 µm in aerodynamic diameter. Particulate matter extracts were analyzed for organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, and in vitro oxidative potential of aqueous extracts. Associations between exposures and biomarkers, stratified by haplogroup, were analyzed by mixed-effects models.IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with traffic-related air pollutants (BC, CO, NOx and PAH, and with mass and oxidative potential of quasi-ultrafine particles <0.25 µm. These associations were stronger for haplogroup H than haplogroup U.Results suggest that mitochondrial haplogroup U is a novel protective factor for air pollution-related systemic inflammation in this small group of subjects.

  5. Circulating histones are major mediators of systemic inflammation and cellular injury in patients with acute liver failure.

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    Wen, Zongmei; Lei, Zhen; Yao, Lu; Jiang, Ping; Gu, Tao; Ren, Feng; Liu, Yan; Gou, Chunyan; Li, Xiuhui; Wen, Tao

    2016-09-29

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a life-threatening systemic disorder. Here we investigated the impact of circulating histones, recently identified inflammatory mediators, on systemic inflammation and liver injury in murine models and patients with ALF. We analyzed histone levels in blood samples from 62 patients with ALF, 60 patients with chronic liver disease, and 30 healthy volunteers. We incubated patients' sera with human L02 hepatocytes and monocytic U937 cells to assess cellular damage and cytokine production. d-galactosamine plus lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS), concanavalin A (ConA), and acetaminophen (APAP) were given to C57BL/6N mice to induce liver injury, respectively, and the pathogenic role of circulating histones was studied. Besides, the protective effect of nonanticoagulant heparin, which can bind histones, was evaluated with in vivo and ex vivo investigations. We observed that circulating histones were significantly increased in patients with ALF, and correlated with disease severity and mortality. Significant systemic inflammation was also pronounced in ALF patients, which were associated with histone levels. ALF patients' sera induced significant L02 cell death and stimulated U937 cells to produce cytokines, which were abrogated by nonanticoagulant heparin. Furthermore, circulating histones were all released remarkably in GalN/LPS, ConA, and APAP-treated mice, and associated with high levels of inflammatory cytokines. Heparin reduced systemic inflammation and liver damage in mice, suggesting that it could interfere with histone-associated liver injury. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that circulating histones are critical mediators of systemic inflammation and cellular damage in ALF, which may be potentially translatable for clinical use.

  6. HMGB1 and Extracellular Histones Significantly Contribute to Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Failure in Acute Liver Failure.

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    Yang, Runkuan; Zou, Xiaoping; Tenhunen, Jyrki; Tønnessen, Tor Inge

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is the culmination of severe liver cell injury from a variety of causes. ALF occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death exceeds the hepatic regenerative capacity. ALF has a high mortality that is associated with multiple organ failure (MOF) and sepsis; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Emerging evidence shows that ALF patients/animals have high concentrations of circulating HMGB1, which can contribute to multiple organ injuries and mediate gut bacterial translocation (BT). BT triggers/induces systemic inflammatory responses syndrome (SIRS), which can lead to MOF in ALF. Blockade of HMGB1 significantly decreases BT and improves hepatocyte regeneration in experimental acute fatal liver injury. Therefore, HMGB1 seems to be an important factor that links BT and systemic inflammation in ALF. ALF patients/animals also have high levels of circulating histones, which might be the major mediators of systemic inflammation in patients with ALF. Extracellular histones kill endothelial cells and elicit immunostimulatory effect to induce multiple organ injuries. Neutralization of histones can attenuate acute liver, lung, and brain injuries. In conclusion, HMGB1 and histones play a significant role in inducing systemic inflammation and MOF in ALF.

  7. HMGB1 and Extracellular Histones Significantly Contribute to Systemic Inflammation and Multiple Organ Failure in Acute Liver Failure

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    Runkuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute liver failure (ALF is the culmination of severe liver cell injury from a variety of causes. ALF occurs when the extent of hepatocyte death exceeds the hepatic regenerative capacity. ALF has a high mortality that is associated with multiple organ failure (MOF and sepsis; however, the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. Emerging evidence shows that ALF patients/animals have high concentrations of circulating HMGB1, which can contribute to multiple organ injuries and mediate gut bacterial translocation (BT. BT triggers/induces systemic inflammatory responses syndrome (SIRS, which can lead to MOF in ALF. Blockade of HMGB1 significantly decreases BT and improves hepatocyte regeneration in experimental acute fatal liver injury. Therefore, HMGB1 seems to be an important factor that links BT and systemic inflammation in ALF. ALF patients/animals also have high levels of circulating histones, which might be the major mediators of systemic inflammation in patients with ALF. Extracellular histones kill endothelial cells and elicit immunostimulatory effect to induce multiple organ injuries. Neutralization of histones can attenuate acute liver, lung, and brain injuries. In conclusion, HMGB1 and histones play a significant role in inducing systemic inflammation and MOF in ALF.

  8. Decreases in colonic and systemic inflammation in chronic HIV infection after IL-7 administration.

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    Irini Sereti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite antiretroviral therapy (ART, some HIV-infected persons maintain lower than normal CD4(+ T-cell counts in peripheral blood and in the gut mucosa. This incomplete immune restoration is associated with higher levels of immune activation manifested by high systemic levels of biomarkers, including sCD14 and D-dimer, that are independent predictors of morbidity and mortality in HIV infection. In this 12-week, single-arm, open-label study, we tested the efficacy of IL-7 adjunctive therapy on T-cell reconstitution in peripheral blood and gut mucosa in 23 ART suppressed HIV-infected patients with incomplete CD4(+ T-cell recovery, using one cycle (consisting of three subcutaneous injections of recombinant human IL-7 (r-hIL-7 at 20 µg/kg. IL-7 administration led to increases of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cells in peripheral blood, and importantly an expansion of T-cells expressing the gut homing integrin α4β7. Participants who underwent rectosigmoid biopsies at study baseline and after treatment had T-cell increases in the gut mucosa measured by both flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. IL-7 therapy also resulted in apparent improvement in gut barrier integrity as measured by decreased neutrophil infiltration in the rectosigmoid lamina propria 12 weeks after IL-7 administration. This was also accompanied by decreased TNF and increased FOXP3 expression in the lamina propria. Plasma levels of sCD14 and D-dimer, indicative of systemic inflammation, decreased after r-hIL-7. Increases of colonic mucosal T-cells correlated strongly with the decreased systemic levels of sCD14, the LPS coreceptor - a marker of monocyte activation. Furthermore, the proportion of inflammatory monocytes expressing CCR2 was decreased, as was the basal IL-1β production of peripheral blood monocytes. These data suggest that administration of r-hIL-7 improves the gut mucosal abnormalities of chronic HIV infection and attenuates the systemic inflammatory and coagulation

  9. Exposure to mitochondrial genotoxins and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Claudia P González-Hunt

    Full Text Available Neurodegeneration has been correlated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA damage and exposure to environmental toxins, but causation is unclear. We investigated the ability of several known environmental genotoxins and neurotoxins to cause mtDNA damage, mtDNA depletion, and neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that paraquat, cadmium chloride and aflatoxin B1 caused more mitochondrial than nuclear DNA damage, and paraquat and aflatoxin B1 also caused dopaminergic neurodegeneration. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA caused similar levels of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA damage. To further test whether the neurodegeneration could be attributed to the observed mtDNA damage, C. elegans were exposed to repeated low-dose ultraviolet C radiation (UVC that resulted in persistent mtDNA damage; this exposure also resulted in dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Damage to GABAergic neurons and pharyngeal muscle cells was not detected. We also found that fasting at the first larval stage was protective in dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration. Finally, we found that dopaminergic neurons in C. elegans are capable of regeneration after laser surgery. Our findings are consistent with a causal role for mitochondrial DNA damage in neurodegeneration, but also support non mtDNA-mediated mechanisms.

  10. Microglial activation is not equivalent to neuroinflammation in alcohol-induced neurodegeneration: The importance of microglia phenotype.

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    Marshall, S Alex; McClain, Justin A; Kelso, Matthew L; Hopkins, Deann M; Pauly, James R; Nixon, Kimberly

    2013-06-01

    Excessive alcohol intake, a defining characteristic of an alcohol use disorder (AUD), results in neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex that has been linked to a variety of cognitive deficits. Neuroinflammation is thought to be a factor in alcohol-induced neurodegeneration, and microglia activation is a key but not sole component of an inflammatory response. These experiments investigate the effects of ethanol exposure in a well-accepted model of an AUD on both microglial activation and blood brain barrier disruption (BBB) in order to understand their relationship to classical definitions of inflammation and alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Following a four-day binge ethanol paradigm, rat hippocampal and entorhinal cortex tissue was examined using three distinct approaches to determine microglia phenotype and BBB disruption: immunohistochemistry, autoradiography, and ELISA. After ethanol exposure, there was an increase in [(3)H]-PK-11195 binding and OX-42 immunoreactivity indicative of microglial activation; however, microglia were not fully activated since both OX-6 and ED-1 immunoreactive microglia were absent. This data was supported by functional evidence as there was no increase in the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 or TNF-α, but a 26% increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, and a 38% increase in the growth factor, TGF-β, seven days after exposure. Furthermore, there was no evidence of a disruption of the BBB. These data suggest that the four-day binge model of an AUD, which produces neurodegeneration in corticolimbic regions, does not elicit classical neuroinflammation but instead produces partially activated microglia. Partial activation of microglia following binge ethanol exposure suggest that microglia in this model have beneficial or homeostatic roles rather than directly contributing to neurodegeneration and are a consequence of alcohol-induced-damage instead of the source of damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  11. Role of spleen-derived IL-10 in prevention of systemic low-grade inflammation by obesity [Review].

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    Gotoh, Koro; Fujiwara, Kansuke; Anai, Manabu; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Masaki, Takayuki; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2017-04-29

    Obesity can be associated with systemic low-grade inflammation that leads to obesity-related metabolic disorders. Recent studies raise the possibility that the inflammation in hypothalamus, liver and white adipose tissue (WAT) contributes to the pathogenesis of diet-induced obesity. We focus on the role of interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine produced from spleen in obesity because it is indicated that obesity decreases the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in spleen. Obesity results in decrease of IL-10 synthesis from spleen, probably due to reduction of B-cells expression by promoting oxidative stress and apoptosis in spleen. Splenectomy (SPX) aggravates the inflammatory response in hypothalamus, liver and WAT. These SPX-induced alterations are inhibited by systemic administration of IL-10. Moreover, in IL-10 deficiency, SPX had little effect on the inflammatory responses in these multiple organs. We show the role of spleen-derived IL-10 on inflammatory responses in obesity.

  12. Local and Systemic Inflammation May Mediate Diesel Engine Exhaust-Induced Lung Function Impairment in a Chinese Occupational Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Duan, Huawei; Meng, Tao; Yang, Mo; Cui, Lianhua; Bin, Ping; Dai, Yufei; Niu, Yong; Shen, Meili; Zhang, Liping; Zheng, Yuxin; Leng, Shuguang

    2018-04-01

    Diesel exhaust (DE) as the major source of vehicle-emitted particle matter in ambient air impairs lung function. The objectives were to assess the contribution of local (eg, the fraction of exhaled nitric oxide [FeNO] and serum Club cell secretory protein [CC16]) and systemic (eg, serum C-reaction protein [CRP] and interleukin-6 [IL-6]) inflammation to DE-induced lung function impairment using a unique cohort of diesel engine testers (DETs, n = 137) and non-DETs (n = 127), made up of current and noncurrent smokers. Urinary metabolites, FeNO, serum markers, and spirometry were assessed. A 19% reduction in CC16 and a 94% increase in CRP were identified in DETs compared with non-DETs (all p values regulatory risk assessment. Local and systemic inflammation may be key processes that contribute to the subsequent development of obstructive lung disease in DE-exposed populations.

  13. Increased leptin/leptin receptor pathway affects systemic and airway inflammation in COPD former smokers.

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    Bruno, Andreina; Alessi, Marinella; Soresi, Simona; Bonanno, Anna; Riccobono, Loredana; Montalbano, Angela Marina; Albano, Giusy Daniela; Gjomarkaj, Mark; Profita, Mirella

    2011-01-01

    Leptin, a hormone produced mainly by adipose tissue, regulates food intake and energy expenditure. It is involved in inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and its deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility to the infection. The leptin receptor is expressed in the lung and in the neutrophils. We measured the levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and soluble form of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) in sputum and plasma from 27 smoker and former smoker patients with stable COPD using ELISA methods. Further we analyzed leptin and its receptor expression in sputum cells from 16 COPD patients using immunocytochemistry. In plasma of COPD patients, leptin was inversely correlated with TNF-α and positively correlated with the patient weight, whereas the levels of sICAM-1 were positively correlated with TNF-α. In sputum of COPD patients leptin levels were correlated with forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vitality capacity. Additionally, increased levels of sputum leptin and TNF-α were observed in COPD former smokers rather than smokers. Further the expression of leptin receptor in sputum neutrophils was significantly higher in COPD former smokers than in smokers, and the expression of leptin and its receptor was positively correlated in neutrophils of COPD former smokers. Our findings suggest a role of leptin in the local and systemic inflammation of COPD and, taking into account the involvement of neutrophils in this inflammatory disease, describe a novel aspect of the leptin/leptin receptor pathway in the regulation of host defense after smoking cessation.

  14. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are inversely associated with systemic inflammation in severe obese subjects.

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    Bellia, Alfonso; Garcovich, Caterina; D'Adamo, Monica; Lombardo, Mauro; Tesauro, Manfredi; Donadel, Giulia; Gentileschi, Paolo; Lauro, Davide; Federici, Massimo; Lauro, Renato; Sbraccia, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Obesity is frequently characterized by a reduced vitamin D bioavailability, as well as insulin-resistance and a chronic inflammatory response. We tested the hypothesis of an independent relationship between serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and several circulating inflammatory markers in a cohort of severely obese individuals. Cross-sectional study was carried out among obese patients undergoing a clinical evaluation before bariatric surgery in our University Hospital. Serum 25(OH)D, fasting and post load glucose and insulin, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs CRP), fibrinogen, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), leptin, adiponectin and lipid profile were collected. Insulin-resistance was assessed by insulin sensitivity index (ISI). Total body fat (FAT kg), total percent body fat (FAT%) and truncal fat mass (TrFAT) were assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A total of 147 obese subjects (89 women, 37.8 ± 7.1 years) with mean body mass index (BMI) of 43.6 ± 4.3 kg/m(2) were enrolled. Patients in the lowest tertile of 25(OH)D were significantly more obese with a higher amount of TrFAT, more insulin-resistant, and had higher levels of fasting and post-challenge glucose (p < 0.05 for all). In a multivariate regression analysis, serum 25(OH)D was inversely related to significant levels of hs CRP, IL-6 and TNF-α after accounting for age, gender, season of recruitment, BMI, FAT kg and TrFAT (p < 0.01 for all). In extremely obese subjects, 25(OH)D serum concentrations are inversely associated with several biomarkers of systemic inflammation, regardless of the total quantity of fat mass.

  15. IL6 and CRP haplotypes are associated with COPD risk and systemic inflammation: a case-control study

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    Passos Valéria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin (IL-6 and fibrinogen (FG have been repeatedly associated with many adverse outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. To date, it remains unclear whether and to what extent systemic inflammation is primary or secondary in the pathogenesis of COPD. The aim of this study was to examine the association between haplotypes of CRP, IL6 and FGB genes, systemic inflammation, COPD risk and COPD-related phenotypes (respiratory impairment, exercise capacity and body composition. Methods Eighteen SNPs in three genes, representing optimal haplotype-tagging sets, were genotyped in 355 COPD patients and 195 healthy smokers. Plasma levels of CRP, IL-6 and FG were measured in the total study group. Differences in haplotype distributions were tested using the global and haplotype-specific statistics. Results Raised plasma levels of CRP, IL-6 and fibrinogen were demonstrated in COPD patients. However, COPD population was very heterogeneous: about 40% of patients had no evidence of systemic inflammation (CRP CRP gene and CRP plasma levels (P = 0.0004 and IL6 gene and COPD (P = 0.003. Subsequent analysis has shown that IL6 haplotype H2, associated with an increased COPD risk (p = 0.004, OR = 4.82; 1.64 to 4.18, was also associated with very low CRP levels (p = 0.0005. None of the genes were associated with COPD-related phenotypes. Conclusion Our findings suggest that common genetic variation in CRP and IL6 genes may contribute to heterogeneity of COPD population associated with systemic inflammation.

  16. Effects of an Encapsulated Fruit and Vegetable Juice Concentrate on Obesity-Induced Systemic Inflammation: A Randomised Controlled Trial

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    Evan J. Williams

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals from fruit and vegetables reduce systemic inflammation. This study examined the effects of an encapsulated fruit and vegetable (F&V juice concentrate on systemic inflammation and other risk factors for chronic disease in overweight and obese adults. A double-blinded, parallel, randomized placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 56 adults aged ≥40 years with a body mass index (BMI ≥28 kg/m2. Before and after eight weeks daily treatment with six capsules of F&V juice concentrate or placebo, peripheral blood gene expression (microarray, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, plasma tumour necrosis factor (TNFα (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, body composition (Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA and lipid profiles were assessed. Following consumption of juice concentrate, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol and plasma TNFα decreased and total lean mass increased, while there was no change in the placebo group. In subjects with high systemic inflammation at baseline (serum C-reactive protein (CRP ≥3.0 mg/mL who were supplemented with the F&V juice concentrate (n = 16, these effects were greater, with decreased total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and plasma TNFα and increased total lean mass; plasma CRP was unchanged by the F&V juice concentrate following both analyses. The expression of several genes involved in lipogenesis, the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK signalling pathways was altered, including phosphomevalonate kinase (PMVK, zinc finger AN1-type containing 5 (ZFAND5 and calcium binding protein 39 (CAB39, respectively. Therefore, F&V juice concentrate improves the metabolic profile, by reducing systemic inflammation and blood lipid profiles and, thus, may be useful in reducing the risk of obesity-induced chronic disease.

  17. Association between PSA Levels and Biomarkers of Subclinical Systemic Inflammation in Middle-Aged Healthy Men from the General Population.

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    Elzanaty, Saad; Rezanezhad, Babak; Borgquist, Rasmus

    2016-10-01

    This study was aimed to determine the association between PSA levels and biomarkers of subclinical systemic inflammation based on data from 119 middle-aged healthy men from the general population. Serum levels of PSA and biomarkers of systemic inflammation (CRP and fibrinogen) were measured. Demographic data were also collected. Subjects were divided into two groups according to PSA levels; PSA and fibrinogen levels (r = 0.20, p = 0.04), and between CRP and fibrinogen levels (r = 0.60, p = 0.01). On the other hand, no significant correlation between PSA and CRP levels was found. Men with PSA values ≥ 2 ng/ml had significantly higher levels of fibrinogen as compared to those with PSA PSA as a dependent variable, serum level of fibrinogen predicted higher PSA-values (odds ratio = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.05-10.20, p = 0.042). The present results indicate that serum fibrinogen is a biomarker of subclinical systemic inflammation associated with PSA elevation among middle-aged healthy men from the general population.

  18. Midlife Systemic Inflammation, Late-Life White Matter Integrity, and Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Keenan A; Power, Melinda C; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Folsom, Aaron R; Ballantyne, Christie M; Knopman, David S; Windham, B Gwen; Selvin, Elizabeth; Jack, Clifford R; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2017-12-01

    It is currently unclear whether midlife systemic inflammation promotes the development of white matter (WM) abnormalities and small vessel disease in the elderly. We examined the association of midlife systemic inflammation with late-life WM hyperintensity volume, deep and periventricular WM microstructural integrity (fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity [MD]), cerebral infarcts, and microbleeds in a biracial prospective cohort study. Linear and logistic regression examined the relation between midlife high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP)-a nonspecific marker of inflammation-and brain magnetic resonance imaging markers assessed 21 years later in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. We included 1485 participants (baseline age, 56[5]; 28% black). After adjusting for demographic factors and cardiovascular disease, each SD increase in midlife CRP was associated with lower fractional anisotropy (-0.09 SD; 95% confidence interval, -0.15 to -0.02) and greater MD (0.08 SD; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.15) in deep WM and lower fractional anisotropy (-0.07 SD; 95% confidence interval, -0.13 to 0.00) in periventricular WM. We found stronger associations between CRP and periventricular WM microstructural integrity among black participants ( P interaction=0.011). Although an association between higher CRP levels and greater WM hyperintensity volume was found only among APOE ε4-positive participants in our primary analysis (0.14 SD; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.26; P interaction=0.028), this relationship extended to the entire sample after accounting for differential attrition. Midlife CRP was not associated with the presence of cerebral infarcts or microbleeds in late life. Our findings support the hypothesis that midlife systemic inflammation may promote the development of chronic microangiopathic structural WM abnormalities in the elderly. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Green tea polyphenols attenuate deterioration of bone microarchitecture in female rats with systemic chronic inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Our previous study demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) benefit bone health in female rats with chronic inflammation, because of GTP’s antioxidant capacity. The current study further evaluates whether GTP can restore bone microstructure along with related mechanism in rats wit...

  20. Kidney dysfunction, systemic inflammation and mental well-being in elderly post-myocardial infarction patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, Rick H.M.; Hoogeveen, Ellen K.; Geleijnse, Marianne; Goede, De Janette; Kromhout, Daan; Giltay, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim was to investigate whether mild kidney dysfunction and low-grade inflammation in post-myocardial infarction patients are independently associated with markers of mental well-being (i.e. depressive and apathy symptoms, and dispositional optimism). Methods In post-myocardial

  1. Longitudinal Relationship of Low Leisure Satisfaction but not Depressive Symptoms With Systemic Low-Grade Inflammation in Dementia Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to further elucidate the biobehavioral mechanisms linking dementia caregiving with an increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that both elevated depressive symptoms and a behavioral correlate of depression, low leisure satisfaction, are associated with systemic inflammation. Method. We studied 121 elderly Alzheimer’s disease caregivers who underwent 4 annual assessments for depressive symptoms, leisure satisfaction, and circulating levels of inflammatory markers. We used mixed-regression analyses controlling for sociodemographic and health-relevant covariates to examine longitudinal relationships between constructs of interest. Results. There were inverse relationships between total leisure satisfaction and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α; p = .047), interleukin-8 (IL-8; p leisure activities was related to higher levels of TNF-α (p = .045), IL-8 (p leisure activities was related only to higher IL-8 levels (p = .023). Depressive symptoms were not associated with any inflammatory marker (all p values > .17). Depressive symptoms did not mediate the relationship between leisure satisfaction and inflammation. Discussion. Lower satisfaction with leisure activities is related to higher low-grade systemic inflammation. This knowledge may provide a promising way of improving cardiovascular health in dementia caregivers through behavioral activation treatments targeting low leisure satisfaction. PMID:23650246

  2. Genomic and lipidomic analyses differentiate the compensatory roles of two COX isoforms during systemic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinzhi; Mazaleuskaya, Liudmila L; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Meng, Hu; FitzGerald, Garret A; Funk, Colin D

    2018-01-01

    Both cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2, encoded by Ptgs1 and Ptgs2 , function coordinately during inflammation. But the relative contributions and compensations of COX-1 and COX-2 to inflammatory responses remain unanswered. We used three engineered mouse lines where the Ptgs1 and Ptgs2 genes substitute for one another to discriminate the distinct roles and interchangeability of COX isoforms during systemic inflammation. In macrophages, kidneys, and lungs, "flipped" Ptgs genes generate a "reversed" COX expression pattern, where the knock-in COX-2 is expressed constitutively and the knock-in COX-1 is lipopolysaccharide inducible. A panel of eicosanoids detected in serum and kidney demonstrates that prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis requires native COX-1 and cannot be rescued by the knock-in COX-2. Our data further reveal preferential compensation of COX isoforms for prostanoid production in macrophages and throughout the body, as reflected by urinary PG metabolites. NanoString analysis indicates that inflammatory networks can be maintained by isoform substitution in inflamed macrophages. However, COX-1>COX-2 macrophages show reduced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways, indicating that COX-1 may be replaced by COX-2 within this complex milieu, but not vice versa. Collectively, each COX isoform plays a distinct role subject to subcellular environment and tissue/cell-specific conditions, leading to subtle compensatory differences during systemic inflammation. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Dexpramipexole is ineffective in two models of ALS related neurodegeneration.

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    Fernando G Vieira

    Full Text Available Treatment options for people living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are limited and ineffective. Recently, dexpramipexole (RPPX was advanced into human ALS clinical trials. In the current studies, we investigated RPPX in two parallel screening systems: 1 appropriately powered, sibling-matched, gender-balanced survival efficacy screening in high-copy B6-SJL-SOD1G93A/Gur1 mice, and 2 high-content neuronal survival screening in primary rat cortical neurons transfected with wild-type human TDP43 or mutant human TDP43. In both cases, we exposed the test systems to RPPX levels approximating those achieved in human Phase II clinical investigations. In SOD1G93A mice, no effect was observed on neuromotor disease progression or survival. In primary cortical neurons transfected with either mutant or wild-type human TDP43, a marginally significant improvement in a single indicator of neuronal survival was observed, and only at the 10 µM RPPX treatment. These systems reflect both mutant SOD1- and TDP43-mediated forms of neurodegeneration. The systems also reflect both complex non-cell autonomous and neuronal cell autonomous disease mechanisms. The results of these experiments, taken in context with results produced by other molecules tested in both screening systems, do not argue positively for further study of RPPX in ALS.

  4. Dexpramipexole is ineffective in two models of ALS related neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fernando G; LaDow, Eva; Moreno, Andy; Kidd, Joshua D; Levine, Beth; Thompson, Kenneth; Gill, Alan; Finkbeiner, Steven; Perrin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for people living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are limited and ineffective. Recently, dexpramipexole (RPPX) was advanced into human ALS clinical trials. In the current studies, we investigated RPPX in two parallel screening systems: 1) appropriately powered, sibling-matched, gender-balanced survival efficacy screening in high-copy B6-SJL-SOD1G93A/Gur1 mice, and 2) high-content neuronal survival screening in primary rat cortical neurons transfected with wild-type human TDP43 or mutant human TDP43. In both cases, we exposed the test systems to RPPX levels approximating those achieved in human Phase II clinical investigations. In SOD1G93A mice, no effect was observed on neuromotor disease progression or survival. In primary cortical neurons transfected with either mutant or wild-type human TDP43, a marginally significant improvement in a single indicator of neuronal survival was observed, and only at the 10 µM RPPX treatment. These systems reflect both mutant SOD1- and TDP43-mediated forms of neurodegeneration. The systems also reflect both complex non-cell autonomous and neuronal cell autonomous disease mechanisms. The results of these experiments, taken in context with results produced by other molecules tested in both screening systems, do not argue positively for further study of RPPX in ALS.

  5. Application of medical cannabis in patients with the neurodegeneration disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Kotuła

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical cannabis is the dried flowers of the female Cannabis sativa L. plant. Cannabis contains a number of active elements, including dronabinol (THC and cannabidiol (CBD. Dronabinol is usually the main ingredient. The body’s own cannabinoid system has been identified. The discovery of this system, which comprises endocannabinoids and receptors, confirmed that cannabis has a positive effect on certain illnesses and conditions. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified: CB1 and CB2 receptors. The first type CB1 is mostly found in the central nervous system, modulate pain. It also has an anti-emetic effect, and has influence on the memory and the motor system. The second type of receptors CB2 is peripheral, and it is primarily found in immune system cells and it is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of cannabinoids. Medical cannabis can help in cases of the neurodegeneration disorders, for example Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Patients generally tolerate medical cannabis well.

  6. Early oxidative damage underlying neurodegeneration in X-adrenoleukodystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourcade, Stéphane; Lopez-Erauskin, Jone; Galino, Jorge; Duval, Carine; Naudi, Alba; Jove, Mariona; Kemp, S.; Villarroya, Francesc; Ferrer, Isidre; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Pujol, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by progressive cerebral demyelination cerebral childhood adrenoleukodystrophy (CCALD) or spinal cord neurodegeneration (adrenomyeloneuropathy, AMN), adrenal insufficiency and accumulation of very long-chain

  7. Brief Report: Higher ART Adherence Is Associated With Lower Systemic Inflammation in Treatment-Naive Ugandans Who Achieve Virologic Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Morrow, Mary; Boum, Yap; Byakwaga, Helen; Haberer, Jessica E; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David; Mawhinney, Samantha; Musinguzi, Nicholas; Huang, Yong; Tracy, Russell P; Burdo, Tricia H; Williams, Kenneth; Muzzora, Conrad; Hunt, Peter W; Siedner, Mark J

    2018-04-15

    Residual systemic inflammation persists despite suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) and is associated with non-AIDS clinical outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the association between ART adherence and inflammation in Ugandans living with HIV who were predominantly receiving nevirapine-based ART with a thymidine analog backbone and were virologically suppressed by conventional assays. Plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), D-dimer, soluble (s)CD14, sCD163, and the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, in addition to CD8 T-cell activation, were measured at baseline and 6 months after ART initiation in treatment-naive adults who achieved an undetectable plasma HIV RNA (<400 copies/mL) at their 6-month visit. Adherence was measured through medication event monitoring system and calculated as the ratio of observed/prescribed device openings per participant. We fit adjusted linear regression models to estimate the association between ART adherence and the log-transformed plasma concentrations of inflammatory biomarkers. We evaluated 282 participants (median age, 35 years; 70% women). The median (interquartile range) adherence was 93% (84-98). In the adjusted analyses, for every 10% increase in average ART adherence, we found a 15% [P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval (CI), -21.0 to -7.9], 11% (P = 0.017; 95% CI, -18.3 to -2.0), and 3% (P = 0.028; 95% CI, -5.0 to -0.3) decrease in IL-6, D-dimer, and sCD14, respectively. Higher ART adherence was associated with lower levels of biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, and coagulopathy among Ugandans living with HIV who achieved viral suppression shortly after ART initiation. This suggests that ART adherence could have biological consequences beyond viral suppression. Whether ART adherence optimization in virologically suppressed individuals could reduce residual inflammation remains unknown.

  8. Exercise as a Mean to Control Low-Grade Systemic Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Mathur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs, which include cardiovascular disease, some cancers, for example, colon cancer, breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes, are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. It has now become clear that low-grade chronic inflammation is a key player in the pathogenesis of most CNCDs. Given that regular exercise offers protection against all causes of mortality, primarily by protection against atherosclerosis and insulin resistance, we suggest that exercise may exert some of its beneficial health effects by inducing anti-inflammatory actions. Recently, IL-6 was introduced as the first myokine, defined as a cytokine, which is produced and released by contracting skeletal muscle fibres, exerting its effects in other organs of the body. We suggest that skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ and that myokines may be involved in mediating the beneficial effects against CNCDs associated with low-grade inflammation.

  9. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy': Neurodegeneration versus Neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Puerta

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The amphetamine analogue 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ‘ecstasy’ is widely abused as a recreational drug due to its unique psychological effects. Of interest, MDMA causes long-lasting deficits in neurochemical and histological markers of the serotonergic neurons in the brain of different animal species. Such deficits include the decline in the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase in parallel with the loss of 5-HT and its main metabolite 5-hydoxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA along with a lower binding of specific ligands to the 5-HT transporters (SERT. Of concern, reduced 5-HIAA levels in the CSF and SERT density have also been reported in human ecstasy users, what has been interpreted to reflect the loss of serotonergic fibers and terminals. The neurotoxic potential of MDMA has been questioned in recent years based on studies that failed to show the loss of the SERT protein by western blot or the lack of reactive astrogliosis after MDMA exposure. In addition, MDMA produces a long-lasting down-regulation of SERT gene expression; which, on the whole, has been used to invoke neuromodulatory mechanisms as an explanation to MDMA-induced 5-HT deficits. While decreased protein levels do not necessarily reflect neurodegeneration, the opposite is also true, that is, neuroregulatory mechanisms do not preclude the existence of 5-HT terminal degeneration.

  10. Cognitive ability in early adulthood is associated with systemic inflammation in middle age: the Vietnam experience study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anna C; Batty, G David; van Zanten, Jet J C S Veldhuijzen; Mortensen, Laust H; Deary, Ian J; Calvin, Catherine M; Carroll, Douglas

    2011-02-01

    We examined the prospective association between cognitive ability in early adulthood and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, a marker of inflammation, in middle age. Participants were 4256 male Vietnam era US veterans. Data on cognitive ability, assessed by the Army General Technical Test, ethnicity, and place of service were extracted from enlistment files. Smoking behaviour, alcohol consumption, basic socio-demographics, and whether participants suffered from a physician diagnosed chronic disease were determined by telephone interview in middle-age in 1985. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, cholesterol, blood pressure, height, and weight were measured at a 3-day medical examination in 1986. In linear regression models that adjusted for age and then additionally for circumstantial, socio-demographic, lifestyle, and health factors, poor cognitive ability in early adulthood was associated with greater erythrocyte sedimentation rate in middle age, β=-.09. Thus, it would appear that not only does systemic inflammation influence cognition, but also that poor cognitive ability earlier in life is associated with inflammation in middle-age. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Sleep Disruption Alters Gut Microbiota, Induces Systemic and Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poroyko, Valeriy A; Carreras, Alba; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Leone, Vanessa; Peris, Eduard; Almendros, Isaac; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Hubert, Nathaniel; Farré, Ramon; Chang, Eugene B; Gozal, David

    2016-10-14

    Chronic sleep fragmentation (SF) commonly occurs in human populations, and although it does not involve circadian shifts or sleep deprivation, it markedly alters feeding behaviors ultimately promoting obesity and insulin resistance. These symptoms are known to be related to the host gut microbiota. Mice were exposed to SF for 4 weeks and then allowed to recover for 2 weeks. Taxonomic profiles of fecal microbiota were obtained prospectively, and conventionalization experiments were performed in germ-free mice. Adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and inflammation, as well as circulating measures of inflammation, were assayed. Effect of fecal water on colonic epithelial permeability was also examined. Chronic SF-induced increased food intake and reversible gut microbiota changes characterized by the preferential growth of highly fermentative members of Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae and a decrease of Lactobacillaceae families. These lead to systemic and visceral white adipose tissue inflammation in addition to altered insulin sensitivity in mice, most likely via enhanced colonic epithelium barrier disruption. Conventionalization of germ-free mice with SF-derived microbiota confirmed these findings. Thus, SF-induced metabolic alterations may be mediated, in part, by concurrent changes in gut microbiota, thereby opening the way for gut microbiome-targeted therapeutics aimed at reducing the major end-organ morbidities of chronic SF.

  12. ROLE OF RENIN-ANGIOTENSIN SYSTEM AND OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION TO THE BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL IN YOUNG SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiko Sato

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS, oxidative stress and inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension and salt sensitivity of hypertension. The present study was designed to evaluate the role of RAS, oxidative stress and inflammation to the regulation of blood pressure in young subjects. 111 young students (19.2±0.8 years old who have taken health checkup were randomly selected for the study. Urinary excretions of angiotensinogen (AGT, oxidative stress (TBARS, and inflammatory markers (MCP-1 were analyzed. Urinary excretions of these parameters were estimated by 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion, age, height and body weight. Subjects were divided to two groups based on the blood pressure: below 140/90 mmHg (Normal and over 140/90 mmHg (High. Blood pressure was significantly increased with increased BMI. Urinary AGT, TBARS, and MCP-1 of high blood pressure group were significantly (p<0.05 increased compared to those of normal blood pressure. Urinary AGT has significant positive correlation with urinary TBARS, though it did not have a significant correlation with MCP-1. Estimated 24-h urinary Na excretion was significantly increased with increased urinary MCP-1, and TBARS. These results indicate that increase in blood pressure is accompanied with RAS, oxidative stress, and inflammation in young subjects, which is associated with salt intake.

  13. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  14. Dioxin-like PCB 126 increases systemic inflammation and accelerates atherosclerosis in lean LDL receptor deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriello, Michael C; Brandon, J Anthony; Hoffman, Jessie; Wang, Chunyan; Tripathi, Himi; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Ye, Xiang; Li, Xiangan; Yang, Liping; Lee, Eun; Soman, Sony; Barney, Jazmyne; Wahlang, Banrida; Hennig, Bernhard; Morris, Andrew J

    2017-12-01

    Exposure to dioxins and related persistent organic pollutants likely contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk through multiple mechanisms including the induction of chronic inflammation. Epidemiological studies have shown that leaner individuals may be more susceptible to the detrimental effects of lipophilic toxicants because they lack large adipose tissue depots that can accumulate and sequester these pollutants. This phenomenon complicates efforts to study mechanisms of pollutant-accelerated atherosclerosis in experimental animal models where high-fat feeding and adipose expansion limit the bioavailability of lipophilic pollutants. Here, we investigated whether a model dioxin-like pollutant, PCB 126, could increase inflammation and accelerate atherosclerosis in Ldlr -/- mice fed a low-fat atherogenic diet. We fed Ldlr -/- mice the Clinton/Cybulsky diet (10% kcal fat, 0.15% cholesterol) and sacrificed mice at 8, 10, or 12 weeks post PCB (2 doses of 1 μmol/kg) or vehicle gavage. To characterize this novel model, we examined the effects of PCB 126 on markers of systemic inflammation, hematological indices, fatty livers, and atherosclerotic lesion size. Mice exposed to PCB 126 exhibited significantly increased plasma inflammatory cytokine levels, increased circulating biomarkers of CVD, altered platelet and red blood cell counts, increased accumulation of hepatic fatty acids, and accelerated atherosclerotic lesion formation in the aortic root. PCB 126 also increased circulating neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages as determined by flow cytometry analysis. Exposure to dioxin-like PCB 126 increases inflammation and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice. This low-fat atherogenic diet may provide a useful tool to study the mechanisms linking exposure to lipophilic pollutants to increased risk of CVD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Canine serum amyloid A (SAA) measured by automated latex agglutination turbidimetry is useful for routine sensitive and specific detection of systemic inflammation in a general clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Michelle B; Langhorn, Rebecca; Goddard, Amelia; Andreasen, Eva B; Moldal, Elena; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Kirpenteijn, Jolle; Jakobsen, Sabrina; Persson, Frida; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2013-05-02

    Canine serum amyloid A (SAA) is a useful diagnostic marker of systemic inflammation. A latex agglutination turbidimetric immunoassay (LAT) was validated for automated measurements. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical applicability of SAA measured by the LAT. SAA was measured in 7 groups of dogs with and without systemic inflammation (n=247). Overlap performance was investigated. Diagnostic performance was compared to body temperature and leukocyte markers. Clinical decision limits for SAA were estimated. In dogs with neurological, neoplastic or gastrointestinal disorders (n=143), it was investigated whether a higher proportion of SAA positive dogs could be detected in cases of complications with risk of systemic inflammation. Significantly higher concentrations of SAA were measured in dogs with (range [48.75; 5,032 mg/l]), compared to dogs without systemic inflammation [0; 56.4 mg/l]. SAA was a more sensitive and specific marker of systemic inflammation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) 1.00), compared to body temperature (0.6) and segmented neutrophils (best performing leukocyte marker, 0.84). A clinical decision limit of 56.4 mg/l was established giving close to perfect discrimination between dogs with and without systemic inflammation. Higher proportions of SAA-positive dogs were observed in dogs with neurological, neoplastic and gastrointestinal disorders with complications known to increase risk of systemic inflammation, compared to uncomplicated cases. The automated LAT makes SAA applicable as a relevant diagnostic marker of systemic inflammation in dogs for routine random-access real-time use in a general clinical setting.

  16. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula I. Moreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ. Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  17. TGF-β1 Protection against Aβ1–42-Induced Neuroinflammation and Neurodegeneration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Xing Shen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor (TGF-β1, a cytokine that can be expressed in the brain, is a key regulator of the brain’s responses to injury and inflammation. Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common neurodegenerative disorder, involves inflammatory processes in the brain in addition to the hallmarks, amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Recently, we have shown that T-helper (Th 17 cells, a subpopulation of CD4+ T-cells with high proinflammation, also participate in the brain inflammatory process of AD. However, it is poorly known whether TGF-β1 ameliorates the lymphocyte-mediated neuroinflammation and, thereby, alleviates neurodegeneration in AD. Herein, we administered TGF-β1 via the intracerebroventricle (ICV in AD model rats, by Aβ1–42 injection in both sides of the hippocampus, to show the neuroprotection of TGF-β1. The TGF-β1 administration after the Aβ1–42 injection ameliorated cognitive deficit and neuronal loss and apoptosis, reduced amyloid precursor protein (APP expression, elevated protein phosphatase (PP2A expression, attenuated glial activation and alleviated the imbalance of the pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory responses of T-lymphocytes, compared to the Aβ1–42 injection alone. These findings demonstrate that TGF-β1 provides protection against AD neurodegeneration and suggest that the TGF-β1 neuroprotection is implemented by the alleviation of glial and T-cell-mediated neuroinflammation.

  18. PACAP/Receptor System in Urinary Bladder Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain Following Urinary Bladder Inflammation or Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice M. Girard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex organization of CNS and PNS pathways is necessary for the coordinated and reciprocal functions of the urinary bladder, urethra and urethral sphincters. Injury, inflammation, psychogenic stress or diseases that affect these nerve pathways and target organs can produce lower urinary tract (LUT dysfunction. Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems are expressed in the neural pathways of the LUT and non-neural components of the LUT (e.g., urothelium also express peptides. One such neuropeptide receptor system, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP; Adcyap1 and its cognate receptor, PAC1 (Adcyap1r1, have tissue-specific distributions in the LUT. Mice with a genetic deletion of PACAP exhibit bladder dysfunction and altered somatic sensation. PACAP and associated receptors are expressed in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes with neural injury, inflammation, and diseases of the LUT as well as psychogenic stress. Blockade of the PACAP/PAC1 receptor system reduces voiding frequency in preclinical animal models and transgenic mouse models that mirror some clinical symptoms of bladder dysfunction. A change in the balance of the expression and resulting function of the PACAP/receptor system in CNS and PNS bladder reflex pathways may underlie LUT dysfunction including symptoms of urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, and visceral pain. The PACAP/receptor system in micturition pathways may represent a potential target for therapeutic intervention to reduce LUT dysfunction.

  19. Radiographic progression is associated with resolution of systemic inflammation in patients with axial spondylarthritis treated with tumor necrosis factor a inhibitors: a study of radiographic progression, inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging, and circulating biomarkers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Lambert, Robert G. W.

    2011-01-01

    metalloproteinase 3 [MMP-3], and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein [COMP]), and bone turnover (CTX-I and osteocalcin) to inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic progression in patients with axial spondylarthritis (SpA) beginning tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor therapy.......To investigate the relationship of circulating biomarkers of inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and YKL-40), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), cartilage turnover (C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type II collagen [CTX-II], total aggrecan, matrix...

  20. Radiographic progression is associated with resolution of systemic inflammation in patients with axial spondylarthritis treated with tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors: A study of radiographic progression, inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging, and circulating biomarkers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Lambert, Robert G W

    2011-01-01

    metalloproteinase 3 [MMP-3], and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein [COMP]), and bone turnover (CTX-I and osteocalcin) to inflammation on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic progression in patients with axial spondylarthritis (SpA) beginning tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa) inhibitor therapy.......To investigate the relationship of circulating biomarkers of inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and YKL-40), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor), cartilage turnover (C-terminal crosslinking telopeptide of type II collagen [CTX-II], total aggrecan, matrix...

  1. Lidocaine Prevents Oxidative Stress-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction of the Systemic Artery in Rats With Intermittent Periodontal Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takumi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Feng, Guo-Gang; Kazaoka, Yoshiaki; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    Periodontal inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction of the systemic artery. However, it is unknown whether the use of local anesthetics during painful dental procedures alleviates periodontal inflammation and systemic endothelial function. This study was designed to examine whether the gingival or systemic injection of lidocaine prevents oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction of the systemic artery in rats with intermittent periodontal inflammation caused by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Some rats received 1500 µg LPS injections to the gingiva during a week interval from the age of 8 to 11 weeks (LPS group). Lidocaine (3 mg/kg), LPS + lidocaine (3 mg/kg), LPS + lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg), and LPS + lidocaine (3 mg/kg, IP) groups simultaneously received gingival 1.5 or 3 mg/kg or IP 3 mg/kg injection of lidocaine on the same schedule as the gingival LPS. Isolated aortas or mandibles were subjected to the evaluation of histopathologic change, isometric force recording, reactive oxygen species, and Western immunoblotting. Mean blood pressure and heart rate did not differ among the control, LPS, LPS + lidocaine (3 mg/kg), and lidocaine (3 mg/kg) groups. LPS application reduced acetylcholine (ACh, 10 to 10 mol/L)-induced relaxation (29% difference at ACh 3 × 10 mol/L, P = .01), which was restored by catalase. Gingival lidocaine (1.5 and 3 mg/kg) dose dependently prevented the endothelial dysfunction caused by LPS application (24.5%-31.1% difference at ACh 3 × 10 mol/L, P = .006 or .001, respectively). Similar to the gingival application, the IP injection of lidocaine (3 mg/kg) restored the ACh-induced dilation of isolated aortas from rats with the LPS application (27.5% difference at ACh 3 × 10 mol/L, P lidocaine (3 mg/kg), or the combination. The LPS induced a 4-fold increase in the protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α in the periodontal tissue (P lidocaine (3 mg/kg) coadministration partly reduced the levels. Lidocaine application also decreased

  2. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento ESP

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eloisa Sanches Pereira do Nascimento,1 Luciana Maria Malosá Sampaio,1 Fabiana Sobral Peixoto-Souza,1 Fernanda Dultra Dias,1 Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas Gomes,1 Flavia Regina Greiffo,2 Ana Paula Ligeiro de Oliveira,2 Roberto Stirbulov,3 Rodolfo Paula Vieira,2 Dirceu Costa11Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation (LARESP, 2Laboratory of Pulmonary and Exercise Immunology (LABPEI, Nove de Julho University (UNINOVE, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 3Department of Pneumology, Santa Casa University Hospital, São Paulo, SP, BrazilAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8. At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal

  3. Biomarkers of Myocardial Stress and Systemic Inflammation in Patients Who Engage in Heart Failure Self-Care Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher S.; Moser, Debra K.; Lennie, Terry A.; Tkacs, Nancy C.; Margulies, Kenneth B.; Riegel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Background Self-care is believed to improve heart failure (HF) outcomes, but the mechanisms by which such improvement occurs remain unclear. Methods We completed a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data collected on adults with symptomatic HF to test our hypothesis that effective self-care is associated with less myocardial stress and systemic inflammation. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to determine if better HF self-care reduced the odds of having serum levels of NT proBNP and soluble TNFα receptor type 1 at or above the sample median. HF self-care was measured using the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index. Results The sample (n=168) was predominantly male (65.5%) and most (50.6%) had NYHA III HF (mean LVEF= 34.9%±14.0%); mean age was 58.8±11.5 years. Self-care management was an independent factor in the model (block χ2 =14.74, p=.005) after controlling for pertinent confounders (model χ2 =52.15, pself-care management score (range 15–100) was associated with a 12.7% reduction in the odds of having both biomarkers at or above the sample median (adjusted odds ratio =0.873, 95% CI=0.77–0.99, p=.03). Conclusion Better self-care management was associated with reduced odds of myocardial stress and systemic inflammation over and above pharmacologic therapy and other common confounding factors. Teaching HF patients early symptom recognition and self-care of symptoms may decrease myocardial stress and systemic inflammation. PMID:21263344

  4. Systemic inflammation, nutritional status and tumor immune microenvironment determine outcome of resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifano, Marco; Mansuet-Lupo, Audrey; Lococo, Filippo; Roche, Nicolas; Bobbio, Antonio; Canny, Emelyne; Schussler, Olivier; Dermine, Hervé; Régnard, Jean-François; Burroni, Barbara; Goc, Jérémy; Biton, Jérôme; Ouakrim, Hanane; Cremer, Isabelle; Dieu-Nosjean, Marie-Caroline; Damotte, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Hypothesizing that nutritional status, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune microenvironment play a role as determinants of lung cancer evolution, the purpose of this study was to assess their respective impact on long-term survival in resected non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). Clinical, pathological and laboratory data of 303 patients surgically treated for NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed. C-reactive protein (CRP) and prealbumin levels were recorded, and tumoral infiltration by CD8+ lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was assessed. We observed that factors related to nutritional status, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune microenvironment were correlated; significant correlations were also found between these factors and other relevant clinical-pathological parameters. With respect to outcome, at univariate analysis we found statistically significant associations between survival and the following variables: Karnofsky index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, CRP levels, prealbumin concentrations, extent of resection, pathologic stage, pT and pN parameters, presence of vascular emboli, and tumoral infiltration by either CD8+ lymphocytes or mature dendritic cells and, among adenocarcinoma type, tumor grade (all pnutrition and tumoral immune microenvironment allowed robust prognostic discrimination; indeed patients with undetectable CRP, high (>285 mg/L) prealbumin levels and high (>96/mm2) CD8+ cell count had a 5-year survival rate of 80% [60.9-91.1] as compared to 18% [7.9-35.6] in patients with an opposite pattern of values. When stages I-II were considered alone, the prognostic significance of these factors was even more pronounced. Our data show that nutrition, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune contexture are prognostic determinants that, taken together, may predict outcome.

  5. Systemic inflammation, nutritional status and tumor immune microenvironment determine outcome of resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Alifano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypothesizing that nutritional status, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune microenvironment play a role as determinants of lung cancer evolution, the purpose of this study was to assess their respective impact on long-term survival in resected non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Clinical, pathological and laboratory data of 303 patients surgically treated for NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed. C-reactive protein (CRP and prealbumin levels were recorded, and tumoral infiltration by CD8+ lymphocytes and mature dendritic cells was assessed. We observed that factors related to nutritional status, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune microenvironment were correlated; significant correlations were also found between these factors and other relevant clinical-pathological parameters. With respect to outcome, at univariate analysis we found statistically significant associations between survival and the following variables: Karnofsky index, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class, CRP levels, prealbumin concentrations, extent of resection, pathologic stage, pT and pN parameters, presence of vascular emboli, and tumoral infiltration by either CD8+ lymphocytes or mature dendritic cells and, among adenocarcinoma type, tumor grade (all p285 mg/L prealbumin levels and high (>96/mm2 CD8+ cell count had a 5-year survival rate of 80% [60.9-91.1] as compared to 18% [7.9-35.6] in patients with an opposite pattern of values. When stages I-II were considered alone, the prognostic significance of these factors was even more pronounced. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that nutrition, systemic inflammation and tumoral immune contexture are prognostic determinants that, taken together, may predict outcome.

  6. Effects of active smoking on airway and systemic inflammation profiles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrino, Nilva R G; Tanni, Suzana E; Amaral, Renata A F; Angeleli, Aparecida Y O; Correa, Camila; Godoy, Irma

    2013-06-01

    The markers that characterize local and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remain unclear, as do their correlations with smoking status and presence of disease. The aim of this study was to assess markers of inflammation in the peripheral blood and airways of current smokers without COPD, of current smokers with COPD and of ex-smokers with COPD. In this study, 17 current smokers with COPD (mean age: 58.2 ± 9.6 years; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1]: 56.1 ± 15.9%), 35 ex-smokers with COPD (mean age: 66.3 ± 7.3 years; mean FEV1: 47.9 ± 17.2%) and 20 current smokers without COPD (mean age: 49.1 ± 6.2 years; mean FEV1: 106.5 ± 15.8%) were evaluated. Spirometry findings, body composition and serum/induced sputum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and IL-10, together with serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, were assessed. Serum TNF-α concentration was higher in all current smokers than in ex-smokers with COPD. In current smokers without COPD, serum CRP level was lower than in ex-smokers with COPD and significantly lower than in current smokers with COPD. Sputum TNF-α concentration was higher in current and ex-smokers with COPD than in current smokers without COPD. Multiple regression analyses showed that serum TNF-α was associated with active smoking, and serum CRP and sputum TNF-α were associated with COPD diagnosis. Smoking is associated with higher systemic inflammation in patients with COPD. Current findings also support the hypothesis that smoking and COPD have different effects on the regulation of airway and systemic inflammatory processes.

  7. Systemic inflammation: a key factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, S

    2012-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent disease and is recognised as a major public health burden. Large-scale epidemiological studies have demonstrated an independent relationship between OSAS and various cardiovascular disorders. The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in OSAS is not completely understood but a multifactorial aetiology is likely. Inflammatory processes have emerged as critical in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis at all stages of atheroma formation. Increased levels of various circulating markers of inflammation including tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 6 (IL6), IL-8 and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been reported as associated with future cardiovascular risk. There is increasing evidence of elevated inflammatory markers in OSAS with a significant fall after effective treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. This evidence is particularly strong for TNFalpha, whereas studies on IL6 and CRP have yielded conflicting results possibly due to the confounding effects of obesity. Cell culture and animal studies have significantly contributed to our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the association between OSAS and inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSAS, results in activation of pro-inflammatory transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and activator protein (AP)-1. These promote activation of various inflammatory cells, particularly lymphocytes and monocytes, with the downstream consequence of expression of pro-inflammatory mediators that may lead to endothelial dysfunction. This review provides a critical analysis of the current evidence for an association between OSAS, inflammation and cardiovascular disease, discusses basic mechanisms that may be responsible for this association and proposes future research possibilities.

  8. Cecal Ligation and Puncture Results in Long-Term Central Nervous System Myeloid Inflammation.

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    Benjamin H Singer

    Full Text Available Survivors of sepsis often experience long-term cognitive and functional decline. Previous studies utilizing lipopolysaccharide injection and cecal ligation and puncture in rodent models of sepsis have demonstrated changes in depressive-like behavior and learning and memory after sepsis, as well as evidence of myeloid inflammation and cytokine expression in the brain, but the long-term course of neuroinflammation after sepsis remains unclear. Here, we utilize cecal ligation and puncture with greater than 80% survival as a model of sepsis. We found that sepsis survivor mice demonstrate deficits in extinction of conditioned fear, but no acquisition of fear conditioning, nearly two months after sepsis. These cognitive changes occur in the absence of neuronal loss or changes in synaptic density in the hippocampus. Sepsis also resulted in infiltration of monocytes and neutrophils into the CNS at least two weeks after sepsis in a CCR2 independent manner. Cellular inflammation is accompanied by long-term expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine genes, including TNFα and CCR2 ligands, in whole brain homogenates. Gene expression analysis of microglia revealed that while microglia do express anti-microbial genes and damage-associated molecular pattern molecules of the S100A family of genes at least 2 weeks after sepsis, they do not express the cytokines observed in whole brain homogenates. Our results indicate that in a naturalistic model of infection, sepsis results in long-term neuroinflammation, and that this sustained inflammation is likely due to interactions among multiple cell types, including resident microglia and peripherally derived myeloid cells.

  9. Neuroantibody Biomarkers: Links and Challenges in Environmental Neurodegeneration and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A. N. El-Fawal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of neurodegenerative (ND and autoimmune diseases (AID remain idiopathic. The contribution of environmental chemicals to the development of these disorders has become of great interest in recent years. A convergence of mechanism between of ND and AID development has also emerged. In the case of ND, including neurotoxicity, the focus of this review, work over the last two decade in the realm of biomarker development, indicates that the immune response provides a venue whereby humoral immunity, in the form of autoantibodies to nervous system specific proteins, or neuroantibodies (NAb, may provide, once validated, a sensitive high throughput surrogate biomarker of effect with the potential of predicting outcome in absence of overt neurotoxicity/neurodegeneration. In addition, NAb may prove to be a contributor to the progression of the nervous system pathology, as well as biomarker of stage and therapeutic efficacy. There is a compelling need for biomarkers of effect in light of the introduction of new chemicals, such as nanoengineered material, where potential neurotoxicity remains to be defined. Furthermore, the convergence of mechanisms associated with ND and AID draws attention to the neglected arena of angiogenesis in defining the link between environment, ND, and AID.

  10. Neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia is caused by horror autotoxicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljis, R O; Aguila, M C

    1999-05-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic, multi-system disorder with manifestations that include immune deficiency, sensitivity to ionizing radiation and neoplasms. Many of these manifestations are understood in principle since the identification in A-T patients of mutations in a gene encoding a protein kinase that plays a key role in signaling and repair of DNA damage. However, the cause of the neurodegeneration that afflicts patients with A-T for at least a decade before they succumb to overwhelming infections or malignancy remains mysterious. Based on our work in a mouse model of A-T and previous evidence of extra-neural autoimmune disorders in A-T, we postulate that the neurodegenerative process in A-T is not due to a function for A-T mutated (ATM) essential for the postnatal brain, but to an autoimmune process (hence 'horror autotoxicus', Paul Ehrlich's term for autoimmune disorder). This hypothetical mechanism may be analogous to that in the so-called 'paraneoplastic' neurodegenerative syndromes in patients with various malignancies. Thus, alterations in the balance between cellular and humoral immunity in A-T probably result in autoantibodies to cerebral epitopes shared with cells of the immune system. This hypothesis has important implications for the understanding and development of effective palliative and even preventative strategies for A-T, and probably for other so far relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. No effect of anti-inflammatory medication on postprandial and postexercise muscle protein synthesis in elderly men with slightly elevated systemic inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Kasper Juel; Reitelseder, Søren; Malmgaard-Clausen, Nikolai Mølkjær

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Based on circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, some individuals develop slightly increased inflammation as they age. In elderly inflamed rats, the muscle response to protein feeding is impaired, whereas it can be maintained by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs...... increase in systemic inflammation does not affect the basal myofibrillar FSR or the myofibrillar FSR responses, which suggests that elderly individuals with slightly increased inflammation can benefit from protein ingestion and resistance exercise to stimulate muscle protein anabolism. Moreover, the NSAID...

  12. Effect of industrially produced trans fat on markers of systemic inflammation: evidence from a randomized trial in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie T.; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal B.

    2011-01-01

    Consumption of industrially produced trans fatty acids (IP-TFA) has been positively associated with systemic markers of low-grade inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in cross-sectional studies, but results from intervention studies are inconclusive. Therefore, we conducted a 16 week double...... (15.7 g/day IP-TFA) or control oil without IP-TFA. After 16 weeks, IP-TFA intake increased baseline-adjusted serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α by 12% [95% confidence interval (CI): 5–20; P = 0.002] more in the IP-TFA group compared with controls. Plasma soluble TNF receptors 1 and 2 were also...

  13. Translational Mini-Review Series on Immunology of Vascular Disease: Mechanisms of vascular inflammation and remodelling in systemic vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugeri, N; Rovere-Querini, P; Baldini, M; Sabbadini, M G; Manfredi, A A

    2009-01-01

    Vessel walls are the primary inflammatory sites in systemic vasculitides. In most cases the initiating event is unknown, and a self-sustaining circuit attracts and activates inflammatory leucocytes in the wall of vessels of various size and anatomical characteristics. Recent studies have revealed homeostatic roles of vascular inflammation and have identified the action of humoral innate immunity, in particular injury-associated signals and acute phase proteins, on the activation of circulating leucocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. These advances have provided clues to the molecular mechanisms underlying the vicious circle that maintains and amplifies vessel and tissue injury. PMID:19309348

  14. The macrophage system in the intestinal muscularis externa during inflammation: an immunohistochemical and quantitative study of osteopetrotic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Hadberg, Hanne

    2008-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation results in disturbed intestinal motility in humans as well as in animal models. This altered function of smooth muscle cells and/or the enteric nervous system may be caused by activation of macrophages in muscularis externa and a thereby following release of cytokines...... and chemokines that causes influx of mononuclear cells and neutrophilic granulocytes. We subjected osteopetrotic (op/op) mice that lack certain macrophage subtypes, e.g. macrophages in the muscularis externa and +/+ mice to LPS to induce inflammatory cell influx. The densities of F4/80(+), MHCII...

  15. Dual Role of Vitamin C on the Neuroinflammation Mediated Neurodegeneration and Memory Impairments in Colchicine Induced Rat Model of Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Susmita; Ghosh, Tusharkanti; Gupta, Pritha; Ghosh, Rupsa; Kabir, Syed N; Roy, Avishek

    2016-12-01

    The neurodegeneration in colchicine induced AD rats (cAD) is mediated by cox-2 linked neuroinflammation. The importance of ROS in the inflammatory process in cAD has not been identified, which may be deciphered by blocking oxidative stress in this model by a well-known anti-oxidant vitamin C. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the role of vitamin C on colchicine induced oxidative stress linked neuroinflammation mediated neurodegeneration and memory impairments along with peripheral immune responses in cAD. The impairments of working and reference memory were associated with neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus of cAD. Administration of vitamin C (200 and 400 mg/kg BW) in cAD resulted in recovery of memory impairments, with prevention of neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus. The neuroinflammation in the hippocampus also influenced the peripheral immune responses and inflammation in the serum of cAD and all of these parameters were also recovered at 200 and 400 mg dose of vitamin C. However, cAD treated with 600 mg dose did not recover but resulted in increase of memory impairments, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation in hippocampus along with alteration of peripheral immune responses in comparison to cAD of the present study. Therefore, the present study showed that ROS played an important role in the colchicine induced neuroinflammation linked neurodegeneration and memory impairments along with alteration of peripheral immune responses. It also appears from the results that vitamin C at lower doses showed anti-oxidant effect and at higher dose resulted in pro-oxidant effects in cAD.

  16. Natural Products Combating Neurodegeneration: Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solayman, Md; Islam, Md Asiful; Alam, Fahmida; Khalil, Md Ibrahim; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Gan, Siew Hua

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by neurodegeneration and a progressive functional impairment of the midbrain nigral dopaminergic neurons. The cause remains unknown; however, several pathological processes and central factors, such as protein aggregation, mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, have been reported. The current treatment method primarily targets symptoms by using anti-Parkinson drugs such as levodopa, carbidopa, dopamine (DA) agonists, monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors and anticholinergics to replace DA. When drug therapy is not satisfactory, surgical treatments are recommended. Unfortunately, the existing conventional strategies that target PD are associated with numerous side effects and possess an economic burden. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches that regulate the pathways leading to neuronal death and dysfunction are necessary. For many years, nature has provided the primary resource for the discovery of potential therapeutic agents. Remarkably, many natural products from medicinal plants, fruits and vegetables have been demonstrated to be efficacious anti-Parkinson agents. These products possess neuroprotective properties as a result of not only their wellrecognized anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities but also their inhibitory roles regarding iron accumulation, protein misfolding and the maintenance of proteasomal degradation, as well as mitochondrial homeostasis. The aim of this review is to report the available anti-Parkinson agents based on natural products and delineate their therapeutic actions, which act on various pathways. Overall, this review emphasizes the types of natural products that are potential future resources in the treatment of PD as novel regimens or supplementary agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Does one size fit all? The role of body mass index and waist circumference in systemic inflammation in midlife by race and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanikova, Irena; Oates, Gabriela R; Bateman, Lori Brand

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the associations of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) with markers of systemic inflammation in midlife by race and gender. Data were obtained from the Survey of Midlife in the United States, a cross-sectional, observational study of Americans 35 years old or older (White men: N = 410; White women: N = 490; Black men: N = 58; Black women: N = 117). Inflammation was measured by concentrations of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) in fasting plasma and concentrations of E-selectin and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in fasting serum. Anthropometric data were used to obtain BMI and WC. Socio-demographic and health-related factors were assessed with a survey. Multivariate models by race and gender were estimated to test the roles of BMI and WC for each inflammation marker. Compared to White men, Black women have higher BMI and higher levels of all four inflammation markers; White women have lower BMI, lower WC, and lower E-selectin and fibrinogen but higher CRP; and Black men have higher fibrinogen. After adjusting for socio-demographic and health-related covariates as well as perceived discrimination, WC is associated with all four markers of inflammation among White men and women; with three markers (fibrinogen, CRP, and IL-6) of inflammation among Black women; and with CRP (and marginally with fibrinogen and E-selectin) among Black men. BMI is associated with higher CRP and fibrinogen among Black men (marginally so for White men) but not for women of either race. WC shows more consistent associations with inflammation markers than BMI, although the relationships vary by inflammation marker and population group. Our findings suggest that WC is a risk factor for systemic inflammation among White and Black men and women, and BMI is an additional risk factor for Black men.

  18. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of genetic information between the hematopoietic system and the brain in response to inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Ridder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms behind how the immune system signals to the brain in response to systemic inflammation are not fully understood. Transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase specifically in the hematopoietic lineage in a Cre reporter background display recombination and marker gene expression in Purkinje neurons. Here we show that reportergene expression in neurons is caused by intercellular transfer of functional Cre recombinase messenger RNA from immune cells into neurons in the absence of cell fusion. In vitro purified secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs from blood cells contain Cre mRNA, which induces recombination in neurons when injected into the brain. Although Cre-mediated recombination events in the brain occur very rarely in healthy animals, their number increases considerably in different injury models, particularly under inflammatory conditions, and extend beyond Purkinje neurons to other neuronal populations in cortex, hippocampus, and substantia nigra. Recombined Purkinje neurons differ in their miRNA profile from their nonrecombined counterparts, indicating physiological significance. These observations reveal the existence of a previously unrecognized mechanism to communicate RNA-based signals between the hematopoietic system and various organs, including the brain, in response to inflammation.

  19. Genetically predicted testosterone and systemic inflammation in men: a separate-sample Mendelian randomization analysis in older Chinese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhao

    Full Text Available Observationally, testosterone is negatively associated with systemic inflammation, but this association is open to both residual confounding and reverse causality. Large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs, assessing exogenous effects, are presently unavailable. We examined the association of endogenous testosterone with well-established systemic inflammatory markers (white blood cell, granulocyte, lymphocyte and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP using a separate-sample Mendelian randomization analysis to minimize reverse causality.A genetic prediction rule for serum testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men with mean age of 21.0, using selected testosterone-related SNPs (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the association of genetically predicted serum testosterone with inflammatory markers among 4,212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.Genetically predicted testosterone was unrelated to white blood cell count (-0.01 109/L per nmol/L testosterone, 95% confidence interval (CI -0.05 to 0.04, granulocyte count (-0.02 109/L, 95% CI -0.06 to 0.02, lymphocyte count (0.005 109/L, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.02 and hsCRP (-0.05 mg/L, 95% CI -0.15 to 0.06.Our findings did not corroborate any anti-inflammatory effects of testosterone or corresponding potentially protective effects of testosterone on chronic diseases resulting from reduced low-grade systemic inflammation.

  20. Virulence test using nematodes to prescreen Nocardia species capable of inducing neurodegeneration and behavioral disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Bernardin Souibgui

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Parkinson’s disease (PD is a disorder characterized by dopaminergic neuron programmed cell death. The etiology of PD remains uncertain—some cases are due to selected genes associated with familial heredity, others are due to environmental exposure to toxic components, but over 90% of cases have a sporadic origin. Nocardia are Actinobacteria that can cause human diseases like nocardiosis. This illness can lead to lung infection or central nervous system (CNS invasion in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. The main species involved in CNS are N. farcinica, N. nova, N. brasiliensis and N. cyriacigeorgica. Some studies have highlighted the ability of N. cyriacigeorgica to induce Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms in animals. Actinobacteria are known to produce a large variety of secondary metabolites, some of which can be neurotoxic. We hypothesized that neurotoxic secondary metabolite production and the onset of PD-like symptoms in animals could be linked. Methods Here we used a method to screen bacteria that could induce dopaminergic neurodegeneration before performing mouse experiments. Results The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans allowed us to demonstrate that Nocardia strains belonging to N. cyriacigeorgica and N. farcinica species can induce dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Strains of interest involved with the nematodes in neurodegenerative disorders were then injected in mice. Infected mice had behavioral disorders that may be related to neuronal damage, thus confirming the ability of Nocardia strains to induce neurodegeneration. These behavioral disorders were induced by N. cyriacigeorgica species (N. cyriacigeorgica GUH-2 and N. cyriacigeorgica 44484 and N. farcinica 10152. Discussion We conclude that C. elegans is a good model for detecting Nocardia strains involved in neurodegeneration. This model allowed us to detect bacteria with high neurodegenerative effects and which should be studied in mice to

  1. Combined Inhibition of C5 and CD14 Attenuates Systemic Inflammation in a Piglet Model of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anub Mathew; Schjalm, Camilla; Nilsson, Per H; Lindenskov, Paal H H; Rørtveit, Runa; Solberg, Rønnaug; Saugstad, Ola Didrik; Berglund, Magnus M; Strömberg, Patrik; Lau, Corinna; Espevik, Terje; Jansen, Johan Høgset; Castellheim, Albert; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Barratt-Due, Andreas

    2018-02-27

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a severe lung condition affecting newborns and it can lead to a systemic inflammatory response. We previously documented complement activation and cytokine release in a piglet MAS model. Additionally, we showed ex vivo that meconium-induced inflammation was dependent on complement and Toll-like receptors. To assess the efficacy of the combined inhibition of complement (C5) and CD14 on systemic inflammation induced in a forceful piglet MAS model. Thirty piglets were randomly allocated to a treatment group receiving the C5-inhibitor SOBI002 and anti-CD14 (n = 15) and a nontreated control group (n = 15). MAS was induced by intratracheal meconium instillation, and the piglets were observed for 5 h. Complement, cytokines, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) were measured by ELISA. SOBI002 ablated C5 activity and the formation of the terminal complement complex in vivo. The combined inhibition attenuated the inflammasome cytokines IL-1β and IL-6 by 60 (p = 0.029) and 44% (p = 0.01), respectively, and also MPO activity in the bronchoalveolar fluid by 42% (p = 0.017). Ex vivo experiments in human blood revealed that the combined regimen attenuated meconium-induced MPO release by 64% (p = 0.008), but there was only a negligible effect with single inhibition, indicating a synergic cross-talk between the key molecules C5 and CD14. Combined inhibition of C5 and CD14 attenuates meconium-induced inflammation in vivo and this could become a future therapeutic regimen for MAS. © 2018 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Quercetin reverses hypobaric hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurodegeneration and improves memory function in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Jyotsna; Baitharu, Iswar; Sharma, Alpesh Kumar; Dutta, Ruma; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2013-12-01

    Inadequate oxygen availability at high altitude causes elevated oxidative stress, resulting in hippocampal neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Though oxidative stress is known to be a major cause of neurodegeneration in hypobaric hypoxia, neuroprotective and ameliorative potential of quercetin, a flavonoid with strong antioxidant properties in reversing hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment has not been studied. Four groups of male adult Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia for 7 days in an animal decompression chamber at an altitude of 7600 meters. Rats were supplemented with quercetin orally by gavage during 7 days of hypoxic exposure. Spatial working memory was assessed by a Morris Water Maze before and after exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Changes in oxidative stress markers and apoptotic marker caspase 3 expression in hippocampus were assessed. Histological assessment of neurodegeneration was performed by cresyl violet and fluoro Jade B staining. Our results showed that quercetin supplementation during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reactive oxygen species levels and consequent lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus by elevating antioxidant status and free radical scavenging enzyme system. There was reduction in caspase 3 expression, and decrease in the number of pyknotic and fluoro Jade B-positive neurons in hippocampus after quercetin supplementation during hypoxic exposure. Behavioral studies showed that quercetin reversed the hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. These findings suggest that quercetin provides neuroprotection to hippocampal neurons during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, and possesses promising therapeutic potential to ameliorate hypoxia-induced memory dysfunction.

  3. Modelling Systemic Iron Regulation during Dietary Iron Overload and Acute Inflammation: Role of Hepcidin-Independent Mechanisms.

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    Enculescu, Mihaela; Metzendorf, Christoph; Sparla, Richard; Hahnel, Maximilian; Bode, Johannes; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Legewie, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Systemic iron levels must be maintained in physiological concentrations to prevent diseases associated with iron deficiency or iron overload. A key role in this process plays ferroportin, the only known mammalian transmembrane iron exporter, which releases iron from duodenal enterocytes, hepatocytes, or iron-recycling macrophages into the blood stream. Ferroportin expression is tightly controlled by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms in response to hypoxia, iron deficiency, heme iron and inflammatory cues by cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms. At the systemic level, the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin is released from the liver in response to these cues, binds to ferroportin and triggers its degradation. The relative importance of individual ferroportin control mechanisms and their interplay at the systemic level is incompletely understood. Here, we built a mathematical model of systemic iron regulation. It incorporates the dynamics of organ iron pools as well as regulation by the hepcidin/ferroportin system. We calibrated and validated the model with time-resolved measurements of iron responses in mice challenged with dietary iron overload and/or inflammation. The model demonstrates that inflammation mainly reduces the amount of iron in the blood stream by reducing intracellular ferroportin transcription, and not by hepcidin-dependent ferroportin protein destabilization. In contrast, ferroportin regulation by hepcidin is the predominant mechanism of iron homeostasis in response to changing iron diets for a big range of dietary iron contents. The model further reveals that additional homeostasis mechanisms must be taken into account at very high dietary iron levels, including the saturation of intestinal uptake of nutritional iron and the uptake of circulating, non-transferrin-bound iron, into liver. Taken together, our model quantitatively describes systemic iron metabolism and generated experimentally testable predictions for additional

  4. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F 2 -isoprostanes (F 2 -IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 μM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F 2 -IsoPs and PGE 2 in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  5. LINGO-1 and Neurodegeneration: Pathophysiologic Clues for Essential Tremor?

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    Zhou Zhi-dong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Essential tremor (ET, one of the most common adult-onset movement disorders, has been associated with cerebellar Purkinje cell degeneration and formation of brainstem Lewy bodies. Recent findings suggest that genetic variants of the leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain containing 1 (LINGO-1 gene could be risk factors for ET. The LINGO-1 protein contains both leucine-rich repeat (LRR and immunoglobulin (Ig-like domains in its extracellular region, as well as a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail. LINGO-1 can form a ternary complex with Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1 and p75. Binding of LINGO-1 with NgR1 can activate the NgR1 signaling pathway, leading to inhibition of oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination in the central nervous system. LINGO-1 has also been found to bind with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and induce downregulation of the activity of EGFR–PI3K–Akt signaling, which might decrease Purkinje cell survival. Therefore, it is possible that genetic variants of LINGO-1, either alone or in combination with other genetic or environmental factors, act to increase LINGO-1 expression levels in Purkinje cells and confer a risk to Purkinje cell survival in the cerebellum. Here, we provide a concise summary of the link between LINGO-1 and neurodegeneration and discuss various hypotheses as to how this could be potentially relevant to ET pathogenesis.

  6. Hormesis in aging and neurodegeneration-a prodigy awaiting dissection.

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    Mao, Lei; Franke, Jacqueline

    2013-06-25

    Hormesis describes the drug action of low dose stimulation and high dose inhibition. The hormesis phenomenon has been observed in a wide range of biological systems. Although known in its descriptive context, the underlying mode-of-action of hormesis is largely unexplored. Recently, the hormesis concept has been receiving increasing attention in the field of aging research. It has been proposed that within a certain concentration window, reactive oxygen species (ROS) or reactive nitrogen species (RNS) could act as major mediators of anti-aging and neuroprotective processes. Such hormetic phenomena could have potential therapeutic applications, if properly employed. Here, we review the current theories of hormetic phenomena in regard to aging and neurodegeneration, with the focus on its underlying mechanism. Facilitated by a simple mathematical model, we show for the first time that ROS-mediated hormesis can be explained by the addition of different biomolecular reactions including oxidative damage, MAPK signaling and autophagy stimulation. Due to their divergent scales, the optimal hormetic window is sensitive to each kinetic parameter, which may vary between individuals. Therefore, therapeutic utilization of hormesis requires quantitative characterizations in order to access the optimal hormetic window for each individual. This calls for a personalized medicine approach for a longer human healthspan.

  7. Central Nervous System Inflammation and Infection During Early, Non-Accelerated Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

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    Hsu, Denise C; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Wegner, Matthew; Schuetz, Alexandra; Silsorn, Decha; Estes, Jacob D; Deleage, Claire; Tomusange, Khamis; Lakhashe, Samir K; Ruprecht, Ruth M; Lombardini, Eric; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Kuncharin, Yanin; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Inthawong, Dutsadee; Chuenarom, Weerawan; Burke, Robin; Robb, Merlin L; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Valcour, Victor; O'Connell, Robert J; Spudich, Serena; Michael, Nelson L; Vasan, Sandhya

    2018-03-21

    Studies utilizing highly pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have largely focused on the immunopathology of the central nervous system (CNS) during end-stage neuro AIDS and SIV encephalitis. However, this may not model pathophysiology in earlier stages of infection. In this non-accelerated SHIV model, plasma SHIV RNA levels and peripheral blood and colonic CD4 T+ cell counts mirrored early HIV infection in humans. At 12 weeks post infection, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) detection of SHIV RNA and elevations in IP-10 and MCP-1 reflected a discrete neurovirologic process. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a diffuse, low-level CD3+, CD4- cellular infiltrate in the brain parenchyma, without a concomitant increase in CD68/CD163+ monocytes, macrophages and activated microglial cells. Rare SHIV-infected cells in the brain parenchyma and meninges were identified by RNAscope ® in situ hybridization. In the meninges, there was also a trend toward increased CD4+ infiltration in SHIV-infected animals, but no differences in CD68/CD163+ cells between SHIV-infected and uninfected control animals. These data suggest that in a model that closely recapitulates human disease, CNS inflammation and SHIV in CSF may be predominantly mediated by T-cell mediated processes during early infection in both brain parenchyma and meninges. Because SHIV expresses an HIV rather than SIV envelope, this model could inform studies to understand potential HIV cure strategies targeting the HIV envelope. IMPORTANCE Animal models of the neurologic effects of HIV are needed because brain pathology is difficult to assess in humans. Many current models focus on the effects of late stage disease utilizing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). In the era of antiretroviral therapy, manifestations of late stage HIV are less common. Furthermore, new interventions such as monoclonal antibodies and therapeutic vaccinations target HIV envelope. We therefore

  8. Is the COPD assessment test (CAT) effective in demonstrating the systemic inflammation and other components in COPD?

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    Sarioglu, N; Hismiogullari, A A; Bilen, C; Erel, F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently a complex, multicomponent disorder. The COPD Assessment Test (CAT) has been increasingly used to assess COPD patients. This study aims to investigate the relationship between CAT and inflammation markers and other COPD components. We enrolled 110 stable COPD patients and 65 control subjects in this study. All patients completed the CAT questionnaire and the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dispnea scale. The quality of life of these patients was measured with St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). Levels of TNFα, IL-6, CRP were determined in blood samples. In COPD patients, serum levels of TNFα (109.5 ± 58 pg/ml), IL-6 (10.3 ± 18 pg/ml), and C-reactive protein (CRP) (1.6 ± 1.7 mg/L) were found to be significantly higher compared to controls (TNF-α: 14.6 ± 18 pg/ml, IL-6: 2.14 ± 1.9 pg/ml, CRP: 0.4 ± 0.3mg/L, pCAT score correlated with GOLD spirometric stages, mMRC dyspnea score, number of exacerbations in the previous year and FEV1 (pCAT score (r=0.43, pCAT was observed. Systemic inflammation persists in the stable period of COPD. CRP, one of the inflammation markers, was correlated with the CAT. Further studies are required to confirm the relationship between CAT and biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

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    R. Andrew Shanely

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125. Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05, however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05. WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05, but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine, antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function.

  10. Analysis of local chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate combined with systemic inflammation improves prognostication in stage II colon cancer independent of standard clinicopathologic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Natalie; Wong, Hui-Li; Templeton, Arnoud; Tripathy, Sagarika; Whiti Rogers, Te; Croxford, Matthew; Jones, Ian; Sinnathamby, Mathuranthakan; Desai, Jayesh; Tie, Jeanne; Bae, Susie; Christie, Michael; Gibbs, Peter; Tran, Ben

    2016-02-01

    In Stage II colon cancer, multiple independent studies have shown that a dense intratumoural immune infiltrate (local inflammation) is associated with improved outcomes, while systemic inflammation, measured by various markers, has been associated with poorer outcomes. However, previous studies have not considered the interaction between local and systemic inflammation, nor have they assessed the type of inflammatory response compared with standard clinicopathologic criteria. In order to evaluate the potential clinical utility of inflammatory markers in Stage II colon cancer, we examined local and systemic inflammation in a consecutive series of patients with resected Stage II colon cancer between 2000 and 2010 who were identified from a prospective clinical database. Increased intratumoural chronic inflammatory cell (CIC) density, as assessed by pathologist review of hematoxylin and eosin stained slides, was used to represent local inflammation. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) >5, as calculated from pre-operative full blood counts, was used to represent systemic inflammation. In 396 eligible patients identified, there was a non-significant inverse relationship between local and systemic inflammation. Increased CIC density was significantly associated with improved overall (HR 0.45, p = 0.001) and recurrence-free survival (HR 0.37, p = 0.003). High NLR was significantly associated with poorer overall survival (HR 2.56, p < 0.001). The combination of these markers further stratified prognosis independent of standard high-risk criteria, with a dominant systemic inflammatory response (low CIC/high NLR) associated with the worst outcome (5-year overall survival 55.8%). With further validation this simple, inexpensive combined inflammatory biomarker might assist in patient selection for adjuvant chemotherapy in Stage II colon cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  11. Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor are increased and correlate with malnutrition, immunosuppression involving MDSCs and systemic inflammation in patients with cancer of the digestive system.

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    Nakamura, Izumi; Shibata, Masahiko; Gonda, Kenji; Yazawa, Takashi; Shimura, Tatsuo; Anazawa, Takayuki; Suzuki, Satoshi; Sakurai, Kenichi; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Ohto, Hitoshi; Tomita, Ryouichi; Gotoh, Mitsukazu; Takenoshita, Seiichi

    2013-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) reportedly has an important role in the progression of malignant neoplasms and has been reported to induce myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) that appear in cancer and inflammation. In the present study, serum concentrations of VEGF were measured in patients with digestive system cancer and the correlations with nutritional damage, immune suppression and systemic inflammation were analyzed. A significant increase in VEGF serum levels was observed in patients with esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers compared with healthy volunteers. Levels of VEGF were inversely correlated with the serum concentrations of albumin, prealbumin and retinol-binding protein. The serum concentrations of VEGF were inversely correlated with the production of interleukin (IL)-12 and correlated with MDSC counts. VEGF levels were also correlated with neutrophil and neutrophil/lymphocyte counts and inversely correlated with lymphocyte count. Serum VEGF levels were divided at a cutoff of 500 pg/ml, with levels of prealbumin and retinol-binding protein significantly decreased in patients with higher VEGF levels. The stimulation index and IL-12 production were significantly decreased in the group with higher VEGF levels and MDSC counts tended to be higher in this group. These results demonstrated that increased production of VEGF was correlated with systemic inflammation, nutritional impairment and the inhibition of cell-mediated immunity involving MDSCs.

  12. The association between biliary tract inflammation and risk of digestive system cancers: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Lin, Che-Chen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Su, Wen-Pang; Lai, Shih-Wei; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lai, Hsueh-Chou

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between biliary tract inflammation (BTI) and digestive system cancers is unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the association between BTI and the risks of digestive system cancers.Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance claims data, information on a cohort of patients diagnosed with BTI (n = 4398) between 2000 and 2009 was collected. A comparison cohort of sex-, age-, and index year-matched persons without BTI (n = 17,592) was selected from the same database. The disease was defined by the ICD-9-CM. Both cohorts were followed until the end of 2010 and incidences of digestive system cancers were calculated.The results revealed an increase in adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of biliary tract cancer (24.45; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 9.20-65.02), primary liver cancer (1.53; 95% CI: 1.07-2.18), and pancreatic cancer (3.10; 95% CI: 1.20-8.03) in patients with both gallbladder and BTI. The aHR of stomach cancer was also found to be increased (2.73; 95% CI: 1.28-5.81) in patients with gallbladder inflammation only. There were no differences in esophageal cancer (aHR: 0.82; 95% CI: 0.23-2.87) and colorectal cancer (aHR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.59-1.45). The aHR for digestive system cancers increased by 3.66 times (95% CI: 2.50-5.35) and 12.20 times (95% CI: 8.66-17.17) in BTI visits frequency averaged 2 to 4 visits per year and frequency averaged ≥5 visits per year, respectively.Patients with BTI have significantly higher risk of digestive system cancers, particularly biliary tract, pancreatic, and primary liver cancers, compared with those who are without it.

  13. The Association Between Low Grade Systemic Inflammation and Skin Diseases: A Cross-sectional Survey in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966

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    Suvi-Päivikki Sinikumpu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Low grade inflammation is associated with many noncommunicable diseases. The association between skin diseases in general and systemic inflammation has not previously been studied at the population level. A whole-body investigation on 1,930 adults belonging to Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 was performed and high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP level was measured as a marker of low grade inflammation in order to determine the association between low grade inflammation and skin diseases in an unselected adult population. After adjustment for confounding factors the following skin disorders were associated with low grade inflammation in multinomial logistic regression analysis: atopic eczema (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2–3.9, onychomycosis (OR 2.0, 1.2–3.2 and rosacea (OR 1.7, 1.1–2.5. After additionally adjusting for body mass index and systemic diseases, the risks for atopic eczema (OR 2.4, 1.3–4.6 and onychomycosis (OR 1.9, 1.1–3.1 remained statistically significant. In conclusion, low grade inflammation is present in several skin diseases.

  14. Systemic inflammation in peripheral arterial disease with or without coexistent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: analysis of selected markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; Sleszycka, Justyna; Safianowska, Aleksandra; Wiechno, Wieslaw; Domagala-Kulawik, Joanna

    2012-07-04

    Low-grade systemic inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The aim of the study was to analyze plasma concentrations of selected markers of inflammation in patients suffering from PAD with or without coexistent COPD. Thirty patients (6 women) with advanced PAD (at least IIb stage according to Fontaine scale) hospitalized due to critical limb ischemia were examined. In all patients spirometry was performed to confirm or exclude COPD. Plasma concentration of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α was measured using ELISA method. Statistical analysis was performed according to COPD status and according to smoking status independently. In the whole group of patients with PAD, COPD was recognized in 14 cases (for the first time in 10 cases). All patients were smokers (46.7% current, 53.3% ex-smokers). We found a significant correlation between FEV1%N (percent of norm of first second expiratory volume) and the number of years of smoking (r = -0.39; p diseases.

  15. Comparison of particle-exposure triggered pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice fed with three different diets

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    Hrabě de Angelis Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity can be linked to disease risks such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders, but recently, the adipose tissue (AT macrophage also emerges as actively participating in inflammation and immune function, producing pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. Connections between the AT and chronic lung diseases, like emphysema and asthma and a protective role of adipocyte-derived proteins against acute lung injury were suggested. In this study we addressed the question, whether a diet challenge increases the inflammatory response in the alveolar and the blood compartment in response to carbon nanoparticles (CNP, as a surrogate for ambient/urban particulate air pollutants. Methods Mice were fed a high caloric carbohydrate-rich (CA or a fat-rich (HF diet for six weeks and were compared to mice kept on a purified low fat (LF diet, respectively. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL and blood samples were taken 24 h after intratracheal CNP instillation and checked for cellular and molecular markers of inflammation. Results and discussion The high caloric diets resulted in distinct effects when compared with LF mice, respectively: CA resulted in increased body and fat mass without affecting blood cellular immunity. Conversely, HF activated the blood system, increasing lymphocyte and neutrophil counts, and resulted in slightly increased body fat content. In contrast to higher pro-inflammatory BAL Leptin in CA and HF mice, on a cellular level, both diets did not lead to an increased pro-inflammatory basal status in the alveolar compartment per se, nor did result in differences in the particle-triggered response. However both diets resulted in a disturbance of the alveolar capillary barrier as indicated by enhanced BAL protein and lactate-dehydrogenase concentrations. Systemically, reduced serum Adiponectin in HF mice might be related to the observed white blood cell increase. Conclusion The increase in BAL pro-inflammatory factors in high caloric

  16. Neuroinflammation and J2 prostaglandins: linking impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondria to neurodegeneration

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    Maria Emilia Figueiredo-Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune response of the CNS is a defense mechanism activated upon injury to initiate repair mechanisms while chronic over-activation of the CNS immune system (termed neuroinflammation may exacerbate injury. The latter is implicated in a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, HIV dementia and prion diseases. Cyclooxygenases (COX -1 and COX-2, which are key enzymes in the conversion of arachidonic acid into bioactive prostanoids, play a central role in the inflammatory cascade. J2 prostaglandins are endogenous toxic products of cyclooxygenases, and because their levels are significantly increased upon brain injury, they are actively involved in neuronal dysfunction induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which J2 prostaglandins (1 exert their actions, (2 potentially contribute to the transition from acute to chronic inflammation and to the spreading of neuropathology, (3 disturb the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mitochondrial function, and (4 contribute to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as stroke, traumatic brain injury, and demyelination in Krabbe disease. We conclude by discussing the therapeutic potential of targeting the J2 prostaglandin pathway to prevent/delay neurodegeneration associated with neuroinflammation. In this context, we suggest a shift from the traditional view that cyclooxygenases are the most appropriate targets to treat neuroinflammation, to the notion that J2 prostaglandin pathways and other neurotoxic prostaglandins downstream from cyclooxygenases, would offer significant benefits as more effective therapeutic targets to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases, while minimizing adverse side effects.

  17. Transdermal Delivery of Cannabidiol Attenuates Binge Alcohol-Induced Neurodegeneration in a Rodent Model of an Alcohol Use Disorder

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    Liput, Daniel J.; Hammell, Dana C.; Stinchcomb, Audra L.; Nixon, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption, characteristic of alcohol use disorders, results in neurodegeneration and behavioral and cognitive impairments that are hypothesized to contribute to the chronic and relapsing nature of alcoholism. Therefore, the current study aimed to advance the preclinical development of transdermal delivery of cannabidiol (CBD) for the treatment of alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. In experiment 1, 1.0%, 2.5% and 5.0% CBD gels were evaluated for neuroprotection. The 5.0% CBD gel resulted in a 48.8% reduction in neurodegeneration in the entorhinal cortex assessed by Fluoro-Jade B (FJB), which trended to statistical significance (p = 0.069). Treatment with the 5.0% CBD gel resulted in day 3 CBD plasma concentrations of ~100.0 ng/mL so this level was used as a target concentration for development of an optimized gel formulation. Experiment 2 tested a next generation 2.5% CBD gel formulation, which was compared to CBD administration by intraperitoneal injection (IP; 40.0 mg/kg/d). This experiment found similar magnitudes of neuroprotection following both routes of administration; transdermal CBD decreased FJB+ cells in the entorhinal cortex by 56.1% (p < 0.05), while IP CBD resulted in a 50.6% (p < 0.05) reduction in FJB+ cells. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using CBD transdermal delivery systems for the treatment of alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:24012796

  18. SMOKING’S ROLE IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF BRONCHIAL AND SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION AT THE INITIAL STAGE COPD

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    A. E. Shuganov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available COPD is characterized by a pathological inflammatory response in the lungs. Inflammation is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that  of smokers and persons without nicotine addiction. There is evidence for the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, which probably originates in the lungs. Immune system was investigated on the basis of blood cytotoxic lymphocytes such as cytotoxic T — lymphocytes and NK — cells in patients with COPD 2 tbsp. The study included 42 patients with COPD severity according to 2 g (22 GOLD 2014 criteria. 22 patients with COPD 2 tbsp had smoking index of at least 20 pack \\ years and 20 patients who had never smoked. In all patients, there were no data on atopy and asthma history. All surveyed patients received inhaled M-holinolitik — tiotropium bromide monohydrate 18 micrograms, and on-demand short-acting bronchodilators for 2 breaths. Age of patients was 1 group (smokers from 50 to 62 years (mean age 54,1±1,3 years .2 The second group — 58-75 years (58,21±0,7 years. By indirect immunofluorescence  were determined  relative and absolute  content  in peripheral blood lymphocytes, ekspresiruyuschie antigens CD3, CD4, CD16, CD20, CD23, CD25, CD54, CD71, CD72, HLA-DR, CD95, membrane  immunoglobulin mIgM and mIgG. As a result of the study it was found that  patients  in the early stages of COPD 2 tbsp. there was a significant change in blood levels of cytotoxic lymphocytes,  regardless of the addiction to smoking. But when smoking signs “oxidative stress” are more pronounced,  resulting in a more rapid and possibly further more severe course of the disease. Thus, COPD is characterized by the development  of systemic inflammation, however, the underlying mechanisms, as well as the desirability and feasibility of the suppression of inflammatory processes require further study.

  19. Dietary acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats: Dataset of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation markers

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    Xiaolei Jin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that dietary acrylamide, at doses (10 and 50 mg/kg diet known to cause rodent tumors, lowered serum total high density lipoprotein and total testosterone, increased serum lipase, and lowered lymphocytes levels together with other hematological parameters in male F344 rats exposed for 10 weeks (doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2014.11.009 [1]. Here we present data related to the role of food-borne acrylamide exposure (at 0, 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg diet in the presence of low (7% wt/wt or high (23.9% wt/wt dietary fat on serum and urinary markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in F344 rats. Briefly, urine and serum samples were collected from the experimental animals a day prior to or at the time of necropsy, respectively and processed for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay estimations of biochemical markers. Urine samples were analyzed for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and isoprostane, and serum samples for total antioxidant capacity, paraoxonase 1 activity, c-reactive protein, homocysteine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, thromboxin 2, and Nε-(carboxymethyllysine.

  20. Resistance to systemic inflammation and multi organ damage after global ischemia/reperfusion in the arctic ground squirrel.

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    Lori K Bogren

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest (CA and hemorrhagic shock (HS are two clinically relevant situations where the body undergoes global ischemia as blood pressure drops below the threshold necessary for adequate organ perfusion. Resistance to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is a characteristic of hibernating mammals. The present study sought to determine if arctic ground squirrels (AGS are protected from systemic inflammation and multi organ damage after CA- or HS-induced global I/R and if, for HS, this protection is dependent upon their hibernation season.For CA, rats and summer euthermic AGS (AGS-EU were asphyxiated for 8 min, inducing CA. For HS, rats, AGS-EU, and winter interbout arousal AGS (AGS-IBA were subject to HS by withdrawing blood to a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg and maintaining that pressure for 20 min before reperfusion with Ringers. For both I/R models, body temperature (Tb was kept at 36.5-37.5°C. After reperfusion, animals were monitored for seven days (CA or 3 hrs (HS then tissues and blood were collected for histopathology, clinical chemistries, and cytokine level analysis (HS only. For the HS studies, additional groups of rats and AGS were monitored for three days after HS to access survival and physiological impairment.Rats had increased serum markers of liver damage one hour after CA while AGS did not. For HS, AGS survived 72 hours after I/R whereas rats did not survive overnight. Additionally, only rats displayed an inflammatory response after HS. AGS maintained a positive base excess, whereas the base excess in rats was negative during and after hemorrhage.Regardless of season, AGS are resistant to organ damage, systemic inflammation, and multi organ damage after systemic I/R and this resistance is not dependent on their ability to become decrease Tb during insult but may stem from an altered acid/base and metabolic response during I/R.

  1. Endometriosis and possible inflammation markers

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    Meng-Hsing Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Infiltration of peritoneal macrophages and local proinflammatory mediators in the peritoneal microenvironment affect ovarian function and pelvic anatomy leading to the symptoms and signs of endometriosis. The identification of a noninvasive marker for endometriosis will facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. This review provides an overview of local microenvironmental inflammation and systemic inflammation biomarkers in endometriosis.

  2. Impact of systemic inflammation on the relationship between insulin resistance and all-cause and cancer-related mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Rhee, Eun-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Sohn, Chong Il; Shin, Ho-Cheol; Ryu, Seungho; Lee, Won-Young

    2017-11-27

    Insulin resistance and inflammation play an important role in a variety of chronic diseases. We investigated the influence of systemic inflammation on the relationship between insulin resistance and mortality risk in apparently healthy adults. This study examined the mortality outcomes for 165,849 Koreans enrolled in a health-screening program. The subjects were divided into four groups according to their homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels: group 0, HOMA-IR HOMA-IR ≥75% and hs-CRP HOMA-IR HOMA-IR ≥75% and hs-CRP ≥2.0mg/L. The Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all-cause, cardiovascular disease, and cancer-related mortality. During the follow-up period of 1,417,325.6 person-years, a total of 1316 deaths (182 from cardiovascular disease) occurred. The multivariate-adjusted HRs for all-cause mortality were significantly higher in groups 2 (HR 1.40; 95% CI: 1.19-1.64) and group 3 (HR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.34-2.10) than that in group 0. For cardiovascular mortality, the sex-adjusted hazards were also significantly higher in groups 2 and 3 than that in group 0; however, this increased risk disappeared during multivariate analysis. Groups 2 and 3 had significantly higher risk for cancer-related mortality than group 0, with multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios of 1.48 (95% CI: 1.18-1.86) and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.35-2.51), respectively. Systemic inflammation can be used to stratify the subjects according to the all-cause and cancer-related mortality risks, irrespective of the insulin-resistance status. And this tendency is most pronounced in cancer-related mortality. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. STATE OF JNK AND P38 MAP-KINASE SYSTEM IN BLOOD monon uclea r le ucocytes DUR ING INFLAMMATION

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    N. Y. Chasovskih

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Pogrammed cell death of peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with acute inflammatory diseases (non-nosocomial pneumonia, acute appendicitis was investigated under ex vivo conditions, upon cultivation of the cells with selective inhibitors of JNK (SP600125 and р38 МАРК (ML3403. In vitro addition of SP600125 and ML3403 under oxidative stress conditions prevents increase of annexinpositive mononuclear cells numbers, thus suggesting JNK and р38 МАР-kinases to be involved into oxidative mechanisms of apoptosis deregulation. A role of JNK in IL-8 production by mononuclear leucocytes was revealed in cases of acute inflammation. Regulatory effect of JNK and p38 MAP-kinases can be mediated through activation of redox-sensitive apoptogenic signal transduction systems, as well as due to changes in cellular cytokine-producing function.

  4. Temporal dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis in chronic neurodegeneration

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    Suzzi, Stefano; Vargas-Caballero, Mariana; Fransen, Nina L.; Al-Malki, Hussain; Cebrian-Silla, Arantxa; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Perry, V. Hugh

    2014-01-01

    The study of neurogenesis during chronic neurodegeneration is crucial in order to understand the intrinsic repair mechanisms of the brain, and key to designing therapeutic strategies. In this study, using an experimental model of progressive chronic neurodegeneration, murine prion disease, we define the temporal dynamics of the generation, maturation and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, using dual pulse-chase, multicolour γ-retroviral tracing, transmission electron microscopy and patch-clamp. We found increased neurogenesis during the progression of prion disease, which partially counteracts the effects of chronic neurodegeneration, as evidenced by blocking neurogenesis with cytosine arabinoside, and helps to preserve the hippocampal function. Evidence obtained from human post-mortem samples, of both variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer’s disease patients, also suggests increased neurogenic activity. These results open a new avenue into the exploration of the effects and regulation of neurogenesis during chronic neurodegeneration, and offer a new model to reproduce the changes observed in human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24941947

  5. Differentiating sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammation based on microvesicle-bacteria aggregation

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    Herrmann, I. K.; Bertazzo, S.; O'Callaghan, D. J. P.; Schlegel, A. A.; Kallepitis, C.; Antcliffe, D. B.; Gordon, A. C.; Stevens, M. M.

    2015-08-01

    Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions.Sepsis is a severe medical condition and a leading cause of hospital mortality. Prompt diagnosis and early treatment has a significant, positive impact on patient outcome. However, sepsis is not always easy to diagnose, especially in critically ill patients. Here, we present a conceptionally new approach for the rapid diagnostic differentiation of sepsis from non-septic intensive care unit patients. Using advanced microscopy and spectroscopy techniques, we measure infection-specific changes in the activity of nano-sized cell-derived microvesicles to bind bacteria. We report on the use of a point-of-care-compatible microfluidic chip to measure microvesicle-bacteria aggregation and demonstrate rapid (sepsis diagnosis and introduces microvesicle-bacteria aggregation as a potentially useful parameter for making early clinical management decisions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1: Markers of inflammation and microvesicle characteristics in patient plasma samples, Fig. S2: Experimental sepsis model, Table S1: Patient characteristics. Table S2: Inclusion/exclusion criteria. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01851j

  6. Dairy Consumption Lowers Systemic Inflammation and Liver Enzymes in Typically Low-Dairy Consumers with Clinical Characteristics of Metabolic Syndrome.

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    Dugan, Christine E; Aguilar, David; Park, Young-Ki; Lee, Ji-Young; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2016-01-01

    A 6-week cross-over study design was used to determine the effect of increased dairy consumption in typically low-dairy consumers (n = 37) with metabolic syndrome (MetS) on systemic inflammation and hepatic enzymes. This was a randomized study in which participants consumed low-fat dairy (LFD) (10 oz 1% milk, 6 oz nonfat yogurt, 4 oz 2% cheese) or a carbohydrate-based control (CNT) (1.5 oz granola bar and 12 oz 100% juice) for 6 weeks. After a 4-week washout, they were allocated to the alternate dietary treatment. Inflammatory status was assessed by fasting plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and monocyte chemoattractant -1 (MCP-1). In addition, gene expression of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and TNF-α was evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from a subset of 17 subjects (13 women, 3 men) at the end of each dietary period. Liver enzymes were also assessed to evaluate whether dairy components would affect hepatic function. Participants had lower concentrations of both hepatic alanine aminotransferase (p < 0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase (p < 0.005) after the LFD period. No significant changes in any of the plasma inflammatory compounds were found when all data were analyzed together. In contrast, expression of IL-1b and IL-6 were reduced by 46% and 63%, respectively, compared to the control period. When stratified by gender, women had lower TNF-α, (p = 0.028) and MCP-1 (p = 0.001) following LFD consumption compared to CNT. In addition, hepatic steatosis index scores were significantly lower (p < 0.001) during the LFD period. We conclude that three dairy servings per day improved both liver function and systemic inflammation in subjects with MetS.

  7. Lipid Accumulation Product Is Associated with Insulin Resistance, Lipid Peroxidation, and Systemic Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Parvin Mirmiran

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLipid accumulation product (LAP is a novel biomarker of central lipid accumulation related to risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we assessed the association of LAP with glucose homeostasis, lipid and lipid peroxidation, and subclinical systemic inflammation in diabetic patients.MethodsThirty-nine male and 47 female type 2 diabetic patients were assessed for anthropometrics and biochemical measurements. LAP was calculated as [waist circumference (cm-65]×[triglycerides (mmol/L] in men, and [waist circumference (cm-58]×[triglycerides (mmol/L] in women. Associations of LAP with fasting glucose, insulin, insulin resistance index, lipid and lipoprotein levels, malondialdehyde, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP were assessed.ResultsMean age and LAP index were 53.6±9.6 and 51.9±31.2 years, respectively. After adjustments for age, sex and body mass index status, a significant positive correlation was observed between LAP index and fasting glucose (r=0.39, P<0.001, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (r=0.31, P<0.05. After additional adjustment for fasting glucose levels, antidiabetic and antilipidemic drugs, the LAP index was also correlated to total cholesterol (r=0.45, P<0.001, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels (r=-0.29, P<0.05, triglycerides to HDL-C ratio (r=0.89, P<0.001, malondialdehyde (r=0.65, P<0.001, and hs-CRP levels (r=0.27, P<0.05.ConclusionHigher central lipid accumulation in diabetic patients was related to higher insulin resistance, oxidative stress and systemic inflammation.

  8. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry involving the microbiota in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    The concept of molecular mimicry was established to explain commonalities of structure which developed in response to evolutionary pressures. Most examples of molecular mimicry in medicine have involved homologies of primary protein structure which cause disease. Molecular mimicry can be expanded beyond amino acid sequence to include microRNA and proteomic effects which are either pathogenic or salutogenic (beneficial) in regard to Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and related disorders. Viruses of animal or plant origin may mimic nucleotide sequences of microRNAs and influence protein expression. Both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases involve the formation of transmissible self-propagating prion-like proteins. However, the initiating factors responsible for creation of these misfolded nucleating factors are unknown. Amyloid patterns of protein folding are highly conserved through evolution and are widely distributed in the world. Similarities of tertiary protein structure may be involved in the creation of these prion-like agents through molecular mimicry. Cross-seeding of amyloid misfolding, altered proteostasis, and oxidative stress may be induced by amyloid proteins residing in bacteria in our microbiota in the gut and in the diet. Pathways of molecular mimicry induced processes induced by bacterial amyloid in neurodegeneration may involve TLR 2/1, CD14, and NFκB, among others. Furthermore, priming of the innate immune system by the microbiota may enhance the inflammatory response to cerebral amyloids (such as amyloid-β and α-synuclein). This paper describes the specific molecular pathways of these cross-seeding and neuroinflammatory processes. Evolutionary conservation of proteins provides the opportunity for conserved sequences and structures to influence neurological disease through molecular mimicry.

  9. Inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Sandra; Puentes, Fabiola; Baker, David; van der Valk, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegeneration, the slow and progressive dysfunction and loss of neurons and axons in the central nervous system, is the primary pathological feature of acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, neurotropic viral infections, stroke, paraneoplastic disorders, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis. Despite different triggering events, a common feature is chronic immune activation, in particular of microglia, the resident macrophages of the central nervous system. Apart from the pathogenic role of immune responses, emerging evidence indicates that immune responses are also critical for neuroregeneration. Here, we review the impact of innate and adaptive immune responses on the central nervous system in autoimmune, viral and other neurodegenerative disorders, and discuss their contribution to either damage or repair. We also discuss potential therapies aimed at the immune responses within the central nervous system. A better understanding of the interaction between the immune and nervous systems will be crucial to either target pathogenic responses, or augment the beneficial effects of immune responses as a strategy to intervene in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20561356

  10. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease.

  11. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  12. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  13. Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in the Mouse Is Associated with Decrease of Viscoelasticity of Substantia Nigra Tissue.

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    Elisabeth G Hain

    Full Text Available The biomechanical properties of brain tissue are altered by histopathological changes due to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease (PD. Such alterations can be measured by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE as a non-invasive technique to determine viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Until now, the correlation between histopathological mechanisms and observed alterations in tissue viscoelasticity in neurodegenerative diseases is still not completely understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate (1 the validity of MRE to detect viscoelastic changes in small and specific brain regions: the substantia nigra (SN, midbrain and hippocampus in a mouse model of PD, and (2 if the induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inflammation in the SN is reflected by local changes in viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE measurements of the SN, midbrain and hippocampus were performed in adult female mice before and at five time points after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin hydrochloride (MPTP treatment specifically lesioning dopaminergic neurons in the SN. At each time point, additional mice were utilized for histological analysis of the SN. After treatment cessation, we observed opposed viscoelastic changes in the midbrain, hippocampus and SN with the midbrain showing a gradual rise and the hippocampus a distinct transient increase of viscous and elastic parameters, while viscosity and-to a lesser extent-elasticity in the SN decreased over time. The decrease in viscosity and elasticity in the SN was paralleled by a reduced number of neurons due to the MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. In conclusion, MRE is highly sensitive to detect local viscoelastic changes in specific and even small brain regions. Moreover, we confirmed that neuronal cells likely constitute the backbone of the adult brain mainly accounting for its viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE could be established as a new potential instrument for clinical evaluation

  14. Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in the Mouse Is Associated with Decrease of Viscoelasticity of Substantia Nigra Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Elisabeth G; Klein, Charlotte; Munder, Tonia; Braun, Juergen; Riek, Kerstin; Mueller, Susanne; Sack, Ingolf; Steiner, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of brain tissue are altered by histopathological changes due to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease (PD). Such alterations can be measured by magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) as a non-invasive technique to determine viscoelastic parameters of the brain. Until now, the correlation between histopathological mechanisms and observed alterations in tissue viscoelasticity in neurodegenerative diseases is still not completely understood. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate (1) the validity of MRE to detect viscoelastic changes in small and specific brain regions: the substantia nigra (SN), midbrain and hippocampus in a mouse model of PD, and (2) if the induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and inflammation in the SN is reflected by local changes in viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE measurements of the SN, midbrain and hippocampus were performed in adult female mice before and at five time points after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridin hydrochloride (MPTP) treatment specifically lesioning dopaminergic neurons in the SN. At each time point, additional mice were utilized for histological analysis of the SN. After treatment cessation, we observed opposed viscoelastic changes in the midbrain, hippocampus and SN with the midbrain showing a gradual rise and the hippocampus a distinct transient increase of viscous and elastic parameters, while viscosity and-to a lesser extent-elasticity in the SN decreased over time. The decrease in viscosity and elasticity in the SN was paralleled by a reduced number of neurons due to the MPTP-induced neurodegeneration. In conclusion, MRE is highly sensitive to detect local viscoelastic changes in specific and even small brain regions. Moreover, we confirmed that neuronal cells likely constitute the backbone of the adult brain mainly accounting for its viscoelasticity. Therefore, MRE could be established as a new potential instrument for clinical evaluation and diagnostics

  15. Pentraxin 3 as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Systemic Inflammation or Infection

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    Siguan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a key component of the humoral arm of the innate immune system. PTX3 is produced locally in response to proinflammatory stimuli. We reviewed the usefulness of systemic levels of PTX3 in critically ill patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, sepsis, and bacteremia, focusing on its diagnostic and prognostic value. Methods. A PubMed search on PTX3 was conducted. The list of papers was narrowed to original studies of critically ill patients. Eleven papers on original studies of critically ill patients that report on PTX3 in SIRS, sepsis, or bacteremia were identified. Results. Systematic levels of PTX3 have little diagnostic value in critically ill patients with SIRS, sepsis, or bacteremia. Systemic levels of PTX3, however, have superior prognostic power over other commonly used biological markers in these patients. Systemic levels of PTX3 correlate positively with markers of organ dysfunction and severity-of-disease classification system scores. Finally, systemic levels of PTX3 remain elevated in the acute phase and decreased on recovery. Notably, the age of the patients and underlying disease affect systemic levels of PTX3. Conclusions. The diagnostic value of PTX3 is low in patients with sepsis. Systemic levels of PTX3 have prognostic value and may add to prognostication of patients with SIRS or sepsis, complementing severity-of-disease classification systems and other biological markers.

  16. Early Intravenous Delivery of Human Brain Stromal Cells Modulates Systemic Inflammation and Leads to Vasoprotection in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Badner, Anna; Vawda, Reaz; Laliberte, Alex; Hong, James; Mikhail, Mirriam; Jose, Alejandro; Dragas, Rachel; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-08-01

    : Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a life-threatening condition with multifaceted complications and limited treatment options. In SCI, the initial physical trauma is closely followed by a series of secondary events, including inflammation and blood spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption, which further exacerbate injury. This secondary pathology is partially mediated by the systemic immune response to trauma, in which cytokine production leads to the recruitment/activation of inflammatory cells. Because early intravenous delivery of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been shown to mitigate inflammation in various models of neurologic disease, this study aimed to assess these effects in a rat model of SCI (C7-T1, 35-gram clip compression) using human brain-derived stromal cells. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for a human-specific DNA sequence was used to assess cell biodistribution/clearance and confirmed that only a small proportion (approximately 0.001%-0.002%) of cells are delivered to the spinal cord, with the majority residing in the lung, liver, and spleen. Intriguingly, although cell populations drastically declined in all aforementioned organs, there remained a persistent population in the spleen at 7 days. Furthermore, the cell infusion significantly increased splenic and circulating levels of interleukin-10-a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine. Through this suppression of the systemic inflammatory response, the cells also reduced acute spinal cord BSCB permeability, hemorrhage, and lesion volume. These early effects further translated into enhanced functional recovery and tissue sparing 10 weeks after SCI. This work demonstrates an exciting therapeutic approach whereby a minimally invasive cell-transplantation procedure can effectively reduce secondary damage after SCI through systemic immunomodulation. Central nervous system pericytes (perivascular stromal cells) have recently gained significant attention within the scientific community. In addition to

  17. Evaluation of BODE index and its relationship with systemic inflammation mediated by proinflammatory biomarkers in patients with COPD

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    Khan NA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Naushad Ahmad Khan,1,2 Mradul Kumar Daga,1 Istaq Ahmad,2 Govind Mawari,1 Suman Kumar,3 Naresh Kumar,1 Syed Akhter Husain2 1Department of Medicine, Maulana Azad Medical College, 2Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, 3Department of Microbiology, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India Introduction: BODE index, a multidimensional grading system which is based on Body mass index, airway Obstruction, Dyspnea scale, and Exercise capacity, has been increasingly used for the evaluation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Many of the systemic manifestations of COPD are shown to be mediated by elevated levels of proinflammatory biomarkers.Objective: We aimed to investigate the relationship between the BODE index, its components, disease severity, and proinflammatory biomarkers like C-reactive protein (CRP, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interleukin (IL-6.Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study which included 290 clinically stable COPD patients and 80 smoker controls was conducted. Medical history, body mass index, pulmonary function tests, 6-minute walking test, and modified scale of Medical Research Council dyspnea scale were evaluated. BODE scores were determined. Systemic inflammation was evaluated with the measurement of CRP, TNF-α, and IL-6 in the serum samples of all studied subjects. The correlation between inflammatory biomarkers and BODE index was assessed in COPD patients.Results: We found a significant relationship between COPD stages and BODE index. Our analysis showed significant association between systemic biomarkers and components of the BODE index. Both TNF-α and CRP levels exhibited weak but significant correlation with BODE index. Serum IL-6 concentrations exhibited significant correlation with 6-minute walking test, modified scale of Medical Research Council, and BODE index (r=0.201, P=0.004; r=0.068, P=0.001; and r=0.530, P=0.001, respectively. Also, an inverse and significant correlation

  18. Gut microbiome may contribute to insulin resistance and systemic inflammation in obese rodents: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Na; Baker, Susan S; Nugent, Colleen A; Tsompana, Maria; Cai, Liting; Wang, Yong; Buck, Michael J; Genco, Robert J; Baker, Robert D; Zhu, Ruixin; Zhu, Lixin

    2018-01-26

    A number of studies have associated obesity with altered gut microbiota, although results are discordant regarding compositional changes in the gut microbiota of obese animals. Herein we aimed to obtain an unbiased evaluation of structural and functional changes of the gut microbiota in diet-induced obese rodents using a meta-analysis. The raw sequencing data of nine studies generated with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rodent models were processed with QIIME to obtain gut microbiota compositions. Biological functions were predicted and annotated with KEGG pathways using PICRUSt. No significant difference was observed for alpha diversity and Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes (B/F) ratio between obese and lean rodents. Bacteroidia, Clostridia, Bacilli and Erysipelotrichi were dominant classes but gut microbiota compositions varied among studies. Meta-analysis of the nine microbiome datasets identified 15 differential taxa and 57 differential pathways between obese and lean rodents. In obese rodents, increased abundance was observed for Dorea, Oscillospira, and Ruminococcus, known for fermenting polysaccharide into short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Decreased Turicibacter and increased Lactococcus are consistent with elevated inflammation in the obese status. Differential functional pathways of the gut microbiome in obese rodents included enriched pyruvate metabolism, butanoate metabolism, propanoate metabolism, pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis and glycerolipid metabolism pathways. These pathways converge in the function of carbohydrate metabolism, SCFAs metabolism and biosynthesis of lipid. HFD-induced obesity results in structural and functional dysbiosis of gut microbiota. The altered gut microbiome may contribute to obesity development by promoting insulin resistance and systemic inflammation.

  19. Where Does Inflammation Fit?

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    Biasucci, Luigi M; La Rosa, Giulio; Pedicino, Daniela; D'Aiello, Alessia; Galli, Mattia; Liuzzo, Giovanna

    2017-09-01

    This review focuses on the complex relationship between inflammation and the onset of acute coronary syndrome and heart failure. In the last few years, two important lines of research brought new and essential information to light in the pathogenesis of acute coronary syndrome: a) the understanding of the immune mediate mechanisms of inflammation in Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and b) evidence that the inflammatory mechanisms associated with atherosclerosis and its complications can be modulated by anti-inflammatory molecules. A large amount of data also suggests that inflammation is a major component in the development and exacerbation of heart failure (HF), in a symbiotic relationship. In particular, recent evidence underlies peculiar aspects of the phenomenon: oxidative stress and autophagy; DAMPS and TLR-4 signaling activation; different macrophages lineage and the contribution of NLRP-3 inflammasome; adaptive immune system. A possible explanation that could unify the pathogenic mechanism of these different conditions is the rising evidence that increased bowel permeability may allow translation of gut microbioma product into the circulation. These findings clearly establish the role of inflammation as the great trigger for two of the major cardiovascular causes of death and morbidity. Further studies are needed, to better clarify the issue and to define more targeted approaches to reduce pathological inflammation while preserving the physiological one.

  20. Sinonasal inflammation in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kåre; Konge, Lars; Thomsen, Sf

    2013-01-01

    In this review we demonstrate that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) frequently report sinonasal symptoms. Furthermore, we present evidence that smoking on its own can cause nasal disease, and that in COPD patients, nasal inflammation mimics that of the bronchi. All...... this evidence suggests that COPD related sinonasal disease does exist and that smoking on its own rather than systemic inflammation triggers the condition. However, COPD related sinonasal disease remains to be characterized in terms of symptoms and endoscopic findings. In addition, more studies are needed...... to quantify the negative impact of sinonasal symptoms on the quality of life in COPD patients....

  1. Interleukin-6 and lung inflammation: evidence for a causative role in inducing respiratory system resistance increments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that has been shown to be increased in some pathological conditions involving the respiratory system such as those experimentally induced in animals or spontaneously occurring in humans. Experimental data demonstrating that interleukin-6 plays a significant role in commonly occurring respiratory system inflammatory diseases are reviewed here. Those diseases, i.e. asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, are characterised by mechanical derangements of the respiratory system, for the most part due to increased elastance and airway resistance. Recent findings showing that interleukin-6 has a causative role in determining an increase in airway resistance are reviewed. The end-inflation occlusion method was used to study the mechanical properties of the respiratory system before and after interleukin-6 administration. The cytokine was shown to induce significant, dose-dependent increments in both the resistive pressure dissipation due to frictional forces opposing the airflow in the airway (ohmic resistance) and the additional resistive pressure dissipation due to the visco-elastic properties of the system, i.e. stress relaxation (visco-elastic resistance). There were no alterations in respiratory system elastance. Even when administered to healthy mammals, interleukin-6 determines a significant effect on respiratory system resistance causing an increase in the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration. IL-6 hypothetically plays an active role in the pathogenesis of respiratory system diseases and the mechanisms that may be involved are discussed here.

  2. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...

  3. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen L. McCoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them.

  4. The enigma of multiple sclerosis: inflammation and neurodegeneration cause heterogeneous dysfunction and damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis has an autoimmune inflammatory component, which has dominated the description of multiple sclerosis. A degenerative component to multiple sclerosis was always apparent, but was underappreciated until recently. Recent work has brought...... axonal pathology and brain atrophy into new focus. The purpose of this review is to highlight the relative roles played by the inflammatory and degenerative processes in multiple sclerosis pathology. RECENT FINDINGS: In the past year reports have been published to show that early disability and disease...... progression correlate with axonal damage, and that brain atrophy resulting from axonal loss is a feature of early multiple sclerosis, and is not restricted to the secondary progressive forms of the disease. Inflammatory mediators (CD8 T cells and antibodies) are implicated in axonal damage, and treatment...

  5. Relationship between cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modvig, Signe; Degn, Matilda; Horwitz, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Various inflammatory biomarkers show prognostic potential for multiple sclerosis (MS)-risk after clinically isolated syndromes. However, biomarkers are often examined singly and their interrelation and precise aspects of their associated pathological processes remain unclear. Clarification of the...

  6. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d’Amati, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2, responsible for the phosphorylation of pantothenate or vitamin B5 in the biosynthesis of co-enzyme A. A Pank2 knockout (Pank2−/−) mouse model did not recapitulate the human disease but showed azoospermia and mitochondrial dysfunctions. We challenged this mouse model with a low glucose and high lipid content diet (ketogenic diet) to stimulate lipid use by mitochondrial beta-oxidation. In the presence of a shortage of co-enzyme A, this diet could evoke a general impairment of bioenergetic metabolism. Only Pank2−/− mice fed with a ketogenic diet developed a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration-like syndrome characterized by severe motor dysfunction, neurodegeneration and severely altered mitochondria in the central and peripheral nervous systems. These mice also showed structural alteration of muscle morphology, which was comparable with that observed in a patient with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We here demonstrate that pantethine administration can prevent the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype in mice suggesting the possibility of experimental treatment in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:24316510

  7. Lifestyle and nutritional imbalances associated with Western diseases : causes and consequences of chronic systemic low-grade inflammation in an evolutionary context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Nunez, Begona; Pruimboom, Leo; Dijck-Brouwer, D.A. Janneke; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    In this review, we focus on lifestyle changes, especially dietary habits, that are at the basis of chronic systemic low grade inflammation, insulin resistance and Western diseases. Our sensitivity to develop insulin resistance traces back to our rapid brain growth in the past 2.5 million years. An

  8. Investigating bacterial sources of toxicity as an environmental contributor to dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim A Caldwell

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease (PD involves progressive neurodegeneration, including loss of dopamine (DA neurons from the substantia nigra. Select genes associated with rare familial forms of PD function in cellular pathways, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, involved in protein degradation. The misfolding and accumulation of proteins, such as alpha-synuclein, into inclusions termed Lewy Bodies represents a clinical hallmark of PD. Given the predominance of sporadic PD among patient populations, environmental toxins may induce the disease, although their nature is largely unknown. Thus, an unmet challenge surrounds the discovery of causal or contributory neurotoxic factors that could account for the prevalence of sporadic PD. Bacteria within the order Actinomycetales are renowned for their robust production of secondary metabolites and might represent unidentified sources of environmental exposures. Among these, the aerobic genera, Streptomyces, produce natural proteasome inhibitors that block protein degradation and may potentially damage DA neurons. Here we demonstrate that a metabolite produced by a common soil bacterium, S. venezuelae, caused DA neurodegeneration in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, which increased as animals aged. This metabolite, which disrupts UPS function, caused gradual degeneration of all neuronal classes examined, however DA neurons were particularly vulnerable to exposure. The presence of DA exacerbated toxicity because neurodegeneration was attenuated in mutant nematodes depleted for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA production. Strikingly, this factor caused dose-dependent death of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, a dopaminergic line. Efforts to purify the toxic activity revealed that it is a highly stable, lipophilic, and chemically unique small molecule. Evidence of a robust neurotoxic factor that selectively impacts neuronal survival in a progressive yet moderate manner is consistent

  9. Neuropsychiatry phenotype in asthma: Psychological stress-induced alterations of the neuroendocrine-immune system in allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Ohno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the recognition of asthma as a syndrome with complex pathophysiological signs and symptoms, recent research has sought to classify asthma phenotypes based on its clinical and molecular pathological features. Psychological stress was first recognized as a potential immune system modulator of asthma at the end of the 19th century. The activation of the central nervous system (CNS upon exposure to psychological stress is integral for the initiation of signal transduction processes. The stress hormones, including glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, which are secreted following CNS activation, are involved in the immunological alterations involved in psychological stress-induced asthma exacerbation. The mechanisms underlying this process may involve a pathological series of events from the brain to the lungs, which is attracting attention as a conceptually advanced phenotype in asthma pathogenesis. This review presents insights into the critical role of psychological stress in the development and exacerbation of allergic asthma, with a special focus on our own data that emphasizes on the continuity from the central sensing of psychological stress to enhanced eosinophilic airway inflammation.

  10. Neuropsychiatry phenotype in asthma: Psychological stress-induced alterations of the neuroendocrine-immune system in allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Isao

    2017-09-01

    Since the recognition of asthma as a syndrome with complex pathophysiological signs and symptoms, recent research has sought to classify asthma phenotypes based on its clinical and molecular pathological features. Psychological stress was first recognized as a potential immune system modulator of asthma at the end of the 19th century. The activation of the central nervous system (CNS) upon exposure to psychological stress is integral for the initiation of signal transduction processes. The stress hormones, including glucocorticoids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine, which are secreted following CNS activation, are involved in the immunological alterations involved in psychological stress-induced asthma exacerbation. The mechanisms underlying this process may involve a pathological series of events from the brain to the lungs, which is attracting attention as a conceptually advanced phenotype in asthma pathogenesis. This review presents insights into the critical role of psychological stress in the development and exacerbation of allergic asthma, with a special focus on our own data that emphasizes on the continuity from the central sensing of psychological stress to enhanced eosinophilic airway inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Winter to summer change in vitamin D status reduces systemic inflammation and bioenergetic activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Emily K; Keane, Kevin N; Raizel, Raquel; Rowlands, Jordan; Soares, Mario J; Newsholme, Philip

    2017-08-01

    Vitamin D status [25(OH)D] has recently been reported to be associated with altered cellular bioenergetic profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). No study has tracked the seasonal variation of 25(OH)D and its putative influence on whole body energy metabolism, cellular bioenergetic profiles, inflammatory markers and clinical chemistry. Whole body energy metabolism and substrate utilisation were measured by indirect calorimetry. PBMCs obtained from the same subjects were isolated from whole blood, counted and freshly seeded. Bioenergetic analysis (mitochondrial stress test and glycolysis stress test) was performed using the Seahorse XF e 96 flux analyser. 25(OH)D was assessed using the Architect immunoassay method. 25(OH)D increased by a median (IQR) of 14.40 (20.13)nmol/L (pwinter to summer and was accompanied by significant improvements in indices of insulin sensitivity, McAuley's index (p=0.019) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (p=0.028). PBMC mitochondrial parameters basal respiration, non-mitochondrial respiration, ATP production, proton leak, and maximal respiration decreased in summer compared to winter. Similarly, PBMC glycolytic parameters glycolytic activity, glucose response, and glycolytic capacity were all reduced in summer compared to winter. There was also a trend for absolute resting metabolic rate (RMR) to decrease (p=0.066). Markers of systemic inflammation MCP-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and IL-12p70 decreased significantly in summer compared to winter. Participants who entered winter with a low 25(OH)D (winter 25(OH)D concentrations of 50-75nmol/L or >75nmol/L. The absolute change in 25(OH)D was not associated with altered bioenergetics. Seasonal improvements in 25(OH)D was associated with reduced systemic inflammation, PBMC bioenergetic profiles and whole body energy metabolism. These observational changes in PBMC bioenergetics were most pronounced in those who had insufficient 25(OH)D in winter. The data warrants

  12. Aerobic exercise improves quality of life, psychological well-being and systemic inflammation in subjects with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; Al-Jiffri, Osama H

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease has a destructive drawbacks on the patient and his/her entire family as this disease badly af fects the behavior, cognition and abilities to do activities of daily living (ADL). The physical and mental benefits of exercise are widely known but seldom available to persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to measure quality of life, systemic inflammation and psychological well-being response to aerobic exercises in Alzheimer's. Forty Alzheimer elderly subjects were enrolled in two groups; the first group received treadmill aerobic exercise, while the second group was considered as a control group and received no training intervention for two months. Assessment of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES),Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Profile of Mood States(POMS) and SF-36 health quality of life (SF-36 HRQL) were taken before and at the end of the study. There was a 25.2%, 19.4%, 23.5%, 21.3%, 17.7% , 11.7%, 12.5% and 10.1 % reduction in mean values of TNF-α, IL-6, BDI, POMS, health transition SF-36 subscale, bodily pain SF-36 subscale, role functioning: emotional SF-36 subscale and mental health SF-36 subscale respectively in addition to 15.7%, 13.1%, 12.6%, 11.1%, 13.2% and 11.2 % increase in mean values of RSES, physical functioning SF-36 subscale, role functioning:physical SF-36 subscale, general health SF-36 subscale, Vitality SF-36 subscale and Social functioning SF-36 subscale respectively in group (A) received aerobic exercise training, so that there was a significant reduction in the mean values of TNF-α, IL-6, BDI & POMS and increase in the mean values of SF-36 HRQL subscale scores, RSES in group (A) as a result of aerobic exercise training, while the results of group (B) who received no training intervention were not significant. Also, there were significant differences between mean levels of the investigated parameters in group (A) and group (B) at

  13. IL-18: a key player in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Schmidt, Oliver I; Oberholzer, Andreas; Bührer, Christoph; Stahel, Philip F

    2005-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a potent inflammatory cytokine of the IL-1 family. It is synthesized as an inactive precursor (pro-IL-18), which is cleaved into its functionally active form by caspase-1. Resident cells of the CNS express IL-18 and caspase-1 constitutively, thus providing a local IL-18-dependent immune response. Recent studies have highlighted a crucial role for IL-18 in mediating neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the CNS under pathological conditions, such as bacterial and viral infection, autoimmune demyelinating disease, and hypoxic-ischemic, hyperoxic and traumatic brain injuries. This review provides a synopsis of the current knowledge of IL-18-dependent mechanisms of action during acute neurodegeneration in immature and adult brains.

  14. Evidence for autophagic gridlock in aging and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Mathieu F; Bakhoum, Christine Y; Ding, Zhixia; Carlton, Susan M; Campbell, Gerald A; Jackson, George R

    2014-07-01

    Autophagy is essential to neuronal homeostasis, and its impairment is implicated in the development of neurodegenerative pathology. However, the underlying mechanisms and consequences of this phenomenon remain a matter of conjecture. We show that misexpression of human tau in Drosophila induces accumulation of autophagic intermediates with a preponderance of large vacuoles, which we term giant autophagic bodies (GABs), which are reminiscent of dysfunctional autophagic entities. Lowering basal autophagy reduces GABs, whereas increasing autophagy decreases mature autolysosomes. Induction of autophagy is also associated with rescue of the tauopathy phenotype, suggesting that formation of GABs may be a compensatory mechanism rather than a trigger of neurodegeneration. Last, we show that the peculiar Biondi bodies observed in the choroid epithelium of both elderly and Alzheimer's disease human brains express immunoreactive markers similar to those of GABs. Collectively, these data indicate that autophagic gridlock contributes to the development of pathology in aging and neurodegeneration. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Treatment failure in major depression associated with chronic inflammation of the immune system : a psychoneuroimmunological hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Rodríguez, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) fails to respond in 30%-50% of the cases, triggering researchers to dig deeper into the neurobiological underpinnings of depression. This has put the immune system in the spotlight and induced the formulation of the “cytokine hypothesis of depression”. The current literature demonstrates an association between antidepressant action and cytokine function in MDD, suggesting that the lack of clinical benefit of antidepressants is, ...

  16. Ocular inflammation in the setting of concomitant systemic autoimmune conditions in an older male population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Alexandra E.; McManus, Katherine T.; McClellan, Allison L.; Davis, Janet; Goldhardt, Raquel; Galor, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This retrospective cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the frequency and types of inflammatory ocular manifestations of specific systemic autoimmune diseases in a South Florida Veterans Affairs Hospital population. Methods Demographic and medical diagnosis information was extracted from the Veterans Administration database for 1225 patients. These patients were seen in Miami and Broward Veterans Affairs hospitals between 4/18/2008 and 4/17/2013 and were diagnosed with at least one of the following: systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoid, rheumatoid arthritis, polymyalgia rheumatica, Takayasu arteritis, giant cell arteritis, Kawasaki disease, polyarteritis nodosa, Buerger disease, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, Behcet syndrome, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, other polyarteritis nodosa associated vasculitides, or arteritis NOS. Results Of 1225 patients, 618 were seen in the VA eye clinic, and 25 were diagnosed with concomitant inflammatory ocular conditions. Uveitis was the most common, and included 8 cases of anterior, 1 anterior-intermediate, 1 intermediate, 2 panuveitis, and 3 unspecified. Other manifestations included 7 cases of keratitis and 2 each of scleritis, episcleritis and AION. The overall frequency of inflammatory ocular disease was 2%. The diseases associated with the highest frequency of ocular involvement were granulomatosis with polyangiitis (1/8), sarcoid (9/198), giant cell arteritis (2/68), and rheumatoid arthritis (11/576). Of these 25 patients, 9 were diagnosed with eye prior to systemic disease. Conclusions In this population, ocular manifestations were rarely the presenting feature of systemic disease, but autoimmune disorders are an important underlying cause of inflammatory eye disease that should be considered on first evaluation, even in this “non-traditional”, predominantly male, autoimmune disease population. PMID:26053887

  17. Central Nervous System and Innate Immune Mechanisms for Inflammation- and Cancer-induced Anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Ruud, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Anyone who has experienced influenza or a bacterial infection knows what it means to be ill. Apart from feeling feverish, experiencing aching joints and muscles, you lose the desire to eat. Anorexia, defined as loss of appetite or persistent satiety leading to reduced energy intake, is a hallmark of acute inflammatory disease. The anorexia is part of the acute phase response, triggered as the result of activation of the innate immune system with concomitant release of inflammatory mediators, ...

  18. Sorbus alnifolia protects dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Se-Myeong; Jang, Insoo; Lee, Myon-Hee; Kim, Dae Keun; Jeon, Hoon; Cha, Dong Seok

    2017-12-01

    The twigs of Sorbus alnifolia (Sieb. et Zucc.) K. Koch (Rosaceae) have been used to treat neurological disorders as a traditional medicine in Korea. However, there are limited data describing the efficacy of S. alnifolia in Parkinson's disease (PD). This study was conducted to identify the protective effects of the methanol extracts of S. alnifolia (MESA) on the dopaminergic (DA) neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans. To test the neuroprotective action of MESA, viability assay was performed after 48 h exposure to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MMP + ) in PC12 cells and C. elegans (400 μM and 2 mM of MMP + , respectively). Fluorescence intensity was quantified using transgenic mutants such as BZ555 (Pdat-1::GFP) and and UA57 (Pdat-1::GFP and Pdat-1::CAT-2) to determine MESA's effects on DA neurodegeneration in C. elegans. Aggregation of α-synuclein was observed using NL5901 strain (unc-54p::α-synuclein::YFP). MESA's protective effects on the DA neuronal functions were examined by food-sensing assay. Lifespan assay was conducted to test the effects of MESA on the longevity. MESA restored MPP + -induced loss of viability in both PC12 cells and C. elegans (85.8% and 54.9%, respectively). In C. elegans, MESA provided protection against chemically and genetically-induced DA neurodegeneration, respectively. Moreover, food-sensing functions were increased 58.4% by MESA in the DA neuron degraded worms. MESA also prolonged the average lifespan by 25.6%. However, MESA failed to alter α-synuclein aggregation. These results revealed that MESA protects DA neurodegeneration and recovers diminished DA neuronal functions, thereby can be a valuable candidate for the treatment of PD.

  19. Glucocorticoids and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Rainer H; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that once bound to their receptor interact with the DNA binding domain. Almost 1000-2000 genes are sensitive to their effects, including immune/inflammatory response genes. However, their role in pathophysiology and therapy is still debated. We performed a literature survey using the key words glucocorticoids, inflammation, autoimmune disease, rheumatology and adrenal glands in order to define important targets for this review on glucocorticoids. Considering endogenous/exogenous glucocorticoids in chronic inflammatory diseases brought up five major points for discussion: inadequately low production of endogenous cortisol relative to systemic inflammation (the disproportion principle); changes of the systemic and local cortisol-to-cortisone shuttle (reactivation and degradation of cortisol); inflammation-induced glucocorticoid resistance; highlights of present glucocorticoid therapy; and the role of circadian rhythms in action of cortisol. Much of this information becomes understandable in the context of neurohormonal energy regulation as recently summarized. The optimization of long-term low-dose glucocorticoid therapy in chronic inflammatory diseases arises from the understanding of the above mentioned aspects. Since glucocorticoid resistance is a consequence of inflammation, adequate anti-inflammatory therapy is mandatory. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The Immune System and the Role of Inflammation in Perinatal Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff-Gelman, Philippe; Mancilla-Herrera, Ismael; Flores-Ramos, Mónica; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; García-Cuétara, María Del Pilar; Bugnot-Pérez, Marielle Danitza; Pulido-Ascencio, David Ellioth

    2016-08-01

    Major depression during pregnancy is a common psychiatric disorder that arises from a complex and multifactorial etiology. Psychosocial stress, sex, hormones, and genetic vulnerability increase the risk for triggering mood disorders. Microglia and toll-like receptor 4 play a crucial role in triggering wide and varied stress-induced responses mediated through activation of the inflammasome; this leads to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, increased serotonin metabolism, and reduction of neurotransmitter availability along with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity. Dysregulation of this intricate neuroimmune communication network during pregnancy modifies the maternal milieu, enhancing the emergence of depressive symptoms and negative obstetric and neuropsychiatric outcomes. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the role of the innate immune system in major depression, it is still unclear how the placenta, the brain, and the monoaminergic and neuroendocrine systems interact during perinatal depression. Thus, in the present review we describe the cellular and molecular interactions between these systems in major depression during pregnancy, proposing that the same stress-related mechanisms involved in the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in microglia and peripheral myeloid cells in depressed patients operate in a similar fashion in the neuroimmune placenta during perinatal depression. Thus, activation of Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome in placental immune cells may promote a shift of the Th1/Th2 bias towards a predominant Th1/Th17 inflammatory response, associated with increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, among other secreted autocrine and paracrine mediators, which play a crucial role in triggering and/or exacerbating depressive symptoms during pregnancy.

  1. Effects of escin on acute inflammation and the immune system in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Fu, Fenghua; Zhang, Leiming; Han, Bin; Zhu, Mei; Zhang, Xiumei

    2009-01-01

    Escin has been used extensively to treat chronic venous insufficiency, hemorrhoids, and edema resulting from cerebral ischemic damage, trauma or operation. However, no studies have looked at the anti-inflammatory properties of escin administered by intravenous injection, and it is still not clear whether escin has an effect on the immune system. This study seeks to investigate the time-dependent anti-inflammatory properties of escin and its effect on the immune system. The anti-inflammatory effect of escin was observed in carrageenan-induced paw edema and acetic acid-induced capillary permeability in mice. The immunopharmacological effects of escin were evaluated by spleen index (SI), thymus index (TI), proliferative capacity of splenocytes (PS), lymphocyte count (LC), serum TNF-alpha levels, and phagocytic rate (PR) in mice. Escin treatment showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect, similar to that seen with dexamethasone treatment. However, the duration of the anti-inflammatory response was longer with escin treatment than with dexamethasone treatment. The results also demonstrated that escin had no significant effects on SI, TI, LC, PS, TNF-alpha levels, and PR. The findings suggest that escin is a potent anti-inflammatory drug with long-lasting anti-inflammatory effects and without any immunosuppressive effects.

  2. Systemic inflammation markers in patients with aggressive periodontitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dong; Meng, Huanxin; Xu, Li; Zhang, Li; Chen, Zhibin; Feng, Xianghui; Lu, Ruifang; Sun, Xiaojun; Ren, Xiuyun

    2008-12-01

    The association between periodontitis and systemic health is evident; however, until recently, there was a lack of scientific evidence to define the relationship between aggressive periodontitis (AgP) and systemic conditions. The aim of this study was to explore the characteristics of peripheral blood cellular and serum protein parameters in patients with AgP. Patients with AgP (n = 150) and healthy controls (n = 94) were recruited. Clinical parameters, including probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and percentage of severe sites, were examined. Blood cell variables, including leukocyte, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts, as well as serum protein parameters, including total protein, albumin, globulin, and albumin/globulin ratio, were analyzed. Elevated neutrophil numbers and serum globulin levels were observed in patients with AgP compared to controls (4.22 +/- 1.81 x 10(9)/l versus 3.20 +/- 0.91 x 10(9)/l and 29.20 +/- 3.75 g/l versus 27.17 +/- 3.32 g/l, respectively; P periodontal destruction.

  3. The Dynamic cerebral autoregulatory adaptive response to noradrenaline is attenuated during systemic inflammation in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M. G.; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Bailey, Damian M.

    2015-01-01

    and repeated after a 4-h intravenous LPS infusion. The assessments of dCA were based on transfer function analysis of spontaneous oscillations between MAP and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the low frequency range (0.07-0.20 Hz). Prior to LPS.......81-0.97) cm/mmHg per s; P = 0.46) nor phase (1.10 (1.04-1.30) vs 1.37 (1.23-1.51) radians; P = 0.64). The improvement of dCA to a steady state increase in MAP is attenuated during an LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response. This may suggest that vasopressor treatment with noradrenaline offers no additional...

  4. Hip Inflammation MRI Scoring System (HIMRISS) to predict response to hyaluronic acid injection in hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deseyne, Nicolas; Conrozier, Thierry; Lellouche, Henri

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess predictors of response, according to hip MRI inflammatory scoring system (HIMRISS), in a sample of patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) treated by hyaluronic acid (HA) injection. METHOD: Sixty patients with hip OA were included. Clinical outcomes were assessed at baseline...... and three months after HA injection by WOMAC. On hip MRI performed before HA injection, bone marrow lesion (BML) and synovitis were assessed by HIMRISS by four readers. The inter-reader reliability of HIMRISS was for HIMRISS total, acetabular BML, femoral BML and synovitis-effusion respectively 0.86, 0.......64, 0.83 and 0.78. Associations between MRI features and clinical data were assessed. Logistic regression (univariate and multivariate) was used to explore associations between MRI features and response to HA injection, according to WOMAC50 response at three months. RESULTS: In total, 45.5% of patients...

  5. Systemic inflammation in progressive multiple sclerosis involves follicular T-helper, Th17- and activated B-cells and correlates with progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeppe Romme Christensen

    Full Text Available Pathology studies of progressive multiple sclerosis (MS indicate a major role of inflammation including Th17-cells and meningeal inflammation with ectopic lymphoid follicles, B-cells and plasma cells, the latter indicating a possible role of the newly identified subset of follicular T-helper (TFH cells. Although previous studies reported increased systemic inflammation in progressive MS it remains unclear whether systemic inflammation contributes to disease progression and intrathecal inflammation. This study aimed to investigate systemic inflammation in progressive MS and its relationship with disease progression, using flow cytometry and gene expression analysis of CD4(+ and CD8(+T-cells, B-cells, monocytes and dendritic cells. Furthermore, gene expression of cerebrospinal fluid cells was studied. Flow cytometry studies revealed increased frequencies of ICOS(+TFH-cells in peripheral blood from relapsing-remitting (RRMS and secondary progressive (SPMS MS patients. All MS subtypes had decreased frequencies of Th1 TFH-cells, while primary progressive (PPMS MS patients had increased frequency of Th17 TFH-cells. The Th17-subset, interleukin-23-receptor(+CD4(+T-cells, was significantly increased in PPMS and SPMS. In the analysis of B-cells, we found a significant increase of plasmablasts and DC-SIGN(+ and CD83(+B-cells in SPMS. ICOS(+TFH-cells and DC-SIGN(+B-cells correlated with disease progression in SPMS patients. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood cell subsets substantiated the flow cytometry findings by demonstrating increased expression of IL21, IL21R and ICOS in CD4(+T-cells in progressive MS. Cerebrospinal fluid cells from RRMS and progressive MS (pooled SPMS and PPMS patients had increased expression of TFH-cell and plasmablast markers. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate the potential involvement of activated TFH-cells in MS. The increased frequencies of Th17-cells, activated TFH- and B-cells parallel findings

  6. Systemic inflammation in 222.841 healthy employed smokers and nonsmokers: white blood cell count and relationship to spirometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández José Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking has been linked to low-grade systemic inflammation, a known risk factor for disease. This state is reflected in elevated white blood cell (WBC count. Objective We analyzed the relationship between WBC count and smoking in healthy men and women across several age ranges who underwent preventive medical check-ups in the workplace. We also analysed the relationship between smoking and lung function. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study in 163 459 men and 59 382 women aged between 16 and 70 years. Data analysed were smoking status, WBC count, and spirometry readings. Results Total WBC showed higher counts in both male and female smokers, around 1000 to 1300 cell/ml (t test, P 1% was higher in nonsmokers for both sexes between 25 to 54 years (t test, P 1% were found to have higher WBC counts, in comparison to smokers with a normal FEV1% among similar age and BMI groups. Conclusions Smoking increases WBC count and affects lung function. The effects are evident across a wide age range, underlining the importance of initiating preventive measures as soon as an individual begins to smoke.

  7. Dietary geraniol by oral or enema administration strongly reduces dysbiosis and systemic inflammation in dextran sulphate sodium-treated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigia eDe Fazio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available (Trans-3,7-Dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol, commonly called geraniol (Ge-OH, is an acyclic monoterpene alcohol with well-known anti-inflammatory, antitumoral and antimicrobial properties. It is widely used as a preservative in the food industry and as an antimicrobial agent in animal farming. The present study investigated the role of Ge-OH as an anti-inflammatory and anti-dysbiotic agent in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS-induced colitis mouse model. Ge-OH was orally administered to C57BL/6 mice at daily doses of 30 and 120mg kg(-1 body weight, starting six days before DSS treatment and ending the day after DSS removal. Furthermore, Ge-OH 120 mg kg(-1 dose body weight was administered via enema during the acute phase of colitis to facilitate its on-site action. The results show that orally or enema-administered Ge-OH is a powerful antimicrobial agent able to prevent colitis-associated dysbiosis and decrease the inflammatory systemic profile of colitic mice. As a whole, Ge-OH strongly improved the clinical signs of colitis and significantly reduced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression in colonocytes and in the gut wall. Ge-OH could be a powerful drug for the treatment of intestinal inflammation and dysbiosis.

  8. Short-Term Exposure to Ambient Air Pollution and Biomarkers of Systemic Inflammation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan; Dorans, Kirsten S; Wilker, Elissa H; Rice, Mary B; Ljungman, Petter L; Schwartz, Joel D; Coull, Brent A; Koutrakis, Petros; Gold, Diane R; Keaney, John F; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mittleman, Murray A

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine associations between short-term exposure to ambient air pollution and circulating biomarkers of systemic inflammation in participants from the Framingham Offspring and Third Generation cohorts in the greater Boston area. We included 3996 noncurrent smoking participants (mean age, 53.6 years; 54% women) who lived within 50 km from a central air pollution monitoring site in Boston, MA, and calculated the 1- to 7-day moving averages of fine particulate matter (diameterfactor receptor 2, which were measured up to twice for each participant; we used linear regression models for interleukin-6, fibrinogen, and tumor necrosis factor α, which were measured once. We adjusted for demographics, socioeconomic position, lifestyle, time, and weather. The 3- to 7-day moving averages of fine particulate matter (diameterfactor receptor 2. However, black carbon, sulfate, and nitrogen oxides were negatively associated with fibrinogen, and sulfate was negatively associated with tumor necrosis factor α. Higher short-term exposure to relatively low levels of ambient air pollution was associated with higher levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 but not fibrinogen or tumor necrosis factor α in individuals residing in the greater Boston area. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. A Ketogenic Formula Prevents Tumor Progression and Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Tonouchi, Hidekazu; Sasayama, Akina; Ashida, Kinya

    2018-02-14

    Low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (ketogenic diets) might prevent tumor progression and could be used as supportive therapy; however, few studies have addressed the effect of such diets on colorectal cancer. An infant formula with a ketogenic composition (ketogenic formula; KF) is used to treat patients with refractory epilepsy. We investigated the effect of KF on cancer and cancer cachexia in colon tumor-bearing mice. Mice were randomized into normal (NR), tumor-bearing (TB), and ketogenic formula (KF) groups. Colon 26 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into TB and KF mice. The NR and TB groups received a standard diet, and the KF mice received KF ad libitum . KF mice preserved their body, muscle, and carcass weights. Tumor weight and plasma IL-6 levels were significantly lower in KF mice than in TB mice. In the KF group, energy intake was significantly higher than that in the other two groups. Blood ketone body concentrations in KF mice were significantly elevated, and there was a significant negative correlation between blood ketone body concentration and tumor weight. Therefore, KF may suppress the progression of cancer and the accompanying systemic inflammation without adverse effects on weight gain, or muscle mass, which might help to prevent cancer cachexia.

  10. Systemic inflammation in patients with compromised upper airway anatomy and primary snoring or mild obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Christoph; Gouveris, Haralampos; Matthias, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to study associations between serum fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and respiratory parameters on polysomnography (PSG) in patients with snoring as their main complaint and compromised upper airway anatomy. In this retrospective study, consecutive patients (43 female and 132 male; age range 11-82 years, respiratory distress index-RDI range 0.1-94.4/h) with snoring as their main complaint and compromised upper airway anatomy who underwent PSG were assessed. Spearman's Rho coefficients between RDI, AI (apnea index), hypopnea index (HI), average and lowest SpO2 (in %) and CRP- and fibrinogen serum levels were calculated. Comparisons between groups were made using Wilcoxon-W test. Patients with CRP > 5 mg/dl (22 % of the cohort) had significantly increased RDI, AI, average and lowest SpO2 than patients with CRP 350 mg/dl (in 33 %) had significantly increased RDI, HI, AI, average and lowest SpO2 than patients with fibrinogen  5/h. Systemic inflammation is strongly associated with average and lowest SpO2, RDI and AI (and with HI) in snorers with compromised upper airway anatomy and is present even in patients with primary snoring and mild obstructive sleep apnea.

  11. A Ketogenic Formula Prevents Tumor Progression and Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Nakamura

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (ketogenic diets might prevent tumor progression and could be used as supportive therapy; however, few studies have addressed the effect of such diets on colorectal cancer. An infant formula with a ketogenic composition (ketogenic formula; KF is used to treat patients with refractory epilepsy. We investigated the effect of KF on cancer and cancer cachexia in colon tumor-bearing mice. Mice were randomized into normal (NR, tumor-bearing (TB, and ketogenic formula (KF groups. Colon 26 cells were inoculated subcutaneously into TB and KF mice. The NR and TB groups received a standard diet, and the KF mice received KF ad libitum. KF mice preserved their body, muscle, and carcass weights. Tumor weight and plasma IL-6 levels were significantly lower in KF mice than in TB mice. In the KF group, energy intake was significantly higher than that in the other two groups. Blood ketone body concentrations in KF mice were significantly elevated, and there was a significant negative correlation between blood ketone body concentration and tumor weight. Therefore, KF may suppress the progression of cancer and the accompanying systemic inflammation without adverse effects on weight gain, or muscle mass, which might help to prevent cancer cachexia.

  12. Systemic inflammation in 222.841 healthy employed smokers and nonsmokers: white blood cell count and relationship to spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José Antonio Fiz; Prats, Josép Morera; Artero, José Vicente Monsonis; Mora, Alberto Calvo; Fariñas, Anna Vazquez; Espinal, Anna; Méndez, José Antonio Gelpi

    2012-05-21

    Smoking has been linked to low-grade systemic inflammation, a known risk factor for disease. This state is reflected in elevated white blood cell (WBC) count. We analyzed the relationship between WBC count and smoking in healthy men and women across several age ranges who underwent preventive medical check-ups in the workplace. We also analysed the relationship between smoking and lung function. Cross-sectional descriptive study in 163 459 men and 59 382 women aged between 16 and 70 years. Data analysed were smoking status, WBC count, and spirometry readings. Total WBC showed higher counts in both male and female smokers, around 1000 to 1300 cell/ml (t test, P Smokers with airway obstruction measured by FEV1% were found to have higher WBC counts, in comparison to smokers with a normal FEV1% among similar age and BMI groups. Smoking increases WBC count and affects lung function. The effects are evident across a wide age range, underlining the importance of initiating preventive measures as soon as an individual begins to smoke.

  13. Cytokines as immunological markers for systemic inflammation in dogs with pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, I; Hagman, R; Johannisson, A; Wang, L; Karlstam, E; Wernersson, S

    2012-12-01

    Pyometra is a disease in dogs caused by bacterial infection of the uterus and resulting in SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) in nearly 6 of 10 cases. Clinical diagnostic criteria for SIRS are relatively unspecific, and biomarkers for the diagnosis of pyometra and SIRS in dogs are needed. Serum samples from 32 dogs were used in this study and grouped into dogs with pyometra and SIRS, dogs with pyometra without SIRS and healthy controls. The serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-15, IL-18 and TNF-α were measured using multiplex analyses. The serum concentrations of CRP (C-reactive protein) were determined using sandwich ELISA. IL-7, IL-8, IL-15, IL-18 and TNF-α were detected in >94% of samples. IL-10 was detected in 28% of samples, and IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ were undetectable. Higher serum concentrations of IL-7 (p pyometra (n = 13) as compared with healthy controls (n = 11). The concentrations of IL-8 were higher in SIRS-positive dogs with pyometra compared to the SIRS-negative group (n = 8; p pyometra compared to controls (p pyometra and a possible diagnostic value for serum CRP, IL-7, IL-15 and IL-18 in canine SIRS caused by pyometra. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Supragingival biofilm control and systemic inflammation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilana Paula Carillo ARTESE

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of strict supragingival biofilm control on serum inflammatory markers and on periodontal clinical parameters in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients with chronic severe periodontitis. Twenty-four individuals with T2DM and periodontitis were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. The supragingival therapy group (ST, n = 12 received supragingival scaling, whereas the intensive therapy group (IT, n = 12 underwent supra- and subgingival scaling, as well as root planing. Patients from both groups received professional oral hygiene instructions every month. Data regarding visible plaque index (VPI, gingival bleeding index (GBI, bleeding on probing (BOP, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, serum levels of interleukin (IL-6, IL-17A, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels were obtained at baseline and at 6 months post-therapy. Both therapies resulted in the improvement of almost all clinical periodontal parameters (p 0.05, between the two periods. However, MCP-1 levels were significantly reduced in both the ST (p = 0.034 and the IT (p = 0.016 groups, whereas the serum IL-6 levels were significantly reduced only in the IT group (p = 0.001. Strict control of supragingival biofilm has a limited effect on systemic inflammatory markers, and a moderate effect on periodontal clinical parameters.

  15. Immune system inflammation in cocaine dependent individuals: implications for medications development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen C.; D’Sa, Carrol; Kimmerling, Anne; Siedlarz, Kristen M.; Tuit, Keri L.; Stowe, Raymond; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cocaine dependence is a chronic stress state. Furthermore, both stress and substance abuse have robust and reciprocal effects on immune system cytokines, which are known to be powerful modulators of mood. We therefore examine basal and provoked changes in peripheral cytokines in cocaine dependent individuals to better understand their role in the negative reinforcing effects of cocaine. Methods Twenty-eight (16 F/12 M) treatment-seeking cocaine dependent individuals and 27 (14 F/13 M) social drinkers were exposed to three 5-min guided imagery conditions (stress, drug cue, relaxing) presented randomly across consecutive days. Measures of salivary cortisol, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were collected at baseline and various post-imagery time-points. Results Cocaine abusers demonstrated decreased basal IL-10 compared with social drinkers. They also showed significant elevations in pro-inflammatory TNFα when exposed to stress compared with when they were exposed to relaxing imagery. This was not observed in the social drinkers. Conversely, social drinkers demonstrated increases in the anti-inflammatory markers, IL-10 and IL-1ra, following exposure to cue, which were not seen in the dependent individuals. Conclusions Cocaine dependent individuals demonstrate an elevated inflammatory state both at baseline and following exposure to the stress imagery condition. Cytokines may reflect potentially novel biomarkers in addicted populations for treatment development. PMID:22389080

  16. Sustained, neuron-specific IKK/NF-κB activation generates a selective neuroinflammatory response promoting local neurodegeneration with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Ayesha; Lattke, Michael; Wirth, Thomas; Baumann, Bernd

    2013-10-12

    Increasing evidence indicates that neuroinflammation is a critical factor contributing to the progression of various neurodegenerative diseases. The IKK/NF-κB signalling system is a central regulator of inflammation, but it also affects neuronal survival and differentiation. A complex interplay between different CNS resident cells and infiltrating immune cells, which produce and respond to various inflammatory mediators, determines whether neuroinflammation is beneficial or detrimental. The IKK/NF-κB system is involved in both production of and responses to these mediators, although the precise contribution depends on the cell type as well as the cellular context, and is only partially understood. Here we investigated the specific contribution of neuronal IKK/NF-κB signalling on the regulation of neuroinflammatory processes and its consequences. To address this issue, we established and analysed a conditional gain-of-function mouse model that expresses a constitutively active allele of IKK2 in principal forebrain neurons (IKK2nCA). Proinflammatory gene and growth factor expression, histopathology, microgliosis, astrogliosis, immune cell infiltration and spatial learning were assessed at different timepoints after persistent canonical IKK2/NF-κB activation. In contrast to other cell types and organ systems, chronic IKK2/NF-κB signalling in forebrain neurons of adult IKK2nCA animals did not cause a full-blown inflammatory response including infiltration of immune cells. Instead, we found a selective inflammatory response in the dentate gyrus characterized by astrogliosis, microgliosis and Tnf-α upregulation. Furthermore, downregulation of the neurotrophic factor Bdnf correlated with a selective and progressive atrophy of the dentate gyrus and a decline in hippocampus-dependent spatial learning. Neuronal degeneration was associated with increased Fluoro-jade staining, but lacked activation of apoptosis. Remarkably, neuronal loss could be partially reversed when

  17. Association of Systemic Inflammation with Marked Changes in Particulate Air Pollution in Beijing in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Deng, Furong; Guo, Xinbiao; Lv, Peng; Zhong, Mianhua; Liu, Cuiqing; Wang, Aixia; Tzan, Kevin; Jiang, Silis Y.; Lippmann, Morton; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Lung-Chi; Sun, Qinghua

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have linked ambient fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5) air pollution to increased morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases in the general population, but the biologic mechanisms of these associations are yet to be elucidated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between daily variations in exposure to PM2.5 and inflammatory responses in mice during and for 2 months after the Beijing Olympic Games. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Beijing PM2.5 or filtered air (FA) in 2008 during the 2 months of Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games, and for 2 months after the end of the Games. During the Games, circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and interleukin 6 were increased significantly in the PM2.5 exposure group, when compared with the FA control group, although there were no significant inter-group differences in tumor necrosis factor α or interferon γ, or in macrophages, neutrophils or lymphocytes in the spleen or thymus between these 2 groups. However, macrophages were significantly increased in the lung and visceral fat with increasing PM2.5. After the Olympic Games, there were no significant PM2.5-associated differences for macrophages, neutrophils or lymphocytes in the thymus, but macrophages were significantly elevated in the lung, spleen, subcutaneous and visceral fat with increasing PM2.5, and the numbers of macrophages were even higher after than those during the Games. Moreover, the number of neutrophils was markedly higher in the spleen for the PM2.5-exposed- than the FA-group. These data suggest that short-term increases in exposure to ambient PM2.5 leads to increased systemic inflammatory responses, primarily macrophages and neutrophils in the lung, spleen, and visceral adipose tissue. Short-term air quality improvements were significantly associated with reduced overall inflammatory responses. PMID:22617750

  18. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  19. Reduced nasal nitric oxide production in cystic fibrosis patients with elevated systemic inflammation markers.

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    Ruth K Michl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitric oxide (NO is produced within the respiratory tract and can be detected in exhaled bronchial and nasal air. The concentration varies in specific diseases, being elevated in patients with asthma and bronchiectasis, but decreased in primary ciliary dyskinesia. In cystic fibrosis (CF, conflicting data exist on NO levels, which are reported unexplained as either decreased or normal. Functionally, NO production in the paranasal sinuses is considered as a location-specific first-line defence mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between upper and lower airway NO levels and blood inflammatory parameters, CF-pathogen colonisation, and clinical data. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Nasal and bronchial NO concentrations from 57 CF patients were determined using an electrochemical analyser and correlated to pathogen colonisation of the upper and lower airways which were microbiologically assessed from nasal lavage and sputum samples. Statistical analyses were performed with respect to clinical parameters (lung function, BMI, laboratory findings (CRP, leucocytes, total-IgG, fibrinogen, and anti-inflammatory and antibiotic therapy. There were significant correlations between nasal and bronchial NO levels (rho = 0.48, p<0.001, but no correlation between NO levels and specific pathogen colonisation. In patients receiving azithromycin, significantly reduced bronchial NO and a tendency to reduced nasal NO could be found. Interestingly, a significant inverse correlation of nasal NO to CRP (rho = -0.28, p = 0.04 and to leucocytes (rho = -0.41, p = 0.003 was observed. In contrast, bronchial NO levels showed no correlation to clinical or inflammatory parameters. CONCLUSION: Given that NO in the paranasal sinuses is part of the first-line defence mechanism against pathogens, our finding of reduced nasal NO in CF patients with elevated systemic inflammatory markers indicates impaired upper airway defence. This

  20. Tenascins in Retinal and Optic Nerve Neurodegeneration

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    Jacqueline Reinhard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tenascins represent key constituents of the extracellular matrix (ECM with major impact on central nervous system (CNS development. In this regard, several studies indicate that they play a crucial role in axonal growth and guidance, synaptogenesis and boundary formation. These functions are not only important during development, but also for regeneration under several pathological conditions. Additionally, tenascin-C (Tnc represents a key modulator of the immune system and inflammatory processes. In the present review article, we focus on the function of Tnc and tenascin-R (Tnr in the diseased CNS, specifically after retinal and optic nerve damage and degeneration. We summarize the current view on both tenascins in diseases such as glaucoma, retinal ischemia, age-related macular degeneration (AMD or diabetic retinopathy. In this context, we discuss their expression profile, possible functional relevance, remodeling of the interacting matrisome and tenascin receptors, especially under pathological conditions.

  1. Associations among tooth loss, systemic inflammation and antibody titers to periodontal pathogens in Japanese patients with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, N; Suzuki, J-I; Kobayashi, N; Hanatani, T; Ashigaki, N; Yoshida, A; Shiheido, Y; Sato, H; Minabe, M; Izumi, Y; Isobe, M

    2018-02-01

    It is well known that there is a strong relationship between periodontitis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Tooth loss reflects an end-stage condition of oral diseases, such as periodontitis. Infection with specific periodontal pathogens is known as a possible factor that influences development of CVD. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the number of residual teeth and systemic inflammatory conditions in patients with CVD. We divided 364 patients with CVD into four groups, according to the number of residual teeth: (i) ≥20 teeth; (ii) 10-19 teeth; (iii) 1-9 teeth; and (iv) edentulous. We recorded medical history, blood data and periodontal conditions. Serum samples were obtained and their IgG titers against three major periodontal pathogens were measured. Smoking rate and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were higher in edentulous patients and in subjects with a few teeth compared with patients with many teeth. The levels of C-reactive protein were higher in patients with 1-9 teeth than in those with 10-19 teeth and with ≥20 teeth. The level of Porphyromonas gingivalis IgG in the group with 10-19 teeth was statistically higher than that in the group with ≥20 teeth. The level of P. gingivalis IgG in the edentulous group tended to be lower than that in the other groups. The patients with 1-9 teeth had the highest level of C-reactive protein among the four groups, and the patients with 10-19 teeth had the highest level of IgG to periodontal bacteria. We conclude that the number of remaining teeth may be used to estimate the severity of systemic inflammation in patients with CVD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Menopause Is a Determinant of Breast Aromatase Expression and Its Associations With BMI, Inflammation, and Systemic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kristy A; Iyengar, Neil M; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Gucalp, Ayca; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Wang, Hanhan; Giri, Dilip D; Morrow, Monica; Falcone, Domenick J; Wendel, Nils K; Winston, Lisle A; Pollak, Michael; Dierickx, Anneloor; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2017-05-01

    Most estrogen-dependent breast cancers occur after menopause, despite low levels of circulating estrogens. Breast expression of the estrogen-biosynthetic enzyme, aromatase, is proposed to drive breast cancer development after menopause. However, the effects of menopause on breast aromatase expression are unknown. To determine the effect of menopause on breast aromatase expression in relation to body mass index (BMI), white adipose tissue inflammation (WATi), and systemic markers of metabolic dysfunction. Cross-sectional study of 102 premenopausal (age 27 to 56) and 59 postmenopausal (age 45 to 74) women who underwent mastectomy for breast cancer treatment/prevention. Breast tissue was assessed for the presence of crown-like structures and the expression and activity of aromatase. Systemic markers examined include interleukin (IL)-6, insulin, glucose, leptin, adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), cholesterol, and triglycerides. Multivariable analysis was performed for aromatase messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to BMI, WATi, and blood markers. Postmenopausal women had higher BMI and more breast WATi than premenopausal women. Fasting levels of IL-6, glucose, leptin, hsCRP, and homeostatic model assessment 2 insulin resistance score were higher in the postmenopausal group. BMI was positively correlated with aromatase mRNA in both pre- and postmenopausal women. Aromatase levels were higher in breast tissue of postmenopausal women, with levels being higher in inflamed vs noninflamed, independent of BMI. Adipocyte diameter and levels of leptin, hsCRP, adiponectin, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were more strongly correlated with aromatase in postmenopausal than premenopausal women. Elevated aromatase in the setting of adipose dysfunction provides a possible mechanism for the higher incidence of hormone-dependent breast cancer in obese women after menopause. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  3. Assaying locomotor, learning, and memory deficits in Drosophila models of neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Yousuf O; Escala, Wilfredo; Ruan, Kai; Zhai, R Grace

    2011-03-11

    Advances in genetic methods have enabled the study of genes involved in human neurodegenerative diseases using Drosophila as a model system. Most of these diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease are characterized by age-dependent deterioration in learning and memory functions and movement coordination. Here we use behavioral assays, including the negative geotaxis assay and the aversive phototaxic suppression assay (APS assay), to show that some of the behavior characteristics associated with human neurodegeneration can be recapitulated in flies. In the negative geotaxis assay, the natural tendency of flies to move against gravity when agitated is utilized to study genes or conditions that may hinder locomotor capacities. In the APS assay, the learning and memory functions are tested in positively-phototactic flies trained to associate light with aversive bitter taste and hence avoid this otherwise natural tendency to move toward light. Testing these trained flies 6 hours post-training is used to assess memory functions. Using these assays, the contribution of any genetic or environmental factors toward developing neurodegeneration can be easily studied in flies.

  4. Uncoupling of Protein Aggregation and Neurodegeneration in a Mouse Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo-Yong; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Li, Ming; Kapur, Meghan; Choi, Su Jin; Kim, Hak-June; Park, Song-Yi; Zhu, Haining; Yao, Tso-Pang

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of protein aggregates is a pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although a buildup of protein aggregates frequently leads to cell death, whether it is the key pathogenic factor in driving neurodegenerative disease remains controversial. HDAC6, a cytosolic ubiquitin-binding deacetylase, has emerged as an important regulator of ubiquitin-dependent quality control autophagy, a lysosome-dependent degradative system responsible for the disposal of misfolded protein aggregates and damaged organelles. Here, we show that in cell models HDAC6 plays a protective role against multiple disease-associated and aggregation-prone cytosolic proteins by facilitating their degradation. We further show that HDAC6 is required for efficient localization of lysosomes to protein aggregates, indicating that lysosome targeting to autophagic substrates is regulated. Supporting a critical role of HDAC6 in protein aggregate disposal in vivo, genetic ablation of HDAC6 in a transgenic SOD1G93A mouse, a model of ALS, leads to dramatic accumulation of ubiquitinated SOD1G93A protein aggregates. Surprisingly, despite a robust buildup of SOD1G93A aggregates, deletion of HDAC6 only moderately modified the motor phenotypes. These findings indicate that SOD1G93A aggregation is not the only determining factor to drive neurodegeneration in ALS, and that HDAC6 likely modulates neurodegeneration through additional mechanisms beyond protein aggregate clearance. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. PATHOBIOLOGY OF NEURODEGENERATION: THE ROLE FOR ASTROGLIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Zorec, Robert; Rodriguez, Jose J; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The common denominator of neurodegenerative diseases, which mainly affect humans, is the progressive death of neural cells resulting in neurological and cognitive deficits. Astroglial cells are the central elements of the homoeostasis, defence and regeneration of the central nervous system, and their malfunction or reactivity contribute to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Pathological remodelling of astroglia in neurodegenerative context is multifaceted. Both astroglial atrophy with a loss of function and astroglial reactivity have been identified in virtually all the forms of neurodegenerative disorders. Astroglia may represent a novel target for therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing and possibly curing neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  7. Vascular Changes and Neurodegeneration in the Early Stages of Diabetic Retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Karoline Boegeberg; Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Grauslund, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Neurodegeneration is an early component of diabetic retinopathy (DR). It is unclear whether neurodegeneration is an independent factor or a consequence of damaged retinal vasculature. The aims of this study were to review the literature concerning neurodegeneration in diabetic...... neurodegeneration in patients with no or mild DR as compared to healthy controls. Outcome measures were mean retinal thickness (RT), mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness and ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness. Also, mfERG amplitude and implicit time were analyzed. RESULTS: Eleven studies which used mf...

  8. Deletion of macrophage-inflammatory protein 1 alpha retards neurodegeneration in Sandhoff disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Ping; Proia, Richard L

    2004-06-01

    Sandhoff disease is a prototypical lysosomal storage disorder in which a heritable deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme, beta-hexosaminidase, results in the storage of the enzyme's substrates in lysosomes. As with many of the other lysosomal storage diseases, neurodegeneration is a prominent feature. Although the cellular and molecular pathways that underlie the neurodegenerative process are not yet fully understood, macrophage/microglial-mediated inflammation has been suggested as one possible mechanism. We now show that the expanded macrophage/microglial population in the CNS of Sandhoff disease mice is compounded by the infiltration of cells from the periphery. Coincident with the cellular infiltration was an increased expression of macrophage-inflammatory protein 1alpha (MIP-1alpha), a leukocyte chemokine, in astrocytes. Deletion of MIP-1alpha expression resulted in a substantial decrease in infiltration and macrophage/microglial-associated pathology together with neuronal apoptosis in Sandhoff disease mice. These mice without MIP-1alpha showed improved neurologic status and a longer lifespan. The results indicate that the pathogenesis of Sandhoff disease involves an increase in MIP-1alpha that induces monocytes to infiltrate the CNS, expand the activated macrophage/microglial population, and trigger apoptosis of neurons, resulting in a rapid neurodegenerative course.

  9. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in plasma is associated with preeclampsia risk in Peruvian women with systemic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muy-Rivera, Martin; Sanchez, Sixto E; Vadachkoria, Surab; Qiu, Chunfang; Bazul, Victor; Williams, Michelle A

    2004-04-01

    In a case-control study of 100 preeclamptics and 100 controls, we assessed plasma transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) concentrations in relation to preeclampsia risk among Peruvian women with and without systemic inflammation. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The OR of preeclampsia increased across quartiles of TGF-beta1 concentrations. Women with elevated TGF-beta1 and a proinflammatory profile experienced the highest risk of preeclampsia (OR = 15.4, 95% CI 4.7-50.4). Our results confirm an association between TGF-beta1 and risk of preeclampsia and extend the literature by indicating a strong association in women with systemic inflammation.

  10. BAFF knockout improves systemic inflammation via regulating adipose tissue distribution in high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Hwan; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2015-01-16

    Obesity is recognized as a chronic low-grade inflammatory state due to adipose tissue expansion being accompanied by an increase in the production of proinflammatory adipokines. Our group is the first to report that B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is produced from adipocytes and functions as a proinflammatory adipokine. Here, we investigated how loss of BAFF influenced diet-induced obesity in mice by challenging BAFF(-/-) mice with a high-fat diet for 10 weeks. The results demonstrated that weight gain in BAFF(-/-) mice was >30% than in control mice, with a specific increase in the fat mass of the subcutaneous region rather than the abdominal region. Expression of lipogenic genes was examined by quantitative real-time PCR, and increased lipogenesis was observed in the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), whereas lipogenesis in the epididymal adipose tissue (EAT) was reduced. A significant decrease in EAT mass resulted in the downregulation of inflammatory gene expression in EAT, and more importantly, overall levels of inflammatory cytokines in the circulation were reduced in obese BAFF(-/-) mice. We also observed that the macrophages recruited in the enlarged SAT were predominantly M2 macrophages. 3T3-L1 adipocytes were cultured with adipose tissue conditioned media (ATCM), demonstrating that EAT ATCM from BAFF(-/-) mice contains antilipogenic and anti-inflammatory properties. Taken together, BAFF(-/-) improved systemic inflammation by redistributing adipose tissue into subcutaneous regions. Understanding the mechanisms by which BAFF regulates obesity in a tissue-specific manner would provide therapeutic opportunities to target obesity-related chronic diseases.

  11. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S., E-mail: rozekl@umich.edu

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity.

  12. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity

  13. Inflammation-related cancer or cancer-related inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    T.G, Shrihari

    2018-01-01

    Inflammationis the body’s defensive action against various stimuli such as physical orchemical or infectious agents. Acute inflammation and their mediators help intissue repair and healing. If the inflammation aggravates chronically,non-resolved, dysregulated immune system, results release of various inflammatorymediators such as free radicals (ROS and RNS), cytokines, chemokines, growthfactors and proteolytic enzymes produced by innate and adaptive immune cellsactivate transcriptional factor...

  14. Huntingtin interacting proteins are genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S Kaltenbach

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by expansion of the polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin (Htt protein. Neuronal toxicity in HD is thought to be, at least in part, a consequence of protein interactions involving mutant Htt. We therefore hypothesized that genetic modifiers of HD neurodegeneration should be enriched among Htt protein interactors. To test this idea, we identified a comprehensive set of Htt interactors using two complementary approaches: high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screening and affinity pull down followed by mass spectrometry. This effort led to the identification of 234 high-confidence Htt-associated proteins, 104 of which were found with the yeast method and 130 with the pull downs. We then tested an arbitrary set of 60 genes encoding interacting proteins for their ability to behave as genetic modifiers of neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of HD. This high-content validation assay showed that 27 of 60 orthologs tested were high-confidence genetic modifiers, as modification was observed with more than one allele. The 45% hit rate for genetic modifiers seen among the interactors is an order of magnitude higher than the 1%-4% typically observed in unbiased genetic screens. Genetic modifiers were similarly represented among proteins discovered using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down/mass spectrometry methods, supporting the notion that these complementary technologies are equally useful in identifying biologically relevant proteins. Interacting proteins confirmed as modifiers of the neurodegeneration phenotype represent a diverse array of biological functions, including synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal organization, signal transduction, and transcription. Among the modifiers were 17 loss-of-function suppressors of neurodegeneration, which can be considered potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we show that seven interacting proteins from among 11 tested were able to

  15. Crystals, inflammation, and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Ann K

    2011-03-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are common components of osteoarthritic joint fluids and tissues. Why these crystals form and how they contribute to joint damage in osteoarthritis remain unclear. With renewed interest in inflammation as a key component of osteoarthritis the role of calcium-containing crystals in this common disease warrants re-examination. There is ample evidence supporting a pathogenic role for inflammation in osteoarthritis, and the innate immune system likely participates in this inflammatory process. Recent work reinforces the almost universal existence of calcium-containing crystals in tissues from patients with end-stage osteoarthritis. Calcium-containing crystals may contribute to inflammation in osteoarthritis tissues through their direct interactions with components of the innate immune system, as well as by inducing or amplifying other inflammatory signals. There is increasing evidence that calcium-containing crystals contribute to osteoarthritis and their inflammatory properties may mediate detrimental effects through innate immunity signals. Calcium-containing crystals may thus represent important therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis.

  16. Allergic Respiratory Inflammation and Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, Kawa

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and rhinitis are inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract. Respiratory inflammation of the adaptive and innate immune system is the focus of this review, and chronic inflammation is not limited to the respiratory tissue. The inflammatory response, which consists of phagocytes, eosinophils, mast cells, and lymphocytes, spreads along the respiratory tract, leading to tissue damage. Mast cells and eosinophils are commonly recognized for their detrimental role in allergic reactions o...

  17. Endometriosis and possible inflammation markers

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Hsing Wu; Kuei-Yang Hsiao; Shaw-Jenq Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. Infiltration of peritoneal macrophages and local proinflammatory mediators in the peritoneal microenvironment affect ovarian function and pelvic anatomy leading to the symptoms and signs of endometriosis. The identification of a noninvasive marker for endometriosis will facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. This review provides an overview of local microenvironmental inflammation and systemic inflam...

  18. Circulating surfactant protein -D is low and correlates negatively with systemic inflammation in early, untreated rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2010-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collectin with immuno-regulatory functions, which may depend on oligomerization. Anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory properties have been attributed to multimeric SP-D variants, while trimeric subunits per se have been suggested to enhance inflammation. Previously...

  19. Toward Omics-Based, Systems Biomedicine, and Path and Drug Discovery Methodologies for Depression-Inflammation Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, Michael; Nowak, Gabriel; Caso, Javier R.; Carlos Leza, Juan; Song, Cai; Kubera, Marta; Klein, Hans; Galecki, Piotr; Noto, Cristiano; Glaab, Enrico; Balling, Rudi; Berk, Michael

    Meta-analyses confirm that depression is accompanied by signs of inflammation including increased levels of acute phase proteins, e.g., C-reactive protein, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interleukin-6. Supporting the translational significance of this, a meta-analysis showed that

  20. Transgenic rat model of neurodegeneration caused by mutation in the TDP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Chen, Han; Wang, Dian; Landel, Carlisle P; Xia, Pedro Yuxing; Bowser, Robert; Liu, Yong-Jian; Xia, Xu Gang

    2010-03-26

    TDP-43 proteinopathies have been observed in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 (i.e., TDP) have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in frontotemporal lobe degeneration associated with motor neuron disease. To study the consequences of TDP mutation in an intact system, we created transgenic rats expressing normal human TDP or a mutant form of human TDP with a M337V substitution. Overexpression of mutant, but not normal, TDP caused widespread neurodegeneration that predominantly affected the motor system. TDP mutation reproduced ALS phenotypes in transgenic rats, as seen by progressive degeneration of motor neurons and denervation atrophy of skeletal muscles. This robust rat model also recapitulated features of TDP-43 proteinopathies including the formation of TDP-43 inclusions, cytoplasmic localization of phosphorylated TDP-43, and fragmentation of TDP-43 protein. TDP transgenic rats will be useful for deciphering the mechanisms underlying TDP-43-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Human metabolic response to systemic inflammation: assessment of the concordance between experimental endotoxemia and clinical cases of sepsis/SIRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Haimovich, Beatrice; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Langley, Raymond J; Kingsmore, Stephen F; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2015-03-03

    . Compared with earlier studies which focused exclusively on comparing transcriptional dynamics, the distinct metabolomic responses to systemic inflammation with or without confirmed infection, suggest that the metabolome is much better at differentiating these pathophysiologies. Finally, the metabolic changes in the recovering patients shift towards the LPS-induced response pattern strengthening the notion that the metabolic, as well as transcriptional responses, characteristic to the endotoxemia model represent necessary and "healthy" responses to infectious stimuli.

  2. Systemic Administration of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Extracellular Vesicles Ameliorates Aspergillus Hyphal Extract-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in Immunocompetent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Fernanda F; Borg, Zachary D; Goodwin, Meagan; Sokocevic, Dino; Wagner, Darcy E; Coffey, Amy; Antunes, Mariana; Robinson, Kristen L; Mitsialis, S Alex; Kourembanas, Stella; Thane, Kristen; Hoffman, Andrew M; McKenna, David H; Rocco, Patricia R M; Weiss, Daniel J

    2015-11-01

    An increasing number of studies demonstrate that administration of either conditioned media (CM) or extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow and other sources are as effective as the MSCs themselves in mitigating inflammation and injury. The goal of the current study was to determine whether xenogeneic administration of CM or EVs from human bone marrow-derived MSCs would be effective in a model of mixed Th2/Th17, neutrophilic-mediated allergic airway inflammation, reflective of severe refractory asthma, induced by repeated mucosal exposure to Aspergillus hyphal extract (AHE) in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice. Systemic administration of both CM and EVs isolated from human and murine MSCs, but not human lung fibroblasts, at the onset of antigen challenge in previously sensitized mice significantly ameliorated the AHE-provoked increases in airway hyperreactivity (AHR), lung inflammation, and the antigen-specific CD4 T-cell Th2 and Th17 phenotype. Notably, both CM and EVs from human MSCs (hMSCs) were generally more potent than those from mouse MSCs (mMSCs) in most of the outcome measures. The weak cross-linking agent 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl]carbodiimide hydrochloride was found to inhibit release of both soluble mediators and EVs, fully negating effects of systemically administered hMSCs but only partly inhibited the ameliorating effects of mMSCs. These results demonstrate potent xenogeneic effects of CM and EVs from hMSCs in an immunocompetent mouse model of allergic airway inflammation and they also show differences in mechanisms of action of hMSCs versus mMSCs to mitigate AHR and lung inflammation in this model. There is a growing experience demonstrating benefit of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapies in preclinical models of asthma. In the current study, conditioned media (CM) and, in particular, the extracellular vesicle fraction obtained from the CM were as potent as the MSCs

  3. Endotoxin-induced and vaccine-induced systemic inflammation both impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but not pulse wave reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lars Lind,1 Johannes Hulthe,2,3 Annika Johansson,3 Ewa Hedner31Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, 2Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg, 3AstraZeneca Research and Development, Mölndal, SwedenBackground: Inflammation induced by either endotoxin or vaccination has previously been shown to impair endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDV in healthy young individuals. However, the vascular effects of these two mechanisms of inducing inflammation have not been compared in the same individuals.Methods: Twelve young healthy males were studied at the same time of the day on three occasions in a random order; on one occasion 4 hours following an endotoxin injection (Escherichia coli endotoxin, 20 IU/kg, on another occasion 8 hours following vaccination against Salmonella typhi, and on a third occasion 4 hours following a saline control injection. EDV and endothelium-independent vasodilation (EIDV were evaluated by local infusions of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in the brachial artery, and forearm blood flow was measured with venous occlusion plethysmography. The augmentation index was determined by pulse wave analysis as an index of pulse wave reflection.Results: Both endotoxin and vaccination impaired EDV to a similar degree compared with the saline control (P = 0.005 and P = 0.014, respectively. EIDV was not significantly affected by inflammation. Endotoxin, but not vaccination, increased body temperature and circulating levels of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and interleukin-6. Augmentation index was not affected by the interventions.Conclusion: Despite the fact that endotoxin induced a more pronounced degree of inflammation than vaccination, both inflammatory challenges impaired EDV to a similar degree, supporting the view that different inflammatory stimuli could induce harmful effects on the vasculature.Keywords: endothelium, endotoxin, vaccination, vasodilation, inflammation

  4. Withanolide A prevents neurodegeneration by modulating hippocampal glutathione biosynthesis during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iswar Baitharu

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone

  5. Withanolide A prevents neurodegeneration by modulating hippocampal glutathione biosynthesis during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner.

  6. Can inhaled fluticasone alone or in combination with salmeterol reduce systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? – study protocol for a randomized controlled trial [NCT00120978

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Warren

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic inflammation is associated with various complications in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease including weight loss, cachexia, osteoporosis, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Inhaled corticosteroids attenuate airway inflammation, reduce exacerbations, and improve mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Whether inhaled corticosteroids by themselves or in combination with a long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist repress systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is unknown. The Advair Biomarkers in COPD (ABC study will determine whether the effects of inhaled corticosteroids alone or in combination with a long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist reduce systemic inflammation and improve health status in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods/Design After a 4-week run-in phase during which patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will receive inhaled fluticasone (500 micrograms twice daily, followed by a 4-week withdrawal phase during which all inhaled corticosteroids and long acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists will be discontinued, patients will be randomized to receive fluticasone (500 micrograms twice daily, fluticasone/salmeterol combination (500/50 micrograms twice daily, or placebo for four weeks. The study will recruit 250 patients across 11 centers in western Canada. Patients must be 40 years of age or older with at least 10 pack-year smoking history and have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease defined as forced expiratory volume in one second to vital capacity ratio of 0.70 or less and forced expiratory volume in one second that is 80% of predicted or less. Patients will be excluded if they have any known chronic systemic infections, inflammatory conditions, history of previous solid organ transplantation, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular accident within the past 3 months prior to study enrolment. The primary end-point is serum C

  7. Pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic adipose tissues contribute to systemic inflammation and calcified coronary atherosclerosis independent of body fat composition, anthropometric measures and traditional cardiovascular risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chun-Ho; Lin, Tin-Yu; Wu, Yih-Jer; Liu, Chuan-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Yeh, Hung-I.; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu; Hou, Charles Jia-Yin; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Cury, Ricardo C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Coronary atherosclerosis has traditionally been proposed to be associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and anthropometric measures. However, clinical data regarding the independent value of visceral adipose tissue in addition to such traditional predictors remains obscure. Materials and methods: We subsequently studied 719 subjects (age: 48.1 ± 8.3 years, 25% females) who underwent multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for coronary calcium score (CCS) quantification. Baseline demographic data and anthropometric measures were taken with simultaneous body fat composition estimated. Visceral adipose tissue of pericardial and thoracic peri-aortic fat was quantified by MDCT using TeraRecon Aquarius workstation (San Mateo, CA). Traditional cardiovascular risk stratification was calculated by metabolic (NCEP ATP III) and Framingham (FRS) scores and high-sensitivity CRP (Hs-CRP) was taken to represent systemic inflammation. The independent value of visceral adipose tissue to systemic inflammation and CCS was assessed by utilizing multivariable regression analysis. Results: Of all subjects enrolled in this study, the mean values for pericardial and peri-aortic adipose tissue were 74.23 ± 27.51 and 7.23 ± 3.69 ml, respectively. Higher visceral fat quartile groups were associated with graded increase of risks for cardiovascular diseases. Both adipose burdens strongly correlated with anthropometric measures including waist circumference, body weight and body mass index (all p < 0.001). In addition, both visceral amount correlates well with ATP and FRS scores, all lipid profiles and systemic inflammation marker in terms of Hs-CRP (all p < 0.001). After adjustment for baseline variables, both visceral fat were independently related to Hs-CRP levels (all p < 0.05), but only pericardial fat exerted independent role in coronary calcium deposit. Conclusion: Both visceral adipose tissues strongly correlated with systemic inflammation beyond traditional

  8. Expression of Fos protein in the rat central nervous system in response to noxious stimulation: effects of chronic inflammation of the superior cervical ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laudanna A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the possible interactions between the nociceptive system, the sympathetic system and the inflammatory process. Thus, the superior cervical ganglion of rats was submitted to chronic inflammation and Fos expression was used as a marker for neuronal activity throughout central neurons following painful peripheral stimulation. The painful stimulus consisted of subcutaneously injected formalin applied to the supra-ocular region. Fos-positive neurons were identified by conventional immunohistochemical techniques, and analyzed from the obex through the cervical levels of the spinal cord. In the caudal sub-nucleus of the spinal trigeminal nuclear complex, the number of Fos-positive neurons was much higher in rats with inflammation of the superior cervical ganglion than in control rats, either sham-operated or with saline applied to the ganglion. There was a highly significant difference in the density of Fos-positive neurons between the inflamed and control groups. No significant difference was found between control groups. These results suggest that the inflammation of the superior cervical ganglion generated an increased responsiveness to painful stimuli, which may have been due to a diminished sympathetic influence upon the sensory peripheral innervation.

  9. Midlife systemic inflammatory markers are associated with late-life brain volume: The ARIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Keenan A; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Folsom, Aaron R; Ballantyne, Christie M; Knopman, David S; Windham, B Gwen; Jack, Clifford R; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2017-11-28

    To clarify the temporal relationship between systemic inflammation and neurodegeneration, we examined whether a higher level of circulating inflammatory markers during midlife was associated with smaller brain volumes in late life using a large biracial prospective cohort study. Plasma levels of systemic inflammatory markers (fibrinogen, albumin, white blood cell count, von Willebrand factor, and Factor VIII) were assessed at baseline in 1,633 participants (mean age 53 [5] years, 60% female, 27% African American) enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Using all 5 inflammatory markers, an inflammation composite score was created for each participant. We assessed episodic memory and regional brain volumes, using 3T MRI, 24 years later. Each SD increase in midlife inflammation composite score was associated with 1,788 mm 3 greater ventricular ( p = 0.013), 110 mm 3 smaller hippocampal ( p = 0.013), 519 mm 3 smaller occipital ( p = 0.009), and 532 mm 3 smaller Alzheimer disease signature region ( p = 0.008) volumes, and reduced episodic memory ( p = 0.046) 24 years later. Compared to participants with no elevated (4th quartile) midlife inflammatory markers, participants with elevations in 3 or more markers had, on average, 5% smaller hippocampal and Alzheimer disease signature region volumes. The association between midlife inflammation and late-life brain volume was modified by age and race, whereby younger participants and white participants with higher levels of systemic inflammation during midlife were more likely to show reduced brain volumes subsequently. Our prospective findings provide evidence for what may be an early contributory role of systemic inflammation in neurodegeneration and cognitive aging. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  10. Immunsystemet ved kronisk inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity has evolved as a defence against infections and as an important repair mechanism after physical injury. If elimination of microbes and healing is not achieved, or if the immune system is dysregulated, chronic inflammation ensues. Immune cells become engaged in prolonged...... reactions with other cell types in vessels and organs, frequently with superimposed autoreactive T-cells and autoantibody-producing B-cells/plasma cells. The processes are distinguished on the basis of clinical manifestations in organ-specific and systemic inflammatory diseases. The underlying factors...

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration are decreased or normal in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Pedersen, Lars Østergaard; Bahl, Justyna Maria Czarna

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. METHODS: Twenty-one patients with central...... that hypocretin deficiency and an abnormal sleep-wake pattern alter the turnover of these proteins in CNS....

  12. Systemic Immune-Inflammation Index Predicts the Clinical Outcome in Patients With mCRPC Treated With Abiraterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Lolli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A systemic immune-inflammation index (SII based on neutrophil (N, lymphocyte (L, and platelet (P counts has shown a prognostic impact in several solid tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic role of SII in mCRPC patients treated with abiraterone post docetaxel.Patients and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive mCRPC patients treated with abiraterone after docetaxel in our Institutions. X-tile 3.6.1 software, cut-off values of SII, NLR defined as N/L and PLR as P/L. Overall survival (OS and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. The impact of SII, PLR and NLR on OS was evaluated by Cox regression analyses and on PSA response rates were evaluated by binary logistic regression.Results: A total of 230 mCRPC patients treated abiraterone were included. SII ≥535, NLR ≥3 and PLR ≥210 were considered as elevated levels (high risk groups. The median OS was 17.3 months, 21.8 months in SII <535 group and 14.7 months in SII ≥535 (p < 0.0001. At univariate analysis ECOG performance status, previous enzalutamide, visceral metastases, SII, NLR and PLR predicted OS. In multivariate analysis, ECOG performance status, previous enzalutamide, visceral metastases, SII and NLR remained significant predictors of OS (HR = 5.08, p < 0.0001; HR = 2.12, p = 0.009, HR = 1.77, 95% p = 0.012; HR = 1.80, p = 0.002; and HR = 1.90, p = 0.001, respectively, whereas, PLR showed a borderline ability only (HR = 1.41, p = 0.068.Conclusion: SII and NLR might represent an early and easy prognostic marker in mCRPC patients treated with abiraterone. Further studies are needed to better define their impact and role in these patients.

  13. Systemic inflammation as a function of the individual and combined associations of sedentary behaviour, physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2018-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates individual associations of sedentary behaviour, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and cardiorespiratory fitness on systemic inflammation, often assessed via C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Their potential additive association on CRP, however, has not been fully evaluated, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used (N = 627 adults 20-49 years). Sedentary behaviour and MVPA were objectively assessed (accelerometry) with cardiorespiratory fitness determined from a submaximal treadmill-based test. Participants were classified as above or below the median values for each of these three parameters, with a PACS (Physical Activity Cardiorespiratory Sedentary) score ranging from 0 to 3, indicating the participant number of these three positive characteristics. A blood sample was obtained from each participant to assess CRP via latex-enhanced nephelometry. Above median sedentary behaviour (OR = 1·04; 95% CI: 0·65-1·66) was not associated with elevated (>0·3 mg dl -1 ) CRP, but above median MVPA (OR = 0·62; 95% CI: 0·40-0·97) and above median VO 2max (OR = 0·61; 95% CI: 0·40-0·93) were associated with a reduced odds of having an elevated CRP. With regard to the additive model, and after adjustment, the odds ratios (95% CI) for the PACS score of 1 (versus 0), 2 (versus 0) and 3 (versus 0), respectively, were 0·59 (0·34-1·05; P = 0·07), 0·60 (0·31-1·15; P = 0·11) and 0·34 (0·12-0·97; P = 0·04). Cardiorespiratory fitness and MVPA, but not sedentary behaviour, were independently associated with reduced odds of elevated CRP. Adults with all three characteristics, however, had the lowest odds of elevated CRP. © 2016 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Longitudinal associations of long-term exposure to ultrafine particles with blood pressure and systemic inflammation in Puerto Rican adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlin, Laura; Woodin, Mark; Hart, Jaime E; Simon, Matthew C; Gute, David M; Stowell, Joanna; Tucker, Katherine L; Durant, John L; Brugge, Doug

    2018-04-05

    Few longitudinal studies have examined the association between ultrafine particulate matter (UFP, particles blood pressure and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, a biomarker of systemic inflammation). Residential annual average UFP exposure (measured as particle number concentration, PNC) was assigned using a model accounting for spatial and temporal trends. We also adjusted PNC values for participants' inhalation rate to obtain the particle inhalation rate (PIR) as a secondary exposure measure. Multilevel linear models with a random intercept for each participant were used to examine the association of UFP with blood pressure and hsCRP. Overall, in adjusted models, an inter-quartile range increase in PNC was associated with increased hsCRP (β = 6.8; 95% CI = - 0.3, 14.0%) but not with increased systolic blood pressure (β = 0.96; 95% CI = - 0.33, 2.25 mmHg), pulse pressure (β = 0.70; 95% CI = - 0.27, 1.67 mmHg), or diastolic blood pressure (β = 0.55; 95% CI = - 0.20, 1.30 mmHg). There were generally stronger positive associations among women and never smokers. Among men, there were inverse associations of PNC with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. In contrast to the primary findings, an inter-quartile range increase in the PIR was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (β = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.00, 2.06 mmHg) and diastolic blood pressure (β = 1.01; 95% CI = 0.36, 1.66 mmHg), but not with pulse pressure or hsCRP. We observed that exposure to PNC was associated with increases in measures of CVD risk markers, especially among certain sub-populations. The exploratory PIR exposure metric should be further developed.

  15. Lamin in inflammation and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Joseph R; Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Zheng, Yixian

    2016-06-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive loss of tissue function and an increased susceptibility to injury and disease. Many age-associated pathologies manifest an inflammatory component, and this has led to the speculation that aging is at least in part caused by some form of inflammation. However, whether or not inflammation is truly a cause of aging, or is a consequence of the aging process is unknown. Recent work using Drosophila has uncovered a mechanism where the progressive loss of lamin-B in the fat body upon aging triggers systemic inflammation. This inflammatory response perturbs the local immune response of the neighboring gut tissue and leads to hyperplasia. Here, we will discuss the literature connecting lamins to aging and inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from genesis to senescence: the influence of LCPUFA on neural development, aging, and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Carola I F; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2014-01-01

    Many clinical and animal studies demonstrate the importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) in neural development and neurodegeneration. This review will focus on involvement of LCPUFA from genesis to senescence. The LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid are important components of neuronal membranes, while eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, and arachidonic acid also affect cardiovascular health and inflammation. In neural development, LCPUFA deficiency can lead to severe disorders like schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Perinatal LCPUFA supplementation demonstrated beneficial effects in neural development in humans and rodents resulting in improved cognition and sensorimotor integration. In normal aging, the effect of LCPUFA on prevention of cognitive impairment will be discussed. LCPUFA are important for neuronal membrane integrity and function, and also contribute in prevention of brain hypoperfusion. Cerebral perfusion can be compromised as result of obesity, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, or diabetes mellitus type 2. Last, we will focus on the role of LCPUFA in most common neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. These disorders are characterized by impaired cognition and connectivity and both clinical and animal supplementation studies have shown the potential of LCPUFA to decrease neurodegeneration and inflammation. This review shows that LCPUFA are essential throughout life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Peritoneal dialysis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velloso, Marina Souza Silva; Otoni, Alba; de Paula Sabino, Adriano; de Castro, Whocely Victor; Pinto, Sérgio Wyton Lima; Marinho, Maria Aparecida Silva; Rios, Danyelle Romana Alves

    2014-03-20

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a kidney replacement therapy for end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Despite being a lifesaving treatment, the rate of mortality in patients under PD is elevated, mainly due to the chronic peritoneal dysfunction which is characterized by inflammation, peritoneal fibrosis and neoangiogenesis. The inflammatory process is trigged and modulated by the type of the peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDSs) used during PD. Currently, different PDSs are commercially available: (i) the conventional solutions; (ii) solutions of neutral pH containing low concentration of glucose degradation products (GDPs); (iii) solutions with icodextrin; and (iv) solutions containing taurine. Therefore, the aim of this review is to describe the different types of peritoneal dialysis solutions used during PD and their relationship with systemic and intraperitoneal inflammation. Some studies suggested that solutions of neutral pH containing low concentration of GDPs, icodextrin and taurine have better biocompatibility and lower influence on the inflammatory process compared to the conventional one. On the other hand, the studies, in general, were performed with a small population and for a short period of time. Therefore, further well-designed and -controlled clinical trials with larger number of individuals are required in order to better understand the role of different peritoneal dialysis solution types in the development of inflammation in patients with chronic peritoneal dialysis. Accordingly, studies that are more well-designed, well-controlled and with a larger number of patients are needed to explain and define the role of different types of PDS in the inflammation development in patients with chronic peritoneal dialysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inflammation in epileptic encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy (EE) that manifests with infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants) and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12–15%) or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment [adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and high dose steroids], the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate pro-inflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of West syndrome? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? PMID:28427564

  20. Retinal Vascular Fractals Correlate With Early Neurodegeneration in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydkjaer-Olsen, Ulrik; Soegaard Hansen, Rasmus; Pedersen, Knud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the retinal vascular fractal dimension (Fd) and neurodegenerative changes in patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy (DR). Methods: In this cross-sectional study we examined 103 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with no or mild DR....... In a randomly selected eye of each patient, Fd was calculated using SIVA-Fractal, a specialized semiautomatic software. Retinal neurodegeneration was evaluated by Topcon 3D OCT-2000 spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) and by a RETI-scan multifocal ERG (mf-ERG) system in rings one to six. Level...... found between early vascular and neurogenic changes. Thus, retinal vascular fractal analysis might be considered as a tool to identify patients with early neurodegenerative retinal changes....

  1. Obesity and the Ageing Brain: Could Leptin Play a Role in Neurodegeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. H. Doherty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and ageing are both characteristics of the human population that are on the increase across the globe. It has long been established that ageing is the major risk factor for neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, and it is becoming increasingly evident that obesity is another such factor. Leptin resistance or insensitivity has been uncovered as a cause of obesity, and in addition the leptin signalling system is less potent in the elderly. Taken together, these findings reveal that this molecule may be a link between neurodegeneration and obesity or ageing. It is now known that leptin has beneficial effects on both the survival and neurophysiology of the neurons that are lost in Alzheimer's disease suggesting that it may be an important research target in the quest for strategies to prevent, halt, or cure this condition.

  2. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet’s role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. PMID:24607659

  3. Beneficial effects of an alternating high- fat dietary regimen on systemic insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopala K Yakala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An Alternating high- cholesterol dietary regimen has proven to be beneficial when compared to daily high- cholesterol feeding. In the current study we explored whether the same strategy is applicable to a high- fat dietary regimen. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether an alternating high- fat dietary regimen can effectively diminish insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal dysfunction as compared to a continuous high- fat diet. DESIGN: Four groups of male ApoE*3Leiden mice (n=15 were exposed to different diet regimens for 20 weeks as follows: Group 1: low- fat diet (10 kcal% fat; Group 2: intermediate- fat diet (25 kcal% fat; Group 3: high- fat diet (45 kcal% fat and Group 4: alternating- fat diet (10 kcal% fat for 4 days and 45 kcal% fat for 3 days in a week. RESULTS: Compared to high fat diet feeding, the alternating and intermediate- fat diet groups had reduced body weight gain and did not develop insulin resistance or albuminuria. In addition, in the alternating and intermediate- fat diet groups, parameters of tissue inflammation were markedly reduced compared to high fat diet fed mice. CONCLUSION: Both alternating and intermediate- fat feeding were beneficial in terms of reducing body weight gain, insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal dysfunction. Thus beneficial effects of alternating feeding regimens on cardiometabolic risk factors are not only applicable for cholesterol containing diets but can be extended to diets high in fat content.

  4. Timing of neurodegeneration and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide deposition in the brain of aging kokanee salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Tammy A; Jones, Richard E; Norris, David O

    2002-10-01

    Brains of kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) in