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Sample records for system das lhcb

  1. LHCb: The LHCb data bookkeeping system

    CERN Multimedia

    Lanciotti, E

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb Bookkeeping is a system for the storage and retrieval of meta data associated with LHCb datasets. e.g. whether it is real or simulated data, which running period it is associated with, how it was processed and all the other relevant characteristics of the files. etc. The meta data is stored in an oracle database which is interrogated using services provided by the LHCb DIRAC3 infrastructure, that provides security, data streaming, and multi threading connections. Users can browse the bookkeeping database through a command line interface or Graphical User Interface (GUI). The command line presents a view similar to a file system and the GUI is implemented on top of this.

  2. The LHCb DAQ system

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, B

    2000-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is the most recently approved of the 4 experiments under construction at CERN's LHC accelerator. It is a special purpose experiment designed to precisely measure the CP violation parameters in the B-B system. Triggering poses special problems since the interesting events containing B-mesons are immersed in a large background of inelastic p-p reactions. We therefore decided to implement a 4 level triggering scheme. The LHCb Data Acquisition (DAQ) system will have to cope with an average trigger rate of similar to 40 kHz, after two levels of hardware triggers, and an average event size of similar to 150 kB. Thus an event-building network which can sustain an average bandwidth of 6 GB /s is required. A powerful software trigger farm will have to be installed to reduce the rate from the 40 kHz to similar to 200 Hz of events written to permanent storage. In this paper we will concentrate on the networking aspects of the LHCb data acquisition and the controls system. 11 Refs.

  3. LHCb : Tracking system of the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment will run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10^33 cm^-2 s^-1 with a fully software based trigger, allowing to read out the detector at a rate of 40MHz. For this purpose, the full tracking system will be newly developed: the vertex locator (VELO) will be replaced by a pixel-based detector, withstanding the high radiation dose and providing an excellent track reconstruction with an efficiency of above 99% for all charged particles of interest. Upstream of the magnet, a silicon mico-strip detector with a high granularity and an improved acceptance coverage, called the Upstream Tracker (UT), will replace the current silicon strip tracker, and provide a rough momentum estimate. The tracking system downstream of the magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre tracker (SciFi), which will consist of 12 layers using 2.5m long scintillating fibres read out by silicon photo-multipliers, providing a spatial resolution better than 100 micron and resulting in a total momentum reso...

  4. The LHCb Data Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baud, J P; Charpentier, Ph; Ciba, K; Lanciotti, E; Màthè, Z; Graciani, R; Remenska, D; Santana, R

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb Data Management System is based on the DIRAC Grid Community Solution. LHCbDirac provides extensions to the basic DMS such as a Bookkeeping System. Datasets are defined as sets of files corresponding to a given query in the Bookkeeping system. Datasets can be manipulated by CLI tools as well as by automatic transformations (removal, replication, processing). A dynamic handling of dataset replication is performed, based on disk space usage at the sites and dataset popularity. For custodial storage, an on-demand recall of files from tape is performed, driven by the requests of the jobs, including disk cache handling. We shall describe the tools that are available for Data Management, from handling of large datasets to basic tools for users as well as for monitoring the dynamic behavior of LHCb Storage capacity.

  5. LHCb: A New Nightly Build System for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Clemencic, M

    2013-01-01

    The nightly build system used so far by LHCb has been implemented as an extension on the system developed by CERN PH/SFT group (as presented at CHEP2010). Although this version has been working for many years, it has several limitations in terms of extensibility, management and ease of use, so that it was decided to develop a new version based on a continuous integration system. In this paper we describe a new implementation of the LHCb Nightly Build System based on the open source continuous integration system Jenkins and report on the experience on the configuration of a complex build workflow in Jenkins.

  6. LHCb: A new Readout Control system for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire readout architecture will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate and higher network load. In this paper, we describe the architecture, functionalities and the first hardware implementation of a new Readout Control system for the LHCb upgrade. The system is based on FPGAs and bi-directional links for the control of the entire readout architecture. First results on the validation of the system are also given.

  7. LHCb : The LHCb trigger system and its upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Dziurda, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz to 1 MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a farm of 20k parallel-processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. We review the performance of the LHCb trigger system during Run I of the LHC. Special attention is given to the use of multivariate analyses in the High Level Trigger. The major bottleneck for hadronic decays is the hardware trigger. LHCb plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018, enabling a purely software based trigger to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. We demonstrate that the planned architecture will be able to meet this challenge. We discuss the use of disk space in the trigger farm to buffer events while performing run-by-run detector calibrations, and the way this real time calibration and subsequent full event reconstruction will allow LHCb to ...

  8. LHCB RICH gas system proposal

    CERN Document Server

    Bosteels, Michel; Haider, S

    2001-01-01

    Both LHCb RICH will be operated with fluorocarbon as gas radiator. RICH 1 will be filled with 4m^3 of C4F10 and RICH 2 with 100m^3 of CF4. The gas systems will run as a closed loop circulation and a gas recovery system within the closed loop is planned for RICH 1, where the recovery of the CF4 will only be realised during filling and emptying of the detector. Inline gas purification is foreseen for the gas systems in order to limit water and oxygen impurities.

  9. LHCb: First year of running for the LHCb calorimeter system

    CERN Multimedia

    Guz, Y

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva) [1, 2]. LHCb is a single-arm spectrometer with a forward angular coverage from approximately 10 mrad to 300 mrad. It comprises a calorimeter system composed of four subdetectors [3]. It selects transverse energy hadron, electron and photon candidates for the first trigger level (L0), which makes a decision 4µs after the interaction. It provides the identification of electrons, photons and hadrons as well as the measurement of their energies and positions. The set of constraints resulting from these functionalities defines the general structure and the main characteristics of the calorimeter system and its associated electronics. A classical structure of an electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) followed by a hadron calorimeter (HCAL) has been adopted. In addition the system includes in front of them the Scintillating Pad Detector (SPD) and Pre-Showe...

  10. Implementing database system for LHCb publications page

    CERN Document Server

    Abdullayev, Fakhriddin

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb is one of the main detectors of Large Hadron Collider, where physicists and scientists work together on high precision measurements of matter-antimatter asymmetries and searches for rare and forbidden decays, with the aim of discovering new and unexpected forces. The work does not only consist of analyzing data collected from experiments but also in publishing the results of those analyses. The LHCb publications are gathered on LHCb publications page to maximize their availability to both LHCb members and to the high energy community. In this project a new database system was implemented for LHCb publications page. This will help to improve access to research papers for scientists and better integration with current CERN library website and others.

  11. The LHCb Data Management System

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    We shall describe all the tools that are available for Data Management, from handling of large datasets to basic tools for users as well as for monitoring the dynamic behaviour of LHCb Storage capacity.

  12. LHCb: LHCb Muon System Performance at High Luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinci, D

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector was conceived to operate with an average Luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. During the last year of LHC run, the whole apparatus has shown to be able to perfectly acquire and manage data produced at a Luminosity as high as $4 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. In these conditions, all sub-detectors operated at average particle rates higher than the design ones and in particular the Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers equipping the Muon System had to sustain a particle rate as high as 250 kHz/cm$^{2}$. In order to study the possibility of increasing the Luminosity of operation of the whole experiment several tests were performed. The effective beam Luminosity at the interaction point of LHCb was increased in several steps up to $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and in each step the behavior of all the detectors in the Muon System was recorded. The data analysis has allowed to study the performance of the Muon System as a function of the LHC Luminosity and the results are r...

  13. LHCb : Full Experiment System Test

    CERN Multimedia

    Cattaneo, M

    2009-01-01

    LHCb had been planning to commission its High Level Trigger software and Data Quality monitoring procedures using real collisions data from the LHC pilot run. Following the LHC incident on 19th September 2008, it was decided to commission the system using simulated data. This “Full Experiment System Test” consists of: - Injection of simulated minimum bias events into the full HLT farm, after selection by a simulated Level 0 trigger. - Processing in the HLT farm to achieve the output rate expected for nominal LHC luminosity running, sustained over the typical duration of an LHC fill. - Real time Data Quality validation of the HLT output, validation of calibration and alignment parameters for use in the reconstruction. - Transmission of the event data, calibration data and book-keeping information to Tier1 sites and full reconstruction of the event data. - Data Quality validation of the reconstruction output. We will report on the preparations and results of FEST09, and on the status of commissioning for no...

  14. Software Management in the LHCb Online System

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, N; Brarda, L; Closier, J; Moine, G; Degaudenzi, H

    2009-01-01

    LHCb has a large online IT infrastructure with thousands of servers and embedded systems, network routers and switches, databases and storage appliances. These systems run a large number of different applications on various operating systems. The dominant operating systems are Linux and MS-Windows. This large heterogeneous environment, operated by a small number of administrators, requires that new software or updates can be pushed quickly, reliably and as automated as possible. We present here the general design of LHCb's software management along with the main tools: LinuxFC / Quattor and Microsoft SMS, how they have been adapted and integrated and discuss experiences and problems.

  15. The LHCb Trigger System: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Johannes; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC inelastic collision rate of 30 MHz to 1MHz, at which the entire detector is read out. In a second level, implemented in a CPU farm, the event rate is reduced to about 5 kHz. The major bottleneck in LHCb's trigger efficiencies for hadronic heavy flavour decays is the hardware trigger. The LHCb experiment plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC shutdown of 2018. In this upgrade, a purely software based trigger system is being developed, which will have to process the full 30 MHz of inelastic collisions delivered by the LHC. Both the current trigger system and its planned upgrade are discussed in these proceedings.

  16. Monitoring the LHCb data quality system

    CERN Multimedia

    Baranov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the quality of the data, DQM, is crucial in a high-energy physics experiment to ensure the correct functioning of the apparatus during the data taking. DQM at LHCb is carried out in two phase. The first one is performed on-site, in real time, using unprocessed data directly from the LHCb detector, while the second, also performed on-site, requires the reconstruction of the data selected by the LHCb trigger system and occurs with some delay. For the Run II data taking the LHCb collaboration has re-engineered the DQM protocols and the DQM graphical interface, moving the latter to a web-based monitoring system, called Monet, thus allowing researchers to perform the second phase off-site. In order to support the operator's task, Monet is also equipped with an automated, fully configurable, alarm system, thus allowing its use not only for DQM purposes, but also to track and assess the quality of LHCb software and simulation.

  17. LHCb Conditions database operation assistance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemencic, M.; Shapoval, I.; Cattaneo, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Santinelli, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Conditions Database (CondDB) of the LHCb experiment provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data for all LHCb data processing applications (simulation, high level trigger (HLT), reconstruction, analysis) in a heterogeneous computing environment ranging from user laptops to the HLT farm and the Grid. These different use cases impose front-end support for multiple database technologies (Oracle and SQLite are used). Sophisticated distribution tools are required to ensure timely and robust delivery of updates to all environments. The content of the database has to be managed to ensure that updates are internally consistent and externally compatible with multiple versions of the physics application software. In this paper we describe three systems that we have developed to address these issues. The first system is a CondDB state tracking extension to the Oracle 3D Streams replication technology, to trap cases when the CondDB replication was corrupted. Second, an automated distribution system for the SQLite-based CondDB, providing also smart backup and checkout mechanisms for the CondDB managers and LHCb users respectively. And, finally, a system to verify and monitor the internal (CondDB self-consistency) and external (LHCb physics software vs. CondDB) compatibility. The former two systems are used in production in the LHCb experiment and have achieved the desired goal of higher flexibility and robustness for the management and operation of the CondDB. The latter one has been fully designed and is passing currently to the implementation stage.

  18. Particle Identification with the LHCb RICH System

    CERN Document Server

    Harnew, Neville

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system to provide particle identification over the momentum range 2-100 GeV/c. Two RICH detectors are employed. The upstream detector, RICH1, utilizes both aerogel and C$_4$F$_{10}$ gas radiators whilst the downstream RICH2 uses a CF$_4$ gas radiator. The RICH2 detector has been fabricated and is installed in the LHCb interaction region; RICH1 has a programme of phased design and construction. Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs are enclosed in iron shielding and Mumetal cylinders to allow operation in magnetic fields up to 50mT. The performance of pre-series HPDs and the results obtained from a particle test beam using the full LHCb readout chain is presented. The production of a total of 484 HPDs required for the two RICH detectors has recently commenced. The expected performance of the LHCb RICH system, obtained from real...

  19. Particle identification with the LHCb RICH system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnew, Neville

    2006-07-01

    The LHCb experiment uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system to provide particle identification over the momentum range 2- 100 GeV/c. Two RICH detectors are employed. The upstream detector, RICH 1, utilizes both aerogel and C4F10 gas radiators whilst the downstream RICH 2 uses a CF4 gas radiator. The RICH 2 detector has been fabricated and is installed in the LHCb interaction region; RICH 1 has a programme of phased design and construction. Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons in the wavelength range 200-600 nm. The HPDs are enclosed in iron shielding and Mumetal cylinders to allow operation in magnetic fields up to 50 mT. The performance of pre-series HPDs and the results obtained from a particle test beam using the full LHCb readout chain is presented. The production of a total of 484 HPDs required for the two RICH detectors has recently commenced. The expected performance of the LHCb RICH system, obtained from realistic simulation, is described.

  20. LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Frank, M; Neufeld, N; Ruf, T; Batista lopes, J C; Martinelli, M; Perazzini, S; Stagni, F; Dorigo, M; Di canto, A; Nolte, N S; Battista, V; Birnkraut, A; Uwer, U; Zhelezov, A; Han, X; Kolpin, M; Le gac, R; Wormser, G H M; Barsuk, S; Maurice, E A; Renaudin, V; Benayoun, M C; Polci, F; Watson, N; Souza covacich, D; Barlow, R J; Pastore, A; Lax, I; Peco, G; Bortolotti, D; Vilaca pinheiro soares, M; Leflat, A; Krokovnyi, P; Gibson, V; Ward, D R; Doherty, F; Longstaff, I R; Dean, C T; Traill, M T; Fiorini, M; Campana, P; Saputi, A; Ciambrone, P; Morello, M J; Carboni, G; Van veghel, M; Raven, G H; Witek, M; Ossowska, A; Fiutowski, T A; Dzhelyadin, R; Stenyakin, O; Popov, A; Wang, J; Artuso, M; Rudolph, M S; Batsukh, B; Mendes gandelman, M; Garrido beltran, L; Rosello canal, M D M; Luengo alvarez, S; Picatoste olloqui, E; Marin benito, C; Sanchez gonzalo, D; Wilson, F F; Nandakumar, R; Wark, H M; Hecker, M; Baker, S K; Kochenda, L; Parker, W C; Petrolini, A; Saitta, B; Brundu, D; Belin, S; Calvi, M; Pessina, G E; Shao, B; Zeng, M; Sun, J; Kechadi, M T; Zheng, Y; Lyu, X; Polukhina, N; Gromov, S; Seco miguelez, M A; Vazquez regueiro, P; Fernandez prieto, A; Buytaert, J; Camilleri, L L; Lindner, R; Corti, G; Ponce, S; Coco, V; Schwemmer, R A; Ravonel salzgeber, M; Gruber, L; Seyfert, P; Stahl, S; De aguiar francisco, O A; Chrzaszcz, M J; Voneki, B; Masson, G A; Rodrigues cavalcante, A B; Marino, P; Vollhardt, A; Zhukov, V; Niet, R; Haas, T; Leroy, O; Mancinelli, G; Hachon, F; Stocchi, A; Lisovskyi, V; Naik, P P; Richards, S E; John, M; Nandi, A K; Palano, A; Iarocci, E; Sciubba, A; Auriemma, G; Shapoval, I; Philippov, S; Petrov, A; Basiladze, S; Kozachuk, A; Berdiouguine, A; Weisser, C N; Graziani, G; Anderlini, L; Evans, H M; Eklund, L M; Alexander, M T; Tellarini, G; Capon, G; Bloise, C; Santimaria, M; Lucchesi, D; Michielin, E; Bedeschi, F; Van beuzekom, M G; Berkien, A; Giubega, L; Koliiev, S; Volkov, V; Sokoloff, M D; Pappenheimer, C A; Da silva, C L; Blusk, S R; Ely, S E; Wilkinson, M K; Marangotto, D; Santana rangel, M; Camboni, A; Orellana martin, D; Niess, V; Franek, B; Loveridge, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Shears, T G; Smith, A N; Whitley, M D A; Marshall, P J; Sutcliffe, W L; Sagidova, N; Vznuzdaev, M; Aidala, C A; Sun, Y; Fontana, M; Mazza, R; Cheng, J; Huang, Y; Luo, Y; Hushchyn, M; Hess, M; Perez trigo, E; Borsato, M; Crocombe, A C; Needham, M D; Petrucci, S; Jacobsson, R; Mathe, Z; Rauschmayr, N; Pearce, A; Byczynski, W; Frei, R; Nakada, T; Nguyen mau, C; Pinard, A; Schulte, S; Bernet, R; Serra, N; Bezshyiko, I; Wang, Y; Kirn, T; Guth, A; Kruse, F; Bauer, C; Dembinski, H P; Braun, S A; Piucci, A; Kecke, M; Minard, M; Aslanides, E; Barrand, G C; Lefrancois, J; Chamont, D; Usachov, A; Billoir, P; Del buono, L; Ben haim, E; Bertholet, E; Plews, J P; Velthuis, J J; Dalseno, J P; Borghi, S; Appleby, R B; Hombach, C; Sarpis, G; Capriotti, L; Hilton, M; Pullen, H L; Galli, D; Garibaldi, F; Shatalov, P; Nikitin, N; Williams, J M; Boettcher, T J; Smith, J W; Williams, I; Spradlin, P M; Calabrese, R; Lenisa, P; Neri, I; Skiba, I; Bencivenni, G; Lanfranchi, G; Simi, G; Ceelie, L; Van petten, O R; Pellegrino, A; Roeland, E; Dendek, A M; Obraztsov, V; Stone, S L; Olejnik, L; Petruzzo, M; Hicheur, A; Silva de oliveira, L G; Lebsir, B; Golutvin, A; Humair, T; Moise, R; Bartolini, M; Gao, Y; Liu, X; Zhu, X; Milanes carreno, D A; Rodriguez lopez, J A; Monroy canon, I A; Borisyak, M; Szymanski, M P; Krasilnikova, I; Meinert, N; Adeva andany, B; Hernando morata, J A; Millard, E J; Webster, J; Correa dos reis, A; Gomes dos santos neto, A; Brarda, L; D'ambrosio, C; Ferro-luzzi, M; Gys, T; Schopper, A; Teubert, F; Wyllie, K; Couturier, B; Kristic, R; Fournier, C; Haen, C D; Ciezarek, G M; Durante, P; Lupton, O J; Pais, P R; Kirsebom, V S; Straumann, U D; Mueller, K; Buonaura, A; Spaan, B; Albrecht, J; Ekelhof, R J; Shires, A; Schlupp, M; Demmer, M; Muller, J; Schmelzer, T; Lindemann, T; Bachmann, S; Cachemiche, J; De abreu barbosa coelho, J; Tou, D Y; Calladine, R B; Pomery, G J; Bhasin, S; De capua, S; Burr, C M; Topp-joergensen, S; Bjorn, M; Patrignani, C; Vagnoni, V M; Kandybei, S; Shekhtman, L; Jones, C R; Cliff, H V; Sirendi, M; Tully, A M; Soler jermyn, P F; Luppi, E; Vecchi, S; De simone, P; Rotondo, M; Satta, A; Merk, M; Jans, E; Krzemien, W J; Merkin, M; Vasilyev, A; Durham, J M; Merli, A; Souza de paula, B; Pinto eboli, O J; Vilasis cardona, J; Ajaltouni, Z; Quintana, B J; Casse, G; Hennessy, K P; Rinnert, K; Dornan, P J; Patel, M; Savidge, T E; Spiridenkov, E; Makarenkov, G; Filimonov, A; Stepanova, M; Jawahery, A; Gong, G; Zhang, W; Gan, Y; Ruiz vidal, J; Raab, N V; Huang, W; Cai, H; Bian, L; Waldi, R G; Gershon, T J; Playfer, S M; Gizdov, K; Marques de miranda, J; De bediaga hickman, I A; Marujo da silva, F; Silveira mizher, A J; Dijkstra, H; Van herwijnen, E; Forty, R; Gaspar, C; Hatch, M; Jost, B; Piedigrossi, D; Alessio, F; Vazquez gomez, R; Johnson, D; Colombo, T; Pisani, F; Tran, M; Repond, J; Macko, V; Yu, J; Tekampe, T; Hofmann, W; Schmelling, M T; Rummel, C; Machefert, F; Fleuret, F D; Bossu, F; Lazzeroni, C; Zarebski, K A; Saunders, D M; Mcnab, I A; Maguire, K S; Dutta, D; Pinci, D; Shevchenko, O; Gushchin, E; Nogay, A; Belyaev, I; Semennikov, A; Danilina, A; Gorelov, I V; Haines, S C; Delaney, B; Bozzi, C; Sciascia, B; Fantechi, R; Groep, D L; Onderwater, C; Glab, S M; Idzik, M A; Firlej, M; Guzik, Z; Maciuc, F; Pirghie, A; Pugatch, V; Okhrimenko, O; Belous, K; Ostankov, A; Meadows, B; Niu, N; Salazar de paula, L; Polycarpo macedo, E; Lefevre, R P; Websdale, D M; Maev, E; Hamilton, B K; Wimberley, J T; Lai, A; Liu, B; Jiang, F; Cang, J; Vagner, A; Saborido silva, J J; Muheim, F; Collins, P; Schneider, T H; Granado cardoso, L A; Valat, S J; Dordei, F; Karacson, M; Schneider, O P; Haefeli, G J; Hopchev, P H; Maurin, B E; Stefko, P; Wang, Z; Schael, S; Eitschberger, U P; Knopf, J M; D'argent, P; Pietrzyk, B; Drancourt, C; T'jampens, S; Duval, P; Cogan, J; Beigbeder-beau, C; Slater, M W; Farley, N; Williams, T; Adinolfi, M; Harnew, S T; Prouve, C; Buchanan, E; Parkes, C J; Gronbech, P D; Hancock, T H; Rollings, A P; Zucchelli, S; Bocci, V; Satriano, C; Morgunova, O; Golubkov, D; Kvaratskheliya, T; Egorychev, V; Bondar, A; Eydelman, S; Kuzmin, A; Krokovny, P; Veltri, M; Bettler, M O; Schiller, M T; Felici, G; Morandin, M; Doets, M; Schimmel, A; Kraan, M J; Vink, W; Vitkovskiy, A; Szumlak, T; Straticiuc, M; Guz, Y; Artamonov, A; Rodrigues figueiredo, E M; Xing, Z; Beiter, A; Lopes, H J; Gascon, D; Casajus ramo, A; Trenado garcia, J; Golobardes ribe, E; Alfonso albero, A; Deschamps, O; Gazzoni, G; Cooke, P A; Wormald, M; Stefkova, S; Tilley, M J; Newcombe, R; Levitskaya, O; Golovtcov, V; Semenchuk, G; Matteuzzi, C; Martinez vidal, F; Henry, L; Garcia martin, L M; Qin, J; Xu, Q; Didenko, S; Gallas torreira, A A; Dosil suarez, A; Chobanova, V G; Ramos pernas, M; Poluektov, A; Latham, T E; Blake, T; Eisenhardt, S; Cattaneo, M; Chadaj, B; Charpentier, P; Closier, J; Jamet, O; Lacarrere, D; Schmidt, B; Clemencic, M; Thomas, E P C; Schindler, H; Faerber, C; Matev, R I; Muller, D; Bay, A; Gonzalez, R; Girard, O G; Atzeni, M; Xiao, D; Mueller, V; Hansmann-menzemer, S; Nikodem, T; Leverington, B D; Ghez, P; Xu, Z; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Serrano, J; Schune, M; Jouvin, M; Robbe, P A; Duarte, O; Balagura, V; Vom bruch, D; Rademacker, J H; Kariuki, J M; Lafferty, G D; Gersabeck, M; Harnew, N; Malde, S S; Gruberg cazon, B R; Marconi, U; Valenti, G; Carbone, A; Betti, F; Santacesaria, R; Kravchuk, L; Maltsev, T; Gobel burlamaqui de mello, C; Wotton, S; Garra tico, J; Baldini, W; Tomassetti, L; Andreotti, M; Siddi, B G; Palutan, M; Tagnani, D; Busetto, G; Walsh, J J; Punzi, G; Santovetti, E; Berbee, E M; Lesiak, T; Wiechczynski, J P; Baszczyk, M K; Muryn, B; Ukleja, A; Batozskaya, V; Cojocariu, L N; Shapkin, M; Romanovskiy, V; Luchinskii, A; Huard, Z C; Otalora goicochea, J M; Graciani diaz, R; Grauges pous, E; Coquereau, S; Monteil, S; Chanal, H P; Cogneras, E R D; Vert, P; Easo, S; Bowcock, T; Egede, U; Neustroev, P; Kashchuk, A; Petrov, G; Andrews, J E; Fontanelli, F; Cadeddu, S; Cogoni, V; Belloli, N; De oyanguren campos, M A; Mcnulty, R C; Ratnikov, F; He, J; Li, P; Baryshnikov, F; Shmanin, E; Viemann, H M; Santamarina rios, C; Mathad, A; Loh, D J; Costa sobral, C M; Smith, I T; Kos antunes maciel, A; Santana, R; Pepe-altarelli, M; Dumps, R; Frei, C M; Roy, L; De bruyn, K A M; Tolk, S; Brodski, M; Sciuccati, A; Fernandez declara, P; Blanc, F H; Graverini, E; Mukherjee, M; Yin, H; Heister, A; Voss, H H; Moch, M; Decamp, D L; Arnau romeu, J; Breton, D R; Charlet, D M; Amhis, Y S; Hidalgo charman, R; Harris, F J; Hill, D; Hadavizadeh, T B; De serio, M; Martellotti, G; Dovbnya, A; Kutuzov, V; Zhivaeva, L; Likhomanenko, T; Bogdanova, G; Vorobyev, V; Kaminer, I E; Bizzeti, A; Passaleva, G; Garsed, P J; Vitti, M; Lovell, G H; Smeaton, J G; Pappalardo, L L; Anelli, M; Amerio, S; Lupato, A; Sluijk, T; Munneke, B; Mulder, M; Dufour, L; Dorosz, P A; Melnychuk, D; Grecu, A T; Pirghie, C; Yushchenko, O; Likhoded, A; Soldatov, M; Schreiner, H F; Mountain, R J; Skwarnicki, T; Kelsey, M J; Venkateswaran, A; Yao, Y; Neri, N; Amato, S F; Calvo gomez, M G; Gonzalez bano, C; Henrard, P; Perret, P; Magne, M M; Maratas, J; Puech, G; Ricciardi, S; Gamet, R; Noor, A; Liles, M M; Pritchard, A A; Cunliffe, S T; Alkhazov, G; Trofimov, V; Shapkin, G; Smirenin, Y; Yang, Z; Cardini, A; Gong, H; Yang, Z; Mazorra de cos, J; Sanchez mayordomo, C; Evangelho vieira, D; Pazos alvarez, A; Sanmartin sedes, B; Kreps, M; Clarke, P; Cowan, G A; Gabriel, E P M

    2002-01-01

    The LHCb detector is designed to study CP violation and other rare phenomena in decays of hadrons with heavy flavours, in particular $ \\rm B_s$ mesons. Interest in CP violation comes not only from elementary particle physics but also from cosmology, in order to explain the dominance of matter over antimatter observed in our universe, which could be regarded as the largest CP violation effect ever seen. The LHCb experiment will improve significantly results from earlier experiments both quantitatively and qualitatively, by exploiting the large number of different kinds of b hadrons produced at LHC. This is done by constructing a detector which has \\begin{enumerate} \\item Good trigger efficiencies for b-hadron final states with only hadrons, as well as those containing leptons. \\item Capability of identifying kaons and pions in a momentum range of $\\sim 1$ to above 100 GeV/$c$. \\item Excellent decay time and mass resolution. \\end{enumerate} The LHCb spectrometer shown in the figure consists of the following det...

  1. LHCb Conditions Database Operation Assistance Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Shapoval, Illya

    2012-01-01

    The Conditions Database of the LHCb experiment (CondDB) provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data for all LHCb data processing applications (simulation, high level trigger, reconstruction, analysis) in a heterogeneous computing environment ranging from user laptops to the HLT farm and the Grid. These different use cases impose front-end support for multiple database technologies (Oracle and SQLite are used). Sophisticated distribution tools are required to ensure timely and robust delivery of updates to all environments. The content of the database has to be managed to ensure that updates are internally consistent and externally compatible with multiple versions of the physics application software. In this paper we describe three systems that we have developed to address these issues: - an extension to the automatic content validation done by the “Oracle Streams” replication technology, to trap cases when the replication was unsuccessful; - an automated distribution process for the S...

  2. Performance of the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, A.A., Jr.; Anelli, M.; Nobrega, R.Antunes; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Berutti, R.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Botchin, B.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Ciambrone, P.; Dane, E.; de Capua, S.; De Leo, V.; Deplano, C.; De Simone, P.; Dettori, F.; Falabella, A.; Rodriguez, F.Ferreira; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Gruber, L.; Haefeli, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Iacoangeli, F.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lenzi, M.; Levitskaya, O.; Mair, K.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Mara, M.; Martellotti, G.; Rodrigues, A.Massafferri; Messi, R.; Murtas, F.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R.G.C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Raspino, D.; Sabatino, G.; Saitta, B.; Salamon, A.; Santacesaria, R.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Serra, N.; Shatalov, P.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, A.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of the LHCb Muon system and its stability across the full 2010 data taking with LHC running at ps = 7 TeV energy is studied. The optimization of the detector setting and the time calibration performed with the first collisions delivered by LHC is described. Particle rates, measured for the wide range of luminosities and beam operation conditions experienced during the run, are compared with the values expected from simulation. The space and time alignment of the detectors, chamber efficiency, time resolution and cluster size are evaluated. The detector performance is found to be as expected from specifications or better. Notably the overall efficiency is well above the design requirements

  3. Upgrade of the monitoring system of LHCb ECAL

    CERN Document Server

    Guz, Iouri; Chernov, Evgeny; Egorychev, Victor; Kandybei, Sergii; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Perret, Pascal; Philippov, Sergey; Savrina, Daria; Shatalov, Sppavel; Zakoriuchkina, Tatiana; Zhokhov, Anatoli; Zvyagintsev, Serguei

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb ECAL is a shashlik calorimeter of 6016 cells, covering 7.686.24 m2 area. To monitor the readout chain of each ECAL cell, the LHCb ECAL is equipped with a LED based monitoring system. During the LHC Run I (2009-2012) it was found that the precision of the monitoring suffers from the radiation degradation of transparency of polystyrene clear fibers used to transport the LED light to the ECAL photomultipliers. In order to improve the performance of the monitoring system, and especially in view of significant increase of LHCb working luminosity foreseen after 2018, the present plastic fibers have been replaced by radiation hard quartz fibers. The design of the upgraded version of the LHCb ECAL monitoring system is described here. The usage and performance of the new system for the ECAL calibration during the LHCb Run II are discussed.

  4. ARIADNE: a tracking system for relationships in LHCb metadata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapoval, I; Clemencic, M; Cattaneo, M

    2014-01-01

    The data processing model of the LHCb experiment implies handling of an evolving set of heterogeneous metadata entities and relationships between them. The entities range from software and databases states to architecture specificators and software/data deployment locations. For instance, there is an important relationship between the LHCb Conditions Database (CondDB), which provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data, and the LHCb software, which is the data processing applications (used for simulation, high level triggering, reconstruction and analysis of physics data). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that relationships between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. These issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. In this paper we present Ariadne – a generic metadata relationships tracking system based on the novel NoSQL Neo4j graph database. Its aim is to track and analyze many thousands of evolving relationships for cases such as the one described above, and several others, which would otherwise remain unmanaged and potentially harmful. The highlights of the paper include the system's implementation and management details, infrastructure needed for running it, security issues, first experience of usage in the LHCb production and potential of the system to be applied to a wider set of LHCb tasks.

  5. ARIADNE: a Tracking System for Relationships in LHCb Metadata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapoval, I.; Clemencic, M.; Cattaneo, M.

    2014-06-01

    The data processing model of the LHCb experiment implies handling of an evolving set of heterogeneous metadata entities and relationships between them. The entities range from software and databases states to architecture specificators and software/data deployment locations. For instance, there is an important relationship between the LHCb Conditions Database (CondDB), which provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data, and the LHCb software, which is the data processing applications (used for simulation, high level triggering, reconstruction and analysis of physics data). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that relationships between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. These issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. In this paper we present Ariadne - a generic metadata relationships tracking system based on the novel NoSQL Neo4j graph database. Its aim is to track and analyze many thousands of evolving relationships for cases such as the one described above, and several others, which would otherwise remain unmanaged and potentially harmful. The highlights of the paper include the system's implementation and management details, infrastructure needed for running it, security issues, first experience of usage in the LHCb production and potential of the system to be applied to a wider set of LHCb tasks.

  6. Status of the LHCb magnet system

    CERN Document Server

    André, J; Flegel, W; Giudici, P A; Jamet, O; Lançon, P; Losasso, M; Röhner, F; Rosset, C

    2002-01-01

    The LHCb experiment focuses on the precision measurement of CP violation and rare decays in the B-meson system. It plans to operate with an average luminosity of $2\\times 10^{32}$~cm$^{-2}$s$~^{-1}$, which should be obtained from the beginning of the LHC operation. The LHCb detector exploits the forward region of the pp collisions at the LHC collider. It requires a single-arm spectrometer for the separation and momentum measurement of the charged particles with a large dipole magnet of a free aperture of $\\pm 300$~mrad horizontally and $\\pm 250$~mrad vertically. The magnet is designed for a total integrated field of 4~Tm. The pole gap is 2.2 to 3.5~m vertically (the direction of the field) and 2.6 to 4.2~m horizontally. The overall length of the magnet (in beam direction) is 5~m and its total weight about 1500~t. The power dissipation in the aluminium coils will be 4.2~MW. The magnet yoke is constructed from low carbon steel plates of 100~mm thickness. The maximum weight of one plate does not exceed 25~t. The...

  7. Preliminary studies for the LHCb vertex detector vacuum system

    CERN Document Server

    Doets, M; Van Bakel, N; Van den Brand, J F J; van den Brand, Jo

    2000-01-01

    We lay down some general considerations which will serve as a starting point for design studies of a realistic LHCb vertex detector vacuum system. Based on these considerations, we propose a design strategy and identify issues to be further studied. In particular we try to outline some boundary conditions imposed by LHC and LHCb on the vacuum system. We discuss two possibilities for the LHCb vertex detector vacuum system. The preferred strategy uses a differentially pumped vacuum system with the silicon detectors separated from the beam line vacuum. Some estimations on static vacuum pressures and gas flows are presented.

  8. LHCb: Monitoring the DIRAC Distribution System

    CERN Multimedia

    Nandakumar, R; Santinelli, R

    2009-01-01

    DIRAC is the LHCb gateway to any computing grid infrastructure (currently supporting WLCG) and is intended to reliably run large data mining activities. The DIRAC system consists of various services (which wait to be contacted to perform actions) and agents (which carry out periodic activities) to direct jobs as required. An important part of ensuring the reliability of the infrastructure is the monitoring and logging of these DIRAC distributed systems. The monitoring is done collecting information from two sources - one is from pinging the services or by keeping track of the regular heartbeats of the agents, and the other from the analysis of the error messages generated by both agents and services and collected by the logging system. This allows us to ensure that he components are running properly and to collect useful information regarding their operations. The process status monitoring is displayed using the SLS sensor mechanism which also automatically allows one to plot various quantities and also keep ...

  9. The LHCb Silicon Tracker - Control system specific tools and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, G; Gallas, A; Pazos Alvarez, A; Perez Trigo, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Saborido, J; Amhis, Y; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Bressieux, J; Conti, G; Dupertuis, F; Fave, V; Frei, R; Gauvin, N; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Luisier, J; Marki, R; Muresan, R; Nakada, T; Needham, M; Knecht, M; Schneider, O; Tran, M; Anderson, J; Buechler, A; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; De Cian, M; Elsasser, C; Salzmann, C; Saornil Gamarra, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; van Tilburg, J; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2014-01-01

    The Experiment Control System (ECS) of the LHCb Silicon Tracker sub-detectors is built on the integrated LHCb ECS framework. Although all LHCb sub-detectors use the same framework and follow the same guidelines, the Silicon Tracker control system uses some interesting additional features in terms of operation and monitoring. The main details are described in this document. Since its design, the Silicon Tracker control system has been continuously evolving in a quite disorganized way. Some major maintenance activities are required to be able to keep improving. A description of those activities can also be found here.

  10. Design and performances of the LHCb Muon System

    CERN Multimedia

    Campana, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the detector design and performance of the LHCb Muon System. In order to fulfill the requirements of the experiment, the chambers have to provide high detection efficiency, a good time resolution, a high rate capability and good aging characteristics. We present performance results of the chambers from beam tests, with cosmics rays and at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. Cosmic rays have also been used to study the performance of the chambers in the experimental setup. The obtained results allow us to conclude that the requirements of the LHCb experiment are fulfilled and that the LHCb Muon detector is ready for data taking.

  11. Upgrade of the LHCb ECAL monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Rabusov, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    During the LHCb running in 2011 and 2012 it was found that the precision of PMT gain monitoring with LED system is affected by radiation damage of the long light guides transporting LED light to calorimeter cells. It was decided to replace in 2014 the present light guides to new ones that should be made of radiation tolerant quartz fibers. After the replacement, the system requires full tuning. It includes adjustment of the LED flash agnitudes and delays, and, after that, adjustment of the PIN diode system. My work was the following: to adjust the PIN signal amplitudes. This included a rough equalization of the amplitudes of signal from the 4 or 2 LEDs served by each PIN diode (achieved by mechanical adjustment of positions of corresponding fibers with respect to the PIN), and then reducing the PIN signal amplitude to the middle of the ADC range when necessary (total of 40 resistive attenuators were produced for this); to find timing corrections for ADCs digitizing the PIN signals; perform a PMT gain measure...

  12. LHCb Online Log Analysis and Maintenance System

    CERN Document Server

    Garnier, J-C

    2011-01-01

    History has shown, many times computer logs are the only information an administrator may have for an incident, which could be caused either by a malfunction or an attack. Due to the huge amount of logs that are produced from large-scale IT infrastructures, such as LHCb Online, critical information may be overlooked or simply be drowned in a sea of other messages. This clearly demonstrates the need for an automatic system for long-term maintenance and real time analysis of the logs. We have constructed a low cost, fault tolerant centralized logging system which is able to do in-depth analysis and cross-correlation of every log. This system is capable of handling O(10000) different log sources and numerous formats, while trying to keep the overhead as low as possible. It provides log gathering and management, Offline analysis and online analysis. We call Offline analysis the procedure of analyzing old logs for critical information, while Online analysis refer to the procedure of early alerting and reacting. ...

  13. LHCb: The LHCb Silicon Tracker - Control system specific tools and challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Saornil Gamarra, S

    2013-01-01

    The experiment control system of the LHCb experiment is continuously evolving and improving. The guidelines and structure initially defined are kept, and more common tools are made available to all sub-detectors. Although the main system control is mostly integrated and actions are executed in common for the whole LHCb experiment, there is some degree of freedom for each sub-system to implement the control system using these tools or by creating new ones. The implementation of the LHCb Silicon Tracker control system was extremely disorganized and with little documentation. This was due to either lack of time and manpower, and/or to limited experience and specifications. Despite this, the Silicon Tracker control system has behaved well during the first LHC run. It has continuously evolved since the start of operation and been adapted to the needs of operators with very different degrees of expertise. However, improvements and corrections have been made on a best effort basis due to time constraints placed by t...

  14. Wire pad chamber for LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Botchine, B; Lazarev, V A; Sagidova, N; Vorobev, A P; Vorobyov, A; Vorobyov, Alexei

    2000-01-01

    2000-003 Wire pad chambers (WPC) have been proposed for the outer Region 4 of the LHCb Muon System. These are double gap MWPCs with small wire spacing allowing to obtain 99% detection efficiency in a 20 ns time window. The chambers have a rectangular shape with the vertical dimension from 20 cm in Station 1 to 30 cm in Station 5. The horizontal dimensions will be different with the maximal size of 3 meters in Station 5. The wires are in the vertical direction. The short wire length allows to use small wire spacing needed for high time resolution. Also, this helps to obtain the uniform gas gain over the whole chamber area. The WPC has one row of the wire pads formed by grouping wires in separate readout channels. Four WPC prototypes have been built at PNPI and tested in the PS beam at CERN. Here we report on the results from these tests. Also, the results of simulation of the WPC performance are presented.

  15. LHCb: Optimising query execution time in LHCb Bookkeeping System using partition pruning and partition wise joins

    CERN Multimedia

    Mathe, Z

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment produces a huge amount of data which has associated metadata such as run number, data taking condition (detector status when the data was taken), simulation condition, etc. The data are stored in files, replicated on the Computing Grid around the world. The LHCb Bookkeeping System provides methods for retrieving datasets based on their metadata. The metadata is stored in a hybrid database model, which is a mixture of Relational and Hierarchical database models and is based on the Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS). The database access has to be reliable and fast. In order to achieve a high timing performance, the tables are partitioned and the queries are executed in parallel. When we store large amounts of data the partition pruning is essential for database performance, because it reduces the amount of data retrieved from the disk and optimises the resource utilisation. This research presented here is focusing on the extended composite partitioning strategy such as rang...

  16. LHCb : First years of running for the LHCb calorimeter system and preparation for run 2

    CERN Multimedia

    Chefdeville, Maximilien

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva). It comprises a calorimeter system composed of four subdetectors: a Scintillating Pad Detector (SPD) and a Pre-Shower detector (PS) in front of an electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) which is followed by a hadron calorimeter (HCAL). They are used to select transverse energy hadron, electron and photon candidates for the first trigger level and they provides the identification of electrons, photons and hadrons as well as the measurement of their energies and positions. The calorimeter has been pre-calibrated before its installation in the pit. The calibration techniques have been tested with data taken in 2010 and used regularly during run 1. For run 2, new calibration methods have been devised to follow and correct online the calorimeter detector response. The design and construction characteristics of the LHCb calorimeter will be recalled. Strategies for...

  17. Virtualization for the LHCb Online system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorsi, Enrico; Brarda, Loic; Moine, Gary; Neufeld, Niko

    2011-01-01

    Virtualization has long been advertised by the IT-industry as a way to cut down cost, optimise resource usage and manage the complexity in large data-centers. The great number and the huge heterogeneity of hardware, both industrial and custom-made, has up to now led to reluctance in the adoption of virtualization in the IT infrastructure of large experiment installations. Our experience in the LHCb experiment has shown that virtualization improves the availability and the manageability of the whole system. We have done an evaluation of available hypervisors / virtualization solutions and find that the Microsoft HV technology provides a high level of maturity and flexibility for our purpose. We present the results of these comparison tests, describing in detail, the architecture of our virtualization infrastructure with a special emphasis on the security for services visible to the outside world. Security is achieved by a sophisticated combination of VLANs, firewalls and virtual routing - the cost and benefits of this solution are analysed. We have adapted our cluster management tools, notably Quattor, for the needs of virtual machines and this allows us to migrate smoothly services on physical machines to the virtualized infrastructure. The procedures for migration will also be described. In the final part of the document we describe our recent R and D activities aiming to replacing the SAN-backend for the virtualization by a cheaper iSCSI solution - this will allow to move all servers and related services to the virtualized infrastructure, excepting the ones doing hardware control via non-commodity PCI plugin cards.

  18. LHCb : Clock and timing distribution in the LHCb upgraded detector and readout system

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, Federico; Barros Marin, M; Cachemiche, JP; Hachon, F; Jacobsson, Richard; Wyllie, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is upgrading part of its detector and the entire readout system towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity and increase its trigger efficiency. In this paper, the new timing, trigger and control distribution system for such an upgrade is reviewed with particular attention given to the distribution of the clock and timing information across the entire readout system, up to the FE and the on-detector electronics. Current ideas are here presented in terms of reliability, jitter, complexity and implementation.

  19. Performance of the LHCb muon system with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, M; Auriemma, G; Baldini, W; Bencivenni, G; Berutti, R; Bocci, V; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Botchin, B; Cadeddu, S; Campana, P; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Carletti, M; Ciambrone, P; Dane, E; de Capua, S; Deplano, C; De Simone, P; Dettori, F; Falabella, A; Ferreira Rodriguez, F; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Graziani, G; Gruber, L; Kashchuk, A; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Lenzi, M; Levitskaya, O; Mair, K; Maev, O; Manca, G; Martellotti, G; Massafferri Rodrigues, A; Messi, R; Murtas, F; Neustroev, P; Oldeman, R G.C; Palutan, M; Passaleva, G; Penso, G; Petrella, A; Pinci, D; Pozzi, S; Sabatino, G; Saitta, B; Santacesaria, R; Santovetti, E; Saputi, A; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, T; Sciubba, A; Shatalov, P; Vecchi, S; Veltri, M; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb Muon system performance is presented using cosmic ray events collected in 2009. These events allowed to test and optimize the detector configuration before the LHC start. The space and time alignment and the measurement of chamber efficiency, time resolution and cluster size are described in detail. The results are in agreement with the expected detector performance.

  20. LHCb : Performance of the LHCb tracking system in Run I of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system consists of a Vertex Locator around the interaction point, a tracking station with four layers of silicon strip detectors in front of the magnet, and three tracking stations, using either straw-tubes or silicon strip detectors, behind the magnet. This system allows to reconstruct charged particles with a high efficiency (typically > 95% for particles with momentum > 5 GeV) and an excellent momentum resolution (0.5% for particles with momentum mu mu. Furthermore an optimal decay time resolution is an essential element in the studies of time dependent CP violation. Thanks to the excellent performance of the tracking system, a decay time resolution of ~50 fs is obtained, allowing to resolve the fast B0s oscillation with a mixing frequency of 17.7 ps-1. In this talk, we will give an overview of the track reconstruction in LHCb and review its performance in Run I of the LHC. We will highlight the challenges and improvements of the track reconstruction for the data taking period from 2015 ...

  1. LHCb: Study of the Performance of the LHCb Muon System with First LHC Data

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardini, A

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb Muon System is composed by five detection stations (M1-M5), one upstream and four downstream of the calorimeter system, equipped on the 99% of the surface with a total of 1368 Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC). Triple-GEM detectors with digital pad readout were chosen for the innermost region of the first station thanks to their excellent performances, in particular for what concerns rate capability and radiation hardness. In order to allow a fast evaluation of the transverse momentum of muons, all detectors are required to have a high efficiency, a fast response and a good space resolution with a readout granularity that decreases with the distance from the beam axis. The detector installation phase (2006-2009) was followed by an extensive commissioning and events were acquired with pulse trigger to several millions of cosmic tracks already in the commissioning phase and are being used for the first LHC collisions.

  2. The Usage of ROOT in the LHCb Online System

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, M

    2013-01-01

    The online system in the LHCb experiment uses ROOT in various areas. ROOT is used in all processes participating in event data processing. The degree of usage varies quite significantly - from the very rudimentary usage of the ROOT plugin mechanism to fully equipped applications filling histograms with data describing online the detector status for monitoring purposes and the display of these data. An increasing number of processes uses the python binding offered by PyROOT to configure these processes. PyROOT also allows to efficiently and quickly manipulate certain corners of the experiment controls system where necessary. Beside these areas, where the LHCb online team advocated the usage of ROOT, in other areas other technologies were chosen. These deliberate choices like e.g. in the area of persistency of event data from particle collisions will be discussed.

  3. LHCB: Non-POSIX File System for the LHCB Online Event Handling

    CERN Multimedia

    Garnier, J-C; Cherukuwada, S S

    2010-01-01

    LHCb aims to use its O(20000) CPU cores in the High Level Trigger (HLT) and its 120 TB Online storage system for data reprocessing during LHC shutdown periods. These periods can last between a few days and several weeks during the winter shutdown or even only a few hours during beam interfill gaps. These jobs run on files which are staged in from tape storage to the local storage buffer. The result are again one or more files. Efficient file writing and reading is essential for the performance of the system. Rather than using a traditional shared filesystem such as NFS or CIFS we have implemented a custom, light-weight, non-Posix file-system for the handling of these files. Streaming this filesystem for the data-access allows to obtain high performance, while at the same time keep the resource consumption low and add nice features not found in NFS such as high-availability, transparent failover of the read and write service. The writing part of this file-system is in successful use for the Online, real-time w...

  4. LHCb: Phronesis, a diagnosis and recovery tool for system administrators

    CERN Multimedia

    Haen, C; Bonaccorsi, E; Neufeld, N

    2013-01-01

    The backbone of the LHCb experiment is the Online system, which is a very large and heterogeneous computing center. Making sure of the proper behavior of the many different tasks running on the more than 2000 servers represents a huge workload for the small expert-operator team and is a 24/7 task. At the occasion of CHEP 2012, we presented a prototype of a framework that we designed in order to support the experts. The main objective is to provide them with always improving diagnosis and recovery solutions in case of misbehavior of a service, without having to modify the original applications. Our framework is based on adapted principles of the Autonomic Computing model, on reinforcement learning algorithms, as well as innovative concepts such as Shared Experience. While the presentation made at CHEP 2012 showed the validity of our prototype on simulations, we here present a version with improved algorithms, manipulation tools, and report on experience with running it in the LHCb Online system.

  5. Timing and Readout Contorl in the LHCb Upgraded Readout System

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In 2019, the LHCb experiment at CERN will undergo a major upgrade where its detectors electronics and entire readout system will be changed to read-out events at the full LHC rate of 40 MHz. In this paper, the new timing, trigger and readout control system for such upgrade is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the distribution of the clock, timing and synchronization information across the entire readout system using generic FTTH technology like Passive Optical Networks. Moreover the system will be responsible to generically control the Front-End electronics by transmitting configuration data and receiving monitoring data, offloading the software control system from the heavy task of manipulating complex protocols of thousands of Front-End electronics devices. The way in which this was implemented is here reviewed with a description of results from first implementations of the system, including usages in test-benches, implementation of techniques for timing distribution and latency control."

  6. ARIADNE: a Tracking System for Relationships in LHCb Metadata

    CERN Document Server

    Shapoval, I; Cattaneo, M

    2014-01-01

    The data processing model of the LHCb experiment implies handling of an evolving set of heterogeneous metadata entities and relationships between them. The entities range from software and databases states to architecture specificators and software/data deployment locations. For instance, there is an important relationship between the LHCb Conditions Database (CondDB), which provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data, and the LHCb software, which is the data processing applications (used for simulation, high level triggering, reconstruction and analysis of physics data). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that relationships between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. These issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. In this paper we present Ari...

  7. LHCb Silicon Tracker DAQ and DCS Online Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    Buechler, A; Rodriguez, P

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva Switzerland is specialized on precision measurements of b quark decays. The Silicon Tracker (ST) contributes a crucial part in tracking the particle trajectories and consists of two silicon micro-strip detectors, the Tracker Turicensis upstream of the LHCb magnet and the Inner Tracker downstream. The radiation and the magnetic field represent new challenges for the implementation of a Detector Control System (DCS) and the data acquisition (DAQ). The DAQ has to deal with more than 270K analog readout channels, 2K readout chips and real time DAQ at a rate of 1.1 MHz with data processing at TELL1 level. The TELL1 real time algorithms for clustering thresholds and other computations run on dedicated FPGAs that implement 13K configurable parameters per board, in total 1.17 K parameters for the ST. After data processing the total throughput amounts to about 6.4 Gbytes from an input data rate of around ~337 Gbytes per second. A finite state ma...

  8. LHCb on track

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    On 7 and 8 June 2006, the last large component of the LHCb experiment was lowered into the cavern. This 10-tonne, 18-metre long metal structure known as 'the bridge' will support the LHCb tracking system.

  9. The Monitor System for the LHCb on-line farm

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Carbone, A; Galli, D; Gregori, D; Marconi, U; Peco, G; Vagnoni, V

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb on-line farm Monitor System is to keep under control all the working indicators which are relevant for the farm operation, and to set the appropriate alarms whenever an error or a critical condition comes up. Since the most stressing tasks of the farm are the data transfer and processing, relevant indicators includes the CPU and the memory load of the system, the network interface and the TCP/IP stack parameters, the rates of the interrupts raised by the network interface card and the detailed status of the running processes. The monitoring of computers’ physical conditions (temperatures, fan speeds and motherboard voltages) are the subject of a separate technical note, since they are accessed in a different way, by using the IPMI protocol.

  10. LHCb:MuSyC: a Software Package for the time alignment of the LHCb Muon System

    CERN Multimedia

    Lai, A

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb Muon System consists of 122000 front-end channels, which require being time-aligned within about 2 ns for proper operation of the experiment trigger. We describe a program which, on the base of the information acquired directly from detector, is able to calculate all the time parameters (programmable delay settings) to be loaded at different stages of the System in order to fix the necessary system calibration. The same criteria and similar procedures are also used to monitor the correct system time behavior during data-taking.

  11. File-Metadata Management System for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cioffi, C

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb experiment needs to store all the information about the datasets and their processing history of recorded data resulting from particle collisions at the LHC collider at CERN as well as of simulated data. To achieve this functionality a design based on data warehousing techniques was chosen, where several user-services can be implemented and optimized individually without losing functionality nor performance. This approach results in an experiment- independent and flexible system. It allows fast access to the catalogue of available data, to detailed history information and to the catalogue of data replicas. Queries can be made based on these three sets of information. A flexible underlying database schema allows the implementation and evolution of these services without the need to change the basic database schema. The consequent implementation of interfaces based on XML-RPC allows to access and to modify the stored information using a well defined encapsulating API.

  12. Time-integrated CP violation measurements in the B mesons system at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinale, R

    2016-01-01

    Time-integrated CP violation measurements in the B meson system provide information for testing the CKM picture of CP violation in the Standard Model. A review of recent results from the LHCb experiment is presented.

  13. Aufbau der Ausleseelektronik für das äussere Spurkammersystem des LHCb-Detektors

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedner, D

    2004-01-01

    The readout electronics of the LHCb outer tracker measures the drift time in the straw tubes, digitizes the time signal and stores it in a 160 word deep buffer. For a positive pre-trigger (L0) decision the drift time information is serialized and transmitted over optical fiber to a trigger and L1 buffer board. Here the data are de-serialized, checked, translated into spacial information and stored for a maximum of 60 ms. The level 1 trigger (L1) selected events are broadcasted to a PC farm with about 1000 CPUs. Because of the high interaction rate of 40 MHz and an occupancy of up to 10%, the electronics used in the irradiated area must be fast. Three radiation hard chips are used for the readout. The ASDBLR preamplifier amplifies and discriminates the charge pulse from the drift electrons. For the outer tracker the OTIS TDC was developed, it must measure drift times of 32 channels every 25 ns. The GOL chip is used for the data transmission via optical fiber. It serializes the data from four TDCs and feeds the...

  14. High rate tests of the LHCb RICH Upgrade system

    CERN Multimedia

    Blago, Michele Piero

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges for the upgrade of the LHCb RICH detectors from 2020 is to readout the photon detectors at the full 40 MHz rate of the LHC proton-proton collisions. A test facility has been setup at CERN with the purpose to investigate the behaviour of the Multi Anode PMTs, which have been proposed for the upgrade, and their readout electronics at high trigger rates. The MaPMTs are illuminated with a monochromatic laser that can be triggered independently of the readout electronics. A first series of tests, including threshold scans, is performed at low trigger rates (20 kHz) for both the readout and the laser with the purpose to characterise the behaviour of the system under test. Then the trigger rate is increased in two separate steps. First the MaPMTs are exposed to high illumination by triggering the pulsed laser at a high (20 MHz) repetition rate while the DAQ is readout at the same low rate as before. In this way the performance of the MaPMTs and the attached electronics can be evaluated ...

  15. Performance and Upgrade Plans of the LHCb Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Gligorov, Vladimir V

    2013-01-01

    The trigger of the LHCb experiment consists of two stages : an initial hardware trigger, and a high-level trigger implemented in a farm of parallel-processing CPUs. It reduces the event rate from an input of 15 MHz to an output rate of around 4 kHz. In order to maximize efficiencies and minimize biases, the trigger is designed around inclusive selection algorithms, culminating in a novel boosted decision tree which enables the efficient selection of beauty hadron decays based on a robust partial reconstruction of their decay products. In order to improve performance, the LHCb upgrade aims to significantly increase the rate at which the detector will be read out, and hence shift more of the workload onto the high-level trigger. It is demonstrated that the current high-level trigger architecture will be able to meet this challenge, and the expected efficiencies in several key channels are discussed in context of the LHCb upgrade.

  16. LHCb: The nightly build and test system for LCG AA and LHCb software

    CERN Multimedia

    Kruzelecki, K; Degaudenzi, H

    2009-01-01

    The core software stack both from the LCG Application Area and LHCb consists of more than 25 C++/Fortran/Python projects build for about 20 different configurations on Linux, Windows and MacOSX. To these projects, one can also add about 20 external software packages (Boost, Python, Qt, CLHEP, ...) which have also to be build for the same configurations. It order to reduce the time of the development cycle and increase the quality insurance, a framework has been developed for the daily (nightly actually) build and test of the software. Performing the build and the tests on several configurations and platform allows to increase the efficiency of the unit and integration tests. Main features: - flexible and fine grained setup (full, partial build) through a web interface - possibility to build several "slots" with different configurations - precise and highly granular reports on a web server - support for CMT projects (but not only) with their cross-dependencies. - scalable client -server architecture for the co...

  17. LHCb: The LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Borghi, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the LHC. The operation and the results obtained from the data collected in 2010 and 2011 demonstrate that the detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of ~1 fb$^{–1}$ of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. We therefore plan for an upgraded spectrometer by 2018 with a 40 MHz readout and a much more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency, especially in the hadronic channels

  18. A new readout control system for the LHCb upgrade at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire readout architecture will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate and higher network load. In this paper, we describe the architecture, functionalities and a first hardware implementation of a new fast Readout Control system for the LHCb upgrade, which will be entirely based on FPGAs and bi-directional links. We also outline the real-time implementations of the new Readout Control system, together with solutions on how to handle the synchronous distribution of timing and synchronous information to the complex upgraded LHCb readout architecture. One section will also be dedicated to the control and usage of the newly developed CERN GBT chipset to transmit fast and slow control commands to the upgraded LHCb Front-End electronics. At the end, we outline the plans for the deployment of the system in the global LHCb upgrade readout architecture.

  19. The PCIe-based readout system for the LHCb experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachemiche, J. P.; Duval, P. Y.; Hachon, F.; Le Gac, R.; Réthoré, F.

    2016-02-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study differences between particles and anti-particles as well as very rare decays in the beauty and charm sector at the LHC. The detector will be upgraded in 2019 in order to significantly increase its efficiency, by removing the first-level hardware trigger. The upgrade experiment will implement a trigger-less readout system in which all the data from every LHC bunch-crossing are transported to the computing farm over 12000 optical links without hardware filtering. The event building and event selection are carried out entirely in the farm. Another original feature of the system is that data transmitted through these fibres arrive directly to computers through a specially designed PCIe card called PCIe40. The same board handles the data acquisition flow and the distribution of fast and slow controls to the detector front-end electronics. It embeds one of the most powerful FPGAs currently available on the market with 1.2 million logic cells. The board has a bandwidth of 480 Gbits/s in both input and output over optical links and 100 Gbits/s over the PCI Express bus to the CPU. We will present how data circulate through the board and in the PC server for achieving the event building. We will focus on specific issues regarding the design of such a board with a very large FPGA, in particular in terms of power supply dimensioning and thermal simulations. The features of the board will be detailed and we will finally present the first performance measurements.

  20. The PCIe-based readout system for the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachemiche, J.P.; Duval, P.Y.; Hachon, F.; Gac, R. Le; Réthoré, F.

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study differences between particles and anti-particles as well as very rare decays in the beauty and charm sector at the LHC. The detector will be upgraded in 2019 in order to significantly increase its efficiency, by removing the first-level hardware trigger. The upgrade experiment will implement a trigger-less readout system in which all the data from every LHC bunch-crossing are transported to the computing farm over 12000 optical links without hardware filtering. The event building and event selection are carried out entirely in the farm. Another original feature of the system is that data transmitted through these fibres arrive directly to computers through a specially designed PCIe card called PCIe40. The same board handles the data acquisition flow and the distribution of fast and slow controls to the detector front-end electronics. It embeds one of the most powerful FPGAs currently available on the market with 1.2 million logic cells. The board has a bandwidth of 480 Gbits/s in both input and output over optical links and 100 Gbits/s over the PCI Express bus to the CPU. We will present how data circulate through the board and in the PC server for achieving the event building. We will focus on specific issues regarding the design of such a board with a very large FPGA, in particular in terms of power supply dimensioning and thermal simulations. The features of the board will be detailed and we will finally present the first performance measurements

  1. The LHCb RICH system: current detector performance and status of the upgrade program

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorini, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    LHCb is a precision experiment devoted to the study of CP violation and rare decays of b and c quarks, and to the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system is a key component of the LHCb experiment: it consists of two RICH detectors that provide charged particle identification over a wide momentum range (2-100 GeV/c) and angular acceptance (15-300 mrad). The LHCb RICH system has been performing extremely well during Run 1 and is providing the LHCb experiment also in Run 2 with a robust, reliable and precise particle identification system. Performance of the RICH detectors measured from data will be presented, with special reference to its dependence on calibration parameters and event multiplicities. The LHCb experiment is preparing for an upgrade during the second LHC long shutdown (2019-2020) in order to fully exploit the LHC flavour physics potential. A five-fold increase in instantaneous luminosity is foreseen reac...

  2. Beam test results for the upgraded LHCb RICH opto-electronic readout system

    CERN Multimedia

    Carniti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is devoted to high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics by studying the decays of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Two RICH detectors are currently installed and operating successfully, providing a crucial role in the particle identification system of the LHCb experiment. Starting from 2019, the LHCb experiment will be upgraded to operate at higher luminosity, extending its potential for discovery and study of new phenomena. Both the RICH detectors will be upgraded and the entire opto-electronic system has been redesigned in order to cope with the new specifications, namely higher readout rates, and increased occupancies. The new photodetectors, readout electronics, mechanical assembly and cooling system have reached the final phase of development and their performance was thoroughly and successfully validated during several beam test sessions in 2014 and 2015 at the SPS facility at CERN. Details of the test setup and perf...

  3. First experiences with a parallel architecture testbed in the LHCb trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00293740; Lucchesi, Donatella; Gianelle, Alessio; Amerio, Silvia; Corvo, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In this note we will discuss the application of new technologies, such as GPU cards, in the current LHCb trigger system. During Run2, a node equipped with a GPU has been inserted in the LHCb online monitoring system. During normal data taking, real events have been sent to the node and processed by GPU-based and CPU-based tracking algorithms. This gave us the unique opportunity to test the new hardware and the new algorithms in the real-time environment of the experiment. In the following sections, we will describe the algorithm developed for parallel architectures, the setup of the testbed and the results compared to the LHCb official reconstruction.

  4. First results from an aging test of a prototype RPC for the LHCb Muon System

    CERN Document Server

    Bizzeti, A; Collazuol, G; De Capua, S; Dominici, Daniele; Ganis, G; Messi, R; Passaleva, G; Santovetti, E; Veltri, M; Bizzeti, Andrea; Carboni, Giovanni; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Capua, Stefano De; Domenici, Danilo; Ganis, Gerardo; Messi, Roberto; Passaleva, Giovanni; Santovetti, Emanuele; Veltri, Michele

    2003-01-01

    Recent results of an aging test performed at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility on a single--gap RPC prototype developed for the LHCb Muon System are presented. The results are based on an accumulated charge of about 0.45 C/cm$^2$, corresponding to about 4 years of LHCb running at the highest background rate. The performance of the chamber has been studied under several photon flux values exploiting a muon beam. A degradation of the rate capability above 1 kHz/cm$^2$ is observed, which can be correlated to a sizeable increase of resistivity of the chamber plates. An increase of the chamber dark current is also observed. The chamber performance is found to fulfill the LHCb operation requirements.

  5. Performance of the RASNIK Optical Alignment Monitoring System for the LHCb Outer Tracker Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Szczekowski, Marek; Ukleja, Artur; Pellegrino, Antonio; Hart, Robert; Syryczynski, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    We present the results collected by an optical system for position control of the Outer Tracker detector stations in the LHCb experiment. This system has been constructed using the RASNIK three-point alignment monitors. The measurements are based on data taken in Run 2 of LHC.

  6. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, Mateusz Karol; Calabrese, Roberto; Cardinale, Roberta; Carniti, Paolo; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cojocariu, Lucian Nicolae; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dorosz, Piotr Andrzej; Easo, Sajan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frei, Christoph; Gambetta, Silvia; Gibson, Valerie; Gotti, Claudio; Harnew, Neville; He, Jibo; Keizer, Floris; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Maciuc, Florin; Maino, Matteo; Malaguti, Roberto; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mccann, Michael Andrew; Morris, Adam; Muheim, Franz; Papanestis, Antonis; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedigrossi, Didier; Pistone, Alessandro; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Sigurdsson, Saevar; Simi, Gabriele; Smith, Jackson William; Spradlin, Patrick; Tomassetti, Luca; Wotton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to use the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors are one of the key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper, we describe the setup and the results of the first tests in a particle beam carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded optoelectronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  7. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M.K.

    2017-01-16

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  8. Control System Virtualization for the LHCb Online System

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaccorsi, E; Neufeld, N; Sborzacchi, F

    2014-01-01

    Vir­tu­al­iza­tion pro­vides many ben­e­fits such as more ef­fi­ciency in re­source uti­liza­tion, less power con­sump­tion, bet­ter man­age­ment by cen­tral­ized con­trol and higher avail­abil­ity. It can also save time for IT pro­jects by elim­i­nat­ing ded­i­cated hard­ware pro­cure­ment and pro­vid­ing stan­dard soft­ware con­fig­u­ra­tions. In view of this vir­tu­al­iza­tion is very at­trac­tive for mis­sion-crit­i­cal pro­jects like the ex­per­i­ment con­trol-sys­tem (ECS) of the large LHCb ex­per­i­ment at CERN. This paper de­scribes our im­ple­men­ta­tion of the con­trol sys­tem in­fra­struc­ture on a gen­eral pur­pose server-hard­ware based on Linux and the RHEV en­ter­prise clus­ter­ing plat­form. The paper de­scribes the meth­ods used , our ex­pe­ri­ences and the knowl­edge ac­quired in eval­u­at­ing the per­for­mance of the setup using test sys­tems, con­straints and lim­i­ta­tions we en­coun­tered. We co...

  9. LHCb: Beam and Background Monitoring and the Upgrade of the Timing and Fast Control System of the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN is preparing for first real data taking, foreseen by the end of the year 2009 with the start-up of the LHC. A large amount of work of commissioning, tests and improvements of the full detector has been done in order to optimize its performance. During my first year as a Doctoral Student at CERN, I have been working on the timing and readout control of the LHCb experiment in the frame of the LHCb Online group. The group is responsible for the full data acquisition of the LHCb experiment, from the Front-End Electronics (FEE) to the storage of the data for offline analysis, as well as the Timing and Fast Control (TFC) system. The latter controls and distributes centrally timing and trigger information, as well as synchronous and asynchronous commands to the readout system. It is also responsible for receiving and adjusting the bunch and orbit clocks of the LHC machine and distributing it to the electronics of the whole experiment. It is of vital importance to assure that the timing o...

  10. Cluster size measurements for the LHCb Muon System M5R4 MWPCs using cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Sabatino, G; Graziani, G; Lenzi, M; Messi, R; Pennazzi, S; Santovetti, E

    2006-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of cluster size measurements in the M5R4 wire-pad readout chambers used in the LHCb Muon System. We measured the cluster size due to capacitive coupling using cosmic ray tracks at two different operating voltages. The results can be used in the muon detector complete simulation.

  11. The readout system for the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedner, D; Apeldorn, G; Bachmann, S; Bagaturia, Yu S; Bauer, T; Berkien, A; Blouw, J; Bos, E; Deisenroth, M; Dubitzki, R; Eisele, F; Guz, Yu; Haas, T; Hommels, B; Ketel, T; Knopf, J; Merk, M; Nardulli, J; Nedos, M; Pellegrino, A; Rausch, A; Rusnyak, R; Schwemmer, R; Simoni, E; Sluijk, T; Spaan, B; Spelt, J; Stange, U; Van Tilburg, J; Trunk, U; Tuning, N; Uwer, U; Vankow, P; Warda, K

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is composed of 55 000 straw drift tubes. The requirements for the OT electronics are the precise (1 ns) drift time measurement at 6 % occupancy and 1 MHz readout. Charge signals from the straw detector are amplified, shaped and discriminated by ATLAS ASDBLR chips. Drift-times are determined and stored in the OTIS TDC and put out to a GOL serializer at L0 accept. Optical fibres carry the data 90 m to the TELL1 acquisition board. The full readout chain performed well in an e- test beam.

  12. A Readout System for the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedner, D; Apeldorn , G; Bachmann, S; Bagaturi , I; Bauer, T; Berkien, A; Blouw, J; Bos, E; Deisenroth, M; Dubitzki, R; Eisele, F; Guz , Y; Haas, T; Hommels, B; Ketel, T; Knopf , J; Merk , M; Nardulli , J; Nedos, M; Pellegrino, A; Rausch, A; Rusnyak, R; Schwemmer, R; Simoni, E; Sluijk , T; Spaan, B; Spelt , J; Stange, U; van Tilburg, J; Trunk , U; Tuning , N; Uwer, U; Vankow , P; Warda, K

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb Outer Tracker is composed of 55 000 straw drift tubes. The requirements for the OT electronics are the precise (1 ns) drift time measurement at 6 % occupancy and 1 MHz readout. Charge signals from the straw detector are amplified, shaped and discriminated by ATLAS ASDBLR chips. Drift-times are determined and stored in the OTIS TDC and put out to a GOL serializer at L0 accept. Optical fibres carry the data 90 m to the TELL1 acquisition board. The full readout chain performed well in an e- test beam.

  13. LHCbDirac: distributed computing in LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagni, F.; Charpentier, P.; Graciani, R.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Closier, J.; Mathe, Z.; Ubeda, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Lanciotti, E.; Romanovskiy, V.; Ciba, K. D.; Casajus, A.; Roiser, S.; Sapunov, M.; Remenska, D.; Bernardoff, V.; Santana, R.; Nandakumar, R.

    2012-12-01

    We present LHCbDirac, an extension of the DIRAC community Grid solution that handles LHCb specificities. The DIRAC software has been developed for many years within LHCb only. Nowadays it is a generic software, used by many scientific communities worldwide. Each community wanting to take advantage of DIRAC has to develop an extension, containing all the necessary code for handling their specific cases. LHCbDirac is an actively developed extension, implementing the LHCb computing model and workflows handling all the distributed computing activities of LHCb. Such activities include real data processing (reconstruction, stripping and streaming), Monte-Carlo simulation and data replication. Other activities are groups and user analysis, data management, resources management and monitoring, data provenance, accounting for user and production jobs. LHCbDirac also provides extensions of the DIRAC interfaces, including a secure web client, python APIs and CLIs. Before putting in production a new release, a number of certification tests are run in a dedicated setup. This contribution highlights the versatility of the system, also presenting the experience with real data processing, data and resources management, monitoring for activities and resources.

  14. LHCb: LHCb Distributed Computing Operations

    CERN Multimedia

    Stagni, F

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation of tools for monitoring both activities and infrastructure, together with the pressing need for prompt reaction in case of problems impacting data taking, data reconstruction, data reprocessing and user analysis brought to the need of better organizing the huge amount of information available. The monitoring system for the LHCb Grid Computing relies on many heterogeneous and independent sources of information offering different views for a better understanding of problems while an operations team and defined procedures have been put in place to handle them. This work summarizes the state-of-the-art of LHCb Grid operations emphasizing the reasons that brought to various choices and what are the tools currently in use to run our daily activities. We highlight the most common problems experienced across years of activities on the WLCG infrastructure, the services with their criticality, the procedures in place, the relevant metrics and the tools available and the ones still missing.

  15. First experiences with a parallel architecture testbed in the LHCb trigger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallorini, S.; Lucchesi, D.; Gianelle, A.; Amerio, S.; Corvo, M.

    2017-10-01

    In view of Run3 (2020) the LHCb experiment is planning a major upgrade to fully readout events at 40 MHz collision rate. This in order to highly increase the statistic of the collected samples and go further in precision beyond Run2. An unprecedented amount of data will be produced, which will be fully reconstructed real-time to perform fast selection and categorization of interesting events. The collaboration has decided to go for a fully software trigger which will have a total time budget of 13 ms to take a decision. This calls for faster hardware and software. In this talk we will present our efforts on the application of new technologies, such as GPU cards, for the future LHCb trigger system. During Run2 a node equipped with a GPU has been inserted in the LHCb online monitoring system; during normal data taking, a subset of real events is sent to the node and processed in parallel by GPU-based and CPU-based track reconstruction algorithms. This gives us the unique opportunity to test the new hardware and the new algorithms in a realistic environment. We will present the setup of the testbed, the algorithms developed for parallel architectures and discuss the performance compared to the current LHCb track reconstruction algorithms.

  16. Development and test of the CO2 evaporative cooling system for the LHCb UT Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Coelli, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb detector, which will take place during the Long Shutdown 2 from mid 2018 to the end of 2019, will extend significantly the physics reach of the experiment by allowing it to run at higher instantaneous luminosity with increased trigger efficiency for a wide range of decay channels. The LHCb upgrade relies on two major changes. Firstly, the full read-out of the front-end electronics, currently limited by a Level-0 trigger to 1 MHz, will be replaced with a 40 MHz trigger system. Secondly, the upgraded LHCb detector will be designed to cope with an increase of the nominal operational luminosity by a factor five compared to the current detector. Compared to the current experiment several subsystems need to be partially rebuilt. Among these the 4 TT planes will be replaced by new high granularity silicon micro-strip planes with an improved coverage of the LHCb acceptance.The new system is called the Upstream Tracker. The radiation length of each UT plane should not exceed the value of 1 % X0...

  17. LHCb: LHCb Upstream Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Manning Jr, P; Stone, S

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb upgrade requires replacing the silicon strip tracker between the vertex locator and the magnet. A new design has been developed and tested based on the "stave" concept planned for the ATLAS upgrade. We will describe the new detector being constructed and show its improved performance in charged particle tracking and triggering.

  18. First results of an aging test of a full scale MWPC prototype for the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Souvorov, V; Schmidt, B; Riegler, Werner; Kashchuk, A; Hutchcroft, D E

    2003-01-01

    Aging studies for a multi-wire proportional chamber of the LHCb muon system have been performed using the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. The irradiated four-gap chamber corresponds to a full-size prototype with 1500 cm**2 sensitive area and has been operated with an Ar/CO //2/CF//4 (40:50:10) gas mixture. A linear charge of 0.25 C/cm for 100 m anode wire length has been accumulated over a period of 6 months, which corresponds to the charge collected in 5 LHCb years. The observed aging effects do not prohibit the use of these chambers in the LHCb experiment.

  19. An integrated experiment control system, architecture, and benefits The LHCb approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, C; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Morlini, S; Neufeld, N; Vannerem, P

    2004-01-01

    LHCb's Experiment Control System will handle the configuration, monitoring, and operation of all experimental equipment involved in the various activities of the experiment. A control framework (based on an industrial SCADA system) allowing the integration of the various devices into a coherent hierarchical system is being developed in common for the four Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the same architecture and tools can be used to control and monitor all the different types of devices, from front-end electronics boards to temperature sensors to algorithms in an event filter farm, thus providing LHCb with a homogeneous control system and a coherent interface to all parts of the experiment. 9 Refs.

  20. Production of the front-end boards of the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Bonivento, W; Auriemma, G

    2008-01-01

    This note describes the production of the front end boards CARDIAC, for the 1368 MWPC, and CARDIAC-GEM, for the 12 triple-GEM chambers, of the LHCb muon system. The PCB structure and component layout and the production issues, such as component soldering, quality assurance at the company and delivery rates, are described. The performance of these boards will be the subject of a future publication.

  1. The LHCb RICH Upgrade: Development of the DCS and DAQ system.

    CERN Multimedia

    Cavallero, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is preparing for an upgrade during the second LHC long shutdown in 2019-2020. In order to fully exploit the LHC flavour physics potential with a five-fold increase in the instantaneous luminosity, a trigger-less readout will be implemented. The RICH detectors will require new photon detectors and a brand new front-end electronics. The status of the integration of the RICH photon detector modules with the MiniDAQ, the prototype of the upgraded LHCb readout architecture, has been reported. The development of the prototype of the RICH Upgrade Experiment Control System, integrating the DCS and DAQ partitions in a single FSM, has been described. The status of the development of the RICH Upgrade Inventory, Bookkeeping and Connectivity database has been reported as well.

  2. Status of the Test System of the MWPC for the LHCb Muon System

    CERN Document Server

    Massafferri, A; Santoveti, E; Nobrega, R; Bocci, V

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the apparatus and the procedure used to test the 1368 Multi Wire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) after front-end assembly for the LHCb Muon System. Given a fully equipped chamber, this system is able to diagnose every channel through an analysis of front-end output drivers and noise rate versus threshold response. In addition, it verifies if the noise rate at the operational threshold is within appropriate limits. Aiming at an automatic, fast and userfriendly system for mass production tests of MWPC, the project has foreseen as well electronic identification of every chamber and front-end board, and data archiving in such a way to make it available to the Experiment Control System (ECS). The results obtained on about 130 chambers tested are described.

  3. Clock and timing distribution in the LHCb upgraded detector and readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Barros Marin, M; Cachemiche, JP; Hachon, F; Jacobsson, R; Wyllie, K

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is upgrading part of its detector and the entire readout system towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity and increase its trigger efficiency. In this paper, the new timing, trigger and control distribution system for such an upgrade is reviewed with particular attention given to the distribution of the clock and timing information across the entire readout system, up to the FE and the on-detector electronics. Current ideas are here presented in terms of reliability, jitter, complexity and implementation.

  4. LHCb: Dataflow Monitoring in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Svantesson, D; Neufeld, N; Schwemmer, R

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb data-flow starts from the collection of event-fragments from more than 300 read-out boards at a rate of 1 MHz. These data are moved through a large switching network consisting of more than 50 routers to an event-filter farm of up to 2000 servers. Accepted events are sent through a dedicated network to storage collection nodes which concatenate accepted events in to files and transfer them to mass-storage. At nominal conditions more than 30 million packets enter and leave the network every second. Precise monitoring of this data-flow down to the single packet counter is essential to trace rare but systematic sources of data-loss. We have developed a comprehensive monitoring framework allowing to verify the data-flow at every level using a variety of standard tools and protocols such as sFlow, SNMP and custom software based on the LHCb Experiment Control System frame-work. This paper starts from an analysis of the data-flow and the involved hardware and software layers. From this analysis it derives t...

  5. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Pérez Trigo, E; Rodríguez Pérez, P; Amhis, Y; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Cowan, G; Dupertuis, F; Fave, V; Haefeli, G; Komarov, I; Luisier, J; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Tran, M T; Anderson, J; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; De Cian, M; Elsasser, Ch; Salzmann, C; Saornil, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, V; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Britsch, M; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for new physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charm hadrons produced at the LHC. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities. The Silicon Tracker is part of the tracking system and measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. The LHCb Silicon Tracker covers a total sensitive area of about 12 M$^2$ using silicon micro-strip detectors with long readout strips. It consists of one four-layer tracking station before the LHCb dipole magnet and three stations after. The detector has performed extremely well since the start of the LHC operation despite the fact that the experiment is collecting data at instantaneous lum...

  6. LHCb: The LHCb Silicon Tracker: Running experience

    CERN Multimedia

    Saornil Gamarra, S

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb Silicon Tracker is part of the main tracking system of the LHCb detector at the LHC. It measures very precisely the particle trajectories coming from the interaction point in the region of high occupancies around the beam axis. After presenting our production and comissioning issues in TWEPP 2008, we report on our running experience. Focusing on electronic and hardware issues as well as operation and maintenance adversities, we describe the lessons learned and the pitfalls encountered after three years of successful operation.

  7. Beam tests of WPC-7 prototype of iwire pad chambers for the LHCb muon system

    CERN Document Server

    Bochin, B; Lazarev, V A; Saguidova, N; Spiridenkov, E M; Vorobev, A P; Vorobyov, A

    2000-01-01

    A new prototype of the Wire Pad Chamber for the LHCb Muon System, WPC-7, has been constructed at PNPI and tested in the T11 beam at CERN. This prototype proved to be more stable against the electrical discharges at high voltages thus extending the operational plateau of the chamber by 200V. This made it possible to operate with larger wire pad sizes up to 12x16cm2. This report presents the results from the beam tests of the WPC-7 prototype : time resolution and efficiency, cross-talk, noise counting rates, streamer probability measured at various high voltages and discriminator thresholds.

  8. LHCb; LHCb Jet Reconstruction

    CERN Multimedia

    Augusto, O

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world. It has been designed to collide proton beams at an energy up to 14 TeV in the center of mass. In 2011, the data taking was done with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV, the instant luminosity has reached values greater than $4 \\times 10^{32} cm^{-2} s^{-1}$ and the integrated luminosity reached the value of 1.02 $fb^{-1}$ on the LHCb. The jet reconstruction is fundamental to observe events that can be used to test pertubative QCD (pQCD). It also provides a way to observe standard model channels and searches for new physics like SUSY. The anti-kt algorithm is a jet reconstruction algorithm that is based on the distance of the particles on the space $\\eta \\times \\phi$ and on the transverse momentum of particles. To maximize the energy resolution all information about the trackers and the calo...

  9. arXiv Architecture of the LHCb muon Frontend control system upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bocci, Valerio

    2016-10-06

    The LHCb experiment(Fig. 1), that is presently taking data at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research) Large Hadron Collider (LHC), aims at the study of CP violation in the B meson sector. Its key elements is the Muon detector [1], which allows triggering, and muon identification from inclusive b decays. The electronic system (Fig. 2) of the whole detector is very complex and its Muon detector Experiment Control System (ECS) allows monitoring and control of a number of Front-End boards in excess of 7000. The present system in charge of controlling Muon detector Front-End (FE) Electronics consists of 10 Crates of equipment; each crate contains two kinds of modules: a Pulse Distribution Module (PDM) and up to 20 Service Boards (SB) connected via a custom Backplane for a total amount of about 800 microcontrollers[2]. LHCb upgrade is planned for 2018/19, which will allow the detector to exploit higher luminosity running. This upgrade will allow the experiment to accumulate more luminosity to allow measurements...

  10. System-level Specifications of the Timing and Fast Control system for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times the initial design luminosity. The various sub-systems in the readout architecture will need to be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate and higher network load. In this paper, we describe the specifications of the new Timing and Fast Control (S- TFC) system. We define the requirements for the new S-TFC, and specify its architecture and the individual components. The system is based on a single new Readout Supervisor (S-ODIN) instantiating several S-TFC masters to allow partitioning. The communication with the readout electronics is ensured by a shared high-speed optical link network for both the distribution of timing and synchronous control information, as well as trigger/throttle communication. An interface board (SOL40) with fan-out capabilities for timing and synchronous information and fan-in capabilities for throttle and rate regulation of the...

  11. LHCb data quality monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, M.; Archilli, F.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Derkach, D.; Panin, A.; Pearce, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.

    2017-10-01

    Data quality monitoring, DQM, is crucial in a high-energy physics experiment to ensure the correct functioning of the experimental apparatus during the data taking. DQM at LHCb is carried out in two phases. The first one is performed on-site, in real time, using unprocessed data directly from the LHCb detector, while the second, also performed on-site, requires the reconstruction of the data selected by the LHCb trigger system and occurs later. For the LHC Run II data taking the LHCb collaboration has re-engineered the DQM protocols and the DQM graphical interface, moving the latter to a web-based monitoring system, called Monet, thus allowing researchers to perform the second phase off-site. In order to support the operator’s task, Monet is also equipped with an automated, fully configurable alarm system, thus allowing its use not only for DQM purposes, but also to track and assess the quality of LHCb software and simulation over time.

  12. The high voltage system of the RICH and the multiplicity study with LHCb data

    CERN Document Server

    Fanchini, E; Pessina, G; Gys, T

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is about the work done during my PhD at the Univerità degli studi di Milano–Bicocca. During these three years I was involved in the RICH group of the LHCb experiment. LHCb is one of the four main experiments at CERN. It uses proton–proton collisions to study CP violation and to search for new physics beyond the Standard Model in the $b$ decays. One of the main feature of the experiment is the particle identification, performed with the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technology. The RICH detects Cherenkov rings via photons emitted by charged particles traversing radiator materials. The photon detection system used consists of pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs). They convert photons into photoelectrons which are then accelerated by means of a field generated by three electrodes, biased with high voltages (-18 kV, -17.7 kV and -14.8 kV), onto the silicon pixel anode. The energy released in the pixel is converted into a binary output. My work can be divided in two main parts: the hardware and th...

  13. A Lightweight Monitoring and Accounting System for LHCb DC'04 Production

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-García, M; Graciani-Díaz, R; Saborido-Silva, J J; Vizcaya-Carrillo, R

    2005-01-01

    The phase 1 of the LHCb Data Challenge 04[1] includes the simulation of 200 million simulated events using distributed computing resources on 63 sites and spanning over 4 months. This was achieved using the DIRAC [2] distributed computing Grid infrastructure. Job Monitoring and Accounting services have been developed to track the status of the production and to evaluate the results at the end of the Data Challenge. The end user connects with a web browser to Web-Server applications showing dynamic reports for a whole set of possible queries. These applications in turn interrogate the Job Monitoring Service and Accounting Database by means of dedicated XML-RPC interfaces, querying for the information requested by the user. The reports provide a uniform view of the usage of the computing resources available. All the system components are implemented as a set of cooperating python classes following the design choice of LHCb. The different services are distributed over a number of independent machines. This allow...

  14. The new LHCb trigger and DAQ strategy a system architecture based on gigabit-ethernet

    CERN Document Server

    Barczyk, A; Gaspar, C; Gavillet, P; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N; Vannerem, P

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb software trigger has two levels: a high-speed trigger running at 1 MHz with strictly limited latency and a second level running below 40 kHz without latency limitations. The trigger strategy requires full flexibility in the distribution of the installed CPU power to the two software trigger levels because of the unknown background levels and event topology distribution at the time the LHC accelerator will start its operation. This requirement suggests using a common CPU farm for both trigger levels fed by a common data acquisition (DAQ) infrastructure. The limited latency budget of the first level of software trigger has an impact on the organization of the CPU farm performing the trigger function for optimal usage of the installed CPU power. We will present the architecture and the design of the hardware infrastructure for the entire LHCb software triggering system based on Ethernet as link technology that fulfills these requirements. The performance of the event-building of the combined traffic of ...

  15. Job prioritization in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Castellani, G

    2007-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four high-energy experiments running in the near future at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. LHCb will try to answer some fundamental questions about the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. The experiment is expected to produce about 2PB of data per year. Those will be distributed to several laboratories all over Europe and then analyzed by the Physics community. To achieve this target LHCb fully uses the Grid to reprocess, replicate and analyze data. The access to the Grid happens through LHCb's own distributed production and analysis system, DIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control). Dirac implements the ‘pull’ job scheduling paradigm, where all the jobs are stored in a central task queues and then pulled via generic grid jobs called Pilot Agents. The whole LHCb community (about 600 people) is divided in sets of physicists, developers, production and software managers that have different needs about their jobs on the Grid. While a Monte Carlo simulation...

  16. A Cherenkov-based Beam Loss Scintillator system for beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Jacobsson, R

    2013-01-01

    The installation of a scintillator-based system in the LHCb cavern was initially proposed in order to observe injection problems around the LHCb interaction region. Thanks to the fact that LHCb had already developed a custom-made electronics board (BPIM) for the LHCb beam pickups and global LHCb timing monitoring, a complete, inexpensive but flexible and robust system was quickly developed and installed few cm from the beam pipe just in front of the LHCb VELO detector in time for the very first beams injected in the LHC. The current and final system – commonly referred to as Beam Loss Scintillator (BLS) system - ultimately played a central role in the fast beam, background and online luminosity monitoring at LHCb. In this paper, the features of the detector – based on quartz radiator and Cherenkov light - are described, including the functionalities that the system acquired during the proton-proton physics programmes in 2009- 2013 thanks to its flexibility, reliability and sensitivity to beam hal...

  17. Photomultiplier pulse Read Out system for the preshower detector of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Cornat, R; Deschamps, O; Lecoq, J; Monteil, S; Perret, P

    2003-01-01

    The second generation experiment for CP violation studies in B decays, LHCb, is a 20-m-long single-arm spectrometer to be installed on the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For its precision measurement purpose, it combines precise vertex location and particle identification, in addition to a performance trigger system able to cope with high flux. The first level of trigger is mainly based on the fast response of the calorimetric subsystem. Of major importance is the 6000 channels preshower detector that aims to validate the electromagnetic nature of calorimetric showers. It consists of two- radiation-length lead sheet in front of a scintillator plane. Scintillator signals are extracted from plastic cells using wavelength-shifting fibres coupled to multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. The preshower Read Out system has to cope with fluctuating photomultiplier pulses caused by small amounts of photoelectrons, in addition to strong constraints imposed by the 40 MHz LHC bunch- crossing frequency. A special Read...

  18. Distributed data analysis in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Paterson, S K

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb distributed data analysis system consists of the Ganga job submission front-end and the DIRAC Workload and Data Management System (WMS). Ganga is jointly developed with ATLAS and allows LHCb users to submit jobs on several backends including: several batch systems, LCG and DIRAC. The DIRAC API provides a transparent and secure way for users to run jobs to the Grid and is the default mode of submission for the LHCb Virtual Organisation (VO). This is exploited by Ganga to perform distributed user analysis for LHCb. This system provides LHCb with a consistent, efficient and simple user experience in a variety of heterogeneous environments and facilitates the incremental development of user analysis from local test jobs to the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. With a steadily increasing number of users, the LHCb distributed analysis system has been tuned and enhanced over the past two years. This paper will describe the recent developments to support distributed data analysis for the LHCb experiment on WLCG.

  19. Online Data Conversion for the LHCb Active Radiation Monitor System (ARMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Farrugia, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Active radiation monitors are distributed in and around the LHCb experiment in order to monitor the evolution of radiation dose and 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence. The active monitors are connected to an online network and their raw voltage measurement can be read out via WinCC panels. However, the raw voltage measurements must be corrected before conversion into correct dose or fluence. Previous work by [1] included a signal correction algorithm that corrects the values offline. The aim of this work is to understand how the signal correction algorithm works, archive previously corrected values into a new database system that will be integrated to a WinCC graphical interface and modify the algorithm so that it may process new values online while using less time and computing resources.

  20. LHCb: The LHCb tracking concept and performance

    CERN Multimedia

    Rodrigues, E

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb tracking system is designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories in the forward spectrometer, in view of high precision studies of CP-violating phenomena and searches for rare b-hadron decays at the LHC. The system is composed of four major subdetectors and a dedicated magnet, providing an excellent momentum resolution just above 0.4%. The tracking model is based on the innovative trajectories concept introduced by the BaBar collaboration to reconstruct and fit the tracks, and has been further developed and improved. It is now able to cope with realistic geometries and misalignments in a sophisticated, robust and detector-independent way. The LHCb tracking concept including the interplay of various complementary pattern recognition algorithms and the bi-directional Kalman fitter will be described. The current performance of the tracking, based on the latest simulations, will be presented. Recent results obtained with the first LHC beam tracks from injection tests will be discussed.

  1. LHCb: Quarkonium Production at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Frosini, M

    2011-01-01

    Despite large experimental and theoretical efforts, quarkonium production in hadronic collisions is not yet satisfactorily understood. Due to its forward geometry, LHCb has the unique opportunity to explore the field of quarkonium production at high rapidity, thus exploring new and unknown territory. We report he measurement of the double differential $J/\\psi, \\psi (2S)$ and $\\Upsilon$ cross section at LHCb with the data sample recorded by the LHCb experiment during the 2010 data taking. The $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi (2S)$ prompt components are separated from the products of b-hadrons decays using topological information. The results are compared with several theoretical models and other experiments. Preliminary results and prospects for the other quarkonium states will also be given.

  2. LHCb: Improvements in the LHCb DAQ

    CERN Multimedia

    Campora, D; Schwemmer, R

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb data acquisition system is realized as a Gigabit Ethernet local area network with more than 330 FPGA driven data-sources, two core-routers, 56 fan-out switches and more than 1400 servers (will be upgraded to about 1800 soon). In total there are almost 3000 switch-ports. Data are pushed top-down, quasi-synchronously using n unreliable datagram protocol (like UDP).

  3. The LHCb trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolko, I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes progress in the development of the LHCb trigger system since the letter of intent. The trigger philosophy has significantly changed, resulting in an increase of trigger efficiency for signal B events. It is proposed to implement a level-1 vertex topology trigger in specialised hardware. (orig.)

  4. LHCb: Hardware Data Injector

    CERN Multimedia

    Delord, V; Neufeld, N

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb High Level Trigger and Data Acquisition system selects about 2 kHz of events out of the 1 MHz of events, which have been selected previously by the first-level hardware trigger. The selected events are consolidated into files and then sent to permanent storage for subsequent analysis on the Grid. The goal of the upgrade of the LHCb readout is to lift the limitation to 1 MHz. This means speeding up the DAQ to 40 MHz. Such a DAQ system will certainly employ 10 Gigabit or technologies and might also need new networking protocols: a customized TCP or proprietary solutions. A test module is being presented, which integrates in the existing LHCb infrastructure. It is a 10-Gigabit traffic generator, flexible enough to generate LHCb's raw data packets using dummy data or simulated data. These data are seen as real data coming from sub-detectors by the DAQ. The implementation is based on an FPGA using 10 Gigabit Ethernet interface. This module is integrated in the experiment control system. The architecture, ...

  5. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  6. An approach for high voltage power supply system for HCAL of LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimpean, A.; Dumitru, D.; Kluger, A.; Magureanu, C.; Tarta, D.; Coca, C.; Orlandea, M.; Popescu, S.

    2003-01-01

    The main aim of the calorimeter system of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider Beauty) experiment dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation and rare phenomena is to provide identification of the electrons, hadrons and photons, for the level-0 trigger and offline analysis with measurements of position and energy. The system consists in a scintillator pad/preshower (SPD/PS) detector, an electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) and a hadron calorimeter (HCAL), all the sub-detectors having a similar technology with scintillating tiles as active material and being read out via wavelength-shifting fibers and with an identical readout electronics for ECAL and HCAL and similar electronics for the PS. During 1997-1999 a computer controlled High Voltage (HV) distribution scheme was developed by Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) group and used to supply the PMTs of half HCAL prototype during the beam tests (1998-2000). This scheme consisted of three parts: 1) a control box which includes low voltage power supply, the RS232 interface to a PC and three modules of high voltage power supply; 2) two types of multichannel HV distributors with an individual voltage setting; 3) a software package to control all settings and refresh them periodically. Based on the acquired experience, a new design for a High Voltage Power Supply (HVPS) which satisfies the LHCb requirements has been developed for PMTs of the hadron calorimeter. The demands of this system are simplicity and low cost. This HVPS with multiple outputs (HV for photocathode and D1 - D4 dynodes) is destined to supply, with the same high voltage, groups of PMTs sorted by similar characteristics as gain and sensitivity. Because of the high rates (∼ 40 MHz) supported by PMTs, booster voltage sources are necessary to supply current for the last 4 dynodes. The box has 5 HV power supplies for photocathodes and the last 4 dynodes, each HV power supply being followed by a 4 channel

  7. The LHCb Grid Simulation

    CERN Multimedia

    Baranov, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb Grid access if based on the LHCbDirac system. It provides access to data and computational resources to researchers with different geographical locations. The Grid has a hierarchical topology with multiple sites distributed over the world. The sites differ from each other by their number of CPUs, amount of disk storage and connection bandwidth. These parameters are essential for the Grid work. Moreover, job scheduling and data distribution strategy have a great impact on the grid performance. However, it is hard to choose an appropriate algorithm and strategies as they need a lot of time to be tested on the real grid. In this study, we describe the LHCb Grid simulator. The simulator reproduces the LHCb Grid structure with its sites and their number of CPUs, amount of disk storage and bandwidth connection. We demonstrate how well the simulator reproduces the grid work, show its advantages and limitations. We show how well the simulator reproduces job scheduling and network anomalies, consider methods ...

  8. The LHCb Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piucci, Alessio

    2017-07-01

    During the LHC Run 1 the LHCb experiment has successfully performed a large number of high precision measurements in heavy flavour physics using 3 fb-1 of data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. In LHC Run 2 the LHCb is expected to integrate an additional 5 fb-1 data, however many of the measurements will remain limited by statistics. For this reason LHCb will undergo in 2020 a major upgrade during the Long Shutdown 2 of LHC, with the aim to collect 50 fb-1 of data by 2028. To achieve this goal the LHCb detector readout rate will be upgraded from the current 1 MHz to the LHC bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. The luminosity delivered to the experiment will increase by a factor five, up to 2 ṡ 1033 cm-2 s-1. The online selection of events will be uniquely performed by a pure software trigger, improving the trigger efficiencies. In order to sustain the increased luminosity and readout rate, all the sub-detectors will be upgraded. The architecture of the upgraded DAQ system and trigger strategy will be presented, as well an overview of the sub-detector upgrades.

  9. Entwicklung, Bau und Alterungsstudien von Straw Tube Driftkammern für das Äußere Spurkammersystem von LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Physics in Heidelberg participates in the development and construction of the Outer Tracker (OT) of LHCb at CERN. The OT is a modular system of straw tube drift chambers of up to 5 m length. This thesis reports the prototyping at the end of 2001 and the developments up to the definite design at the beginning of the mass production in spring 2004 at Heidelberg. Based on the experience gained from the prototype production and following operation tests, several components of the chamber, as well as the production process were gradually optimized. In addition to the operation tests of a full size prototype, ageing studies were performed with specially designed chambers at the X-ray facility of the Institute of Physics. Two drift gases Ar/CO2/CF4 and Ar/CO2 were tested to compare their ageing properties. Moreover the impact of the water content in the gases on wire etching and deposits on the anode wires was studied. In addition the possible impact of different construction materials on ageing was...

  10. DIRAC reliable data management for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, A C

    2008-01-01

    DIRAC, LHCb's Grid Workload and Data Management System, utilizes WLCG resources and middleware components to perform distributed computing tasks satisfying LHCb's Computing Model. The Data Management System (DMS) handles data transfer and data access within LHCb. Its scope ranges from the output of the LHCb Online system to Grid-enabled storage for all data types. It supports metadata for these files in replica and bookkeeping catalogues, allowing dataset selection and localization. The DMS controls the movement of files in a redundant fashion whilst providing utilities for accessing all metadata. To do these tasks effectively the DMS requires complete self integrity between its components and external physical storage. The DMS provides highly redundant management of all LHCb data to leverage available storage resources and to manage transient errors in underlying services. It provides data driven and reliable distribution of files as well as reliable job output upload, utilizing VO Boxes at LHCb Tier1 sites ...

  11. Photomultiplier pulse Read Out system for the preshower detector of the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaltouni, Z.; Bohner, G.; Cornat, R.; Deschamps, O.; Lecoq, J.; Monteil, S.; Perret, P.

    2003-01-01

    The second generation experiment for CP violation studies in B decays, LHCb, is a 20-m-long single-arm spectrometer to be installed on the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For its precision measurement purpose, it combines precise vertex location and particle identification, in addition to a performance trigger system able to cope with high flux. The first level of trigger is mainly based on the fast response of the calorimetric subsystem. Of major importance is the 6000 channels preshower detector that aims to validate the electromagnetic nature of calorimetric showers. It consists of two-radiation-length lead sheet in front of a scintillator plane. Scintillator signals are extracted from plastic cells using wavelength-shifting fibres coupled to multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. The preshower Read Out system has to cope with fluctuating photomultiplier pulses caused by small amounts of photoelectrons, in addition to strong constraints imposed by the 40 MHz LHC bunch-crossing frequency. A special Read Out electronics including perfect 40 MHz integrators able to shape fluctuating photomultiplier pulses has been designed, and successfully realized. The temporal shape of photomultiplier pulse and the upstream Read Out system for preshower are described in this document

  12. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  13. Characterisation of the Photon Detection System for the LHCb RICH Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2097582; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Easo, Sajan

    The LHCb Experiment will be upgraded during Long Shutdown II of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2019 and 2020. The goal of the upgrade is to efficiently use the increased instantaneous luminosity in LHC Run 3 and to collect data at the proton collision rate of 40 MHz. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) particle identification detectors will be upgraded to perform in the new operating conditions with continuing reliability. The photon detection system will be replaced using multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MaPMTs) and associated read-out electronics. The photon detection chain was studied at CERN using a pulsed laser to test the system under high event rates and high photon intensities. The behaviour of two types of MaPMTs which are foreseen for the upgrade is presented for varying rates and intensities, and different applied bias voltages. A simulation was created to model the photon detection chain using the Geant4 simulation toolkit. The RICH Upgrade test beam using 180 GeV positive hadrons from CERN SP...

  14. A complete system for controlling and monitoring the timing of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068847; Rivetti, A; Jacobsson, R

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN will study the results of the production of B/antiB in the LHC accelerator mesons with the higher precision ever. It is vital that the experiment is able to record sub-detectors signals at the optimal detector efficiency, referring to the right collision occurring in the LHC ring, and that those signals are stable, clean and reliable. The solution is the development of a complete system to centrally time align and at the same time to monitor the timing of the whole experiment. An electronics custom-made acquisition board, called Beam Phase and Intensity Monitor (BPIM), has the main aim to monitor the beam processing a bipolar signal coming from a dedicated Beam Pick-Up detector, sitting along the LHC ring and whose signal is a clear representation of the bunches of protons. The BPIM is then able to integrate the intensity of the beam and at the same time to compare the phase of the bunch signal with the clock coming from the timing distribution system as well as the phase of the or...

  15. The front-end electronics of the LHCb ring-imaging-Cherenkov system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyllie, K.

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider will use ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors for particle identification. By measuring rings of Cherenkov photons generated by elementary particles traversing a radiative medium, these particles can be identified across a wide range of momenta. The photons will be measured by a new type of detector, the pixel hybrid photon detector (HPD). In total, 484 HPDs will be used, providing ∼500,000 channels of data. Specific readout electronics have been developed for processing the data from the HPDs, and this paper describes the design and testing of these devices together with the final system to be used in the experiment. Emphasis is on the application-specific integrated circuits that are encapsulated within the HPDs, allowing high channel density and low noise. These are subject to the strict requirements of efficient photon detection and reliability within the harsh environment of the experiment. Special interconnect techniques developed for this application are described. Finally, the additional electronics infrastructure to readout the full system of 500,000 channels is outlined, including data transmission and power distribution

  16. LHCb: Electroweak studies at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salustino Guimaraes, V

    2012-01-01

    Results on the measurement of the $W^{\\pm}$ and $Z^{0}$ cross-sections are presented using final state leptons with pseudorapidities between 2 and 4.5. Due to its acceptance, LHCb can probe a regime of low low-x electroweak boson production, where parton distribution functions are not well constrained. We summarize the $W^{\\pm}$ measurements performed in the decay $\\mu^{\\pm}\

  17. LHCb Software and Conditions Database Cross-Compatibility Tracking System: a Graph-Theory Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, M; Shapoval, I

    2012-01-01

    The Conditions Database (CondDB) of the LHCb experiment provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data or all LHCb data processing applications (simulation, high level trigger, reconstruction, analysis). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that compatibility between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. More over, a CondDB state by itself belongs to a complex three-dimensional phase space which evolves according to certain CondDB self-compatibility criteria, so it is sometimes difficult even to determine a self-consistent CondDB state. These compatibility issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. Thus, there is a need for defining a well-established set of compatibility criteria between mentioned above entities, together with developing a compatibil...

  18. LHCb : The LHCb Turbo stream

    CERN Multimedia

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will record an unprecedented dataset of beauty and charm hadron decays during Run II of the LHC, set to take place between 2015 and 2018. A key computing challenge is to store and process this data, which limits the maximum output rate of the LHCb trigger. So far, LHCb has written out a few kHz of events containing the full raw sub-detector data, which are passed through a full offline event reconstruction before being considered for physics analysis. Charm physics in particular is limited by trigger output rate constraints. A new streaming strategy includes the possibility to perform the physics analysis with candidates reconstructed in the trigger, thus bypassing the offline reconstruction. In the "turbo stream" the trigger will write out a compact summary of "physics" objects containing all information necessary for analyses, and this will allow an increased output rate and thus higher average efficiencies and smaller selection biases. This idea will be commissioned and developed during...

  19. LHCb GPU Acceleration Project

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)744808; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Neufeld, Niko; Vilasis Cardona, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector is due to be upgraded for processing high-luminosity collisions, which will increase the load on its computation infrastructure from 100 GB/s to 4 TB/s, encouraging us to look for new ways of accelerating the Online reconstruction. The Coprocessor Manager is our new framework for integrating LHCb’s existing computation pipelines with massively parallel algorithms running on GPUs and other accelerators. This paper describes the system and analyzes its performance.

  20. The LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nakada, Tatsuya

    2000-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to fully exploit the large number of b hadrons expected at the LHC energy and luminosity. The experiment is equipped with particle identification devices and can efficiently trigger events with different B-meson final states, allowing systematic studies of CP violation and other rare phenomena in the b hadron system with a high precision which could reveal physics beyond the standard model.

  1. LHCb; DAQ Architecture for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Neufeld, N

    2013-01-01

    LHCb will have an upgrade of its detector in 2018. After the upgrade, the LHCb experiment will run at a high luminosity of 2x 10$^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$ . s$^{-1}$. The upgraded detector will be read out at 40 MHz with a highly flexible software-based triggering strategy. The Data Acquisition (DAQ) system of HCb reads out the data fragments from the Front-End Electronics and transports them to the High-Lever Trigger farm at an aggregate throughput of 32 Tbit/s. The DAQ system will be based on high speed network technologies such as InfiniBand and/or 10/40/100 Gigabit Ethernet. Independent of the network technology, there are different possible architectures for the DAQ system. In this paper, we present our studies on the DAQ architecture, where we analyze size, complexity and (relative) cost. We evaluate and compare several data-flow schemes for a network-based DAQ: push, pull and push with barrel-shifter traffic shaping. We also discuss the requirements and overall implications of the data-flow schemes on the DAQ ...

  2. ALICE & LHCb: refinements for the restart

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Following the previous issue, the Bulletin continues its series to find out what the six LHC experiments have been up to since last September, and how they are preparing for the restart. Previously we looked at CMS and ATLAS; this issue we will round up the past 10 months of activity at ALICE and LHCb. LHCb The cavern of the LHCb experiment. This year has given LHCb the chance to install the 5th and final plane of muon chambers, which will improve the triggering at nominal luminosity. This is the final piece of the experiment to be installed. "Now the detector looks exactly as it does in the technical design report," confirms Andrei Golutvin, LHCb Spokesperson. "We also took advantage of this shutdown to make several improvements. For example, we modified the high voltage system of the electromagnetic calorimeter to reduce noise further to a negligible level. We also took some measures to improve ...

  3. B0 physics at LHCb

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    y; 13.20.-v; 13.25.-k. 1. Introduction. LHCb is one of the four major experiments in preparation at the LHC, along with the two big general-purpose detectors, .... Following the vertex detector there is a tracking system based around a large ... there is a muon detector system, using five stations of MWPC detectors interleaved.

  4. Status of the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straumann, Ulrich D.

    2002-01-01

    LHCb is a second generation experiment on b physics which will run from the beginning of the LHC operation. The goals of the experiment are systematic measurements of CP violation and rare decays in the B-meson system with unprecedented precisions. By measuring CP violation in many different decay modes of B d and B s mesons and comparing the results with the predictions from the Standard Model, the experiment will search for new physics. This talk summarises the present status of the preparation and construction of the LHCb experiment. Details can be found in the technical design reports of the respective subsystems

  5. Status of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, U

    2001-01-01

    LHCb is a second generation experiment on b physics which runs from the beginning of the LHC operation. The goals of the experiment are systematic measurements of CP violation and rare decays in the B- meson system with unprecedented precisions. By measuring CP violation in many different decay modes of B/sub d/ and B/sub s/, mesons and comparing the results with the predictions from the standard model, the experiment searches for new physics. This talk summarises the present status of the preparation and construction of the LHCb experiment. Details are found in the technical design reports of the respective subsystems. (12 refs).

  6. LHCb: Fast Readout Control for the upgraded readout architecture of the LHCb experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity with an upgraded LHCb detector. As a consequence, the various LHCb sub-systems in the readout architecture will be upgraded to cope with higher sub-detector occupancies, higher rate, and higher readout load. The new architecture, new functionalities, and the first hardware implementation of a new LHCb Readout Control system (commonly referred to as S-TFC) for the upgraded LHCb experiment is here presented. Our attention is focused in describing solutions for the distribution of clock and timing information to control the entire upgraded readout architecture by profiting of a bidirectional optical network and powerful FPGAs, including a real-time mechanism to synchronize the entire system. Solutions and implementations are presented, together with first results on the simulation and the validation of the system.

  7. LHCb: Managing Large Data Productions in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2009-01-01

    LHC experiments are producing very large volumes of data either accumulated from the detectors or generated via the Monte-Carlo modeling. The data should be processed as quickly as possible to provide users with the input for their analysis. Processing of multiple hundreds of terabytes of data necessitates generation, submission and following a huge number of grid jobs running all over the Computing Grid. Manipulation of these large and complex workloads is impossible without powerful production management tools. In LHCb, the DIRAC Production Management System (PMS) is used to accomplish this task. It enables production managers and end-users to deal with all kinds of data generation, processing and storage. Application workflow tools allow to define jobs as complex sequences of elementary application steps expressed as Directed Acyclic Graphs. Specialized databases and a number of dedicated software agents ensure automated data driven job creation and submission. The productions are accomplished by thorough ...

  8. LHCb: Upgrade of the LHCb calorimeter electronics

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauricio Ferre, J

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration foresees a major upgrade of the detector for the high luminosity run that should take place after 2018. Apart from the increase of the instantaneous luminosity at the interaction point of the experiment, one of the major ingredients of this upgrade is a full readout at 40MHz of the sub-detectors and the acquisition of the data by a large farm of PC. The trigger will be done by this farm and should increase the overall trigger efficiency with respect to the current detector, especially in hadronic B meson decays. A general overview of the modifications foreseen to the calorimeter system and the integration of the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters in this new scheme will be described.

  9. The LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Elsasser, Ch; Gallas Torreira, A; Pérez Trigo, A; Rodríguez Pérez, P; Bay, A; Blanc, F; Dupertuis, F; Haefeli, G; Komarov, I; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Schneider, O; Tobin, M; Tran, M T; Anderson, J; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; Saornil, S; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Vollhardt, A; Britsch, M; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is to study rare heavy quark decays and CP vio- lation with the high rate of beauty and charmed hadrons produced in $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The detector is designed as a single-arm forward spectrometer with excellent tracking and particle identification performance. The Silicon Tracker is a key part of the tracking system to measure the particle trajectories to high precision. This paper reports the performance as well as the results of the radiation damage monitoring based on leakage currents and on charge collection efficiency scans during the data taking in the LHC Run I.

  10. LHCb New algorithms for Flavour Tagging at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Fazzini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    The Flavour Tagging technique allows to identify the B initial flavour, required in the measurements of flavour oscillations and time-dependent CP asymmetries in neutral B meson systems. The identification performances at LHCb are further enhanced thanks to the contribution of new algorithms.

  11. LHCb: Radiative Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Orlandea, M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present a measurement of the ratio of the branching fraction of the radiative decays $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ and $B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma$ using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of data taken with the LHCb detector. The value obtained is \\begin{equation} \\frac{B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)}{B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)}=1.23\\pm0.06(stat.)\\pm0.04(syst.)\\pm0.10\\left(f_s/f_d\\right) \\end{equation} Using the world average value $B\\left(B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma\\right)=\\left(4.33\\pm0.15\\right)\\times10^{-5}$ branching fraction is determined to be $B\\left(B^{0}_{s}\\rightarrow \\phi\\gamma\\right)=3.5\\pm0.4\\times10^{-5}$. A measurement of the direct CP asymmetry of the decay $B^{0}\\rightarrow K^{*0}\\gamma$ is also presented. Both measurements are the most precise to date and are in agreement with the previous experimental results and theoretical expectations.

  12. Control and Operation of the LHCb Readout Boards Using Embedded Microcontrollers and the PVSS II SCADA System

    CERN Document Server

    Köstner, S

    2007-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Before final reconstruction of the data in PC farms, high speed preprocessing is performed on a set of a few hundred custom electronics boards employing large modern field programmable gate array (FPGA) driven electronics. The local control of these boards is achieved via an embedded microcontroller which is connected to a large Local Area Network. After a brief introduction to the hardware we summarize the implementation of the entire layered software architecture for the readout boards and its integration into the Experiment Control System, which is built upon a common control framework based on an industrial SCADA system. Abstraction of different access modes and separation from the modeling of the components in the control system allow the reuse of various components on different hardware types. Each board has several hundreds of registers and memory blocks, so the optimization of write and read accesses is crucial for the start up configur...

  13. Development and test of the $\\rm CO_2$ evaporative cooling system for the LHCb UT Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Coelli, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The LHCb upgrade requires a new silicon strip tracker detector placed between the vertex locator and the magnet. The new detector will have improved performance in charged particle tracking and triggering. The front-end electronics will be in the active area, close to the sensors: this is a key feature driving the mechanical and cooling detector design, together with the requirement to make the sensors work below −5°C, to withstand radiation damage. The new design exploits a cooling system based on $\\rm CO_2$ evaporation at temperatures around −25°C. The support structure for the sensor modules is a lightweight carbon fiber mechanical structure embedding a cooling pipe, designed to pass underneath the read-out ASICs, which are the main thermal power sources to be cooled down. Here a description of the detector will be given, with a main focus on the cooling system and on the progress done to its qualification.

  14. CKM angle $\\gamma$ from LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, Jackson

    2015-01-01

    Results of the latest $\\gamma$ combination from LHCb are presented, along with the six LHCb measurements used as inputs. In addition, the anticipated precision attainable for measuring $\\gamma$ after the LHCb Upgrade is outlined

  15. LHCB : The upgraded LHCb RICH detector: status and perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardinale, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and search for New Physics using the enormous flux of beauty and charmed hadrons produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The two RICH detectors installed in LHCb have performed successfully during the 2010-2012 data taking period. The data from these detectors were essential to most of the physics results published by LHCb. In order to extend its potential for discovery and study of new phenomena it is planned to upgrade the LHCb experiment in 2018 with a 40MHz readout and a much more flexible software-based triggering system. This would increase the readout rate and occupancies for the RICH detectors. The RICH detector will require new photon detectors and modifications of the optics of the upstream RICH detector. Tests of the complete opto-electronic chain have been performed during testbeam sessions in autumn 2014. The status and perspectives of the RICH upgrade project will be presented.

  16. Recent results from LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer that collects data at the LHC. In this review, a few of recent results in the field of $b$-hadron decays performed by the LHCb Collaboration are presented. The analyses use proton-proton collision data corresponding to 3 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb detector during 2011 and 2012 physics runs with the center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV.

  17. LHCb Tag Collector

    CERN Document Server

    Fuente Fernàndez, P; Cousin, N

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with software management and Nightly Build programs is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  18. LHCb Calorimeter from Trigger to Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Deschamps, O

    2004-01-01

    LHCb is a second generation experiment for CP violation study in B decays. It consists in a 20 meters long single-arm spectrometer to be installed on the future Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For its precision measurement purpose, it combines precise vertex location and particle identification, in addition with a per- formant trigger system able to cope with high flux. This document addresses the use of the calorimeter data for the LHCb trigger and the physics analyses.

  19. LHCb: Self managing experiment resources

    CERN Multimedia

    Stagni, F

    2013-01-01

    Within this paper we present an autonomic Computing resources management system used by LHCb for assessing the status of their Grid resources. Virtual Organizations Grids include heterogeneous resources. For example, LHC experiments very often use resources not provided by WLCG and Cloud Computing resources will soon provide a non-negligible fraction of their computing power. The lack of standards and procedures across experiments and sites generated the appearance of multiple information systems, monitoring tools, ticket portals, etc... which nowadays coexist and represent a very precious source of information for running HEP experiments Computing systems as well as sites. These two facts lead to many particular solutions for a general problem: managing the experiment resources. In this paper we present how LHCb, via the DIRAC interware addressed such issues. With a renewed Central Information Schema hosting all resources metadata and a Status System ( Resource Status System ) delivering real time informatio...

  20. User analysis of LHCb data with Ganga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Andrew; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Moscicki, Jakub; Muraru, Adrian; Ster, Daniel van der; Brochu, Frederic; Cowan, Greg; Egede, Ulrik; Reece, Will; Williams, Mike; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Harrison, Karl; Slater, Mark; Tan, Chun Lik; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Liko, Dietrich; Pajchel, Katarina; Samset, Bjoern; Soroko, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    GANGA (http://cern.ch/ganga) is a job-management tool that offers a simple, efficient and consistent user analysis tool in a variety of heterogeneous environments: from local clusters to global Grid systems. Experiment specific plug-ins allow GANGA to be customised for each experiment. For LHCb users GANGA is the officially supported and advertised tool for job submission to the Grid. The LHCb specific plug-ins allow support for end-to-end analysis helping the user to perform his complete analysis with the help of GANGA. This starts with the support for data selection, where a user can select data sets from the LHCb Bookkeeping system. Next comes the set up for large analysis jobs: with tailored plug-ins for the LHCb core software, jobs can be managed by the splitting of these analysis jobs with the subsequent merging of the resulting files. Furthermore, GANGA offers support for Toy Monte-Carlos to help the user tune their analysis. In addition to describing the GANGA architecture, typical usage patterns within LHCb and experience with the updated LHCb DIRAC workload management system are presented.

  1. The LHCb configuration database

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, L; Van Herwijnen, Eric; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb configuration database is to store information about all the controllable devices of the detector. The experiment's control system (that uses PVSS ) will configure, start up and monitor the detector from the information in the configuration database. The database will contain devices with their properties, connectivity and hierarchy. The ability to store and rapidly retrieve huge amounts of data, and the navigability between devices are important requirements. We have collected use cases to ensure the completeness of the design. Using the entity relationship modelling technique we describe the use cases as classes with attributes and links. We designed the schema for the tables using relational diagrams. This methodology has been applied to the TFC (switches) and DAQ system. Other parts of the detector will follow later. The database has been implemented using Oracle to benefit from central CERN database support. The project also foresees the creation of tools to populate, maintain, and co...

  2. The LHCb Muon Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cardini, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration is currently working on the upgrade of the experiment to allow, after 2018, an efficient data collection while running at an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10$^{33}$/cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. The upgrade will allow 40 MHz detector readout, and events will be selected by means of a very flexible software-based trigger. The muon system will be upgraded in two phases. In the first phase, the off-detector readout electronics will be redesigned to allow complete event readout at 40 MHz. Also, part of the channel logical-ORs, used to reduce the total readout channel count, will be removed to reduce dead-time in critical regions. In a second phase, higher-granularity detectors will replace the ones installed in highly irradiated regions, to guarantee efficient muon system performances in the upgrade data taking conditions.

  3. LHCb brochure (Spanish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. LHCb will study a phenomenon which could partly explain why the Universe is all matter and practically no antimatter.

  4. The LHCb magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb magnet consists of two huge 27 tonne coils mounted inside a 1450 tonne iron yoke. As charged particles pass through the magnet's field their trajectories will be bent according to their momentum, allowing their momentum to be measured as they pass through the detector walls. LHCb will study bottom quarks, which will be produced close to the two colliding proton beams.

  5. LHCb brochure (French version)

    CERN Document Server

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. LHCb studies a phenomenon which could partly explain why the Universe is all matter and practically no antimatter.

  6. LHCb brochure (German version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. LHCb will study a phenomenon which could partly explain why the Universe is all matter and practically no antimatter.

  7. LHCb brochure (Italian version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. LHCb studies a phenomenon which could partly explain why the Universe is all matter and practically no antimatter.

  8. LHCb brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four big experiments for the LHC, the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, which will start up in 2008. LHCb studies a phenomenon which could partly explain why the Universe is all matter and practically no antimatter.

  9. The nightly build and test system for LCG AA and LHCb software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruzelecki, Karol; Roiser, Stefan; Degaudenzi, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    The core software stack both from the LCG Application Area and LHCb consists of more than 25 C++/Fortran/Python projects built for about 20 different configurations on Linux, Windows and MacOSX. To these projects, one can also add about 70 external software packages (Boost, Python, Qt, CLHEP, ...) which also have to be built for the same configurations. It order to reduce the time of the development cycle and assure the quality, a framework has been developed for the daily (in fact nightly) build and test of the software. Performing the build and the tests on several configurations and platforms increases the efficiency of the unit and integration tests. Main features: - flexible and fine grained setup (full, partial build) through a web interface; - possibility to build several 'slots' with different configurations; - precise and highly granular reports on a web server; - support for CMT projects (but not only) with their cross-dependencies; - scalable client-server architecture for the control machine and its build machines; - copy of the results in a common place to allow early view of the software stack. The nightly build framework is written in Python for portability and it is easily extensible to accommodate new build procedures.

  10. LHCb RICH Upgrade: an overview on the photon detector and the electronics system

    CERN Multimedia

    Cassina, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four detectors operating at the LHC at CERN and it is mainly devoted to CP violation measurements and the search for new physics in beauty and charm hadrons rare decays. The data from the two Ring Image Cherenkov (RICH-1 and RICH-2) detectors are essential to identify particles in a wide momentum range. Up to now the luminosity has reached up to 4 . $10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with 50 ns bunch spacing and 3 fb$^{-1}$ have been collected since 2010. From 2019 onwards 14 TeV collisions with luminosities reaching up to 2 . $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with 25 ns bunch spacing are planned, with the goal of collecting 5 fb$^{-1}$ of data per year. In order to avoid degradation of the RICH detectors particle identification performance at such high rate (40 MHz), a detector upgrade is necessary. The present photodetectors (HPDs equipped with encapsulated 1 MHz readout chips) will be replaced with flat panel MaPMTs read out by external chips, designed for this purpose. The 25.4x25.4 m...

  11. LHCb: LHCb VELO TELL1 Algorithms

    CERN Multimedia

    Hennessy, Karol

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is dedicated to searching for New Physics effects in the heavy flavour sector, precise measurements of CP violation and rare heavy meson decays. Precise tracking and vertexing around the interaction point is crucial in achieving these physics goals. The LHCb VELO (VErtex LOcator) silicon micro-strip detector is the highest precision vertex detector at the LHC and is located at only 8 mm from the proton beams. The high spatial resolution (up to 4 microns single hit precision) is obtained by a complex chain of processing algorithms to suppress noise and reconstruct clusters. These are implemented in large FPGAs, with over one million parameters that need to be individually optimised. Previously we presented a novel approach that has been developed to optimise the parameters and integrating their determination into the full software framework of the LHCb experiment. Presently we report on the experience gained from regular operation of the calibration and monitoring software with the collisio...

  12. Hadron spectroscopy in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Palano, Antimo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study the properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The data collected in the LHC Run I enables precision spectroscopy studies of beauty and charm hadrons. The latest results on spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons are reviewed. In particular the discovery of the first charmonium pentaquark states in the $J/\\psi p$ system, the possible existence of four-quark states decaying to $J/\\psi \\phi$ and the confirmation of resonant nature of the $Z_c(4430)^−$ mesonic state are discussed. In the sector of charmed baryons, the observation of five new $\\Omega_c$ states, the observation of the $\\Xi^+_{cc}$ and the study of charmed baryons decaying to $D^0 p$ are presented.

  13. The LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Eckstein, D

    2003-01-01

    The dedicated CP violation experiment at the LHC, LHCb, will be equipped with a novel silicon detector (VELO). The VELO will provide precise measurements of tracks from displaced $b$-vertices and will allow to trigger on them. The entire detector will be housed in a mobile secondary vacuum system, and after the injection and stabilisation of the beams each fill, the silicon detectors will move inwards and approach to within $7\\,$mm of the beams. In order to fulfil the trigger requirements, the VELO must combine in an unprecedented way the use of high resolution silicon detectors and large CPU farms. The extreme, non-uniform radiation environment puts additional constraints on the sensor design. The design of the VELO is described, along with the R\\&D of the silicon sensors and its production status.

  14. LHCbDIRAC as Apache Mesos microservices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Christophe; Couturier, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    The LHCb experiment relies on LHCbDIRAC, an extension of DIRAC, to drive its offline computing. This middleware provides a development framework and a complete set of components for building distributed computing systems. These components are currently installed and run on virtual machines (VM) or bare metal hardware. Due to the increased workload, high availability is becoming more and more important for the LHCbDIRAC services, and the current installation model is showing its limitations. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager which aims at abstracting heterogeneous physical resources on which various tasks can be distributed thanks to so called “frameworks” The Marathon framework is suitable for long running tasks such as the DIRAC services, while the Chronos framework meets the needs of cron-like tasks like the DIRAC agents. A combination of the service discovery tool Consul together with HAProxy allows to expose the running containers to the outside world while hiding their dynamic placements. Such an architecture brings a greater flexibility in the deployment of LHCbDirac services, allowing for easier deployment maintenance and scaling of services on demand (e..g LHCbDirac relies on 138 services and 116 agents). Higher reliability is also easier, as clustering is part of the toolset, which allows constraints on the location of the services. This paper describes the investigations carried out to package the LHCbDIRAC and DIRAC components into Docker containers and orchestrate them using the previously described set of tools.

  15. LS1 Report: LHCb's early Christmas

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Accelerator chain up and running... CCC Operators back at their desks... all telltale signs of the start of Run 2! For the experiments, that means there are just a few short weeks left for them to prepare for beams. Over at LHCb, teams have kept ahead of the curve by focusing on new installations and improvements.   A delicate task: re-connecting the beam pipe in LHCb. From the primary detector services to the DAQ system to the high level trigger, November's injector test beams saw their way through a well-prepared LHCb experiment. “We set the transfer line tests as our deadline for the restart - the entire experiment had to be at nominal position and conditions,” says Eric Thomas, LHCb deputy Technical Coordinator and LHCb LS1 Project Coordinator. “Achieving this was a major milestone for the collaboration. If beam were to come tomorrow, we would be ready.” The injector tests gave the LHCb team a chance to synchronise their detectors, and to al...

  16. LHCb: W and Z production at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Barter, W

    2011-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the production cross-sections of $Z^0$ and $W^{\\pm}$ production at the LHCb experiment. Also shown is the $W$ charge asymmetry as a function of lepton pseudo-rapidity. These measurements have particular interest because of the forward acceptance of the LHCb experiment, which covers pseudo-rapidities between approximately 2 and 5. The results may be interpreted as tests of the Standard Model, or can be used to constrain better the parton density functions. Prospects are given for improving these measurements in the forthcoming run, and for making complementary studies of Drell-Yan production to lower mass dilepton final states.

  17. LHCb-The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to exploit the real-time alignment, calibration and analysis capabilities of LHCb in Run-II. An increase in the CPU and disk capacity of the event filter farm, combined with improvements to the reconstruction software, mean that efficient, exclusive selections can be made in the first stage of the High Level Trigger (HLT1). The output of HLT1 is buffered to the 5 PB of disk on the event filter farm, while the detector is aligned and calibrated in real time. The second stage, HLT2, performs complete, offline quality, event reconstruction. Physics analyses can be performed directly on this information, and for the majority of charm physics selections, a reduced event format can be written out, which permits higher event rates.

  18. LHCb: Fabric Management with Diskless Servers and Quattor on LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Schweitzer, P; Brarda, L; Neufeld, N

    2011-01-01

    Large scientific experiments nowadays very often are using large computer farms to process the events acquired from the detectors. In LHCb a small sysadmin team manages 1400 servers of the LHCb Event Filter Farm, but also a wide variety of control servers for the detector electronics and infrastructure computers: file servers, gateways, DNS, DHCP and others. This variety of servers could not be handled without a solid fabric management system. We choose the Quattor toolkit for this task. We will present our use of this toolkit, with an emphasis on how we handle our diskless nodes (Event filter farm nodes and computers embedded in the acquisition electronic cards). We will show our current tests to replace the standard (RedHat/Scientific Linux) way of handling diskless nodes to fusion filesystems and how it improves fabric management.

  19. LHCb - Novel Muon Identification Algorithms for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cogoni, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The present LHCb Muon Identification procedure was optimised to guarantee high muon detection efficiency at the istantaneous luminosity $\\mathcal{L}$ of $2\\cdot10^{32}$~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$. In the current data taking conditions, the luminosity is higher than foreseen and the low energy background contribution to the visible rate in the muon system is larger than expected. A worse situation is expected for Run III when LHCb will operate at $\\mathcal{L} = 2\\cdot10^{33}$~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$ causing the high particle fluxes to deteriorate the muon detection efficiency, because of the increased dead time of the electronics, and in particular to worsen the muon identification capabilities, due to the increased contribution of the background, with deleterious consequences especially for the analyses requiring high purity signal. In this context, possible new algorithms for the muon identification will be illustrated. In particular, the performance on combinatorial background rejection will be shown, together with the ...

  20. Virtualization for the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorsi, E.; Brarda, L.; Chebbi, M.; Neufeld, N.; Sborzacci, F.

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, one of the 4 large particle detector at CERN, counts in its Online System more than 2000 servers and embedded systems. As a result of ever-increasing CPU performance in modern servers, many of the applications in the controls system are excellent candidates for virtualization technologies. We see virtualization as an approach to cut down cost, optimize resource usage and manage the complexity of the IT infrastructure of LHCb. Recently we have added a Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) cluster based on Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization for Servers (RHEV) complementary to the existing Hyper-V cluster devoted only to the virtualization of the windows guests. This paper describes the architecture of our solution based on KVM and RHEV as along with its integration with the existing Hyper-V infrastructure and the Quattor cluster management tools and in particular how we use to run controls applications on a virtualized infrastructure. We present performance results of both the KVM and Hyper-V solutions, problems encountered and a description of the management tools developed for the integration with the Online cluster and LHCb SCADA control system based on PVSS. (authors)

  1. Central Exclusive Production at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00392425

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector, with its excellent momentum resolution and flexible trigger strategy, is ideally suited for measuring particles produced exclusively. In addition, a new system of forward shower counters has been installed upstream and downstream of the detector, and has been used to facilitate studies of Central Exclusive Production. Such measurements of integrated and differential cross-section in both Run 1 and Run 2 of the LHC, are summarised here.

  2. LHCb: The LHCb Trigger Architecture beyond LS1

    CERN Multimedia

    Albrecht, J; Neubert, S; Raven, G; Sokoloff, M D; Williams, M

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a spectrometer dedicated to the study of heavy flavor at the LHC. The rate of proton-proton collisions at the LHC is 15 MHz, but resource limitations mean that only 5 kHz can be written to storage for offline analytsis. For this reason the LHCb data acquisition system -- trigger -- plays a key role in selecting signal events and rejecting background. In contrast to previous experiments at hadron colliders like for example CDF or D0, the bulk of the LHCb trigger is implemented in software and deployed on a farm of 20k parallel processing nodes. This system, called the High Level Trigger (HLT) is responsible for reducing the rate from the maximum at which the detector can be read out, 1.1 MHz, to the 5 kHz which can be processed offline,and has 20 ms in which to process and accept/reject each event. In order to minimize systematic uncertainties, the HLT was designed from the outset to reuse the offline reconstruction and selection code. During the long shutdown it is proposed to extend th...

  3. LHCb: Physics with the LHCb calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Barsuk, S

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb calorimeter comprises the scintillator pad detector (SPD), preshower (PS), electromagnetic Shashlyk type (ECAL) and hadronichadronic Tile (HCAL) calorimeters, arranged in pseudo-projective geometry. All the four detectors follow the general principle of reading the light from scintillator tiles with wave length shifting fibers, and transporting the light towards photomultipliers (25 ns R/O).

  4. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  5. LHCb launches new website

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    A new public website for the LHCb experiment was launched last Friday to coincide with CERN’s Open Day weekend. Designed to provide accessible information on all aspects of the experiment, the website contains images and key facts about the LHCb detector, its design and installation and the international team behind the project. "LHCb is going to be one of the most important b-physics experiments in the world when it starts taking data later this year", explains Roger Forty, the experiment’s deputy spokesperson. "We hope the website will be a valuable resource, enabling people to learn about this fascinating area of research." The new website can be found at: http://cern.ch/lhcb-public

  6. LHCb VELO Tracking Resolutions

    CERN Multimedia

    Alexander, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The excellent tracking performance of the Vertex Locator (VELO) at LHCb is presented. The resolutions it achieves on single hits, impact parameters, and primary vertex positions are shown, with particular attention paid to measurement of impact parameters.

  7. LHCb Upstream Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Gandini, P

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb upgrade requires replacing the silicon strip tracker between the vertex locator (VELO) and the magnet. A new design has been developed and tested based on the "stave" concept planned for the ATLAS upgrade

  8. LHCb Upstream Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Gandini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb upgrade requires replacing the silicon strip tracker between the vertex locator (VELO) and the magnet. A new design has been developed and tested based on the "stave" concept planned for the ATLAS upgrade.

  9. LHCb magnet coils arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Each of the two coils for the LHCb magnet comprises 15 individual monolayer 'pancakes' of identical trapezoidal racetrack shape, and is bent at 45 degrees on the two transverse sides. Each pancake consists of eight turns of conductor, wound from a single length (approx. 290 m) of extruded aluminium. The coils have arrived at CERN; one of them is seen here being unloaded above the LHCb experimental cavern.

  10. LHCb: LHCbDirac is a DIRAC extension to support LHCb specific workflows

    CERN Multimedia

    Stagni, Federico

    2012-01-01

    We present LHCbDIRAC, an extension of the DIRAC community Grid solution to handle the LHCb specificities. The DIRAC software has been developed for many years within LHCb only. Nowadays it is a generic software, used by many scientific communities worldwide. Each community wanting to take advantage of DIRAC has to develop an extension, containing all the necessary code for handling their specific cases. LHCbDIRAC is an actively developed extension, implementing the LHCb computing model and workflows. LHCbDIRAC extends DIRAC to handle all the distributed computing activities of LHCb. Such activities include real data processing (reconstruction, stripping and streaming), Monte-Carlo simulation and data replication. Other activities are groups and user analysis, data management, resources management and monitoring, data provenance, accounting for user and production jobs. LHCbDIRAC also provides extensions of the DIRAC interfaces, including a secure web client, python APIs and CLIs. While DIRAC and LHCbDIRAC f...

  11. The LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobsson, R

    2013-01-01

    With the demonstration that LHCb can successfully perform forward precision measurements with event pileup, the operation and trigger strategy evolved significantly during the LHC Run 1 allowing LHCb to collect over 3fb$^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8TeV. Increased bandwidth opened the door for LHCb to extend the physics program. The additional statistics and well managed systematic effects together with the stable trigger and data taking conditions have led to a very large number of world-class measurements and dominance in heavy flavour physics [1], in addition to a reputation of an excellent forward general purpose detector at the LHC. Long Shutdown (LS) 1 (2013-2014) will allow LHCb to fully explore the large statistics collected and prepare LHCb for Run 2 (2015 – 2017). However, even after an additional expected integrated luminosity of 5-6 fb$^{-1}$ in Run 2, many of the LHCb precision measurements will remain limited by statistics, and some exploratory physics modes will not even be a...

  12. LHCb: Alignment of the LHCb Detector with Kalman Filter Fitted Tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    Amoraal, J; Hulsbergen, W; Needham, M; Nicolas, L; Pozzi, S; Raven, G; Vecchi, S

    2009-01-01

    We report on an implementation of a global chisquare algorithm for the simultaneous alignment of all tracking systems in the LHCb detector. Our algorithm uses hit residuals from the standard LHCb track fit which is based on a Kalman filter. The algorithm is implemented in the LHCb reconstruction framework and exploits the fact that all sensitive detector elements have the same geometry interface. A vertex constraint is implemented by fitting tracks to a common point and propagating the change in track parameters to the hit residuals. To remove unconstrained or poorly constrained degrees of freedom (so-called weak modes) the average movements of (subsets of) alignable detector elements can be fixed with Lagrange constraints. Alternatively, weak modes can be removed with a cutoff in the eigenvalue spectrum of the second derivative of the chisquare. As for all LHCb reconstruction and analysis software the configuration of the algorithm is done in python and gives detailed control over the selection of alignable ...

  13. Results of the LHCb experiment Data Challenge 2004

    CERN Document Server

    Closier, J; Blouw, J; Brook, N; Charpentier, P; Charpentier, Ph; Egede, U; Frank, M; Frank, M; Gandelman, M; Garonne, V; Graciani-Diaz, R; Korolko, I; Kuznetsov, G; Patrick, G; Pickford, A; Romanovski, V; Saborido-Silva, J; Sanchez-Garcia, M; Saroka, A; Stokes-Rees, I; Tobin, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Vagnoni, V; Witek, M

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb [1] experiment performed its latest Data Challenge during 2004; the first phase (Monte Carlo production) lasted from May to August 2004. The main goal of the Data Challenge was to stress test the LHCb production system and to perform distributed analysis of the simulated data. The LHCb production system called DIRAC [2] provided all of the necessary services for the Data Challenge: Production and Bookkeeping databases, File catalogs, Workload and Data Management systems, Monitoring and Accounting tools. It enabled resources of more than 20 LHCb production sites as well as the LCG2 grid resources to be accessed in a consistent way. 187 Million events constituting 62 TB of data were produced and stored in 5 Tier 1centers. This paper will present the Data Challenge results, the experience gained utilizing DIRAC native sites and the LCG grid as well as further developments necessary to scale to the ultimate needs of the LHCb experiment.

  14. LHCb calorimeter electronics. Photon identification. Calorimeter calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machefert, F.

    2011-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four large experiments installed on the LHC accelerator ring. The aim of the detector is to precisely measure CP violation observables and rare decays in the B meson sector. The calorimeter system of LHCb is made of four sub-systems: the scintillating pad detector, the pre-shower, the electromagnetic (ECAL) and hadronic (HCAL) calorimeters. It is essential to reconstruct B decays, to efficiently trigger on interesting events and to identify electrons and photons. After a review of the LHCb detector sub-systems, the first part of this document describes the calorimeter electronics. First, the front-end electronics in charge of measuring the ECAL and HCAL signals from the photomultipliers is presented, then the following section is an overview of the control card of the four calorimeters. The chapters three and four concern the test software of this electronics and the technological choices making it tolerant to radiations in the LHCb cavern environment. The measurements performed to ensure this tolerance are also given. The second part of this document concerns both the identification of the photons with LHCb and the calibration of the calorimeters. The photon identification method is presented and the performances given. Finally, the absolute energy calibration of the PRS and ECAL, based on the data stored in 2010 is explained. (author)

  15. Thermal study and design of a cooling system for the electronics boards of the LHCb SciFi tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Hamrat, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector, one of the four large LHC detectors, has launched a major upgrade program with the goal to enormously boost the rate and selectivity of the data taking. The LHCb upgrade comprises the complete replacement of several sub-detectors, the substantial upgrade of the front-end electronics and the introduction of a new paradigm, namely the suppression of a hardware trigger by reading out the whole experiment synchronously at a rate of 40 MHz. The high readout frequency, unprecedented in a particle physics experiment, and the harsh radiation environment related to the increased LHC intensity, are the major challenges to be addressed by the new sub-detectors. The development and construction of a new large-scale tracking detector, based on a novel scintillating fibre (SciFi) technology, read out with silicon photomultipliers (SiPM), is one of the key projects of the LHCb upgrade program. The LHCb SciFi detector will count more than 500,000 channels. It is composed of 12 layers arranged in 3 tracking...

  16. LHCb: A GPU offloading mechanism for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Badalov, A; Zvyagin, A; Neufeld, N; Vilasis Cardona, X

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb Software Infrastructure is built around a flexible, extensible, single-process, single-threaded framework named Gaudi. One way to optimise the overall usage of a multi-core server, which is used for example in the Online world, is running multiple instances of Gaudi-based applications concurrently. For LHCb, this solution has been shown to work well up to 32 cores and is expected to scale up a bit further. The appearance of many-core architectures such as GPGPUs and the Intel Xeon/Phi poses a new challenge for LHCb. Since the individual data sets are so small (about 60 kB raw event size), many events must be processed in parallel for optimum efficiency. This is, however, not possible with the current framework, which allows only a single event at a time. Exploiting the fact that we always have many instances of the same application running, we have developed an offloading mechanism, based on a client-server design. The server runs outside the Gaudi framework and thus imposes no additional dependencie...

  17. LHCb Data Replication During SC3

    CERN Multimedia

    Smith, A

    2006-01-01

    LHCb's participation in LCG's Service Challenge 3 involves testing the bulk data transfer infrastructure developed to allow high bandwidth distribution of data across the grid in accordance with the computing model. To enable reliable bulk replication of data, LHCb's DIRAC system has been integrated with gLite's File Transfer Service middleware component to make use of dedicated network links between LHCb computing centres. DIRAC's Data Management tools previously allowed the replication, registration and deletion of files on the grid. For SC3 supplementary functionality has been added to allow bulk replication of data (using FTS) and efficient mass registration to the LFC replica catalog.Provisional performance results have shown that the system developed can meet the expected data replication rate required by the computing model in 2007. This paper details the experience and results of integration and utilisation of DIRAC with the SC3 transfer machinery.

  18. Direct search for Higgs boson in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Currat, C

    2001-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward one-arm spectrometer to precision measurements of CP violation in the B-meson systems. The motivation of the present work is to assess the potential of LHCb to observe a Standard Model (SM) Higgs signal. The recent results obtained at LEP give a hint of a SM Higgs boson with a mass mH = 115.0 +1.3 –0.9 GeV/c2 with a statistical significance of 2.9 standard deviations. Because of the high longitudinal boost encountered by the products in the pp collisions at LHC, a significant fraction (~30%) of light Higgs (mH = 115 GeV/c2) are produced in the LHCb acceptance 1.8 < h < 4.9. These facts potentially place LHCb in the race for the observation of the SM Higgs. Given a relatively low running luminosity of 2 x 1032 cm-2s-1- compared to the nominal 1034 cm-2s-1 at LHC and a limited geometrical acceptance, we have shown that the channels accessible to LHCb are H + W± Z0 b`b + l± X for Higgs masses in the range 100-130 GeV/c2. This work pioneered a setup for the pro...

  19. LHCb VELO Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, Karol

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of $2\\times10^{33} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have $55\\times55 \\mu m^{2}$ pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separate...

  20. The LHCb VELO Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    de Capua, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-3, will transform the experiment to a triggerless system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm−2 s −1 . The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current strip detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will allow for fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction in the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 µm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC. The VeloPix builds on the currently available Timepix3, modified to deliver a radiation hard design capable of an order of magnitude increase in output rate. The hottest regions will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s, yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO...

  1. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro; LHCb VELO Upgrade Group

    2016-07-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1 and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm2 pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  2. LHCb VELO upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Karol; LHCb VELO Upgrade Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×1033 cm-2 s-1. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm2 pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade is described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies are presented.

  3. The LHCb VELO upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dosil Suárez, Álvaro, E-mail: alvaro.dosil@usc.es

    2016-07-11

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2019, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm. The upgraded detector will run at luminosities of 2×10{sup 33} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector with unprecedented precision. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The detector comprises silicon pixel sensors with 55×55 μm{sup 2} pitch, read out by the VeloPix ASIC, based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The detector halves are retracted when the beams are injected and closed at stable beams, positioning the first sensitive pixel at 5.1 mm from the beams. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO{sub 2} coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates.

  4. Geant4 hadronic and electromagnetic validation tests in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Griffith, Peter Noel

    2016-01-01

    LHCb uses Geant4 to simulate the interactions of particles with the detector material and components. The simulation response can vary significantly due to modification of material description, of detector geometry, or of the Geant4 toolkit itself. Therefore, an extensive variety of tools have been developed to study the effects of Geant4 modification on the LHCb simulation framework and on stand-alone environments within the LHCb software infrastructure. These tools have proven to be very effective for investigating new and alternative models provided by Geant4, and also in identifying and fixing anomalous behaviours that arise from changes. The next goal is to have these validation tests run autonomously and periodically, alerting the relevant users when problems are detected. Quick and easy comparison of the results from different software versions and simulation models will be made possible through the web interface of the LHCb Performance and Regression testing system, LHCbPR.

  5. DAS: A Data Management System for Instrument Tests and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailis, M.; Sartor, S.; Zacchei, A.; Lodi, M.; Cirami, R.; Pasian, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Franceschi, E.; Nicastro, L.; Conforti, V.; Zoli, A.; Smart, R.; Morbidelli, R.; Dadina, M.

    2014-05-01

    The Data Access System (DAS) is a and data management software system, providing a reusable solution for the storage of data acquired both from telescopes and auxiliary data sources during the instrument development phases and operations. It is part of the Customizable Instrument WorkStation system (CIWS-FW), a framework for the storage, processing and quick-look at the data acquired from scientific instruments. The DAS provides a data access layer mainly targeted to software applications: quick-look displays, pre-processing pipelines and scientific workflows. It is logically organized in three main components: an intuitive and compact Data Definition Language (DAS DDL) in XML format, aimed for user-defined data types; an Application Programming Interface (DAS API), automatically adding classes and methods supporting the DDL data types, and providing an object-oriented query language; a data management component, which maps the metadata of the DDL data types in a relational Data Base Management System (DBMS), and stores the data in a shared (network) file system. With the DAS DDL, developers define the data model for a particular project, specifying for each data type the metadata attributes, the data format and layout (if applicable), and named references to related or aggregated data types. Together with the DDL user-defined data types, the DAS API acts as the only interface to store, query and retrieve the metadata and data in the DAS system, providing both an abstract interface and a data model specific one in C, C++ and Python. The mapping of metadata in the back-end database is automatic and supports several relational DBMSs, including MySQL, Oracle and PostgreSQL.

  6. LHCb migration from Subversion to Git

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemencic, M.; Couturier, B.; Closier, J.; Cattaneo, M.

    2017-10-01

    Due to user demand and to support new development workflows based on code review and multiple development streams, LHCb decided to port the source code management from Subversion to Git, using the CERN GitLab hosting service. Although tools exist for this kind of migration, LHCb specificities and development models required careful planning of the migration, development of migration tools, changes to the development model, and redefinition of the release procedures. Moreover we had to support a hybrid situation with some software projects hosted in Git and others still in Subversion, or even branches of one projects hosted in different systems. We present the way we addressed the special LHCb requirements, the technical details of migrating large non standard Subversion repositories, and how we managed to smoothly migrate the software projects following the schedule of each project manager.

  7. LHCbDIRAC as Apache Mesos microservices

    CERN Multimedia

    Couturier, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment relies on LHCbDIRAC, an extension of DIRAC, to drive its offline computing. This middleware provides a development framework and a complete set of components for building distributed computing systems. These components are currently installed and ran on virtual machines (VM) or bare metal hardware. Due to the increased load of work, high availability is becoming more and more important for the LHCbDIRAC services, and the current installation model is showing its limitations. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager which aims at abstracting heterogeneous physical resources on which various tasks can be distributed thanks to so called "framework". The Marathon framework is suitable for long running tasks such as the DIRAC services, while the Chronos framework meets the needs of cron-like tasks like the DIRAC agents. A combination of the service discovery tool Consul together with HAProxy allows to expose the running containers to the outside world while hiding their dynamic placements. Such an arc...

  8. LHCb unveils new particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefania Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration announces the observation of four “exotic” particles from its analysis of the LHC data.   The LHCb experimental cavern. On 28 June, the LHCb collaboration reported the observation of three new "exotic" particles and confirmation of the existence of a fourth one in data from the LHC. These particles each appear to be formed by four quarks (the fundamental constituents of the matter inside all the atoms of the universe): two quarks and two antiquarks (that is, a tetraquark). Due to their non-standard quark content, the newly observed particles have been included in the broad category of so-called exotic particles, although their exact theoretical interpretation is still under study.            The quark model, proposed by Murray Gell-Mann and George Zweig in 1964, is considered to be the most valid scheme for the classification of hadrons (all the composite particles) that has been fou...

  9. The Latest from LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    This month the LHCb Collaboration has observed the first Cherenkov rings from the RICH1 detector. These rings were emitted by cosmic particles passing through the detector. Cherenkov radiation occurs when a charged particle passes through a medium faster than the speed of light. As it travels, the particle emits photons along a cone. This cone is measured and, along with a measurement of momentum, is used to identify the particle. There are two types of radiators in RICH1, the first gaseous and the other made from aerogel. Both rings seen on the picture are from the same particle passing through the two different radiators. This is the fist time that the RICH detector has seen a particle as it will see them when the LHC re-starts. It has also been a time for the experiment to begin commissioning. After network upgrades, LHCb held a commissioning week, an opportunity for physicists working on all the different detectors within LHCb...

  10. Das politische System Deutschlands - Der Bundestag

    OpenAIRE

    BĚLOHLÁVKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this Bachelor thesis is to describe the political system of the Federal Republic of Germany with a focus on the Bundestag. The author summarizes in the theoretical part the political system and the separation of powers in the Federal Republic of Germany and then focuses she on the German Bundestag, its organization, functions and electoral system. In the practical part, the author will deal with a comparison of the electoral system in the German Bundestag and the electoral syst...

  11. VELO aperture considerations for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, RB; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Giovannozzi, M; Holzer, B

    2012-01-01

    In Long Shutdown 2 the VELO detectors will be replaced by new modules compatible with the LHCb Upgrade 40 MHz read-out system. A smaller inner radius of the VELO RF foil and of the silicon sensor active area will allow LHCb to considerably improve the impact parameter resolution. Here, a limit of the minimum VELO aperture during physics (Stable Beams) is discussed. A value of 3.5 mm for the nominal radius of the inner edge fo the RF foil seems acceptable.

  12. LHCb experiment magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The leading members of the LHCb magnet project, from left to right: Pierre-Ange Giudici, who organized and supervised the industrial production of the coils; Marcello Losasso, who performed the 3D calculations to optimise the magnetic field; Olivier Jamet, responsible for the 3D design; Jean Renaud, in charge of the magnet assembly, and Wilfried Flegel, project leader. The LHCb detector will investigate matter-antimatter differences in B mesons at the LHC. The coils of the detector's huge dipole magnet are seen here in April 2004.

  13. Latest LHCb results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinelli Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCb experiment is one of the major research projects at the Large Hadron Collider. Its acceptance and instrumentation is optimised to perform high-precision studies of flavour physics and particle production in a unique kinematic range at unprecedented collision energies. Using large data samples accumulated in the years 2010-2012, the LHCb collaboration has conducted a series of measurements providing a sensitive test of the Standard Model and strengthening our knowledge of flavour physics, QCD and electroweak processes. The status of the experiment and some of its recent results are presented here.

  14. The data acquisition system (DAS) for the improved CERN SC

    CERN Document Server

    Beger, H; Fiebig, A; Schroot, H

    1975-01-01

    A digital data acquisition system (DAS) based on a minicomputer is described which registers the failure sequences in various equipment areas of the CERN synchrocyclotron (henceforward referred to as the SC). The avalanches of failure signals which occur from time to time are tapped from the alarm/security systems, time-resolved to 10 msec and recorded on a printer in order to aid SC failure diagnosis. The mechanisms of the DAS and its relation to the SC equipment are explained in some detail. All programs were constructed at assembler language level for speed and for ease of on-line program maintenance. The alarm sequences recorded have been of considerable help during the running in of the new radiofrequency system. Now that the new SC is operational, the DAS furnishes useful data from several equipment areas to the operators and engineers.

  15. The Operational Experience of the Triple-GEM Detectors of the LHCb Muon System: Summary of 2 Years of Data Taking

    CERN Document Server

    Cardini, Alessandro; De Simone, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb muon system consists of more than a thousand gas detectors, mostly MWPC, located in five different stations. The Muon detector is used to define the muon trigger and to identify muons at the high-level triger and at the recontruction stage. The first station of the muon detector, located in front of the calorimetric system, is made of 274 chambers. The 12 most irradiated chambers, the ones closer to the beam pipe, are double triple-GEM detectors with pad readout. These detectors have an active area of 200x240 mm$^2$ and are routinely operated at rates close to 300 kHz/cm$^2$. With the gas mixture used (Ar/CO$_2$/CF$_4$ at 45/15/40) these detectors have the requested efficiency (>96% in a 20 ns time window for the logical OR of the two sensitive gaps) when operated at gains of about 2300. In this presentation we will report on the performance of these 24 triple-GEM detectors after more than 2 years of operation in the harsh LHCb conditions. We will also show some problems occurred during data taking, ...

  16. LHCb: Design of a Highly Optimised Vacuum Chamber Support for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Leduc, L; Veness, R

    2011-01-01

    The beam vacuum chamber in the LHCb experimental area passes through the centre of a large aperture dipole magnet. The vacuum chamber and all its support systems lie in the acceptance of the detector, so must be highly optimised for transparency to particles. As part of the upgrade programme for the LHCb vacuum system, the support system has been re-designed using advanced lightweight materials. In this paper we discuss the physics motivation for the modifications, the criteria for the selection of materials and tests performed to qualify them for the particular environment of a particle physics experiment. We also present the design of the re-optimised support system.

  17. LHCb VELO Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    van Beuzekom, Martin; Ketel, Tjeerd; Gershon, Timothy; Parkes, Christopher; Reid, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a vital piece of apparatus for allowing precision measurements in hadronic physics. It provides not only superb impact parameter resolutions but also excellent momentum resolution, both important discriminating tools for precision high energy physics. This poster focuses on the R&D going into the future LHCb VELO detector. At present there are two proposed options for the upgrade; pixel chips or strip detectors. The LHCb upgrade is designed with higher luminosities and increased yields in mind. In order to get more out of the LHCb detector changes to the front end electronics will have to be made. At present, the first level hardware trigger is sets a limiting factor on the maximum efficiency for hadronic channels. As the VELO is positioned so close the proton-proton interaction region, whatever the choice of sensor, we will require efficient cooling and some proposed solutions are outlined. The LHCb TimePix telescope has had a very successful years running, with various devic...

  18. LHCb - measuring beauty

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    When is a VELO not a bike? When it's something a bit more complex, like the vertex detector of the LHCb experiment. VELO stands for VErtex LOcator, and its Technical Design Report was presented, along with that for the experiment's muon detector, in July.

  19. B Physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Pepe Altarelli, Monica

    2008-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated detector for b physics at the LHC. In this article we present a concise review of the detector design and performance together with the main physics goals and their relevance for a precise test of the Standard Model and search of New Physics beyond it.

  20. The LHCb Starterkit initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of high-energy physicists use and produce software every day. Software skills are usually acquired on the go and dedicated training courses are rare. The LHCb Starterkit is a new training format for getting LHCb collaborators started in effectively using software to perform their research. The initiative, combining courses and online tutorials, focuses on teaching basic skills for research computing, as well as LHCb software specifics. Unlike traditional tutorials we focus on starting with basics, performing all the material live, with a high degree of interactivity, giving priority to understanding the tools as opposed to handing out recipes that work “as if by magic”. The LHCb Starterkit was started by young members of the collaboration inspired by the principles of Software Carpentry, and the material is created in a collaborative fashion using the tools we teach. Three successful entry-level workshops, as well as two advanced ones, have taken place since the start of the initiative i...

  1. The LHCb Turbo stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig, A., E-mail: albert.puig@cern.ch

    2016-07-11

    The LHCb experiment will record an unprecedented dataset of beauty and charm hadron decays during Run II of the LHC, set to take place between 2015 and 2018. A key computing challenge is to store and process this data, which limits the maximum output rate of the LHCb trigger. So far, LHCb has written out a few kHz of events containing the full raw sub-detector data, which are passed through a full offline event reconstruction before being considered for physics analysis. Charm physics in particular is limited by trigger output rate constraints. A new streaming strategy includes the possibility to perform the physics analysis with candidates reconstructed in the trigger, thus bypassing the offline reconstruction. In the Turbo stream the trigger will write out a compact summary of physics objects containing all information necessary for analyses. This will allow an increased output rate and thus higher average efficiencies and smaller selection biases. This idea will be commissioned and developed during 2015 with a selection of physics analyses. It is anticipated that the turbo stream will be adopted by an increasing number of analyses during the remainder of LHC Run II (2015–2018) and ultimately in Run III (starting in 2020) with the upgraded LHCb detector.

  2. LHCb - measuring beauty

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    When is a VELO not a bike? When it's something a bit more complex, like the vertex detector of the LHCb experiment. VELO stands for VErtex LOcator, and its Technical Design Report was presented, along with that for the experiment's muon detector, in

  3. LHCb : Status and Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raven, G.

    The huge b over(b, ̄) cross section at the LHC makes it possible to collect large samples of B hadrons. This allows for the detailed study of CP violating asymmetries, and hunt for rare decays. The LHCb detector is a dedicated B-physics experiment aimed at meeting the challenges involved. After

  4. LHCb Outreach example

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, B

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a general purpose spectrometer in the forward region optimized for precision studies of beauty and charm hadron properties. The volumes of data produced by the LHC make it possible to perform such precision measurements with only a fraction of the total LHCb dataset, making it an ideal playground for developing new types of masterclass exercises. We present here LHCb's first foray into the masterclass programme, in which students are taught how to make a 1% precision measurement of the D0 meson lifetime. The students learn to separate D0 mesons from the background in LHCb's vertex detector and build up a signal mass peak, before learning about how to use background sidebands to extract the signal properties in other variables of interest. They then perform a fit to measure the D0 lifetime, and discover that the result is biased by charm produced in the decays of B hadrons, which has an artificially long lifetime compared to charm produced directly in the proton-proton collision. Finally...

  5. LHCb: Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Rodriguez Perez, P

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The beauty and charm hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), and hence the detector is critical for both the trigger and offline physics analyses. The 88 VELO sensors are all n-on-n type but one, which is made from n-on-p silicon, and is the only n-on-p module silicon sensor operated at the LHC. The sensors have an inner radius of only 7 mm from the LHC beam and an outer radius of 42 mm, consequently the sensors receive a large and non-uniform radiation dose. The LHCb is planned to record an integrated luminosity up to 5 $fb^{-1}$ with collision energies between 7 and 14 TeV before 2018. The leakage current in the sensors has increased significantly following the delivered luminosity, and decreased during shutdown periods due to annealing. The effective depletion voltage of the sensors is measured from the charge collection effi...

  6. LHCb VELO upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennessy, Karol

    2017-02-11

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, scheduled for LHC Run-III, scheduled to start in 2021, will transform the experiment to a trigger-less system reading out the full detector at 40 MHz event rate. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm enabling the detector to run at luminosities of 2×10{sup 33} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon vertex detector surrounding the interaction region. The current detector will be replaced with a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at 40 MHz. The upgraded VELO will provide fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction to the software trigger. The silicon pixel sensors have 55×55 μm{sup 2} pitch, and are read out by the VeloPix ASIC, from the Timepix/Medipix family. The hottest region will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhits/s yielding a total data rate of more than 3 Tbit/s for the upgraded VELO. The detector modules are located in a separate vacuum, separated from the beam vacuum by a thin custom made foil. The foil will be manufactured through milling and possibly thinned further by chemical etching. The material budget will be minimised by the use of evaporative CO{sub 2} coolant circulating in microchannels within 400 μm thick silicon substrates. The current status of the VELO upgrade is described and latest results from operation of irradiated sensor assemblies are presented.

  7. Study of gas gain uniformity of the LHCb Muon System MWPCs using cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Capua, S; Brusa, S; Carboni, G; Franconieri, A; Graziani, G; Lenzi, M; Messi, R; Pennazzi, S; Sabatino, G; Santovetti, E; Savrié, M

    2006-01-01

    We present here a measurement of the gas gain uniformity of the M2R3 and M5R4 chambers and we discuss the comparison with the values obtained via the source. The method could also be used to monitor the gas gain uniformity of the Muon System during data taking.

  8. LHCb: The LHCb off-Site HLT Farm Demonstration

    CERN Multimedia

    Liu, Guoming

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb High Level Trigger (HLT) farm consists of about 1300 nodes, which are housed in the underground server room of the experiment point. Due to the constraints of the power supply and cooling system, it is difficult to install more servers in this room for the future. Off-site computing farm is a solution to enlarge the computing capacity. In this paper, we will demonstrate the LHCb off-site HLT farm which locate in the CERN computing center. Since we use private IP addresses for the HLT farm, we would need virtual private network (VPN) to bridge both sites. There are two kinds of traffic in the event builder: control traffic for the control and monitoring of the farm and the Data Acquisition (DAQ) traffic. We adopt IP tunnel for the control traffic and Network Address Translate (NAT) for the DAQ traffic. The performance of the off-site farm have been tested and compared with the on-site farm. The effect of the network latency has been studied. To employ a large off-site farm, one of the potential bottle...

  9. User analysis of LHCb data with Ganga

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, A; Cowan, G; Egede, U; Elmsheuser, J; Gaidioz, B; Harrison, K; Lee, H -C; Liko, D; Moscicki, J; Muraru, A; Pajchel, K; Reece, W; Samset, B; Slater, M; Soroko, A; van der Ster, D; Williams, M; Tan, C L

    2010-01-01

    GANGA (http://cern.ch/ganga) is a job-management tool that offers a simple, efficient and consistent user analysis tool in a variety of heterogeneous environments: from local clusters to global Grid systems. Experiment specific plug-ins allow GANGA to be customised for each experiment. For LHCb users GANGA is the officially supported and advertised tool for job submission to the Grid. The LHCb specific plug-ins allow support for end-to-end analysis helping the user to perform his complete analysis with the help of GANGA. This starts with the support for data selection, where a user can select data sets from the LHCb Bookkeeping system. Next comes the set up for large analysis jobs: with tailored plug-ins for the LHCb core software, jobs can be managed by the splitting of these analysis jobs with the subsequent merging of the resulting files. Furthermore, GANGA offers support for Toy Monte-Carlos to help the user tune their analysis. In addition to describing the GANGA architecture, typical usage patterns with...

  10. LHCb Online event processing and filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Alessio, F; Brarda, L; Frank, M; Franek, B; Galli, D; Gaspar, C; Van Herwijnen, E; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Köstner, S; Moine, G; Neufeld, N; Somogyi, P; Stoica, R; Suman, S

    2008-01-01

    The first level trigger of LHCb accepts one million events per second. After preprocessing in custom FPGA-based boards these events are distributed to a large farm of PC-servers using a high-speed Gigabit Ethernet network. Synchronisation and event management is achieved by the Timing and Trigger system of LHCb. Due to the complex nature of the selection of B-events, which are the main interest of LHCb, a full event-readout is required. Event processing on the servers is parallelised on an event basis. The reduction factor is typically 1/500. The remaining events are forwarded to a formatting layer, where the raw data files are formed and temporarily stored. A small part of the events is also forwarded to a dedicated farm for calibration and monitoring. The files are subsequently shipped to the CERN Tier0 facility for permanent storage and from there to the various Tier1 sites for reconstruction. In parallel files are used by various monitoring and calibration processes running within the LHCb Online system. ...

  11. Behind the scenes at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    A new book chronicling the journey of LHCb has just been published: “LHCb: the collaboration in photos”. It takes readers through the creation of the detector, from the project's inception to the construction of the site and final operation.   Cover of the new book, "LHCb: the collaboration in photos". “LHCb: the collaboration in photos” presents a stunning collection of images and information about the experiment and its staff. Part photo journal of the experiment’s creation, part introduction to the physics and engineering of the detector, it provides a complete overview of the LHCb project. The many faces of the LHCb collaboration are reflected in the 77 glossy pages of the new book: from technical staff to computer scientists, physicists to secretaries, and Nobel Prize winners to post-docs. For all of its members, the book represents a well-earned celebration of their 15 years of effort. “We are very pleased to ha...

  12. LHCb: LHCb results on $B$ meson mixing

    CERN Multimedia

    Eitschberger, U

    2013-01-01

    On the poster three LHCb results on B meson mixing using a datasample of 1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 7 TeV are presented. The B meson oscillation frequencies are measured as $\\Delta m_d = 0.5156 \\pm 0.0051 (\\text{stat}) \\pm 0.0033 (\\text{syst}) \\text{ps}^{-1}$ and $\\Delta m_s = 17.768 \\pm 0.023 (\\text{stat}) \\pm 0.006 (\\text{syst}) \\text{ps}^{-1}$. The CP violation observables in the decay channel $B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^0_S$ are determined as $S_{J/\\psi K^0_S} = 0.73 \\pm 0.07 (\\text{stat})\\pm 0.04 (\\text{syst})$ and $C_{J/\\psi K^0_S} = 0.03 \\pm 0.09 (\\text{stat})\\pm 0.01 (\\text{syst})$.

  13. Optimisation of the LHCb detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hierck, R H

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a comparison of the LHCb classic and LHCb light concept from a tracking perspective. The comparison includes the detector occupancies, the various pattern recognition algorithms and the reconstruction performance. The final optimised LHCb setup is used to study the physics performance of LHCb for the Bs->DsK and Bs->DsPi decay channels. This includes both the event selection and a study of the sensitivity for the Bs oscillation frequency, delta m_s, the Bs lifetime difference, DGamma_s, and the CP parameter gamma-2delta gamma.

  14. LHCb trigger streams optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, D.; Kazeev, N.; Neychev, R.; Panin, A.; Trofimov, I.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Vesterinen, M.

    2017-10-01

    The LHCb experiment stores around 1011 collision events per year. A typical physics analysis deals with a final sample of up to 107 events. Event preselection algorithms (lines) are used for data reduction. Since the data are stored in a format that requires sequential access, the lines are grouped into several output file streams, in order to increase the efficiency of user analysis jobs that read these data. The scheme efficiency heavily depends on the stream composition. By putting similar lines together and balancing the stream sizes it is possible to reduce the overhead. We present a method for finding an optimal stream composition. The method is applied to a part of the LHCb data (Turbo stream) on the stage where it is prepared for user physics analysis. This results in an expected improvement of 15% in the speed of user analysis jobs, and will be applied on data to be recorded in 2017.

  15. Anatomy of an upgrade event in the upgrade era, and implications for the LHCb trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, C

    2014-01-01

    This document studies the rates at which particles of interest are produced within the LHCb detector acceptance, in both Run 1 and Upgrade conditions. We present the event rates that could be selected by an idealised trigger system during the LHCb Upgrade, and compare these to the rates selected by the Run 1 trigger system. We discuss the implications of our findings for the proposed LHCb Upgrade trigger.

  16. LHCb CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    Vesterinen, Mika

    2016-01-01

    The study of $CP$ violation in the beauty hadron sector is a promising approach to search for the effects of physics beyond the Standard Model. Several recent measurements in this area from the LHCb experiment are reported in these proceedings. These are based on the Run-I dataset of 3~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected at proton-proton centre of mass energies of 7 and 8~TeV.

  17. LHCb: Beam Pipe portrait

    CERN Multimedia

    LHCb, Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    The proton beams circulate in the accelerator in Ultra High Vacuum to make them interact only with each other when colliding at the interaction point. A special beam pipe "holds" the vacuum where they pass through the LHCb detector: it has to be mechanically very strong to stand the difference in pressure between the vacuum inside it and the air in the cavern but also be as transparent as possible for the particles originating in the proton−proton collisions.

  18. LHCb: Beam Pipe

    CERN Multimedia

    LHCb, Collaboration

    2005-01-01

    The proton beams circulate in the accelerator in Ultra High Vacuum to make them interact only with each other when colliding at the interaction point. A special beam pipe "holds" the vacuum where they pass through the LHCb detector:it has to be mechanically very strong to stand the difference in pressure between the vacuum inside it and the air in the cavern but also be as transparent as possible for the particles originating in the proton−proton collisions.

  19. The LHCb electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    This huge 6X7 square metre wall consists of 3300 blocks containing scintillator, fibre optics and lead, which took engineers on the LHCb experiment at CERN only one month to construct. It will measure the energy of particles produced in proton-proton collisions at the LHC when it is started in 2008. Photons, electrons and positrons will pass through the layers of material in these modules and deposit their energy in the detector through a shower of particles.

  20. Electroweak penguins at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jibo; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    Electroweak penguin decays are flavour-changing neutral current processes, and are highly suppressed in the Standard Model. They can only proceed via loop diagrams. Such decays may receive contributions from New Physics and change their decay behaviours like decay rate and angular distribution. Studying the properties of these decays thus provides a powerful method to probe for New Physics. In this contribution the most recent LHCb results on electroweak penguin decays are reported.

  1. Electroweak penguins at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2073177

    2016-01-01

    Electroweak penguin decays are flavour-changing neutral current processes, and are highly suppressed in the Stan- dard Model. They can only proceed via loop diagrams. Such decays may receive contributions from New Physics and change their decay behaviours like decay rate and angular distribution. Studying the properties of these decays thus provides a powerful method to probe for New Physics. In this contribution the most recent LHCb results on electroweak penguin decays are reported.

  2. IHEP in the LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The LHCb hadron calorimeter (HCAL), designed at IHEP, is a sampling device made out of steel and scintillating tiles readout by wavelength-shifting fibers. A total of 52 modules have to be produced to built up the two halves of the HCAL structure. IHEP took responsibility for the tiles production, assembling and testing of the modules and for precise machining of the optics components.

  3. LHCb Distributed Conditions Database

    CERN Document Server

    Clemencic, Marco

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb Conditions Database project provides the necessary tools to handle non-event time-varying data. The main users of conditions are reconstruction and analysis processes, which are running on the Grid. To allow efficient access to the data, we need to use a synchronized replica of the content of the database located at the same site as the event data file, i.e. the LHCb Tier1. The replica to be accessed is selected from information stored on LFC (LCG File Catalog) and managed with the interface provided by the LCG developed library CORAL. The plan to limit the submission of jobs to those sites where the required conditions are available will also be presented. LHCb applications are using the Conditions Database framework on a production basis since March 2007. We have been able to collect statistics on the performance and effectiveness of both the LCB library COOL (the library providing conditions handling functionalities) and the distribution framework itself. Stress tests on the CNAF hosted replica o...

  4. The LHCb Starterkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Albert; LHCb Starterkit Team

    2017-10-01

    The vast majority of high-energy physicists use and produce software every day. Software skills are usually acquired “on the go” and dedicated training courses are rare. The LHCb Starterkit is a new training format for getting LHCb collaborators started in effectively using software to perform their research. The course focuses on teaching basic skills for research computing. Unlike traditional tutorials we focus on starting with basics, performing all the material live, with a high degree of interactivity, giving priority to understanding the tools as opposed to handing out recipes that work “as if by magic”. The LHCb Starterkit was started by two young members of the collaboration inspired by the principles of Software Carpentry, and the material is created in a collaborative fashion using the tools we teach. Three successful entry-level workshops, as well as an advance one, have taken place since the start of the initiative in 2015, and were taught largely by PhD students to other PhD students.

  5. LHCb distributed conditions database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemencic, M

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb Conditions Database project provides the necessary tools to handle non-event time-varying data. The main users of conditions are reconstruction and analysis processes, which are running on the Grid. To allow efficient access to the data, we need to use a synchronized replica of the content of the database located at the same site as the event data file, i.e. the LHCb Tier1. The replica to be accessed is selected from information stored on LFC (LCG File Catalog) and managed with the interface provided by the LCG developed library CORAL. The plan to limit the submission of jobs to those sites where the required conditions are available will also be presented. LHCb applications are using the Conditions Database framework on a production basis since March 2007. We have been able to collect statistics on the performance and effectiveness of both the LCG library COOL (the library providing conditions handling functionalities) and the distribution framework itself. Stress tests on the CNAF hosted replica of the Conditions Database have been performed and the results will be summarized here

  6. LHCb: Recent results on B and D decays from LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Obłakowska-Mucha, A

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has collected more than 3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity in 2011 and 2012 and is producing a large amount of excellent results in beauty and charmed meson physics. An overview of the most recent results on rare B decays, CP violation, and charm physics will be given along with an outlook to the physics perspectives and to the LHCb upgrade.

  7. LHCb; Neutral Higgs $ \\to \\tau \\tau$ Limits at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Ilten, P

    2013-01-01

    LHCb is fully instrumented in the forward region, $2 \\leq \\eta \\leq 5$, and provides compelentary results to the central measurements of ATLAS and CMS. Preliminary limits are presented on neutral Higgs production usint $\\tau \\tau$ final states in the forward region of LHCb.

  8. The LHCb Vertex Locator – Performance and Radiation Damage

    CERN Document Server

    Oblakowska-Mucha, A

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is an important part of a LHCb tracking system, enabling precision measurement of beauty and charm mesons’ flight distance. The VELO consist of a set of silicon micro-strip detectors, arranged in two retractable halves, operating only 7 mm from the interac- tion region. In these proceedings the VELO performance during the Run 1 is summarised and radiation damage studies are presented.

  9. Bs semileptonic asymmetry at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Dufour, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    When neutral $B^{0}_{s,d}$ mesons evolve in time they can change into their own antiparticles. In this mixing process CP symmetry is not necessarily conserved, as the probability for a $B^{0}$ meson to change into a $\\bar{B}^{0}$ meson can be different from the probability for the reverse process. The CP violation in the $B^{0}_{s}$ system as measured using semileptonic decays, defined as $a^{s}_{sl}$, is very small according to the Standard Model. However, earlier measurements of the semileptonic mixing asymmetry in both the $B_s^{0}$ and $B_d^{0}$ systems have shown a $3 \\sigma$ deviation with respect to the Standard Model value. A measurement of $a^{s}_{sl}$ performed using $1 \\text{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected at the LHCb detector is presented, together with an outlook to the updated $3 \\text{fb}^{-1}$ result.

  10. LHCb: Handling online information in the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Barandela Pazos, M D C

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a complex particle physics detector, large amount of information is needed for its run time configuration, control and monitoring. All these data are stored in the three main logical databases of the online system: configuration database, archiving database and conditions database. The configuration database contains information needed by the online hardware and software components, like for example the electronics boards, high voltage and low voltage power supplies and trigger algorithms, to be configured, according to the partitioning mode (which components are needed) and running mode(which data are being produced: physics, cosmic, test, etc.). The archiving database contains all data read from hardware used for the monitoring and debugging of the experiment, like for example temperature readings. The third online database, the conditions database, contains a subset of the monitoring data, read from hardware, that are needed for physics processing and also some configuration data...

  11. LHCb: Ageing Phenomena in the Straw Tube Tracker (Outer Tracker) of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Bachmann, S

    2009-01-01

    The outer tracking system of the LHCb spectrometer is built in the straw tube technology. In tota it consists of 53760 straw of 2.5m length. Thorough investigations have been performed to study the detector performance under long-term irradiations. Problems occuring caused by ageing are discussed and solutions are presented.

  12. LHCb: Control and Monitoring of the Online Computer Farm for Offline processing in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Granado Cardoso, L A; Closier, J; Frank, M; Gaspar, C; Jost, B; Liu, G; Neufeld, N; Callot, O

    2013-01-01

    LHCb, one of the 4 experiments at the LHC accelerator at CERN, uses approximately 1500 PCs (averaging 12 cores each) for processing the High Level Trigger (HLT) during physics data taking. During periods when data acquisition is not required most of these PCs are idle. In these periods it is possible to profit from the unused processing capacity to run offline jobs, such as Monte Carlo simulation. The LHCb offline computing environment is based on LHCbDIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control). In LHCbDIRAC, job agents are started on Worker Nodes, pull waiting tasks from the central WMS (Workload Management System) and process them on the available resources. A Control System was developed which is able to launch, control and monitor the job agents for the offline data processing on the HLT Farm. This control system is based on the existing Online System Control infrastructure, the PVSS SCADA and the FSM toolkit. It has been extensively used launching and monitoring 22.000+ agents simultaneo...

  13. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agari, M. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Bauer, C. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Baumeister, D. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Blouw, J. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany)]. E-mail: Johan.Blouw@mpi-hd.mpg.de; Hofmann, W. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Knoepfle, K.T. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Loechner, S. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Schmelling, M. [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (Germany); Pugatch, V. [Kiev Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine); Bay, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Carron, B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Frei, R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Jiminez-Otero, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Tran, M.-T. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Voss, H. [Laboratoire de Physique des Hautes Energies, Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne (France); Adeva, B. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Esperante, D. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lois, C. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Vasquez, P. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Bernhard, R.P. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Bernet, R. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Ermoline, Y. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Gassner, J. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Koestner, S. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland); Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D. [Physik-Insitut Universitaet Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2006-01-15

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(Italy) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  14. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agari, M.; Bauer, C.; Baumeister, D.; Blouw, J.; Hofmann, W.; Knoepfle, K.T.; Loechner, S.; Schmelling, M.; Pugatch, V.; Bay, A.; Carron, B.; Frei, R.; Jiminez-Otero, S.; Tran, M.-T.; Voss, H.; Adeva, B.; Esperante, D.; Lois, C.; Vasquez, P.; Bernhard, R.P.; Bernet, R.; Ermoline, Y.; Gassner, J.; Koestner, S.; Lehner, F.; Needham, M.; Siegler, M.; Steinkamp, O.; Straumann, U.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.

    2006-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(Italy) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry

  15. The LHCb silicon tracker project

    CERN Document Server

    Blouw, J

    2004-01-01

    Two silicon strip detectors, the Trigger Tracker(TT) and the Inner Tracker(IT) will be constructed for the LHCb experiment. Transverse momentum information extracted from the TT will be used in the Level 1 trigger. The IT is part of the main tracking system behind the magnet. Both silicon detectors will be read out using a custom-developed chip by the ASIC lab in Heidelberg. The signal-over-noise behavior and performance of various geometrical designs of the silicon sensors, in conjunction with the Beetle read-out chip, have been extensively studied in test beam experiments. Results from those experiments are presented, and have been used in the final choice of sensor geometry.

  16. LHCb Semileptonic Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Vesterinen, Mika

    2013-01-01

    A recent LHCb measurement of the CP violating flavour specific asymmetry in $B_s^0$ decays, $a^s_{ls}$, is presented. This measurement is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ $=$ 7 TeV, collected during the 2011 run of the LHC. The result is $a^s_{ls} = (-0.24 \\pm 0.54_{\\rm stat} \\pm 0.33_{\\rm syst})\\times 10^{-2}$, which is the most precise measurement of this quantity to date and agrees with the Standard Model prediction.

  17. Flavour Tagging at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Grabalosa Gandara, M

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the most possible accurate knowledge of the flavour at production of the reconstructed B meson is required. This poster summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. We use same side an opposite side algorithms to establish wheter the meson contained a b or a b\\bar quark. The final decision is obtained through a combination of several methods. The use of control channels, decays to a flavour specific final state, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction \\omega (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as input for the determination of CKM unitary triangle angles.

  18. LHCb Dockerized Build Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemencic, M.; Belin, M.; Closier, J.; Couturier, B.

    2017-10-01

    Used as lightweight virtual machines or as enhanced chroot environments, Linux containers, and in particular the Docker abstraction over them, are more and more popular in the virtualization communities. The LHCb Core Software team decided to investigate how to use Docker containers to provide stable and reliable build environments for the different supported platforms, including the obsolete ones which cannot be installed on modern hardware, to be used in integration builds, releases and by any developer. We present here the techniques and procedures set up to define and maintain the Docker images and how these images can be used to develop on modern Linux distributions for platforms otherwise not accessible.

  19. Demo LHCb data analysis using Ganga

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The ARDA-LHCb prototype activity is focusing on the GANGA system (a joint ATLAS-LHCb project). The main idea behind GANGA is that the physicists should have a simple interface to their analysis programs. GANGA allows preparing the application, to organize the submission and gather results via a clean Python API. The details needed to submit a job on the Grid (like special configuration files) are factorised out and applied transparently by the system. In other words, it is possible to set up an application on a portable PC, then run some higher-statistics tests on a local facility (like LSF at CERN) and finally analyse all the available statistics on the Grid just changing the parameter which identifies the execution back-end.

  20. Backsplah simulation for the SPD (LHCB Subdetector)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) of the LHCb experiment is part of the calorimeter system, positioned just before the Preshower (PS), and is meant to distinguish between electrons and photons at level-0 of the trigger. Backsplash effects is this subdetector have been studied via Monte Carlo simulations. With backsplash we refer to the particles travelling backwards from the following sudbtectors (PS, ECAL) with the possibility of leaving a signal so we can misidentify a photon as a charged particle. (Author)

  1. LHCb distributed computing and the GRID

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, N; Closier, J; Galli, D; Gaspar, C; Harris, F; Harrison, K; Van Herwijnen, Eric; Khan, A; Klous, S; Kuznetsov, G; Marconi, U; Mato, P; McArthur, I; Patrick, G N

    2003-01-01

    The current architecture of the LHCb distributed system for Monte Carlo data production was described. An overview was given of the current and planned use of Grid technology from the European Datagrid project, and of the development of an experiment-specific user interface of the Grid services. The future planning was done in terms of executing large-scale 'Data Challenges' together with the phased integration of tools emerging from the EDG project. (Edited abstract) 10 Refs.

  2. Measurement of semileptonic asymmetries at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    CP violation in neutral B meson mixing is an excellent place to search for the effects of new physics beyond the Standard Model. I report on the first measurements of the CP violating semileptonic asymmetries in the B_s0 and B_d0 systems from LHCb. Both are consistent with the Standard Model expectations and are the most precise single measurements of these parameters to date.

  3. LHCb Event display

    CERN Document Server

    Trisovic, Ana

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Event Display was made for educational purposes at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN in Geneva, Switzerland. The project was implemented as a stand-alone application using C++ and ROOT, a framework developed by CERN for data analysis. This paper outlines the development and architecture of the application in detail, as well as the motivation for the development and the goals of the exercise. The application focuses on the visualization of events recorded by the LHCb detector, where an event represents a set of charged particle tracks in one proton-proton collision. Every particle track is coloured by its type and can be selected to see its essential information such as mass and momentum. The application allows students to save this information and calculate the invariant mass for any pair of particles. Furthermore, the students can use additional calculating tools in the application and build up a histogram of these invariant masses. The goal for the students is to find a $D^0$ par...

  4. The LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Panman, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of LHCb is to measure the effects of new particles or forces beyond the Standard Model. Results obtained from data collected in 2010 and 2011 show that the detector is robust and functioning well. While LHCb will be able to measure a host of interesting channels in heavy flavour decays in the upcoming few years, a limit of about 1 fb$^{-1}$ of data per year cannot be overcome without upgrading the detector. The LHC machine does not face such a limitation. With the upgraded detector, read out at 40 MHz, a much more flexible software-based triggering strategy will allow a large increase not only in data rate, as the detector would collect 5 fb$^{-1}$ per year, but also the ability to increase trigger efficiencies especially in decays to hadronic final states. In addition, it will be possible to change triggers to explore different physics as LHC discoveries point us to the most interesting channels. Our physics scope extends beyond that of flavour. Possibilities for interesting discoveries exis...

  5. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00400931; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-23

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  6. LHCb Calorimeter modules arrive at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Two of the three components of the LHCb Calorimeter system have started to arrive from Russia. Members of the LHCb Calorimeter group with the ECAL and HCAL modules that have just arrived at CERN. The first two of the 56 Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) modules and 1200 of the 3300 modules of the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) have reached CERN from Russia. The third part of the system, the Preshower detector, is still being prepared in Russia. The calorimeter system identifies and triggers on high-energy particles, namely electrons, hadrons and photons by measuring their positions and energies. The HCAL is going to be a pure trigger device. The ECAL will also be used in the triggering, but in addition it will reconstruct neutral pions and photons from B meson decays. One of the major aims of the LHCb experiment is to study CP violation through B meson decays including Bs mesons with high statistics in different decay modes. CP violation (violation of charge and parity) is necessary to explain why the Universe...

  7. LHCb: Study of a solution with COTS for the LHCb calorimeter upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Abellan Beteta, C

    2011-01-01

    Since the end of the commissioning of LHCb in 2009 the detector has proven to work nicely even in high pile-up conditions and by the end of 2010 nominal instantaneous luminosity was reached. Data taking is expected to continue for 5 more years, aiming to accumulate an integrated luminosity of 5fb-1. Even if new physics is discovered at that time, it will be difficult to characterize it and it would be more profitable to upgrade the detector. The foreseen long shutdown offers an opportunity to upgrade the detector . As expressed in the Letter of Intend for the LHCb upgrade [1] the main objective of this enhancement is to have a 40MHz readout electronics to allow the use of a more flexible and efficient software-based triggering system. Moreover, after the shutdown, the instantaneous luminosity at the LHCb interaction point is expected to be multiplied by 5. From the point of view of the LHCb calorimeter changing the readout implies a change of the electronic boards. Also because of the luminosity increase and ...

  8. Radiation damage at LHCb, results and expectations

    CERN Multimedia

    Faerber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb Detector is a single-arm spectrometer at the LHC designed to detect new physics through measuring CP violation and rare decays of heavy flavor mesons. The detector consists of vertex detector, tracking system, dipole magnet, 2 RICH detectors, em. calorimeter, hadron calorimeter, muon detector which all use different technologies and suffer differently from radiation damage. These radiation damage results and the investigation methods will be shown. The delivered luminosity till July 2011 was about 450 pb−1. The Vertex detector receives the highest particle flux at LHCb. The currents drawn by the silicon sensors are, as expected, increasing proportional to the integrated luminosity. The highest irradiaton regions of the n-bulk silicon sensors are observed to have recently undergone space charge sign inversion. The Silicon Trackers show increasing leakage currents comparable with earlier predictions. The electromagentic calorimeter and hadron calorimeter suffer under percent-level signal decrease whi...

  9. 3D Monitoring of LHCb Inner Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Sainvitu, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The positions of the Inner Tracker (IT) detectors of the LHCb experiment installed in the LHC at CERN are impacted by the LHCb dipole magnet powering. In the past the movements of the stations have been measured using standard survey methods during magnet tests in shutdown periods. But the survey targets are visible only in very narrow spaces and the access to the IT is very difficult, even impossible in the central region when the detector is closed. Finally the precision of the standard survey measurement is affected by the poor configuration. In 2013 and 2014, during the first long shutdown of the LHC (LS1), the CERN Survey team (EN/MEF-SU) in collaboration with the LHCb Technical Coordination and the EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de LAUSANNE, CH), developed a permanent monitoring system which has been tested and installed in order to allow the 3D position measurement of the IT stations, even during the run periods, with a precision of 100 microns at 1 sigma level. The 3D Monitoring system of the LH...

  10. Selection of LHCb Physics Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Burkhard

    2013-05-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC searching for physics beyond the Standard Model through precision measurements of CP-violating observables and the study of very rare decays of beauty- and charm-flavoured hadrons. In this article a selection of recent LHCb results is presented. Unless otherwise stated, the results are based on an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1 accumulated during the year 2011 at √s = 7 TeV.

  11. Electroweak boson production at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Sestini, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment offers a complementary phase space to ATLAS and CMS to study electroweak processes, thanks to the forward acceptance and the large bandwidth of the trigger allowing low energy thresholds. For this reason electroweak measurements at LHCb can provide unique constraints to the Parton Distribution Functions. Moreover these measurements can be used to validate reconstruction techniques. In these proceedings the latest measurements on W and Z bosons production performed during the LHC Run I and Run II data taking are presented.

  12. Charm mixing at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Di Canto, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent ratio of $D^0\\to K^+\\pi^-$ to $D^0\\to K^-\\pi^+$ decay rates in $D^{*+}$-tagged events using 1.0\\,fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment. We measure the mixing parameters $x'^2=(-0.9\\pm1.3)\\times10^{-4}$, $y'=(7.2\\pm2.4)\\times10^{-3}$ and the ratio of doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates $R_D=(3.52\\pm0.15)\\times10^{-3}$. The result excludes the no-mixing hypothesis with a probability corresponding to 9.1 standard deviations and represents the first observation of charm mixing from a single measurement

  13. Rare Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons provide an effective method of testing the Standard Model and probing possible new physics scenarios. The LHCb experiment has published a variety of interesting results in this field, some of which are presented here. In particular the measurements of the branching fractions of B(s)0 → μ+μ- which, in combination with CMS, resulted in the first observation of the Bs0 → μ+μ- decay. Other topics include searches for the rare decay D0 → μ+μ-, the lepton flavour violating decays B(s)0 → e±μ∓, and the observation of the ψ(4160) resonance in the region of low recoil in B+ → K+μ+μ- decay. New results on the angular analysis of the decay B0 → K*0μ+μ- with form factor independent observables are also shown.

  14. LHCb Online Networking Requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Jost, B

    2003-01-01

    This document describes the networking requirements of the LHCb online installation. It lists both quantitative aspects such as the number of required switch ports, as well as some qualitative features of the equipment, such as minimum buffer sizes in switches. The document comprises both the data acquisition network and the controls/general-purpose network. While the numbers represent our best current knowledge and are intended to give (in particular) network equipment manufacturers an overview of our needs, this document should not be confused with a market survey questionnaire or a formal tendering document. However the information contained in this document will be the input of any such document. A preliminary schedule for procurement and installation is also given.

  15. Flavour physics at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeva B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Some selected results of the LHCb experiment, running at the LHC with ppcollisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV, are reported here, after operation with a total integratedluminosity of 3.0 fb−1 (Run 1. We focus on the most recent analyses on flavour physics,that include measurements of the CKM invariant phases γ and β, precision determination of the quark coupling strength Vub, observation of the very rare decays B0(s→μ+μ−, search for new physics in the anomalous branching ratio of B→D*τv̄, and precision angular analysis of the rare decays B0→K*0μ+μ− and B0s→ϕμ+μ−. Detailed comparisons are performed in all cases with the predictions of the Standard Model, and a fewinteresting tensions are observed.

  16. LHCb upstream tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Artuso, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The detector for the LHCb upgrade is designed for 40MHz readout, allowing the experiment to run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2x10^33 cm$^2$s$^-1$. The upgrade of the tracker subsystem in front of the dipole magnet, the Upstream Tracker, is crucial for charged track reconstruction and fast trigger decisions based on a tracking algorithm involving also vertex detector information. The detector consists of 4 planes with a total area of about 8.5m$^2$, made of single sided silicon strip sensors read-out by a novel custom-made ASIC (SALT). Details on the performance of prototype sensors, front-end electronics, near-detector electronics and mechanical components are presented.

  17. Pancake day comes early for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The assembly of LHCb has begun! The two coils of the LHCb magnet arrived and were lowered into the underground experimental area during the arctic conditions of Epiphany week. Deliveries for the yoke continue.

  18. LHCb Computing Resource usage in 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzi, Concezio

    2018-01-01

    This document reports the usage of computing resources by the LHCb collaboration during the period January 1st – December 31st 2017. The data in the following sections have been compiled from the EGI Accounting portal: https://accounting.egi.eu. For LHCb specific information, the data is taken from the DIRAC Accounting at the LHCb DIRAC Web portal: http://lhcb-portal-dirac.cern.ch.

  19. LHCb Computing Resource usage in 2015 (II)

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzi, Concezio

    2016-01-01

    This documents reports the usage of computing resources by the LHCb collaboration during the period January 1st – December 31st 2015. The data in the following sections has been compiled from the EGI Accounting portal: https://accounting.egi.eu. For LHCb specific information, the data is taken from the DIRAC Accounting at the LHCb DIRAC Web portal: http://lhcb-portal-dirac.cern.ch.

  20. The LHCb VeLo for Phase 1 upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Dean, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) is a dedicated experiment for studying b and c hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). LHCb uses a silicon-strip detector, the Vertex Locator (VELO), for high precision tracking of collisions from the LHC. During Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC, the LHCb collaboration will upgrade the detector, switching from the current VELO, ca- pable of a 1 MHz readout, to a hybrid pixel detector capable of reading out at the full bunch crossing rate of the LHC. Substantial progress has been made in the development of the new de- tector. The status of the silicon sensors, custom designed VeloPix ASIC and electronic system will be discussed in detail. The current status of the cooling system and RF foil will also be presented.

  1. LHCb : A Scintillating Fibre Trackind Detector for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Lindner, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is preparing the upgrade which is scheduled to be installed in 2018/19. The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker will be designed to replace the current tracking system downstream of the magnet, required to run at an increased luminosity of 1 - 2 10$^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and to collect a total of 50fb$^{-1}$ of data. The readout of the detector will be at 40MHz, applying a full software based trigger for every single bunch crossing. The SciFi Tracker consists of 12 planes covering a total surface of 350 m2. Modules are based on 2.5 m long multilayer ribbons made of 250 um diameter scintillating fibres as the active medium and signal transport. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays with 128 channels at a width of 250 um are used for the readout. The signals from the SiPMS are digitized on an ASIC chip before reconstructing the track hit position within an FPGA on the front-end board. Several challenges facing this detector and the significant progress over the last year will be presented regarding the p...

  2. The VELO (VErtex LOcator) at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    De Capua, S.

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb silicon vertex locator (VELO) is an array of silicon planes installed in a retractable roman pot system, which will enable the LHCb experiment to reconstruct and trigger on b-hadrons produced in collisions at the LHC. The VELO will be also used to attempt measuring the absolute luminosity with a novel method based on vertex reconstruction of beam gas interactions. In this paper the VELO system, its construction and the results from the commissioning phase are presented. The options for a possible upgraded detector are also discussed.

  3. LHCb: Installation and operation of the LHCb Silicon Tracker detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Esperante Pereira, D

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays of B hadrons. The construction and installation phases of the Silicon Tracker (ST) of the experiment were completed by early summer 2008. The LHCb Silicon Tracker sums up to a total sensitive area of about 12 m^2 using silicon micro-strip technology and withstands charged particle fluxes of up to 5 x 10^5cm^−2s^−1. We will report on the preparation of the detectors for the first LHC beams. Selected results from the commissioning in LHCb are shown, including the first beam-related events accumulated during LHC injection tests in September 2008. Lessons are drawn from the experience gathered during the installation and commissioning.

  4. LHCb: Beam and Background Monitoring and the Development of an Online Condition Analysis Tool for the LHCb Experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, F

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data since more than half a year at the LHC, recording events from collisions at the highest energy ever achieved. For its physics purposes in the sector of CP violation, the experiment will record data with the best precision achievable. An online and offline beam and background monitoring became therefore essential to understand the performance of the LHC accelerator at CERN, to monitor and study the behavior of the background around the LHCb experiment and to optimize the experimental conditions. During my second year as a Doctoral Student at CERN, I have been working on the timing and readout control as well as on the online Beam, Background, and Luminosity Monitoring of the LHCb experiment in the frame of the LHCb Online group. The group is responsible for the complete data acquisition of the LHCb experiment, from the Front-End Electronics (FEE) to the storage of the data for offline analysis, including the Timing and Fast Control (TFC) system. The latter controls and...

  5. LHCb: Parameterization of the LHCb magnetic field map

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb warm magnet has been designed to provide an integrated field of 4 Tm for tracks coming from the primary vertex. To insure good momentum resolution of a few per mil, an accurate description of the magnetic field map is needed. This is achieved by combining the information from a TOSCA-based simulation and data from measurements. The paper presents the fit method applied to both the simulation and data to achieve the requirements. It also explains how the corresponding software tool is integrated in the LHCb Gaudi software and shows the relation with the environment in which it is used.

  6. CERN Open Days 2013, Point 8 - LHCb: LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photolab

    2013-01-01

    Stand description: Fourteen billion years ago, the Universe began with a "Big Bang" in which energy coalesced to form equal quantities of matter and antimatter.  LHCb is an experiment set up to explore what happened after the Big Bang that allowed matter to survive and build the Universe we inhabit today.  During the visit the LHCb detector located 100 metres below ground will be shown together with the nearby section of the LHC. On surface no restricted access  An LHC dipole magnet and a module used to accelerate protons will be show at the surface.

  7. Trigger tracking for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Dungs, K

    2014-01-01

    This poster presents a trigger system for the upgraded LHCb detector, scheduled to begin operation in 2020. The proposed trigger system is implemented entirely in software. We show that track reconstruction of a similar quality to that available in the offline algorithms can be performed on the full inelastic pp-collision rate. A track finding efficiency of 98.8% relative to offline can be achieved for good trigger tracks. The CPU time required for this reconstruction is less than 60% of the available budget.

  8. The LHCb hadron calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Dzhelyadin, R I

    2002-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) is designed for the LHCb experiment. The main purpose of the detector is to provide data for the L0 hadron trigger. The HCAL is designed as consisting of two symmetric movable parts of about 500 ton in total getting in touch in operation position without non-instrumented zones. The lateral dimensions of an active area are X = 8.4 m width, Y = 6.8 m height, and is distanced from the interaction point at Z=13.33 m. Both halves are assembled from stacked up modules. An internal structure consisting of thin iron plates interspaced with scintillating tiles has been chosen. Attention is paid to optimize the detector according to the requirements of the experiment, reducing the spending needed for its construction. Different construction technologies are being discussed. The calorimeter properties have been extensively studied with a variety of prototype on the accelerator beam. The calibration with a radioactive source and module-0 construction experience is discussed.

  9. LHCb computing model

    CERN Document Server

    Frank, M; Pacheco, Andreu

    1998-01-01

    This document is a first attempt to describe the LHCb computing model. The CPU power needed to process data for the event filter and reconstruction is estimated to be 2.2 \\Theta 106 MIPS. This will be installed at the experiment and will be reused during non data-taking periods for reprocessing. The maximal I/O of these activities is estimated to be around 40 MB/s.We have studied three basic models concerning the placement of the CPU resources for the other computing activities, Monte Carlo-simulation (1:4 \\Theta 106 MIPS) and physics analysis (0:5 \\Theta 106 MIPS): CPU resources may either be located at the physicist's homelab, national computer centres (Regional Centres) or at CERN.The CPU resources foreseen for analysis are sufficient to allow 100 concurrent analyses. It is assumed that physicists will work in physics groups that produce analysis data at an average rate of 4.2 MB/s or 11 TB per month. However, producing these group analysis data requires reading capabilities of 660 MB/s. It is further assu...

  10. The LHCb hadron calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhelyadin, R.I.

    2002-01-01

    The Hadron Calorimeter (HCAL) is designed for the LHCb experiment. The main purpose of the detector is to provide data for the L0 hadron trigger. The HCAL is designed as consisting of two symmetric movable parts of about 500 ton in total getting in touch in operation position without non-instrumented zones. The lateral dimensions of an active area are X=8.4 m width, Y=6.8 m height, and is distanced from the interaction point at Z=13.33 m. Both halves are assembled from stacked up modules. An internal structure consisting of thin iron plates interspaced with scintillating tiles has been chosen. Attention is paid to optimize the detector according to the requirements of the experiment, reducing the spending needed for its construction. Different construction technologies are being discussed. The calorimeter properties have been extensively studied with a variety of prototype on the accelerator beam. The calibration with a radioactive source and module-0 construction experience is discussed

  11. LHCb connects its pipes

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Two weeks ago the first beryllium section of the LHCb beam vacuum chamber was installed. This three-day operation, after requiring lengthy preparation work, demanded patience and precision as the first of four sections of the beampipe was connected to the vertex locator (VeLo) vacuum vessel. The AT-VAC Group with the collaboration of PH/LBD, including Gloria Corti, Tatsuya Nakada, Patrice Mermet, Delios Ramos, Frans Mul, Bruno Versollato, Bernard Corajod, and Raymond Veness. (Not pictured: Adriana Rossi and Laurent Bouvet) This first installed section is composed of a nearly two-metre long conical tube of one-millimetre thick beryllium and of a thin spherical-shaped window, 800 millimeter diameter, made of an aluminum alloy, and has the appearance of a mushroom lying on its side. The window is connected to the conical part of the beampipe through an aluminum alloy bellow, which is needed to allow for mechanical alignment once the assembly is installed. Beryllium was chosen as the material for 12 m of the 19...

  12. Looking for New Physics: Prospects for B Physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Uwer, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    With the startup of LlICb, the dedicated heavy flavor experiment at the LHC, the next round of precision B-experiments will be launched. LHCb has access to about $10^{12}$ B meson decays per year. allowing significant mcasurcmel)ts of even very rare B decays and, in particular, the precision study of the $B_s$ system. With the measurement of rates, angular distributions and CP asymmetries of loop suppressed B decays, LHCb will probe the quantum corrections predicted by the Standard Model. Many observables show a large sensitivity to New Physics contributions. In the following the expected LHCb physics performance and the potential to search for New Physics is discussed for a set of key measurements.

  13. LHCb: Performance of the fourgap LHCb Muon Chambers tested with cosmic rays

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinci, D

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb Muon System is composed of five detection stations (M1M5)mainly equipped with a total of 1368 MultiWire Proportional Chambers (MWPC). MWPCs need to ensure a high detection efficiency, a fast response and a good space resolution. We present here the results of detailed studies of the performance of different fourgap chambers, completely equipped with the final FrontEnd Electronics, measured with cosmic rays. Aspects such as time resolution, hit multiplicity and time and space structure of the crosstalk hits were measured. For the first time, both types of chambers, those with anodewirereadout and those with cathodepadreadout, were tested and the results are compared. Results hereby obtained will be used to individuate the optimal working conditions of the apparatus and to achieve a more realistic detector description in the LHCb Monte Carlo simulation.

  14. LHCb: Machine assisted histogram classification

    CERN Multimedia

    Somogyi, P; Gaspar, C

    2009-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments under completion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Monitoring the quality of the acquired data is important, because it allows the verification of the detector performance. Anomalies, such as missing values or unexpected distributions can be indicators of a malfunctioning detector, resulting in poor data quality. Spotting faulty components can be either done visually using instruments such as the LHCb Histogram Presenter, or by automated tools. In order to assist detector experts in handling the vast monitoring information resulting from the sheer size of the detector, a graph-theoretic based clustering tool, combined with machine learning algorithms is proposed and demonstrated by processing histograms representing 2D event hitmaps. The concept is proven by detecting ion feedback events in the LHCb RICH subdetector.

  15. VeloTT tracking for LHCb Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, Espen Eie; Tresch, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This note describes track reconstruction in the LHCb tracking system upstream of the magnet, combining VELO tracks with hits in the TT sub-detector. The implementation of the VeloTT algorithm and its performance in terms of track reconstruction efficiency, ghost rate and execution time are presented. The algorithm has been rewritten for use in the first software trigger level for LHCb Run II. The momentum and charge information obtained for the VeloTT tracks (due to a fringe magnetic field between the VELO and TT sub-detectors) can reduce the total execution time for the full tracking sequence.

  16. Determination of the phase $\\phi_{s}$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2018-01-01

    The determination of the mixing-induced $C\\!P$-violating phase $\\phi_{s}$ in the $B^{0}_{s}-\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}$ system is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment. Using several $B^{0}_{s}$ decay modes it has been measured by the LHCb collaboration exploiting the Run~I data set. The first observation of the $B^{0}_{s}\\to\\eta_{c}\\phi$ and $B^{0}_{s}\\to\\eta_{c}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ decay modes which can be used to measure $\\phi_{s}$ with Run~II data is presented.

  17. An upgrade for the LHCb monitoring infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    El Majdoubi, Driss; Haen, Christophe; Brarda, Loic

    This document is the result of my work during the second year internship, realized within the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The goal of this internship is to design and setup a new monitoring infrastructure based on Icinga 2 tool and integrate it as much as possible to a new configuration management tool, Puppet. During this internship, the first step of my mission was to interact with members of the LHCb Online team to have an overview of the system. Then I had to understand the basic concepts of Icinga 2 as well as those of Puppet before proceeding to the implementation of the complete monitoring solution.

  18. The LHCb trigger in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Michielin, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb trigger system has been upgraded to allow alignment, calibration and physics analysis to be performed in real time. An increased CPU capacity and improvements in the software have allowed lifetime unbiased selections of beauty and charm decays in the high level trigger. Thanks to offline quality event reconstruction already available online, physics analyses can be performed directly on this information and for the majority of charm physics selections a reduced event format can be written out. Beauty hadron decays are more efficiently triggered by re-optimised inclusive selections, and the HLT2 output event rate is increased by a factor of three.

  19. Silicon strip detectors for the LHCb experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Steinkamp, O

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a single-arm magnetic spectrometer. Silicon micro-strip detectors are employed in a significant fraction of the tracking system. The Vertex Locator consists of 21 detector stations that operate inside the LHC beam pipe and are separated from the beam vacuum by a thin aluminium foil. The Silicon Tracker is a large-surface silicon micro-strip detector that covers the full acceptance of the experiment in a single tracking station upstream of the spectrometer magnet and the...

  20. LHCb: FPGA-based, radiation-tolerant on-detector electronics for the upgrade of the LHCb Outer Tracker Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Vink, W

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb experiment studies B-decays at the LHC. The Outer Tracker straw tubes detects charged decay particles. The on-detector electronics will be upgraded to be able to digitize and transmit drift-times at every LHC crossing without the need for a hardware trigger. FPGAs have been preferred to application-specific integrated circuits to implement dead-time free TDCs, able to transmit data volumes of up to 36 Gbits/s per readout unit, including the possibility of performing zero suppression. Extensive irradiation tests have been carried out to validate the usage of field-programmable devices in the hostile environment of the LHCb tracking system.

  1. LHCb commissioning and early physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Dettori, F

    2008-01-01

    Dedicated for the study of b hadrons, LHCb will exploit the copious production of beauty mesons and baryons in proton-proton collisions at the LHC. Precision measurements of CP violation and rare decays will be performed and the heavy flavour sector will be studied in detail searching for New Physics

  2. Forward Top Physics at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    The first Run 2 measurement of top pair production in the dilepton channel at 13 TeV will be presented, along with previous Run 1 measurements in final states accessible to both single top and top pair production. Heavy flavour tagging strategies at LHCb will also be discussed.

  3. Beauty hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings, I will report the recent results on properties, production and decays of beauty baryons, as well as measurements of B + c meson decays, based on data collected by the LHCb collaboration at the LHC collider in 2011–2012.

  4. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  5. Grounding, Shielding and Power Distribution for the LHCb Silicon Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, C; Frei, R; Straumann, U; Vázquez, P; Vollhardt, A

    2005-01-01

    This note lists the relevant items for power and grounding, it explains the sensitive detector input signal circuits and describes the grounding, power distribution and line filtering measures applied to each of the electrical units of the LHCb silicon tracking system. This note deals with both silicon sub-projects, the Inner Tracker (IT) and the Trigger Tracker (TT).

  6. The certification process of the LHCb distributed computing software

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    DIRAC contains around 200 thousand lines of python code, and LHCbDIRAC around 120 thousand. The testing process for each release consists of a number of steps, that includes static code analysis, unit tests, integration tests, regression tests, system tests. We dubbed the full p...

  7. Calibration samples for particle identification at LHCb in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Lupton, Olli; Sciascia, Barbara; Gligorov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The strategy for data-driven determination of particle identication performance at LHCb has changed signicantly from Run 1 to Run 2 of the LHC. This note outlines these changes, explains the rationale behind them and summarises the new system and conguration.

  8. User Manual for the AZ-101 Data Acquisition System (AS-101 DAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAYTON, D.D.

    2000-01-01

    User manual for the TK AZ-101 Waste Retrieval System Data Acquisition System. The purpose of this document is to describe use of the AZ-101 Data Acquisition System (AZ-101 DAS). The AZ-101 DAS is provided to fulfill the requirements for data collection and monitoring as defined in Letters of Instruction (LOI) from Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to Fluor Federal Services (FFS). For a complete description of the system, including design, please refer to the AZ-101 DAS System Description document, RPP-5572

  9. Measurements of B Meson Lifetime Ratios with the LHCb Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Luisier, Johan

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four main experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The LHCb detector is a one-arm spectrometer dedicated to precise measurements of the CP-violation and studies or rare b-hadron decays. The centre of mass energy and luminosity for a hadron collider) have both values never reached before. LHCb started data taking in November 2009. LHCb relies on excellent reconstruction and trigger efficiency, very good mass and proper time resolution, reliable particle identification systems to achieve the wanted precision on CP-violation parameters. These performances cannot be fulfilled without the detector to be calibrated. For instance, the Inner Tracker (IT) is readout by around a thousand chips, and the data are processed by 42 data acquisition cards, called TELL1. The Tracker Turicensis (TT) data are processed by 48 TELL1 boards. Each of these TELl1 boards has more than 18,000 parameters that need to be tuned in order to reduce the fake hits in the tracking systems. A hi...

  10. Eclipse plugins for LHCb software development

    CERN Document Server

    Astruc, Gregoire

    2011-01-01

    CERN LHCb Offline team, working on experiments around the LHC particle collider, had a number of tools to assist developers. LHCb projects use a domain-specific structure. Tools are always evolving and some team members started to look for ways to integrate those programs (most of them being CLIs) into more recent programming software like the Eclipse IDE. During this internship, a set of Eclipse plugins was created. They link the LHCb projects concepts to the ones in the IDE.

  11. LHCb: Measurement of $b$-hadron lifetimes at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Amhis, Y

    2014-01-01

    Lifetimes are among the most fundamental properties of elementary particles. Precision Measurements of $b$-hadron lifetimes are an important tool to test theoretical models such as HQET. These models allow to predict various observables related to B-mixing. Using data collected during Run 1 at the LHC, LHCb measured the lifetime of B-decays including a $J/\\psi$ in the final state.

  12. LHCb Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Ali, S

    2014-01-01

    In this poster we present the latest result by the LHCb collaboration in determining the CKM angle $\\gamma$ ($(67.1 \\pm 12)^{\\circ}$). The result is determined by combining several $B \\to Dh$ analyses. Latest results from the decay time dependent $B_{s} \\to D_{s}K$ analysis is also reported, along with a few other decay channels interesting for determination of $\\gamma$ in the future.

  13. The LHCb Upgrade Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Leverington, Blake D

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker is designed to replace the current downstream tracking detectors in the LHCb Upgrade during 2018 (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15). The operation and the results obtained from the data collected 2011 and 2012 demonstrate that the current detector is robust and functioning very well. However, the limit of O ( 1 fb-1) of data per year cannot be overcome without improving the detector. This will be achieved using 25 ns bunch spacing with the average number of proton-proton interactions per bunch crossing n = 7 : 6. Collecting data at this luminosity will only be possible if the detector is improved by increasing the readout of the front-end electronics to 40MHz and implementing a more flexible software-based triggering system that will increase the data rate as well as the efficiency. The increase in interactions per bunch crossing will result in an increased occupancy in the tracking detectors and will exceed the operational occupancy for the Outer Tracker. Here we presen...

  14. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Papanestis, Antonis

    2005-01-01

    The success of the LHCb experiment depends heavily on particle identification over the momentum 2-100 GeV/c. To meet this challenge, LHCb uses a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system composed of two detectors with three radiators. RICH1 has both aerogel and gas (C$_4$F$_{10}$) radiators, while RICH2 has only a gas (CF$_4$) radiator. The design of RICH1 is almost complete, whereas RICH2 has been constructed and installed (Nov 2005). Novel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) have been developed in collaboration with industry to detect the Cherenkov photons. A silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to a readout chip is encapsulated in a vacuum tube. A bi-alkali photocathode is deposited on the inside of the quartz entrance window to convert photons in the range 200-600 nm. The pixel chip is manufactured in 0.25 $\\mu$m deep-submicron radiation-tolerant technology and consists of 1024 logical pixels, each pixel having an area of 0.5 mm x 05. Mm. Photo-electrons are accelerated by a 20kV potential, resulting in a signal of ...

  15. Cosmics in the LHCb Outer Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel

    2010-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider studies the decay of B mesons to test the description of CP violation in the Standard Model and to search for new physics. The decay $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ has been identified as very promising in the search for new physics. An excellent invariant mass resolution is required to suppress backgrounds to this decay. This in turn requires a momentum resolution of dp/p = 0.4%. The Outer Tracker is part of the LHCb tracking system and has been commissioned with cosmic muons. The noise in the Outer Tracker is shown to be less than 0.05%. To use drift time information in the reconstruction of cosmic tracks, the event time must be known. Four methods to obtain the event time are studied and compared. It is shown that the event time can be obtained with a resolution better than 2.6 ns. Using drift time information, tracks are reconstructed with a resolution of 344 $\\mu$m. Knowledge of the event time enables the calibration of electronic time offsets and the r(t)– relati...

  16. Developments towards the LHCb VELO upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid Vidal, Xabier, E-mail: xabier.cid.vidal@cern.ch

    2016-09-21

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector surrounding the interaction region of the LHCb experiment. The upgrade of the VELO is planned to be installed in 2019–2020, and the current detector will be replaced by a hybrid pixel system equipped with electronics capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. The new detector is designed to withstand the radiation dose expected at an integrated luminosity of 50 fb{sup −1}. The detector will be composed of silicon pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC that is being developed based on the TimePix/MediPix family. The prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are being irradiated in five different facilities and the post-irradiation performance is being measured with testbeams, and in the lab. These proceedings present the VELO upgrade and briefly discuss the results of the sensor testing campaign. - Highlights: • The VELO is the detector surrounding the LHCb collision point. • After its upgrade, the VELO will be capable of reading out at a rate of 40 MHz. • The detector will be composed of Si pixel sensors, read out by the VeloPix ASIC. • The irradiated prototype sensors for the VELO upgrade are currently being tested.

  17. COTS Analog Prototype for LHCb's Calorimeter Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Abellan Beteta, Carlos; Herms i Berenguer, Atilà

    The objective of this thesis is to present a proposal for the analogue signal processing chain needed for the LHCb calorimeter upgrade improving the design used originally. The design contains several novelties: the system was designed with low noise in mind from the beginning, it is made to have good immunity to interferences stressing the fact that the board will be shared with large digital circuits, differential operational amplifiers are used in a non-standard way as a mean to obtain opposite polarity signals for the signal treatment and a way to increase the available signal in the front end electronics is proposed. The thesis starts with a brief introduction to the detector and its environment. This is followed by an explanation of the use of shapers in high energy physics detectors and the constraints that the shaper must address in the LHCb calorimeter. This leads to a chapter where the circuit design is explained starting from the analysis of the original circuit and its flaws. Once the original cir...

  18. Design and implementation of the decision unit of the first level trigger system of the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC); Conception et realisation de l'unite de decision du systeme de declenchement de premier niveau du detecteur LHCb au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laubser, J

    2007-11-15

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four particle physic detector installed at the new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. In order to reduce the amount of data storage for offline analysis, an online trigger system of interesting event according to the studied physic is implemented in parallel of the Data Acquisition system. The trigger system is composed by a first level (Level-0) made by a complex electronic system and a second level made by a computing system called the High Level Trigger. The Level-0 Decision Unit is the central part of the first trigger level that takes the decision to accept or to reject the event by using a fraction of information coming from the fastest sub-triggers (432 bits at 80 MHz). It is a full custom 16 layers board using advanced FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) in BGA (Bill Grid Array) package. Each sub-trigger transmit their data via high speed optical links running at 1.6 Gbit/s. The processing is implemented using a 40 MHz synchronous pipelined architecture. It performs a simple physical algorithm to compute the Level-0 trigger decision in order to reduce the data flow from 40 MHz down to 1 MHz for the next trigger level. The internal design of the processing FPGA is mainly composed by a Partial Data Processing (PDP) and a Trigger Definition Unit (TDU). The aim of the PDP is to adjust the clock phase, perform the time alignment, prepare the data for the TDU and monitor the data processing. The TDU is flexible and allows to fully re-configure all the trigger conditions through the Experiment Control System without any FPGA re-programming. (author)

  19. Exclusive dimuon production with LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Shears, Tara

    2011-01-01

    We report on studies of exclusive dimuon production using LHCb experimental data. Exclusively produced muon pairs can be produced by two photon fusion (a QED process ideally suited to obtaining a precise integrated luminosity measure), or through resonances produced by pomeron-photon fusion or double pomeron exchange.We present cross-section measurements for exclusive dimuon production, and the first observations at a proton-proton collider of exclusive J/psi, psi’ and chi_c states, obtained with 37 pb-1 of data at centre of mass energy of 7 TeV. The resolution of the LHCb detectors allow the chic0, chic1 and chic2 states to be separated. We compare our results to theoretical predictions.

  20. Detector Description Framework in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Ponce, Sébastien

    2003-01-01

    The Gaudi architecture and framework are designed to provide a common infrastructure and environment for simulation, filtering, reconstruction and analysis applications. In this context, a Detector Description Service was developed in LHCb in order to also provide easy and coherent access to the description of the experimental apparatus. This service centralizes every information about the detector, including geometry, materials, alignment, calibration, structure and controls. From the proof of concept given by the first functional implementation of this service late 2000, the Detector Description Service has grown and has become one of the major components of the LHCb software, shared among all applications, including simulation, reconstruction, analysis and visualization. We describe here the full and functional implementation of the service. We stress the easiness of customization and extension of the detector description by the user, on the seamless integration with condition databases in order to handle ...

  1. b-JETS AT LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Coco, Victor

    2008-01-01

    LHCb 1 is a LHC experiment dedicated to pre-jets. LHCh detector is a one arm spectrometer. It covers the forward region of interaction point, from 30 mrad to 300 (250) mrad in bending (non-bending) plane. The choice of such a limited acceptance is motivated by the fact that most of the 500 µb correlated bb pairs are produced in this region. LHCb experiment will take data at a luminosity of 2 x ID32cm-2s-1, where bunch crossing are dominated by single pp interactions. Good particle identification, excellent tracking and vcrtcxing arc needed for B physic mcasurmcnts. Expected resolution on track momentum is about bp/p = 0.35% around 10 GeV /c to bp/p = 0.55% around 140 GeV /c. Impact parameter resolution is expected to be aIP = 14µm + 35µm/p-r.

  2. First mass measurements at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Bressieux, J

    2011-01-01

    The LHC opens new frontiers in heavy flavour physics through an unprecedented statistical reach for a variety of interesting states produced in pp collisions. The LHCb spectrometer provides a good mass resolution and is suitable for spectroscopy studies. We present first preliminary mass measurements of several $b$ hadrons and of the exotic $X(3872)$ meson, reconstructed in final states containing a $J/\\psi$ using the data collected in 2010 by the LHCb experiment. An important aspect of the analysis is the calibration of the momentum scale using $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decays, as well as the control of systematic uncertainties. While the already very competitive mass measurements for the $B^+$, $B^0$ and $B^0_s$ mesons receive similar contributions from systematic and statistical uncertainties, those of the $\\Lambda_b$, $B^+_c$ and $X(3872)$ particles are dominated by statistical uncertainties, and will therefore substantially improve with more data in the future.

  3. Rare B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Puig Navarro, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Rare decays are flavour changing neutral current processes that allow sensitive searches for phenomena beyond the Standard Model (SM). In the SM, rare decays are loop-suppressed and new particles in SM extensions can give significant contributions. The very rare decay $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in addition helicity suppressed and constitutes a powerful probe for new (pseudo) scalar particles. Of particular interest are furthermore tests of lepton universality in rare $b\\to s\\ell^+\\ell^-$ decays. The LHCb experiment is designed for the study of b-hadron decays and ideally suited for the analysis of rare decays due to its high trigger efficiency, as well as excellent tracking and particle identification performance. Recent results from the LHCb experiment in the area of rare decays are presented, including tests of lepton universality and searches for lepton flavour violation.

  4. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  5. Full offline reconstruction in real-time with the LHCb detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00341115

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the novel, unique in High Energy Physics, real-time alignment and calibration of the full LHCb detector. The LHCb experiment has been designed as a dedicated heavy flavour physics experiment focused on the reconstruction of c and b hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer, which measures proton-proton interactions at the LHC. The operational bunch crossing rate is several orders of magnitude above the current abilities of data recording and storage. Therefore, a trigger system has been implemented to reduce this rate to an acceptable value. The LHCb trigger system has been redesigned during the 2013-2015 long shutdown, achieving oine-quality alignment and calibration online. It also allows analyses to be performed entirely at the trigger level. In addition, having the best performing reconstruction in the trigger gives the possibility to fully use the particle identification selection criteria and greatly increases the eciency, in particular for the selection of ...

  6. LHCb Exotica and Higgs searches

    CERN Multimedia

    Lucchesi, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    The unique phase space coverage and features of the LHCb detector at the LHC makes it an ideal environment to probe complementary New Physics parameter regions. In particular, recently developed jet tagging algorithms are ideal for searches involving $b$ and $c$ jets. This poster will review different jet-related exotica searches together with the efforts in the search for a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of heavy quarks.

  7. View of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Unlike the other large barrel-like experiments at the LHC, the LHCb detector consists of a series of large wall-like sub-detectors. The proton beams will collide at one end of the experiment hall and the detector will observe particles produced which travel close to the axis of the beam. This experiment will observe the production and subsequent decay of bottom quarks to look for rare 'CP violating' processes.

  8. Measurement of the $CP$-even Fraction of the $D^0 \\rightarrow 2\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ Decay using Quantum Correlated ${D\\bar{D}}$ Pairs at CLEO-c, and Real-time Alignment of the LHCb RICH optical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00392372

    This thesis covers three subjects, namely the measurement of the $C\\!P$-even fraction of the $D^0\\rightarrow 2\\pi^+2\\pi^-$ decay, the real-time alignment of the LHCb RICH mirror systems and the estimation of the sensitivity to the CKM angle $\\gamma$ that can be obtained using $B^{\\pm}\\rightarrow D(\\rightarrow 2\\pi^+2\\pi^-)K^{\\pm}$ events at LHCb.\\\\ \\\\ The $C\\!P$-even fraction $F_{4\\pi}^{+}$ of the $D^0\\rightarrow 2\\pi^+2\\pi^-$ decay is measured using a dataset corresponding to 818$\\,pb^{-1}$ of quantum correlated $D\\bar{D}$ decays produced in electron-positron collisions at the $\\psi(3770)$ resonance collected by the CLEO-c experiment at Cornell University. In the analysis, one of the correlated $D$ mesons is reconstructed as $D\\rightarrow 2\\pi^+2\\pi^-$ while the other $D$ meson is reconstructed as $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_{S,L}\\pi^+\\pi^-$. Sensitivity to the $C\\!P$-even fraction of $D^0\\rightarrow 2\\pi^+2\\pi^-$ is obtained by determining the variation of yields over the $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_{S,L}\\pi^+\\pi^-$ phase ...

  9. The LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumlak, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider beauty LHCb detector is a dedicated flavour physics experiment, designed to efficiently detect decays of b- and c-hadrons to perform precise studies of CP violation and rare decays. At the end of Run 2, many of the LHCb measurements will remain statistically dominated. In order to increase the trigger yield for purely hadronic channels, the hardware trigger will be removed, and the full detector will be read out at 40 MHz. This, in combination with the five-fold increase in luminosity necessitates radical changes to LHCb's electronics with entire subdetector replacements required in some cases. The Vertex Locator (VELO) surrounding the interaction region is used to reconstruct the proton-proton collision points (primary vertices) and decay vertices of long-lived particles (secondary vertices). The upgraded VELO will be equipped with silicon hybrid pixel sensors, each read out by VeloPix ASICs. The highest occupancy ASICs will have pixel hit rates of 900 Mhit/s and produce an output data rate of over 15 Gbit/s, with a total rate of 1.6 Tbit/s anticipated for the whole detector. Selected highlights of this challenging and ambitious project are described in this paper.

  10. Fast calorimeter simulation in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Fast calorimeter simulation in LHCb In HEP experiments CPU resources required by MC simulations are constantly growing and become a very large fraction of the total computing power (greater than 75%). At the same time the pace of performance improvements from technology is slowing down, so the only solution is a more efficient use of resources. Efforts are ongoing in the LHC experiments to provide multiple options for simulating events in a faster way when higher statistics is needed. A key of the success for this strategy is the possibility of enabling fast simulation options in a common framework with minimal action by the final user. In this talk we will describe the solution adopted in Gauss, the LHCb simulation software framework, to selectively exclude particles from being simulated by the Geant4 toolkit and to insert the corresponding hits generated in a faster way. The approach, integrated within the Geant4 toolkit, has been applied to the LHCb calorimeter but it could also be used for other subdetec...

  11. LHCb RICH 2 engineering design review report

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Allebone, L R; Ameri, M; Barber, G J; Barczyk, A; Bellunato, T F; Benayoun, M; Bibby, J; Braem, André; Brew, C A J; Brook, N; Buckley, A; Calvi, M; Campbell, M; Chamonal, R; Cole, J; Cuneo, S; D'Ambrosio, C; Damerell, G; Densham, C J; Dornan, Peter John; Duane, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Eisenhardt, S; Flavell, AJ; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R W; Franek, B J; Frei, C; George, K; Gibson, V; Girone, M; Gracco, Valerio; Guy, J; Gys, Thierry; Harnew, N; Head, R; Hill, R; Jolly, S; Jones, C; Katvars, S G; Khan, A; Laub, M; Lawrence, J; Libby, J; Lidbury, J A; Losasso, M; MacGregor, A; Matteuzzi, C; Mini, G; Morris, J V; Muheim, F; Musico, P; Musy, M; Negri, P; Newby, C; O'Shea, V; Papanestis, A; Parkes, CJ; Patrick, G N; Petrolini, A; Phillips, A; Piazzoni, C; Pickford, A N; Piedigrossi, D; Playfer, S; Presland, A; Price, D R; Radermacker, J; Sannino, M; Savage, P; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Smale, N J; Snoeys, W; Soler, F J P; Temple, S A; Topp-Jørgensen, S; Ullaland, O; Ward, C P; Websdale, D M; White, R; Wilkinson, G; Wilson, F; Woodward, M L; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, Ken H

    2002-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a single arm spectrometer designed to exploit the large number of b-hadrons produced at the LHC in order to make precision studies of CP asymmetries and of rare decays in the B-meson system. It is therefore essential for the experiment that the detector configuration includes a particle identification system with high separation power between kaons and pions. We will present in this note the engineering solutions for the lightweight, high precision Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector, RICH2, of the spectrometer. The design is built around a large space frame used as a high stability support for the optical system and as a supporting structure for the magnetic shielding needed for the photon detectors. All material not essential for the operation of the detector is located outside the acceptance of the spectrometer. The space frame also defines the Cherenkov gas volume.

  12. Lifetime measurements of the $\\mathrm{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}}$ system and RICH studies at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Sail, Paul D; Parkes, Christopher; Eklund, Lars

    Lifetime analyses in heavy flavour systems can provide excellent opportunities to make precision measurements of Standard Model (SM) parameters that probe for new physics. This thesis presents lifetime measurements from the $\\mathrm{B_{d}^{0}}$ and $\\mathrm{B_{s}^{0}}$ mesons to the charmless two-body hadron family of decays, known as $\\mathrm{B \\rightarrow h^{+}h^{'-}}$, where $h$ can be either a kaon or a pion. A particular interest is given to the $\\mathrm{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}}$ decay channel. The $\\mathrm{B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}}$ channel is interesting as it decays into a $CP$ even final state, with a small amount of $CP$-violation predicted by the Standard Model. This can be quantified using the decay rate asymmetry parameter ${\\cal A}_{\\Delta\\Gamma}$. The decay is also loop dominated, and thus sensitive to New Physics (NP) that could enter in these processes. These effects can be studied by constraining the values of the decay rate difference, $\\Delta\\Gamma_{s}$, and ${\\cal A}_{\\...

  13. LHCb: Pilot Framework and the DIRAC WMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Graciani, R; Casajus, A

    2009-01-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community Grid solution, has pioneered the use of pilot jobs in the Grid. Pilot jobs provide a homogeneous interface to an heterogeneous set of computing resources. At the same time, pilot jobs allow to delay the scheduling decision to the last moment, thus taking into account the precise running conditions at the resource and last moment requests to the system. The DIRAC Workload Management System provides one single scheduling mechanism for jobs with very different profiles. To achieve an overall optimisation, it organizes pending jobs in task queues, both for individual users and production activities. Task queues are created with jobs having similar requirements. Following the VO policy a priority is assigned to each task queue. Pilot submission and subsequent job matching are based on these priorities following a statistical approach. Details of the implementation and the security aspects of this framework will be discussed.

  14. A symphony of data at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Like musical instruments in an orchestra, the main difficulty with the many detectors of LHCb is coaxing them into playing in harmony. On 8 February 2008, for the first time, the LHCb control room team managed to extract a symphony of data from an almost complete ensemble of LHCb detectors. The LHCb control room team examining the data read out from the LHCb detectors. General view of the LHCb detector components.Now that all the detectors of LHCb are installed in the cavern they can begin to play a tune. The week of 4 February was commissioning week for the LHCb control room, when, for the first time, data from the majority of the sub-detectors (VELO, RICH 1, RICH 2, ECAL, HCAL, MUON, L0Calo and L0DU) was read out, controlled from a single window on the main computer. Sixty electronic boards, which read out the fragments of triggered events, were used during the readout at a frequency of 100 Hz. As not all of the boards ...

  15. Plans and status of the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) is a high precision experiment dedicated to searching for New Physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy flavour sector. Since LHCb is optimised to perf orm indirect studies and is sensitive to mass scales potentially larger than the LHC energy it is playing a key role in broad searches for New Physics phenomena. This expectation is supported by many intriguing anomalies, especially related to rare decays and lepton flavour universality, observed and reported by LHCb. Thus, it is essential for LHCb to enter the high luminosity phase and continue data taking beyond LHC Long Shutdown 2 (LS2). The LHCb experimental setup will undergo a major upgrade that is be ing planned for the LHC Run 3. Here we will discuss selected aspects of this project.

  16. No mission is impossible for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Time: 01:37:51 am, 3 October, 2011. The LHC is producing million collisions per second in its detectors. But at that time, one collision is “more special” than the others in the LHCb detector: the milestone of 1 inverse femtobarn of luminosity is surpassed. What was considered as “mission impossible” at the beginning of the year is now “mission accomplished”.   Mike Lamont (Operations Group Leader), Pierluigi Campana (LHCb Spokesperson), Steve Myers (Director for Accelerators and Technology), and Paul Collier (Head of the Beams Department) celebrate the LHCb milestone. LHCb is the CERN experiment specialising in the study of b-quarks, whose properties and behaviour are likely to provide physicists with important hints on several physics processes, including some new physics. “One inverse femtobarn of luminosity corresponds to about seventy billion b-quark pairs decayed in the LHCb detector,” explains Pierluigi Cam...

  17. LHCb: Evaluation of the Radiation Environment of the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Karacson, M

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of all aspects of the radiation field of the LHCb experiment is needed to understand the impact of the unprecedented radiation levels to which its detector and electronics are exposed to. The methodology on how this is done is described. Analysis of the measurements of active and passive sensors of various types which are distributed in and around the detector will be carried out. Appropriate cross calibrations will be applied and comparisons between them will be performed. Critical comparisons with simulation results obtained with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code are also an essential element of the study.

  18. Disk storage management for LHCb based on Data Popularity estimator

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00545541; Charpentier, Philippe; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-12-23

    This paper presents an algorithm providing recommendations for optimizing the LHCb data storage. The LHCb data storage system is a hybrid system. All datasets are kept as archives on magnetic tapes. The most popular datasets are kept on disks. The algorithm takes the dataset usage history and metadata (size, type, configuration etc.) to generate a recommendation report. This article presents how we use machine learning algorithms to predict future data popularity. Using these predictions it is possible to estimate which datasets should be removed from disk. We use regression algorithms and time series analysis to find the optimal number of replicas for datasets that are kept on disk. Based on the data popularity and the number of replicas optimization, the algorithm minimizes a loss function to find the optimal data distribution. The loss function represents all requirements for data distribution in the data storage system. We demonstrate how our algorithm helps to save disk space and to reduce waiting times ...

  19. Alignment of the LHCb vertex locator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gersabeck, M.

    2009-01-01

    LHCb will commence data taking as the first dedicated heavy flavour experiment at a hadron collider in 2008. A very high hit precision from its vertex detector (vertex locator, VELO) is essential to meet the tight requirements of vertex reconstruction in B-physics. The single hit precision of the VELO is better than 10μm. However, the VELO is operated only 8 mm from the beam and must be retracted and reinserted each LHC fill. Hence, the detector places unique demands on its alignment algorithm. The partially assembled VELO system has already been tested in a beam test. The novel software alignment methods are presented together with their interplay with the metrology measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulation studies are discussed and recent beam test results are shown that prove the method's precision at the micron level.

  20. Alignment of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Gersabeck, Marco

    2009-01-01

    LHCb will commence data taking as the first dedicated heavy flavour experiment at a hadron collider in 2008. A very high hit precision from its vertex detector (VELO) is essential to meet the tight requirements of vertex reconstruction in B-physics. The single hit precision of the VELO is better than 10 micron. However, the VELO is operated only 8 mm from the beam and must be retracted and reinserted each LHC fill. Hence, the detector places unique demands on its alignment algorithm. The partially assembled VELO system has already been tested in a beam test. The novel software alignment methods are presented together with their interplay with the metrology measurements. Results from Monte Carlo simulation studies are discussed and recent beam test results are shown that prove the method's precision at the micron level.

  1. Ageing of the LHCb outer tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Blom, M R; Tuning, N

    2009-01-01

    The modules of the LHCb outer tracker have shown to suffer severe gain loss under moderate irradiation. This process is called ageing. Ageing of the modules results from contamination of the gas system by glue, araldite AY 103-1, used in their construction. In this thesis the ageing process will be shown. The schemes known to reduce, reverse, or prevent ageing have been investigated to determine their effect on the detector performance. The addition of O2 to the gas mixture lowers the detector response by an acceptable amount and does not affect the gas transport properties significantly. The ageing rate is decreased after extensive flushing and HV training could eventually repair the irradiation damage. The risks of HV training have been assessed. Furthermore, several gaseous and aquatic additions have been tested for their capability to prevent, or moderate ageing, but none showed significant improvement.

  2. Flavour tagging performance in LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabalosa Gandara, Marc

    2009-01-01

    To do precise CP violation measurements, the best possible determination of the flavour of the B-meson is necessary. This report summarizes the flavour tagging performances for the LHCb experiment. The flavour tagging is obtained through a combination of several methods, based on different signatures. The use of control channels, which are decays to flavour-specific final states, will allow to determine the wrong tag fraction ω (the probability of a tag to be wrong), which can be used as an input for the determination of CKM unitarity triangle angles.

  3. LHCb: $2\\beta_s$ measurement at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Conti, G

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of $2\\beta_s$, the phase of the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ oscillation amplitude with respect to that of the ${\\rm b} \\rightarrow {\\rm c^{+}}{\\rm W^{-}}$ tree decay amplitude, is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment with first data. In the Standard Model (SM), $2\\beta_s$ is predicted to be $0.0360^{+0.0020}_{-0.0016} \\rm rad$. The current constraints from the Tevatron are: $2\\beta_{s}\\in[0.32 ; 2.82]$ at 68$\\%$CL from the CDF experiment and $2\\beta_{s}=0.57^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ from the D$\\oslash$ experiment. Although the statistical uncertainties are large, these results hint at the possible contribution of New Physics in the $B_s-\\bar{B_s}$ box diagram. After one year of data taking at LHCb at an average luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}\\sim2\\cdot10^{32}\\rm cm^{-2} \\rm s^{-1}$ (integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}_{\\rm int}\\sim 2 \\rm fb^{-1}$), the expected statistical uncertainty on the measurement is $\\sigma(2\\beta_s)\\simeq 0.03$. This uncertainty is similar to the $2\\beta_s$ value predicted by the SM.

  4. LHCb: Time structure analysis of the LHCb Online network

    CERN Multimedia

    Antichi, G; Campora Perez, D H; Liu, G; Neufeld, N; Giordano, S; Owezarski, P; Moore, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb Online Network is a real time high performance network, in which 350 data sources send data over a Gigabit Ethernet LAN to more than 1500 receiving nodes. The aggregated throughput of the application, called Event Building, is more than 60 GB/s. The protocol employed by LHCb makes the sending nodes transmit simultaneously portions of events to one receiving node at a time, which is selected using a credit-token scheme. The resulting traffic is very bursty and sensitive to irregularities in the temporal distribution of packet-bursts to the same destination or region of the network. In order to study the relevant properties of such a dataflow, a non-disruptive monitoring setup based on a networking capable FPGA (NetFPGA) has been deployed. The NetFPGA allows order of hundred nano-second precise time-stamping of packets. We study in detail the timing structure of the Event Building communication, and we identify potential effects of micro-bursts like buffer packet drops or jitter.

  5. Automated Grid Monitoring for LHCb through HammerCloud

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The HammerCloud system is used by CERN IT to monitor the status of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). HammerCloud automatically submits jobs to WLCG computing resources, closely replicating the workflow of Grid users (e.g. physicists analyzing data). This allows computation nodes and storage resources to be monitored, software to be tested (somewhat like continuous integration), and new sites to be stress tested with a heavy job load before commissioning. The HammerCloud system has been in use for ATLAS and CMS experiments for about five years. This summer's work involved porting the HammerCloud suite of tools to the LHCb experiment. The HammerCloud software runs functional tests and provides data visualizations. HammerCloud's LHCb variant is written in Python, using the Django web framework and Ganga/DIRAC for job management.

  6. New results on Bs mixing and CP violation from LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Oscillation effects in the Bs meson system provide a window on physics beyond the Standard Model. The latest results from LHCb on the mass and width differences between the two physical eigenstates, and the CP violating phase measured in the Bs -> J/psi phi decay channel are presented. In addition, results of a first study of the CP violating phase in the penguin-dominated Bs -> phiphi decays are shown.

  7. LHC-B trigger and data acquisition progress report

    CERN Document Server

    Dijkstra, H; Harris, Frank

    1997-01-01

    97-05 This report describes the progress since the Letter of Intent [1] in the development of the trigger and data acquisition system for LHC-B. The basic philosophy has changed significantly, with the proposal to implement tracking and vertex topology triggers in specialised hardware. This will be at an additional trigger level, giving 4 levels in total. We present details of the new proposal, together with preliminary requirements estimates, and some simulation results.

  8. The new version of the LHCb SOL40-SCA core to drive front-end GBT-SCAs for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Gaspar, Clara

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is currently engaged in an upgrade effort that will implement a triggerless 40 MHz readout system. The upgraded Front-End Electronics profit from the GBT chipset functionalities and bidirectional optical fibers for readout, control and synchronization. This paper describes the new version of the firmware core that transmits slow control information from the Control System to thousands of Front-End chips and discusses the implementation that expedites and makes the operation more versatile. The detailed architecture, original interaction with the software control system and integration within the LHCb upgraded architecture are described.

  9. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements of $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production is fundamental. This is known as "flavour tagging" and at LHCb it is performed with several algorithms. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. Also the performances of the flavour tagging algorithms in the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  10. The LHCb Upstream Tracker Project

    CERN Document Server

    Steinkamp, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb detector performs searches for New Physics in CP-violating observables and rare heavy-quark decays at the LHC. A comprehensive upgrade is planned for the long shutdown of the LHC in 2018/19. A goal of this upgrade is to abolish hardware triggers and read out the full detector at 40 MHz. This requires to replace the existing TT station upstream of the LHCb magnet by a new silicon micro-strip detector, the Upstream Tracker (UT). The UT will have a new front-end chip compatible with 40 MHz readout, silicon sensors with improved radiation hardness, finer readout granularity, and improved acceptance coverage at small polar angles. The outer region of each detection layer will be covered by p-in-n sensors with 10 cm long strips and a pitch of about 180 mum, while n-in-p sensors with half the pitch and strip length will be employed in the regions of highest particle density close to the beam pipe. The innermost sensors will have a circular cutout to optimize the forward acceptance. The front-end chip is bei...

  11. The LHCb magnet design team

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Photos 01, 02: The LHCb magnet is equipped with resistive coils. Having a "warm " rather than a superconducting magnet, as was originally planned, was a design choice advocated by former Technical Coordinator Hans-Jurgen Hilke. Although this solution was adopted to keep the experiment on budget and on schedule, the geometry required and the need for good lateral homogeneity of the magnetic field called for an innovative design, developed by Wilfried Flegel. Jacques André, Claude Rosset and Olivier Jamet were responsible for the working drawings while Marcello Losasso did the 3-D calculations of the magnetic field. The LHCb magnet design team is pictured in front of one of the two magnet coils which recently arrived at CERN. Each coil comprises 15 individual monolayer ´pancakes´ of identical trapezoidal racetrack shape, and is bent at 45 degrees on the two transverse sides. Each pancake consists of 15 turns of conductor, wound from a 300-m length of extruded aluminium. Left to right: Olivier Jamet, Hans-Jur...

  12. LHCb : LHCbVELO: Performance and Radiation Damage in LHC Run I and Preparationfor Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 um thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 um is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 x 10...

  13. Developing LHCb Grid Software: Experiences and Advances

    CERN Document Server

    Stokes-Rees, I; Cioffi, C; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Garonne, V; Graciani, R; Sanchez, M; Frank, M; Closier, J; Kuznetsov, G

    2004-01-01

    The LHCb grid software has been used for two Physics Data Challenges, the most recent of which will have produced 90 TB of data and required over 400 processor-years of computing power. This paper discusses the group's experience with developing Grid Services, interfacing to the LCG, running LHCb experiment software on the grid, and the integration of a number of new technologies into the LHCb grid software. Our experience and utilisation of the following core technologies will be discussed: OGSI, XML-RPC, grid services, LCG middle-ware, and instant messaging.

  14. Implications of LHCb measurements and future prospects

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    This is the 2017 edition of a series of workshops between the LHCb collaboration and the theory community. It follows similar meetings held on 10-11 Nov. 2011, 16-18 April 2012 (which resulted in a paper published in EPJ C 73 (2013) 2373), 14-16 Oct. 2013, 15-17 Oct. 2014, 3-5 Nov. 2015 and 12-14 Oct. 2016. The purpose of the meeting is to consider the latest results from LHCb, discuss possible interpretations and identify important channels and observables to test leading theoretical frameworks in the near future of LHCb data-taking.

  15. Performance of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Latham, T

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is an essential part of the LHCb detector, permitting precision measurements of the production and decay vertices of beauty and charm particles. The VELO consists of a series of silicon micro-strip detectors, arranged in two retractable halves. Positioned only 7 mm from the beam during normal operations, it must withstand very high levels of radiation. The performance of the LHCb VELO during the first year of LHC physics running is presented.

  16. The LHCb Vertex Locator (VELO) Pixel Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00536755

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is designed to perform high-precision measurements of CP violation and the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. There is a planned upgrade during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2), expected in 2019, which will allow the detector to run at higher luminosities by transforming the entire readout to a trigger-less system. This will include a substantial upgrade of the Vertex Locator (VELO), the silicon tracker that surrounds the LHCb interaction region. The VELO is moving from silicon strip technology to hybrid pixel sensors, where silicon sensors are bonded to VeloPix ASICs. Sensor prototypes have undergone rigorous testing using the Timepix3 Telescope at the SPS, CERN. The main components of the upgrade are summarised and testbeam results presented.

  17. VeloUT tracking for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, E

    2014-01-01

    This note describes track reconstruction in the LHCb tracking system upstream of the magnet, namely the VELO and UT sub-detectors. The implementation of the VeloUT algorithm and its performance in terms of track reconstruction efficiency, ghost rate and execution time per event are presented. The algorithm has been optimised for use in the Upgrade software trigger of LHCb. The momentum information obtained for the VeloUT tracks (due to a fringe magnetic field between the VELO and UT sub-detectors) can reduce the total execution time per event for the full tracking sequence. The performance of the tracking sequence with and without the use of VeloUT tracks is also presented.

  18. LHCb Data Management: consistency, integrity and coherence of data

    CERN Document Server

    Bargiotti, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will start operating in 2007. The LHCb experiment is preparing for the real data handling and analysis via a series of data challenges and production exercises. The aim of these activities is to demonstrate the readiness of the computing infrastructure based on WLCG (Worldwide LHC Computing Grid) technologies, to validate the computing model and to provide useful samples of data for detector and physics studies. DIRAC (Distributed Infrastructure with Remote Agent Control) is the gateway to WLCG. The Dirac Data Management System (DMS) relies on both WLCG Data Management services (LCG File Catalogues, Storage Resource Managers and File Transfer Service) and LHCb specific components (Bookkeeping Metadata File Catalogue). Although the Dirac DMS has been extensively used over the past years and has proved to achieve a high grade of maturity and reliability, the complexity of both the DMS and its interactions with numerous WLCG components as well as the instability of facilit...

  19. Charm: Mixing, CP Violation and Rare Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00160626

    2014-01-01

    Recent results on mixing, CP violation and rare decays in charm physics from the LHCb experiment are presented. Study of ''wrong-sign'' $D^{0} \\rightarrow K^+ \\pi^-$ decays provides the highest precision measurements to date of the mixing parameters $x^{\\prime 2}$ and $y^{\\prime}$, and of CP violation in this decay mode. Direct and indirect CP violation in the $D^0$ system are probed to a sensitivity of around $10^{-3}$ using $D^0 \\rightarrow K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays and found to be consistent with zero. Searches for the rare decays $D^+_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^+\\mu^+\\mu^-$, $D^+_{(s)} \\rightarrow \\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^+$ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ find no evidence of signal, but set the best limits on branching fractions to date. Thus, despite many excellent results in charm physics from LHCb, no evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model is found.

  20. The Software Architecture of the LHCb High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a spectrometer dedicated to the study of heavy flavor at the LHC. The rate of proton-proton collisions at the LHC is 15 MHz, but disk space limitations mean that only 3 kHz can be written to tape for offline processing. For this reason the LHCb data acquisition system -- trigger -- plays a key role in selecting signal events and rejecting background. In contrast to previous experiments at hadron colliders like for example CDF or D0, the bulk of the LHCb trigger is implemented in software and deployed on a farm of 20k parallel processing nodes. This system, called the High Level Trigger (HLT) is responsible for reducing the rate from the maximum at which the detector can be read out, 1.1 MHz, to the 3 kHz which can be processed offline,and has 20 ms in which to process and accept/reject each event. In order to minimize systematic uncertainties, the HLT was designed from the outset to reuse the offline reconstruction and selection code, and is based around multiple independent and redunda...

  1. LHCb: The Evolution of the LHCb Grid Computing Model

    CERN Multimedia

    Arrabito, L; Bouvet, D; Cattaneo, M; Charpentier, P; Clarke, P; Closier, J; Franchini, P; Graciani, R; Lanciotti, E; Mendez, V; Perazzini, S; Nandkumar, R; Remenska, D; Roiser, S; Romanovskiy, V; Santinelli, R; Stagni, F; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Ubeda Garcia, M; Vedaee, A; Zhelezov, A

    2012-01-01

    The increase of luminosity in the LHC during its second year of operation (2011) was achieved by delivering more protons per bunch and increasing the number of bunches. Taking advantage of these changed conditions, LHCb ran with a higher pileup as well as a much larger charm physics introducing a bigger event size and processing times. These changes led to shortages in the offline distributed data processing resources, an increased need of cpu capacity by a factor 2 for reconstruction, higher storage needs at T1 sites by 70\\% and subsequently problems with data throughput for file access from the storage elements. To accommodate these changes the online running conditions and the Computing Model for offline data processing had to be adapted accordingly. This paper describes the changes implemented for the offline data processing on the Grid, relaxing the Monarc model in a first step and going beyond it subsequently. It further describes other operational issues discovered and solved during 2011, present the ...

  2. LHCb: Radiation hard programmable delay line for LHCb Calorimeter Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauricio Ferre, J; Vilasís Cardona, X; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Machefert, F; Lefrançois, J; Duarte, O

    2013-01-01

    This poster describes the implementation of a SPI-programmable clock delay chip based on a Delay Locked Loop (DLL) in order to shift the phase of the LHC clock (25 ns) in steps of 1ns, with a 4ps jitter and 18ps of DNL. The delay lines will be integrated into ICECAL, the LHCb calorimeter front-end ASIC in the near future. The stringent noise requirements on the ASIC imply minimizing the noise contribution of digital components. This is accomplished by implementing the DLL in differential mode. To achieve the required radiation tolerance several techniques are applied: double guard rings between PMOS and NMOS transistors as well as glitch suppressors and TMR Registers. This 5.7 mm2 chip has been implemented in CMOS 0.35um technology.

  3. LHCb - Search for hidden-sector bosons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauri, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A search is presented for a hidden-sector boson, $\\chi$, produced in the decay $B^0 \\rightarrow K^* (892)^0 \\chi$, with $K^* (892)^0 \\rightarrow K^+ \\pi^-$ and $\\chi \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ . The search is performed using a $pp$-collision data sample collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and 8 TeV with the LHCb detector, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 and 2 fb$^{-1}$ respectively. No significant signal is observed in the mass range $214 \\le m_\\chi \\le 4350$ MeV, and upper limits are placed on the branching fraction product $\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow K^* (892)^0 \\chi) \\times \\mathcal{B}(\\chi \\rightarrow \\mu^+ \\mu^- )$ as a function of the mass and lifetime of the $\\chi$ boson. These limits place the most stringent constraints to date on many theories that predict the existence of additional low-mass dark bosons.

  4. Production measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00392425

    2017-01-01

    The $\\text{LHC}b$ detector, with its excellent momentum resolution and flexible trigger strategy, is ideally suited for measuring heavy quark and quarkonia production properties. In addition, the new system of forward shower counters installed upstream and downstream has begun to be used, therefore the experiment is being suited to measure central exclusive production. The $\\text{LHC}b$ measurements of inclusive and differential cross-sections of the production of $J/\\psi$ resonance and $J/\\psi$ pairs, as well bottom quarks and $Z^0$ boson, based on Run 2 datasets are summarized. Finally, results on the prompt production of open charm hadrons and the exclusive production of charmonium are discussed.

  5. Synergy of BESIII and LHCb physics programmes

    CERN Document Server

    Malde, Sneha Sirirshkumar

    2016-01-01

    There is potential for BESIII open-charm measurements to have a significant impact on the LHCb physics programme. Despite the general purpose design of the LHCb detector there are certain inputs that can be better determined in other environments or in production mechanisms not accessible at the LHC. With the unprecedented amount of LHCb data that will become available over the one-to-two decades it is necessary to consider where additional inputs are essential, to avoid the situation where the uncertainty on a measurement is dominated by the lack of knowledge of an external input. This document considers the capabilities of the BESIII experiment to provide vital inputs into key LHCb measurements. A number of different potential measurements that could be pursued are discussed.

  6. Rare decays at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pescatore, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons offer a rich playground to make precise tests of the Standard Model and look for New Physics at the level of quantum corrections. A review of recent LHCb results will be presented.

  7. Rare Decays at the LHCb Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, L.

    2015-06-01

    Rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons offer a rich playground to make precise tests of the Standard Model and look for New Physics at the level of quantum corrections. A review of recent LHCb results will be presented.

  8. An LHCb general-purpose acquisition board for beam and background monitoring at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, F.; Guzik, Z.; Jacobsson, R.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will present an LHCb custom-made acquisition board which was developed for a continuous beam and background monitoring during LHC operations at CERN. The paper describes both the conceptual design and its performance, and concludes with results from the first period of beam operations at the LHC. The main purpose of the acquisition board is to process signals from a pair of beam pickups to continuously monitor the intensity of each bunch, and to monitor the phase of the arrival time of each proton bunch with respect to the LHC bunch clock. The extreme versatility of the board also allowed the LHCb experiment to build a high-speed and high-sensitivity readout system for a fast background monitor based on a pair of plastic scintillators. The board has demonstrated very good performance and proved to be conceptually valid during the first months of operations at the LHC. Connected to the beam pickups, it provides the LHCb experiment with a real-time measurement of the total intensity of each beam and of the arrival time of each beam at the LHCb Interaction Point. It also monitors the LHC filling scheme and the beam current per bunch at a continuous rate of 40 MHz, and assures a proper global timing of LHCb. The continuous readout of the scintillators at bunch clock speed provides the LHCb experiment with high-resolution information about the beam halo and fast losses during both injection and circulating beam. It has also provided valuable information to the LHC during machine commissioning with beam. Recent results also shows that it could contribute as a luminosity monitor independent from the LHCb experiment readout system. Beam, background and luminosity measurements are continuously fed back to the LHC in the data exchange framework between the experiments and the LHC machine aimed at improving efficiently the experimental conditions real-time.

  9. Heavy Flavour and Quarkonia production at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2080005

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector, with its excellent momentum resolution and flexible trigger strategy, is ideally suited for measuring heavy quark and quarkonia production properties. Recent LHCb measurements of inclusive and differential cross-sections of the production of $J/\\psi= $ and $\\Upsilon$ resonances, as well as charm, bottom and top quarks, in $pp$ collisions at different centre-of-mass energies are presented. Finally, results on the associated production of $\\Upsilon$ and open charm hadrons and the exclusive production of charmonium are discussed.

  10. Considerations on Xi- reconstruction in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Brochu, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative method of charged hyperon reconstruction applicable to the LHCb experiment. It extends the seminal work of the FOCUS collaboration to the specific detector layout of LHCb and addresses the reconstruction ambiguities reported in their earlier work, leading to improvements in the reconstruction efficiency for the specific cases of Xi- and Omega- baryon decays to a charged meson and a Lambda baryon.

  11. Development of Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Bellunato, T; Matteuzzi, C

    2003-01-01

    The work described in this thesis has been carried out in the framework of the development program of the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors of the LHCb experiment. LHCb will operate at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and it will perform a wide range of measurements in the b-hadrons realm. The extensive study of CP violation and rare decays in the b-hadron system are the main goals of the experiment. An introduction to CP violation in hadronic interactions is given in chapter 1. The high b-b bar production cross section at the LHC energy will provide an unprecedented amount of data which will give LHCb a unique opportunity for precision tests on a large set of physics channels as well as a promising discovery potential for sources of CP violation arising from physics beyond the Standard Model. The experiment is designed in such a way to optimally match the kinematic structure of events where a pair of b quarks is produced in the collision between to 7 GeV protons. Chapter 2 is devoted to an overview o...

  12. LHCb Kalman filter cross architecture studies

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388548

    2017-01-01

    The 2020 upgrade of the LHCb detector will vastly increase the rate of collisions the Online system needs to process in software, in order to filter events in real time. 30 million collisions per second will pass through a selection chain, where each step is executed conditional to its prior acceptance. The Kalman filter is a fit applied to all reconstructed tracks which, due to its time characteristics and early execution in the selection chain, consumes 40% of the whole reconstruction time in the current trigger software. This makes the Kalman filter a time-critical component as the LHCb trigger evolves into a full software trigger in the Upgrade. I present a new Kalman filter algorithm for LHCb that can efficiently make use of any kind of SIMD processor, and its design is explained in depth. Performance benchmarks are compared between a variety of hardware architectures, including x86_64 and Power8, and the Intel Xeon Phi accelerator, and the suitability of said architectures to efficiently perform th...

  13. The LHCb Vertex Locator performance and Vertex Locator upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00259789

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is an experiment dedicated to the study of new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The Vertex Locator (VELO) is the silicon detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point. The detector operates in a severe and highly non-uniform radiation environment. The small pitch and analogue readout result in a best single hit precision of 4 $\\rm \\mu$m. The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz event rate. The vertex detector will have to cope with radiation levels up to 10$^{16}$ 1 MeV$\\rm n_{eq}/cm^2$, more than an order of magnitude higher than those expected at the current experiment. A solution is under development with a pixel detector, based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips with 55 x 55 $\\rm \\mu m$ pixels. In addition a micro-strip solution is also under development, with finer pitch, higher granularity and lower mass than the current detector. The current...

  14. Search for Exotics with LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Muster, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    A search is presented for long-lived particles with a mass between 25 and 50 GeV/c^2 and a lifetime between 1 and 200ps in a sample of proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{s} = 7TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.62fb^{-1}, collected by the LHCb detector. The particles are assumed to be pair-produced by the decay of a Standard Model-like Higgs boson. The experimental signature of the long-lived particle is a displaced vertex with two associated jets. No excess above the background is observed and limits are set on the production cross-section as a function of the long-lived particle mass and lifetime.

  15. Reconstruction and calibration strategies for the LHCb RICH detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    - LHCb particle identification - LHCb ring pattern recognition algorithm requirements - RICH pattern recognition - Cherenkov angle reconstruction online - Online PID - Hough transform - Metropolis- Hastings Markov chains - PID online: physics performances - Rich PID Callibration

  16. LHCb Computing Resources: 2019 requests and reassessment of 2018 requests

    CERN Document Server

    Bozzi, Concezio

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the computing resources needed by LHCb in 2019 and a reassessment of the 2018 requests, as resulting from the current experience of Run2 data taking and minor changes in the LHCb computing model parameters.

  17. PENGGUNAAN DATA PENGINDERAAN JAUH DAN SIG UNTUK PEMANTAUAN KEKRITISAN DI DAS LUK ULO HULU JAWA TENGAH (Use of Remote Sensing Data and GIS (Geographic Informatiion System for Monitoring Cryticalness in DAS Luk Ulo Stream, Central Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puguh Dwi Raharjo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK DAS Lukulo Hulu adalah DAS yang berada di Jawa Tengah dengan koordinat 340.000 - 365.000 mT dan 916.0000 - 917.5000 mU. Aktifitas masyarakat dimungkinkan sangat mempengaruhi kondisi DAS, yaitu dengan ekploitasi sumberdaya alam (batu, pasir. Pada DAS Lukulo Hulu mempunyai 7 (tujuh Sub DAS yaitu, DAS Lukulo, DAS Lokidang, DAS Maetan, DAS Gebang, DAS Loning, DAS Mondo, dan DAS Cacaban. Pehitungan lndeks Erosivitas Tertimbang menggunakan SIG (Sistem lnformasi Geografis memperlihatkan bahwa DAS Lokidang merupakan DAS kritis yang mempunyai prioritas pertama, nilai dari total lndeks Erosivitas Tertimbangnya sebesar 1082,62 dengan luas DAS sebesar 3602,705 hektar. Darr sudut nandang penutup lahan (vegetasi dengan metode penginderaan jar.rh menggunakan transformasi NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index DAS Gebang, DAS Cacaban, dan DAS Lukulo merupakan DAS yang sangat mudah rusak (erosi hal tersebut karena pentrukaan lahannya tidak terdapat vegetasi sehingga mudah tererosi.    ABSTRACT Lukulo Upstream Watershed is watershed which located in Central Java with coordinate 340.000  - 365.000 mT and 916.0000 - 917.5000 mU. Human activities  which still immeasurable influence the watershed condition, its exploitation of natural resouces (rocks, sand. In Lukulo Upstream Watershed there are seven sub  watershed they are Lukulo sub watershed, Lokidang sub watershed, Maetan watershed, Gebang watershed, Loning watershed, Mondo watershed, and Cacaban watershed. Calculation using GIS (Geographic Information System for  deliberated erosivity index formula found that Lokidang watershed is first priority of watershed  criticaly, value the deliberated erosivity index equal to 1082,62 broadly 3602,705 hectare. While from viewpoint  land cover (vegetation  with remote sensing method transformation using NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Gebang watershed, Cacaban watershed, and Lukulo watershed is watershed which is very easy of damage

  18. Performance of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Akiba, K.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Appleby, R.B.; Artuso, M.; Bates, A.; Bay, A.; Behrendt, O.; Benton, J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Bogdanova, G.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; van den Brand, J.; Brown, H.; Buytaert, J.; Callot, O.; Carroll, J.; Casse, G.; Collins, P.; De Capua, S.; Doets, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dossett, D.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Eklund, L.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Frei, R.; Garofoli, J.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Gong, A.; Gong, H.; Gordon, H.; Haefeli, G.; Harrison, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Hulsbergen, W.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, P.; Jans, E.; John, M.; Keaveney, J.; Ketel, T.; Korolev, M.; Kraan, M.; Lastovicka, T.; Lafferty, G.; Latham, T.; Lefeuvre, G.; Leflat, A.; Liles, M.; van Lysebetten, A.; MacGregor, G.; Marinho, F.; McNulty, R.; Merkin, M.; Moran, D.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Needham, M.; Nikitin, N.; Noor, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Papadelis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Patel, G.D.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A.F.; Schiller, M.; Schneider, O.; Shears, T.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Smith, N.A.; Szumlak, T.; Thomas, C.; van Tilburg, J.; Tobin, M.; Velthuis, J.; Verlaat, B.; Viret, S.; Volkov, V.; Wallace, C.; Wang, J.; Webber, A.; Whitehead, M.; Zverev, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon microstrip detector that surrounds the proton-proton interaction region in the LHCb experiment. The performance of the detector during the first years of its physics operation is reviewed. The system is operated in vacuum, uses a bi-phase CO2 cooling system, and the sensors are moved to 7 mm from the LHC beam for physics data taking. The performance and stability of these characteristic features of the detector are described, and details of the material budget are given. The calibration of the timing and the data processing algorithms that are implemented in FPGAs are described. The system performance is fully characterised. The sensors have a signal to noise ratio of approximately 20 and a best hit resolution of 4 microns is achieved at the optimal track angle. The typical detector occupancy for minimum bias events in standard operating conditions in 2011 is around 0.5%, and the detector has less than 1% of faulty strips. The proximity of the detector to the beam means ...

  19. Study on the performance of the Particle Identification Detectors at LHCb after the LHC First Long Shutdown (LS1)

    CERN Document Server

    Fontana, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    During the First Long Shutdown (LS1), the LHCb experiment has introduced major modification in the data-processing procedure and modified part of the detector to deal with the increased energy and the increased heavy-hadron production cross-section. In this contribution we review the performance of the particle identification detectors at LHCb, Rich, Calorimeters, and Muon system, after the LS1

  20. LHCb: The LHCb Muon detector commissioning and first running scenarios

    CERN Multimedia

    Furcas, S

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb Muon detector, being part of the first trigger level (L0), has been optimized in order to provide a fast and efficient identification of the muons produced in pp collisions at the LHC. The expected performances are: 95% L0 trigger efficiency within a 25ns time window and muon identification in L0 with a pT resolution of ~20%. The detector has been built, to met those stringent requirements, using Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and Gas Electron Multiplier (in the innermost region, closest to the IP) technology. The chambers (1368 MWPC + 12 GEM) are arranged in 5 detector stations, interspersed with iron filters placed along the beam pipe. While the installation of chambers in stations 2 to 5 has already been completed, the work on the first and most challenging station is still ongoing and expected to end by July 09. The results obtained in the commissioning of all the installed chambers as well as the performances measured by means of data acquired during cosmics runs since September 08 are reviewe...

  1. Observation of charm mixing at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Meson-antimeson mixing has been observed in the K0−K0bar, B0−B0bar and B0s−B0sbar systems. Evidence of mixing in the charm system has been reported by three experiments using different D0 decay channels, but only the combination of these results provides confirmation of D0−D0bar mixing with more than 5σ significance. We report a measurement of charm mixing using the time-dependent ratio of D0 → K+π− to D0 → K−π+ decay rates in D∗+-tagged events reconstructed in 1.0 fb−1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment in 2011. We measure the mixing parameters x'2 = (−0.9 ± 1.3) × 10−4, y' = (7.2 ± 2.4) × 10−3 and the ratio of doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored decay rates RD = (3.52 ± 0.15) × 10−3. The result excludes the no-mixing hypothesis with a probability corresponding to 9.1σ and represents the first observation of D0−D0bar oscillations from a single measurement.

  2. Distributed control and monitoring of high-level trigger processes on the LHCb online farm

    CERN Document Server

    Vannerem, P; Jost, B; Neufeld, N

    2003-01-01

    The on-line data taking of the LHCb experiment at the future LHC collider will be controlled by a fully integrated and distributed Experiment Control System (ECS). The ECS will supervise both the detector operation (DCS) and the trigger and data acquisition (DAQ) activities of the experiment. These tasks require a large distributed information management system. The aim of this paper is to show how the control and monitoring of software processes such as trigger algorithms are integrated in the ECS of LHCb.

  3. Real-time calibration and alignment of the LHCb RICH detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    HE, Jibo

    2017-12-01

    In 2015, the LHCb experiment established a new and unique software trigger strategy with the purpose of increasing the purity of the signal events by applying the same algorithms online and offline. To achieve this, real-time calibration and alignment of all LHCb sub-systems is needed to provide vertexing, tracking, and particle identification of the best possible quality. The calibration of the refractive index of the RICH radiators, the calibration of the Hybrid Photon Detector image, and the alignment of the RICH mirror system, are reported in this contribution. The stability of the RICH performance and the particle identification performance are also discussed.

  4. LHCb: full-steam strategy pays off

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    LHCb looks at LHC proton collisions from a special angle. The experiment studies rare decays of the B particle to look into the physical processes that might hide new physics. Designed to operate at moderate luminosity, LHCb has been more daring for the last year and is running at conditions tougher than the nominal. The new strategy is paying off, as important physics results have just started to emerge…   Event display presented at the EPS-HEP 2011 conference showing a B0s meson decaying into a μ+ and μ- pair.  The LHCb detector was originally designed to run at moderate luminosity and low interaction pile-up. In other words, unlike the CMS and ATLAS experiments, the whole LHCb experimental set-up and data-taking infrastructure was designed to process just one proton interaction for each bunch crossing. For the last year, however, this has all been old news. A change in LHCb strategy was made possible when it became clear that the LHC was going to first i...

  5. Framework TDR for the LHCb Upgrade Technical Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bediaga, I; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; Nasteva, I; dos Reis, A C; Amato, S; Carvalho Akiba, K; De Paula, L; Francisco, O; Gandelman, M; Gomes, A; Lopes, J H; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Polycarpo, E; Rangel, M S; Souza De Paula, B; Vieira, D; Göbel, C; Molina Rodriguez, J; Chen, P; Gao, Y; Gong, G; Gong, H; Jing, F; Li, L; Li, Y; Liu, B; Lu, H; Shao, B; Wu, S; Xue, T; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Zeng, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, Y; Zhong, L; De Bonis, I; Decamp, D; Drancourt, C; Ghez, Ph; Hopchev, P; Lees, J -P; Machikhiliyan, I V; Minard, M -N; Pietrzyk, B; T'Jampens, S; Tisserand, V; Tournefier, E; Vouters, G; Ajaltouni, Z; Chanal, H; Cogneras, E; Deschamps, O; El Rifai, I; Henrard, P; Hoballah, M; Jahjah Hussein, M; Lefèvre, R; Li Gioi, L; Monteil, S; Niess, V; Perret, P; Roa Romero, D A; Sobczak, K; Adrover, C; Aslanides, E; Cachemiche, J -P; Cogan, J; Duval, P -Y; Hachon, F; Khanji, B; Le Gac, R; Leroy, O; Mancinelli, G; Maurice, E; Perrin-Terrin, M; Rethore, F; Sapunov, M; Serrano, J; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Barsuk, S; Beigbeder-Beau, C; Cacérès, T; Callot, O; Charlet, D; Duarte, O; He, J; Jean-Marie, B; Kochebina, O; Lefrançois, J; Machefert, F; Martín Sánchez, A; Nicol, M; Robbe, P; Schune, M -H; Teklishyn, M; Tocut, V; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; David, P; Del Buono, L; Martens, A; Polci, F; Brambach, T; Cauet, Ch; Deckenhoff, M; Domke, M; Ekelhof, R; Kaballo, M; Karbach, T M; Kruse, F; Merkel, J; Rudloff, K; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Spaan, B; Swientek, S; Warda, K; Wishahi, J; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Föhr, C; Fontana, M; Fuchs, H; Hofmann, W; Kihm, T; Popov, D; Schmelling, M; Volyanskyy, D; Voss, H; Zavertyaev, M; Bachmann, S; Bien, A; Blouw, J; Dordei, F; Färber, C; Gersabeck, E; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Jaeger, A; Kreplin, K; Krocker, G; Linn, C; Marks, J; Meissner, M; Nikodem, T; Seyfert, P; Stahl, S; van Tilburg, J; Uwer, U; Wandernoth, S; Wiedner, D; Zhelezov, A; Grünberg, O; Hartmann, T; Voß, C; Waldi, R; Bifani, S; Farry, S; Ilten, P; Kechadi, T; Mathe, Z; McNulty, R; Wallace, R; Zhang, W C; Milanes, D A; Palano, A; Carbone, A; D'Antone, I; Derkach, D; Falabella, A; Galli, D; Lax, I; Marconi, U; Perazzini, S; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Zangoli, M; Bonivento, W; Cadeddu, S; Cardini, A; Lai, A; Manca, G; Oldeman, R; Saitta, B; Baldini, W; Bozzi, C; Evangelisti, F; Landi, L; Mazurov, A; Savrie, M; Squerzanti, S; Vecchi, S; Bizzeti, A; Frosini, M; Graziani, G; Passaleva, G; Veltri, M; Anelli, M; Archilli, F; Bencivenni, G; Campana, P; Ciambrone, P; De Simone, P; Felici, G; Lanfranchi, G; Palutan, M; Saputi, A; Sarti, A; Sciascia, B; Soomro, F; Cardinale, R; Fontanelli, F; Patrignani, C; Petrolini, A; Calvi, M; Furcas, S; Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Kucharczyk, M; Maino, M; Matteuzzi, C; Pessina, G; Carboni, G; De Capua, S; Sabatino, G; Santovetti, E; Satta, A; Alves Jr, A A; Auriemma, G; Bocci, V; Martellotti, G; Penso, G; Pinci, D; Santacesaria, R; Satriano, C; Sciubba, A; Nisar, S; Morawski, P; Polok, G; Witek, M; Muryn, B; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Senderowska, K; Szumlak, T; Guzik, Z; Nawrot, A; Szczekowski, M; Ukleja, A; Burducea, I; Coca, C; Dogaru, M; Grecu, A; Maciuc, F; Muresan, R; Orlandea, M; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Popovici, B; Stoica, S; Straticiuc, M; Teodorescu, E; Alkhazov, G; Bochin, B; Bondar, N; Dzyuba, A; Gets, S; Golovtsov, V; Kashchuk, A; Maev, O; Matveev, M; Sagidova, N; Shcheglov, Y; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Balagura, V; Belogurov, S; Belyaev, I; Egorychev, V; Golubkov, D; Kvaratskheliya, T; Savrina, D; Semennikov, A; Shatalov, P; Shevchenko, V; Zhokhov, A; Berezhnoy, A; Bogdanova, G; Komarov, I; Korolev, M; Leflat, A; Nikitin, N; Volkov, V; Zverev, E; Filippov, S; Gushchin, E; Karavichev, O; Kravchuk, L; Kudenko, Y; Laptev, S; Tikhonov, A; Bondar, A; Eidelman, S; Krokovny, P; Kudryavtsev, V; Shekhtman, L; Vorobyev, V; Artamonov, A; Belous, K; Dzhelyadin, R; Guz, Yu; Novoselov, A; Obraztsov, V; Ostankov, A; Romanovsky, V; Shapkin, M; Stenyakin, O; Yushchenko, O; Abellan Beteta, C; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Casajus Ramo, A; Comerma-Montells, A; Domingo Bonal, F; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Graugés, E; Lopez Asamar, E; Mauricio, J; Mendez-Munoz, V; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Potterat, C; Puig Navarro, A; Rosello, M; Ruiz, H; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Adeva, B; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Cid Vidal, X; Dosil Suárez, A; Esperante Pereira, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Gallas Torreira, A; Hernando Morata, J A; Pazos Alvarez, A; Perez Trigo, E; Plo Casasus, M; Rodriguez Perez, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santamarina Rios, C; Seco, M; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Visniakov, J; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Barschel, C; Blake, T; Bonaccorsi, E; Brarda, L; Buytaert, J; Cattaneo, M; Chadaj, B; Charpentier, Ph; Chebbi, M; Ciba, K; Clemencic, M; Closier, J; Collins, P; Corajod, B; Corti, G; Couturier, B; D'Ambrosio, C; Decreuse, G; Dijkstra, H; Dumps, R; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Forty, R; Fournier, C; Frank, M; Frei, C; Gaspar, C; Gersabeck, M; Gligorov, V V; Granado Cardoso, L A; Gys, T; Haen, C; van Herwijnen, E; Jacobsson, R; Jamet, O; Jost, B; Karacson, M; Kristic, R; Lacarrere, D; Lanciotti, E; Langenbruch, C; Lindner, R; Liu, G; Martinez Santos, D; Matev, R; Neufeld, N; Panman, J; Pepe Altarelli, M; Piedigrossi, D; Rauschmayr, N; Roiser, S; Roy, L; Ruf, T; Schindler, H; Schmidt, B; Schneider, T; Schopper, A; Schwemmer, R; Stagni, F; Subbiah, V K; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; Tonelli, D; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ullaland, O; Vesterinen, M; Wicht, J; Witzeling, W; Wyllie, K; Zvyagin, A; Amhis, Y; Bay, A; Bernard, F; Blanc, F; Bressieux, J; Cowan, G A; Degaudenzi, H; Dupertuis, F; Fave, V; Frei, R; Gauvin, N; Haefeli, G; Jaton, P; Keune, A; Knecht, M; La Thi, V N; Lopez-March, N; Luisier, J; Märki, R; Muster, B; Nakada, T; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Prisciandaro, J; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rouvinet, J; Schneider, O; Szczypka, P; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Veneziano, G; Anderson, J; Bernet, R; Büchler-Germann, A; Bursche, A; Chiapolini, N; De Cian, M; Elsasser, Ch; Müller, K; Palacios, J; Salzmann, C; Saornil Gamarra, S; Serra, N; Steinkamp, O; Straumann, U; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Aaij, R; Ali, S; Band, H; Bauer, Th; van Beuzekom, M; van Beveren, V; Boer Rookhuizen, H; Ceelie, L; Coco, V; David, P N Y; De Bruyn, K; De Groen, P; van Eijk, D; Farinelli, C; Gromov, V; van der Heijden, B; Heijne, V; Hulsbergen, W; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jansen, L; Jansweijer, P; Kluit, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; van Leerdam, J; Martinelli, M; Merk, M; Mous, I; Munneke, B; Oggero, S; van Overbeek, M; Pellegrino, A; van Petten, O; Roeland, E; de Roo, K; Schimmel, A; Schuijlenburg, H; Sluijk, T; Storaci, B; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Vink, W; Wenerke, P; Wiggers, L; Zappon, F; Zwart, A; van den Brand, J; Dettori, F; Ketel, T; Koopman, R F; Kos, J; Lambert, R W; Mul, F; Raven, G; Schiller, M; Tolk, S; Dovbnya, A; Kandybei, S; Raniuk, I; Shapoval, I; Shevchenko, O; Iakovenko, V; Nikolaiko, Y; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, M; Pugatch, V; Faulkner, P J W; Kenyon, I R; Lazzeroni, C; McCarthy, J; Slater, M W; Watson, N K; Adinolfi, M; Benton, J; Brook, N H; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Hampson, T; Harnew, S T; Naik, P; Rademacker, J H; Solomin, A; Souza, D; Velthuis, J J; Voong, D; Barter, W; Bettler, M -O; Cliff, H V; Garra Tico, J; Gibson, V; Gregson, S; Haines, S C; Jones, C R; Sigurdsson, S; Ward, D R; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Back, J J; Craik, D; Dossett, D; Gershon, T; Kreps, M; Latham, T; Pilař, T; Poluektov, A; Reid, M M; Silva Coutinho, R; Whitehead, M; Williams, M P; Easo, S; Nandakumar, R; Papanestis, A; Patrick, G N; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Benson, S; Clarke, P E L; Currie, R; Eisenhardt, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Lambert, D; Luo, H; Mejia, H; Muheim, F; Needham, M; Playfer, S; Sparkes, A; Xie, Y; Alexander, M; Beddow, J; Borghi, S; Eklund, L; Hynds, D; Ogilvy, S; Pappagallo, M; Rodrigues, E; Sail, P; Soler, F J P; Spradlin, P; Bowcock, T J V; Brown, H; Casse, G; Donleavy, S; Hennessy, K; Hicks, E; Huse, T; Hutchcroft, D; Liles, M; Patel, G D; Rinnert, K; Shears, T; Smith, N A; Carson, L; Ciezarek, G; Cunliffe, S; Egede, U; Golutvin, A; Hall, S; Owen, P; Parkinson, C J; Patel, M; Petridis, K; Richards, A; Savidge, T; Sepp, I; Shires, A; Websdale, D; Williams, M; Appleby, R B; Barlow, R J; Bird, T; Bjørnstad, P M; Brett, D; Harrison, J; Lafferty, G; McGregor, G; Moran, D; Parkes, C; Smith, M; Webber, A D; Brock, M; Charles, M; Harnew, N; John, J J; John, M; Malde, S; Nomerotski, A; Powell, A; Thomas, C; Topp-Joergensen, S; Wilkinson, G; Meadows, B; Sokoloff, M D; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Borgia, A; Britton, T; Garofoli, J; Gui, B; Hadjivasiliou, C; Mountain, R; Pal, B K; Phan, A; Qian, W; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J; Xing, Z; Zhang, L

    2012-01-01

    This document is a Framework Technical Design Report for the upgrade of the LHCb experiment. It adds to the information in the Letter of Intent, in particular concerning the foreseen schedule, cost and participating institutes. Updates are given for the physics performance, based on the experience gained with the first full year of data taking, on the detector requirements and the progress of the sub-system R&D. Within the framework presented here, it is expected that the individual sub-system TDRs will follow on completion of the R&D phase in the next year.

  6. A New Readout Electronics for the LHCb Muon Detector Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Cadeddu, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    The 2018/2019 upgrade of LHCb Muon System foresees a 40 MHz readout scheme and requires the development of a new Off Detector Electronics (nODE) board that will be based on the nSYNC, a radiation tolerant custom ASIC developed in UMC 130 nm technology. Each nODE board has 192 input channels processed by 4 nSYNCs. The nSYNC is equipped with fully digital TDCs and it implements all the required functionalities for the readout: bunch crossing alignment, data zero suppression, time measurements. Optical interfaces, based on GBT and Versatile link components, are used to communicate with DAQ, TFC and ECS systems.

  7. LHCb Upgraded RICH 2 Engineering Design Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Garsed, Philip John; Cardinale, Roberta; Petrolini, Alessandro; Benettoni, Massimo; Simi, Gabriele; Zago, M; Easo, Sajan; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Frei, Christoph; He, Jibo; Piedigrossi, Didier

    2016-01-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb experiment and, specifically, its two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors will undergo a major upgrade. RICH 2 will be refurbished with new photon detectors and their associated electronics, with the capability of up to 40 MHz sustained acquisition rate. A new support and cooling system has been developed for the two photodetector arrays, retaining the vessel, gas and optical systems unchanged. This document describes their new mechanical arrangement, its engineering design, installation and alignment. A summary of the project schedule and Institute responsibilities is provided.

  8. Performance of the LHCb RICH detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Brook, N.H.; Coombes, M.; Hampson, T.; Rademacker, J.H.; Solomin, A.; Voong, D. [University of Bristol, H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Bristol (United Kingdom); Aglieri Rinella, G.; Albrecht, E.; D' Ambrosio, C.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Kanaya, N.; Koblitz, S.; Mollen, A.; Morant, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Storaci, B.; Ullaland, O.; Vervink, K.; Wyllie, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Fanchini, E.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Kucharczyk, M.; Maino, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Perego, D.L.; Pessina, G. [Sezione INFN di Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Benson, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Kim, Y.M.; Lambert, D.; Main, A.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Sparkes, A.; Young, R. [University of Edinburgh, School of Physics and Astronomy, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Blake, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Blanks, C.; Cameron, B.; Carson, L.; Egede, U.; Owen, P.; Patel, M.; Plackett, R.; Savidge, T.; Sepp, I.; Soomro, F.; Websdale, D. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Brisbane, S.; Contu, A.; Gandini, P.; Gao, R.; Harnew, N.; Hill, D.; Hunt, P.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Malde, S.; Muresan, R.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Wilkinson, G.; Xing, F. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Cardinale, R.; Fontanelli, F.; Mini' , G.; Petrolini, A.; Sannino, M. [Sezione INFN di Genova, Genova (Italy); Easo, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Garra Tico, J.; Gibson, V.; Gregson, S.; Haines, S.C.; Jones, C.R.; Katvars, S.; Kerzel, U.; Mangiafave, N.; Rogers, G.J.; Sigurdsson, S.; Wotton, S.A. [University of Cambridge, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Mountain, R. [Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY (United States); Morris, J.V.; Nardulli, J.; Papanestis, A.; Patrick, G.N.; Ricciardi, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom); Sail, P.; Soler, F.J.P.; Spradlin, P. [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Collaboration: The LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2013-05-15

    The LHCb experiment has been taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN since the end of 2009. One of its key detector components is the Ring-Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system. This provides charged particle identification over a wide momentum range, from 2-100 GeV/c. The operation and control, software, and online monitoring of the RICH system are described. The particle identification performance is presented, as measured using data from the LHC. Excellent separation of hadronic particle types ({pi}, K, p) is achieved. (orig.)

  9. Development of an indicator system for the German action plan to global climate change (DAS); Entwicklung eines Indikatorensystems fuer die Deutsche Anpassungsstrategie an den Klimawandel (DAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenthaler, Konstanze; Andrian-Werburg, Stefan von [Bosch und Partner GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Nickel, Darla [Ecologic gGmbH Institut fuer Internationale und Europaeische Umweltpolitik, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    On 17th December 2008 the German Federal Cabinet adopted the German Strategy for Adaptation to Climate Change (DAS: Deutsche Anpassungsstrategie) (BUNDESREGIERUNG 2008). The DAS has created the framework for adapting to the consequences of climate change in Germany. First and foremost, the DAS contributes its guidelines at Federal level, to provide guidance for agents at other levels. The Strategy lays the foundation for a medium-term process. In conjunction with the individual Federal States and other groups representing various sectors of society, the Strategy provides a step-by-step assessment of the risks of climate change. Furthermore, it states the potential requirements for action, and defines the appropriate goals and potential adaptation measures to be developed and implemented in the process. The Strategy is divided into 13 action fields and two cross-sectional fields (=14+15). (1) Human health (2) Building sector (3) Water regime, water management, coastal and marine protection (4) Soil (5) Biological diversity (6) Agriculture (7) Woodland and forestry (8) Fishery (9) Energy industry (conversion, transport and supply) (10) Financial services industry (11) Transport, transport infrastructure (12) Trade and industry (13) Tourism industry (14) Spatial, regional and physical development planning (15) Civil protection. In due course, the Federal Environment Agency (UBA) will design a comprehensive set of tools to support and implement the DAS. This will be made available for download from www.anpassung.net. An integral part of this will be the 'Tatenbank' (www.tatenbank.anpassung.net), the 'Klimalotse' (www.klimalotse.anpassung.net), FISKA (special information system 'Adaptation') and an Indicator System to aid adaptation. The latter is one of the key tasks identified for the DAS. As far as the Indicator System is concerned, it has been decided to prepare a Report on Indicators for the challenges facing Germany and the

  10. Charmless B Decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, L

    2010-01-01

    The potential of the LHCb experiment to test the Standard Model and probe New Physics effects by making precision measurements using decays of $B$ hadrons to charmless hadronic final states is explored. The CKM angle $\\gamma$ can be measured using NP-sensitive decays involving penguin amplitudes. A U-spin analysis of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in the decays $B_d \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_s\\rightarrow K^{-}K^{+}$ is expected to give a total uncertainty on $\\gamma$ of $\\simeq$ 7° with one nominal year of data. A similar sensitivity is achievable via a Dalitz analysis of $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow K_S \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$. With relatively small amounts of data, discoveries of the rare modes $B_d\\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-}, B_s \\rightarrow \\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_d \\rightarrow p\\bar{p}$ are expected. The ultra-rare modes $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{-}\\pi ^{+}\\pi^{+}$ and $B^{+} \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{+}\\pi^{-}$ may be observed if their branching ratios are significantly enhance...

  11. LHCb: DIRAC Secure Distributed Platform

    CERN Multimedia

    Casajus, A

    2009-01-01

    DIRAC, the LHCb community grid solution, provides access to a vast amount of computing and storage resources to a large number of users. In DIRAC users are organized in groups with different needs and permissions. In order to ensure that only allowed users can access the resources and to enforce that there are no abuses, security is mandatory. All DIRAC services and clients use secure connections that are authenticated using certificates and grid proxies. Once a client has been authenticated, authorization rules are applied to the requested action based on the presented credentials. These authorization rules and the list of users and groups are centrally managed in the DIRAC Configuration Service. Users submit jobs to DIRAC using their local credentials. From then on, DIRAC has to interact with different Grid services on behalf of this user. DIRAC has a proxy management service where users upload short-lived proxies to be used when DIRAC needs to act on behalf of them. Long duration proxies are uploaded by us...

  12. Filling the vacuum at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Last month, the Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings (VSC) group was tasked with an unusually delicate operation in the LHCb experiment cavern: removing the LHC beam pipe while keeping the sensitive Vertex Locator vacuum vessel (VELO) completely isolated from the action.   The VSC group seal off the VELO beam pipe with a flange. Image: Gloria Corti. LHCb’s VELO detector is one of the crown jewels of the experiment. With detector elements surrounded by a vacuum, it gets as close as 5 cm from the beam. Fantastic for physics, but difficult for all-important access. “Because of the sensitivity of the VELO detector and its proximity to the beam, the collaboration decided not to bake (see box) its portion of the beam pipe,” says Giulia Lanza (TE-VSC-LBV), the expert in charge of the beam vacuum operation. “Our group was therefore asked to remove the rest of the LHC beam pipe while keeping the VELO portion of the pipe completely isolated. This work...

  13. Test of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes for the LHCb scintillator pad detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aguiló, Ernest; Comerma-Montells, A; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Graciani, Ricardo; Grauges, Eugeni; Vilasis Cardona, Xavier; Xirgu, Xavier; Bohner, Gerard; Bonnefoy, Romeo; Borras, David; Cornat, Remi; Crouau, Michel; Deschamps, Olivier; Jacquet, Philippe; Lecoq, Jacques; Monteil, Stephane; Perret, Pascal; Reinmuth, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The LHCb experiment (The LHCb Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 98-4) is designed to study B meson physics in the LHC proton-proton collider at CERN. The Scintillator Pad Detector (SPD) has been designed to complete the calorimeter information performing an e/gamma identification for the experiment level-0 trigger system. The detection technology consists in transmitting scintillation light by means of both Wavelength Shifting and clear fibers to fast multi- anode photomultiplier tubes. In this paper, it is described the instrumentation and setup used to characterize the baseline photomultiplier solution (Hamamatsu R5900-00-M64) together with the scintillators and optical fibers for the SPD at LHCb.

  14. Novel strategies at Lhcb for particle identification

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is performing high precision measurements in the avour sector. An excellent performance of the particle identication (PID) detectors as well as the development of new data taking techniques are of fundamental importance in order to cope with increasingly harder challenges posed by the LHC Run 2. The approach of data-driven calibration of particle identication performance at LHCb has changed significantly from Run 1 to Run 2 and calibration samples are now selected directly in the LHCb high-level trigger. This change of data-taking paradigm enables larger calibration samples with respect to Run 1 to be collected, giving access to low-level detector informations useful for studies of systematic effects, while retaining the same (or improving) the PID performances observed Run 1.

  15. Implications of LHCb measurements and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Anelli, M; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Band, H; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Beigbeder-Beau, C; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernard, F; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; van Beveren, V; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bochin, B; Boer Rookhuizen, H; Bogdanova, G; Bonaccorsi, E; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Brarda, L; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cacérès, T; Cachemiche, J -P; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casajus Ramo, A; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Ceelie, L; Chadaj, B; Chanal, H; Charles, M; Charlet, D; Charpentier, Ph; Chebbi, M; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciambrone, P; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corajod, B; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; D'Antone, I; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, Michel; De Groen, P; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Decreuse, G; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Domke, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Drancourt, C; Duarte, O; Dumps, R; Dupertuis, F; Duval, P -Y; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Evangelisti, F; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Faulkner, P J W; Fave, V; Felici, G; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Föhr, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Fournier, C; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frei, R; Frosini, M; Fuchs, H; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Gets, S; Ghez, Ph; Giachero, A; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golovtsov, V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gong, G; Gong, H; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gromov, V; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Guzik, Z; Gys, T; Hachon, F; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; van der Heijden, B; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hofmann, W; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jamet, O; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jansen, L; Jansweijer, P; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karavichev, O; Karbach, T M; Kashchuk, A; Kechadi, T; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kihm, T; Kluit, R; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kos, J; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Kristic, R; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudenko, Y; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Landi, L; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Laptev, S; Latham, T; Lax, I; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Likhoded, A; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mauricio, J; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meissner, M; Mejia, H; Mendez-Munoz, V; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Mul, F; Müller, K; Munneke, B; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nawrot, A; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nikolaiko, Y; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Ostankov, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; van Overbeek, M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; van Petten, O; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Piedigrossi, D; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, M; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Rethore, F; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roeland, E; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; de Roo, K; Rouvinet, J; Roy, L; Rudloff, K; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Saornil Gamarra, S; Sapunov, M; Saputi, A; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savidge, T; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schimmel, A; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schneider, T; Schopper, A; Schuijlenburg, H; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Sigurdsson, S; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Slater, M W; Sluijk, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Squerzanti, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; Tikhonov, A; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tocut, V; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ullaland, O; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vink, W; Volkov, S; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Vouters, G; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Warda, K; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Wenerke, P; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xue, T; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zappon, F; Zavertyaev, M; Zeng, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A; Zwart, A; Bharucha, A; Bigi, I.I.; Bobeth, C; Bobrowski, M; Brod, Joachim; Buras, A J; Davies, C T H; Datta, A.; Delaunay, C; Descotes-Genon, S; Ellis, J; Feldmann, T; Fleischer, R; Gedalia, O; Girrbach, J; Guadagnoli, D; Hiller, G; Hochberg, Y; Hurth, T; Isidori, G; Jager, S; Jung, M; Kagan, A; Kamenik, J F; Lenz, A; Ligeti, Z; London, D; Mahmoudi, F; Matias, J; Nandi, S; Nir, Y; Paradisi, P; Perez, G; Petrov, A A; Rattazzi, R; Sharpe, S R; Silvestrini, L; Soni, A; Straub, D M; van Dyk, D; Virto, J; Wang, Y M; Weiler, A; Zupan, J

    2013-01-01

    During 2011 the LHCb experiment at CERN collected $1.0 {\\mbox{fb}^{-1}}$ of $\\sqrt{s} = 7 {\\mathrm{\\,Te\\kern -0.1em V}}$ $pp$ collisions. Due to the large heavy quark production cross-sections, these data provide unprecedented samples of heavy flavoured hadrons. The first results from LHCb have made a significant impact on the flavour physics landscape and have definitively proved the concept of a dedicated experiment in the forward region at a hadron collider. This document discusses the implications of these first measurements on classes of extensions to the Standard Model, bearing in mind the interplay with the results of searches for on-shell production of new particles at ATLAS and CMS. The physics potential of an upgrade to the LHCb detector, which would allow an order of magnitude more data to be collected, is emphasised.

  16. Commissioning and Early Physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Gallas, A

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been designed to perform precision measurements on CP asymmetries and rare decay searches of B mesons. The LHCb construction and installation has been finished early summer last year. The experiment is ready to exploit first data from CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The very first data collected with a minimal interaction trigger should allow the space alignment of the detector to be performed. Then, when energy and momentum scales have been calibrated, the particle identification will be commissioned. The trigger will also be commissioned ready for data-taking in 2010, when LHCb's nominal luminosity should be reached and the full physics programme deployed. First measurements comprise inclusive particle production, where final states containing a pair of oppositely charged muons (e.g. J/ psi production) will be isolated. We will report on the commissioning of the different subsystems performed with cosmic data and the few particle beams delivered by the accelerator last year and t...

  17. Status and prospects for strange physics at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Rare decays are fundamental probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. We present the current status of rare decays studies at the LHCb experiment and discuss a possible picture emerging from these measurements. The expanding LHCb program of strange physics, in particular of their rare decays, provides a unique and complementary probe to test the SM with respect to the beauty and charm. We present recent results on rare strange hadrons decays exploiting the LHCb Run I data. We then present prospects for strange physics with the LHCb Run II data and after the improvements in the trigger for the LHCb Upgrade.

  18. Measurements of CPT Violation at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00260865

    2017-01-01

    Recent measurements of CPT violation and Lorentz symmetry breaking in $B^0-\\bar{B}^0$ mixing and $B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s$ mixing, obtained from data taken by the LHCb experiment, are highlighted. The results are expressed in terms of the Standard-Model Extension (SME) coefficients, which incorporate both CPT and Lorentz violation. Due to the large boost of the $B$ mesons at LHCb, the SME coefficients can be determined with high precision. The bounds on these coefficients are improved significantly compared to previous measurements.

  19. The LHCb Outer Tracker Front End Electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Berkien, A; Hommels, B; Knopf, J; Nedos, M; Pellegrino, A; Sluijk, T; Spelt, J; Stange, U; Trunk, U; Uwer, U; Wiedner, D; Zwart, A

    2008-01-01

    This note provides an overview of the front-end electronics used to readout the drift-times of the LHCb Outer Tracker straw tube chambers. The main functional components of the readout are the ASDBLR ASIC for amplification and signal digitization, the OTIS ASIC for the time measurement and for the L0 buffering, and the GOL ASIC to serialize the digital data for the optical data transmission. The L1 buffer board used to receive the data which is sent via the optical link is a common LHCb development and is not described here. This note supersedes an earlier document [1].

  20. Search for CP violation in baryon decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of CP violation has been observed in the K- and B-meson systems, but not yet with any baryonic particle. We report on searches for CP violation in baryon decays at LHCb using Run I data. We find evidence for CP violation in Lambda0b -> p pi- pi+ pi- decays with a statistical significance corresponding to 3.3 standard deviations, including systematic uncertainties. This represents the first evidence of CP violation in the baryon sector. An overview of other recent results of baryon decays will be presented, along with some highlights of the charmless B-decay programme.

  1. Flavour tagging of $b$ mesons in $pp$ collisions at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Mueller, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Flavour tagging, i.e. the inference of the production flavour of reconstructed $b$ hadrons, is essential for precision measurements of decay time-dependent $CP$ violation and of mixing parameters in the the neutral $B$ meson systems. LHC's $pp$ collisions with their high track multiplicities constitute a challenging environment for flavour tagging and demand for new and improved strategies. We present recent progress and new developments in flavour tagging at the LHCb experiment, which will allow for a further improvement of $CP$ violation measurements in decays of $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ mesons.

  2. Implementing Data Acquisition Systems DAS1 and DAS2 at Cernavoda Full-Scope Simulator Main Control Room based on the SIEN2007 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu, Ana Maria; Tutuianu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Teodor

    2009-01-01

    Modern personnel training, re-training and licensing is a guarantee of NPP's safe reliable operation. Cernavoda NPP personnel training system is the main objective of its specialized department built up as Training Center (TC), directly supervised by Administration of the National Nuclearelectrica Society (SNN) and National Regulatory Body for Nuclear Activities (CNCAN). It was implemented to ensure the abilities, skills and knowledge required by the safe reliable operation of the nuclear reactor by the Main Control Room (MCR) operators. This objective was reached through training lessons taught and tested on the Full Scope Simulator (FSS), the TC's main training tool, a replica of the MCR of the real plant. Its description is the subject of this paper. The TC's FSS includes a computer network equipped with a software connected to the specialized program DATAPATH supplied for Cernavoda FSS by the FSS provider, delivered by L-3/ MAPPS. An alternative to DATAPATH Communication of the L 3/MAPPS Simulation System, developed by Cernavoda Full Scope Simulator Staff, was presented in the previous edition of the symposium (see the SIEN 2007 paper). This original solution is now already applied in order to connect to simulation process Data Acquisition Systems DAS1 and DAS2, two new systems already installed in the real MCR but not included by the Cernavoda FSS initial design. Communication between simulation software and DAS1 and DAS2, considered to be simple receivers of simulated data both as much alike as the two DASs from real plant, is performed in parallel with DATAPATH in a safe mode and without affecting simulation process. This paperwork presents the above mentioned application of this communication solution, developed by the Cernavoda NPP Full Scope Simulator Staff with details about the hardware/software solutions and their performance, training impact, cost and benefits. (authors)

  3. LHCb: Optimization and Calibration of Flavour Tagging Algorithms for the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Falabella, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb purposes are to make precise measurements in $B$ and $D$ meson decays. In particular in time-dependent CP violation studies the determination of $B$ flavour at production ("Flavour Tagging") is fundamental. The performances and calibration of the flavour tagging algorithms with 2011 data collected by LHCb are reported. The performances of the flavour tagging algorithms on the relevant CP violation and asymmetry studies are also reported.

  4. LHCb : A generic firmware core to drive the Front-End GBT-SCAs for the LHCb ugprade

    CERN Multimedia

    Alessio, Federico; Gaspar, Clara; Jacobsson, Richard; Wyllie, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has proposed an upgrade towards a full 40 MHz readout system in order to run between five and ten times its initial design luminosity. The entire Front-End electronics will be upgraded in order to cope with higher sub-detector occupancy, higher data rate and to work in a complete trigger-less fashion. In this paper, we describe a novel way to transmit slow control information to the Front-End electronics, by profiting from bidirectional optical connections and the GBT and GBT-SCA chipset capabilities. The implementation and preliminary validation tests are shown as well

  5. Measurements of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartik, S Vijay; Couturier, Ben; Clemencic, Marco; Neufeld, Niko

    2014-01-01

    The ARM architecture is a power-efficient design that is used in most processors in mobile devices all around the world today since they provide reasonable compute performance per watt. The current LHCb software stack is designed (and thus expected) to build and run on machines with the x86/x86 6 4 architecture. This paper outlines the process of measuring the performance of the LHCb software stack on the ARM architecture – specifically, the ARMv7 architecture on Cortex-A9 processors from NVIDIA and on full-fledged ARM servers with chipsets from Calxeda – and makes comparisons with the performance on x86 6 4 architectures on the Intel Xeon L5520/X5650 and AMD Opteron 6272. The paper emphasises the aspects of performance per core with respect to the power drawn by the compute nodes for the given performance – this ensures a fair real-world comparison with much more 'powerful' Intel/AMD processors. The comparisons of these real workloads in the context of LHCb are also complemented with the standard synthetic benchmarks HEPSPEC and Coremark. The pitfalls and solutions for the non-trivial task of porting the source code to build for the ARMv7 instruction set are presented. The specific changes in the build process needed for ARM-specific portions of the software stack are described, to serve as pointers for further attempts taken up by other groups in this direction. Cases where architecture-specific tweaks at the assembler lever (both in ROOT and the LHCb software stack) were needed for a successful compile are detailed – these cases are good indicators of where/how the software stack as well as the build system can be made more portable and multi-arch friendly. The experience gained from the tasks described in this paper are intended to i) assist in making an informed choice about ARM-based server solutions as a feasible low-power alternative to the current compute nodes, and ii) revisit the software design and build system for portability and

  6. LHCb RICH1 Engineering Design Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, N; Metlica, F; Muir, A; Phillips, A; Buckley, A; Gibson, V; Harrison, K; Jones, C R; Katvars, S G; Lazzeroni, C; Storey, J; Ward, CP; Wotton, S; Alemi, M; Arnabaldi, C; Bellunato, T F; Calvi, M; Matteuzzi, C; Musy, M; Negri, P; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Chamonal, R; Eisenhardt, S; Lawrence, J; McCarron, J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Walker, A; Cuneo, S; Fontanelli, F; Gracco, Valerio; Mini, G; Musico, P; Petrolini, A; Sannino, M; Bates, A; MacGregor, A; O'Shea, V; Parkes, C; Paterson, S; Petrie, D; Pickford, A; Rahman, M; Soler, F; Allebone, L; Barber, J H; Cameron, W; Clark, D; Dornan, Peter John; Duane, A; Egede, U; Hallam, R; Howard, A; Plackett, R; Price, D; Savidge, T; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Websdale, D M; Adinolfi, M; Bibby, J H; Cioffi, C; Gligorov, Vladimir V; Harnew, N; Harris, F; McArthur, I A; Newby, C; Ottewell, B; Rademacker, J; Senanayake, R; Somerville, L P; Soroko, A; Smale, N J; Topp-Jørgensen, S; Wilkinson, G; Yang, S; Benayoun, M; Khmelnikov, V A; Obraztsov, V F; Densham, C J; Easo, S; Franek, B; Kuznetsov, G; Loveridge, P W; Morrow, D; Morris, JV; Papanestis, A; Patrick, G N; Woodward, M L; Aglieri-Rinella, G; Albrecht, A; Braem, André; Campbell, M; D'Ambrosio, C; Forty, R W; Frei, C; Gys, Thierry; Jamet, O; Kanaya, N; Losasso, M; Moritz, M; Patel, M; Piedigrossi, D; Snoeys, W; Ullaland, O; Van Lysebetten, A; Wyllie, K

    2005-01-01

    This document describes the concepts of the engineering design to be adopted for the upstream Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH1) of the reoptimized LHCb detector. Our aim is to ensure that coherent solutions for the engineering design and integration for all components of RICH1 are available, before proceeding with the detailed design of these components.

  7. LHCb Vertex Locator Upgrade Work Report

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Michael

    2017-01-01

    As the LHCb prepares for the planned upgrade of its vertex locator, there is a great need for supporting work such as the design and testing of apparatus that will ensure the smooth implementation of new hardware and infrastructure. My work this summer consisted largely of tasks to support this process.

  8. Mounting LHCb hadron calorimeter scintillating tiles

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Scintillating tiles are carefully mounted in the hadronic calorimeter for the LHCb detector. These calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  9. LHCb in the International Particle Physics Masterclasses

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider Beauty (LHCb) Experiment joined the International Particle Physics Masterclass programme in 2013. The experiment proposed the measurement of the D0 meson lifetime, using real data gathered at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. We describe the exercise as well as the lessons learned during this first participation in the International Masterclass programme.

  10. CP violation in $b$ hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Hicheur, Adlene

    2017-01-01

    The most recent results on $CP$ violation in b hadrons obtained by the LHCb Collaboration with Run I and years 2015-2016 of Run II are reviewed. The different types of violation are covered by the studies presented in this paper.

  11. Occupancy and Functional Architecture of the Pigment Binding Sites of Photosystem II Antenna Complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, Matteo; Mozzo, Milena; Croce, Roberta; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  12. Pigment binding sites occupancy and functional architecture of the Photosystem II antenna complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, M.; Mozzo, M.; Croce, R.; Morosinotto, T.; Bassi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  13. DAS performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, G.; Bodine, S.; Carroll, T.; Keller, M.

    1984-02-01

    This report begins with an overview of the Data Acquisition System (DAS), which supports several of PPPL's experimental devices. Performance measurements which were taken on DAS and the tools used to make them are then described

  14. Track pattern-recognition on GPGPUs in the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gallorini, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is entering in its upgrading phase, with its detector and read-out system re-designed to cope with the increased LHC energy after the long shutdown of 2018. In this upgrade, a trigger-less data acquisition is being developed to read-out the full detector at the bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz. In particular, the High Level Trigger (HLT) system has to be heavily revised. Since the small LHCb event size (about 100 kB), many-core architectures such as General Purpose Graphics Processing Units (GPGPUs) and multi-core CPUs can be used to process many events in parallel for real-time selection, and may offer a solution for reducing the cost of the HLT farm. Track reconstruction and vertex finding are the more time-consuming applications running in HLT and therefore are the first to be ported on many-core. In this talk we present our implementation of the existing tracking algorithms on GPGPU, discussing in detail the case of the VErtex LOcator detector (VELO), and we show the achieved performances...

  15. VeloPix ASIC development for LHCb VELO upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzekom, M. van; Buytaert, J.; Campbell, M.; Collins, P.; Gromov, V.; Kluit, R.; Llopart, X.; Poikela, T.; Wyllie, K.; Zivkovic, V.

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the readout of the entire experiment to a triggerless system operating at 40 MHz. All data reduction algorithms will be run in a high level software farm, and will have access to event information from all subdetectors. This approach will give great power and flexibility in accessing the physics channels of interest in the future, in particular the identification of flavour tagged events with displaced vertices. The data acquisition and front end electronics systems require significant modification to cope with the enormous throughput of data. For the silicon vertex locator (VELO) a dedicated development is underway for a new ASIC, VeloPix, which will be a derivative of the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The chip will be radiation hard and be able to cope with pixel hit rates of above 500 MHz, highly non-uniformly distributed over the 2 cm 2 chip area. The chip will incorporate local intelligence in the pixels for time-over-threshold measurements, time-stamping and sparse readout. It must in addition be low power, radiation hard, and immune to single event upsets. In order to cope with the datarates and use the pixel area most effectively, an on-chip data compression scheme will integrated. This paper will describe the requirements of the LHCb VELO upgrade, and give an overview of the digital architecture being developed specifically for the readout chip

  16. Jobs masonry in LHCb with elastic Grid Jobs

    CERN Document Server

    Stagni, F

    2015-01-01

    In any distributed computing infrastructure, a job is normally forbidden to run for an indefinite amount of time. This limitation is implemented using different technologies, the most common one being the CPU time limit implemented by batch queues. It is therefore important to have a good estimate of how much CPU work a job will require: otherwise, it might be killed by the batch system, or by whatever system is controlling the jobs' execution. In many modern interwares, the jobs are actually executed by pilot jobs, that can use the whole available time in running multiple consecutive jobs. If at some point the available time in a pilot is too short for the execution of any job, it should be released, while it could have been used efficiently by a shorter job. Within LHCbDIRAC, the LHCb extension of the DIRAC interware, we developed a simple way to fully exploit computing capabilities available to a pilot, even for resources with limited time capabilities, by adding elasticity to production MonteCarlo (MC) si...

  17. LHCb: Grid administration,towards an autonomic approach

    CERN Multimedia

    Ubeda Garcia, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Within the DIRAC framework in the LHCb collaboration, we deployed an autonomous policy system acting as a central status information point for grid elements. Experts working as grid administrators have a broad and very deep knowledge about the underlying system which makes them very precious. We have attempted to formalize this knowledge in an autonomous system able to aggregate information, draw conclusions, validate them, and take actions accordingly. The DIRAC Resource Status System is a monitoring and generic policy system that enforces managerial and operational actions automatically. As an example, the status of a grid entity can be evaluated using a number of policies, each making assessments relative to specific monitoring information. Individual results of these policies can be combined to evaluate and propose a global status for the resource. This evaluation goes through a validation step driven by a state machine and an external validation system. Once validated, actions can be triggered accordingl...

  18. Commissioning of the LHCb Silicon Tracker using data from the LHC injection tests

    CERN Document Server

    Knecht, M; Blanc, F; Bettler, M-O; Conti, G; Fave, V; Frei, R; Gauvin, N; Haefeli, G; Keune, A; Luisier, J; Muresan, R; Nakada, T; Needham, M; Nicolas, L; Perrin, A; Potterat, C; Schneider, O; Tran, M; Bauer, C; Britsch, M; Hofmann, W; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Voss, H; Anderson, J; Buechler, A; Chiapolini, N; Hangartner, V; Salzmann, C; Steiner, S; Steinkamp, O; Van Tilburg, J; Tobin, M; Vollhardt, A; Adeva, B; Fungueiri no Pazos, J; Gallas, A; Pazos-Alvarez, A; Pérez-Trigo, E; Pló-Casasus, M; Rodriguez Perez, P; Saborido, J; Vázquez, P; Iakovenko, V; Okhrimenko, O; Pugatch, V

    2011-01-01

    LHCb is a single-arm forward spectrometer dedicated to the study of the CP-violation and rare decays in the b-quark sector. An efficient and high precision tracking system is a key requirement of the experiment. The LHCb Silicon Tracker Project consists of two sub-detectors that make use of silicon micro-strip technology: the Tracker Turicensis located upstream of the spectrometer magnet and the Inner Tracker which covers the innermost part of the tracking stations after the magnet. In total an area of 12 m^2 is covered by silicon. In September 2008 and June 2009, injection tests from the SPS to the LHC were performed. Bunches of order 5x10^9 protons were dumped onto a beam stopper (TED) located upstream of LHCb. This produced a spray of ~10 GeV muons in the LHCb detector. Though the occupancy in this environment is relatively large, these TED runs have allowed a first space and time alignment of the tracking system. Results of these studies together and the overall detector performance obtained in the TED ru...

  19. From noise to signal - a new approach to LHCb muon optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchuk, A P

    2010-01-01

    One has to exploit the LHCb muon detector at the lowest possible gas gain and operational voltage in order to minimize the charge accumulated during 10 years of the LHCb experiment keeping the aging effects as low as possible. The detector lifetime prolongation 1.5-2 times can be achieved following the optimization of the LHCb muon system proposed in this note. An optimization of the LHCb muon system assumes: minimization of the electronics thresholds and detector gas gain, a choice of the working point near the knee of the efficiency plateau at high enough efficiency at stabilization the signal-to-noise ratio during long-term data taking runs by gas gain stabilization. An efficiency of each chamber tuned once by a time alignment remains constant at the constant gas gain. Cluster size, cross-talks, multi-hits become constant and minimal at constant and minimal gas gain. It is shown in the note how to reconstruct the noise distribution in each chamber already installed in the pit and to measure precisely offse...

  20. Supervision de l'écriture de données de l'expérience LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Fanane, C

    2008-01-01

    Located on the French-Swiss border near Geneva, CERN is one of the world's biggest scientific laboratories in particles physics, home for both theoretical and experimental research. At CERN the world's most powerful particle collider was build and is now being commissioned, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC, designed as a ring collider, is hosting several big physics experiments,including the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment (LHCb). The LHC, together with the LHCb experiment are expected to go officially into operation in the middle of September 2008. It is precisely in this commissioning phase of the LHCb detector that my internship between April and September 2008 takes place. The aim of my project is to implement a monitoring system for the event data writing of physics data coming from the LHCb DAQ System. Event data writing is the last stage of the LHCb DAQ System and is a crucial part for the success of the experiment. It is a fully redundant distributed system composed of various tasks an...

  1. LHCb: The Front-End electronics for the LHCb scintillating fibres detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Chanal, H; Pillet, N

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the next LHC shutdown in 2018/19. The tracker system will have a major overhaul. Its components will be replaced with new technologies in order to cope with the increased hit occupancy and radiation environment. A detector made of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) is studied for this upgrade. Even if this technology has proven to achieve high efficiency and spatial resolution, its integration within a LHC experiment bears new challenges. This detector will consist of 12 planes of 5 to 6 layers of 250 $\\mu$m fibres with an area of 5×6 m$^2$. Its lead to a total of 500k SiPM channels which need to will be read out at 40MHz. This talk gives an overview of the R&D status of the readout board and the PACIFIC chip. The readout board is connected to the SiPM on one side and to the experiment data-acquisition, experimental control system and services on the other side . The PACIFIC chip is a 128 channel ASIC which can be connected to one 12...

  2. ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE Career Networking Event 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marinov, Andrey; Strom, Derek Axel

    2015-01-01

    A networking event for alumni of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE experiments as well as current ATLAS/CMS/LHCb/ALICE postdocs and graduate students. This event offers an insight into career opportunities outside of academia. Various former members of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ALICE collaborations will give presentations and be part of a panel discussion and elaborate on their experience in companies in a diverse range of fields (industry, finance, IT,...). Details at https://indico.cern.ch/event/440616

  3. LHCb: LHCb Software and Conditions Database Cross-Compatibility Tracking: a Graph-Theory Approach

    CERN Multimedia

    Cattaneo, M; Shapoval, I

    2012-01-01

    The Conditions Database (CondDB) of the LHCb experiment provides versioned, time dependent geometry and conditions data or all LHCb data processing applications (simulation, high level trigger, reconstruction, analysis). The evolution of CondDB and of the LHCb applications is a weakly-homomorphic process. It means that compatibility between a CondDB state and LHCb application state may not be preserved across different database and application generations. More over, a CondDB state by itself belongs to a complex three-dimensional phase space which evolves according to certain CondDB self-compatibility criteria, so it is sometimes difficult even to determine a self-consistent CondDB state. These compatibility issues may lead to various kinds of problems in the LHCb production, varying from unexpected application crashes to incorrect data processing results. Thus, there is a need for defining a well-established set of compatibility criteria between mentioned above entities, together with developing a compatibil...

  4. LHCb: SALT - new silicon strip readout chip for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Swientek, K; Fiutowski, T; Idzik, M; Moron, J; Szumlak, T

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector, operating at the LHC proton-proton collider, has finished its Run I period. After more than two years of collision data taking the experiment accumulated corresponding integrated luminosity of around 3.1 fb$^{-1}$. The full recorded data sample will be used by physicists to search for New Physics and precise measurement of CP-violation in heavy flavor quark sector. Despite its superb performance it is clear that the LHCb experiment is statistically limited for a number of important decay channels (such as $B_d \\to K^*\\mu \\mu$ or $B_s \\to \\phi \\phi$ ). This, in turn, is related to the current data acquisition architecture which can acquire data at the top rate of 1.1 MHz at the instantaneous luminosity close to 4x10$^{32}$ [cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$]. The LHC machine is already capable of delivering more than one order of magnitude higher luminosity that is presently used by the LHCb. This fact led the LHCb Collaboration to preparing a proposal regarding an upgrade of the LHCb spectrometer that woul...

  5. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  6. New Web Technologies for the LHCb Online Monitoring Displays

    CERN Document Server

    Lagou, Charalampia

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb Online Monitoring Displays is a web application, that gives access to real-time measurements and status information about the LHCb detector and its components, without the need to login. It is hosted at CERN on the computer lbcomet.cern.ch. The system is architecturally complex, based on the Comet technology for the data-transfer and the STOMP protocol for the communication between the clients and the message broker. The application is functional, however concerns are expressed over the future maintenance of the system’s architecture as is. The cause of these concerns are firstly the fact that the STOMP JavaScript client package is outdated and flagged by the original author flagged as non-maintained and secondly that todays modern browsers support real-time bi-directional communication which, at the time of development was not compatible even with some of the major browsers. Therefore, the objective of this project is to investigate modern data-push mechanisms, which could complement or replace...

  7. Tracking, Vertexing and data handling strategy for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Seyfert, Paul

    2017-01-01

    For Run III (2021 onwards) of the LHC, LHCb will take data at an instantaneous luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{33} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2} \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$, five times higher than in Run II (2015-2018). To cope with the harsher data taking conditions, the LHCb collaboration will upgrade the DAQ system and install a purely software based trigger, in addition to various detector upgrades. The high readout rate contributes to the challenge of reconstructing and selecting events in real time. Special emphasis in this contribution will be put on the need for fast track reconstruction in the software trigger. The modified detector infrastructure will be able to face this challenge and the necessary changes to the reconstruction sequence are discussed. A novel strategy is presented which distributes and maximises the bandwidth among the different physics channels using a genetic algorithm. The data processing chain includes a re-design of the event scheduling, introduction of concurrent processing, optimisations in processor ...

  8. SciFi - A large Scintillating Fibre Tracker for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Quagliani, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. Concept, design and operational parameters are driven by the challenging LHC environment including significant ionising and neutron radiation levels. Over a total active surface of 360 m2 the SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres (Ø 0.25 mm) read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The project is now at the transition from R&D to series production. We will present the evolution of the design a...

  9. Instruments for calibration and monitoring of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this Ph. D. thesis is the study and the development of the instruments needed to monitor and calibrate the Muon Detector of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment. LHCb is currently under installation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and will start to take data during 2007. The experiment will study B mesons decays to achieve a profound understanding of favour physics in the Standard Model framework and to search signs of new physics beyond. Muons can be found in the final states of many B-decays which are sensitive to CP violation. The Muon Detector has the crucial role to identify the muon particles generated by the b-hadron decays through a measurement of their transverse momentum, already at the first trigger level (Level-0). A 95% effciency in events selection is required for the Muon Trigger, which operates at the Level-0. 1380 detectors are used to equip the whole Muon System and the corresponding 122,112 readout channels must be time aligned and monitored with a resol...

  10. Real time analysis with the upgraded LHCb trigger in Run III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2017-10-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to 1.1 MHz, a rate at which the entire detector is read out. A second level, implemented in a farm of around 20k parallel processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to around 12.5 kHz. The LHCb experiment plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC long shutdown II (2018-2019). In this upgrade, a purely software based trigger system is being developed and it will have to process the full 30 MHz of bunch crossings with inelastic collisions. LHCb will also receive a factor of 5 increase in the instantaneous luminosity, which further contributes to the challenge of reconstructing and selecting events in real time with the CPU farm. We discuss the plans and progress towards achieving efficient reconstruction and selection with a 30 MHz throughput. Another challenge is to exploit the increased signal rate that results from removing the 1.1 MHz readout bottleneck, combined with the higher instantaneous luminosity. Many charm hadron signals can be recorded at up to 50 times higher rate. LHCb is implementing a new paradigm in the form of real time data analysis, in which abundant signals are recorded in a reduced event format that can be fed directly to the physics analyses. These data do not need any further offline event reconstruction, which allows a larger fraction of the grid computing resources to be devoted to Monte Carlo productions. We discuss how this real-time analysis model is absolutely critical to the LHCb upgrade, and how it will evolve during Run-II.

  11. The LHCb experiment: status and expected physics performance

    OpenAIRE

    Barsuk, S

    2005-01-01

    Physics motivation of the LHCb experiment, detector design, status of construction and installation of the detector components, and expected performance of selected b physics measurements are discussed.

  12. $CP$ Violation in $b$- and $c$-hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00260853

    2017-01-01

    Testing the Standard Model of particle physics by precision measurements of CP violating observables in the decays of b and c hadrons has been one of the design goals of the LHCb experiment. World-leading measurements have been performed of the semileptonic asymmetry, $a^{sl}_s$, and of the mixing-induced CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$ in the $B^0_s {\\overline B}{}^0_s$ system. The CKM angle $\\gamma$ is still the least known angle of the Unitarity Triangle, and the only one easily accessible using tree-level decays. A recent combination of LHCb measurements in various $B \\to DK$ decay modes has yielded the most precise determination of $\\gamma$ from a single experiment to date. The LHCb experiment is collecting unprecedented samples of beauty baryons, allowing for the first time to study CP violating observables in their decays. A recent analysis provided the first evidence for CP violation in the beauty baryon sector. Finally, LHCb has the largest samples of charmed hadron decays collected by any experiment to ...

  13. CP Violation in b- and c-hadron decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, Olaf; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Testing the Standard Model of particle physics by precision measurements of CP violating observables in the decays of b and c hadrons has been one of the design goals of the LHCb experiment. World-leading measurements have been performed of the semileptonic asymmetry, {a}ssl, and of the mixing-induced CP-violating phase ϕs in the {B}s0{\\bar{B}}s0 system. The CKM angle γ is still the least known angle of the Unitarity Triangle, and the only one easily accessible using tree-level decays. A recent combination of LHCb measurements in various B → DK decay modes has yielded the most precise determination of γ from a single experiment to date. The LHCb experiment is collecting unprecedented samples of beauty baryons, allowing for the first time to study CP violating observables in their decays. A recent analysis provided the first evidence for CP violation in the beauty baryon sector. Finally, LHCb has the largest samples of charmed hadron decays collected by any experiment to date. These samples yield some of the world’s most sensitive searches for direct and indirect CP violation in the charm sector.

  14. The LHCb Data Acquisition during LHC Run 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alessio, F; Brarda, L; Bonaccorsi, E; Perez, D H Campora; Chebbi, M; Frank, M; Gaspar, C; Cardoso, L Granado; Haen, C; Herwijnen, E v; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N; Schwemmer, R; Kartik, V; Zvyagin, A

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb Data Acquisition system reads data from over 300 read-out boards and distributes them to more than 1500 event-filter servers. It uses a simple push-protocol over Gigabit Ethernet. After filtering, the data is consolidated into files for permanent storage using a SAN-based storage system. Since the beginning of data-taking many lessons have been learned and the reliability and robustness of the system has been greatly improved. We report on these changes and improvements, their motivation and how we intend to develop the system for Run 2. We also will report on how we try to optimise the usage of CPU resources during the running of the LHC ('deferred triggering') and the implications on the data acquisition.

  15. Primary Vertex Reconstruction for Upgrade at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Wanczyk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is the study of beauty and charm hadron decays with the main focus on CP violating phenomena and searches for physics beyond the Standard Model through rare decays. At the present, the second data taking period is ongoing, which is called Run II. After 2018 during the long shutdown, the replacement of signicant parts of the LHCb detector is planned. One of main changes is upgrade of the present software and hardware trigger to a more rapid full software trigger. Primary Vertex (PV) is a basis for the further tracking and it is sensitive to the LHC running conditions, which are going to change for the Upgrade. In particular, the center-of-mass collision energy should reach the maximum value of 14 TeV. As a result the quality of the reconstruction has to be studied and the reconstruction algorithms have to be optimized.

  16. Particle combinations in the LHCb Upgrade trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Fanyi

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will be upgraded during long shutdown II (2018-2020) to process inelastic proton-proton collisions at 30MHz in a software application and run at a higher instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times 10^{33}cm^{−2}s^{−1}$. Each of these collisions will contain substantially more proton-proton interactions and charged particles. It is important to identify the decay vertices of heavy-flavour hadrons produced by the primary proton-proton interaction in an efficient, CPU-performant manner. In this project, I will learn about the LHCb trigger and experimental programme and investigate alternative models for reconstructing these vertices, which may scale more efficiently to the upgraded trigger conditions than the current model.

  17. Radiation Damage in the LHCb VELO

    CERN Multimedia

    Harrison, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The VErtex LOcator (VELO) is a silicon strip detector designed to reconstruct particle tracks and vertices produced by proton-proton interactions near to the LHCb interaction point. The excellent track resolution and decay vertex separation provided by the VELO are essential to all LHCb analyses. For the integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC up to the end of $2011$ the VELO is exposed to higher particle fluences than any other silicon detector of the four major LHC experiments. These proceedings present results from radiation damage studies carried out during the first two years of data taking at the LHC. Radiation damage has been observed in all of the $88$ VELO silicon strip sensors, with many sensors showing evidence of type-inversion in the highest fluence regions. Particular attention has been given to the two \

  18. SIMD studies in the LHCb reconstruction software

    CERN Document Server

    Campora Perez, D H

    2015-01-01

    During the data taking process in the LHC at CERN, millions of collisions are recorded every second by the LHCb Detector. The LHCb Online computing farm, counting around 15000 cores, is dedicated to the reconstruction of the events in real-time, in order to filter those with interesting Physics. The ones kept are later analysed $Offline$ in a more precise fashion on the Grid. This imposes very stringent requirements on the reconstruction software, which has to be as efficient as possible. Modern CPUs support so-called vector-extensions, which extend their Instruction Sets, allowing for concurrent execution across functional units. Several libraries expose the Single Instruction Multiple Data programming paradigm to issue these instructions. The use of vectorisation in our codebase can provide performance boosts, leading ultimately to Physics reconstruction enhancements. In this paper, we present vectorisation studies of significant reconstruction algorithms. A variety of vectorisation libraries are analysed a...

  19. Recording the LHCb data and software dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisovic, Ana; Couturier, Ben; Gibson, Val; Jones, Chris

    2017-10-01

    In recent years awareness of the importance of preserving the experimental data and scientific software at CERN has been rising. To support this effort, we are presenting a novel approach to structure dependencies of the LHCb data and software to make it more accessible in the long-term future. In this paper, we detail the implementation of a graph database of these dependencies. We list the implications that can be deduced from the graph mining (such as a search for the legacy software), with emphasis on data preservation. Furthermore, we introduce a methodology of recreating the LHCb data, thus supporting reproducible research and data stewardship. Finally, we describe how this information is made available to the users on a web portal that promotes data and analysis preservation and good practise with analysis documentation.

  20. RICH High Voltages & PDF Analysis @ LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Fanchini, E

    2009-01-01

    In the LHCb experiment an important issue is the identification of the hadrons of the final states of the B mesons decays. Two RICH subdetectors are devoted to this task, and the Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) are the photodetectors used to detect Cherenkov light. In this poster there is a description of how the very high voltage (-18 KV) supply stability used to power the HPDs is monitored. It is also presented the basics of a study which can be done with the first collision data: the analysis of the dimuons from the Drell-Yan process. This process is well known and the acceptance of the LHCb detector in terms of pseudorapidity will be very useful to improve the knowledge of the proton structure functions or, alternatively, try to estimate the luminosity from it.

  1. Alignment strategy for the LHCb vertex locator

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075236

    2007-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four main experiments of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, which will start at CERN in 2008. The experiment is primarily dedicated to B-Physics and hence requires precise vertex reconstruction. These requirements place strict constraints on the LHCb vertex locator (VELO) alignment. Additional challenges arise from the VELO being retracted between each fill of the LHC and from its unique circular disc R/$\\Phi$ strip geometry. This paper describes the software alignment procedure developed for the VELO, which is primarily based on a non-iterative method using a matrix inversion technique. The procedure is demonstrated with simulated events, and results obtained during runs in external test-beams are also presented.

  2. Matter-antimatter puzzle: LHCb improves resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, Fermilab’s DØ experiment reported a one percent difference in the properties of matter and antimatter in decays of B mesons (that is, particles containing beauty quarks) to muons. Saturday, at the ICHEP Conference in Melbourne, the LHCb experiment at CERN presents new results, which do not confirm this anomaly and are consistent with the Standard Model predictions. The same experiment has also presented the first evidence of asymmetry arising in other decays of the same family of mesons. The image becomes clearer but the puzzle has not yet been solved.   Inside the LHCb detector. The matter-antimatter imbalance in the Universe is a very hot topic in physics. The conundrum arises from the fact that, although objects made of antimatter are not observed in the Universe, theory predicts that matter and antimatter be created equally in particle interactions and in the Big Bang. Only small deviations from this very symmetric behaviour are incorporated in the theory. E...

  3. V0 particle production studies at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Knecht, M

    2009-01-01

    Although QCD is firmly established as the fundamental theory of strong interactions, the fragmentation process from partons into hadrons is still poorly understood. Phenomenological models tuned to Tevatron data show significant differences when extrapolated to LHC energies. The hadronization process can be probed at the LHC by studying V0 production, i.e. the production of KS mesons and Lambda hyperons. The LHCb experiment, with a rapidity range complementary to that of the other LHC detectors, offers a particularly interesting environment, covering the forward region where the existing models are very tunable but lack predictive power. The first 100 millions minimum bias events at LHCb will already provide a high-statistics and high-purity V0 sample. Measurements will include differential cross sections and production ratios for different strange particles as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum. The analysis can naturally be extended to cover heavier hyperons as well, and eventually lead, w...

  4. Heavy flavour production and spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258787

    2012-01-01

    At the Moriond QCD conference LHCb has presented results on heavy flavour production and spectroscopy. Here the latest results are discussed, which include the first observation and measurement of the branching fraction of the hadronic decay $B^+_e \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$, the mass measurement of the excited B mesons and the mass measurement of the $\\Xi_b$ and $\\Omega_b$ baryons.

  5. Charmless Hadronic Beauty Decays at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Timothy

    2017-10-01

    A summary of six LHCb results on the topic of charmless hadronic b-hadron decays is presented. These are comprised of: a search for the decay and updated branching fraction measurements of decays (h=K,π) [1]; the first observation of the decays and strong evidence for the decay [2]; the first observation of the decay [3]; a search for the decay [4]; the first observation of the decay [5] and evidence for CP-violation in decays [6].

  6. Digitizations and occupancies for tracking in LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Merk, M

    1998-01-01

    A flexible framework to test the performance of various detector techniques for tracking in LHCB has been developed and implemented in the SICB simulation program. In this framework, a detector response to traversing particles in B _B events is simulated. The calculations include a parametrization for efficiency and resolution for each channel. The chamber segmentation and granulation is governed by limits on drift time and hit multiplicities. The occupancy numbers for a final layout of stations are presented.1

  7. Enabling Real-Time Analysis at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Govorkova, Katya

    2017-01-01

    A new streaming strategy of the LHCb experiment includes the possibility to perform the physics analysis with candidates reconstructed in the trigger, thus bypassing the offline reconstruction. In the Turbo stream the trigger writes out a compact summary of physics objects containing all information necessary for analyses. This allows an increased output rate and thus higher average efficiencies. The Turbo stream was introduced in 2015 and has allowed for and expanded physics program in Run 2 of the LHC.

  8. LHCb celebrates completion of its beam pipe

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Members of the LHCb collaboration and of the AT and TS Departments are ready to pop open the champagne bottles and celebrate the complete installation and commissioning of the LHCb experiment’s beam pipe. Members of the LHCb collaboration and of the AT and TS Departments gather near the newly completed beam pipe in the foreground. All four sections of LHCb’s beam pipe have been installed, interconnected, pumped down and baked out.. Three of the conical tubes are made of beryllium in order to minimize the level of background in the experiment, while the fourth and largest section is composed of stainless steel. The first of the beryllium sections, an important connection to the Vertex Locator vacuum vessel (VELO) was installed in August 2006 (see Bulletin No. 37/2006). One of the more challenging tasks was the installation of the longest (6 m) piece of beryllium beam pipe through the 2.4 m long RICH2 detector in January 2006. Deli...

  9. Results on LHCb Data Challenge 06

    CERN Document Server

    Santinelli, R

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is the front end machine for the high-energy physics (HEP) and will start operating in 2007. The expected amount of data that will be produced and that has to be analyzed is unprecedented. LHCb, one of the large experiments at the LHC, moved toward grid technologies to cope with their requirements. The integration of the experiment specific computing framework into the underlying production grid has not been always effortless. Grid technologies represent the only way to deal with HEP today’s computing needs. The complexity of these new techniques brought the need of designing, for each experiment, a model for processing and analyzing the data. The 2006 data challenge – LHCb DC06 – is the latest of a series of big activities on the Grid and represents the final benchmark before the real data taking. Its goal is validating the computing model and the computing framework of LHCb but it is also the last opportunity for exercising the whole simulation chain on WLCG res...

  10. Optimization of the LHCb track reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Storaci, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb track reconstruction uses sophisticated pattern recognition algorithms to reconstruct trajectories of charged particles. Their main feature is the use of a Hough- transform like approach to connect track segments from different sub-detectors, allowing for having no tracking stations in the magnet of LHCb. While yielding a high efficiency, the track reconstruction is a major contributor to the overall timing budget of the software trigger of LHCb, and will continue to be so in the light of the higher track multiplicity expected from Run II of the LHC. In view of this fact, key parts of the pattern recognition have been revised and redesigned. In this document the main features which were studied are presented. A staged approach strategy for the track reconstruction in the software trigger was investigated: it allows unifying complementary sets of tracks coming from the different stages of the high level trigger, resulting in a more exible trigger strategy and a better overlap between online and offlin...

  11. New spokesperson for the LHCb collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Pierluigi Campana begins his 3-year tenure as LHCb spokesperson this June. As the new voice for the collaboration, Campana will lead the experiment through what should prove to be a very exciting phase.   Pierluigi Campana, from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Frascati, has been with the collaboration since 2000 and was heavily involved in the construction of the muon chamber of the LHCb detector. He replaces Andrei Golutvin, from Imperial College London and Russia’s Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics. “Leading such a large collaboration is not an easy task,” says Campana. While he will rely heavily upon the work of his predecessor, he plans on leaving his own mark on the position: “One of the main goals of my job will be to enhance the spirit of collaboration between the different institutes within our experiment.” LHCb plays a key role in the search for new physics. The experiment is conducting a very precise search...

  12. Monitoring the LHCb Experiment Computing Infrastructure with NAGIOS

    CERN Document Server

    Bonaccorsi, E

    2009-01-01

    LHCb has a large and complex infrastructure consisting of thousands of servers and embedded computers, hundreds of network devices and a lot of common infrastructure services such as shared storage, login and time services, databases and many others. All aspects that are operatively critic are integrated into the standard Experiment Control System (ECS) based on PVSSII. This enables non-expert operators to do first-line reactions. As the lower level and in particular for monitoring the infrastructure, the Control System itself depends on a secondary infrastructure, whose monitoring is based on NAGIOS. We present the design and implementation of the fabric management based on NAGIOS. Care has been taken to complement rather than duplicate functionality available in the Experiment Control System.

  13. LHCb: Measurement of the $\\gamma$ angle from tree decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Martín Sánchez, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    An overview of plans for the measurement of $\\gamma$ at the LHCb experiment will be shown. The $\\gamma$ angle is the parameter of the CKM unitary triangle that is known least well. The LHCb experiment at the CERN LHC aims to perform precision b-physics and CP violation measurements, including improving the knowledge of $\\gamma$. Focus will be put on methods where B mesons decay at the tree level, within the Standard Model framework. The early data recorded by the experiment, from $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, has allowed observations of the first signals of the B decay modes that will be used to perform this measurement.

  14. LHCb: A novel method for an absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb using beam-gas imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used van der Meer scan method (VDM). This poster presents the principles of the Beam Gas Imaging method used to measure the beam overlap integral. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch.

  15. Fabric management with disk-less servers and QUATTOR in LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, P.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Brarda, L.; Neufeld, N.

    2012-01-01

    At CERN LHCb experiment (Large Hadron Collider beauty), in order to reconstitute and filter events, a huge computing facility is required (currently about 1500 nodes). This computing farm, running SLC (Scientific Linux CERN), a Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) derivative, is net booted and managed using Quattor to allow easy maintenance. LHCb is also using around 500 disk-less Credit Card PCs (CCPCs) embedded in the front end electronic cards. To add flexibility to the disk-less nodes handling, we had the idea of using the file system union, which is usually used on Linux live media. The principle of the file system union is to join several file systems, at least one read-only (generally) and one read-write and use that union as a normal Linux file system. We have successfully tested this idea. The use of this new file system has helped to reveal some security vulnerability in the Linux kernel

  16. LHCb results on flavour physics and implications to BSM

    CERN Document Server

    Langenbruch, C

    2014-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC. Precision measurements of CP violation and the study of rare decays of hadrons containing beauty and charm quarks constitute powerful searches for New Physics. A selection of recent LHCb results and their implications to physics beyond the Standard Model are discussed.

  17. Simulation of LHCb RICH Detectors using GEANT4

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, I; Easo, S; Jones, C; Papanestis, A; Pokorski, W; Ranjard, F; Robbe, P

    2005-01-01

    LHCb is one of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It aims to make precision measurements of CP violation in the B-meson decays. The Detector simulation of LHCb was developed using the GEANT4 software toolkit interfaced to the LHCb software framework named GAUDI. This is now being used for a large production run of 210 million events. An important feature of the LHCb experiment is the use of Ring Imaging Cherenkov Counters (RICH) for particle identification. The Cherenkov photons created in this detector are focused onto an array of photodetectors made of Hybrid Photo- diodes. An brief overview of the GEANT4 based LHCb simulation program named GAUSS will be given with the main emphasis on RICH simulation and its verification.

  18. LHCb : Behaviour of Multi-anode Photomultipliers in Magnetic Fields for the LHCb RICH Upgrde

    CERN Multimedia

    Gambetta, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    A key feature of the LHCb upgrade, scheduled for 2019, is to remove the first level trigger and its data reduction from 40MHz to 1MHz, which is implemented in the on-detector readout electronics. The consequence for the LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors is that the Hybrid Photon Detectors need to be replaced as the readout chip is inside the detector vacuum. The baseline for replacement are Multianode Photomultiplier tubes (MaPMT) and new readout electronics. The MaPMTs will be located in the fringe field of the LHCb dipole magnet with residual fields up to 25 G. Therefore, their behaviour in magnetic fields is critical. Here we report about studies of the Hamamatsu models R11265 and H12700 in a magnetic field in an effort to qualify them for use in the LHCb RICH upgrade. Comparisons to the known model R7600 are also made. Measurements of the collection efficiency and gain were performed for all three space directions as a function of the magnetic field strength. In addition to measurements with ba...

  19. LHCb : Measuring $CP$ violation with $\\Delta A_{CP}$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Pearce, A

    2014-01-01

    Measurements are presented of direct $CP$ violation in $D^{0}$ meson decays in LHCb, using the $\\Delta A_{CP}$ technique, and a proposal is outlined to make similar measurements in the decays of the charmed baryon $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$. The motivations for use of the $\\Delta A_{CP}$ method are discussed, along with the current results and future prospects.

  20. LHCb: Statistical Comparison of CPU performance for LHCb applications on the Grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Graciani, R

    2009-01-01

    The usage of CPU resources by LHCb on the Grid id dominated by two different applications: Gauss and Brunel. Gauss the application doing the Monte Carlo simulation of proton-proton collisions. Brunel is the application responsible for the reconstruction of the signals recorded by the detector converting them into objects that can be used for later physics analysis of the data (tracks, clusters,…) Both applications are based on the Gaudi and LHCb software frameworks. Gauss uses Pythia and Geant as underlying libraries for the simulation of the collision and the later passage of the generated particles through the LHCb detector. While Brunel makes use of LHCb specific code to process the data from each sub-detector. Both applications are CPU bound. Large Monte Carlo productions or data reconstructions running on the Grid are an ideal benchmark to compare the performance of the different CPU models for each case. Since the processed events are only statistically comparable, only statistical comparison of the...

  1. Prompt physics analysis from the trigger candidates at LHCb: strategy and new dedicated "TURBO" and PID calibration streams

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00038235

    2016-01-01

    During the first long shutdown of the LHC (2013-2014), the LHCb detector remained essentially unchanged, while the trigger system has been completely revised. Upgrades to the LHCb computing infrastructure have allowed for high quality decay information to be calculated by the software trigger, making separate offline event reconstruction unnecessary. The storage space of the triggered candidate is an order of magnitude smaller than the entire raw event that would otherwise need to be persisted. An application has been designed to process the information calculated by the trigger, with the resulting output used to directly perform physics measurements. Reaching the ultimate precision of the LHCb experiment in real time as the data arrive has the power to transform the experimental approach to processing large quantities of data.

  2. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Hughes, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition systems (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis development and deployment.

  3. GANGA: a user-Grid interface for Atlas and LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, K; Mato, P; Soroko, A; Tan, C L; Tull, C E; Brook, N; Jones, R W L

    2003-01-01

    The Gaudi/Athena and Grid Alliance (GANGA) is a front-end for the configuration, submission, monitoring, bookkeeping, output collection, and reporting of computing jobs run on a local batch system or on the grid. In particular, GANGA handles jobs that use applications written for the Gaudi software framework shared by the Atlas and LHCb experiments. GANGA exploits the commonality of Gaudi-based computing jobs, while insulating against grid-, batch- and framework-specific technicalities, to maximize end-user productivity in defining, configuring, and executing jobs. Designed for a python-based component architecture, GANGA has a modular underpinning and is therefore well placed for contributing to, and benefiting from, work in related projects. Its functionality is accessible both from a scriptable command-line interface, for expert users and automated tasks, and through a graphical interface, which simplifies the interaction with GANGA for beginning and c1asual users. This paper presents the GANGA design and ...

  4. Silicon photomultiplier arrays for the LHCb scintillating fibre tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Girard, Olivier Goran; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Stramaglia, Maria Elena

    2017-01-01

    For the LHCb detector upgrade in 2019, a large scale scintillating fibre tracker read out with silicon photomultipliers is under construction. The harsh radiation environment (neutron and ionising radiation), the 40MHz read-out rate of the trigger less system and the large detector surface of 320m2 impose many challenges. We present the results from lab tests with 1MeV electrons and from the SPS test facility at CERN for the mulitchannel SiPM array that combines peak photo-detection efficiency of 48% and extremely low correlated noise. The measurements were performed with detectors irradiated with neutrons up to a fluence of 12*1011 neq/cm2 and single photon detection was maintained. First results of the characterization of the pre-series of 500 detectors delivered by Hamamatsu and irradiation studies on a large sample will be included.

  5. DIRAC - The Distributed MC Production and Analysis for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2004-01-01

    DIRAC is the LHCb distributed computing grid infrastructure for MC production and analysis. Its architecture is based on a set of distributed collaborating services. The service decomposition broadly follows the ARDA project proposal, allowing for the possibility of interchanging the EGEE/ARDA and DIRAC components in the future. Some components developed outside the DIRAC project are already in use as services, for example the File Catalog developed by the AliEn project. An overview of the DIRAC architecture will be given, in particular the recent developments to support user analysis. The main design choices will be presented. One of the main design goals of DIRAC is the simplicity of installation, configuring and operation of various services. This allows all the DIRAC resources to be easily managed by a single Production Manager. The modular design of the DIRAC components allows its functionality to be easily extended to include new computing and storage elements or to handle new tasks. The DIRAC system al...

  6. New results on exotic baryon resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Observation of exotic resonant structures decaying into $J/\\psi p$ found in the LHCb experiment is discussed. Examination of the $J/\\psi p$ system in $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\to J/\\psi K^{-} p$ decays shows two states, each of which must be composed of at least $c \\bar{c} uud$ quarks, and are thus consistent with pentaquarks. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. Their masses are ($4 380 \\pm 8 \\pm 29$) MeV and ($4 449.8 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 2.5$) MeV, and their corresponding widths are ($205 \\pm 18 \\pm 86$) MeV, and ($39 \\pm 5 \\pm 19$) MeV. The preferred $J^{P}$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  7. Jagiellonian University Study of LHCb pentaquarks with CLAS12

    CERN Document Server

    Celentano, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The experimental study of the $J/\\psi$ photoproduction near threshold is an attractive subject for studying the nucleon gluonic form-factor and, as has been shown recently, is a direct way to produce and study hidden-charm pentaquark states claimed by the LHCb, $P_{c}(4380)$ and $P_{c}(4450)$. The CLAS12 experiment in Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory has developed a program to measure near-threshold $J/\\psi$ photoproduction using the low-$Q^2$ electroproduction technique. Given the foreseen resolution in the invariant mass of the $p-J/\\psi$ system and the expected production rate for the pentaquark states, the experiment will be able to unambiguously confirm the existence of these states, measure the corresponding line-shape, and determine their quantum numbers.

  8. Test beam results of LHCb scintillating fibre tracker prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachmann, Sebastian; Comerma, Albert; Gerick, David; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Kecke, Matthieu; Leverington, Blake; Mazorra de Cos, Jose; Mitzel, Dominik; Neuner, Max; Uwer, Ulrich; Han, Xiaoxue [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    During the Long Shutdown 2 of the LHC, the LHCb detector will undergo a major upgrade to meet the challenges of running at a higher luminosity. The current Inner and Outer Tracking system will not be sufficient to deal with the envisaged increased detector occupancy and higher radiation levels and will be replaced by a single tracking detector based on 0.250 mm diameter plastic scintillating fibres. The fibres are wound to multilayer ribbons 2.4 m long and read out by 128 channel silicon photomultiplier arrays. The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) tracker will cover a total active area of 360 m{sup 2}, arranged in 12 layers. The performances of prototype modules having 6 and 8 layers of fibre have been tested at the SPS at CERN. This talk focuses on basic properties of the prototype modules such as spatial resolution, single hit efficiency and light yield measured during the test beam campaigns in 2015.

  9. The silicon vertex locator for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Head, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a triggerless system being read out at 40 MHz. The upgraded silicon vertex detector (VELO) must be light weight, radiation hard, and compatible with LHC vacuum requirements. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition, fast track reconstruction and high precision vertexing. This challenge is being met with a new VELO design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The detector will be shielded from the beam by a View the MathML source~300μm thick aluminium foil. Evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in micro-channels embedded in a thin silicon substrate will be used for cooling.

  10. Searches for baryons with multiple heavy quarks at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Hadrons are systems bound by the strong interaction, which is described at the fundamental level by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). While QCD is well understood at high energy in the perturbative regime, low-energy phenomena, such as the binding of quarks and gluons within hadrons, are more difficult to predict. High precision measurements are then of paramount importance to test the reliability of several models and computational techniques, such as constituent-quark models or lattice-QCD calculations, in predicting the mass spectrum and the properties of hadrons. Owing to its excellent capabilities with particle identification, tracking and vertex reconstruction, LHCb is in a unique position to make significant contributions to the sector of particle spectroscopy. For example, five narrow structures have been recently observed in the $\\Xi_c^+K^-$ mass spectrum, consistent with excited $\\Omega_c^{0}$ states, composed of a charm quark and two strange quarks. Despite the fact that the quark model predicts the ex...

  11. Latest results on b-hadron spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Hadrons are systems bound by the strong interaction, which is described at the fundamental level by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). While QCD is well understood at high energy in the perturbative regime, low-energy phenomena such as the binding of quarks and gluons within hadrons are more difficult to predict. High precision measurements are most useful to test the reliability of several models and techniques, such as constituent-quark models or lattice-QCD calculations, into predicting the mass spectrum and the properties of the hadrons. Using 3.0/fb of integrated luminosity recorded by the LHCb experiment, we report precise measurements of the B1(5721){0,+} and B2*(5747){0,+} states and the observation of B{+,0} pi{-,+} mass structures. The observations of two new Xib baryons are presented as well.

  12. Machine learning based global particle indentification algorithms at LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Derkach, Denis; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Aleksei; Ratnikov, Fedor

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important aspects of data processing at LHC experiments is the particle identification (PID) algorithm. In LHCb, several different sub-detector systems provide PID information: the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector, the hadronic and electromagnetic calorimeters, and the muon chambers. To improve charged particle identification, several neural networks including a deep architecture and gradient boosting have been applied to data. These new approaches provide higher identification efficiencies than existing implementations for all charged particle types. It is also necessary to achieve a flat dependency between efficiencies and spectator variables such as particle momentum, in order to reduce systematic uncertainties during later stages of data analysis. For this purpose, "flat” algorithms that guarantee the flatness property for efficiencies have also been developed. This talk presents this new approach based on machine learning and its performance.

  13. A History-based Estimation for LHCb job requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschmayr, Nathalie

    2015-12-01

    The main goal of a Workload Management System (WMS) is to find and allocate resources for the given tasks. The more and better job information the WMS receives, the easier will be to accomplish its task, which directly translates into higher utilization of resources. Traditionally, the information associated with each job, like expected runtime, is defined beforehand by the Production Manager in best case and fixed arbitrary values by default. In the case of LHCb's Workload Management System no mechanisms are provided which automate the estimation of job requirements. As a result, much more CPU time is normally requested than actually needed. Particularly, in the context of multicore jobs this presents a major problem, since single- and multicore jobs shall share the same resources. Consequently, grid sites need to rely on estimations given by the VOs in order to not decrease the utilization of their worker nodes when making multicore job slots available. The main reason for going to multicore jobs is the reduction of the overall memory footprint. Therefore, it also needs to be studied how memory consumption of jobs can be estimated. A detailed workload analysis of past LHCb jobs is presented. It includes a study of job features and their correlation with runtime and memory consumption. Following the features, a supervised learning algorithm is developed based on a history based prediction. The aim is to learn over time how jobs’ runtime and memory evolve influenced due to changes in experiment conditions and software versions. It will be shown that estimation can be notably improved if experiment conditions are taken into account.

  14. Operation and performance of the LHCb calorimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chefdeville, M.

    2018-03-01

    The LHCb calorimeters play a key role in the hardware trigger of the experiment. They also serve the measurement of radiative heavy flavor decays and the identification of electrons. Located at twelve meters from the interaction region, they are composed of a plane of scintillating tiles, a preshower detector, an electromagnetic and a hadronic sampling calorimeters using scintillators as active elements. In these proceedings, technical and operational aspects of these detectors are described. Emphasis is then put on calorimeter reconstruction and calibration. Finally, performance for benchmark physics modes are briefly reported.

  15. Luminosity Measurements at LHCb for Run II

    CERN Multimedia

    Coombs, George

    2018-01-01

    A precise measurement of the luminosity is a necessary component of many physics analyses, especially cross-section measurements. At LHCb two different direct measurement methods are used to determine the luminosity: the “van der Meer scan” (VDM) and the “Beam Gas Imaging” (BGI) methods. A combined result from these two methods gave a precision of less than 2% for Run I and efforts are ongoing to provide a similar result for Run II. Fixed target luminosity is determined with an indirect method based on the single electron scattering cross-section.

  16. A GPU offloading mechanism for LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalov, Alexey; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Zvyagin, Alexander; Neufeld, Niko; Vilasis Cardona, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    The current computational infrastructure at LHCb is designed for sequential execution. It is possible to make use of modern multi-core machines by using multi-threaded algorithms and running multiple instances in parallel, but there is no way to make efficient use of specialized massively parallel hardware, such as graphical processing units and Intel Xeon/Phi. We extend the current infrastructure with an out-of-process computational server able to gather data from multiple instances and process them in large batches.

  17. Tests of lepton flavour universality at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lupato, Anna

    2018-01-01

    In the Standard Model the electroweak coupling of the gauge bosons to leptons is independent of the lepton flavour. Semileptonic and rare decays of b quarks provide an ideal laboratory to test this property. Any violation of Lepton Flavour Universality would be a clear sign of physics beyond the Standard Model. In this work a review of the Lepton Flavour Universality tests performed using data collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 at a centre of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV is presented.

  18. Searches for lepton flavour violation at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Charged lepton flavour is conserved within the Standard Model (SM) up to exceedingly small rates of about $10^{-50}$. This makes charged lepton flavour violation (cLFV) a very interesting place to look for hints of New Physics (NP). In fact, many NP scenarios predict cLFV to occur at rates within the reach of the experiments. Finding these transitions would mean a definite departure from the SM, while not finding them narrows the NP phase space. In this seminar, the latest LHCb results in the cLFV sector will be presented, and their implications for NP scenarios discussed.

  19. Rare B meson decays searches with LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Hernando, José A

    2012-01-01

    A search for the very rare decays B,-+ µ+ µ-and B0-+ µ + µ-has been performed using 1.0 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp collisions at ys = 7 TeV collected by the LHCb experiment at LHC during the year 2011. Stringent limits has been imposed on the upper branching fractions: B(B-+ µ-+ µ-) < 4.5 (3.8) x 10-9 and B(B0-+ µ + µ-) < 1.0 (0.81) x 10-9 at 953 (903) confidence level.

  20. Optimizing the Stripping Procedure for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment faces a major challenge from the large amounts of data received while the LHC is running. The ability to sort this information in a useful manner is important for working groups to perform physics analyses. Both hardware and software triggers are used to decrease the data rate and then the stripping process is used to sort the data into streams and further into stripping lines. This project studies the hundreds of stripping lines to look for overlaps between them in order to make the stripping process more efficient.

  1. Fixed-target physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Maurice, Emilie Amandine

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has the unique possibility, among the LHC experiments, to be operated in fixed target mode, using its internal gas target SMOG. The energy scale achievable at the LHC and the excellent detector capabilities for vertexing, tracking and particle identification allow a wealth of measurements of great interest for cosmic ray and heavy ions physics. We report the first measurements made in this configuration: the measurement of antiproton production in proton-helium collisions and the measurements of open and hidden charm production in proton-argon collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\textrm{NN}} =$ 110 GeV.

  2. LHCb: Measuring B to mu mu K

    CERN Multimedia

    De Cian, M

    2009-01-01

    The Flavour Changing Neutral Current decay B to mu mu K, which only occurs via loop processes in the SM, is sensitive to contributions from a variety of possible new physics sources. LHCb, the dedicated b physics experiment at the LHC, will record an unprecedented number of B to mu mu K decays, allowing precision measurements of a large number of variables, which will provide evidence or place constraints for physics beyond the SM. This poster gives a short overview of the detector, introduces some of these variables and presents a selection for B to mu mu K.

  3. The future of RICH detectors through the light of the LHCb RICH

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, C.; LHCb RICH Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The limitations in performance of the present RICH system in the LHCb experiment are given by the natural chromatic dispersion of the gaseous Cherenkov radiator, the aberrations of the optical system and the pixel size of the photon detectors. Moreover, the overall PID performance can be affected by high detector occupancy as the pattern recognition becomes more difficult with high particle multiplicities. This paper shows a way to improve performance by systematically addressing each of the previously mentioned limitations. These ideas are applied in the present and future upgrade phases of the LHCb experiment. Although applied to specific circumstances, they are used as a paradigm on what is achievable in the development and realisation of high precision RICH detectors.

  4. Event building in an intelligent network interface card for the LHCb readout network

    CERN Document Server

    Dufey, J P; Neufeld, N; Zuin, M

    2001-01-01

    LHCb is an experiment being constructed at CERN's LHC accelerator for the purpose of studying precisely the CP violation parameters in the B-B system. Triggering poses special problems since the interesting events containing B-mesons are immersed in a large background of inelastic p-p reactions. Therefore, a 4 Level Triggering scheme (Level 0 to Level 3) has been implemented. Powerful embedded processors, used in modern intelligent Network Interface Cards (smart NICs), make it attractive to use them to handle the event building protocol in the high-speed data acquisition system of the LHCb experiment. The implementation of an event building algorithm developed for a specific Gigabit Ethernet NIC is presented and performance data are discussed. 5 Refs.

  5. Automated Grid Monitoring for the LHCb Experiment Through HammerCloud

    CERN Document Server

    Dice, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The HammerCloud system is used by CERN IT to monitor the status of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG). HammerCloud automatically submits jobs to WLCG computing resources, closely replicating the workflow of Grid users (e.g. physicists analyzing data). This allows computation nodes and storage resources to be monitored, software to be tested (somewhat like continuous integration), and new sites to be stress tested with a heavy job load before commissioning. The HammerCloud system has been in use for ATLAS and CMS experiments for about five years. This summer's work involved porting the HammerCloud suite of tools to the LHCb experiment. The HammerCloud software runs functional tests and provides data visualizations. HammerCloud's LHCb variant is written in Python, using the Django web framework and Ganga/DIRAC for job management.

  6. Systematic profiling to monitor and specify the software refactoring process of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, Ben; Lohn, Stefan B

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb upgrade program implies a significant increase in data processing that will not be matched by additional computing resources. Furthermore, new architectures such as many-core platforms can currently not be fully exploited due to memory and I/O bandwidth limitations. A considerable refactoring effort will therefore be needed to vectorize and parallelize the LHCb software, to minimize hotspots and to reduce the impact of bottlenecks. It is crucial to guide refactoring with a profiling system that gives hints to regions in source-code for possible and necessary re-engineering and which kind of optimization could lead to final success. Software optimization is a sophisticated process where all parts, compiler, operating system, external libraries and chosen hardware play a role. Intended improvements can have different effects on different platforms. To obtain precise information of the general performance, to make profiles comparable, reproducible and to verify the progress of performance in the framewo...

  7. arXiv The Future of RICH Detectors through the Light of the LHCb RICH

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C.; Easo, S.; Petrolini, A.; Ullaland, O.

    2017-12-21

    The limitations in performance of the present RICH system in the LHCb experiment are given by the natural chromatic dispersion of the gaseous Cherenkov radiator, the aberrations of the optical system and the pixel size of the photon detectors. Moreover, the overall PID performance can be affected by high detector occupancy as the pattern recognition becomes more difficult with high particle multiplicities. This paper shows a way to improve performance by systematically addressing each of the previously mentioned limitations. These ideas are applied in the present and future upgrade phases of the LHCb experiment. Although applied to specific circumstances, they are used as a paradigm on what is achievable in the development and realisation of high precision RICH detectors.

  8. A Beowulf-class computing cluster for the Monte Carlo production of the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Avoni, G; Bertin, A; Bruschi, M; Capponi, M; Carbone, A; Collamati, A; De Castro, S; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Faccioli, P; Galli, D; Giacobbe, B; Lax, I; Marconi, U; Massa, I; Piccinini, M; Poli, M; Semprini-Cesari, N; Spighi, R; Vagnoni, V M; Vecchi, S; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Zoccoli, A

    2003-01-01

    The computing cluster built at Bologna to provide the LHCb Collaboration with a powerful Monte Carlo production tool is presented. It is a performance oriented Beowulf-class cluster, made of rack mounted commodity components, designed to minimize operational support requirements and to provide full and continuous availability of the computing resources. In this paper we describe the architecture of the cluster, and discuss the technical solutions adopted for each specialized sub-system.

  9. LHCb : measurement of CP violation in B decays Conference MT17

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the LHCb experiment is to fully investigate CP violation in the B d and B s systems, and to possibly reveal new physics beyond the Standard model. The key detector requirements are: - efficient trigger for many B-decay topologies - excellent particle identification for pi -K separation in a wide momentum range - good decay-time resolution in particular to resolve fast B s oscillations - good mass resolution to efficiently suppress background European Organization for Nuclear Research

  10. $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow D_{s}^{+(*)} D_{s}^{-(*)}$ decays in LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Pritchard, A

    2014-01-01

    The decay of a $B_{s}^{0}$ meson to two oppositely charged $D_{s}$ mesons is one that is postulated to be almost exclusively CP even. Measuring the properties of this decay can therefore give important information about the behaviour of the $B_{s}^{0}$ system. This poster presents two of these measurements, made by LHCb, using data from run 1 of the LHC.

  11. Letter of Intent for the LHCb Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    LHCb Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of LHCb is to measure the effects of new particles or forces beyond the Standard Model. Results obtained from data collected in 2010 show that the detector is robust and functioning well. While LHCb will be able to measure a host of interesting channels in heavy flavour decays in the upcoming few years, a limit of about 1 fb−1 of data per year cannot be overcome without upgrading the detector. The LHC machine does not face such a limitation. With the upgraded detector, read out at 40MHz, a much more flexible software-based triggering strategy will allow a large increase not only in data rate, as the detector would collect 5 fb−1 per year, but also the ability to increase trigger efficiencies especially in decays to hadronic final states. In addition, it will be possible to change triggers to explore different physics as LHC discoveries point us to the most interesting channels. Our physics scope extends beyond that of flavour. Possibilities for interesting discoveries exist over a whole v...

  12. Performance of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    CERN Document Server

    van Beuzekom, Martin

    2012-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study new physics in the decays of beauty and charm hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The beauty and charm hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO), and hence the detector is essential for both the trigger and physics analyses. The VELO is the silicon micro- strip detector surrounding the LHCb interaction point, and is located only 8 mm from the LHC beam during normal operation. It consists of two retractable detector halves with 21 silicon micro-strip tracking modules each and is moved into position for each fill of the LHC, once stable beams are obtained. The detector operates in an extreme and highly non-uniform radiation environment, and the effects of surface and bulk radiation damage have already been measured. The VELO has been successfully operated for the first LHC physics run. Operational results show a signal to noise ratio of > 17 and a cluster finding efficiency of 99.5%. The small pitch a...

  13. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Johannes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rare heavy flavor decays are an ideal place to search for the effects of potential new particles that modify the decay rates or the Lorentz structure of the decay vertices. The LHCb experiment, a dedicated heavy flavour experiment at the LHC at CERN. It has recorded the worlds largest sample of heavy meson and lepton decays. The status of the rare decay analyses with 1 fb−1 of √s = 7 TeV and 1.1 fb−1 of √s = 8 TeV of pp–collisions collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011 and 2012 is reviewed. The worlds most precise measurements of the angular structure of B0 → K*0μ+μ− and B+ → K+μ+μ− decays is discussed, as well as the isospin asymmetry measurement in B → K(*μ+μ− decays. The first evidence for the very rare decay Bs0 → µ+µ− is presented together with the most stringent upper exclusion limits on the branching fraction of decays of B0, D0 and Ks0 mesons into two muons. This note finishes with the discussion of searches for lepton number and lepton flavor violating τ decays.

  14. Rare beauty and charm decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00261996

    2012-01-01

    New results are presented using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of $∼ 1 fb^{−1}$ collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. The B → $µ^+ µ^−$ and $D^0 → µ^+ µ^−$ results have been presented at a previous conference. The angular distributions and (partial) branching fractions of selected radiative penguin decays are studied using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of ∼ 1$fb^{−1}$ collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. The partial branching fraction and theoretically clean observables of the decay $B^0 → K^{∗0} µ^+ µ^−$ have been extracted as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The partial branching fraction of the decay $B^0_s$ → $φµ^+ µ^−$ has also been extracted as a function of the dimuon invariant mass. The branching fraction and first observation of the decay $B^+$ → $π^+ µ^+ µ^−$ is reported. New limits were set on the decay $B → µ^+ µ^− µ^+ µ^−$. Improved limits on the decays $B → µ^+ µ^−$ and $D^0 → µ^+ µ^−$ are...

  15. A facility for long term evaluation and quality assurance of LHCb Vertex Detector modules

    CERN Document Server

    Marinho, F; Dimattia, R; Doherty, F; Dumps, R; Gersabeck, M; Melone, J; Parkes, C; Saavedra, A; Tobin, M

    2007-01-01

    This note describes the facility developed for long term evaluation and quality assurance of the LHCb Vertex Detector modules, known as the 'Glasgow Burn-in System'. This facility was developed to ensure that the modules conform to stringent quality levels. The system was able to uncover any weaknesses that could be introduced during the manufacturing and assembly of the components or during the transport of the modules to CERN. The system consisted of: a high resolution microscope for visual inspections; and a burn-in system to operate cooled modules in vacuum. The main components of the burn-in system were a vacuum system, a cooling system and a DAQ system.

  16. Searching for new spin-0 resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Haisch, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    We study the phenomenology of light spin-0 particles and stress that they can be efficiently searched for at the LHCb experiment in the form of dimuon resonances. Given the large production cross sections in the forward rapidity region together with the efficient triggering and excellent mass resolution, it is argued that LHCb can provide unique sensitivity to such states. We illustrate our proposal using the recent measurement of Upsilon production by LHCb, emphasising the importance of mixing effects in the bottomonium resonance region. The implications for dimuon decays of spin-0 bottomonium states are also briefly discussed.

  17. Probing new top physics at the LHCb experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Alexander L; Kamenik, Jernej F; Perez, Gilad; Stone, Sheldon

    2011-08-19

    We suggest that top quark physics can be studied at the LHCb experiment and that top quark production could be observed. Since LHCb covers a large pseudorapidity region in the forward direction, it has unique abilities to probe new physics in the top quark sector. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LHCb may be able to measure a t ̄t production rate asymmetry and, thus, indirectly probe an anomalous forward-backward t ̄t asymmetry in the forward region, a possibility suggested by the enhanced forward-backward asymmetry reported by the CDF experiment. © 2011 American Physical Society

  18. Monitoring performance of a highly distributed and complex computing infrastructure in LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathe, Z.; Haen, C.; Stagni, F.

    2017-10-01

    In order to ensure an optimal performance of the LHCb Distributed Computing, based on LHCbDIRAC, it is necessary to be able to inspect the behavior over time of many components: firstly the agents and services on which the infrastructure is built, but also all the computing tasks and data transfers that are managed by this infrastructure. This consists of recording and then analyzing time series of a large number of observables, for which the usage of SQL relational databases is far from optimal. Therefore within DIRAC we have been studying novel possibilities based on NoSQL databases (ElasticSearch, OpenTSDB and InfluxDB) as a result of this study we developed a new monitoring system based on ElasticSearch. It has been deployed on the LHCb Distributed Computing infrastructure for which it collects data from all the components (agents, services, jobs) and allows creating reports through Kibana and a web user interface, which is based on the DIRAC web framework. In this paper we describe this new implementation of the DIRAC monitoring system. We give details on the ElasticSearch implementation within the DIRAC general framework, as well as an overview of the advantages of the pipeline aggregation used for creating a dynamic bucketing of the time series. We present the advantages of using the ElasticSearch DSL high-level library for creating and running queries. Finally we shall present the performances of that system.

  19. Real time analysis with the upgraded LHCb trigger in Run-III

    CERN Multimedia

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The current LHCb trigger system consists of a hardware level, which reduces the LHC bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to 1 MHz, a rate at which the entire detector is read out. A second level, implemented in a farm of around 20k parallel processing CPUs, the event rate is reduced to around 12.5 kHz. The LHCb experiment plans a major upgrade of the detector and DAQ system in the LHC long shutdown II (2018-2019 ). In this upgrade, a purely software based trigger system is being developed and it will have to process the full 30 MHz of bunch crossings with inelastic collisions. LHCb will also receive a factor of 5 increase in the instantaneous luminosity, which further contributes to the challenge of reconstructing and selecting events in real time with the CPU farm. We discuss the plans and progress towards achieving efficient reconstruction and selection with a 30 MHz throughput. Another challenge is to exploit the increased signal rate that results from removing the 1 MHz readout bottleneck, combined with the high...

  20. The energy policy turnaround. Designing the new system; Die Energiewende. Das neue System gestalten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, Stephan; Matsoukas, Stella [Deutsche Energie-Agentur GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Diermann, Ralph [Redaktionsbuero fuer Energie und Cleantech, Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The contribution under consideration describes the German energy system in the year 2050 as climatic friendly, secure and economic. The German Energy Agency (Berlin, Federal Republic of Germany) sketches the development to this target.

  1. Measurements of the $C\\!P$-violating phase $\\phi_{s}$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Batozskaya, Varvara

    2018-01-01

    The measurement of the mixing-induced $C\\!P$-violating phase $\\phi_{s}$ in the $B^{0}_{s}-\\bar{B}^{0}_{s}$ system is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment. It has been measured at the LHCb collaboration exploiting the Run~I data set and using several decay channels. In particular, the most recent Run~I result has been obtained analyzing $B^{0}_{s}\\to J/\\psi K^{+}K^{-}$ candidates in the mass region above the $\\phi(1020)$ resonance. Despite the large improvements in the sensitivity of $\\phi_{s}$ during the last decade, the precision is still limited by the available statistics.

  2. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Haisch, Ulrich; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and antiquarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which are provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the b b ¯ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of √{s }=13 TeV . We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the b b ¯ and c c ¯ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  3. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Gauld, Rhorry; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and anti-quarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed-order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which is provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the $b \\bar b$ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 13 \\, {\\rm TeV}$. We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the $b \\bar b$ and $c \\bar c$ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  4. Performance of the LHCb RICH Photon Detectors and Tagging Systematics for CP Violation Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Somerville, L P; Harnew, N

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, currently under construction at CERN, is designed to perform high precision CP violation measurements in the B-meson system. Two Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors provide charged particle identification, and these utilise the novel pixel Hybrid Photon Detectors (HPDs) to detect the Cherenkov photons. A programme was designed and implemented to ensure quality control at each stage of the photon detector production process. A detailed study of the HPD anodes was carried out, including accelerated ageing tests required to demonstrate their robustness over the lifetime of the LHCb experiment. A RICH demonstrator detector with an aerogel radiator was tested in a particle beam and the data were analysed to determine the Cherenkov angle resolution and photon yield. The results were compared with expectations for the detector, taken from a Monte Carlo simulation. The tagging of neutral B mesons, to find their flavour at production, is essential for many CP asymmetry measurements. Biases in ...

  5. Measurements of the $CP$ violating phase $\\phi_s$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Wang, Mengzhen

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of the mixing-induced CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$ in the Bs-Bsbar system is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment. It has been measured at LHCb exploiting the Run I data set and using several decay channels. The poster shows the most recent results obtained analyzing $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ candidates in the mass region above the $\\phi(1020)$ resonance. The poster also shows previous measurements obtained analyzing the golden channel, $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ in $\\phi(1020)$ region, and $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ \\pi^-$. Finally, a combination of those studies is presented.

  6. LHCb: Detector Module Design, Construction and Performance for the LHCb SciFi Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Ekelhof, R

    2014-01-01

    The Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker for the LHCb Upgrade (CERN/LHCC 2014-001; LHCb TDR 15) is based on 2.5 m long multi-layered ribbons from 10,000 km of scintillating fibre over 12 planes covering 350 m2. The planes are separated into modular detectors, each with cooled silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays for photo-readout. In this talk, we will present the construction and performance of this novel detector, including the intricacies of scintillating fibre ribbon production, constructing precision detector planes with a rigid and light module design, and the integration of the readout components for this detector. The complexities and issues regarding this active part of the SciFi Tracker will be emphasised along with the current solutions and measured performances.

  7. LHCb - A SciFi production center in NRC KI FOR LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Shevchenko, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The Scintillating Fiber Tracker, SciFi for short, will be the main new tracking detector in LHCb. It will provide better than 100 µm spatial resolution, and high rate capability and radiation hardness enabling a fast, 40 MHz, trigger rate with a capability to withstand 50 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity, delivered by LHC, without a major performance degradation. The main active element of the tracker is a scintillating fiber ribbon with the SiPM readout. The ribbons consist of 6 layers of the 250 µm scintillating fibers Kuraray SCSF-78MJ, assembled by winding and bound together by the epoxy glue. NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, together with the colleagues from ITEP, CERN, TU of Dortmund and RWTH of Aachen are developing dedicated production centers with the aim to reach by 2016 production rate one ribbon per day per center, necessary to supply more than 1300 fibre ribbons (mats) needed for the new LHCb tracker.

  8. Production and Quality Assurance of Detector Modules for the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Volyanskyy, D; Agari, M; Bauer, C; Blouw, J; Hofmann, W; Löchner, S; Maciuc, F; Schmelling, M; Smale, N; Schwingenheuer, B; Voss, H; Borysova, M; Ohrimenko, O; Pugatch, V; Yakovenko, V; Bay, A; Bettler, M O; Fauland, P; Frei, R; Nicolas, L; Knecht, M; Perrin, A; Schneider, O; Tran, M T; Van Hunen, J; Vervink, K; Adeva, B; Esperante-Pereira, D; Gallas, A; Fungueirino-Pazos, J L; Lois, C; Pazos-Alvarez, A; Pérez-Trigo, E; Pló-Casasus, M; Vázquez, P; Bernhard, R P; Bernet, R; Gassner, J; Köstner, S; Lehner, F; Needham, M; Sakhelashvili, T; Steiner, S; Straumann, U; Van Tilburg, J; Vollhardt, A; Wenger, A

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, which is currently under construction at the Large Hadron Collider~(CERN, Geneva), is designed to study $CP$ violation and find rare decays in the $B$ meson system. To achieve the physics goals the LHCb detector must have excellent tracking performance. An important element of the LHCb tracking system is the Silicon Tracker, which covers a sensitive surface of about 12~m$^2$ with silicon microstrip detectors and includes about 272k readout channels. It uses up to 132~cm long detector modules with readout strips of up to 38~cm in length and up to 57~cm long Kapton interconnects in between sensors and readout hybrids. The production of detector modules has been completed recently and the detector is currently under installation. A rigorous quality assurance programme has been performed to ensure that the detector modules meet the mechanical and electrical requirements and study their various characteristics. In this paper, the detector design, the module production steps, and the module qua...

  9. Physics at 13 TeV: LHCb - a new data-processing strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    Originally, the LHCb detector was designed for operation with moderate luminosity and low pile-up. However, in 2010, the collaboration opted for “luminosity levelling”, a novel solution which allows the experiment to adapt automatically to normal variations in luminosity which occur during an LHC run.   In this way, the detector operates optimally at all times. “For the second LHC run, we will have to redefine the luminosity, to adapt to the conditions at the new energy of 13 TeV,” explains Patrick Koppenburg, physics coordinator of the LHCb collaboration. “However, the most important experimental challenge for us will be the new trigger system.” The trigger rapidly sorts the most interesting data from the data that can be discarded without a significant loss of information. The zero-level (i.e. the first level) trigger system of LHCb “only” lets through one sixteenth of the initial data, but even that is too muc...

  10. LHCb: Measurement of $J/\\psi$ production cross-section at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Zhang, Y

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the $J/\\psi$ production cross-section with the LHCb detector is presented. The cross-section is measured as a function of the $J/\\psi$ transverse momentum and rapidity, in the forward region. Contributions from prompt $J/\\psi$ and $J/\\psi$ from $b$ are measured separately. Prospects for measurements of the $J/\\psi$ polarisation with a full angular analysis are also shown.

  11. LHCb: First observation of $B^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu -$ with LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Ciezarek, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    A search for the decay $B^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ is presented using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data integrated luminosity collected with the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider during 2011. This decay is observed for the first time with 5.2 $\\sigma$ significance, at a branching fraction BR$(B^+ \\to \\pi^+ \\mu^+ \\mu^-) = (2.4 \\pm 0.6 \\rm{(stat)} \\pm 0.2 \\rm{(syst)}) \\times 10^{-8}$.

  12. LHCb: Measuring $CP$ Violation in $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$ Decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Pearce, A

    2013-01-01

    An ongoing analysis of a measurement of CP violation in decays of the charmed baryon $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$, using the full $3\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of data collected by LHCb in 2011 and 2012, is presented. The detection asymmetry of the final states is considered, leading to the use of the narrow $p\\phi$ and $pK_{s}^{0}$ resonances in the $pK^{+}K^{-}$ and $p\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ phase spaces, respectively.

  13. B P Das

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science. B P Das. Articles written in Bulletin of Materials Science. Volume 25 Issue 6 November 2002 pp 517-519. Structural, dielectric and electrical properties of Sm-modified Pb(SnTi)O3 ferroelectric system · B P Das R N P Choudhary P K Mahapatra · More Details Abstract Fulltext ...

  14. Hadron Spectroscopy, exotics and $B_c^+$ physics at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00266843

    2016-12-09

    The LHCb experiment is designed to study properties and decays of heavy flavored hadrons produced from $pp$ collisions at the LHC. During Run~1, it has recorded the world's largest data sample of beauty and charm hadrons, enabling precision spectroscopy studies of such particles. Several important results obtained by LHCb, such as the discovery of the first pentaquark states and the first unambiguous determination of the $Z_c(4430)^-$ as an exotic state, have dramatically increased the interest on spectroscopy of heavy hadrons. An overview of the latest LHCb results on the subject, including the discovery of four strange exotic states decaying as $X \\to J/\\psi \\phi$, is presented. LHCb has also made significant contributions to the field of $B_c^+$ physics, the lowest bound state of the heavy flavor $\\bar{b}$ and $c$ quarks. A synopsis of the the latest results is given.

  15. Assembling the last module of the vertex locator for LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    The 42nd and final vertex locator module is assembled in the LHCb clean room. This will be used to measure the point at which two protons in the beam collide from the tracks of particles produced in the collision.

  16. A Track Matching Algorithm for the LHCb upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Esen, Sevda

    2016-01-01

    This document presents a description and performance estimate of the Track Matching algorithm for the LHCb Upgrade. The algorithm combines tracks reconstructed in the Vertex Locator and in the three stations of the Scintillating Fibre Tracker.

  17. Past, Present and Future of the LHCb Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cogoni, Violetta

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been designed as a high precision experiment devoted to the search of physics beyond the Standard Model through the study of CP violation and rare decays in hadrons containing b and c quarks. During the Run 1 of LHC, the LHCb detector has performed very well producing a large number of physics results on a vast number of subjects. The first Long Shutdown offered the opportunity to further optimise the detector, anticipating in some cases the interventions foreseen for Run 3. Nevertheless, the phase of upgrade of the detector, foreseen for 2019–2020, will be crucial to exploit the full potential of the LHCb experiment. In this context, an overview of the LHCb detector is presented, concerning its past, present, and foreseen future performances

  18. Flavour tagging with baryons and a study of two body $\\Lambda_b$ decays with the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Storey, James William

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will perform precision measurements of CP-violation and search for rare B decays at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which is due to begin operation in 2008. The LHCb Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) system provides the particle identification crucial for these studies. The Multi-Anode photomultiplier tube (MaPMT)is a candidate photon detector for the LHCb RICH system. Performance studies of the MaPMT in a charged particle beam at CERN demonstrate that the pulse shape of the BeetleMA readout ASIC does not return to zero after 125ns, which will lead to ghost pixel hits and the possible drift of the pedestal outside the dynamic range of the amplifier. Measurement of key CP asymmetries at LHCb requires that the flavour of the B-meson at creation is known. Flavour tagging using protons is shown to have potentially useful tagging performance, but the implementation is found to be challenging. A correlation between b-quark and Lambda flavour is observed for a Lambda produced in the same fragmentati...

  19. Jagiellonian University Development of the LHCb VELO monitoring software platform

    CERN Document Server

    Majewski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    One of the most important parts of the LHCb spectrometer is the VErtex LOcator (VELO), dedicated to the precise tracking close to the proton–proton interaction point. The quality of data produced by the VELO depends on the calibration process, which must be monitored to ensure its correctness. This work presents details on how the calibration monitoring is conducted and how it could be improved. It also includes information on monitoring software and data flow in the LHCb software framework.

  20. Experience in Grid Site Testing for ATLAS, CMS and LHCb with HammerCloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmsheuser, Johannes; Medrano Llamas, Ramón; Legger, Federica; Sciabà, Andrea; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Úbeda García, Mario; van der Ster, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Frequent validation and stress testing of the network, storage and CPU resources of a grid site is essential to achieve high performance and reliability. HammerCloud was previously introduced with the goals of enabling VO- and site-administrators to run such tests in an automated or on-demand manner. The ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments have all developed VO plugins for the service and have successfully integrated it into their grid operations infrastructures. This work will present the experience in running HammerCloud at full scale for more than 3 years and present solutions to the scalability issues faced by the service. First, we will show the particular challenges faced when integrating with CMS and LHCb offline computing, including customized dashboards to show site validation reports for the VOs and a new API to tightly integrate with the LHCbDIRAC Resource Status System. Next, a study of the automatic site exclusion component used by ATLAS will be presented along with results for tuning the exclusion policies. A study of the historical test results for ATLAS, CMS and LHCb will be presented, including comparisons between the experiments’ grid availabilities and a search for site-based or temporal failure correlations. Finally, we will look to future plans that will allow users to gain new insights into the test results; these include developments to allow increased testing concurrency, increased scale in the number of metrics recorded per test job (up to hundreds), and increased scale in the historical job information (up to many millions of jobs per VO).