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Sample records for syringae hrp regulon

  1. Global analysis of the HrpL regulon in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 reveals new regulon members with diverse functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is required for virulence in the gram-negative plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The alternative sigma factor HrpL directly regulates expression of T3SS genes via a consensus promoter sequence, often designated as the “hrp promoter.” Although...

  2. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Waite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL. In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses.

  3. The pathogenicity factor HrpF interacts with HrpA and HrpG to modulate type III secretion system (T3SS) function and t3ss expression in Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Chiao; Lin, Yuan-Chuen; Wei, Chia-Fong; Deng, Wen-Ling; Huang, Hsiou-Chen

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the optimal infectivity on contact with host cells, pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae has evolved a complex mechanism to control the expression and construction of the functional type III secretion system (T3SS) that serves as a dominant pathogenicity factor. In this study, we showed that the hrpF gene of P. syringae pv. averrhoi, which is located upstream of hrpG, encodes a T3SS-dependent secreted/translocated protein. Mutation of hrpF leads to the loss of bacterial ability on elicitation of disease symptoms in the host and a hypersensitive response in non-host plants, and the secretion or translocation of the tested T3SS substrates into the bacterial milieu or plant cells. Moreover, overexpression of hrpF in the wild-type results in delayed HR and reduced t3ss expression. The results of protein-protein interactions demonstrate that HrpF interacts directly with HrpG and HrpA in vitro and in vivo, and protein stability assays reveal that HrpF assists HrpA stability in the bacterial cytoplasm, which is reduced by a single amino acid substitution at the 67th lysine residue of HrpF with alanine. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that HrpF has two roles in the assembly of a functional T3SS: one by acting as a negative regulator, possibly involved in the HrpSVG regulation circuit via binding to HrpG, and the other by stabilizing HrpA in the bacterial cytoplasm via HrpF-HrpA interaction prior to the secretion and formation of Hrp pilus on the bacterial surface. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Global regulatory networks control the hrp regulon of the gall-forming bacterium Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panijel, Mary; Chalupowicz, Laura; Sessa, Guido; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Barash, Isaac

    2013-09-01

    Gall formation by Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae is dependent on the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system. Previous studies demonstrated that PagR and PagI, regulators of the quorum-sensing system, induce expression of the hrp regulatory cascade (i.e., hrpXY, hrpS, and hrpL) that activates the HrpL regulon. Here, we isolated the genes of the Gac/Rsm global regulatory pathway (i.e., gacS, gacA, rsmB, and csrD) and of the post-transcriptional regulator rsmA. Our results demonstrate that PagR and PagI also upregulate expression of the Gac/Rsm pathway. PagR acts as a transcriptional activator of each of the hrp regulatory genes and gacA in a N-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone-dependent manner as shown by gel shift experiments. Mutants of the Gac/Rsm genes or overexpression of rsmA significantly reduced Pantoea agglomerans virulence and colonization of gypsophila. Overexpression of rsmB sRNA abolished gall formation, colonization, and hypersensitive reaction on nonhost plants and prevented transcription of the hrp regulatory cascade, indicating a lack of functional type III secretion system. Expression of rsmB sRNA in the background of the csrD null mutant suggests that CsrD may act as a safeguard for preventing excessive production of rsmB sRNA. Results presented indicate that the hrp regulatory cascade is controlled directly by PagR and indirectly by RsmA, whereas deficiency in RsmA activity is epistatic to PagR induction.

  5. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis is essential for HrpZ harpin secretion in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Min; Long, Deliang; He, Huoguang; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall is important phytopathogenic bacterium of stone fruit trees, and able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants. The HrpZ, secreted via type III secretion system (T3SS) to the extracellular space of the plant, is a T3SS-dependent protein and a sole T3SS effector able to induce the host defense response outside host cells. We deleted the phosphatidylcholine synthase gene (pcs) of P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336, and found that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to synthesize phosphatidylcholine and elicit a typical HR in soybean. Further studies showed that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin but could express HrpZ protein in cytoplasm as effectively as the wild type. To confirm if phosphatidylcholine affects HrpZ harpin secretion, we introduced the hrpZ gene into the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593 and the 593 pcs(-) mutant, which were unable to express HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in tobacco or soybean. Western blotting and HR assay showed that the 593H not only secreted HrpZ harpin but also caused a strong HR in tobacco and soybean. In contrast, the 593 pcs(-)H only expressed HrpZ protein in its cytoplasm at the wild type level, but did not secrete HrpZ harpin or elicit HR reaction. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine is essential for the secretion of HrpZ harpin in P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall and other Pseudomonas strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Construction of a tomato leaf cDNA expression library and immunoscreening for the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HrpZ1 target protein

    OpenAIRE

    Österman, Janina

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is a Gram-negative plant pathogen that causes bacterial speck disease on tomato. The virulence of this bacterium is based on the type III secretion system (T3SS). Similar systems are also used by many other plant and animal pathogens, as well as symbiotic bacteria. The T3SS enables the transfer of specific bacterial virulence proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm into the host cell. This secretion is mediated by a needle-like structure that penetrates th...

  7. Evading plant immunity: feedback control of the T3SS inPseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark; Buck, Martin

    2017-03-17

    Microbes are responsible for over 10% of the global yield losses in staple crops such as wheat, rice, and maize. Understanding the decision-making strategies that enable bacterial plant pathogens to evade the host immune system and cause disease is essential for managing their ever growing threat to food security. Many utilise the needle-like type III secretion system (T3SS) to suppress plant immunity, by injecting effector proteins that inhibit eukaryotic signalling pathways into the host cell cytoplasm. Plants can in turn evolve resistance to specific pathogens via recognition and blocking of the T3SS effectors, so leading to an ongoing co-evolutionary 'arms race' between pathogen and host pairs. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL co-ordinates the expression of the T3SS regulon in the leaf-dwelling Pseudomonas syringae and similar pathogens. Recently, we showed that association of HrpL with a target promoter directly adjacent to the hrpL gene imposes negative autogenous control on its own expression level due to overlapping regulatory elements. Our results suggest that by down-regulating T3SS function, this fine-tuning mechanism enables P. syringae to minimise effector-mediated elicitation of plant immunity.

  8. Evading plant immunity: feedback control of the T3SS in Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Waite

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are responsible for over 10% of the global yield losses in staple crops such as wheat, rice, and maize. Understanding the decision-making strategies that enable bacterial plant pathogens to evade the host immune system and cause disease is essential for managing their ever growing threat to food security. Many utilise the needle-like type III secretion system (T3SS to suppress plant immunity, by injecting effector proteins that inhibit eukaryotic signalling pathways into the host cell cytoplasm. Plants can in turn evolve resistance to specific pathogens via recognition and blocking of the T3SS effectors, so leading to an ongoing co-evolutionary ‘arms race’ between pathogen and host pairs. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL co-ordinates the expression of the T3SS regulon in the leaf-dwelling Pseudomonas syringae and similar pathogens. Recently, we showed that association of HrpL with a target promoter directly adjacent to the hrpL gene imposes negative autogenous control on its own expression level due to overlapping regulatory elements. Our results suggest that by down-regulating T3SS function, this fine-tuning mechanism enables P. syringae to minimise effector-mediated elicitation of plant immunity.

  9. SlyA regulates type III secretion system (T3SS) genes in parallel with the T3SS master regulator HrpL in Dickeya dadantii 3937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lifang; Zeng, Quan; Lin, Haiping; Gyaneshwar, Prasad; Chen, Gongyou; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2012-04-01

    The hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes of Dickeya dadantii 3937 encode a type III secretion system (T3SS) which is essential for its full virulence. Previous studies of the T3SS regulation in D. dadantii 3937 revealed that the expression of the hrp genes is regulated by a master regulator, HrpL, through the HrpX-HrpY-HrpS-HrpL and GacS-GacA-rsmB-RsmA pathways. In this work, we identified a novel regulator of the SlyA/MarR family, SlyA, which regulates hrp genes of the HrpL regulon in parallel with HrpL in D. dadantii. SlyA regulates the T3SS in a two-tier manner. It negatively regulates the expression of hrpL by downregulating hrpS and upregulating rsmA. Interestingly, concomitant with its downregulation of the hrpL, SlyA positively regulates the expression of hrpA and hrpN, two hrp genes located in the HrpL regulon. In contrast to Pectobacterium carotovorum, the expression of slyA is not controlled by ExpR and ExpI in D. dadantii 3937. We further show that SlyA is involved in controlling swimming motility and pellicle formation in D. dadantii 3937.

  10. Review of HRP Positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Center for Reliability Studies

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Human Reliability Program (HRP), published as 10 CFR Part 712, is currently being reviewed and revised to address concerns identified during its implementation. Although these ''page changes'' primarily incorporate clarification of terms and language, the following discussion relates to broadening the definition of positions that require HRP certification that is found in {section}712.10.

  11. The Ca2+ induced two-component system, CvsSR regulates the Type III secretion system and the extracytoplasmic function sigma-factor AlgU in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

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    Fishman, Maxwell R; Zhang, Johnson; Bronstein, Philip A; Stodghill, Paul; Filiatrault, Melanie J

    2017-12-20

    Two-component systems (TCSs) of bacteria regulate many different aspects of the bacterial life cycle including pathogenesis. Most TCSs remain uncharacterized with no information about the signal(s) or regulatory targets and/or role in bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we characterized a TCS in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 ( Pto ) composed of the histidine kinase, CvsS, and the response regulator, CvsR. CvsSR is necessary for virulence of Pto , since ΔcvsS and ΔcvsR strains produced fewer symptoms and demonstrated reduced growth on multiple hosts as compared to WT. We discovered that expression of cvsSR is induced by Ca 2+ concentrations found in leaf apoplastic fluid. Thus, Ca 2+ can be added to the list of signals that promote pathogenesis of Pto during host colonization. Through chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) and global transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq) we discerned the CvsR regulon. CvsR directly activated expression of the type III secretion system regulators, hrpR and hrpS , that regulates Pto virulence in a type III secretion system dependent manner. CvsR also indirectly repressed transcription of the extracytoplasmic sigma factor algU and production of alginate. Phenotypic analysis determined that CvsSR inversely regulated biofilm formation, swarming motility, and cellulose production in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. Overall, our results show that CvsSR is a key regulatory hub critical for interaction with host plants. Importance Pathogenic bacteria must be able to react and respond to the surrounding environment, make use of available resources, and avert or counter host immune responses. Often, these abilities rely on two-component systems (TCSs) composed of interacting proteins that modulate gene expression. We identified a TCS in the plant-pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae that responds to the presence of calcium, which is an important signal during the plant

  12. Genome-wide identification of HrpL-regulated genes in the necrotrophic phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii 3937.

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    Shihui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dickeya dadantii is a necrotrophic pathogen causing disease in many plants. Previous studies have demonstrated that the type III secretion system (T3SS of D. dadantii is required for full virulence. HrpL is an alternative sigma factor that binds to the hrp box promoter sequence of T3SS genes to up-regulate their expression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the inventory of HrpL-regulated genes of D. dadantii 3937 (3937, transcriptome profiles of wild-type 3937 and a hrpL mutant grown in a T3SS-inducing medium were examined. Using a cut-off value of 1.5, significant differential expression was observed in sixty-three genes, which are involved in various cellular functions such as type III secretion, chemotaxis, metabolism, regulation, and stress response. A hidden Markov model (HMM was used to predict candidate hrp box binding sites in the intergenic regions of 3937, including the promoter regions of HrpL-regulated genes identified in the microarray assay. In contrast to biotrophic phytopathgens such as Pseudomonas syringae, among the HrpL up-regulated genes in 3937 only those within the T3SS were found to contain a hrp box sequence. Moreover, direct binding of purified HrpL protein to the hrp box was demonstrated for hrp box-containing DNA fragments of hrpA and hrpN using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. In this study, a putative T3SS effector DspA/E was also identified as a HrpL-upregulated gene, and shown to be translocated into plant cells in a T3SS-dependent manner. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCES: We provide the genome-wide study of HrpL-regulated genes in a necrotrophic phytopathogen (D. dadantii 3937 through a combination of transcriptomics and bioinformatics, which led to identification of several effectors. Our study indicates the extent of differences for T3SS effector protein inventory requirements between necrotrophic and biotrophic pathogens, and may allow the development of different strategies for

  13. Draft genome sequences of pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae ALF3 isolated from alfalfa

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the annotated draft genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain ALF3, isolated in Wyoming, USA. Comparison of this genome sequence with those of closely related strains of P. syringae pv. syringae adapted to other hosts will facilitate research into interactions between this pathoge...

  14. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF...

  15. Virulence of the Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. Maculicola Is rpoN Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Erik L.; Guevera, Pablo; Peñaloza-Vàzquez, Alejandro; Shao, Jing; Bender, Carol; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2000-01-01

    We cloned the rpoN (ntrA and glnF) gene encoding ς54 from the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola strain ES4326. The P. syringae ES4326 rpoN gene complemented Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella aerogenes rpoN mutants for a variety of rpoN mutant phenotypes, including the inability to utilize nitrate as sole nitrogen source. DNA sequence analysis of the P. syringae ES4326 rpoN gene revealed that the deduced amino acid sequence was most similar (86% identity; 95% similarity) to the ς54 protein encoded by the Pseudomonas putida rpoN gene. A marker exchange protocol was used to construct an ES4326 rpoN insertional mutation, rpoN::Kmr. In contrast to wild-type ES4326, ES4326 rpoN::Kmr was nonmotile and could not utilize nitrate, urea, C4-dicarboxylic acids, several amino acids, or concentrations of ammonia below 2 mM as nitrogen sources. rpoN was essential for production of the phytotoxin coronatine and for expression of the structural genes encoding coronamic acid. In addition, ES4326 rpoN::Kmr did not multiply or elicit disease symptoms when infiltrated into Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, did not elicit the accumulation of several Arabidopsis defense-related mRNAs, and did not elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) when infiltrated into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves. Furthermore, whereas P. syringae ES4326 carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2 elicited an HR when infiltrated into Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia leaves, ES4326 rpoN::Kmr carrying avrRpt2 elicited no response. Constitutive expression of ES4326 hrpL in ES4326 rpoN::Kmr partially restored defense-related mRNA accumulation, showing a direct role for the hrp cluster in host defense gene induction in a compatible host-pathogen interaction. However, constitutive expression of hrpL in ES4326 rpoN::Kmr did not restore coronatine production, showing that coronatine biosynthesis requires factors other than hrpL. PMID:10852883

  16. Differential secretome analysis of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato using gel-free MS proteomics

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    Jörg eSchumacher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (DC3000 causes virulence by delivering effector proteins into host plant cells through its type three secretion system (T3SS. In response to the plant environment DC3000 expresses hypersensitive response and pathogenicity genes (hrp. Pathogenesis depends on the ability of the pathogen to manipulate the plant metabolism and to inhibit plant immunity, which depends to a large degree on the plant’s capacity to recognise both pathogen and microbial determinants (PAMP/MAMP-triggered immunity. We have developed and employed MS-based shotgun and targeted proteomics to (i elucidate the extracellular and secretome composition of DC3000 and (ii evaluate temporal features of the assembly of the T3SS and the secretion process together with its dependence of pH. The proteomic screen, under hrp inducing in vitro conditions, of extracellular and cytoplasmatic fractions indicated the segregated presence of not only T3SS implicated proteins such as HopK1, HrpK1, HrpA1 and Avrpto1, but also of proteins not usually associated with the T3SS or with pathogenicity. Using multiple reaction monitoring MS (MRM-MS to quantify HrpA1 and Avrpto1, we found that HrpA1 is rapidly expressed, at a strict pH-dependent rate and is post-translationally processed extracellularly. These features appear to not interfere with rapid Avrpto1 expression and secretion but may suggest some temporal post-translational regulatory mechanism of the T3SS assembly. The high specificity and sensitivity of the MRM-MS approach should provide a powerful tool to measure secretion and translocation in infected tissues.

  17. Genome-wide DNA binding pattern of two-component system response regulator RhpR in Pseudomonas syringae

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    Tianhong Zhou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Pseudomonas syringae uses the two-component system RhpRS to modulate the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS genes and pathogenicity, the molecular mechanisms and the regulon of RhpRS have yet to be fully demonstrated. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of RhpR binding to DNA prepared from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola in order to identify candidate direct targets of RhpR-mediated transcriptional regulation, as described in our recent article [1]. The data are available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO with the accession number GSE58533. Here we describe the detailed methods and data analyses of our RhpR ChIP-seq dataset.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine absence affects the secretion of lipodepsipeptide phytoxins in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fang; Xiong, Min; Li, Shunyi; Cai, Huawan; Sun, Yufang; Yang, Sheng; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Rong; Yu, Xuejing; Wang, Xingguo

    2018-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336 (Pss 1336) is the causal agent of bacterial disease of stone fruit trees, and also able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host tobacco. It is known that this pathogen uses PCS-pathway to synthesize phosphatidylcholine (PC), and mutation of the pcs gene abolishes bacterial PC synthesis. Previous study also found that the 1336 pcs - mutant lacking PC in its membrane phospholipids was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in non-host plants. In this study, we further analyzed virulence of lipodepsipeptide phytoxins of Pss 1336 wild type (pcs + ), the 1336RM (pcs-/+) and the 1336 pcs- mutant, and found that the 1336 pcs- mutant was unable to cause necrosis of Chinese date fruits and inhibit fungal growth. HPLC analysis also showed that the 1336 pcs- mutant markedly reduced its secretion of lipodepsipeptide phytoxins. Analysis of semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed that PC presence or absence did not affect gene expressions of SyrD, PseABC and PseEF efflux systems at transcriptional level. However, western blotting assays found that PseE and PseF present only in the cytoplasmic fractions but undetectable in the membrane extract of the 1336 pcs- mutant. PC absence obviously interrupted the translocation of two membrane-associated proteins PseE and PseF from cytoplasm to cell membranes to form an intact PseEF efflux system in bacterial membranes. Failure to form PseEF efflux system could be a major factor for less lipopeptide-phytoxin secretion. Our results demonstrate that PC in bacterial membrane phospholipids plays an important role in maintaining physiological functions of PseEF efflux system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cases, I.; Ussery, David; de Lorenzo, V.

    2003-01-01

    , the sigma(54) regulon has been studied both in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and several species of the Rhizobiaceae. Here we present the analysis of the sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) in the complete genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We have developed an improved method for the prediction...

  20. The cys regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutran, A.; Balan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: In Escherichia coli, genes involved in metabolic pathway of sulfate and sulfonate compounds are clustered in a cys regulon, which includes three ABC transport system (operons: sbpcysWUA; ssuABC and tauABC), thirteen genes involved in the sulfur reduction (ssuDE; tauD and cysDNCHIJGK) and two regulatory proteins that belong to LysR transcription family: CysB and Cbl. Notably, a search and comparative analysis of these genes in the genomes of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri and other phylogenetically related Xanthomonas species revealed the presence of genes involved with alkanesulfonate, sulfate ester and taurine, only in X. citri, suggesting that proteins from this regulon might be associated with pathogenicity in citrus. Using the molecular modeling associated with a system biology view, we modeled all the protein structures of the X. citri cys regulon as well as characterized the important residues forming the putative active sites. Comparison with orthologs from different microorganisms was made in order to get a phylogenetic relationships. We showed that proteins that are responsible for the affinity and specificity of the alkanesulfonate, sulfate and taurine transport systems conserved the residues involved in the sulfate coordination but are organized in different branches in evolution. Inside these phylogenetic branches, proteins involved in the sulfate transporter are highly conserved when compared to the others. Moreover, we identified that the taurine-binding protein (TauA) of the X. citri belongs to a different evolutionary branch from that one that described for E. coli. These differences were also noticed for components of the tau operon, including a putative new regulator. The function and mechanism of action of each protein is discussed in order to bring light for the sulfur assimilation processes and their importance for X. citri physiology. (author)

  1. The cys regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moutran, A.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: In Escherichia coli, genes involved in metabolic pathway of sulfate and sulfonate compounds are clustered in a cys regulon, which includes three ABC transport system (operons: sbpcysWUA; ssuABC and tauABC), thirteen genes involved in the sulfur reduction (ssuDE; tauD and cysDNCHIJGK) and two regulatory proteins that belong to LysR transcription family: CysB and Cbl. Notably, a search and comparative analysis of these genes in the genomes of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri and other phylogenetically related Xanthomonas species revealed the presence of genes involved with alkanesulfonate, sulfate ester and taurine, only in X. citri, suggesting that proteins from this regulon might be associated with pathogenicity in citrus. Using the molecular modeling associated with a system biology view, we modeled all the protein structures of the X. citri cys regulon as well as characterized the important residues forming the putative active sites. Comparison with orthologs from different microorganisms was made in order to get a phylogenetic relationships. We showed that proteins that are responsible for the affinity and specificity of the alkanesulfonate, sulfate and taurine transport systems conserved the residues involved in the sulfate coordination but are organized in different branches in evolution. Inside these phylogenetic branches, proteins involved in the sulfate transporter are highly conserved when compared to the others. Moreover, we identified that the taurine-binding protein (TauA) of the X. citri belongs to a different evolutionary branch from that one that described for E. coli. These differences were also noticed for components of the tau operon, including a putative new regulator. The function and mechanism of action of each protein is discussed in order to bring light for the sulfur assimilation processes and their importance for X. citri physiology. (author)

  2. Gene expression profiling in viable but nonculturable (VBNC cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae

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    Olga A. Postnikova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse crop plants and comprises at least 50 different pathovar strains with different host ranges. More information on the physiological and molecular effects of the host inhibitory environment on the pathogen is needed to develop resistant cultivars. Recently, we reported an in vitro model system that mimics the redox pulse associated with the oxidative burst in plant cells inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Using this system, we demonstrated that oxidation of acetosyringone, a major extracellular phenolic compound induced in some plants in response to bacteria, rendered Pseudomonas syringae. pv. syringae to a viable but nonculturable (VBNC state. Here we performed a large scale transcriptome profiling of P.s.pv. syringae in the VBNC state induced by acetosyringone treatment and identified bacterial genes and pathways presumably associated with this condition. The findings offer insight into what events occur when bacterial pathogens are first encountered and host defense responses are triggered. The acquired knowledge will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance. We believe that this is the first work on global gene expression profiling of VBNC cells in plant pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling in Viable but Nonculturable (VBNC) Cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnikova, Olga A; Shao, Jonathan; Mock, Norton M; Baker, Con J; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae infects diverse crop plants and comprises at least 50 different pathovar strains with different host ranges. More information on the physiological and molecular effects of the host inhibitory environment on the pathogen is needed to develop resistant cultivars. Recently, we reported an in vitro model system that mimics the redox pulse associated with the oxidative burst in plant cells inoculated with Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae. Using this system, we demonstrated that oxidation of acetosyringone, a major extracellular phenolic compound induced in some plants in response to bacteria, rendered Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae to a "viable but nonculturable" (VBNC) state. Here we performed a large scale transcriptome profiling of P. s. pv. syringae in the VBNC state induced by acetosyringone treatment and identified bacterial genes and pathways presumably associated with this condition. The findings offer insight into what events occur when bacterial pathogens are first encountered and host defense responses are triggered. The acquired knowledge will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance. We believe that this is the first work on global gene expression profiling of VBNC cells in plant pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Involvement of hrpX and hrpG in the Virulence of Acidovorax citrulli Strain Aac5, Causal Agent of Bacterial Fruit Blotch in Cucurbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch, a disease that poses a global threat to watermelon and melon production. Despite its economic importance, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms of pathogenicity and virulence of A. citrulli. Like other plant-pathogenic bacteria, A. citrulli relies on a type III secretion system (T3SS for pathogenicity. On the basis of sequence and operon arrangement analyses, A. citrulli was found to have a class II hrp gene cluster similar to those of Xanthomonas and Ralstonia spp. In the class II hrp cluster, hrpG and hrpX play key roles in the regulation of T3SS effectors. However, little is known about the regulation of the T3SS in A. citrulli. This study aimed to investigate the roles of hrpG and hrpX in A. citrulli pathogenicity. We found that hrpG or hrpX deletion mutants of the A. citrulli group II strain Aac5 had reduced pathogenicity on watermelon seedlings, failed to induce a hypersensitive response in tobacco, and elicited higher levels of reactive oxygen species in Nicotiana benthamiana than the wild-type strain. Additionally, we demonstrated that HrpG activates HrpX in A. citrulli. Moreover, transcription and translation of the type 3-secreted effector (T3E gene Aac5_2166 were suppressed in hrpG and hrpX mutants. Notably, hrpG and hrpX appeared to modulate biofilm formation. These results suggest that hrpG and hrpX are essential for pathogenicity, regulation of T3Es, and biofilm formation in A. citrulli.

  5. Molecular characterization of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato isolates from Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Stephan, D.; Mabagala, R. B.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is an emerging disease of tomato in Tanzania. Following reports of outbreaks of the disease in many locations in Tanzania, 56 isolates of P. syringae pv. tomato were collected from four tomato- producing areas and characterized using patho...

  6. From bacterial avirulence genes to effector functions via the hrp delivery system: an overview of 25 years of progress in our understanding of plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, John W

    2009-11-01

    Cloning the first avirulence (avr) gene has led not only to a deeper understanding of gene-for-gene interactions in plant disease, but also to fundamental insights into the suppression of basal defences against microbial attack. This article (focusing on Pseudomonas syringae) charts the development of ideas and research progress over the 25 years following the breakthrough achieved by Staskawicz and coworkers. Advances in gene cloning technology underpinned the identification of both avr and hrp genes, the latter being required for the activation of the defensive hypersensitive reaction (HR) and pathogenicity. The delivery of Avr proteins through the type III secretion machinery encoded by hrp gene clusters was demonstrated, and the activity of the proteins inside plant cells as elicitors of the HR was confirmed. Key roles for avr genes in pathogenic fitness have now been established. The rebranding of Avr proteins as effectors, proteins that suppress the HR and cell wall-based defences, has led to the ongoing search for their targets, and is generating new insights into the co-ordination of plant resistance against diverse microbes. Bioinformatics-led analysis of effector gene distribution in genomes has provided a remarkable view of the interchange of effectors and also their functional domains, as the arms race of attack and defence drives the evolution of microbial pathogenicity. The application of our accrued knowledge for the development of disease control strategies is considered.

  7. Resistant and susceptible responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) to bacterial stem blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial stem blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is a common disease of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in the central and western U.S. and has been reported in Australia and Europe. The disease is not always recognized because symptoms are often associated with frost damage. Two culti...

  8. Comparative genomic analysis of two-component regulatory proteins in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavin, J.L.; Kiil, Kristoffer; Resano, O.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial plant pathogen, and strains of P. syringae may be assigned to different pathovars based on host specificity among different plant species. The genomes of P. syringae pv. syringae (Psy) B728a, pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 and pv. phaseolicola...

  9. Defence responses of arabidopsis thaliana to infection by pseudomonas syringae are regulated by the circadian clock

    KAUST Repository

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav

    2011-10-31

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. © 2011 Bhardwaj et al.

  10. Systemic Induction of Salicylic Acid Accumulation in Cucumber after Inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jack B.; Hammerschmidt, Raymond; Zook, Michael N.

    1991-01-01

    Inoculation of one true leaf of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) plants with Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae results in the systemic appearance of salicylic acid in the phloem exudates from petioles above, below, and at the site of inoculation. Analysis of phloem exudates from the petioles of leaves 1 and 2 demonstrated that the earliest increases in salicylic acid occurred 8 hours after inoculation of leaf 1 in leaf 1 and 12 hours after inoculation of leaf 1 in leaf 2. Detaching leaf 1 at intervals after inoculation demonstrated that leaf 1 must remain attached for only 4 hours after inoculation to result in the systemic accumulation of salicylic acid. Because the levels of salicylic acid in phloem exudates from leaf 1 did not increase to detectable levels until at least 8 hours after inoculation with P. s. pathovar syringae, the induction of increased levels of salicylic acid throughout the plant are presumably the result of another chemical signal generated from leaf 1 within 4 hours after inoculation. Injection of salicylic acid into tissues at concentrations found in the exudates induced resistance to disease and increased peroxidase activity. Our results support a role for salicylic acid as an endogenous inducer of resistance, but our data also suggest that salicylic acid is not the primary systemic signal of induced resistance in cucumber. ImagesFigure 2 PMID:16668554

  11. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  12. Pseudomnas syringae – a Pathogen of Fruit Trees in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Gavrilović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Data about symptomatology, pathogenicity and bacteriological characteristics of Pseudomonas syringae, and PCR methods for fast and reliable detection of the pathogen are given in this paper. P. syringae has been experimentaly proved as a pathogen of pear, apple, apricot, plum cherry, and raspberry, and pathogen strains have also been isolated from necrotic peach buds. Two pathogen varieties, syringae and morsprunorum, were found in our research in Serbia, the former being dominant on fruit trees.The most reliable method for detection of this bacteria is PCR, using BOX and REP primers. This method has also revealed significant differences among the strains originating from fruit trees in Serbia. Thus, it was proved that the population of P. syringae in Serbia is heterogeneous, which is very important for future epidemiologocal studies. Control of this pathogen includes mechanical, cultural and chemical measures, but integrated approach is very important for sustainable control.

  13. Alternative Sigma Factor HrpL of Pectobacterium carotovorum 35 is Important for the Development of Soft-rot Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo-Song Nam

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A bacterial artificial chromosome library of Pectobacterium carotovorum 35 was constructed to characterize the genome and to sequence its hrp region. The hrp cluster of P. carotovorum 35 consisted of 26 open reading frames in five operons. A promoter-based green fluorescent protein technology was used to identify the genes regulated by the alternative sigma factor, HrpL, in P. carotovorum 35. The majority of the selected clones contained the hrpJ operon promoter sequence, which harbors a hrp box, but no putative hrp boxes were detected within the promoter sequences of two other hrpL-regulated genes encoding for pectate lyase and large repetitive protein. Although the promoters of five other hrp operons also contained hrp boxes, their expression was not HrpL-dependent in the promoter-based selection in E. coli. However, transcriptional analysis showed that expression from all operons harboring hrp boxes, except for the hrpN operon, was reduced significantly in the hrpL mutant. The severity of soft-rot symptoms when the hrpL mutant was applied to the surface of tobacco leaves, mimicking natural infection, was greatly attenuated. These results indicate that the hrpL gene of P. carotovorum 35 may be involved in the development of soft-rot symptoms.

  14. Differentiation of Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars Originating from Stone Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Gašić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to an overlapping host range, similar symptomatology and many common characteristics,Pseudomonas syringae pathovars originating from stone fruits can easily be misidentified.In order to select tests for rapid and efficient differentiation of P. s. pvs. syringae,morsprunorum and persicae, we studied the suitability and differentiating potential ofsome standard bacteriological and molecular methods. Differentiation of the strains wasperformed using LOPAT, GATTa and ice nucleation tests, nutrient sucrose broth growthand utilization of various carbon sources. PCR method enabled the detection of toxin-producinggenes: syrB and syrD in P. s. pv. syringae, and cfl gene in P. s. pv. morsprunorum race1. Syringomycin production by pv. syringae was confirmed in bioassay using Geotrichumcandidum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rhodotorula pilimanae as indicator organisms.Pathogenicity test on lemon and immature nectarine fruits, as well as on string bean pods,showed different intensity of reaction of the inoculated material which could separate pv.syringae from the other two pathovars. PCR-based repetitive sequences, Rep-PCR withREP, ERIC and BOX primers revealed different genetic profiles within P. syringae pathovars.

  15. PePPER: a webserver for prediction of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anne; Pietersma, Hilco; Cordes, Martijn; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kok, Jan

    2012-07-02

    Accurate prediction of DNA motifs that are targets of RNA polymerases, sigma factors and transcription factors (TFs) in prokaryotes is a difficult mission mainly due to as yet undiscovered features in DNA sequences or structures in promoter regions. Improved prediction and comparison algorithms are currently available for identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and their accompanying TFs and regulon members. We here extend the current databases of TFs, TFBSs and regulons with our knowledge on Lactococcus lactis and developed a webserver for prediction, mining and visualization of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons via a novel concept. This new approach includes an all-in-one method of data mining for TFs, TFBSs, promoters, and regulons for any bacterial genome via a user-friendly webserver. We demonstrate the power of this method by mining WalRK regulons in Lactococci and Streptococci and, vice versa, use L. lactis regulon data (CodY) to mine closely related species. The PePPER webserver offers, besides the all-in-one analysis method, a toolbox for mining for regulons, promoters and TFBSs and accommodates a new L. lactis regulon database in addition to already existing regulon data. Identification of putative regulons and full annotation of intergenic regions in any bacterial genome on the basis of existing knowledge on a related organism can now be performed by biologists and it can be done for a wide range of regulons. On the basis of the PePPER output, biologist can design experiments to further verify the existence and extent of the proposed regulons. The PePPER webserver is freely accessible at http://pepper.molgenrug.nl.

  16. The PseEF efflux system is a virulence factor of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyosun; Kang, Hyojeung

    2012-02-01

    An ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, called the PseEF efflux system, was identified at the left border of the syr-syp genomic island of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B301D. The PseEF efflux system was located within a 3.3-kb operon that encodes a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (PseE), and an ABC-type cytoplasmic membrane protein (PseF). The PseEF efflux system exhibited amino acid homology to a putative ABC efflux system (MacAB) of E. coli W3104 with identities of 47.2% (i.e., PseE to MacA) and 57.6% (i.e., PseF to MacB). A nonpolar mutation within the pseF gene was generated by nptII insertional mutagenesis. The resultant mutant strain showed significant reduction in secretion of syringomycin (74%) and syringopeptin (71%), as compared to parental strain B301D. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to determine transcript levels of the syringomycin (syrB1) and syringopeptin (sypA) synthetase genes in strain B301D-HK7 (a pseF mutant). Expression of the sypA gene by mutant strain B301D-HK7 was approximately 6.9% as compared to that of parental strain B301D, while the syrB1 gene expression by mutant strain B301D-HK7 was nearly 14.6%. In addition, mutant strain B301D-HK7 was less virulent by approximately 67% than parental strain B301D in immature cherry fruits. Mutant strain B301D-HK7 was not reduced in resistance to any antibiotics used in this study as compared to parental strain B301D. Expression (transcript levels) of the pseF gene was induced approximately six times by strain B301D grown on syringomycin minimum medium (SRM) supplemented with the plant signal molecules arbutin and D-fructose (SRMAF), as compared to that of strain B301D grown on SRM (in the absence of plant signal molecules). In addition, during infection of bean plants by P. syringae pv. syringae strain B728a, expression of the pseF gene increased at 3 days after inoculation (dai). More than 180-fold induction was observed in transcript levels of the pseF gene by parental

  17. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato: the right pathogen, of the right plant, at the right time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, G M

    2000-09-01

    Abstract Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato and the closely related pathovar P. s. pv. maculicola have been the focus of intensive research in recent years, not only because of the diseases they cause on tomato and crucifers, but because strains such as P. s. pv. tomato DC3000 and P. s. pv. maculicola ES4326 are pathogens of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Consequently, both P. s. pv. tomato and P. s. pv. maculicola have been widely used to study the molecular mechanisms of host responses to infection. Analyses of the molecular basis of pathogenesis in P. s. pv. tomato reveal a complex and intimate interaction between bacteria and plant cells that depends on the coordinated expression of multiple pathogenicity and virulence factors. These include toxins, extracellular proteins and polysaccharides, and the translocation of proteins into plant cells by the type III (Hrp) secretion system. The contribution of individual virulence factors to parasitism and disease development varies significantly between strains. Application of functional genomics and cell biology to both pathogen and host within the P. s. pv. tomato/A. thaliana pathosystem provides a unique opportunity to unravel the molecular interactions underlying plant pathogenesis. Taxonomic relationship: Bacteria; Proteobacteria; gamma subdivision; Pseudomonadaceae/Moraxellaceae group; Pseudomonadaceae family; Pseudomonas genus; Pseudomonas syringae species; tomato pathovar. Microbiological properties: Gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped, polar flagella, oxidase negative, arginine dihydrolase negative, DNA 58-60 mol% GC, elicits the hypersensitive response on tobacco. Primarily studied as the causal agent of bacterial speck of tomato and as a model pathogen of A. thaliana, although it has been isolated from a wide range of crop and weed species. Disease symptoms: Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum): Brown-black leaf spots sometimes surrounded by chlorotic margin; dark superficial specks on green fruit

  18. Characterisation of the mgo operon in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 that is required for mangotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin that is produced by strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae; mangotoxin-producing strains are primarily isolated from mango tissues with symptoms of bacterial apical necrosis. The toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase (OAT), a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of the essential amino acids ornithine and arginine. The involvement of a putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene (mgoA) in mangotoxin production and virulence has been reported. Results In the present study, we performed a RT-PCR analysis, insertional inactivation mutagenesis, a promoter expression analysis and terminator localisation to study the gene cluster containing the mgoA gene. Additionally, we evaluated the importance of mgoC, mgoA and mgoD in mangotoxin production. A sequence analysis revealed an operon-like organisation. A promoter sequence was located upstream of the mgoB gene and was found to drive lacZ transcription. Two terminators were located downstream of the mgoD gene. RT-PCR experiments indicated that the four genes (mgoBCAD) constitute a transcriptional unit. This operon is similar in genetic organisation to those in the three other P. syringae pathovars for which complete genomes are available (P. syringae pv. syringae B728a, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A). Interestingly, none of these three reference strains is capable of producing mangotoxin. Additionally, extract complementation resulted in a recovery of mangotoxin production when the defective mutant was complemented with wild-type extracts. Conclusions The results of this study confirm that mgoB, mgoC, mgoA and mgoD function as a transcriptional unit and operon. While this operon is composed of four genes, only the last three are directly involved in mangotoxin production. PMID:22251433

  19. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato. [74 FR 26536, June 3, 2009] ...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1145 - Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1145 Pseudomonas syringae; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Pseudomonas syringae is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance on all raw agricultural...

  1. Characterization of an hrp-aox-polyaniline-graphite composite biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina O. Santana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays there is an increasing demand to develop new and robust biosensors in order to detect low concentrations of different chemicals, in practical and small devices, giving fast and confident responses. The electrode material was a polyaniline-graphite-epoxy composite (PANI/GEC. Alcohol oxidase (AOX and horseradish peroxidase (HRP enzymes were immobilized and the responses were tested by cyclic voltammetry. The conductivities for the composites of graphite/polyaniline were determined. The cyclic voltammograms allowed detecting ethanol in pure diluted samples in a range from 0.036 to 2.62 M. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA were used to verify the thermal characteristics of the composites (0, 10, 20, 30 and 100 % of graphite. The Imax value was determined for the dual enzyme biosensor (0.0724 mA, and the Kapp m  as 1.41 M (with R2 =0.9912.

  2. NASA HRP Immunology Discipline - Use of Terrestrial Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Due to the cost and operational constraints, as well as technical implementation limitations, it is desirous to perform relevant space physiology investigations first in terrestrial 'space analogs'. This is particularly true for initial investigations, which may then provide appropriate focus for subsequent flight investigations, or for mechanistic investigations that simply cannot be performed during spaceflight. Appropriate analog choice is extremely important. There are a wide variety of terrestrial space analogs, each relevant to a particular physiological discipline (or disciplines) and each with a particular fidelity (or lack thereof) to spaceflight, and each with unique operational constraints. The HRP Immunology Discipline is tasked with managing the HRP Risk concerning clinical risk for Astronaut crews related to spaceflight-associated immune dysregulation. Such dysregulation has been documented to occur during spaceflight, and found to persist for the duration of a 6-month ISS mission. Studies continue to characterize the onorbit phenomenon, but it generally consists of diminished immunocyte function, dysregulated cytokine profiles, and persistent herpesvirus reactivation. Causes are thought to synergistically include microgravity, psychological or physiological stress, radiation, and/or circadian misalignment. An appropriate terrestrial analog for immune dysregulation would replicate as many of these influences as possible. Such analogs may include clinostat or bioreactor cell culture (microgravity), hindlimb suspension (stress, fluid shifts, hypokinesis), or human deployment to remote or extreme environments (isolation, stress, circadian). Also, the laboratory setting may be used as an analog, or to augment analogs, such as sleep deprivation/misalignment or human centrifugation to replicate gravitational stress. As an appropriate example of a NASA Disciplines use of Terrestrial space analogs, this talk will discuss spaceflight associated immune

  3. Differences between Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and Pantoea agglomerans BRT98 in Epiphytic and Endophytic Colonization of Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaratnam, Siva; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2003-01-01

    The leaf colonization strategies of two bacterial strains were investigated. The foliar pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B728a and the nonpathogen Pantoea agglomerans strain BRT98 were marked with a green fluorescent protein, and surface (epiphytic) and subsurface (endophytic) sites of bean and maize leaves in the laboratory and the field were monitored to see if populations of these strains developed. The populations were monitored using both fluorescence microscopy and counts of culturable cells recovered from nonsterilized and surface-sterilized leaves. The P. agglomerans strain exclusively colonized epiphytic sites on the two plant species. Under favorable conditions, the P. agglomerans strain formed aggregates that often extended over multiple epidermal cells. The P. syringae pv. syringae strain established epiphytic and endophytic populations on asymptomatic leaves of the two plant species in the field, with most of the P. syringae pv. syringae B728a cells remaining in epiphytic sites of the maize leaves and an increasing number occupying endophytic sites of the bean leaves in the 15-day monitoring period. The epiphytic P. syringae pv. syringae B728a populations appeared to originate primarily from multiplication in surface sites rather than from the movement of cells from subsurface to surface sites. The endophytic P. syringae pv. syringae B728a populations appeared to originate primarily from inward movement through the stomata, with higher levels of multiplication occurring in bean than in maize. A rainstorm involving a high raindrop momentum was associated with rapid growth of the P. agglomerans strain on both plant species and with rapid growth of both the epiphytic and endophytic populations of the P. syringae pv. syringae strain on bean but not with growth of the P. syringae pv. syringae strain on maize. These results demonstrate that the two bacterial strains employed distinct colonization strategies and that the epiphytic and

  4. Analysis of the Pho regulon in Streptomyces tsukubaensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Robles, María; Santos-Beneit, Fernando; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Martín, Juan F

    2017-12-01

    Phosphate regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomyces has been studied due to the importance of this genus as a source of secondary metabolites with biological activity. Streptomyces tsukubaensis is the main producer of tacrolimus (or FK506), an immunosuppressant macrolide that generates important benefits for the pharmaceutical market. However, the production of tacrolimus is under a negative control by phosphate and, therefore, is important to know the molecular mechanism of this regulation. Despite its important role, there are no reports about the Pho regulon in S. tsukubaensis. In this work we combined transcriptional studies on the response to phosphate starvation with the search for PHO boxes in the whole genome sequence of S. tsukubaensis. As a result, we identified a set of genes responding to phosphate starvation and containing PHO boxes that include common Pho regulon members but also new species-specific candidates. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time the functional activity of PhoP from S. tsukubaensis through complementation studies in a Streptomyces coelicolor ΔphoP strain. For this purpose, we developed an anhydrotetracycline inducible system that can be applied to the controlled expression of target genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the YdeO regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions.

  6. Pseudomonas syringae – Pathogen of Sweet Cherry in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Gavrilović

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of pathogenic Pseudomonas bacterial strains isolated from cherry inSerbia are presented in the article. Two types of symptoms were observed on cherry treesat few localities with intensive production in Serbia (Belgrade, Čačak, Topola, Šabac, NoviSad. The first symptom is bud necrosis and the second bacterial canker of cherry branch.Gram negative, fluorescent, oxidative bacterial strains were isolated from the margin ofnecrotic tissue. All investigated strains were levan and HR positive, while negative resultswere recorded for oxidase, pectinase and arginin dihydrolase tests (LOPAT+- - - +.Based on pathogenicity tests and differential GATT tests, investigated strains weredivided in two distinct groups: the first group consisted of strains isolated from necroticcherry branch which caused necrosis on artificially inoculated cherry, pear and lemon fruits,syringae leaves and bean pods, were gelatin and aesculin positive, and tyrosinase and tartratenegative (typical characteristics of P.s. pv. syringae. Contrary, second group strainswere isolated from necrotic cherry buds, showed negative results in mentioned pathogenicitytests, gelatin and aesculin tests were negative, while tyrosinase and tartrate werepositive (typical characteristics of P.s. pv. morsprunorum.REP PCR analyses showed that strains isolated from necrotic cherry buds belong to P. spv. morsprunorum compared to referent strain. In contrast, isolates obtained from necroticcherry branches had unique fingerprint profiles but different from all reference strains.According to the obtained results it was concluded that both pathovars of P. syringae(syringae and morsprunorum cause necrosis of cherry trees in Serbia.

  7. Nanobody Based Immunoassay for Human Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Detection Using Polymeric Horseradish Peroxidase (PolyHRP) for Signal Enhancement: The Rediscovery of PolyHRP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongyang; Cui, Yongliang; Morisseau, Christophe; Gee, Shirley J; Bever, Candace S; Liu, Xiangjiang; Wu, Jian; Hammock, Bruce D; Ying, Yibin

    2017-06-06

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential pharmacological target for treating hypertension, vascular inflammation, cancer, pain, and multiple cardiovascular related diseases. A variable domain of the heavy chain antibody (termed single domain antibody (sdAb), nanobody, or VHH) possesses the advantages of small size, high stability, ease of genetic manipulation, and ability for continuous manufacture, making such nanobody a superior choice as an immunoreagent. In this work, we developed an ultrasensitive nanobody based immunoassay for human sEH detection using polymeric horseradish peroxidase (PolyHRP) for signal enhancement. Llama nanobodies against human sEH were used as the detection antibody in sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) with polyclonal anti-sEH as the capture antibody. A conventional sandwich ELISA using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) labeled anti-hemeagglutinin (HA) tag as the tracer showed a marginal sensitivity (0.0015 optical density (OD)·mL/ng) and limit of detection (LOD) of 3.02 ng/mL. However, the introduction of the PolyHRP as the tracer demonstrated a 141-fold increase in the sensitivity (0.21 OD·mL/ng) and 57-fold decrease in LOD (0.05 ng/mL). Systematic comparison of three different tracers in four ELISA formats demonstrated the overwhelming advantage of PolyHRP as a label for nanobody based immunoassay. This enhanced sEH immunoassay was further evaluated in terms of selectivity against other epoxide hydrolases and detection of the target protein in human tissue homogenate samples. Comparison with an enzyme activity based assay and a Western blot for sEH detection reveals good correlation with the immunoassay. This work demonstrates increased competiveness of nanobodies for practical sEH protein detection utilizing PolyHRP. It is worthwhile to rediscover the promising potential of PolyHRP in nanobody and other affinity based methods after its low-profile existence for decades.

  8. HRP Chief Scientist's Office: Conducting Research to Enable Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J. B.; Fogarty, J.; Vega, L.; Cromwell, R. L.; Haven, C. P.; McFather, J. C.; Savelev, I.

    2017-01-01

    The HRP Chief Scientist's Office sets the scientific agenda for the Human Research Program. As NASA plans for deep space exploration, HRP is conducting research to ensure the health of astronauts, and optimize human performance during extended duration missions. To accomplish this research, HRP solicits for proposals within the U.S., collaborates with agencies both domestically and abroad, and makes optimal use of ISS resources in support of human research. This session will expand on these topics and provide an opportunity for questions and discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist. Presentations in this session will include: NRA solicitations - process improvements and focus for future solicitations, Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration - future directions (MHRPE 2.0), Extramural liaisons - National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Defense (DOD), Standardized Measures for spaceflight, Ground-based Analogs - international collaborations, and International data sharing.

  9. Defining bacterial regulons using ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kevin S; Park, Dan M; Beauchene, Nicole A; Kiley, Patricia J

    2015-09-15

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful method that identifies protein-DNA binding sites in vivo. Recent studies have illustrated the value of ChIP-seq in studying transcription factor binding in various bacterial species under a variety of growth conditions. These results show that in addition to identifying binding sites, correlation of ChIP-seq data with expression data can reveal important information about bacterial regulons and regulatory networks. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about ChIP-seq methodology in bacteria, from sample preparation to raw data analysis. We also describe visualization and various bioinformatic analyses of processed ChIP-seq data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Defining Bacterial Regulons Using ChIP-seq Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kevin S.; Park, Dan M.; Beauchene, Nicole A.; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful method that identifies protein-DNA binding sites in vivo. Recent studies have illustrated the value of ChIP-seq in studying transcription factor binding in various bacterial species under a variety of growth conditions. These results show that in addition to identifying binding sites, correlation of ChIP-seq data with expression data can reveal important information about bacterial regulons and regulatory networks. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about ChIP-seq methodology in bacteria, from sample preparation to raw data analysis. We also describe visualization and various bioinformatic analyses of processed ChIP-seq data. PMID:26032817

  11. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae uses proteasome inhibitor syringolin A to colonize from wound infection sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johana C Misas-Villamil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA. Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues.

  12. RegPredict: an integrated system for regulon inference in prokaryotes by comparative genomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Novichkova, Elena S.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Arkin, Adam P.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Dubchak, Inna

    2010-05-26

    RegPredict web server is designed to provide comparative genomics tools for reconstruction and analysis of microbial regulons using comparative genomics approach. The server allows the user to rapidly generate reference sets of regulons and regulatory motif profiles in a group of prokaryotic genomes. The new concept of a cluster of co-regulated orthologous operons allows the user to distribute the analysis of large regulons and to perform the comparative analysis of multiple clusters independently. Two major workflows currently implemented in RegPredict are: (i) regulon reconstruction for a known regulatory motif and (ii) ab initio inference of a novel regulon using several scenarios for the generation of starting gene sets. RegPredict provides a comprehensive collection of manually curated positional weight matrices of regulatory motifs. It is based on genomic sequences, ortholog and operon predictions from the MicrobesOnline. An interactive web interface of RegPredict integrates and presents diverse genomic and functional information about the candidate regulon members from several web resources. RegPredict is freely accessible at http://regpredict.lbl.gov.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum HRP2 ELISA for analysis of dried blood spot samples in rural Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Lauren E; Markwalter, Christine F; Kimmel, Danielle W; Mudenda, Lwiindi; Mbambara, Saidon; Thuma, Philip E; Wright, David W

    2017-08-23

    Dried blood spots are commonly used for sample collection in clinical and non-clinical settings. This method is simple, and biomolecules in the samples remain stable for months at room temperature. In the field, blood samples for the study and diagnosis of malaria are often collected on dried blood spot cards, so development of a biomarker extraction and analysis method is needed. A simple extraction procedure for the malarial biomarker Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) from dried blood spots was optimized to achieve maximum extraction efficiency. This method was used to assess the stability of HRP2 in dried blood spots. Furthermore, 328 patient samples made available from rural Zambia were analysed for HRP2 using the developed method. These samples were collected at the initial administration of artemisinin-based combination therapy and at several points following treatment. An average extraction efficiency of 70% HRP2 with a low picomolar detection limit was achieved. In specific storage conditions HRP2 was found to be stable in dried blood spots for at least 6 months. Analysis of patient samples showed the method to have a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 89% when compared with microscopy, and trends in HRP2 clearance after treatment were observed. The dried blood spot ELISA for HRP2 was found to be sensitive, specific and accurate. The method was effectively used to assess biomarker clearance characteristics in patient samples, which prove it to be ideal for gaining further insight into the disease and epidemiological applications.

  14. Bioinformatics Analysis of the Complete Genome Sequence of the Mango Tree Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 Reveals Traits Relevant to Virulence and Epiphytic Lifestyle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Manuel Martínez-García

    Full Text Available The genome sequence of more than 100 Pseudomonas syringae strains has been sequenced to date; however only few of them have been fully assembled, including P. syringae pv. syringae B728a. Different strains of pv. syringae cause different diseases and have different host specificities; so, UMAF0158 is a P. syringae pv. syringae strain related to B728a but instead of being a bean pathogen it causes apical necrosis of mango trees, and the two strains belong to different phylotypes of pv.syringae and clades of P. syringae. In this study we report the complete sequence and annotation of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158 chromosome and plasmid pPSS158. A comparative analysis with the available sequenced genomes of other 25 P. syringae strains, both closed (the reference genomes DC3000, 1448A and B728a and draft genomes was performed. The 5.8 Mb UMAF0158 chromosome has 59.3% GC content and comprises 5017 predicted protein-coding genes. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of genes potentially implicated in the virulence and epiphytic fitness of this strain. We identified several genetic features, which are absent in B728a, that may explain the ability of UMAF0158 to colonize and infect mango trees: the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon mbo, a gene cluster for cellulose production, two different type III and two type VI secretion systems, and a particular T3SS effector repertoire. A mutant strain defective in the rhizobial-like T3SS Rhc showed no differences compared to wild-type during its interaction with host and non-host plants and worms. Here we report the first complete sequence of the chromosome of a pv. syringae strain pathogenic to a woody plant host. Our data also shed light on the genetic factors that possibly determine the pathogenic and epiphytic lifestyle of UMAF0158. This work provides the basis for further analysis on specific mechanisms that enable this strain to infect woody plants and for the functional analysis of host

  15. Flagellar motility confers epiphytic fitness advantages upon Pseudomonas syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haefele, D.M.; Lindow, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    The role of flagellar motility in determining the epiphytic fitness of an ice-nucleation-active strain of Pseudomonas syringae was examined. The loss of flagellar motility reduced the epiphytic fitness of a normally motile P. syringae strain as measured by its growth, survival, and competitive ability on bean leaf surfaces. Equal population sizes of motile parental or nonmotile mutant P. syringae strains were maintained on bean plants for at least 5 days following the inoculation of fully expanded primary leaves. However, when bean seedlings were inoculated before the primary leaves had expanded and bacterial populations on these leaves were quantified at full expansion, the population size of the nonmotile derivative strain reached only 0.9% that of either the motile parental or revertant strain. When fully expanded bean primary leaves were coinoculated with equal numbers of motile and nonmotile cells, the population size of a nonmotile derivative strain was one-third of that of the motile parental or revertant strain after 8 days. Motile and nonmotile cells were exposed in vitro and on plants to UV radiation and desiccating conditions. The motile and nonmotile strains exhibited equal resistance to both stresses in vitro. However, the population size of a nonmotile strain on leaves was less than 20% that of a motile revertant strain when sampled immediately after UV irradiation. Epiphytic populations of both motile and nonmotile P. syringae declined under desiccating conditions on plants, and after 8 days, the population size of a nonmotile strain was less than one-third that of the motile parental or revertant strain

  16. Erwinia amylovora expresses fast and simultaneously hrp/dsp virulence genes during flower infection on apple trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pester, Doris; Milčevičová, Renáta; Schaffer, Johann; Wilhelm, Eva; Blümel, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen entry through host blossoms is the predominant infection pathway of the gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora leading to manifestation of the disease fire blight. Like in other economically important plant pathogens, E. amylovora pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system encoded by hrp genes. However, timing and transcriptional order of hrp gene expression during flower infections are unknown. Using quantitative real-time PCR analyses, we addressed the questions of how fast, strong and uniform key hrp virulence genes and the effector dspA/E are expressed when bacteria enter flowers provided with the full defense mechanism of the apple plant. In non-invasive bacterial inoculations of apple flowers still attached to the tree, E. amylovora activated expression of key type III secretion genes in a narrow time window, mounting in a single expression peak of all investigated hrp/dspA/E genes around 24-48 h post inoculation (hpi). This single expression peak coincided with a single depression in the plant PR-1 expression at 24 hpi indicating transient manipulation of the salicylic acid pathway as one target of E. amylovora type III effectors. Expression of hrp/dspA/E genes was highly correlated to expression of the regulator hrpL and relative transcript abundances followed the ratio: hrpA>hrpN>hrpL>dspA/E. Acidic conditions (pH 4) in flower infections led to reduced virulence/effector gene expression without the typical expression peak observed under natural conditions (pH 7). The simultaneous expression of hrpL, hrpA, hrpN, and the effector dspA/E during early floral infection indicates that speed and immediate effector transmission is important for successful plant invasion. When this delicate balance is disturbed, e.g., by acidic pH during infection, virulence gene expression is reduced, thus partly explaining the efficacy of acidification in fire blight control on a molecular level.

  17. Computational analysis of LexA regulons in Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhengchang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor LexA plays an important role in the SOS response in Escherichia coli and many other bacterial species studied. Although the lexA gene is encoded in almost every bacterial group with a wide range of evolutionary distances, its precise functions in each group/species are largely unknown. More recently, it has been shown that lexA genes in two cyanobacterial genomes Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 might have distinct functions other than the regulation of the SOS response. To gain a general understanding of the functions of LexA and its evolution in cyanobacteria, we conducted the current study. Results Our analysis indicates that six of 33 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes do not harbor a lexA gene although they all encode the key SOS response genes, suggesting that LexA is not an indispensable transcription factor in these cyanobacteria, and that their SOS responses might be regulated by different mechanisms. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that lexA was lost during the course of evolution in these six cyanobacterial genomes. For the 26 cyanobacterial genomes that encode a lexA gene, we have predicted their LexA-binding sites and regulons using an efficient binding site/regulon prediction algorithm that we developed previously. Our results show that LexA in most of these 26 genomes might still function as the transcriptional regulator of the SOS response genes as seen in E. coli and other organisms. Interestingly, putative LexA-binding sites were also found in some genomes for some key genes involved in a variety of other biological processes including photosynthesis, drug resistance, etc., suggesting that there is crosstalk between the SOS response and these biological processes. In particular, LexA in both Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 and Gloeobacter violaceus PCC7421 has largely diverged from those in other cyanobacteria in the sequence level. It is likely that LexA is no longer a

  18. Bradyrhizobium elkanii nod regulon: insights through genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane M. P. Passaglia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A successful symbiotic relationship between soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] and Bradyrhizobium species requires expression of the bacterial structural nod genes that encode for the synthesis of lipochitooligosaccharide nodulation signal molecules, known as Nod factors (NFs. Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA 110 possesses a wide nodulation gene repertoire that allows NF assembly and modification, with transcription of the nodYABCSUIJnolMNOnodZ operon depending upon specific activators, i.e., products of regulatory nod genes that are responsive to signaling molecules such as flavonoid compounds exuded by host plant roots. Central to this regulatory circuit of nod gene expression are NodD proteins, members of the LysR-type regulator family. In this study, publicly available Bradyrhizobium elkanii sequenced genomes were compared with the closely related B. diazoefficiens USDA 110 reference genome to determine the similarities between those genomes, especially with regards to the nod operon and nod regulon. Bioinformatics analyses revealed a correlation between functional mechanisms and key elements that play an essential role in the regulation of nod gene expression. These analyses also revealed new genomic features that had not been clearly explored before, some of which were unique for some B. elkanii genomes.

  19. The multifaceted RisA regulon of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutte, Loïc; Huot, Ludovic; Antoine, Rudy; Slupek, Stephanie; Merkel, Tod J; Chen, Qing; Stibitz, Scott; Hot, David; Locht, Camille

    2016-09-13

    The whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis regulates the production of its virulence factors by the BvgA/S system. Phosphorylated BvgA activates the virulence-activated genes (vags) and represses the expression of the virulence-repressed genes (vrgs) via the activation of the bvgR gene. In modulating conditions, with MgSO4, the BvgA/S system is inactive, and the vrgs are expressed. Here, we show that the expression of almost all vrgs depends on RisA, another transcriptional regulator. We also show that some vags are surprisingly no longer modulated by MgSO4 in the risA(-) background. RisA also regulates the expression of other genes, including chemotaxis and flagellar operons, iron-regulated genes, and genes of unknown function, which may or may not be controlled by BvgA/S. We identified RisK as the likely cognate RisA kinase and found that it is important for expression of most, but not all RisA-regulated genes. This was confirmed using the phosphoablative RisAD(60)N and the phosphomimetic RisAD(60)E analogues. Thus the RisA regulon adds a new layer of complexity to B. pertussis virulence gene regulation.

  20. Regulation of membrane peptides by the Pseudomonas plasmid alk regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, S; Oppici, M; Shapiro, J; Fennewald, M

    1979-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains carrying the plasmid alk genes will grow on n-alkanes. Induced alk+ strains contain membrane activities for alkane hydroxylation and dehydrogenation of aliphatic primary alcohols. P. putida cytoplasmic and outer membranes can be separated by sucrose gradient centrifugation after disruption of cells by either mild detergent lysis or passage through a French press. Both the membrane component of alkane hydroxylase and membrane alcohol dehydrogenase fractionated with the cytoplasmic membrane. Induction of the alk regulon resulted in the appearance of at least three new plasmid-determined cytoplasmic membrane peptides of about 59,000 (59K), 47,000 (47K), and 40,000 (40K) daltons as well as the disappearance of a pair of chromosomally encoded outer membrane peptides of about 43,000 daltons. The 40K peptide is the membrane component of alkane hydroxylase and the product of the plasmid alkB gene because the alkB1029 mutation altered the properties of alkane hydroxylase in whole cells, reduced its thermal stability in cell extracts, and led to increased electrophoretic mobility of the inducible 40K peptide. These results are consistent with a model for vectorial oxidation of n-alkanes in the cytoplasmic membrane of P. putida.

  1. GAL regulon of Saccharomyces cerevisiae performs optimally to maximize growth on galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Pushkar; Venkatesh, Kareenhalli V

    2014-03-01

    The GAL regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a well-characterized genetic network that is utilized for the metabolism of galactose as an energy source. The network contains a transcriptional activator, Gal4p, which binds to its cognate-binding site to express GAL genes. Further, Gal80p and Gal3p are the repressor and galactose sensor, respectively, which are also under the regulation of GAL regulon. It is shown that the wild-type strain produces only about 80% of the maximum expression feasible from the regulon, which is observed in a mutant strain lacking Gal80p. This raises a fundamental question regarding the optimality of expression from the GAL regulon in S. cerevisiae. To address this issue, we evaluated the burden on growth due to the synthesis of GAL proteins in S. cerevisiae. The analysis demonstrated that both the media type and the extent of enzyme synthesized play a role in determining the burden on growth. We show that the burden can be quantified by relating to a parameter, β, the ratio of enzyme activity to the initial substrate concentration. The analysis demonstrated that the GAL regulon of the wild-type strain performed effectively to optimize growth on galactose. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. AtHIPM, an ortholog of the apple HrpN-interacting protein, is a negative regulator of plant growth and mediates the growth-enhancing effect of HrpN in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Beer, Steven V

    2007-10-01

    HrpN (harpin) protein is critical to the virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in host plants like apple (Malus x domestica). Moreover, exogenous treatment of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a nonhost plant, with partially purified HrpN enhances growth. To address the bases of the effects of HrpN in disease, we sought a HrpN-interacting protein(s) in apple, using a yeast two-hybrid assay. A single positive clone, designated HIPM (HrpN-interacting protein from Malus), was found. HIPM, a 6.5-kD protein, interacted with HrpN in yeast and in vitro. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 198 of 403 amino acids of HrpN are required for interaction with HIPM. HIPM orthologs were found in Arabidopsis (AtHIPM) and rice (Oryza sativa; OsHIPM). HrpN also interacted with AtHIPM in yeast and in vitro. In silico analyses revealed that the three plant proteins contain putative signal peptides and putative transmembrane domains. We showed that both HIPM and AtHIPM have functional signal peptides, and green fluorescent protein-tagged HIPM and AtHIPM associated, in clusters, with plasma membranes. Both HIPM and AtHIPM are expressed constitutively; however, they are expressed more strongly in apple and Arabidopsis flowers than in leaves and stems. The size of AtHIPM knockout mutant plants of Arabidopsis was slightly larger than the wild-type plants. Interestingly, the knockout mutant did not exhibit enhanced plant growth in response to treatment with HrpN. Overexpression of AtHIPM conversely resulted in smaller plants. These results indicate that AtHIPM functions as a negative regulator of plant growth and mediates enhanced growth that results from treatment with HrpN.

  3. AtHIPM, an Ortholog of the Apple HrpN-Interacting Protein, Is a Negative Regulator of Plant Growth and Mediates the Growth-Enhancing Effect of HrpN in Arabidopsis1[C][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Beer, Steven V.

    2007-01-01

    HrpN (harpin) protein is critical to the virulence of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora in host plants like apple (Malus x domestica). Moreover, exogenous treatment of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a nonhost plant, with partially purified HrpN enhances growth. To address the bases of the effects of HrpN in disease, we sought a HrpN-interacting protein(s) in apple, using a yeast two-hybrid assay. A single positive clone, designated HIPM (HrpN-interacting protein from Malus), was found. HIPM, a 6.5-kD protein, interacted with HrpN in yeast and in vitro. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 198 of 403 amino acids of HrpN are required for interaction with HIPM. HIPM orthologs were found in Arabidopsis (AtHIPM) and rice (Oryza sativa; OsHIPM). HrpN also interacted with AtHIPM in yeast and in vitro. In silico analyses revealed that the three plant proteins contain putative signal peptides and putative transmembrane domains. We showed that both HIPM and AtHIPM have functional signal peptides, and green fluorescent protein-tagged HIPM and AtHIPM associated, in clusters, with plasma membranes. Both HIPM and AtHIPM are expressed constitutively; however, they are expressed more strongly in apple and Arabidopsis flowers than in leaves and stems. The size of AtHIPM knockout mutant plants of Arabidopsis was slightly larger than the wild-type plants. Interestingly, the knockout mutant did not exhibit enhanced plant growth in response to treatment with HrpN. Overexpression of AtHIPM conversely resulted in smaller plants. These results indicate that AtHIPM functions as a negative regulator of plant growth and mediates enhanced growth that results from treatment with HrpN. PMID:17704235

  4. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  5. HrpNEa-induced deterrent effect on phloem feeding of the green ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    State Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory for Monitoring and Management of Crop Pathogens and Insect Pests, Nanjing ... In response to HrpNEa, AtGSL5 expression and callose deposition were induced in the wild-type plant but not in atgsl5. .... as AtGSL1 through AtGSL12 in Arabidopsis (for review, see. Chen and Kim ...

  6. The hnRNP A1 homolog Hrp36 is essential for normal development ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-11

    Aug 11, 2012 ... [Singh AK and Lakhotia SC 2012 The hnRNP A1 homolog Hrp36 is essential for normal development, female fecundity, omega speckle formation and stress tolerance in ..... (b), freshly emerged flies (c) or within 3 days after emergence (d) when reared from egg hatching onwards at 30°C±1°C. Figure 1.

  7. NASA Human Research Program (HRP). International Space Station Medical Project (ISSMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the various flight investigations performed on the International Space Station as part of the NASA Human Research Program (HRP). The evaluations include: 1) Stability; 2) Periodic Fitness Evaluation with Oxygen Uptake Measurement; 3) Nutrition; 4) CCISS; 5) Sleep; 6) Braslet; 7) Integrated Immune; 8) Epstein Barr; 9) Biophosphonates; 10) Integrated cardiovascular; and 11) VO2 max.

  8. Reconstruction of the core and extended regulons of global transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann S Dufour

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The processes underlying the evolution of regulatory networks are unclear. To address this question, we used a comparative genomics approach that takes advantage of the large number of sequenced bacterial genomes to predict conserved and variable members of transcriptional regulatory networks across phylogenetically related organisms. Specifically, we developed a computational method to predict the conserved regulons of transcription factors across alpha-proteobacteria. We focused on the CRP/FNR super-family of transcription factors because it contains several well-characterized members, such as FNR, FixK, and DNR. While FNR, FixK, and DNR are each proposed to regulate different aspects of anaerobic metabolism, they are predicted to recognize very similar DNA target sequences, and they occur in various combinations among individual alpha-proteobacterial species. In this study, the composition of the respective FNR, FixK, or DNR conserved regulons across 87 alpha-proteobacterial species was predicted by comparing the phylogenetic profiles of the regulators with the profiles of putative target genes. The utility of our predictions was evaluated by experimentally characterizing the FnrL regulon (a FNR-type regulator in the alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Our results show that this approach correctly predicted many regulon members, provided new insights into the biological functions of the respective regulons for these regulators, and suggested models for the evolution of the corresponding transcriptional networks. Our findings also predict that, at least for the FNR-type regulators, there is a core set of target genes conserved across many species. In addition, the members of the so-called extended regulons for the FNR-type regulators vary even among closely related species, possibly reflecting species-specific adaptation to environmental and other factors. The comparative genomics approach we developed is readily applicable to other

  9. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Roccella, S.; Candura, D.; Palermo, M.; Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A.; Sanguinetti, G.P.; Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m 2 but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m 2 during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  10. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  11. Dual Effect of the Cubic Ag₃PO₄ Crystal on Pseudomonas syringae Growth and Plant Immunity

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    Mi Kyung Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that the antibacterial activity of silver phosphate crystals on Escherichia coli depends on their structure. We here show that the cubic form of silver phosphate crystal (SPC can also be applied to inhibit the growth of a plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae bacterium. SPC pretreatment resulted in reduced in planta multiplication of P. syringae. Induced expression of a plant defense marker gene PR1 by SPC alone is suggestive of its additional plant immunity-stimulating activity. Since SPC can simultaneously inhibit P. syringae growth and induce plant defense responses, it might be used as a more effective plant disease-controlling agent.

  12. Chemical and Metabolic Aspects of Antimetabolite Toxins Produced by Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars

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    Eva Arrebola

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium present in a wide variety of host plants where it causes diseases with economic impact. The symptoms produced by Pseudomonas syringae include chlorosis and necrosis of plant tissues, which are caused, in part, by antimetabolite toxins. This category of toxins, which includes tabtoxin, phaseolotoxin and mangotoxin, is produced by different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. These toxins are small peptidic molecules that target enzymes of amino acids’ biosynthetic pathways, inhibiting their activity and interfering in the general nitrogen metabolism. A general overview of the toxins’ chemistry, biosynthesis, activity, virulence and potential applications will be reviewed in this work.

  13. Induction of Callose Deposition in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea

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    Pipit Marianingsih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major component of outer-membrane gram-negative bacteria, and it can act as a Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP for perception of pathogens by plants. LPS can be recognized by plants, triggering certain plant defense-related responses, including callose deposition. This study investigated induction of callose deposition by bacterial LPS in tobacco. Tobacco leaves were infiltrated with 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL LPS extracted from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea (Pgl and incubated for 24 h or 48 h. To detect callose deposition, tobacco leaves were cleared in lactophenol solution, stained with aniline blue, and visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that LPS from Pgl induced more callose deposition in tobacco leaves than did that from Pta. In addition, a Pearson correlation test revealed that incubation period was the most significant factor in callose deposition, followed by the type of LPS bacteria. However, LPS concentration was not significantly corelated to callose deposition in tobacco leaves.

  14. Characterization of five ECF sigma factors in the genome of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a.

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    Poulami Basu Thakur

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a, a bacterial pathogen of bean, utilizes large surface populations and extracellular signaling to initiate a fundamental change from an epiphytic to a pathogenic lifestyle. Extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma (σ factors serve as important regulatory factors in responding to various environmental signals. Bioinformatic analysis of the B728a genome revealed 10 ECF sigma factors. This study analyzed deletion mutants of five previously uncharacterized ECF sigma factor genes in B728a, including three FecI-type ECF sigma factors (ECF5, ECF6, and ECF7 and two ECF sigma factors placed in groups ECF11 and ECF18. Transcriptional profiling by qRT-PCR analysis of ECF sigma factor mutants was used to measure expression of their associated anti-sigma and outer membrane receptor proteins, and expression of genes associated with production of extracellular polysaccharides, fimbriae, glycine betaine and syringomycin. Notably, the B728aΔecf7 mutant displayed reduced swarming and had decreased expression of CupC fimbrial genes. Growth and pathogenicity assays, using a susceptible bean host, revealed that none of the tested sigma factor genes are required for in planta growth and lesion formation.

  15. The BvgAS Regulon of Bordetella pertussis

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    Kyung Moon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nearly all virulence factors in Bordetella pertussis are activated by a master two-component system, BvgAS, composed of the sensor kinase BvgS and the response regulator BvgA. When BvgS is active, BvgA is phosphorylated (BvgA~P, and virulence-activated genes (vags are expressed [Bvg(+ mode]. When BvgS is inactive and BvgA is not phosphorylated, virulence-repressed genes (vrgs are induced [Bvg(− mode]. Here, we have used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR to define the BvgAS-dependent regulon of B. pertussis Tohama I. Our analyses reveal more than 550 BvgA-regulated genes, of which 353 are newly identified. BvgA-activated genes include those encoding two-component systems (such as kdpED, multiple other transcriptional regulators, and the extracytoplasmic function (ECF sigma factor brpL, which is needed for type 3 secretion system (T3SS expression, further establishing the importance of BvgA~P as an apex regulator of transcriptional networks promoting virulence. Using in vitro transcription, we demonstrate that the promoter for brpL is directly activated by BvgA~P. BvgA-FeBABE cleavage reactions identify BvgA~P binding sites centered at positions −41.5 and −63.5 in bprL. Most importantly, we show for the first time that genes for multiple and varied metabolic pathways are significantly upregulated in the B. pertussis Bvg(− mode. These include genes for fatty acid and lipid metabolism, sugar and amino acid transporters, pyruvate dehydrogenase, phenylacetic acid degradation, and the glycolate/glyoxylate utilization pathway. Our results suggest that metabolic changes in the Bvg(− mode may be participating in bacterial survival, transmission, and/or persistence and identify over 200 new vrgs that can be tested for function.

  16. Erwinia amylovora expresses fast and simultaneously hrp/dsp virulence genes during flower infection on apple trees.

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    Doris Pester

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen entry through host blossoms is the predominant infection pathway of the gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora leading to manifestation of the disease fire blight. Like in other economically important plant pathogens, E. amylovora pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion system encoded by hrp genes. However, timing and transcriptional order of hrp gene expression during flower infections are unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using quantitative real-time PCR analyses, we addressed the questions of how fast, strong and uniform key hrp virulence genes and the effector dspA/E are expressed when bacteria enter flowers provided with the full defense mechanism of the apple plant. In non-invasive bacterial inoculations of apple flowers still attached to the tree, E. amylovora activated expression of key type III secretion genes in a narrow time window, mounting in a single expression peak of all investigated hrp/dspA/E genes around 24-48 h post inoculation (hpi. This single expression peak coincided with a single depression in the plant PR-1 expression at 24 hpi indicating transient manipulation of the salicylic acid pathway as one target of E. amylovora type III effectors. Expression of hrp/dspA/E genes was highly correlated to expression of the regulator hrpL and relative transcript abundances followed the ratio: hrpA>hrpN>hrpL>dspA/E. Acidic conditions (pH 4 in flower infections led to reduced virulence/effector gene expression without the typical expression peak observed under natural conditions (pH 7. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The simultaneous expression of hrpL, hrpA, hrpN, and the effector dspA/E during early floral infection indicates that speed and immediate effector transmission is important for successful plant invasion. When this delicate balance is disturbed, e.g., by acidic pH during infection, virulence gene expression is reduced, thus partly explaining the efficacy of acidification in fire blight

  17. Modeling and analysis of the dynamic behavior of the XlnR regulon in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omony, J.; Graaff, de L.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In this paper the dynamics of the transcription-translation system for XlnR regulon in Aspergillus niger is modeled. The model is based on Hill regulation functions and uses ordinary differential equations. The network response to a trigger of D-xylose is considered and stability

  18. The MetJ regulon in gammaproteobacteria determined by comparative genomics methods

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    Augustus Anne M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has proceeded at an exponential pace but annotation validation has lagged behind. For instance, the MetJ regulon, which controls methionine biosynthesis and transport, has been studied almost exclusively in E. coli and Salmonella, but homologs of MetJ exist in a variety of other species. These include some that are pathogenic (e.g. Yersinia and some that are important for environmental remediation (e.g. Shewanella but many of which have not been extensively characterized in the literature. Results We have determined the likely composition of the MetJ regulon in all species which have MetJ homologs using bioinformatics techniques. We show that the core genes known from E. coli are consistently regulated in other species, and we identify previously unknown members of the regulon. These include the cobalamin transporter, btuB; all the genes involved in the methionine salvage pathway; as well as several enzymes and transporters of unknown specificity. Conclusions The MetJ regulon is present and functional in five orders of gammaproteobacteria: Enterobacteriales, Pasteurellales, Vibrionales, Aeromonadales and Alteromonadales. New regulatory activity for MetJ was identified in the genomic data and verified experimentally. This strategy should be applicable for the elucidation of regulatory pathways in other systems by using the extensive sequencing data currently being generated.

  19. The response of Bacillus licheniformis to heat and ethanol stress and the role of the SigB regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Birgit; Schroeter, Rebecca; Jürgen, Britta; Albrecht, Dirk; Evers, Stefan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schweder, Thomas; Hecker, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The heat and ethanol stress response of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 was analyzed at the transcriptional and/or translational level. During heat shock, regulons known to be heat-induced in Bacillus subtilis 168 are upregulated in B. licheniformis, such as the HrcA, SigB, CtsR, and CssRS regulon. Upregulation of the SigY regulon and of genes controlled by other extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors indicates a cell-wall stress triggered by the heat shock. Furthermore, tryptophan synthesis enzymes were upregulated in heat stressed cells as well as regulons involved in usage of alternative carbon and nitrogen sources. Ethanol stress led to an induction of the SigB, HrcA, and CtsR regulons. As indicated by the upregulation of a SigM-dependent protein, ethanol also triggered a cell wall stress. To characterize the SigB regulon of B. licheniformis, we analyzed the heat stress response of a sigB mutant. It is shown that the B. licheniformis SigB regulon comprises additional genes, some of which do not exist in B. subtilis, such as BLi03885, encoding a hypothetical protein, the Na/solute symporter gene BLi02212, the arginase homolog-encoding gene BLi00198 and mcrA, encoding a protein with endonuclease activity. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The copper-responsive RicR regulon contributes to Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Festa, Richard A; Ioerger, Thomas R; Butler-Wu, Susan; Sacchettini, James C; Darwin, K Heran; Samanovic, Marie I

    2014-02-18

    As with most life on Earth, the transition metal copper (Cu) is essential for the viability of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, infected hosts can also use Cu to control microbial growth. Several Cu-responsive pathways are present in M. tuberculosis, including the regulated in copper repressor (RicR) regulon, which is unique to pathogenic mycobacteria. In this work, we describe the contribution of each RicR-regulated gene to Cu resistance in vitro and to virulence in animals. We found that the deletion or disruption of individual RicR-regulated genes had no impact on virulence in mice, although several mutants had Cu hypersensitivity. In contrast, a mutant unable to activate the RicR regulon was not only highly susceptible to Cu but also attenuated in mice. Thus, these data suggest that several genes of the RicR regulon are required simultaneously to combat Cu toxicity in vivo or that this regulon is also important for resistance against Cu-independent mechanisms of host defense. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis, killing millions of people every year. Therefore, understanding the biology of M. tuberculosis is crucial for the development of new therapies to treat this devastating disease. Our studies reveal that although host-supplied Cu can suppress bacterial growth, M. tuberculosis has a unique pathway, the RicR regulon, to defend against Cu toxicity. These findings suggest that Cu homeostasis pathways in both the host and the pathogen could be exploited for the treatment of tuberculosis.

  1. The post-transcriptional regulator rsmA/csrA activates T3SS by stabilizing the 5' UTR of hrpG, the master regulator of hrp/hrc genes, in Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maxuel O; Farah, Chuck S; Wang, Nian

    2014-02-01

    The RsmA/CsrA family of the post-transcriptional regulators of bacteria is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that rsmA not only is required for the full virulence of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XCC) but also contributes to triggering the hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host plants. Deletion of rsmA resulted in significantly reduced virulence in the host plant sweet orange and a delayed and weakened HR in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Microarray, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, western-blotting, and GUS assays indicated that RsmA regulates the expression of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The regulation of T3SS by RsmA is a universal phenomenon in T3SS-containing bacteria, but the specific mechanism seems to depend on the interaction between a particular bacterium and its hosts. For Xanthomonads, the mechanism by which RsmA activates T3SS remains unknown. Here, we show that RsmA activates the expression of T3SS-encoding hrp/hrc genes by directly binding to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of hrpG, the master regulator of the hrp/hrc genes in XCC. RsmA stabilizes hrpG mRNA, leading to increased accumulation of HrpG proteins and subsequently, the activation of hrp/hrc genes. The activation of the hrp/hrc genes by RsmA via HrpG was further supported by the observation that ectopic overexpression of hrpG in an rsmA mutant restored its ability to cause disease in host plants and trigger HR in non-host plants. RsmA also stabilizes the transcripts of another T3SS-associated hrpD operon by directly binding to the 5' UTR region. Taken together, these data revealed that RsmA primarily activates T3SS by acting as a positive regulator of hrpG and that this regulation is critical to the pathogenicity of XCC.

  2. The Post-transcriptional Regulator rsmA/csrA Activates T3SS by Stabilizing the 5′ UTR of hrpG, the Master Regulator of hrp/hrc Genes, in Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Maxuel O.; Farah, Chuck S.; Wang, Nian

    2014-01-01

    The RsmA/CsrA family of the post-transcriptional regulators of bacteria is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that rsmA not only is required for the full virulence of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XCC) but also contributes to triggering the hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host plants. Deletion of rsmA resulted in significantly reduced virulence in the host plant sweet orange and a delayed and weakened HR in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Microarray, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, western-blotting, and GUS assays indicated that RsmA regulates the expression of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The regulation of T3SS by RsmA is a universal phenomenon in T3SS-containing bacteria, but the specific mechanism seems to depend on the interaction between a particular bacterium and its hosts. For Xanthomonads, the mechanism by which RsmA activates T3SS remains unknown. Here, we show that RsmA activates the expression of T3SS-encoding hrp/hrc genes by directly binding to the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of hrpG, the master regulator of the hrp/hrc genes in XCC. RsmA stabilizes hrpG mRNA, leading to increased accumulation of HrpG proteins and subsequently, the activation of hrp/hrc genes. The activation of the hrp/hrc genes by RsmA via HrpG was further supported by the observation that ectopic overexpression of hrpG in an rsmA mutant restored its ability to cause disease in host plants and trigger HR in non-host plants. RsmA also stabilizes the transcripts of another T3SS-associated hrpD operon by directly binding to the 5′ UTR region. Taken together, these data revealed that RsmA primarily activates T3SS by acting as a positive regulator of hrpG and that this regulation is critical to the pathogenicity of XCC. PMID:24586158

  3. The post-transcriptional regulator rsmA/csrA activates T3SS by stabilizing the 5' UTR of hrpG, the master regulator of hrp/hrc genes, in Xanthomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxuel O Andrade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The RsmA/CsrA family of the post-transcriptional regulators of bacteria is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes, including pathogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that rsmA not only is required for the full virulence of the phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XCC but also contributes to triggering the hypersensitive response (HR in non-host plants. Deletion of rsmA resulted in significantly reduced virulence in the host plant sweet orange and a delayed and weakened HR in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana. Microarray, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, western-blotting, and GUS assays indicated that RsmA regulates the expression of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The regulation of T3SS by RsmA is a universal phenomenon in T3SS-containing bacteria, but the specific mechanism seems to depend on the interaction between a particular bacterium and its hosts. For Xanthomonads, the mechanism by which RsmA activates T3SS remains unknown. Here, we show that RsmA activates the expression of T3SS-encoding hrp/hrc genes by directly binding to the 5' untranslated region (UTR of hrpG, the master regulator of the hrp/hrc genes in XCC. RsmA stabilizes hrpG mRNA, leading to increased accumulation of HrpG proteins and subsequently, the activation of hrp/hrc genes. The activation of the hrp/hrc genes by RsmA via HrpG was further supported by the observation that ectopic overexpression of hrpG in an rsmA mutant restored its ability to cause disease in host plants and trigger HR in non-host plants. RsmA also stabilizes the transcripts of another T3SS-associated hrpD operon by directly binding to the 5' UTR region. Taken together, these data revealed that RsmA primarily activates T3SS by acting as a positive regulator of hrpG and that this regulation is critical to the pathogenicity of XCC.

  4. Identification of a putative cognate sensor kinase for the two-component response regulator HrpG, a key regulator controlling the expression of the hrp genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui-Fang; Lu, Guang-Tao; Li, Lei; Su, Hui-Zhao; Feng, Guo-fang; Chen, Ya; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    The bacterial phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) relies on the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) genes to cause disease and induce hypersensitive response (HR). The hrp genes of bacterial phytopathogens are divided into two groups. Xcc hrp genes belong to group II. It has long been known that the group II hrp genes are activated by an AraC-type transcriptional regulator whose expression is controlled by a two-component system (TCS) response regulator (named HrpG in Xcc). However, no cognate sensor kinase has yet been identified. Here, we present evidence showing that the Xcc open-reading frame XC_3670 encodes a TCS sensor kinase (named HpaS). Mutation of hpaS almost completely abolished the HR induction and virulence. Bacterial two-hybrid and protein pull-down assays revealed that HpaS physically interacted with HrpG. Phos-tag™ SDS-PAGE analysis showed that mutation in hpaS reduced markedly the phosphorylation of HrpG in vivo. These data suggest that HpaS and HrpG are most likely to form a TCS. We also showed that XC_3669 (named hpaR2), which is adjacent to hpaS and encodes a putative TCS response regulator, is required for full virulence but not HR induction. HpaR2 also physically interacted with HpaS, suggesting that HpaS may also form another TCS with HpaR2. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Homeopathic Treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana Plants Infected with Pseudomonas syringae

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    Devika Shah-Rossi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeopathic basic research is still in the screening phase to identify promising model systems that are adapted to the needs and peculiarities of homeopathic medicine and pharmacy. We investigated the potential of a common plant-pathogen system, Arabidopsis thaliana infected with the virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae, regarding its response towards a homeopathic treatment. A. thaliana plants were treated with homeopathic preparations before and after infection. Outcome measure was the number of P. syringae bacteria in the leaves of A. thaliana, assessed in randomized and blinded experiments. After a screening of 30 homeopathic preparations, we investigated the effect of Carbo vegetabilis 30x, Magnesium phosphoricum 30x, Nosode 30x, Biplantol (a homeopathic complex remedy, and Biplantol 30x on the infection rate in five or six independent experiments in total. The screening yielded significant effects for four out of 30 tested preparations. In the repeated experimental series, only the homeopathic complex remedy Biplantol induced a significant reduction of the infection rate (p = 0.01; effect size, d = 0.38. None of the other four repeatedly tested preparations (Carbo vegetabilis 30x, Magnesium phosphoricum 30x, Nosode 30x, Biplantol 30x yielded significant effects in the overall evaluation. This phytopathological model yielded a small to medium effect size and thus might be of interest for homeopathic basic research after further improvement. Compared to Bion (a common SAR inducer used as positive control, the magnitude of the treatment effect of Biplantol was about 50%. Thus, homeopathic formulations might have a potential for the treatment of plant diseases after further optimization. However, the ecological impact should be investigated more closely before widespread application.

  6. Soil water flow is a source of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in subalpine headwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteil, Caroline L; Lafolie, François; Laurent, Jimmy; Clement, Jean-Christophe; Simler, Roland; Travi, Yves; Morris, Cindy E

    2014-07-01

    The airborne plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is ubiquitous in headwaters, snowpack and precipitation where its populations are genetically and phenotypically diverse. Here, we assessed its population dynamics during snowmelt in headwaters of the French Alps. We revealed a continuous and significant transport of P.syringae by these waters in which the population density is correlated with water chemistry. Via in situ observations and laboratory experiments, we validated that P.syringae is effectively transported with the snow melt and rain water infiltrating through the soil of subalpine grasslands, leading to the same range of concentrations as measured in headwaters (10(2) -10(5) CFU l(-1) ). A population structure analysis confirmed the relatedness between populations in percolated water and those above the ground (i.e. rain, leaf litter and snowpack). However, the transport study in porous media suggested that water percolation could have different efficiencies for different strains of P.syringae. Finally, leaching of soil cores incubated for up to 4 months at 8°C showed that indigenous populations of P.syringae were able to survive in subalpine soil under cold temperature. This study brings to light the underestimated role of hydrological processes involved in the long distance dissemination of P.syringae. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fungicidal activities and mechanisms of action of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae lipodepsipeptide syringopeptins 22A and 25A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekki F. Bensaci

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The plant-associated bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae simultaneously produces two classes of metabolites: the small cyclic lipodepsinonapeptides such as the syringomycins and the larger cyclic lipodepsipeptide syringopeptins SP22 or SP25. The syringomycins inhibit a broad spectrum of fungi (but particularly yeasts by lipid-dependent membrane interaction. The syringopeptins are phytotoxic and inhibitory to Gram positive bacteria. In this study, the fungicidal activities of two major syringopeptins, SP22A and SP25A, and their mechanisms of action were investigated and compared to those of syringomycin E. SP22A and SP25A were observed to inhibit the fungal yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans although less effectively than syringomycin E. S. cerevisiae mutants defective in ergosterol and sphingolipid biosyntheses were less susceptible to SP22A and SP25A but the relative inhibitory capabilities of SRE vs. SP22A and SP25A were maintained. Similar differences were observed for capabilities to cause cellular K+ and Ca2+ fluxes in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, in phospholipid bilayers the syringopeptins are found to induce larger macroscopic ionic conductances than syringomycin E but form single channels with similar properties. These findings suggest that the syringopeptins target the yeast plasma membrane, and, like syringomycin E, employ a lipid-dependent channel forming mechanism of action. The differing degrees of growth inhibition by these lipodepsipeptides may be explained by differences in their hydrophobicity. The more hydrophobic SP22A and SP25A might interact more strongly with the yeast cell wall that would create a selective barrier for their incorporation into the plasma membrane.

  8. Resistant and susceptible responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa to bacterial stem blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

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    Lev G Nemchinov

    Full Text Available Bacterial stem blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is a common disease of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. Little is known about host-pathogen interactions and host defense mechanisms. Here, individual resistant and susceptible plants were selected from cultivars Maverick and ZG9830 and used for transcript profiling at 24 and 72 hours after inoculation (hai with the isolate PssALF3. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs in resistant and susceptible genotypes. Although resistant plants from each cultivar produced a hypersensitive response, transcriptome analyses indicated that they respond differently at the molecular level. The number of DEGs was higher in resistant plants of ZG9830 at 24 hai than in Maverick, suggesting that ZG9830 plants had a more rapid effector triggered immune response. Unique up-regulated genes in resistant ZG9830 plants included genes encoding putative nematode resistance HSPRO2-like proteins, orthologs for the rice Xa21 and soybean Rpg1-b resistance genes, and TIR-containing R genes lacking both NBS and LRR domains. The suite of R genes up-regulated in resistant Maverick plants had an over-representation of R genes in the CC-NBS-LRR family including two genes for atypical CCR domains and a putative ortholog of the Arabidopsis RPM1 gene. Resistance in both cultivars appears to be mediated primarily by WRKY family transcription factors and expression of genes involved in protein phosphorylation, regulation of transcription, defense response including synthesis of isoflavonoids, and oxidation-reduction processes. These results will further the identification of mechanisms involved in resistance to facilitate selection of parent populations and development of commercial varieties.

  9. Resistant and susceptible responses in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) to bacterial stem blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchinov, Lev G; Shao, Jonathan; Lee, Maya N; Postnikova, Olga A; Samac, Deborah A

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial stem blight caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is a common disease of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L). Little is known about host-pathogen interactions and host defense mechanisms. Here, individual resistant and susceptible plants were selected from cultivars Maverick and ZG9830 and used for transcript profiling at 24 and 72 hours after inoculation (hai) with the isolate PssALF3. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in resistant and susceptible genotypes. Although resistant plants from each cultivar produced a hypersensitive response, transcriptome analyses indicated that they respond differently at the molecular level. The number of DEGs was higher in resistant plants of ZG9830 at 24 hai than in Maverick, suggesting that ZG9830 plants had a more rapid effector triggered immune response. Unique up-regulated genes in resistant ZG9830 plants included genes encoding putative nematode resistance HSPRO2-like proteins, orthologs for the rice Xa21 and soybean Rpg1-b resistance genes, and TIR-containing R genes lacking both NBS and LRR domains. The suite of R genes up-regulated in resistant Maverick plants had an over-representation of R genes in the CC-NBS-LRR family including two genes for atypical CCR domains and a putative ortholog of the Arabidopsis RPM1 gene. Resistance in both cultivars appears to be mediated primarily by WRKY family transcription factors and expression of genes involved in protein phosphorylation, regulation of transcription, defense response including synthesis of isoflavonoids, and oxidation-reduction processes. These results will further the identification of mechanisms involved in resistance to facilitate selection of parent populations and development of commercial varieties.

  10. The GlnR Regulon in Streptococcus mutans Is Differentially Regulated by GlnR and PmrA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ywan M Chen

    Full Text Available GlnR-mediated repression of the GlnR regulon at acidic pH is required for optimal acid tolerance in Streptococcus mutans, the etiologic agent for dental caries. Unlike most streptococci, the GlnR regulon is also regulated by newly identified PmrA (SMUGS5_RS05810 at the transcriptional level in S. mutans GS5. Results from gel mobility shift assays confirmed that both GlnR and PmrA recognized the putative GlnR box in the promoter regions of the GlnR regulon genes. By using a chemostat culture system, we found that PmrA activated the expression of the GlnR regulon at pH 7, and that this activation was enhanced by excess glucose. Deletion of pmrA (strain ΔPmrA reduced the survival rate of S. mutans GS5 at pH 3 moderately, whereas the GlnR mutant (strain ΔGlnR exhibited an acid-sensitive phenotype in the acid killing experiments. Elevated biofilm formation in both ΔGlnR and ΔPmrA mutant strains is likely a result of indirect regulation of the GlnR regulon since GlnR and PmrA regulate the regulon differently. Taken together, it is suggested that activation of the GlnR regulon by PmrA at pH 7 ensures adequate biosynthesis of amino acid precursor, whereas repression by GlnR at acidic pH allows greater ATP generation for acid tolerance. The tight regulation of the GlnR regulon in response to pH provides an advantage for S. mutans to better survive in its primary niche, the oral cavity.

  11. Identification of self-consistent modulons from bacterial microarray expression data with the help of structured regulon gene sets

    KAUST Repository

    Permina, Elizaveta A.

    2013-01-01

    Identification of bacterial modulons from series of gene expression measurements on microarrays is a principal problem, especially relevant for inadequately studied but practically important species. Usage of a priori information on regulatory interactions helps to evaluate parameters for regulatory subnetwork inference. We suggest a procedure for modulon construction where a seed regulon is iteratively updated with genes having expression patterns similar to those for regulon member genes. A set of genes essential for a regulon is used to control modulon updating. Essential genes for a regulon were selected as a subset of regulon genes highly related by different measures to each other. Using Escherichia coli as a model, we studied how modulon identification depends on the data, including the microarray experiments set, the adopted relevance measure and the regulon itself. We have found that results of modulon identification are highly dependent on all parameters studied and thus the resulting modulon varies substantially depending on the identification procedure. Yet, modulons that were identified correctly displayed higher stability during iterations, which allows developing a procedure for reliable modulon identification in the case of less studied species where the known regulatory interactions are sparse. Copyright © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  12. A model for evolution and regulation of nicotine biosynthesis regulon in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Sierro, Nicolas; Hashimoto, Takashi; Shoji, Tsubasa

    2017-06-03

    In tobacco, the defense alkaloid nicotine is produced in roots and accumulates mainly in leaves. Signaling mediated by jasmonates (JAs) induces the formation of nicotine via a series of structural genes that constitute a regulon and are coordinated by JA-responsive transcription factors of the ethylene response factor (ERF) family. Early steps in the pyrrolidine and pyridine biosynthesis pathways likely arose through duplication of the polyamine and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthetic pathways, respectively, followed by recruitment of duplicated primary metabolic genes into the nicotine biosynthesis regulon. Transcriptional regulation of nicotine biosynthesis by ERF and cooperatively-acting MYC2 transcription factors is implied by the frequency of cognate cis-regulatory elements for these factors in the promoter regions of the downstream structural genes. Indeed, a mutant tobacco with low nicotine content was found to have a large chromosomal deletion in a cluster of closely related ERF genes at the nicotine-controlling NICOTINE2 (NIC2) locus.

  13. Haemophilus influenzae OxyR: characterization of its regulation, regulon and role in fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Whitby

    Full Text Available To prevent damage by reactive oxygen species, many bacteria have evolved rapid detection and response systems, including the OxyR regulon. The OxyR system detects reactive oxygen and coordinates the expression of numerous defensive antioxidants. In many bacterial species the coordinated OxyR-regulated response is crucial for in vivo survival. Regulation of the OxyR regulon of Haemophilus influenzae was examined in vitro, and significant variation in the regulated genes of the OxyR regulon among strains of H. influenzae was observed. Quantitative PCR studies demonstrated a role for the OxyR-regulated peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin as a mediator of the OxyR response, and also indicated OxyR self-regulation through a negative feedback loop. Analysis of transcript levels in H. influenzae samples derived from an animal model of otitis media demonstrated that the members of the OxyR regulon were actively upregulated within the chinchilla middle ear. H. influenzae mutants lacking the oxyR gene exhibited increased sensitivity to challenge with various peroxides. The impact of mutations in oxyR was assessed in various animal models of H. influenzae disease. In paired comparisons with the corresponding wild-type strains, the oxyR mutants were unaffected in both the chinchilla model of otitis media and an infant model of bacteremia. However, in weanling rats the oxyR mutant was significantly impaired compared to the wild-type strain. In contrast, in all three animal models when infected with a mixture of equal numbers of both wild-type and mutant strains the mutant strain was significantly out competed by the wild-type strain. These findings clearly establish a crucial role for OxyR in bacterial fitness.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the Lactococcus lactis ArgR and AhrC regulons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Martinussen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that direct protein-protein. interaction between the two regulators ArgR and AhrC in Lactococcus lactis is required for arginine-dependent repression of the biosynthetic argC promoter and the activation of the catabolic arcA promoter. Here, we establish the global...... ArgR and AhrC regulons by transcriptome analyses and show that both regulators are dedicated to the control of arginine metabolism in L. lactis....

  15. Deep sequencing whole transcriptome exploration of the σE regulon in Neisseria meningitidis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Antonius Gerhardus Huis in 't Veld

    Full Text Available Bacteria live in an ever-changing environment and must alter protein expression promptly to adapt to these changes and survive. Specific response genes that are regulated by a subset of alternative σ(70-like transcription factors have evolved in order to respond to this changing environment. Recently, we have described the existence of a σ(E regulon including the anti-σ-factor MseR in the obligate human bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis. To unravel the complete σ(E regulon in N. meningitidis, we sequenced total RNA transcriptional content of wild type meningococci and compared it with that of mseR mutant cells (ΔmseR in which σ(E is highly expressed. Eleven coding genes and one non-coding gene were found to be differentially expressed between H44/76 wildtype and H44/76ΔmseR cells. Five of the 6 genes of the σ(E operon, msrA/msrB, and the gene encoding a pepSY-associated TM helix family protein showed enhanced transcription, whilst aniA encoding a nitrite reductase and nspA encoding the vaccine candidate Neisserial surface protein A showed decreased transcription. Analysis of differential expression in IGRs showed enhanced transcription of a non-coding RNA molecule, identifying a σ(E dependent small non-coding RNA. Together this constitutes the first complete exploration of an alternative σ-factor regulon in N. meningitidis. The results direct to a relatively small regulon indicative for a strictly defined response consistent with a relatively stable niche, the human throat, where N. meningitidis resides.

  16. HRP's Healthcare Spin-Offs Through Computational Modeling and Simulation Practice Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulugeta, Lealem; Walton, Marlei; Nelson, Emily; Peng, Grace; Morrison, Tina; Erdemir, Ahmet; Myers, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Spaceflight missions expose astronauts to novel operational and environmental conditions that pose health risks that are currently not well understood, and perhaps unanticipated. Furthermore, given the limited number of humans that have flown in long duration missions and beyond low Earth-orbit, the amount of research and clinical data necessary to predict and mitigate these health and performance risks are limited. Consequently, NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) conducts research and develops advanced methods and tools to predict, assess, and mitigate potential hazards to the health of astronauts. In this light, NASA has explored the possibility of leveraging computational modeling since the 1970s as a means to elucidate the physiologic risks of spaceflight and develop countermeasures. Since that time, substantial progress has been realized in this arena through a number of HRP funded activates such as the Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) and the Integrated Medical Model (IMM). Much of this success can be attributed to HRP's endeavor to establish rigorous verification, validation, and credibility (VV&C) processes that ensure computational models and simulations (M&S) are sufficiently credible to address issues within their intended scope. This presentation summarizes HRP's activities in credibility of modeling and simulation, in particular through its outreach to the community of modeling and simulation practitioners. METHODS: The HRP requires all M&S that can have moderate to high impact on crew health or mission success must be vetted in accordance to NASA Standard for Models and Simulations, NASA-STD-7009 (7009) [5]. As this standard mostly focuses on engineering systems, the IMM and DAP have invested substantial efforts to adapt the processes established in this standard for their application to biological M&S, which is more prevalent in human health and performance (HHP) and space biomedical research and operations [6,7]. These methods have also generated

  17. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships of the dha Regulon by Genomic Context Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinalva Martins-Pinheiro

    Full Text Available 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA and 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD are subproducts of glycerol degradation and of economical interest as they are used for polymers synthesis, such as polyesters and polyurethanes. Some few characterized bacterial species (mostly from Firmicutes and Gamma-proteobacteria groups are able to catabolize these monomers from glycerol using the gene products from the dha regulon. To expand our knowledge and direct further experimental studies on the regulon and related genes for the anaerobic glycerol metabolism, an extensive genomic screening was performed to identify the presence of the dha genes in fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Interestingly, this work shows that although only few bacteria species are known to produce 3-HPA or 1,3-PD, the incomplete regulon is found in more than 100 prokaryotic genomes. However, the complete pathway is found only in a few dozen species belonging to five different taxonomic groups, including one Archaea species, Halalkalicoccus jeotgali. Phylogenetic analysis and conservation of both gene synteny and primary sequence similarity reinforce the idea that these genes have a common origin and were possibly acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT. Besides the evolutionary aspect, the identification of homologs from several different organisms may predict potential alternative targets for faster or more efficient biological synthesis of 3-HPA or 1,3-PD.

  18. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H2O2. In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H2O2. Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H2O2 and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H2O2 is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis. PMID:22797762

  19. The Facultative Symbiont Rickettsia Protects an Invasive Whitefly against Entomopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Martha S.; Baltrus, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Facultative endosymbionts can benefit insect hosts in a variety of ways, including context-dependent roles, such as providing defense against pathogens. The role of some symbionts in defense may be overlooked, however, when pathogen infection is transient, sporadic, or asymptomatic. The facultative endosymbiont Rickettsia increases the fitness of the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in some populations through mechanisms that are not yet understood. In this study, we investigated the role of Rickettsia in mediating the interaction between the sweet potato whitefly and Pseudomonas syringae, a common environmental bacterium, some strains of which are pathogenic to aphids. Our results show that P. syringae multiplies within whiteflies, leading to host death, and that whiteflies infected with Rickettsia show a decreased rate of death due to P. syringae. Experiments using plants coated with P. syringae confirmed that whiteflies can acquire the bacteria at a low rate while feeding, leading to increased mortality, particularly when the whiteflies are not infected with Rickettsia. These results suggest that P. syringae may affect whitefly populations in nature and that Rickettsia can ameliorate this effect. This study highlights the possible importance of interactions among opportunistic environmental pathogens and endosymbionts of insects. PMID:25217020

  20. The mbo operon is specific and essential for biosynthesis of mangotoxin in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Víctor J; Arrebola, Eva; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús; de Vicente, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mangotoxin is an antimetabolite toxin produced by certain Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. This toxin is an oligopeptide that inhibits ornithine N-acetyl transferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ornithine and arginine. Previous studies have reported the involvement of the putative nonribosomal peptide synthetase MgoA in virulence and mangotoxin production. In this study, we analyse a new chromosomal region of P. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158, which contains six coding sequences arranged as an operon (mbo operon). The mbo operon was detected in only mangotoxin-producing strains, and it was shown to be essential for the biosynthesis of this toxin. Mutants in each of the six ORFs of the mbo operon were partially or completely impaired in the production of the toxin. In addition, Pseudomonas spp. mangotoxin non-producer strains transformed with the mbo operon gained the ability to produce mangotoxin, indicating that this operon contains all the genetic information necessary for mangotoxin biosynthesis. The generation of a single transcript for the mbo operon was confirmed and supported by the allocation of a unique promoter and Rho-independent terminator. The phylogenetic analysis of the P. syringae strains harbouring the mbo operon revealed that these strains clustered together.

  1. Pseudomonas syringae enhances herbivory by suppressing the reactive oxygen burst in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Simon C; Humphrey, Parris T; Chevasco, Daniela; Ausubel, Frederick M; Pierce, Naomi E; Whiteman, Noah K

    2016-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions have evolved in the presence of plant-colonizing microbes. These microbes can have important third-party effects on herbivore ecology, as exemplified by drosophilid flies that evolved from ancestors feeding on plant-associated microbes. Leaf-mining flies in the genus Scaptomyza, which is nested within the paraphyletic genus Drosophila, show strong associations with bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas, including Pseudomonas syringae. Adult females are capable of vectoring these bacteria between plants and larvae show a preference for feeding on P. syringae-infected leaves. Here we show that Scaptomyza flava larvae can also vector P. syringae to and from feeding sites, and that they not only feed more, but also develop faster on plants previously infected with P. syringae. Our genetic and physiological data show that P. syringae enhances S. flava feeding on infected plants at least in part by suppressing anti-herbivore defenses mediated by reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Race 1 Strains, Isolated from Tomato Fields in California

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Shree P.; Coaker, Gitta

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato race 1 strains have evolved to overcome genetic resistance in tomato. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two race 1 P.?syringae pv. tomato strains, A9 and 407, isolated from diseased tomato plants in California.

  3. Virulence determinants of Pseudomonas syringae strains isolated from grasses in the context of a small type III effector repertoire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudnik, Alexey; Dudler, Robert

    2014-01-01

    derivative that inhibits the eukaryotic proteasome. In strains colonizing dicotyledonous plants, the compound was demonstrated to suppress the salicylic-acid-dependent defense pathway. Here, we analyze virulence factors of three strains colonizing wheat (Triticum aestivum): P. syringae pathovar syringae (Psy...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae...

  5. Bacterial canker of plum caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, as a serious threat for plum production in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Janse, J.D.; Bruine, de A.; Vink, P.; Pham, K.T.K.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, bacterial canker of plum trees (Prunus domestica) caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars syringae and morsprunorum is a recent and serious problem. The trunks of the affected plum trees are girdled by cankers resulting in relatively sudden death of the trees 1 to 4 years after

  6. Substrate and target sequence length influence RecTE(Psy recombineering efficiency in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmeng Bao

    Full Text Available We are developing a new recombineering system to assist experimental manipulation of the Pseudomonas syringae genome. P. syringae is a globally dispersed plant pathogen and an important model species used to study the molecular biology of bacteria-plant interactions. We previously identified orthologs of the lambda Red bet/exo and Rac recET genes in P. syringae and confirmed that they function in recombineering using ssDNA and dsDNA substrates. Here we investigate the properties of dsDNA substrates more closely to determine how they influence recombineering efficiency. We find that the length of flanking homologies and length of the sequences being inserted or deleted have a large effect on RecTE(Psy mediated recombination efficiency. These results provide information about the design elements that should be considered when using recombineering.

  7. Human Research Program (HRP) Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintron, Nitza; Dutson, Eric; Friedl, Karl; Hyman, William; Jemison, Mae; Klonoff, David

    2009-01-01

    The SRP believes strongly that regularly performed in-flight crew assessments are needed in order to identify a change in health status before a medical condition becomes clinically apparent. It is this early recognition in change that constitutes the foundation of the "occupational health model" expounded in the HRP Requirements Document as a key component of the HRP risk mitigation strategy that will enable its objective of "prevention and mitigation of human health and performance risks". A regular crew status examination of physiological and clinical performance is needed. This can be accomplished through instrumented monitoring of routine embedded tasks. The SRP recommends addition of a new gap to address this action under Category 3.0 Mitigate the Risk. This new gap is closely associated with Task 4.19 which addresses the lack of adequate biomedical monitoring capabilities for performing periodic clinical status evaluations and contingency medical monitoring. A corollary to these gaps is the critical emphasis on preventive medicine, not only during pre- and post-flight phases of a mission as is the current practice, but continued into the in-flight phases of exploration class missions.

  8. Genomic Distribution and Divergence of Levansucrase-Coding Genes in Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias S. Ullrich

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the plant pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, the exopolysaccharide levan is synthesized by extracellular levansucrase (Lsc, which is encoded by two conserved 1,296-bp genes termed lscB and lscC in P. syringae strain PG4180. A third gene, lscA, is homologous to the 1,248-bp lsc gene of the bacterium Erwinia amylovora, causing fire blight. However, lscA is not expressed in P. syringae strain PG4180. Herein, PG4180 lscA was shown to be expressed from its native promoter in the Lsc-deficient E. amylovora mutant, Ea7/74-LS6, suggesting that lscA might be closely related to the E. amylovora lsc gene. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that lscB and lscC homologs in several P. syringae strains are part of a highly conserved 1.8-kb region containing the ORF, flanked by 450-452-bp and 49-51-bp up- and downstream sequences, respectively. Interestingly, the 450-452-bp upstream sequence, along with the initial 48-bp ORF sequence encoding for the N-terminal 16 amino acid residues of Lsc, were found to be highly similar to the respective sequence of a putatively prophage-borne glycosyl hydrolase-encoding gene in several P. syringae genomes. Minimal promoter regions of lscB and lscC were mapped in PG4180 by deletion analysis and were found to be located in similar positions upstream of lsc genes in three P. syringae genomes. Thus, a putative 498-500-bp promoter element was identified, which possesses the prophage-associated com gene and DNA encoding common N-terminal sequences of all 1,296-bp Lsc and two glycosyl hydrolases. Since the gene product of the non-expressed 1,248-bp lscA is lacking this conserved N-terminal region but is otherwise highly homologous to those of lscB and lscC, it was concluded that lscA might have been the ancestral lsc gene in E. amylovora and P. syringae. Our data indicated that its highly expressed paralogs in P. syringae are probably derived from subsequent recombination events initiated by insertion of the 498

  9. Arabidopsis PECTIN METHYLESTERASEs contribute to immunity against Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Gerit; Grundman, Rachael E; Sreekanta, Suma; Truman, William; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Glazebrook, Jane

    2014-02-01

    Pectins, major components of dicot cell walls, are synthesized in a heavily methylesterified form in the Golgi and are partially deesterified by pectin methylesterases (PMEs) upon export to the cell wall. PME activity is important for the virulence of the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Here, the roles of Arabidopsis PMEs in pattern-triggered immunity and immune responses to the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria brassicicola and the bacterial hemibiotroph Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 (Pma ES4326) were studied. Plant PME activity increased during pattern-triggered immunity and after inoculation with either pathogen. The increase of PME activity in response to pathogen treatment was concomitant with a decrease in pectin methylesterification. The pathogen-induced PME activity did not require salicylic acid or ethylene signaling, but was dependent on jasmonic acid signaling. In the case of induction by A. brassicicola, the ethylene response factor, but not the MYC2 branch of jasmonic acid signaling, contributed to induction of PME activity, whereas in the case of induction by Pma ES4326, both branches contributed. There are 66 PME genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting extensive genetic redundancy. Nevertheless, selected pme single, double, triple and quadruple mutants allowed significantly more growth of Pma ES4326 than wild-type plants, indicating a role of PMEs in resistance to this pathogen. No decreases in total PME activity were detected in these pme mutants, suggesting that the determinant of immunity is not total PME activity; rather, it is some specific effect of PMEs such as changes in the pattern of pectin methylesterification.

  10. Identification of 17 HrpX-regulated proteins including two novel type III effectors, XOC_3956 and XOC_1550, in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiao-bo; Zou, Li-fang; Ma, Wen-xiu; Liu, Zhi-yang; Chen, Gong-you

    2014-01-01

    The function of some hypothetical proteins, possibly regulated by key hrp regulators, in the pathogenicity of phytopathogenic bacteria remains largely unknown. In the present study, in silicon microarray data demonstrated that the expression of 17 HrpX-regulated protein (Xrp) genes of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc), which causes bacterial leaf streak in rice, were either positively or negatively regulated by HrpX or/and HrpG. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that five Xrps possess a putative type III secretion (T3S) signal in the first 50 N-terminal amino acids, six xrp genes contain a PIP-box-like sequence (TTCGB-NX-TTCGB, 9 ≤ X ≤ 25) in the promoter regions, and two Xrps have both motifs. Twelve Xrps are widely conserved in Xanthomonas spp., whereas four are specific for X. oryzae (Xrp6) or Xoc (Xrp8, Xrp14 and Xrp17). In addition to the regulation by HrpG/HrpX, some of the 17 genes were also modulated by another hrp regulator HrpD6. Mutagenesis of these 17 genes indicated that five Xrps (Xrp1, Xrp2, Xrp5, Xrp8 and Xrp14) were required for full virulence and bacterial growth in planta. Immunoblotting assays and fusion with N-terminally truncated AvrXa10 indicated that Xrp3 and Xrp5 were secreted and translocated into rice cells through the type-III secretion system (T3S), suggesting they are novel T3S effectors. Our results suggest that Xoc exploits an orchestra of proteins that are regulated by HrpG, HrpX and HrpD6, and these proteins facilitate both infection and metabolism.

  11. Technological review of the HRP manufacturing process R and D activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visca, Eliseo; Pizzuto, A.; Gavila, P.; Riccardi, B.; Roccella, S.; Candura, D.; Sanguinetti, G.P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • R and D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (hot radial pressing) and PBC (pre-brazed casting) of both W and CFC armoured small and medium scale mockups. • ENEA-ANSALDO participate to the European programme for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • A qualification divertor inner vertical target prototype successfully tested at ITER relevant thermal heat fluxes. -- Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. have been deeply involved in the European International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) R and D activities for the manufacturing of high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC), and in particular for the inner vertical target (IVT) of the ITER divertor. This component has to be manufactured by using both armour and structural materials whose properties are defined by ITER. Their physical properties prevent the use of standard joining techniques. The reference armour materials are tungsten and carbon/carbon fibre composite (CFC). The cooling pipe is made of copper alloy (CuCrZr-IG). During the last years ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components of different length, geometry and materials, by using innovative processes: HRP (hot radial pressing) and PBC (pre-brazed casting). The history of the technical issues solved during the R and D phase and the improvements implemented to the assembling tools and equipments are reviewed in the paper together with the testing results. The optimization of the processes started from the successful manufacturing of both W and CFC armoured small scale mockups thermal fatigue tested in the worst ITER operating condition (20 MW/m 2 ) through the achievement of record

  12. Technological review of the HRP manufacturing process R and D activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Italy); Pizzuto, A. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Italy); Gavila, P.; Riccardi, B. [Fusion For Energy, C. Josep Pla 2, ES-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Roccella, S. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Italy); Candura, D.; Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16121 Genova (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • R and D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (hot radial pressing) and PBC (pre-brazed casting) of both W and CFC armoured small and medium scale mockups. • ENEA-ANSALDO participate to the European programme for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • A qualification divertor inner vertical target prototype successfully tested at ITER relevant thermal heat fluxes. -- Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. have been deeply involved in the European International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) R and D activities for the manufacturing of high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC), and in particular for the inner vertical target (IVT) of the ITER divertor. This component has to be manufactured by using both armour and structural materials whose properties are defined by ITER. Their physical properties prevent the use of standard joining techniques. The reference armour materials are tungsten and carbon/carbon fibre composite (CFC). The cooling pipe is made of copper alloy (CuCrZr-IG). During the last years ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components of different length, geometry and materials, by using innovative processes: HRP (hot radial pressing) and PBC (pre-brazed casting). The history of the technical issues solved during the R and D phase and the improvements implemented to the assembling tools and equipments are reviewed in the paper together with the testing results. The optimization of the processes started from the successful manufacturing of both W and CFC armoured small scale mockups thermal fatigue tested in the worst ITER operating condition (20 MW/m{sup 2}) through the achievement of record

  13. Diagnosing severe falciparum malaria in parasitaemic African children: a prospective evaluation of plasma PfHRP2 measurement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse C E Hendriksen

    Full Text Available In African children, distinguishing severe falciparum malaria from other severe febrile illnesses with coincidental Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia is a major challenge. P. falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2 is released by mature sequestered parasites and can be used to estimate the total parasite burden. We investigated the prognostic significance of plasma PfHRP2 and used it to estimate the malaria-attributable fraction in African children diagnosed with severe malaria.Admission plasma PfHRP2 was measured prospectively in African children (from Mozambique, The Gambia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo aged 1 month to 15 years with severe febrile illness and a positive P. falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH-based rapid test in a clinical trial comparing parenteral artesunate versus quinine (the AQUAMAT trial, ISRCTN 50258054. In 3,826 severely ill children, Plasmadium falciparum PfHRP2 was higher in patients with coma (p = 0.0209, acidosis (p<0.0001, and severe anaemia (p<0.0001. Admission geometric mean (95%CI plasma PfHRP2 was 1,611 (1,350-1,922 ng/mL in fatal cases (n = 381 versus 1,046 (991-1,104 ng/mL in survivors (n = 3,445, p<0.0001, without differences in parasitaemia as assessed by microscopy. There was a U-shaped association between log(10 plasma PfHRP2 and risk of death. Mortality increased 20% per log(10 increase in PfHRP2 above 174 ng/mL (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 1.21, 95%CI 1.05-1.39, p = 0.009. A mechanistic model assuming a PfHRP2-independent risk of death in non-malaria illness closely fitted the observed data and showed malaria-attributable mortality less than 50% with plasma PfHRP2≤174 ng/mL. The odds ratio (OR for death in artesunate versus quinine-treated patients was 0.61 (95%CI 0.44-0.83, p = 0.0018 in the highest PfHRP2 tertile, whereas there was no difference in the lowest tertile (OR 1.05; 95%CI 0.69-1.61; p = 0.82. A limitation of the study is that some

  14. Towards in vivo regulon kinetics: PurR activation by 5-phosphoribosyl-a-1-pyrophosphate during purine depletion in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Dimitrov, Peter; Gautier, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    molecules interacting with the regulatory elements in vitro. Here we describe how in vivo regulon kinetics can describe a regulon through the effects of the metabolite controlling it, exemplified by temporal purine exhaustion in Lactococcus lactis. We deduced a causal relation between the pathway precursor...

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose) Glycohydrolase and Poly(ADP-ribose)-interacting Protein Hrp38 Regulate Pattern Formation during Drosophila Eye Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yingbiao; Jarnik, Michael; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila Hrp38, a homolog of human hnRNP A1, has been shown to regulate splicing, but its function can be modified by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Notwithstanding such findings, our understanding of the roles of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated Hrp38 on development is limited. Here, we have demonstrated that Hrp38 is essential for fly eye development based on a rough-eye phenotype with disorganized ommatidia observed in adult escapers of the hrp38 mutant. We also observed that Poly(ADP-ribose) Glycohydrolase (Parg) loss-of-function, which caused increased Hrp38 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, also resulted in the rough-eye phenotype with disrupted ommatidial lattice and reduced number of photoreceptor cells. In addition, ectopic expression of DE-cadherin, which is required for retinal morphogenesis, fully rescued the rough-eye phenotype of the hrp38 mutant. Similarly, Parg mutant eye clones had decreased expression level of DE-cadherin with orientation defects, which is reminiscent of DE-cadherin mutant eye phenotype. Therefore, our results suggest that Hrp38 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation controls eye pattern formation via regulation of DE-cadherin expression, a finding which has implications for understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of Hrp38-related Fragile X syndrome and PARP1-related retinal degeneration diseases. PMID:23711619

  16. The mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo) is specifically distributed within Pseudomonas syringae genomospecies 1 and was acquired only once during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrión, Víctor J; Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Arrebola, Eva; Bardaji, Leire; Codina, Juan C; de Vicente, Antonio; Cazorla, Francisco M; Murillo, Jesús

    2013-02-01

    Mangotoxin production was first described in Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains. A phenotypic characterization of 94 P. syringae strains was carried out to determine the genetic evolution of the mangotoxin biosynthetic operon (mbo). We designed a PCR primer pair specific for the mbo operon to examine its distribution within the P. syringae complex. These primers amplified a 692-bp DNA fragment from 52 mangotoxin-producing strains and from 7 non-mangotoxin-producing strains that harbor the mbo operon, whereas 35 non-mangotoxin-producing strains did not yield any amplification. This, together with the analysis of draft genomes, allowed the identification of the mbo operon in five pathovars (pathovars aptata, avellanae, japonica, pisi, and syringae), all of which belong to genomospecies 1, suggesting a limited distribution of the mbo genes in the P. syringae complex. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences from housekeeping genes differentiated three groups within genomospecies 1. All of the strains containing the mbo operon clustered in groups I and II, whereas those lacking the operon clustered in group III; however, the relative branching order of these three groups is dependent on the genes used to construct the phylogeny. The mbo operon maintains synteny and is inserted in the same genomic location, with high sequence conservation around the insertion point, for all the strains in groups I and II. These data support the idea that the mbo operon was acquired horizontally and only once by the ancestor of groups I and II from genomospecies 1 within the P. syringae complex.

  17. iRegulon: from a gene list to a gene regulatory network using large motif and track collections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekin's Janky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Identifying master regulators of biological processes and mapping their downstream gene networks are key challenges in systems biology. We developed a computational method, called iRegulon, to reverse-engineer the transcriptional regulatory network underlying a co-expressed gene set using cis-regulatory sequence analysis. iRegulon implements a genome-wide ranking-and-recovery approach to detect enriched transcription factor motifs and their optimal sets of direct targets. We increase the accuracy of network inference by using very large motif collections of up to ten thousand position weight matrices collected from various species, and linking these to candidate human TFs via a motif2TF procedure. We validate iRegulon on gene sets derived from ENCODE ChIP-seq data with increasing levels of noise, and we compare iRegulon with existing motif discovery methods. Next, we use iRegulon on more challenging types of gene lists, including microRNA target sets, protein-protein interaction networks, and genetic perturbation data. In particular, we over-activate p53 in breast cancer cells, followed by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, and could identify an extensive up-regulated network controlled directly by p53. Similarly we map a repressive network with no indication of direct p53 regulation but rather an indirect effect via E2F and NFY. Finally, we generalize our computational framework to include regulatory tracks such as ChIP-seq data and show how motif and track discovery can be combined to map functional regulatory interactions among co-expressed genes. iRegulon is available as a Cytoscape plugin from http://iregulon.aertslab.org.

  18. Spatial and temporal dynamics of primary and secondary metabolism in Phaseolus vulgaris challenged by Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bueno, María Luisa; Pineda, Mónica; Díaz-Casado, Elena; Barón, Matilde

    2015-01-01

    Many defense mechanisms contribute to the plant immune system against pathogens, involving the regulation of different processes of the primary and secondary metabolism. At the same time, pathogens have evolved mechanisms to hijack the plant defense in order to establish the infection and proliferate. Localization and timing of the host response are essential to understand defense mechanisms and resistance to pathogens (Rico et al. 2011). Imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and thermography, are a very valuable tool providing spatial and temporal information about a series of plant processes. In this study, bean plants challenged with two pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae have been investigated. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 elicit a compatible and incompatible interaction in bean, respectively. Both types of host-pathogen interaction triggered different changes in the activity of photosynthesis and the secondary metabolism. We conclude that the combined analysis of leaf temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence and green fluorescence emitted by phenolics allows to discriminate compatible from incompatible P. syringae-Phaseolus vulgaris interactions in very early times of the infection, prior to the development of symptoms. These can constitute disease signatures that would allow an early identification of emerging plagues in crops. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  19. BOX-PCR-based identification of bacterial species belonging to Pseudomonas syringae: P. viridiflava group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abi S.A. Marques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic characteristics and genetic fingerprints of a collection of 120 bacterial strains, belonging to Pseudomonas syringae sensu lato group, P. viridiflava and reference bacteria were evaluated, with the aim of species identification. The numerical analysis of 119 nutritional characteristics did not show patterns that would help with identification. Regarding the genetic fingerprinting, the results of the present study supported the observation that BOX-PCR seems to be able to identify bacterial strains at species level. After numerical analyses of the bar-codes, all pathovars belonging to each one of the nine described genomospecies were clustered together at a distance of 0.72, and could be separated at genomic species level. Two P. syringae strains of unknown pathovars (CFBP 3650 and CFBP 3662 and the three P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were grouped in two extra clusters and might eventually constitute two new species. This genomic species clustering was particularly evident for genomospecies 4, which gathered P. syringae pvs. atropurpurea, coronafaciens, garçae, oryzae, porri, striafaciens, and zizaniae at a noticeably low distance.

  20. Syringa oblata Lindl var. alba as a source of oleuropein and related compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nenadis, N.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Boeren, J.A.; Tsimidou, M.Z.

    2007-01-01

    The leaf methanol extract of Syringa oblata Lindl var. alba was investigated as a source of oleuropein and related compounds. The extract had a high total phenol content and a radical scavenging activity similar to that of the respective extract from Olea europaea leaves. HPLC-DAD characterisation

  1. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  2. Dynamics of sugar content in vegetative organs of Syringa Genus representatives introduced into Steppe Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Dolgova

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative and qualitative contents of sugars in phases of growth and development in overground organs of species of Syringa L. genus were determined. It is shown a cryoprotective role of sugars in plants. Conclusions on resistance of plants under conditions of a steppe zone are made.

  3. H2O2 sensing using HRP modified catalyst-free ZnO nanorods synthesized by RF sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Priti; Singh, Sunil Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Catalyst-free ( 00 l) oriented ZnO nanorods (NRs) -based biosensor for the H2O2 sensing has been reported. The (002) oriented ZnO NRs as confirmed by X-ray diffraction were successfully grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by radio frequency (RF) sputtering technique without using any catalyst. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme was immobilized on ZnO NRs by physical adsorption technique to prepare the biosensor. In this HRP/ZnO NR/ITO bioelectrode, nafion solution was added to form a tight membrane on surface. The prepared bioelectrode has been used for biosensing measurements by electrochemical analyzer. The electrochemical studies reveal that the prepared HRP/ZnO NR/ITO biosensor is highly sensitive to the detection of H2O2 over a linear range of 0.250-10 μM. The ZnO NR-based biosensor showed lower value of detection limit (0.125 μM) and higher sensitivity (13.40 µA/µM cm2) towards H2O2. The observed value of higher sensitivity attributed to larger surface area of ZnO nanostructure for effective loading of HRP besides its high electron communication capability. In addition, the biosensor also shows lower value of enzyme's kinetic parameter (Michaelis-Menten constant, K m) of 0.262 μM which indicates enhanced enzyme affinity of HRP to H2O2. The reported biosensor may be useful for various applications in biosensing, clinical, food, and beverage industry.

  4. In silico discovery of the dormancy regulons in a number of Actinobacteria genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimova, Anna; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2010-11-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a dangerous Actinobacteria infecting nearly one third of the human population. It becomes dormant and phenotypically drug resistant in response to stresses. An important feature of the M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is the prevalence of latent infection without disease, making understanding of the mechanisms used by the bacteria to exist in this state and to switch to metabolically active infectious form a vital problem to consider. M. tuberculosis dormancy is regulated by the three-component regulatory system of two kinases (DosT and DevS) and transcriprional regulator (DevR). DevR activates transcription of a set of genes, which allow the bacteria to survive long periods of anaerobiosis, and may be important for long-term survival within the host during latent infection. The DevR-regulon is studied experimentally in M. tuberculosis and few other phylogenetically close Mycobacteria spp. As many other two-component systems, the devRS operon is autoregulated. However, the mechanism of the dormancy is not completely clear even for these bacteria and there is no data describing the dormancy regulons in other species.

  5. Phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase-independent NAD de novo synthesis in Escherichia coli: a new phenotype of phosphate regulon mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    reaction, an enzyme of the NAD de novo pathway. Several NAD-independent mutants of a host from which prs had been deleted were isolated; all of them were shown to have lesions in the pstSCAB-phoU operon, in which mutations lead to derepression of the Pho regulon. In addition NAD-independent growth...

  6. Comparison of the performance of the borax buffer-based HRP-enhanced reagent and the 'Lumi-Phos 530' chemiluminescence systems in the detection of biotinylated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cercek, B; Roby, K; Siaw, M

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of two chemiluminescence methods, the borax buffer-based HRP-enhanced reagent and Lumi-Phos 530, applied to the detection of a biotinylated 30-mer DNA slot blotted onto a nylon membrane, is presented. A streptavidin-HRP and streptavidin-ALP mediated detection system was used. The HRP-enhanced system is up to 15-fold greater with respect to the signal/background ratios than the Lumi-Phos 530 system at 0.5 microgram biotinylated DNA with at least a two-fold improvement in detection sensitivity for 0.5 ng biotinylated DNA.

  7. Mutations in phoB, the positive gene activator of the pho regulon in Escherichia coli, affect the carbohydrate phenotype on MacConkey indicator plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, A; Boos, W

    1993-05-01

    Mutants defective in phoB, the positive gene activator of the Escherichia coli pho regulon, exhibit aberrant behaviour on MacConkey indicator plates. They appear pale in the presence of a fermentable carbon source such as trehalose, maltose or glucose. The addition of at least 5 mM phosphate corrects this defect. Colonies of phoB+ strains turn red on MacConkey indicator plates and derepress the pho regulon when the cells are able to ferment the carbon source. In contrast, the inability to ferment the carbon source maintains the pho regulon in the repressed state.

  8. The life history of Pseudomonas syringae: linking agriculture to earth system processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cindy E; Monteil, Caroline L; Berge, Odile

    2013-01-01

    The description of the ecology of Pseudomonas syringae is moving away from that of a ubiquitous epiphytic plant pathogen to one of a multifaceted bacterium sans frontières in fresh water and other ecosystems linked to the water cycle. Discovery of the aquatic facet of its ecology has led to a vision of its life history that integrates spatial and temporal scales spanning billions of years and traversing catchment basins, continents, and the planet and that confronts the implication of roles that are potentially conflicting for agriculture (as a plant pathogen and as an actor in processes leading to rain and snowfall). This new ecological perspective has also yielded insight into epidemiological phenomena linked to disease emergence. Overall, it sets the stage for the integration of more comprehensive contexts of ecology and evolutionary history into comparative genomic analyses to elucidate how P. syringae subverts the attack and defense responses of the cohabitants of the diverse environments it occupies.

  9. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Baltrus

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species.

  10. Dynamic evolution of pathogenicity revealed by sequencing and comparative genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrus, David A; Nishimura, Marc T; Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R; Jones, Corbin D; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2011-07-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. © 2011 Baltrus et al.

  11. Effect of a glucose impulse on the CcpA regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engelmann Susanne

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The catabolite control protein A (CcpA is a member of the LacI/GalR family of transcriptional regulators controlling carbon-metabolism pathways in low-GC Gram-positive bacteria. It functions as a catabolite repressor or activator, allowing the bacteria to utilize the preferred carbon source over secondary carbon sources. This study is the first CcpA-dependent transcriptome and proteome analysis in Staphylococcus aureus, focussing on short-time effects of glucose under stable pH conditions. Results The addition of glucose to exponentially growing S. aureus increased the expression of genes and enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, while genes and proteins of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, required for the complete oxidation of glucose, were repressed via CcpA. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase, converting acetyl-CoA to acetate with a concomitant substrate-level phosphorylation, were neither regulated by glucose nor by CcpA. CcpA directly repressed genes involved in utilization of amino acids as secondary carbon sources. Interestingly, the expression of a larger number of genes was found to be affected by ccpA inactivation in the absence of glucose than after glucose addition, suggesting that glucose-independent effects due to CcpA may have a particular impact in S. aureus. In the presence of glucose, CcpA was found to regulate the expression of genes involved in metabolism, but also that of genes coding for virulence determinants. Conclusion This study describes the CcpA regulon of exponentially growing S. aureus cells. As in other bacteria, CcpA of S. aureus seems to control a large regulon that comprises metabolic genes as well as virulence determinants that are affected in their expression by CcpA in a glucose-dependent as well as -independent manner.

  12. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, José F; Koide, Tie; Gomes, Suely L; Marques, Marilis V

    2010-08-28

    Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours) of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase), was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  13. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Neto José F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. Results In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase, was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Conclusions Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  14. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ type III effector family in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Lewis

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found in both plant and animal pathogenic bacteria. In P. syringae, this superfamily includes the evolutionarily diverse HopZ1, HopZ2 and HopZ3 alleles. To investigate the roles of the HopZ family in immunomodulation, we generated dexamethasone-inducible T3SE transgenic lines of Arabidopsis for HopZ family members and characterized them for immune suppression phenotypes. We show that all of the HopZ family members can actively suppress various facets of Arabidopsis immunity in a catalytic residue-dependent manner. HopZ family members can differentially suppress the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase cascades or the production of reactive oxygen species, whereas all members can promote the growth of non-virulent P. syringae. Localization studies show that four of the HopZ family members containing predicted myristoylation sites are localized to the vicinity of the plasma membrane while HopZ3 which lacks the myristoylation site is at least partially nuclear localized, suggesting diversification of immunosuppressive mechanisms. Overall, we demonstrate that despite significant evolutionary diversification, all HopZ family members can suppress immunity in Arabidopsis.

  15. The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopF2 suppresses Arabidopsis stomatal immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenden Hurley

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae subverts plant immune signalling through injection of type III secreted effectors (T3SE into host cells. The T3SE HopF2 can disable Arabidopsis immunity through Its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Proteomic analysis of HopF2 interacting proteins identified a protein complex containing ATPases required for regulating stomatal aperture, suggesting HopF2 may manipulate stomatal immunity. Here we report HopF2 can inhibit stomatal immunity independent of its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Transgenic expression of HopF2 in Arabidopsis inhibits stomatal closing in response to P. syringae and increases the virulence of surface inoculated P. syringae. Further, transgenic expression of HopF2 inhibits flg22 induced reactive oxygen species production. Intriguingly, ADP-ribosyltransferase activity is dispensable for inhibiting stomatal immunity and flg22 induced reactive oxygen species. Together, this implies HopF2 may be a bifunctional T3SE with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity required for inhibiting apoplastic immunity and an independent function required to inhibit stomatal immunity.

  16. CBL-interacting protein kinase 6 negatively regulates immune response to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Atish; Nandi, Ashis Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2017-06-15

    Cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) is an essential mediator of the plant innate immune response. Here, we report that a calcium-regulated protein kinase Calcineurin B-like protein (CBL)-interacting protein kinase 6 (CIPK6) functions as a negative regulator of immunity against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis thaliana. Arabidopsis lines with compromised expression of CIPK6 exhibited enhanced disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen and to P. syringae harboring certain but not all avirulent effectors, while restoration of CIPK6 expression resulted in abolition of resistance. Plants overexpressing CIPK6 were more susceptible to P. syringae. Enhanced resistance in the absence of CIPK6 was accompanied by increased accumulation of salicylic acid and elevated expression of defense marker genes. Salicylic acid accumulation was essential for improved immunity in the absence of CIPK6. CIPK6 negatively regulated the oxidative burst associated with perception of pathogen-associated microbial patterns (PAMPs) and bacterial effectors. Accelerated and enhanced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in response to bacterial and fungal elicitors was observed in the absence of CIPK6. The results of this study suggested that CIPK6 negatively regulates effector-triggered and PAMP-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Survival and electrotransformation of Pseudomonas syringae strains under simulated cloud-like conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Laurine S; Monin, Anaïs; Ouertani, Hounaïda; Touaibia, Lamia; Michel, Elisa; Buret, François; Simonet, Pascal; Morris, Cindy E; Demanèche, Sandrine

    2017-05-01

    To diversify their genetic material, and thereby allow adaptation to environmental disturbances and colonization of new ecological niches, bacteria use various evolutionary processes, including the acquisition of new genetic material by horizontal transfer mechanisms such as conjugation, transduction and transformation. Electrotransformation mediated by lightning-related electrical phenomena may constitute an additional gene-transfer mechanism occurring in nature. The presence in clouds of bacteria such as Pseudomonas syringae capable of forming ice nuclei that lead to precipitation, and that are likely to be involved in triggering lightning, led us to postulate that natural electrotransformation in clouds may contribute to the adaptive potential of these bacteria. Here, we quantify the survival rate of 10 P. syringae strains in liquid and icy media under such electrical pulses and their capacity to acquire exogenous DNA. In comparison to two other bacteria (Pseudomonas sp. N3 and Escherichia coli TOP10), P. syringae CC0094 appears to be best adapted for survival and for genetic electrotransformation under these conditions, which suggests that this bacterium would be able to survive and to get a boost in its adaptive potential while being transported in clouds and falling back to Earth with precipitation from storms. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Identification and Evaluation of Integration and Cross Cutting Issues Across HRP Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, S. L.; Shelhamer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The HRP Integrated Research Plan contains the research plans for the 32 risks requiring research to characterize and mitigate. These risks to human health and performance in spaceflight are identified by evidence and each one focuses on a single aspect of human physiology or performance. They are further categorized by aspects of the spaceflight environment, such as altered gravity or space radiation, that that play a major role in their likelihood and consequence. From its inception the "integrate" in the Research Plan has denoted the integrated nature of risks to human health and performance, the connectedness of physiological systems within the human body regardless of the spaceflight environment, and the integrated response of the human body to the spaceflight environment. Common characteristics of the spaceflight environment include altered gravity, atmospheres and light/dark cycles, space radiation, isolation, noise, and periods of high or low workload. Long term exposure to this unique environment produces a suite of physiological effects such as stress; vision, neurocognitive and anthropometric changes; circadian misalignment; fluid shifts, deconditioning; immune dysregulation; and altered nutritional requirements. Matrix diagraming was used to systematically identify, analyze and rate the many-to-many relationships between environmental characteristics and the suite of physiological effects. It was also to identify patterns in the relationships of common physiological effects to each other. Analyses of patterns or relationships in these diagrams help to identify issues that cut across multiple risks. Cross cutting issues benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that synthesizes concepts or data from two or more disciplines to identify and characterize risk factors or develop countermeasures relevant to multiple risks. They also help to illuminate possible problem areas that may arise when a countermeasure impacts risks other than those which it was

  19. Inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare essential oils on virulence factors of phytopathogenic Pseudomonas syringae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carezzano, M E; Sotelo, J P; Primo, E; Reinoso, E B; Paletti Rovey, M F; Demo, M S; Giordano, W F; Oliva, M de Las M

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes lesions in leaves during the colonisation process. The damage is associated with production of many virulence factors, such as biofilm and phytotoxins. The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) have been demonstrated to inhibit P. syringae. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils on production of virulence factors of phytopathogenic P. syringae strains, including anti-biofilm and anti-toxins activities. The broth microdilution method was used for determination of MIC and biofilm inhibition assays. Coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were pheno- and genotypically evaluated. Both oils showed good inhibitory activity against P. syringae, with MIC values from 1.43 to 11.5 mg·ml -1 for thyme and 5.8 to 11.6 mg·ml -1 for oregano. Biofilm formation, production of coronatine, syringomycin and tabtoxin were inhibited by thyme and oregano essential oil in most strains. The results presented here are promising, demonstrating the bactericidal activity and reduction of virulence factor production after treatment with thyme and oregano oil, providing insight into how they exert their antibacterial activity. These natural products could be considered in the future for the control of diseases caused by P. syringae. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides PpsR Regulon: PpsR as a Master Regulator of Photosystem Development†

    OpenAIRE

    Moskvin, Oleg V.; Gomelsky, Larissa; Gomelsky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    PpsR from the anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been known as an oxygen- and light-dependent repressor of bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis genes and puc operons involved in photosystem development. However, the putative PpsR-binding sites, TGTN12ACA, are also located upstream of numerous nonphotosystem genes, thus raising the possibility that the role of PpsR is broader. To characterize the PpsR regulon, transcriptome profiling was performed on the w...

  1. Lex marks the spot: the virulent side of SOS and a closer look at the LexA regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, William L

    2006-12-01

    The SOS response that responds to DNA damage induces many genes that are under LexA repression. A detailed examination of LexA regulons using genome-wide techniques has recently been undertaken in both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. These extensive and elegant studies have now charted the extent of the LexA regulons, uncovered many new genes, and exposed a limited overlap in the LexA regulon between the two bacteria. As more bacterial genomes are analysed, more curiosities in LexA regulons arise. Several notable examples include the discovery of a LexA-like protein, HdiR, in Lactococcus lactis, organisms with two lexA genes, and small DNA damage-inducible cassettes under LexA control. In the cyanobacterium Synechocystis, genetic and microarray studies demonstrated that a LexA paralogue exerts control over an entirely different set of carbon-controlled genes and is crucial to cells facing carbon starvation. An examination of SOS induction evoked by common therapeutic drugs has shed new light on unsuspected consequences of drug exposure. Certain antibiotics, most notably fluoroquinolones such as ciprofloxacin, can induce an SOS response and can modulate the spread of virulence factors and drug resistance. SOS induction by beta-lactams in E. coli triggers a novel form of antibiotic defence that involves cell wall stress and signal transduction by the DpiAB two-component system. In this review, we provide an overview of these new directions in SOS and LexA research with emphasis on a few themes: identification of genes under LexA control, the identification of new endogenous triggers, and antibiotic-induced SOS response and its consequences.

  2. Characterization of a resistance-nodulation-cell division transporter system associated with the syr-syp genomic island of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyojeung; Gross, Dennis C

    2005-09-01

    A tripartite resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) transporter system, called the PseABC efflux system, was identified at the left border of the syr-syp genomic island of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strain B301D. The PseABC efflux system was located within a 5.7-kb operon that encodes an outer membrane protein (PseA), a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (PseB), and an RND-type cytoplasmic membrane protein (PseC). The PseABC efflux system exhibited amino acid homology to a putative RND efflux system of Ralstonia solanacearum, with identities of 48% for PseA, 51% for PseB, and 61% for PseC. A nonpolar mutation within the pseC gene was generated by nptII insertional mutagenesis. The resultant mutant strain showed a larger reduction in syringopeptin secretion (67%) than in syringomycin secretion (41%) compared to parental strain B301D (P system controls expression of the pseA gene. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to determine transcript levels of the syringomycin (syrB1) and syringopeptin (sypA) synthetase genes in strain B301D-HK4 (a pseC mutant). The expression of the sypA gene by mutant strain B301D-HK4 corresponded to approximately 13% of that by parental strain B301D, whereas the syrB1 gene expression by mutant strain B301D-HK4 was nearly 61% (P resistance of mutant strain B301D-HK4 to any antibiotic used in this study was not reduced compared to parental strain B301D, a drug-supersensitive acrB mutant of Escherichia coli showed two- to fourfold-increased resistance to acriflavine, erythromycin, and tetracycline upon heterologous expression of the pseA, pseB, and pseC genes (pseABC efflux genes). The PseABC efflux system is the first RND transporter system described for P. syringae, and it has an important role in secretion of syringomycin and syringopeptin.

  3. Pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae Causing Bacterial Brown Spot and Halo Blight in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Are Distinguishable by Ribotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana J.; Landeras, Elena; Mendoza, M. Carmen

    2000-01-01

    Ribotyping was evaluated as a method to differentiate between Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola and pv. syringae strains causing bacterial brown spot and halo blight diseases in Phaseolus vulgaris L. Ribotyping, with restriction enzymes BglI and SalI and using the Escherichia coli rrnB operon as the probe, differentiated 11 and 14 ribotypes, respectively, and a combination of data from both procedures yielded 19 combined ribotypes. Cluster analysis of the combined ribotypes differentiated the pathovars phaseolicola and syringae, as well as different clonal lineages within these pathovars. The potential of ribotyping to screen for correlations between lineages and factors such as geographical region and/or bean varieties is also reported. PMID:10653764

  4. Isolation and characterisation of EfeM, a periplasmic component of the putative EfeUOBM iron transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekaran, Mohan B [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Sue A; Gibson, Trevor M [Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano [Circular Dichroism Group, Diamond Light Source, Chiltern, Oxfordshire,OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Andrews, Simon C [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Watson, Kimberly A, E-mail: k.a.watson@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom); Structural Biology Unit at The BioCentre, University of Reading, Harborne Building, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, RG6 6AS (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Bioinformatic analysis reveals EfeM is a metallopeptidase with conserved HXXE motif. {yields} Mass spectrometry confirms EfeM consists of 251 residues, molecular weight 27,772Da. {yields} SRCD spectroscopy shows an {alpha}-helical secondary structure. {yields} Single crystals of EfeM are orthorhombic and diffract to 1.6A resolution. {yields} Space group is P22{sub 1}2{sub 1} with cell dimensions a = 46.74, b = 95.17 and c = 152.61 A. -- Abstract: The EfeM protein is a component of the putative EfeUOBM iron-transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae and is thought to act as a periplasmic, ferrous-iron binding protein. It contains a signal peptide of 34 amino acid residues and a C-terminal 'Peptidase{sub M}75' domain of 251 residues. The C-terminal domain contains a highly conserved 'HXXE' motif thought to act as part of a divalent cation-binding site. In this work, the gene (efeM or 'Psyr{sub 3}370') encoding EfeM was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the mature protein was purified from the periplasm. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of the protein (M{sub W} 27,772 Da). Circular dichroism spectroscopy of EfeM indicated a mainly {alpha}-helical structure, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. Purified EfeM was crystallised by hanging-drop vapor diffusion to give needle-shaped crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 A. This is the first molecular study of a peptidase M75 domain with a presumed iron transport role.

  5. Isolation and characterisation of EfeM, a periplasmic component of the putative EfeUOBM iron transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekaran, Mohan B; Mitchell, Sue A; Gibson, Trevor M; Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano; Andrews, Simon C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Bioinformatic analysis reveals EfeM is a metallopeptidase with conserved HXXE motif. → Mass spectrometry confirms EfeM consists of 251 residues, molecular weight 27,772Da. → SRCD spectroscopy shows an α-helical secondary structure. → Single crystals of EfeM are orthorhombic and diffract to 1.6A resolution. → Space group is P22 1 2 1 with cell dimensions a = 46.74, b = 95.17 and c = 152.61 A. -- Abstract: The EfeM protein is a component of the putative EfeUOBM iron-transporter of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar syringae and is thought to act as a periplasmic, ferrous-iron binding protein. It contains a signal peptide of 34 amino acid residues and a C-terminal 'Peptidase M 75' domain of 251 residues. The C-terminal domain contains a highly conserved 'HXXE' motif thought to act as part of a divalent cation-binding site. In this work, the gene (efeM or 'Psyr 3 370') encoding EfeM was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the mature protein was purified from the periplasm. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of the protein (M W 27,772 Da). Circular dichroism spectroscopy of EfeM indicated a mainly α-helical structure, consistent with bioinformatic predictions. Purified EfeM was crystallised by hanging-drop vapor diffusion to give needle-shaped crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 1.6 A. This is the first molecular study of a peptidase M75 domain with a presumed iron transport role.

  6. A Localized Pseudomonas syringae Infection Triggers Systemic Clock Responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Bonaldi, Katia; Uribe, Francisco; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L

    2018-02-19

    The circadian clock drives daily rhythms of many plant physiological responses, providing a competitive advantage that improves plant fitness and survival rates [1-5]. Whereas multiple environmental cues are predicted to regulate the plant clock function, most studies focused on understanding the effects of light and temperature [5-8]. Increasing evidence indicates a significant role of plant-pathogen interactions on clock regulation [9, 10], but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In Arabidopsis, the clock function largely relies on a transcriptional feedback loop between morning (CCA1 and LHY)- and evening (TOC1)-expressed transcription factors [6-8]. Here, we focused on these core components to investigate the Arabidopsis clock regulation using a unique biotic stress approach. We found that a single-leaf Pseudomonas syringae infection systemically lengthened the period and reduced the amplitude of circadian rhythms in distal uninfected tissues. Remarkably, the low-amplitude phenotype observed upon infection was recapitulated by a transient treatment with the defense-related phytohormone salicylic acid (SA), which also triggered a significant clock phase delay. Strikingly, despite SA-modulated circadian rhythms, we revealed that the master regulator of SA signaling, NPR1 [11, 12], antagonized clock responses triggered by both SA treatment and P. syringae. In contrast, we uncovered that the NADPH oxidase RBOHD [13] largely mediated the aforementioned clock responses after either SA treatment or the bacterial infection. Altogether, we demonstrated novel and unexpected roles for SA, NPR1, and redox signaling in clock regulation by P. syringae and revealed a previously unrecognized layer of systemic clock regulation by locally perceived environmental cues. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  8. Pseudomonas syringae evades host Immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA

    OpenAIRE

    Pel, M.J.C.; Van Dijken, A.J.H.; Bardoel, B.W.; Seidl, M.F; Van der Ent, S.; Van Strijp, J.A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of bacterial species. In addition, we investigated the role of AprA in virulence of the bacterial plant athogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The AprA-deficient DC3000 ΔaprA knockout mutant was significantl...

  9. Optimization of Photosynthetic Productivity in Contrasting Environments by Regulons Controlling Plant Form and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Demmig-Adams

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of a family of transcription factors and their regulons in maintaining high photosynthetic performance across a range of challenging environments with a focus on extreme temperatures and water availability. Specifically, these transcription factors include CBFs (C-repeat binding factors and DREBs (dehydration-responsive element-binding, with CBF/DREB1 primarily orchestrating cold adaptation and other DREBs serving in heat, drought, and salinity adaptation. The central role of these modulators in plant performance under challenging environments is based on (i interweaving of these regulators with other key signaling networks (plant hormones and redox signals as well as (ii their function in integrating responses across the whole plant, from light-harvesting and sugar-production in the leaf to foliar sugar export and water import and on to the plant’s sugar-consuming sinks (growth, storage, and reproduction. The example of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes from geographic origins with contrasting climates is used to describe the links between natural genetic variation in CBF transcription factors and the differential acclimation of plant anatomical and functional features needed to support superior photosynthetic performance in contrasting environments. Emphasis is placed on considering different temperature environments (hot versus cold and light environments (limiting versus high light, on trade-offs between adaptations to contrasting environments, and on plant lines minimizing such trade-offs.

  10. Structure-function analysis of the HrpB2-HrcU interaction in the Xanthomonas citri type III secretion system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A Cappelletti

    Full Text Available Bacterial type III secretion systems deliver protein virulence factors to host cells. Here we characterize the interaction between HrpB2, a small protein secreted by the Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type III secretion system, and the cytosolic domain of the inner membrane protein HrcU, a paralog of the flagellar protein FlhB. We show that a recombinant fragment corresponding to the C-terminal cytosolic domain of HrcU produced in E. coli suffers cleavage within a conserved Asn264-Pro265-Thr266-His267 (NPTH sequence. A recombinant HrcU cytosolic domain with N264A, P265A, T266A mutations at the cleavage site (HrcU(AAAH was not cleaved and interacted with HrpB2. Furthermore, a polypeptide corresponding to the sequence following the NPTH cleavage site also interacted with HrpB2 indicating that the site for interaction is located after the NPTH site. Non-polar deletion mutants of the hrcU and hrpB2 genes resulted in a total loss of pathogenicity in susceptible citrus plants and disease symptoms could be recovered by expression of HrpB2 and HrcU from extrachromossomal plasmids. Complementation of the ΔhrcU mutant with HrcU(AAAH produced canker lesions similar to those observed when complemented with wild-type HrcU. HrpB2 secretion however, was significantly reduced in the ΔhrcU mutant complemented with HrcU(AAAH, suggesting that an intact and cleavable NPTH site in HrcU is necessary for total functionally of T3SS in X. citri subsp. citri. Complementation of the ΔhrpB2 X. citri subsp. citri strain with a series of hrpB2 gene mutants revealed that the highly conserved HrpB2 C-terminus is essential for T3SS-dependent development of citrus canker symptoms in planta.

  11. Clarification of Taxonomic Status within the Pseudomonas syringae Species Group Based on a Phylogenomic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gomila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas syringae phylogenetic group comprises 15 recognized bacterial species and more than 60 pathovars. The classification and identification of strains is relevant for practical reasons but also for understanding the epidemiology and ecology of this group of plant pathogenic bacteria. Genome-based taxonomic analyses have been introduced recently to clarify the taxonomy of the whole genus. A set of 139 draft and complete genome sequences of strains belonging to all species of the P. syringae group available in public databases were analyzed, together with the genomes of closely related species used as outgroups. Comparative genomics based on the genome sequences of the species type strains in the group allowed the delineation of phylogenomic species and demonstrated that a high proportion of strains included in the study are misclassified. Furthermore, representatives of at least 7 putative novel species were detected. It was also confirmed that P. ficuserectae, P. meliae, and P. savastanoi are later synonyms of P. amygdali and that “P. coronafaciens” should be revived as a nomenspecies.

  12. Genomic plasticity enables phenotypic variation of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmeng Bao

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing revealed the presence of a genomic anomaly in the region of 4.7 to 4.9 Mb of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 genome. The average read depth coverage of Pst DC3000 whole genome sequencing results suggested that a 165 kb segment of the chromosome had doubled in copy number. Further analysis confirmed the 165 kb duplication and that the two copies were arranged as a direct tandem repeat. Examination of the corresponding locus in Pst NCPPB1106, the parent strain of Pst DC3000, suggested that the 165 kb duplication most likely formed after the two strains diverged via transposition of an ISPsy5 insertion sequence (IS followed by unequal crossing over between ISPsy5 elements at each end of the duplicated region. Deletion of one copy of the 165 kb region demonstrated that the duplication facilitated enhanced growth in some culture conditions, but did not affect pathogenic growth in host tomato plants. These types of chromosomal structures are predicted to be unstable and we have observed resolution of the 165 kb duplication to single copy and its subsequent re-duplication. These data demonstrate the role of IS elements in recombination events that facilitate genomic reorganization in P. syringae.

  13. Origin of the Outbreak in France of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Biovar 3, the Causal Agent of Bacterial Canker of Kiwifruit, Revealed by a Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunty, A; Cesbron, S; Poliakoff, F; Jacques, M-A; Manceau, C

    2015-10-01

    The first outbreaks of bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 were detected in France in 2010. P. syringae pv. actinidiae causes leaf spots, dieback, and canker that sometimes lead to the death of the vine. P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum, which is pathogenic on kiwi as well, causes only leaf spots. In order to conduct an epidemiological study to track the spread of the epidemics of these two pathogens in France, we developed a multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA). MLVA was conducted on 340 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 isolated in Chile, China, France, Italy, and New Zealand and on 39 strains of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum isolated in Australia, France, and New Zealand. Eleven polymorphic VNTR loci were identified in the genomes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 ICMP 18744 and of P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum ICMP 18807. MLVA enabled the structuring of P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum strains in 55 and 16 haplotypes, respectively. MLVA and discriminant analysis of principal components revealed that strains isolated in Chile, China, and New Zealand are genetically distinct from P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains isolated in France and in Italy, which appear to be closely related at the genetic level. In contrast, no structuring was observed for P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum. We developed an MLVA scheme to explore the diversity within P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 and to trace the dispersal routes of epidemic P. syringae pv. actinidiae biovar 3 in Europe. We suggest using this MLVA scheme to trace the dispersal routes of P. syringae pv. actinidiae at a global level. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Measuring the Plasmodium falciparum HRP2 protein in blood from artesunate-treated malaria patients predicts post-artesunate delayed hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndour, Papa Alioune; Larréché, Sébastien; Mouri, Oussama; Argy, Nicolas; Gay, Frédérick; Roussel, Camille; Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Perillaud, Claire; Langui, Dominique; Biligui, Sylvestre; Chartrel, Nathalie; Mérens, Audrey; Kendjo, Eric; Ghose, Aniruddha; Hassan, Md Mahtab Uddin; Hossain, Md Amir; Kingston, Hugh W F; Plewes, Katherine; Dondorp, Arjen M; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bonnefoy, Serge; Thellier, Marc; Woodrow, Charles J; Buffet, Pierre A

    2017-07-05

    Artesunate, the recommended drug for severe malaria, rapidly clears the malaria parasite from infected patients but frequently induces anemia-called post-artesunate delayed hemolysis (PADH)-for which a simple predictive test is urgently needed. The underlying event in PADH is the expulsion of artesunate-exposed parasites from their host erythrocytes by pitting. We show that the histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum persists in the circulation of artesunate-treated malaria patients in Bangladesh and in French travelers who became infected with malaria in Africa. HRP2 persisted in whole blood (not plasma) of artesunate-treated patients with malaria at higher levels compared to quinine-treated patients. Using an optimized membrane permeabilization method, HRP2 was observed by immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and electron microscopy to persist in once-infected red blood cells from artesunate-treated malaria patients. HRP2 was deposited at the membrane of once-infected red blood cells in a pattern similar to that for ring erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA), a parasite invasion marker. On the basis of these observations, we developed a semiquantitative titration method using a widely available HRP2-based rapid diagnostic dipstick test. Positivity on this test using a 1:500 dilution of whole blood from artesunate-treated patients with malaria collected shortly after parasite clearance predicted subsequent PADH with 89% sensitivity and 73% specificity. These results suggest that adapting an existing HRP2-based rapid diagnostic dipstick test may enable prediction of PADH several days before it occurs in artesunate-treated patients with malaria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Disruption of the ammonium transporter AMT1.1 alters basal defences generating resistance against Pseudomonas syringae and Plectosphaerella cucumerina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria ePastor

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of the high-affinity nitrate transporter NRT2.1 activates the priming defence against Pseudomonas syringae, resulting in enhanced resistance. In this study, it is demonstrated that the high-affinity ammonium transporter AMT1.1 is a negative regulator of Arabidopsis defence responses. The T-DNA knockout mutant amt1.1 displays enhanced resistance against Plectosphaerella cucumerina and reduced susceptibility to P. syringae. The impairment of AMT1.1 induces significant metabolic changes in the absence of challenge, suggesting that amt1.1 retains constitutive defence responses. Interestingly, amt1.1 combats pathogens differently depending on the lifestyle of the pathogen. In addition, N starvation enhances the susceptibility of wild type plants and the mutant amt1.1 to P. syringae whereas it has no effect on P. cucumerina resistance. The metabolic changes of amt1.1 against P. syringae are subtler and are restricted to the phenylpropanoid pathway, which correlates with its reduced susceptibility. By contrast, the amt1.1 mutant responds by activating higher levels of camalexin and callose against P. cucumerina. In addition, amt1.1 shows altered levels of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolates and other Trp-related compounds following infection by the necrotroph. These observations indicate that AMT1.1 may play additional roles that affect N uptake and plant immune responses.

  16. The role of crop waste and soil in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar porri infection of leek (Allium porrum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, van L.S.; Nijhuis, E.H.; Koenraadt, H.; Visser, J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. porri, the causal agent of bacterial blight of leek, is a current threat for leek (Allium porrum) production in the Netherlands. The roles of post-harvest crop waste and plant invasion from soil in leek plant infection was investigated with the purpose to gain better

  17. Virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is modulated through the Catabolite Repression Control protein Crc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas syringae (P.s.) infects diverse plant species and several P.s. pathovars have been used in the study of molecular events that occur during plant-microbe interactions. Although the relationship between bacterial metabolism, nutrient acquisition and virulence has attracted increasing atten...

  18. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Rebekah A; Acedo, Elena Lopez; Young, Vivienne L; Chen, Danni; Tong, Brian; Taylor, Corinda; Easingwood, Richard A; Pitman, Andrew R; Kleffmann, Torsten; Bostina, Mihnea; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-06-24

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.). Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding) were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  19. Indole-3-acetaldehyde dehydrogenase-dependent auxin synthesis contributes to virulence of Pseudomonas syringae strain DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri A McClerklin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae modulates plant hormone signaling to promote infection and disease development. P. syringae uses several strategies to manipulate auxin physiology in Arabidopsis thaliana to promote pathogenesis, including its synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, the predominant form of auxin in plants, and production of virulence factors that alter auxin responses in the host; however, the role of pathogen-derived auxin in P. syringae pathogenesis is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that P. syringae strain DC3000 produces IAA via a previously uncharacterized pathway and identify a novel indole-3-acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, AldA, that functions in IAA biosynthesis by catalyzing the NAD-dependent formation of IAA from indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld. Biochemical analysis and solving of the 1.9 Å resolution x-ray crystal structure reveal key features of AldA for IAA synthesis, including the molecular basis of substrate specificity. Disruption of aldA and a close homolog, aldB, lead to reduced IAA production in culture and reduced virulence on A. thaliana. We use these mutants to explore the mechanism by which pathogen-derived auxin contributes to virulence and show that IAA produced by DC3000 suppresses salicylic acid-mediated defenses in A. thaliana. Thus, auxin is a DC3000 virulence factor that promotes pathogenicity by suppressing host defenses.

  20. Genome, Proteome and Structure of a T7-Like Bacteriophage of the Kiwifruit Canker Phytopathogen Pseudomonas Syringae pv. Actinidiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah A. Frampton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an economically significant pathogen responsible for severe bacterial canker of kiwifruit (Actinidia sp.. Bacteriophages infecting this phytopathogen have potential as biocontrol agents as part of an integrated approach to the management of bacterial canker, and for use as molecular tools to study this bacterium. A variety of bacteriophages were previously isolated that infect P. syringae pv. actinidiae, and their basic properties were characterized to provide a framework for formulation of these phages as biocontrol agents. Here, we have examined in more detail φPsa17, a phage with the capacity to infect a broad range of P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains and the only member of the Podoviridae in this collection. Particle morphology was visualized using cryo-electron microscopy, the genome was sequenced, and its structural proteins were analysed using shotgun proteomics. These studies demonstrated that φPsa17 has a 40,525 bp genome, is a member of the T7likevirus genus and is closely related to the pseudomonad phages φPSA2 and gh-1. Eleven structural proteins (one scaffolding were detected by proteomics and φPsa17 has a capsid of approximately 60 nm in diameter. No genes indicative of a lysogenic lifecycle were identified, suggesting the phage is obligately lytic. These features indicate that φPsa17 may be suitable for formulation as a biocontrol agent of P. syringae pv. actinidiae.

  1. Novel Pseudomonas syringae strains associated with leaf spot diseases on watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and squash (Cucurbita pepo) in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2006 and 2011, bacteria, fluorescent on KMB, were isolated from leaf spots of greenhouse-grown watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and field-grown squash (Cucurbita pepo) in coastal California. Biochemical characterization of the isolates indicated that they belonged to Pseudomonas syringae. Multilocu...

  2. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose.

  3. On the necessity and biological significance of threshold-free regulon prediction outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigali, Sébastien; Nivelle, Renaud; Tocquin, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    The in silico prediction of cis-acting elements in a genome is an efficient way to quickly obtain an overview of the biological processes controlled by a trans-acting factor, and connections between regulatory networks. Several regulon prediction web tools are available, designed to identify DNA motifs predicted to be bound by transcription factors using position weight matrix-based algorithms. In this paper we expose and discuss the conflicting objectives of software creators (bioinformaticians) and software users (biologists), who aim for reliable and exhaustive prediction outputs, respectively. Software makers, concerned with providing tools that minimise the number of false positive hits, often impose a stringent threshold score for a sequence to be included in the list of the putative cis-acting sites. This rigidity eventually results in the identification of strongly reliable but largely straightforward sites, i.e. those associated with genes already anticipated to be targeted by the studied transcription factor. Importantly, this biased identification of strongly bound sequences contrasts with the biological reality where, in many circumstances, a weak DNA-protein interaction is required for the appropriate gene's expression. We show here a series of transcriptionally controlled systems involving weakly bound cis-acting elements that could never have been discovered because of the policy of preventing software users from modifying the screening parameters. Proposing only trustworthy prediction outputs thus prevents biologists from fully utilising their knowledge background and deciding to analyse statistically irrelevant hits that could nonetheless be potentially involved in subtle, unexpected, though essential cis-trans relationships.

  4. Identification and characterization of the PhhR regulon in Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M Carmen; Duque, Estrella; Rodríguez-Herva, José J; Fernández-Escamilla, Ana M; Ramos, Juan L

    2010-06-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a soil microorganism that utilizes aromatic amino acids present in root exudates as a nitrogen source. We have previously shown that the PhhR transcriptional regulator induces phhAB genes encoding a phenylalanine hydroxylase. In this study we show, using microarray assays and promoter fusions, that PhhR is a global regulator responsible for the activation of genes essential for phenylalanine degradation, phenylalanine homeostasis and other genes of unknown function. Recently, it has been shown that phenylalanine catabolism occurs through more than one pathway. One of these possible pathways involves the metabolism of phenylalanine via tyrosine, p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, and homogentisate. We identified two genes within this pathway that encode an acyl-CoA transferase involved in the metabolism of acetoacetate. All genes in this pathway were induced in response to phenylalanine in a PhhR-proficient background. The second potential degradative pathway involves the degradation of phenylalanine to produce phenylpyruvate, which seems to be degraded via phenylacetyl-CoA. A number of mutants in the paa genes encoding phenylacetyl-CoA degradation enzymes fail to grow on phenylpyruvate or phenylacetate, further supporting the existence of this second pathway. We found that the PhhR regulon also includes genes involved in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids that are repressed in the presence of phenylalanine, suggesting the possibility of feedback at the transcriptional level. In addition, we found that PhhR modulates the level of expression of the broad-substrate-specificity MexEF/OprN efflux pump. Expression from this pump is under the control of mexT gene product because phenylalanine-dependent transcription from the mexE promoter does not occur in a mexT mutant background. These results place PhhR as an important regulator in the control of bacterial responses to aromatic amino acids.

  5. RNA-Seq analysis reveals a six-gene SoxR regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawar Naseer

    Full Text Available The redox-regulated transcription factor SoxR is conserved in diverse bacteria, but emerging studies suggest that this protein plays distinct physiological roles in different bacteria. SoxR regulates a global oxidative stress response (involving > 100 genes against exogenous redox-cycling drugs in Escherichia coli and related enterics. In the antibiotic producers Streptomyces coelicolor and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, however, SoxR regulates a smaller number of genes that encode membrane transporters and proteins with homology to antibiotic-tailoring enzymes. In both S. coelicolor and P. aeruginosa, SoxR-regulated genes are expressed in stationary phase during the production of endogenously-produced redox-active antibiotics. These observations suggest that SoxR evolved to sense endogenous secondary metabolites and activate machinery to process and transport them in antibiotic-producing bacteria. Previous bioinformatics analysis that searched the genome for SoxR-binding sites in putative promoters defined a five-gene SoxR regulon in S. coelicolor including an ABC transporter, two oxidoreductases, a monooxygenase and an epimerase/dehydratase. Since this in silico screen may have missed potential SoxR-targets, we conducted a whole genome transcriptome comparison of wild type S. coelicolor and a soxR-deficient mutant in stationary phase using RNA-Seq. Our analysis revealed a sixth SoxR-regulated gene in S. coelicolor that encodes a putative quinone oxidoreductase. Knowledge of the full complement of genes regulated by SoxR will facilitate studies to elucidate the function of this regulatory molecule in antibiotic producers.

  6. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e sigmaB regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Torsten; Hossain, Hamid; Chatterjee, Som S; Machata, Silke; Volk, Ute; Wagner, Sandra; Brors, Benedikt; Haas, Stefan; Kuenne, Carsten T; Billion, Andre; Otten, Sonja; Pane-Farre, Jan; Engelmann, Susanne; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2008-01-28

    The opportunistic food-borne gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can exist as a free-living microorganism in the environment and grow in the cytoplasm of vertebrate and invertebrate cells following infection. The general stress response, controlled by the alternative sigma factor, sigmaB, has an important role for bacterial survival both in the environment and during infection. We used quantitative real-time PCR analysis and immuno-blot analysis to examine sigmaB expression during growth of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Whole genome-based transcriptional profiling was used to identify sigmaB-dependent genes at different growth phases. We detected 105 sigmaB-positively regulated genes and 111 genes which appeared to be under negative control of sigmaB and validated 36 sigmaB-positively regulated genes in vivo using a reporter gene fusion system. Genes comprising the sigmaB regulon encode solute transporters, novel cell-wall proteins, universal stress proteins, transcriptional regulators and include those involved in osmoregulation, carbon metabolism, ribosome- and envelope-function, as well as virulence and niche-specific survival genes such as those involved in bile resistance and exclusion. Ten of the sigmaB-positively regulated genes of L. monocytogenes are absent in L. innocua. A total of 75 sigmaB-positively regulated listerial genes had homologs in B. subtilis, but only 33 have been previously described as being sigmaB-regulated in B. subtilis even though both species share a highly conserved sigmaB-dependent consensus sequence. A low overlap of genes may reflects adaptation of these bacteria to their respective environmental conditions.

  7. Identification and characterization of PhoP regulon members in Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Zongmin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription regulator PhoP has been shown to be important for Y. pestis survival in macrophages and under various in vitro stresses. However, the mechanism by which PhoP promotes bacterial intracellular survival is not fully understood. Our previous microarray analysis suggested that PhoP governed a wide set of cellular pathways in Y. pestis. A series of biochemical experiments were done herein to study members of the PhoP regulon of Y. pestis biovar Microtus. Results By using gel mobility shift assay and quantitative RT-PCR, a total of 30 putative transcription units were characterized as direct PhoP targets. The primer extension assay was further used to determine the transcription start sites of 18 PhoP-dependent promoters and to localize the -10 and -35 elements. The DNase I footprinting was used to identify the PhoP-binding sites within 17 PhoP-dependent promoters, enabling the identification of PhoP box and matrix that both represented the conserved signals for PhoP recognition in Y. pestis. Data presented here providing a good basis for modeling PhoP-promoter DNA interactions that is crucial to the PhoP-mediated transcriptional regulation. Conclusion The proven direct PhoP targets include nine genes encoding regulators and 21 genes or operons with functions of detoxification, protection against DNA damages, resistance to antimicrobial peptides, and adaptation to magnesium limitation. We can presume that PhoP is a global regulator that controls a complex regulatory cascade by a mechanism of not only directly controlling the expression of specific genes, but also indirectly regulating various cellular pathways by acting on a set of dedicated regulators. These results help us gain insights into the PhoP-dependent mechanisms by which Y. pestis survives the antibacterial strategies employed by host macrophages.

  8. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e σB regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billion Andre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The opportunistic food-borne gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can exist as a free-living microorganism in the environment and grow in the cytoplasm of vertebrate and invertebrate cells following infection. The general stress response, controlled by the alternative sigma factor, σB, has an important role for bacterial survival both in the environment and during infection. We used quantitative real-time PCR analysis and immuno-blot analysis to examine σB expression during growth of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Whole genome-based transcriptional profiling was used to identify σB-dependent genes at different growth phases. Results We detected 105 σB-positively regulated genes and 111 genes which appeared to be under negative control of σB and validated 36 σB-positively regulated genes in vivo using a reporter gene fusion system. Conclusion Genes comprising the σB regulon encode solute transporters, novel cell-wall proteins, universal stress proteins, transcriptional regulators and include those involved in osmoregulation, carbon metabolism, ribosome- and envelope-function, as well as virulence and niche-specific survival genes such as those involved in bile resistance and exclusion. Ten of the σB-positively regulated genes of L. monocytogenes are absent in L. innocua. A total of 75 σB-positively regulated listerial genes had homologs in B. subtilis, but only 33 have been previously described as being σB-regulated in B. subtilis even though both species share a highly conserved σB-dependent consensus sequence. A low overlap of genes may reflects adaptation of these bacteria to their respective environmental conditions.

  9. Placental Plasmodium falciparum malaria infection: Operational accuracy of HRP2 rapid diagnostic tests in a malaria endemic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montague Mark

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria has a negative effect on the outcome of pregnancy. Pregnant women are at high risk of severe malaria and severe haemolytic anaemia, which contribute 60-70% of foetal and perinatal losses. Peripheral blood smear microscopy under-estimates sequestered placental infections, therefore malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs detecting histidine rich protein-2 antigen (HRP-2 in peripheral blood are a potential alternative. Methods HRP-2 RDTs accuracy in detecting malaria in pregnancy (MIP >28 weeks gestation and placental Plasmodium falciparum malaria (after childbirth were conducted using Giemsa microscopy and placental histopathology respectively as the reference standard. The study was conducted in Mbale Hospital, using the midwives to perform and interpret the RDT results. Discordant results samples were spot checked using PCR techniques. Results Among 433 febrile women tested, RDTs had a sensitivity of 96.8% (95% CI 92-98.8, specificity of 73.5% (95% CI 67.8-78.6, a positive predictive value (PPV of 68.0% (95% CI 61.4-73.9, and negative predictive value (NPV of 97.5% (95% CI 94.0-99.0 in detecting peripheral P. falciparum malaria during pregnancy. At delivery, in non-symptomatic women, RDTs had a 80.9% sensitivity (95% CI 57.4-93.7 and a 87.5% specificity (95%CI 80.9-92.1, PPV of 47.2% (95% CI 30.7-64.2 and NPV of 97.1% (95% CI 92.2-99.1 in detecting placental P. falciparum infections among 173 samples. At delivery, 41% of peripheral infections were detected by microscopy without concurrent placental infection. The combination of RDTs and microscopy improved the sensitivity to 90.5% and the specificity to 98.4% for detecting placental malaria infection (McNemar's X 2> 3.84. RDTs were not superior to microscopy in detecting placental infection (McNemar's X 2 Conclusion Use of HRP-2 RDTs to detect malaria in pregnancy in symptomatic women was accurate when performed by midwives. A combination of RDTs and microscopy provided

  10. Miniature Transposable Sequences Are Frequently Mobilized in the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaji, Leire; Añorga, Maite; Jackson, Robert W.; Martínez-Bilbao, Alejandro; Yanguas-Casás, Natalia; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements are widespread in Pseudomonas syringae, and often associate with virulence genes. Genome reannotation of the model bean pathogen P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A identified seventeen types of insertion sequences and two miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) with a biased distribution, representing 2.8% of the chromosome, 25.8% of the 132-kb virulence plasmid and 2.7% of the 52-kb plasmid. Employing an entrapment vector containing sacB, we estimated that transposition frequency oscillated between 2.6×10−5 and 1.1×10−6, depending on the clone, although it was stable for each clone after consecutive transfers in culture media. Transposition frequency was similar for bacteria grown in rich or minimal media, and from cells recovered from compatible and incompatible plant hosts, indicating that growth conditions do not influence transposition in strain 1448A. Most of the entrapped insertions contained a full-length IS801 element, with the remaining insertions corresponding to sequences smaller than any transposable element identified in strain 1448A, and collectively identified as miniature sequences. From these, fragments of 229, 360 and 679-nt of the right end of IS801 ended in a consensus tetranucleotide and likely resulted from one-ended transposition of IS801. An average 0.7% of the insertions analyzed consisted of IS801 carrying a fragment of variable size from gene PSPPH_0008/PSPPH_0017, showing that IS801 can mobilize DNA in vivo. Retrospective analysis of complete plasmids and genomes of P. syringae suggests, however, that most fragments of IS801 are likely the result of reorganizations rather than one-ended transpositions, and that this element might preferentially contribute to genome flexibility by generating homologous regions of recombination. A further miniature sequence previously found to affect host range specificity and virulence, designated MITEPsy1 (100-nt), represented an average 2.4% of the total

  11. Apoplastic peroxidases are required for salicylic acid-mediated defense against Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammarella, Nicole D; Cheng, Zhenyu; Fu, Zheng Qing; Daudi, Arsalan; Bolwell, G Paul; Dong, Xinnian; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases play an important role in the plant defense response. Diminished expression of at least two Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase encoding genes, PRX33 (At3g49110) and PRX34 (At3g49120), as a consequence of anti-sense expression of a heterologous French bean peroxidase gene (asFBP1.1), were previously shown to result in reduced levels of ROS following pathogen attack, enhanced susceptibility to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, and reduced levels of callose production and defense-related gene expression in response to the microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules flg22 and elf26. These data demonstrated that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in the elicitation of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). Further work reported in this paper, however, shows that asFBP1.1 antisense plants are not impaired in all PTI-associated responses. For example, some but not all flg22-elicited genes are induced to lower levels by flg22 in asFPB1.1, and callose deposition in asFPB1.1 is similar to wild-type following infiltration with a Pseudomonas syringae hrcC mutant or with non-host P. syringae pathovars. Moreover, asFPB1.1 plants did not exhibit any apparent defect in their ability to mount a hypersensitive response (HR). On the other hand, salicylic acid (SA)-mediated activation of PR1 was dramatically impaired in asFPB1.1 plants. In addition, P. syringae-elicited expression of many genes known to be SA-dependent was significantly reduced in asFBP1.1 plants. Consistent with this latter result, in asFBP1.1 plants the key regulator of SA-mediated responses, NPR1, showed both dramatically decreased total protein abundance and a failure to monomerize, which is required for its translocation into the nucleus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Common fur and mystacial vibrissae parallel sensory pathways: 14C 2-deoxyglucose and WGA-HRP studies in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.; Morgan, C.W.; Morton, M.T.; Sharp, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Stimulation of mystacial vibrissae in rows A,B, and C increased (14C) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake in spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis (Sp5c) mostly in ventral portions of laminae III-IV with less activation of II and V. Stimulation of common fur above the whiskers mainly activated lamina II, with less activation in deeper layers. The patterns of activation were compatible with an inverted head, onion skin Sp5c somatotopy. Wheatgerm Agglutinin-Horseradish Peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections into common fur between mystacial vibrissae rows A-B and B-C led to anterograde transganglionic labeling only of Sp5c, mainly of lamina II with less label in layer V, and very sparse label in III and IV. WGA-HRP skin injections appear to primarily label small fibers, which along with larger fibers, were metabolically activated during common fur stimulation. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation increased 2DG uptake in ventral ipsilateral spinal trigeminal nuclei pars interpolaris (Sp5i) and oralis (Sp5o) and principal trigeminal sensory nucleus (Pr5). Common fur stimulation above the whiskers slightly increased 2DG uptake in ventral Sp5i, Sp5o, and possibly Pr5. The most dorsal aspect of the ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus of thalamus was activated contralateral to whisker stimulation. Stimulation of the common fur dorsal to the whiskers activated a region of dorsal VPM caudal to the VPM region activated during whisker stimulation. This is consistent with previous data showing that ventral whiskers and portions of the face are represented rostrally in VPM, and more dorsal whiskers and dorsal portions of the face are represented progressively more caudally in VPM. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation activated the contralateral primary sensory SI barrelfield cortex and a separate region in the second somatosensory SII cortex

  13. Anterograde axonal transport and intercellular transfer of WGA-HRP in trigeminal-innervated sensory receptors of rat incisive papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K Y; Byers, M R

    1985-04-08

    The ultrastructure and identification of WGA-HRP-labeled sensory receptors in the rat incisive papilla (the most anterior part of hard palate) were studied using semiserial thin sections. Various sensory receptors were organized according to three locations: dome region (ventral), chemosensory corpuscle region (medial to orifice of incisive canal), and lateral labium (apposing the incisive canal). In the dome region, the sensory receptors were localized in three sensory zones that were associated with surface ridges (one medial and two lateral). In each of these zones, intraepithelial receptor axons and Merkel receptors occurred in the epithelium, while simple unencapsulated corpuscles, glomerular-Meissner corpuscles, and incisive (encapsulated) corpuscles occurred in the lamina propria. In the chemosensory corpuscle region, chemosensory corpuscles and intraepithelial receptor axons were located in the epithelium, and incisive corpuscles were present in the lamina propria. In the lateral labium, only intraepithelial receptor axons were prominent. In all these sensory receptors, the preterminal axons and axon terminals were labeled with the tracer protein. In addition, some nonneuronal cells closely associated with the axon terminals were selectively labeled, e.g., terminal Schwann cells, lamellar Schwann cells, Merkel cells, corpuscular basal cells and chemosensory cells. Other adjacent cells were not labeled, e.g., unspecialized epithelial cells, capsular cells, corpuscular sustentacular cells, and fibroblasts. In both labeled axons and cells, WGA-HRP was incorporated into vesicles, tubules, and vacuolar organelles. The specific intercellular transfer of tracer protein may indicate trophic interactions between axon terminals and support cells in sensory receptors. The specific organization of multiple sensory receptors in the rat incisive papilla may provide a useful alternative system for studying somatosensory physiology.

  14. Genetic variation of pfhrp2 in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Yemen and the performance of HRP2-based malaria rapid diagnostic test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Al-Jasari, Adel; Sady, Hany; Al-Delaimy, Ahmed K; Nasr, Nabil A; Dawaki, Salwa; Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Lau, Yee Ling; Fong, Mun Yik; Surin, Johari

    2015-07-22

    The genetic variation in the Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (pfhrp2) gene that may compromise the use of pfhrp2-based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for the diagnosis of malaria was assessed in P. falciparum isolates from Yemen. This study was conducted in Hodeidah and Al-Mahwit governorates, Yemen. A total of 622 individuals with fever were examined for malaria by CareStart malaria HRP2-RDT and Giemsa-stained thin and thick blood films. The Pfhrp2 gene was amplified and sequenced from 180 isolates, and subjected to amino acid repeat types analysis. A total of 188 (30.2%) participants were found positive for P. falciparum by the RDT. Overall, 12 different amino acid repeat types were identified in Yemeni isolates. Six repeat types were detected in all the isolates (100%) namely types 1, 2, 6, 7, 10 and 12 while types 9 and 11 were not detected in any of the isolates. Moreover, the sensitivity and specificity of the used PfHRP2-based RDTs were high (90.5% and 96.1%, respectively). The present study provides data on the genetic variation within the pfhrp2 gene, and its potential impact on the PfHRP2-based RDTs commonly used in Yemen. CareStart Malaria HRP2-based RDT showed high sensitivity and specificity in endemic areas of Yemen.

  15. Exploring health practitioners' acceptability of a prospective semi-quantitative pfHRP2 device to define severe malaria in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, Freek; Onyamboko, Marie A.; Fanello, Caterina I.; Woodrow, Charles J.; Lubell, Yoel; Boon, Wouter P. C.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A rapid diagnostic tool is being developed to discern severely ill children with severe malaria from children who are ill with alternative febrile diseases but have coincidental peripheral blood parasitaemia. The device semi-quantitatively measures plasma pfHRP2 and has the potential to

  16. Cross-Species Comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei Quorum-Sensing Regulons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D.; Brittnacher, Mitchell J.; Jacobs, Michael A.; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Matthew C.; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S.; Bydalek, Ryland

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. PMID:25182491

  17. Abscisic acid-cytokinin antagonism modulates resistance against pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2014-01-01

    Phytohormones are known as essential regulators of plant defenses, with ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid as the central immunity backbone, while other phytohormones have been demonstrated to interact with this. Only recently, a function of the classic phytohormone cytokinin in plant...... immunity has been described in Arabidopsis, rice, and tobacco. Although interactions of cytokinins with salicylic acid and auxin have been indicated, the complete network of cytokinin interactions with other immunity-relevant phytohormones is not yet understood. Therefore, we studied the interaction...... of kinetin and abscisic acid as a negative regulator of plant immunity to modulate resistance in tobacco against Pseudomonas syringae. By analyzing infection symptoms, pathogen proliferation, and accumulation of the phytoalexin scopoletin as a key mediator of kinetin-induced resistance in tobacco...

  18. Contribution of alginate and levan production to biofilm formation by Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laue, H.; Schenk, A.; Li, H.

    2006-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) play important roles in the attachment of bacterial cells to a surface and/or in building and maintaining the three-dimensional, complex structure of bacterial biofilms. To elucidate the spatial distribution and function of the EPSs levan and alginate during biofilm...... formation, biofilms of Pseudomonas syringae strains with different EPS patterns were compared. The mucoid strain PG4180.muc, which produces levan and alginate, and its levan- and/or alginate-deficient derivatives all formed biofilms in the wells of microtitre plates and in flow chambers. Confocal laser...... scanning microscopy with fluorescently labelled lectins was applied to investigate the spatial distribution of levan and an additional as yet unknown EPS in flow-chamber biofilms. Concanavalin A (ConA) bound specifically to levan and accumulated in cell-depleted voids in the centres of microcolonies...

  19. Phenolic composition, antioxidant and antinociceptive activities of Syringa vulgaris L. bark and leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Erzsébet; Barabás, Csenge; Tóth, Anita; Boldizsár, Imre; Noszál, Béla; Tóth, Gergő

    2018-01-16

    Metabolite profile, antioxidant and antinociceptive activities of Syringa vulgaris bark and leaf methanolic extracts were investigated. By means of HPLC-DAD-ESI-TOF and HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS, a total of 33 phenolics were identified, including 15 secoiridoids, 6 phenylpropanoids, 3 flavonoids, 3 lignans and 6 low molecular weight phenols. Validated quantitative analysis show that syringin (2.52%) and rutin (1.13%) are the main phenolic compounds in bark and leaf, respectively. Notable radical scavenging and antinociceptive activities of the bark and leaf extracts were confirmed by in vitro DPPH ● and ABTS ●+ assays and by in vivo hot-plate method in mice, respectively. Our results could lay the scientific basic of future clinical perspectives of lilac bark and leaf.

  20. Assessment of strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato from Tanzania for resistance to copper and streptomycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Wydra, K.; Mabagala, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-six strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P.s. pv. tomato) were collected from tomato-producing areas in Tanzania and assessed for resistance to copper and antibiotics. The collection was done from three tomato-producing regions (Morogoro, Arusha and Iringa), representing three...... different ecological conditions in the country. After isolation and identification, the P. s. pv. tomato strains were grown on King's medium B (KB) amended with 20% copper sulphate (w/v). The strains were also assessed for resistance to antibiotics. Results indicated that there was widespread resistance...... of the P. s. pv. tomato strains to copper sulphate. The highest level of resistance was recorded from the Arusha region (Northern Tanzania), 83.3% of the P. s. pv. tomato strains from that region showed resistance to copper sulphate. This was followed by Iringa region (Southern Tanzania), from where...

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Syringa oblata Lindl. Inflorescence Identifies Genes Associated with Pigment Biosynthesis and Scent Metabolism.

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    Jian Zheng

    Full Text Available Syringa oblata Lindl. is a woody ornamental plant with high economic value and characteristics that include early flowering, multiple flower colors, and strong fragrance. Despite a long history of cultivation, the genetics and molecular biology of S. oblata are poorly understood. Transcriptome and expression profiling data are needed to identify genes and to better understand the biological mechanisms of floral pigments and scents in this species. Nine cDNA libraries were obtained from three replicates of three developmental stages: inflorescence with enlarged flower buds not protruded, inflorescence with corolla lobes not displayed, and inflorescence with flowers fully opened and emitting strong fragrance. Using the Illumina RNA-Seq technique, 319,425,972 clean reads were obtained and were assembled into 104,691 final unigenes (average length of 853 bp, 41.75% of which were annotated in the NCBI non-redundant protein database. Among the annotated unigenes, 36,967 were assigned to gene ontology categories and 19,956 were assigned to eukaryoticorthologous groups. Using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database, 12,388 unigenes were sorted into 286 pathways. Based on these transcriptomic data, we obtained a large number of candidate genes that were differentially expressed at different flower stages and that were related to floral pigment biosynthesis and fragrance metabolism. This comprehensive transcriptomic analysis provides fundamental information on the genes and pathways involved in flower secondary metabolism and development in S. oblata, providing a useful database for further research on S. oblata and other plants of genus Syringa.

  2. Analysis of the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium

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    Porwollik Steffen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium is a Gram-negative pathogen that must successfully adapt to the broad fluctuations in the concentration of dissolved dioxygen encountered in the host. In Escherichia coli, ArcA (Aerobic Respiratory Control helps the cells to sense and respond to the presence of dioxygen. The global role of ArcA in E. coli is well characterized; however, little is known about its role in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Results We compared the transcriptional profiles of the virulent wild-type (WT strain (ATCC 14028s and its isogenic arcA mutant grown under anaerobic conditions. We found that ArcA directly or indirectly regulates 392 genes (8.5% of the genome; of these, 138 genes are poorly characterized. Regulation by ArcA in S. Typhimurium is similar, but distinct from that in E. coli. Thus, genes/operons involved in core metabolic pathways (e.g., succinyl-CoA, fatty acid degradation, cytochrome oxidase complexes, flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis were regulated similarly in the two organisms. However, genes/operons present in both organisms, but regulated differently by ArcA in S. Typhimurium included those coding for ethanolamine utilization, lactate transport and metabolism, and succinate dehydrogenases. Salmonella-specific genes/operons regulated by ArcA included those required for propanediol utilization, flagellar genes (mcpAC, cheV, Gifsy-1 prophage genes, and three SPI-3 genes (mgtBC, slsA, STM3784. In agreement with our microarray data, the arcA mutant was non-motile, lacked flagella, and was as virulent in mice as the WT. Additionally, we identified a set of 120 genes whose regulation was shared with the anaerobic redox regulator, Fnr. Conclusion(s We have identified the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Our results demonstrated that in S. Typhimurium, ArcA serves as a transcriptional regulator coordinating cellular metabolism, flagella

  3. Fluorescence enhancement of CdTe quantum dots by HBcAb-HRP for sensitive detection of H2O2in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tingting; Liu, Junfeng; Wu, Yiwei; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Xuehan; Yuan, Siqi

    2017-06-15

    A simple, high selective, ultra-sensitive and stable biosensor based on hepatitis B core antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HBcAb-HRP) induced fluorescent enhancement of CdTe QDs for recognition of H 2 O 2 have been constructed. In this assay, sulfurs in HBcAb-HRP, which possess a strong affinity towards Cd 2+ , can improve greatly the recombination fluorescence of CdTe QDs by creating more radiative centers at CdTe/Cd-SR complex. Then, H 2 O 2 oxidizes Cd-S bonds in CdTe QDs to organic disulfide product (RS-SR), causing thioglycolic acid (TGA) and HBcAb-HRP detach from surface of CdTe QDs and thus leading to fluorescence quenching. Just with the addition of HBcAb-HRP, sensitivity of the new biosensor has been improved by near one order of magnitude as compared with CdTe QDs probe. Detection limit of HBcAb-HRP-CdTe QDs biosensor for determination of H 2 O 2 was 6.9×10 -8 mol L -1 (3σ/slope), and the excellent linear range was 1.0×10 -7 ~1.5×10 -4 molL -1 . By using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) and NH 4 OH as masking agents of Ag + , Hg 2+ and Cu 2+ , H 2 O 2 can be selectively detected in coexistence with Ag + , Hg 2+ and Cu 2+ , and the biosensor has been used to detect H 2 O 2 in human serum with satisfactory results. The superior properties of this biosensor showed great potential usage in more chemical and biological researches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Information Management of Genome Enabled Data Streams for Pseudomonas syringae on the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalen Lindeberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome enabled research has led to a large and ever-growing body of data on Pseudomonas syringae genome variation and characteristics, though systematic capture of this information to maximize access by the research community remains a significant challenge. Major P. syringae data streams include genome sequence data, newly identified type III effectors, biological characterization data for type III effectors, and regulatory feature characterization. To maximize data access, the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI website [1] is primarily focused on categorization of type III effectors and curation of effector functional data represented in the Hop database and Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction Resource, respectively. The PPI website further serves as a conduit for incorporation of new genome characterization data into the annotation records at NCBI and other data repositories, and clearinghouse for additional data sets and updates in response to the evolving needs of the research community.

  5. Immunogenicity of Novel DosR Regulon-Encoded Candidate Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Three High-Burden Populations in Africa▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Gillian F.; Thiel, Bonnie A.; Ota, Martin O.; Parida, Shreemanta K.; Adegbola, Richard; Boom, W. Henry; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Friggen, Annemiek H.; Hill, Philip C.; Klein, Michel R.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Mayanja, Harriet; Schoolnik, Gary; Stanley, Kim; Weldingh, Karin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about DosR regulon-encoded proteins has led us to produce novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for immunogenicity testing in human populations in three countries in Africa to which tuberculosis (TB) is endemic. A total of 131 tuberculin skin test-positive and/or ESAT-6/CFP10-positive, human immunodeficiency virus-negative adult household contacts of active pulmonary TB cases from South Africa (n = 56), The Gambia (n = 26), and Uganda (n = 49) were tested for gamma interferon responses to 7 classical and 51 DosR regulon-encoded M. tuberculosis recombinant protein antigens. ESAT-6/CFP10 fusion protein evoked responses in >75% of study participants in all three countries. Of the DosR regulon-encoded antigens tested, Rv1733c was the most commonly recognized by participants from both South Africa and Uganda and the third most commonly recognized antigen in The Gambia. The four most frequently recognized DosR regulon-encoded antigens in Uganda (Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c) included the three most immunogenic antigens in South Africa. In contrast, Rv3131 induced the highest percentage of responders in Gambian contacts (38%), compared to only 3.4% of Ugandan contacts and no South African contacts. Appreciable percentages of TB contacts with a high likelihood of latent M. tuberculosis infection responded to several novel DosR regulon-encoded M. tuberculosis proteins. In addition to significant similarities in antigen recognition profiles between the three African population groups, there were also disparities, which may stem from genetic differences between both pathogen and host populations. Our findings have implications for the selection of potential TB vaccine candidates and for determining biosignatures of latent M. tuberculosis infection, active TB disease, and protective immunity. PMID:19553548

  6. Protection of Tomato Seedlings against Infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato by Using the Plant Growth-Promoting Bacterium Azospirillum brasilense†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, the causal agent of bacterial speck of tomato, and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense were inoculated onto tomato plants, either alone, as a mixed culture, or consecutively. The population dynamics in the rhizosphere and foliage, the development of bacterial speck disease, and their effects on plant growth were monitored. When inoculated onto separate plants, the A. brasilense population in the rhizosphere of tomato plants was 2 orders of magnitude greater than the population of P. syringae pv. tomato (107 versus 105 CFU/g [dry weight] of root). Under mist chamber conditions, the leaf population of P. syringae pv. tomato was 1 order of magnitude greater than that of A. brasilense (107 versus 106 CFU/g [dry weight] of leaf). Inoculation of seeds with a mixed culture of the two bacterial strains resulted in a reduction of the pathogen population in the rhizosphere, an increase in the A. brasilense population, the prevention of bacterial speck disease development, and improved plant growth. Inoculation of leaves with the mixed bacterial culture under mist conditions significantly reduced the P. syringae pv. tomato population and significantly decreased disease severity. Challenge with P. syringae pv. tomato after A. brasilense was established in the leaves further reduced both the population of P. syringae pv. tomato and disease severity and significantly enhanced plant development. Both bacteria maintained a large population in the rhizosphere for 45 days when each was inoculated separately onto tomato seeds (105 to 106 CFU/g [dry weight] of root). However, P. syringae pv. tomato did not survive in the rhizosphere in the presence of A. brasilense. Foliar inoculation of A. brasilense after P. syringae pv. tomato was established on the leaves did not alleviate bacterial speck disease, and A. brasilense did not survive well in the phyllosphere under these conditions, even in a mist chamber. Several applications

  7. The stealth episome: suppression of gene expression on the excised genomic island PPHGI-1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A C Godfrey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is the causative agent of halo blight in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. P. syringae pv. phaseolicola race 4 strain 1302A contains the avirulence gene avrPphB (syn. hopAR1, which resides on PPHGI-1, a 106 kb genomic island. Loss of PPHGI-1 from P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A following exposure to the hypersensitive resistance response (HR leads to the evolution of strains with altered virulence. Here we have used fluorescent protein reporter systems to gain insight into the mobility of PPHGI-1. Confocal imaging of dual-labelled P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1302A strain, F532 (dsRFP in chromosome and eGFP in PPHGI-1, revealed loss of PPHGI-1::eGFP encoded fluorescence during plant infection and when grown in vitro on extracted leaf apoplastic fluids. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS of fluorescent and non-fluorescent PPHGI-1::eGFP F532 populations showed that cells lost fluorescence not only when the GI was deleted, but also when it had excised and was present as a circular episome. In addition to reduced expression of eGFP, quantitative PCR on sub-populations separated by FACS showed that transcription of other genes on PPHGI-1 (avrPphB and xerC was also greatly reduced in F532 cells harbouring the excised PPHGI-1::eGFP episome. Our results show how virulence determinants located on mobile pathogenicity islands may be hidden from detection by host surveillance systems through the suppression of gene expression in the episomal state.

  8. The Arabidopsis thaliana non-specific phospholipase C2 is involved in the response to Pseudomonas syringae attack

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krčková, Zuzana; Kocourková, Daniela; Daněk, Michal; Brouzdová, Jitka; Pejchar, Přemysl; Janda, Martin; Pokotylo, I.; Ott, P.G.; Valentová, O.; Martinec, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 2 (2018), s. 297-310 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/1942 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis thaliana * effector-triggered immunity * flagellin * MAMP-triggered immunity * non-specific phospholipase C * phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C * Pseudomonas syringae * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  9. A chloroplast DNA phylogeny of lilacs (Syringa, Oleaceae): plastome groups show a strong correlation with crossing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K J; Jansen, R K

    1998-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and genomic compatibility were compared for 60 accessions of Syringa using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers. A total of 669 cpDNA variants, 653 of which were potentially phylogenetically informative, was detected using 22 restriction enzymes. Phylogenetic analyses reveal four strongly supported plastome groups that correspond to four genetically incompatible crossing groups. Relationships of the four plastome groups (I(II(III,IV))) correlate well with the infrageneric classification except for ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae. Group I, which includes subg. Ligustrina, forms a basal lineage within Syringa. Group II includes ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae and the two series have high compatibility and low sequence divergence. Group III consists of three well-defined species groups of ser. Pubescentes. Group IV comprises all members of ser. Villosae and has the lowest interspecific cpDNA sequence divergences. Comparison of cpDNA sequence divergence with crossability data indicates that hybrids have not been successfully generated between species with divergence greater than 0.7%. Hybrid barriers are strong among the four major plastome groups, which have sequence divergence estimates ranging from 1.096 to 1.962%. In contrast, fully fertile hybrids occur between species pairs with sequence divergence below 0.4%. Three regions of the plastome have length variants of greater than 100 bp, and these indels identify 12 different plastome types that correlate with phylogenetic trees produced from cpDNA restriction site data. Biparentally inherited nuclear rDNA and maternally inherited cpDNA length variants enable the identification of the specific parentage of several lilac hybrids.

  10. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of Pseudomonassyringae pv. syringae B728a and pv. tomato DC3000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feil, Helene; Feil, William S.; Chain, Patrick; Larimer, Frank; DiBartolo, Genevieve; Copeland, Alex; Lykidis, Athanasios; Trong,Stephen; Nolan, Matt; Goltsman, Eugene; Thiel, James; Malfatti,Stephanie; Loper, Joyce E.; Lapidus, Alla; Detter, John C.; Land, Miriam; Richardson, Paul M.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lindow, StevenE.

    2005-04-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Pseudomonas syringaepathovar syringae B728a (Pss B728a), has been determined and is comparedwith that of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Thesetwo pathovars of this economically important species of plant pathogenicbacteria differ in host range and apparent patterns of interaction withplants, with Pss having a more pronounced epiphytic stage of growth andhigher abiotic stress tolerance and Pst DC3000 having a more pronouncedapoplastic growth habitat. The Pss B728a genome (6.1 megabases) containsa circular chromosome and no plasmid, whereas the Pst DC3000 genome is6.5 mbp in size, composed of a circular chromosome and two plasmids.While a high degree of similarity exists between the two sequencedPseudomonads, 976 protein-encoding genes are unique to Pss B728a whencompared to Pst DC3000, including large genomic islands likely tocontribute to virulence and host specificity. Over 375 repetitiveextragenic palindromic sequences (REPs) unique to Pss B728a when comparedto Pst DC3000 are widely distributed throughout the chromosome except in14 genomic islands, which generally had lower GC content than the genomeas a whole. Content of the genomic islands vary, with one containing aprophage and another the plasmid pKLC102 of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Among the976 genes of Pss B728a with no counterpart in Pst DC3000 are thoseencoding for syringopeptin (SP), syringomycin (SR), indole acetic acidbiosynthesis, arginine degradation, and production of ice nuclei. Thegenomic comparison suggests that several unique genes for Pss B728a suchas ectoine synthase, DNA repair, and antibiotic production may contributeto epiphytic fitness and stress tolerance of this organism. Pseudomonassyringae, a member of the gamma subgroup of the Proteobacteria, is awidespread bacterial pathogen of many plant species. The species P.syringae is subdivided into approximately 50 pathovars based onpathogenicity and host range. P. syringae is capable of

  11. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-proteins play a critical role in host and nonhost resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghee Lee

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins have been proposed to be involved in many aspects of plant disease resistance but their precise role in mediating nonhost disease resistance is not well understood. We evaluated the roles of specific subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins using knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits in response to host and nonhost Pseudomonas pathogens. Plants lacking functional Gα, Gβ and Gγ1Gγ2 proteins displayed enhanced bacterial growth and disease susceptibility in response to host and nonhost pathogens. Mutations of single Gγ subunits Gγ1, Gγ2 and Gγ3 did not alter bacterial disease resistance. Some specificity of subunit usage was observed when comparing host pathogen versus nonhost pathogen. Overexpression of both Gα and Gβ led to reduced bacterial multiplication of nonhost pathogen P. syringae pv. tabaci whereas overexpression of Gβ, but not of Gα, resulted in reduced bacterial growth of host pathogen P. syringae pv. maculicola, compared to wild-type Col-0. Moreover, the regulation of stomatal aperture by bacterial pathogens was altered in Gα and Gβ mutants but not in any of the single or double Gγ mutants. Taken together, these data substantiate the critical role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in plant innate immunity and stomatal modulation in response to P. syringae.

  12. Biocontrol of postharvest decay using a new strain of Pseudomonas syringae CPA-5 in different cultivars of pome fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. NUNES

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytic micro-organisms isolated from fruits and leaves surfaces of apples from different orchards were screened for antagonistic activity against Penicillium expansum. From all micro-organisms tested the new strain CPA-5 of Pseudomonas syringae, isolated from organic orchard, was selected. This strain was very effective against Botrytis cinerea, P. expansum and Rhizopus stolonifer at various antagonist and pathogen concentrations on ‘Golden Delicious’ apple, and ‘Blanquilla’, ‘Rocha’ and ‘Conference’ pear. Under cold storage conditions and in semi-commercial trials P. syringae (CPA-5 significantly reduced development of P. expansum and B. cinerea on ‘Golden Delicious’ apple, and ‘Blanquilla’ and ‘Rocha’ pears. Control of P. expansum equal to the fungicide imazalil was obtained with CPA-5 at 108cfu ml–1 on ‘Gold Delicious’ apple and ‘Rocha’ pear. The populations of P. syringae CPA-5 increased more than 100-fold during the first 50 days, and then remained stable on apple, and slightly decreased on pears. This indicates the high capacity of this antagonist to colonize wound surfaces of pome fruits under cold storage conditions.;

  13. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Bartoli, Claudia; Varvaro, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav) has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions) and contributing factors (Pav). Because this is a true decline different from "bacterial canker" described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD).

  14. Accuracy of PfHRP2 versus Pf-pLDH antigen detection by malaria rapid diagnostic tests in hospitalized children in a seasonal hyperendemic malaria transmission area in Burkina Faso

    OpenAIRE

    Maltha, Jessica; Guiraud, Issa; Lompo, Palpouguini; Kaboré, Bérenger; Gillet, Philippe; Van Geet, Chris; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background In most sub-Saharan African countries malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are now used for the diagnosis of malaria. Most RDTs used detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2), though P. falciparum-specific parasite lactate dehydrogenase (Pf-pLDH)-detecting RDTs may have advantages over PfHRP2-detecting RDTs. Only few data are available on the use of RDTs in severe illness and the present study compared Pf-pLDH to PfHRP2-detection. Methods Hospitalized children...

  15. Dynamics of defense responses and cell fate change during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safae Hamdoun

    Full Text Available Plant-pathogen interactions involve sophisticated action and counteraction strategies from both parties. Plants can recognize pathogen derived molecules, such as conserved pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and effector proteins, and subsequently activate PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI, respectively. However, pathogens can evade such recognitions and suppress host immunity with effectors, causing effector-triggered susceptibility (ETS. The differences among PTI, ETS, and ETI have not been completely understood. Toward a better understanding of PTI, ETS, and ETI, we systematically examined various defense-related phenotypes of Arabidopsis infected with different Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 strains, using the virulence strain DG3 to induce ETS, the avirulence strain DG34 that expresses avrRpm1 (recognized by the resistance protein RPM1 to induce ETI, and HrcC(- that lacks the type three secretion system to activate PTI. We found that plants infected with different strains displayed dynamic differences in the accumulation of the defense signaling molecule salicylic acid, expression of the defense marker gene PR1, cell death formation, and accumulation/localization of the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. The differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI are dependent on the doses of the strains used. These data support the quantitative nature of PTI, ETS, and ETI and they also reveal qualitative differences between PTI, ETS, and ETI. Interestingly, we observed the induction of large cells in the infected leaves, most obviously with HrcC(- at later infection stages. The enlarged cells have increased DNA content, suggesting a possible activation of endoreplication. Consistent with strong induction of abnormal cell growth by HrcC(-, we found that the PTI elicitor flg22 also activates abnormal cell growth, depending on a functional flg22-receptor FLS2. Thus, our study has revealed a comprehensive

  16. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Selected beneficial Pseudomonas spp. strains have the ability to influence root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting primary root elongation and promoting lateral root and root hair formation. A crucial role for auxin in this long-term (1week), long-distance plant-microbe interaction has been demonstrated. Arabidopsis seedlings were cultivated in vitro on vertical plates and inoculated with pathogenic strains Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), as well as Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu) and Escherichia coli (Eco). Root hair lengths were measured after 24 and 48h of direct exposure to each bacterial strain. Several Arabidopsis mutants with impaired responses to pathogens, impaired ethylene perception and defects in the exocyst vesicle tethering complex that is involved in secretion were also analysed. Arabidopsis seedling roots infected with Psm or Pst responded similarly to when infected with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; root hair growth was stimulated and primary root growth was inhibited. Other plant- and soil-adapted bacteria induced similar root hair responses. The most compromised root hair growth stimulation response was found for the knockout mutants exo70A1 and ein2. The single immune pathways dependent on salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and PAD4 are not directly involved in root hair growth stimulation; however, in the mutual cross-talk with ethylene, they indirectly modify the extent of the stimulation of root hair growth. The Flg22 peptide does not initiate root hair stimulation as intact bacteria do, but pretreatment with Flg22 prior to Psm inoculation abolished root hair growth stimulation in an FLS2 receptor kinase-dependent manner. These early response phenomena are not associated with changes in auxin levels, as monitored with the pDR5::GUS auxin reporter. Early stimulation of root hair growth is an effect of an unidentified component of living plant pathogenic bacteria. The root

  17. A Novel Conductive Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene-BSA Film for the Construction of a Durable HRP Biosensor Modified with NanoAu Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangcheng Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have investigated the contribution of bovine serum albumin (BSA to the durability of the electrochemically synthesized poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT film on a platinum (Pt electrode. The electrode was capable to effectively adsorb the nano Au particles (AuNPs to form a uniform layout, which was then able to immobilize the horseradish peroxidase (HRP to construct a functional HRP/AuNPs/PEDOT(BSA/Pt biosensor. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to evaluate the performance of the biosensor through the measurement of hydrogen peroxide. Our results revealed a satisfied linear correlation between the cathodic current and the concentration of H2O2. Furthermore, the addition of oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, or NAD+, as the electron transfer mediator in the detection solution could dramatically enhance the sensitivity of detection by about 35.5%. The main advantages of the current biosensor are its durability, sensitivity, reliability, and biocompatibility.

  18. The purine efflux pump PbuE in Bacillus subtilis modulates expression of the PurR and G-box (XptR) regulons by adjusting the purine base pool size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, P.; Saxild, Hans Henrik

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the expression of genes encoding enzymes and other proteins involved in purine de novo synthesis and salvage is affected by purine bases and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). The transcription of the genes belonging to the PurR regulon is negatively regulated by the Pur......R protein and PRPP. The expression of the genes belonging to the G-box (XptR) regulon, including the pbuE gene, is negatively regulated by a ribo switch-control led transcription termination mechanism. The G-box regulon effector molecules are hypoxanthine and guanine. pbuE encodes a purine base efflux pump...... and is now recognized as belonging to a third purine regulon. The expression of the pbuE gene is positively regulated by a riboswitch that recognizes adenine. Here we show that the expression of pbuE'-lacZ transcriptional fusions are induced by adenine to the highest extent in mutants which do not express...

  19. Influencia del Estado de Oxidación del Ión Cobalto en la Estabilidad de Electrodos Modificados con Monocapas SAM-TOA-ANTA-Con+-HRP-NHis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro R. Matheus*

    Full Text Available Influence of state oxidation of cobalt ion in the stability electrodes modified with monolayers SAM-TOA-ANTA-Con+-HRP-NHis. Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM was used to investigate the adsorption of the HRP-NHis enzyme (horseradish peroxidase, which was modified by the addition of a tail of six histidine on its extreme N-terminal. The QCM operating at flow of 0.025 mL min-1 on a crystal whose gold electrode was modified with monolayers of SAM-TOA-ANTA-Co2+ and SAM-TOA-ANTA -Co3+. The oxidize form was obtained from the electrochemical oxidation of a monolayer of SAM-TOA-ANTA-Co2+. The results suggest that the HRP-NHis is attached to both monolayers in a similar way; on the contrary, the desortion of the attached protein is dramatically different. Thus, whereas the ligand-Co2+ bonds are reversible, which allows that the anchored protein is easily replaced by imidazol molecules. The 3+ oxidation state of the metal does not allow the interchange of protein by the imidazol molecules.

  20. Phenology of lilac (Syringa vulgaris) and elderberry (Sambucus nigra) as the indicator of spring warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, E.; Hunkár, M.; Dunkel, Z.

    2012-04-01

    Phenological observations in Hungary started in 1871. The observation system collapsed and revived time by time. The aim of the observations as well as the locations, the methods and observed plants have been changed many times, therefore data series for a given plant species derived from the same place are rare. If we want to study the responses of biosphere to climate variability we need long time data series from the same places, especially phenological data of native plants. Phenological observations organized by the Hungarian Meteorological Service between 1983- 1999 contain valuable data for lilac (Syringa vulgaris) and elderberry (Sambucus nigra). Those perennial native plants are good indicators of spring warming therefore it is worth to study their phenological development concerning to climate variability. Eight locations in Hungary were selected where the site of the observations remaind the same year by year. Observed phenological phases were: Sprouting of leaves (SL, BBCH:11); Begin of Flowers (BF, BBCH:61); Fall of leaves (FO, BBCH:95). Spatial and temporal trends and variability of phenophases will be presented. The effect of meteorological conditions is studied to build up phenological model controlled by the temperature. Growing degree days above the base temperature was involved together with the duration and severeness of the chilling period. The study is supported by the National Scientific Foundation (OTKA-81979).

  1. The antibacterial activity of syringopicroside, its metabolites and natural analogues from syringae folium

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Zhengyuan

    2016-02-18

    In the present study, the in vitro antibacterial activity of an effective fraction (ESF) from Syringae Folium (SF) on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was evaluated and then its in vivo activity was evaluated by using the MRSA-infected mouse peritonitis model. The ESF showed a significant in vitro and in vivo activity on decreasing the Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) and increasing the survival rate of mouse from 42.8% to 100%. Six iridoid glucosides (IGs) of ESF were characterized by UPLC-TOF-MS method and also isolated by column chromatography. Most of them showed in vitro anti MRSA activity. Syringopicroside (Sy), the major compound of IGs, was found to increase the survival rate from 42.8% to 92.8% of the MRSA-infected mouse, which revealed Sy is also the main active components of ESF. In order to know why the effect of oral administration of SF is better than its injections in clinic and the metabolites of Sy, seven metabolites of Sy were isolated from rat urine and identified on the basis of NMR and MS spectra. Most of metabolites possessed stronger in vitro anti-MRSA activity than that of Sy, which furtherly proved the clinical result.

  2. Dissection of Resistance Genes to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in UI3 Common Bean Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana M; Godoy, Luís; Santalla, Marta

    2017-11-23

    Few quantitative trait loci have been mapped for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in common bean. Two F₂ populations were developed from the host differential UI3 cultivar. The objective of this study was to further characterize the resistance to races 1, 5, 7 and 9 of Psp included in UI3. Using a QTL mapping approach, 16 and 11 main-effect QTLs for pod and primary leaf resistance were located on LG10, explaining up to 90% and 26% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The homologous genomic region corresponding to primary leaf resistance QTLs detected tested positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL), Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage (NRAMP) and Pentatricopeptide Repeat family (PPR) proteins. It is worth noting that the main effect QTLs for resistance in pod were located inside a 3.5 Mb genomic region that included the Phvul.010G021200 gene, which encodes a protein that has the highest sequence similarity to the RIN4 gene of Arabidopsis, and can be considered an important candidate gene for the organ-specific QTLs identified here. These results support that resistance to Psp from UI3 might result from the immune response activated by combinations of R proteins, and suggest the guard model as an important mechanism in pod resistance to halo blight. The candidate genes identified here warrant functional studies that will help in characterizing the actual defense gene(s) in UI3 genotype.

  3. Optimal level of Purple Acid Phosphatase5 is required for maintaining complete resistance to Pseudomonas syringae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridhar eRavichandran

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants possess an exceedingly complex innate immune system to defend against most pathogens. However, a relative proportion of the pathogens overcome host’s innate immunity and impair plant growth and productivity. We previously showed that mutation in purple acid phosphatase (PAP5 lead to enhanced susceptibility of Arabidopsis to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000. Here, we report that an optimal level of PAP5 is crucial for mounting complete basal resistance. Overexpression of PAP5 impaired ICS1, PR1 expression and salicylic acid (SA accumulation similar to pap5 knockout mutant plants. Moreover, plant overexpressing PAP5 was impaired in H2O2 accumulation in response to Pst DC3000. PAP5 is localized in to peroxisomes, a known site of generation of reactive oxygen species for activation of defense responses. Taken together, our results demonstrate that optimal levels of PAP5 is required for mounting resistance against Pst DC3000 as both knockout and overexpression of PAP5 lead to compromised basal resistance.

  4. Identification, Cloning, and Characterization of l-Phenylserine Dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15

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    Sakuko Ueshima

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene encoding d-phenylserine dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas syringae NK-15 was identified, and a 9,246-bp nucleotide sequence containing the gene was sequenced. Six ORFs were confirmed in the sequenced region, four of which were predicted to form an operon. A homology search of each ORF predicted that orf3 encoded l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. Hence, orf3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and recombinant ORF3 was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The purified ORF3 enzyme showed l-phenylserine dehydrogenase activity. The enzymological properties and primary structure of l-phenylserine dehydrogenase (ORF3 were quite different from those of d-phenylserine dehydrogenase previously reported. l-Phenylserine dehydrogenase catalyzed the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the β-hydroxyl group of l-β-phenylserine. l-Phenylserine and l-threo-(2-thienylserine were good substrates for l-phenylserine dehydrogenase. The genes encoding l-phenylserine dehydrogenase and d-phenylserine dehydrogenase, which is induced by phenylserine, are located in a single operon. The reaction products of both enzymatic reactions were 2-aminoacetophenone and CO2.

  5. Anatomical changes on coffee leaves infected by Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae

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    Lucas Mateus Rivero Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAlthough poorly studied, the bacterial halo blight is an important disease in the major coffee-producing states of Brazil. External damage and anatomical changes on leaves were measured in seedlings of Coffea arabica cv. Mundo Novo, susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae pv. garcae, by using histological sections obtained at 10 and 20 days after inoculation (DAI. The changes on the epidermis were smaller than the lesions measured in the mesophyll, irrespective of the evaluated colonization period, showing that the internal damage caused by the bacterium represent twice the damage observed externally. From the inoculation site, lysis occurred on the epidermal cells and on the palisade and spongy parenchyma cells, with strong staining of their cellular contents, as well as abnormal intercellular spaces in the palisade parenchyma, hypertrophy and hyperplasia of mesophyll cells and partial destruction of chloroplasts. Additionally, this study revealed the presence of inclusion bodies in epidermal and mesophyll cells. Bacterial masses were found in the apoplast between and within mesophyll cells. Bacteria were also observed in the bundle sheath and vascular bundles and were more pronounced at 20 DAI, not only near the inoculation site but also in distant areas, suggesting displacement through the vascular system. These results can be useful to understand this plant-pathogen interaction.

  6. Plant flavonoids target Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 flagella and type III secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Paola; Farias, Gabriela A; Nogales, Joaquina; Prada, Harold; Carvajal, Vivian; Barón, Matilde; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta; Olmedilla, Adela; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2013-12-01

    Flavonoids are among the most abundant plant secondary metabolites involved in plant protection against pathogens, but micro-organisms have developed resistance mechanisms to those compounds. We previously demonstrated that the MexAB-OprM efflux pump mediates resistance of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 to flavonoids, facilitating its survival and the colonization of the host. Here, we have shown that tomato plants respond to Pto infection producing flavonoids and other phenolic compounds. The effects of flavonoids on key traits of this model plant-pathogen bacterium have also been investigated observing that they reduce Pto swimming and swarming because of the loss of flagella, and also inhibited the expression and assembly of a functional type III secretion system. Those effects were more severe in a mutant lacking the MexAB-OprM pump. Our results suggest that flavonoids inhibit the function of the GacS/GacA two-component system, causing a depletion of rsmY RNA, therefore affecting the synthesis of two important virulence factors in Pto DC3000, flagella and the type III secretion system. These data provide new insights into the flavonoid role in the molecular dialog between host and pathogen. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. ENCAPSULATION OF HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE-GLUCOSE OXIDASE (HRP-GOx IN SILICA AQUAGEL SYNTHESIZED FROM RICE HULL ASH FOR ENZYMATIC REACTION OF GLUCOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the sol-gel technique has attracted increasing interest as a unique approach to immobilize biomolecules for bioanalytical applications as well as biochemical and biophysical studies. In this research, encapsulation of Horseradish peroxidase-Glucose oxidase (HRP-GOx enzymes in silica aquagel from rice hull ash by sol-gel process has been carried out. In addition, the effect of several parameters (weight ratio of HRP to GOx, pH, temperature, sodium ion concentration on enzyme activity was studied, as well. Rice hull ash, which was produced by ashing at 700 °C, was extracted it's silika by NaOH solution 1 M at 100 °C for two hours to produce sodium silikate (Na2SiO3 solution. The Na2SiO3 solution with pH of 13 was added with a strong cation exchanger resin, to produce sol solution with the pH of 4. Encapsulation was emphasized by mixing sol solution and phosphate buffer pH 7 containing HRP-GOx solution at volume ratio of buffer to sol solution 1:5. The mixture was transferred into 96-microwell plate and was aged for 24 hours. Enzymatic reaction was carried out by adding chromogenic solution of phenol and 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP and b-D-glucose solution (as substrate into the microwell. Enzymatic activity was examined by measuring absorbance of product solution at 490 nm with ELISA reader. Result of enzymatic activity for encapsulated enzymes (SGE was compared to that for free enzymes (EB. Results showed that at the investigated condition, HRP-GOx enzymes gave high activity at weight ratio of HRP to GOx 10:1 and pH 7 for both SGE and EB. Encapsulation caused the enzymes activity decrease to 53.0±0.2 %. However, SGE was observed to be more stable on pH and temperature changes than EB. Study on the effect of sodium concentration showed that the increase of sodium concentration from 0.10 to 0.37 M decreased the enzymatic activity to 56±0.2%. Reusability test showed that the synthesized SGE was reusable with activity decrease of 60

  8. Effect of BMI and body weight on pregnancy rates with LNG as emergency contraception: analysis of four WHO HRP studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festin, Mario Philip R; Peregoudov, Alexandre; Seuc, Armando; Kiarie, James; Temmerman, Marleen

    2017-01-01

    To estimate the effect of increased body weight and body mass index (BMI) on pregnancy rates with levonorgestrel (LNG) 1.5mg used as emergency contraception (EC). The study reviewed data from 6873 women in four WHO-HRP randomized trials on EC conducted between 1993 and 2010. Participants took either 1.5mg of LNG as a single dose or in two doses 12h apart, up to 120h of unprotected intercourse. Contraceptive efficacy (pregnancy rates) at different weight and BMI categories was evaluated. Overall pregnancy rate was low at 1.2%. Pregnancy rates were also low in women weighing over 80kg (0.7%) and who were obese (BMI over 30kg/m 2 ) (2.0%). The pooled analyses for pregnancy demonstrated that BMI over 30kg/m 2 decreased efficacy significantly (odds ratio 8.27, 95% confidence interval = 2.70-25.37) when compared to women in lower BMI categories, mainly influenced by pregnancies in obese women from one study site. Sensitivity analyses excluding that site showed that obesity was no longer a risk factor; however, the other studies included too few obese women in the sample to exclude a substantial decrease in efficacy. Pregnancy rates with use of LNG 1.5mg for EC were low at less than 3% across different weight and BMI categories. Pooled analyses showed an increase in pregnancy rates among obese women (BMI more than 30kg/m 2 ) compared to women with normal BMI levels, influenced by pregnancies all coming from one study site. Access to LNG as EC should still be promoted to women who need them, and not be restricted in any weight or BMI category, with additional attention for counselling and advice for obese women. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of a gene cluster encoding an additional, rhizobial-like type III secretion system that is narrowly distributed among Pseudomonas syringae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The central role of Type III secretion systems (T3SS) in bacteria-plant interactions is well established, yet unexpected findings are being uncovered through bacterial genome sequencing. Some Pseudomonas syringae strains possess an uncharacterized cluster of genes encoding putative components of a second T3SS (T3SS-2) in addition to the well characterized Hrc1 T3SS which is associated with disease lesions in host plants and with the triggering of hypersensitive response in non-host plants. The aim of this study is to perform an in silico analysis of T3SS-2, and to compare it with other known T3SSs. Results Based on phylogenetic analysis and gene organization comparisons, the T3SS-2 cluster of the P. syringae pv. phaseolicola strain is grouped with a second T3SS found in the pNGR234b plasmid of Rhizobium sp. These additional T3SS gene clusters define a subgroup within the Rhizobium T3SS family. Although, T3SS-2 is not distributed as widely as the Hrc1 T3SS in P. syringae strains, it was found to be constitutively expressed in P. syringae pv phaseolicola through RT-PCR experiments. Conclusions The relatedness of the P. syringae T3SS-2 to a second T3SS from the pNGR234b plasmid of Rhizobium sp., member of subgroup II of the rhizobial T3SS family, indicates common ancestry and/or possible horizontal transfer events between these species. Functional analysis and genome sequencing of more rhizobia and P. syringae pathovars may shed light into why these bacteria maintain a second T3SS gene cluster in their genome. PMID:22937899

  10. Dynamics of membrane potential variation and gene expression induced by Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

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    Irene Bricchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biotic stress induced by various herbivores and pathogens invokes plant responses involving different defense mechanisms. However, we do not know whether different biotic stresses share a common response or which signaling pathways are involved in responses to different biotic stresses. We investigated the common and specific responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to three biotic stress agents: Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used electrophysiology to determine the plasma membrane potential (V(m and we performed a gene microarray transcriptome analysis on Arabidopsis upon either herbivory or bacterial infection. V(m depolarization was induced by insect attack; however, the response was much more rapid to S. littoralis (30 min -2 h than to M. persicae (4-6 h. M. persicae differentially regulated almost 10-fold more genes than by S. littoralis with an opposite regulation. M. persicae modulated genes involved in flavonoid, fatty acid, hormone, drug transport and chitin metabolism. S. littoralis regulated responses to heat, transcription and ion transport. The latest Vm depolarization (16 h was found for P. syringae. The pathogen regulated responses to salicylate, jasmonate and to microorganisms. Despite this late response, the number of genes differentially regulated by P. syringae was closer to those regulated by S. littoralis than by M. persicae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Arabidopsis plasma membranes respond with a V(m depolarization at times depending on the nature of biotic attack which allow setting a time point for comparative genome-wide analysis. A clear relationship between V(m depolarization and gene expression was found. At V(m depolarization timing, M. persicae regulates a wider array of Arabidopsis genes with a clear and distinct regulation than S. littoralis. An almost completely opposite regulation was observed between the aphid and the pathogen

  11. Dynamics of Membrane Potential Variation and Gene Expression Induced by Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricchi, Irene; Bertea, Cinzia M.; Occhipinti, Andrea; Paponov, Ivan A.; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Biotic stress induced by various herbivores and pathogens invokes plant responses involving different defense mechanisms. However, we do not know whether different biotic stresses share a common response or which signaling pathways are involved in responses to different biotic stresses. We investigated the common and specific responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to three biotic stress agents: Spodoptera littoralis, Myzus persicae, and the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Methodology/Principal Findings We used electrophysiology to determine the plasma membrane potential (Vm) and we performed a gene microarray transcriptome analysis on Arabidopsis upon either herbivory or bacterial infection. Vm depolarization was induced by insect attack; however, the response was much more rapid to S. littoralis (30 min −2 h) than to M. persicae (4–6 h). M. persicae differentially regulated almost 10-fold more genes than by S. littoralis with an opposite regulation. M. persicae modulated genes involved in flavonoid, fatty acid, hormone, drug transport and chitin metabolism. S. littoralis regulated responses to heat, transcription and ion transport. The latest Vm depolarization (16 h) was found for P. syringae. The pathogen regulated responses to salicylate, jasmonate and to microorganisms. Despite this late response, the number of genes differentially regulated by P. syringae was closer to those regulated by S. littoralis than by M. persicae. Conclusions/Significance Arabidopsis plasma membranes respond with a Vm depolarization at times depending on the nature of biotic attack which allow setting a time point for comparative genome-wide analysis. A clear relationship between Vm depolarization and gene expression was found. At Vm depolarization timing, M. persicae regulates a wider array of Arabidopsis genes with a clear and distinct regulation than S. littoralis. An almost completely opposite regulation was observed between the aphid and the pathogen, with the former

  12. Auxin promotes susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae via a mechanism independent of suppression of salicylic acid-mediated defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutka, Andrew M; Fawley, Stephen; Tsao, Tiffany; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2013-06-01

    Auxin is a key plant growth regulator that also impacts plant-pathogen interactions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae manipulates auxin physiology in Arabidopsis thaliana to promote pathogenesis. Pseudomonas syringae strategies to alter host auxin biology include synthesis of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and production of virulence factors that alter auxin responses in host cells. The application of exogenous auxin enhances disease caused by P. syringae strain DC3000. This is hypothesized to result from antagonism between auxin and salicylic acid (SA), a major regulator of plant defenses, but this hypothesis has not been tested in the context of infected plants. We further investigated the role of auxin during pathogenesis by examining the interaction of auxin and SA in the context of infection in plants with elevated endogenous levels of auxin. We demonstrated that elevated IAA biosynthesis in transgenic plants overexpressing the YUCCA 1 (YUC1) auxin biosynthesis gene led to enhanced susceptibility to DC3000. Elevated IAA levels did not interfere significantly with host defenses, as effector-triggered immunity was active in YUC1-overexpressing plants, and we observed only minor effects on SA levels and SA-mediated responses. Furthermore, a plant line carrying both the YUC1-overexpression transgene and the salicylic acid induction deficient 2 (sid2) mutation, which impairs SA synthesis, exhibited additive effects of enhanced susceptibility from both elevated auxin levels and impaired SA-mediated defenses. Thus, in IAA overproducing plants, the promotion of pathogen growth occurs independently of suppression of SA-mediated defenses. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy.

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    Jay Ram Lamichhane

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions and contributing factors (Pav. Because this is a true decline different from "bacterial canker" described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD.

  14. Extensive Field Survey, Laboratory and Greenhouse Studies Reveal Complex Nature of Pseudomonas syringae-Associated Hazelnut Decline in Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Jay Ram; Bartoli, Claudia; Varvaro, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas avellanae (Pav) has been reported as the causal agent of bacterial decline and bacterial canker of hazelnut in Italy and Greece, respectively. Both hazelnut diseases were reported to be similar in terms of symptoms, severity and persistence. In this study, we found that both symptomatic and asymptomatic trees in the field were colonized by Pav. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) analysis showed that Pav strains isolated during this study in Italy belong to the P. syringae phylogroup 1 and they are closely related to Pav strains previously isolated in Greece from hazelnut bacterial canker. On the other hand, strains isolated in earlier studies from hazelnut decline in Italy belong to both phylogroup 1 and 2 of P. syringae. Both phylogroup 1 strains of P. syringae from Greece and Italy are different than strains isolated in this study in terms of their capacity to excrete fluorescent pigments on different media. Despite the same plant genotype and cropping practices adopted, the incidence of hazelnut decline ranged from nearly 0 to 91% across our study sites. No disease developed on plants inoculated with Pav through wounding while leaf scar inoculations produced only mild disease symptoms. Based on our results and the previously reported correlation between pedo-climatic conditions and hazelnut decline, we conclude that hazelnut decline in central Italy could be incited by a combination of predisposing (adverse pedo-climatic conditions) and contributing factors (Pav). Because this is a true decline different from “bacterial canker” described in Greece, we refer to it as hazelnut decline (HD). PMID:26840951

  15. A Bayesian Change point model for differential gene expression patterns of the DosR regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Wernisch Lorenz

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low oxygen availability has been shown previously to stimulate M. tuberculosis to establish non-replicative persistence in vitro. The two component sensor/regulator dosRS is a major mediator in the transcriptional response of M. tuberculosis to hypoxia and controls a regulon of approximately 50 genes that are induced under this condition. The aim of this study was to determine whether the induction of the entire DosR regulon is triggered as a synchronous event or if induction can unfold as a cascade of events as the differential expression of subsets of genes is stimulated by different oxygen availabilities. Results A novel aspect of our work is the use of chemostat cultures of M. tuberculosis which allowed us to control environmental conditions very tightly. We exposed M. tuberculosis to a sudden drop in oxygen availability in chemostat culture and studied the transcriptional response of the organism during the transition from a high oxygen level (10% dissolved oxygen tension or DOT to a low oxygen level (0.2% DOT using DNA microarrays. We developed a Bayesian change point analysis method that enabled us to detect subtle shifts in the timing of gene induction. It results in probabilities of a change in gene expression at certain time points. A computational analysis of potential binding sites upstream of the DosR-controlled genes shows how the transcriptional responses of these genes are influenced by the affinity of these binding sites to DosR. Our study also indicates that a subgroup of DosR-controlled genes is regulated indirectly. Conclusion The majority of the dosR-dependent genes were up-regulated at 0.2% DOT, which confirms previous findings that these genes are triggered by hypoxic environments. However, our change point analysis also highlights genes which were up-regulated earlier at levels of about 8% DOT indicating that they respond to small fluctuations in oxygen availability. Our analysis shows that there are

  16. Genome-wide analysis of the Pho regulon in a pstCA mutant of Citrobacter rodentium.

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    Catherine Cheng

    Full Text Available The phosphate-specific transport operon, pstSCAB-phoU, of Gram-negative bacteria is an essential part of the Pho regulon. Its key roles are to encode a high-affinity inorganic phosphate transport system and to prevent activation of PhoB in phosphate-rich environments. In general, mutations in pstSCAB-phoU lead to the constitutive expression of the Pho regulon. Previously, we constructed a pstCA deletion mutant of Citrobacter rodentium and found it to be attenuated for virulence in mice, its natural host. This attenuation was dependent on PhoB or PhoB-regulated gene(s because a phoB mutation restored virulence for mice to the pstCA mutant. To investigate how downstream genes may contribute to the virulence of C. rodentium, we used microarray analysis to investigate global gene expression of C. rodentium strain ICC169 and its isogenic pstCA mutant when grown in phosphate-rich medium. Overall 323 genes of the pstCA mutant were differentially expressed by at least 1.5-fold compared to the wild-type C. rodentium. Of these 145 were up-regulated and 178 were down-regulated. Differentially expressed genes included some involved in phosphate homoeostasis, cellular metabolism and protein metabolism. A large number of genes involved in stress responses and of unknown function were also differentially expressed, as were some virulence-associated genes. Up-regulated virulence-associated genes in the pstCA mutant included that for DegP, a serine protease, which appeared to be directly regulated by PhoB. Down-regulated genes included those for the production of the urease, flagella, NleG8 (a type III-secreted protein and the tad focus (which encodes type IVb pili in Yersinia enterocolitica. Infection studies using C57/BL6 mice showed that DegP and NleG8 play a role in bacterial virulence. Overall, our study provides evidence that Pho is a global regulator of gene expression in C. rodentium and indicates the presence of at least two previously unrecognized

  17. Expression of antimicrobial peptides under control of a camalexin-biosynthetic promoter confers enhanced resistance against Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alexandra; Lindermayr, Christian; Glawischnig, Erich

    2016-02-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana phytoalexin biosynthesis is tightly regulated. The camalexin biosynthetic gene CYP71B15/PAD3 is highly expressed in response to pathogens and specific abiotic triggers, while constitutive expression is very low. Based on this property we expressed artificial antimicrobial peptides under control of the CYP71B15 promoter avoiding potential toxic effects to the plant related to constitutive expression. Significant and substantial growth inhibition of Pseudomonas syringae was observed, demonstrating that expression of these peptides under control of a phytoalexin promoter is an effective approach for enhancement of resistance against bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Molecular genetic marker-based approaches to the verification of lilac Syringa vulgaris L. in in vitro collections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikova, N V; Borkhert, E V; Martynov, S P; Okuneva, I B; Molkanova, O I; Upelniek, V P; Kudriavtsev, A M

    2009-01-01

    RAPD analysis was used to verify the varieties in an in vitro germplasm collection of lilac Syringa vulgaris L. RAPD patterns were obtained with 16 decanucleotide primers for 46 accessions (microclones and corresponding reference varieties). The RAPD patterns of a microclone and the corresponding reference variety often differed in composition; consequently, it was infeasible to verify the accessions by direct comparison of the RAPD patterns. Hence, evaluation of the relative genetic distances between accessions (microclones) and known varieties was proposed as a method to verify lilac in vitro germplasm collections.

  19. Adaptation of the pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, during experimental evolution on a native vs. alternative host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaden, Sean; Koskella, Britt

    2017-04-01

    The specialization and distribution of pathogens among species has substantial impact on disease spread, especially when reservoir hosts can maintain high pathogen densities or select for increased pathogen virulence. Theory predicts that optimal within-host growth rate will vary among host genotypes/species and therefore that pathogens infecting multiple hosts should experience different selection pressures depending on the host environment in which they are found. This should be true for pathogens with broad host ranges, but also those experiencing opportunistic infections on novel hosts or that spill over among host populations. There is very little empirical data, however, regarding how adaptation to one host might directly influence infectivity and growth on another. We took an experimental evolution approach to examine short-term adaptation of the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, to its native tomato host compared with an alternative host, Arabidopsis, in either the presence or absence of bacteriophages. After four serial passages (20 days of selection in planta), we measured bacterial growth of selected lines in leaves of either the focal or alternative host. We found that passage through Arabidopsis led to greater within-host bacterial densities in both hosts than did passage through tomato. Whole genome resequencing of evolved isolates identified numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms based on our novel draft assembly for strain PT23. However, there was no clear pattern of clustering among plant selection lines at the genetic level despite the phenotypic differences observed. Together, the results emphasize that previous host associations can influence the within-host growth rate of pathogens. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Controlled ice nucleation using freeze-dried Pseudomonas syringae encapsulated in alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lindong; Tessier, Shannon N; Swei, Anisa; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    The control of ice nucleation is of fundamental significance in many process technologies related to food and pharmaceutical science and cryobiology. Mechanical perturbation, electromagnetic fields and ice-nucleating agents (INAs) have been known to induce ice nucleation in a controlled manner. But these ice-nucleating methods may suffer from cumbersome manual operations, safety concerns of external fields, and biocompatibility and recovery issues of INA particles, especially when used in living systems. Given the automatic ice-seeding nature of INAs, a promising solution to overcome some of the above limitations is to engineer a biocomposite that accommodates the INA particles but minimizes their interactions with biologics, as well as enabling the recovery of used particles. In this study, freeze-dried Pseudomonas syringae, a model ice-nucleating agent, was encapsulated into microliter-sized alginate beads. We evaluated the performance of the bacterial hydrogel beads to initiate ice nucleation in water and aqueous glycerol solution by investigating factors including the size and number of the beads and the local concentration of INA particles. In the aqueous sample of a fixed volume, the total mass of the INA particles (m) was found to be the governing parameter that is solely responsible for determining the ice nucleation performance of the bacterial hydrogel beads. The freezing temperature has a strong positive linear correlation with log 10 m. The findings in this study provide an effective, predictable approach to control ice nucleation, which can improve the outcome and standardization of many ice-assisted process technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Chromatin Accessibility in Arabidopsis Infected with Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordiya, Yogendra; Kang, Hong-Gu

    2017-01-01

    Changes in chromatin accessibility are an important aspect of the molecular changes that occur in eukaryotic cells responding to stress, and they appear to play a critical role in stress-induced transcriptional activation/reprogramming and epigenetic changes. In plants, pathogen infection has been shown to induce rapid and drastic transcriptional reprogramming; growing evidence suggests that chromatin remodeling plays an essential role in this phenomenon. The recent development of genomic tools to assess chromatin accessibility presents a significant opportunity to investigate the relationship between chromatin dynamicity and gene expression. In this protocol, we have adopted a popular chromatin accessibility assay, DNase-seq, to measure chromatin accessibility in Arabidopsis infected with the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). DNase-seq provides information on chromatin accessibility through the sequencing of DNA fragments generated by DNase I digestion of open chromatin, followed by mapping these sequences on a reference genome. Of the two popular DNase-seq approaches, we based our method on the Stamatoyannopoulos protocol, which involves two DNase cleavages rather than a single cleavage, followed by size fractionation. Please note that this two-cleavage approach is widely accepted and has been used extensively by ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) project, a public research consortium investigating cis- and trans-elements in the transcriptional regulation in animal cells. To enhance the quality of the chromatin accessibility assay, we modified this protocol by including two centrifugation steps for nuclear enrichment and size fractionation and an extra washing step for removal of chloroplasts and Pst. The outcomes obtained by this approach are also discussed.

  2. Pseudomonas syringae evades host immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pel, Michiel J C; van Dijken, Anja J H; Bardoel, Bart W; Seidl, Michael F; van der Ent, Sjoerd; van Strijp, Jos A G; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of bacterial species. In addition, we investigated the role of AprA in virulence of the bacterial plant pathogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The AprA-deficient DC3000 ΔaprA knockout mutant was significantly less virulent on both tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, infiltration of A. thaliana Col-0 leaves with DC3000 ΔaprA evoked a significantly higher level of expression of the defense-related genes FRK1 and PR-1 than did wild-type DC3000. In the flagellin receptor mutant fls2, pathogen virulence and defense-related gene activation did not differ between DC3000 and DC3000 ΔaprA. Together, these results suggest that AprA of DC3000 is important for evasion of recognition by the FLS2 receptor, allowing wild-type DC3000 to be more virulent on its host plant than AprA-deficient DC3000 ΔaprA. To provide further evidence for the role of DC3000 AprA in host immune evasion, we overexpressed the AprA inhibitory peptide AprI of DC3000 in A. thaliana to counteract the immune evasive capacity of DC3000 AprA. Ectopic expression of aprI in A. thaliana resulted in an enhanced level of resistance against wild-type DC3000, while the already elevated level of resistance against DC3000 ΔaprA remained unchanged. Together, these results indicate that evasion of host immunity by the alkaline protease AprA is important for full virulence of strain DC3000 and likely acts by preventing flagellin monomers from being recognized by its cognate immune receptor.

  3. Dissection of Resistance Genes to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in UI3 Common Bean Cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. González

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Few quantitative trait loci have been mapped for resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola in common bean. Two F2 populations were developed from the host differential UI3 cultivar. The objective of this study was to further characterize the resistance to races 1, 5, 7 and 9 of Psp included in UI3. Using a QTL mapping approach, 16 and 11 main-effect QTLs for pod and primary leaf resistance were located on LG10, explaining up to 90% and 26% of the phenotypic variation, respectively. The homologous genomic region corresponding to primary leaf resistance QTLs detected tested positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL, Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage (NRAMP and Pentatricopeptide Repeat family (PPR proteins. It is worth noting that the main effect QTLs for resistance in pod were located inside a 3.5 Mb genomic region that included the Phvul.010G021200 gene, which encodes a protein that has the highest sequence similarity to the RIN4 gene of Arabidopsis, and can be considered an important candidate gene for the organ-specific QTLs identified here. These results support that resistance to Psp from UI3 might result from the immune response activated by combinations of R proteins, and suggest the guard model as an important mechanism in pod resistance to halo blight. The candidate genes identified here warrant functional studies that will help in characterizing the actual defense gene(s in UI3 genotype.

  4. Gene function analysis in environmental isolates: The nif regulon of the strict iron oxidizing bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parro, Víctor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes

    2003-01-01

    A random genomic library from an environmental isolate of the Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans has been printed on a microarray. Gene expression analysis was carried out with total RNA extracted from L. ferrooxidans cultures in the presence or absence of ammonium as nitrogen source under aerobic conditions. Although practically nothing is known about the genome sequence of this bacterium, this approach allowed us the selection and sequencing of only those clones bearing genes that showed an altered expression pattern. By sequence comparison, we have identified most of the genes of nitrogen fixation regulon in L. ferrooxidans, like the nifHDKENX operon, encoding the structural components of Mo-Fe nitrogenase; nifSU-hesB-hscBA-fdx operon, for Fe-S cluster assembly; the amtB gene (ammonium transporter); modA (molybdenum ABC type transporter); some regulatory genes like ntrC, nifA (the specific activator of nif genes); or two glnB-like genes (encoding the PII regulatory protein). Our results show that shotgun DNA microarrays are very powerful tools to accomplish gene expression studies with environmental bacteria whose genome sequence is still unknown, avoiding the time and effort necessary for whole genome sequencing projects. PMID:12808145

  5. Survival of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli in the presence of Acanthamoeba castellanii and its dependence on Pho regulon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekabab, Samuel Mohammed; Daigle, France; Charette, Steve J; Dozois, Charles M; Harel, Josée

    2012-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are involved in outbreaks of food-borne illness and transmitted to humans through bovine products or water contaminated by cattle feces. Microbial interaction is one of the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to survive in the environment. Among protozoa, the free-living amoebae are known to host and protect several water-borne pathogens. In this study, the interaction between EHEC and the predacious protozoa Acanthamoeba castellanii was investigated. Using monoculture and cocultures, growth of both organisms was estimated for 3 weeks by total and viable cell counts. The numbers of EHEC were significantly higher when cultured with amoebae than without, and less EHEC shifted into a viable but nonculturable state in the presence of amoebae. Using several mutants, we observed that the Pho regulon is required for EHEC growth when cocultured with amoebae. In contrast, the Shiga toxins (Stx) were not involved in this association phenotype. Cocultures monitored by electron microscopy revealed a loss of the regular rod shape of EHEC and the secretion of multilamellar vesicles by the amoebae, which did not contain bacteria. As the interaction between A. castellanii and EHEC appears beneficial for bacterial growth, this supports a potential role for protozoa in promoting the persistence of EHEC in the environment. PMID:23233434

  6. Divergent regulation of CBF regulon on cold tolerance and plant phenotype in cassava overexpressing Arabidopsis CBF3 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong An

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is a tropical origin plant that is sensitive to chilling stress. In order to understand the CBF cold response pathway, a well-recognized regulatory mechanism in temperate plants, in cassava, overexpression of an Arabidopsis CBF3 gene is studied. This gene renders cassava increasingly tolerant to cold and drought stresses but is associated with retarded plant growth, leaf curling, reduced storage root yield, and reduced anthocyanin accumulation in a transcript abundance-dependent manner. Physiological analysis revealed that the transgenic cassava increased proline accumulation, reduced malondialdehyde production, and electrolyte leakage under cold stress. These transgenic lines also showed high relative water content when faced with drought. The expression of partial CBF-targeted genes in response to cold displayed temporal and spatial variations in the wild-type and transgenic plants: highly inducible in leaves and less altered in apical buds. In addition, anthocyanin accumulation was inhibited by downregulating the expression of genes involved in its biosynthesis and by interplaying between the CBF3 and the endogenous transcription factors. Thus, the heterologous CBF3 modulates the expression of stress-related genes and carries out a series of physiological adjustments under stressful conditions, showing a varied regulation pattern of CBF regulon from that of cassava CBFs.

  7. A survey of Type III restriction-modification systems reveals numerous, novel epigenetic regulators controlling phase-variable regulons; phasevarions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atack, John M; Yang, Yuedong; Jennings, Michael P

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Many bacteria utilize simple DNA sequence repeats as a mechanism to randomly switch genes on and off. This process is called phase variation. Several phase-variable N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferases from Type III restriction-modification systems have been reported in bacterial pathogens. Random switching of DNA methyltransferases changes the global DNA methylation pattern, leading to changes in gene expression. These epigenetic regulatory systems are called phasevarions — phase-variable regulons. The extent of these phase-variable genes in the bacterial kingdom is unknown. Here, we interrogated a database of restriction-modification systems, REBASE, by searching for all simple DNA sequence repeats in mod genes that encode Type III N6-adenine DNA-methyltransferases. We report that 17.4% of Type III mod genes (662/3805) contain simple sequence repeats. Of these, only one-fifth have been previously identified. The newly discovered examples are widely distributed and include many examples in opportunistic pathogens as well as in environmental species. In many cases, multiple phasevarions exist in one genome, with examples of up to 4 independent phasevarions in some species. We found several new types of phase-variable mod genes, including the first example of a phase-variable methyltransferase in pathogenic Escherichia coli. Phasevarions are a common epigenetic regulation contingency strategy used by both pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. PMID:29554328

  8. Transgenic tomato plants overexpressing tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase exhibit elevated hydroxycinnamic acid amide levels and enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Laura; Lisón, Purificación; López-Gresa, María Pilar; Rodrigo, Ismael; Zacarés, Laura; Conejero, Vicente; Bellés, José María

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acid amides (HCAA) are secondary metabolites involved in plant development and defense that have been widely reported throughout the plant kingdom. These phenolics show antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal activities. Hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:tyramine N-hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (THT) is the key enzyme in HCAA synthesis and is induced in response to pathogen infection, wounding, or elicitor treatments, preceding HCAA accumulation. We have engineered transgenic tomato plants overexpressing tomato THT. These plants displayed an enhanced THT gene expression in leaves as compared with wild type (WT) plants. Consequently, leaves of THT-overexpressing plants showed a higher constitutive accumulation of the amide coumaroyltyramine (CT). Similar results were found in flowers and fruits. Moreover, feruloyltyramine (FT) also accumulated in these tissues, being present at higher levels in transgenic plants. Accumulation of CT, FT and octopamine, and noradrenaline HCAA in response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato infection was higher in transgenic plants than in the WT plants. Transgenic plants showed an enhanced resistance to the bacterial infection. In addition, this HCAA accumulation was accompanied by an increase in salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene induction. Taken together, these results suggest that HCAA may play an important role in the defense of tomato plants against P. syringae infection.

  9. Operational accuracy and comparative persistent antigenicity of HRP2 rapid diagnostic tests for Plasmodium falciparum malaria in a hyperendemic region of Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odong George W

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasite-based diagnosis of malaria by microscopy requires laboratory skills that are generally unavailable at peripheral health facilities. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs require less expertise, but accuracy under operational conditions has not been fully evaluated in Uganda. There are also concerns about RDTs that use the antigen histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2 to detect Plasmodium falciparum, because this antigen can persist after effective treatment, giving false positive test results in the absence of infection. An assessment of the accuracy of Malaria Pf™ immuno-chromatographic test (ICT and description of persistent antigenicity of HRP2 RDTs was undertaken in a hyperendemic area of Uganda. Methods Using a cross-sectional design, a total of 357 febrile patients of all ages were tested using ICT, and compared to microscopy as the gold standard reference. Two independent RDT readings were used to assess accuracy and inter-observer reliability. With a longitudinal design to describe persistent antigenicity of ICT and Paracheck, 224 children aged 6–59 months were followed up at 7-day intervals until the HRP2 antigens where undetectable by the RDTs. Results Of the 357 patients tested during the cross-sectional component, 40% (139 had positive blood smears for asexual forms of P. falciparum. ICT had an overall sensitivity of 98%, a specificity of 72%, a negative predictive value (NPV of 98% and a positive predictive value (PPV of 69%. ICT showed a high inter-observer reliability under operational conditions, with 95% of readings having assigned the same results (kappa statistics 0.921, p In children followed up after successful antimalaria treatment, the mean duration of persistent antigenicity was 32 days, and this duration varied significantly depending on pre-treatment parasitaemia. In patients with parasite density >50,000/μl, the mean duration of persistent antigenicity was 37 days compared to 26 days for parasitaemia

  10. Accuracy of PfHRP2 versus Pf-pLDH antigen detection by malaria rapid diagnostic tests in hospitalized children in a seasonal hyperendemic malaria transmission area in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, Jessica; Guiraud, Issa; Lompo, Palpouguini; Kaboré, Bérenger; Gillet, Philippe; Van Geet, Chris; Tinto, Halidou; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-01-13

    In most sub-Saharan African countries malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are now used for the diagnosis of malaria. Most RDTs used detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2), though P. falciparum-specific parasite lactate dehydrogenase (Pf-pLDH)-detecting RDTs may have advantages over PfHRP2-detecting RDTs. Only few data are available on the use of RDTs in severe illness and the present study compared Pf-pLDH to PfHRP2-detection. Hospitalized children aged one month to 14 years presenting with fever or severe illness were included over one year. Venous blood samples were drawn for malaria diagnosis (microscopy and RDT), culture and complete blood count. Leftovers were stored at -80 °C and used for additional RDT analysis and PCR. An RDT targeting both PfHRP2 and Pf-pLDH was performed on all samples for direct comparison of diagnostic accuracy with microscopy as reference method. PCR was performed to explore false-positive RDT results. In 376 of 694 (54.2%) included children, malaria was microscopically confirmed. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value were 100.0, 70.9, 69.4 and 100.0%, respectively for PfHRP2-detection and 98.7, 94.0, 91.6 and 99.1%, respectively for Pf-pLDH-detection. Specificity and PPV were significantly lower for PfHRP2-detection (p <0.001). For both detection antigens, specificity was lowest for children one to five years and in the rainy season. PPV for both antigens was highest in the rainy season, because of higher malaria prevalence. False positive PfHRP2 results were associated with prior anti-malarial treatment and positive PCR results (98/114 (86.0%) samples tested). Among children presenting with severe febrile illness in a seasonal hyperendemic malaria transmission area, the present study observed similar sensitivity but lower specificity and PPV of PfHRP2 compared to Pf-pLDH-detection. Further studies should assess the diagnostic accuracy and safety of an

  11. Assessment of strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato from Tanzania for resistance to copper and streptomycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Wydra, K.; Mabagala, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-six strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P.s. pv. tomato) were collected from tomato-producing areas in Tanzania and assessed for resistance to copper and antibiotics. The collection was done from three tomato-producing regions (Morogoro, Arusha and Iringa), representing three differ...

  12. Silencing and heterologous expression of ppo-2 indicate a specific function of a single polyphenol oxidase isoform in resistance of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Carolin; Dirks, Mareike E; Gronover, Christian Schulze; Prüfer, Dirk; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2012-02-01

    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) possesses an unusually high degree of disease resistance. As this plant exhibits high polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and PPO have been implicated in resistance against pests and pathogens, we analyzed the potential involvement of five PPO isoenzymes in the resistance of dandelion against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only one PPO (ppo-2) was induced during infection, and ppo-2 promoter and β-glucuronidase marker gene fusions revealed strong induction of the gene surrounding lesions induced by B. cinerea. Specific RNAi silencing reduced ppo-2 expression only, and concomitantly increased plant susceptibility to P. syringae pv. tomato. At 4 days postinoculation, P. syringae pv. tomato populations were strongly increased in the ppo-2 RNAi lines compared with wild-type plants. When the dandelion ppo-2 gene was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, a plant having no PPO gene, active protein was formed and protein extracts of the transgenic plants exhibited substrate-dependent antimicrobial activity against P. syringae pv. tomato. These results clearly indicate a strong contribution of a specific, single PPO isoform to disease resistance. Therefore, we propose that specific PPO isoenzymes be included in a new family of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins.

  13. Transposon insertion libraries for the characterization of mutants from the kiwifruit pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Rees-George, Jonathan; Gardner, Paul P.; Ghomi, Fatemeh Ashari; Gerth, Monica L.; Andersen, Mark T.; Rikkerink, Erik H. A.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of kiwifruit canker, is one of the most devastating plant diseases of recent times. We have generated two mini-Tn5-based random insertion libraries of Psa ICMP 18884. The first, a ‘phenotype of interest’ (POI) library, consists of 10,368 independent mutants gridded into 96-well plates. By replica plating onto selective media, the POI library was successfully screened for auxotrophic and motility mutants. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis mutants with ‘Fuzzy-Spreader’-like morphologies were also identified through a visual screen. The second, a ‘mutant of interest’ (MOI) library, comprises around 96,000 independent mutants, also stored in 96-well plates, with approximately 200 individuals per well. The MOI library was sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform using Transposon-Directed Insertion site Sequencing (TraDIS) to map insertion sites onto the Psa genome. A grid-based PCR method was developed to recover individual mutants, and using this strategy, the MOI library was successfully screened for a putative LPS mutant not identified in the visual screen. The Psa chromosome and plasmid had 24,031 and 1,236 independent insertion events respectively, giving insertion frequencies of 3.65 and 16.6 per kb respectively. These data suggest that the MOI library is near saturation, with the theoretical probability of finding an insert in any one chromosomal gene estimated to be 97.5%. However, only 47% of chromosomal genes had insertions. This surprisingly low rate cannot be solely explained by the lack of insertions in essential genes, which would be expected to be around 5%. Strikingly, many accessory genes, including most of those encoding type III effectors, lacked insertions. In contrast, 94% of genes on the Psa plasmid had insertions, including for example, the type III effector HopAU1. These results suggest that some chromosomal sites are rendered inaccessible to transposon insertion, either

  14. Genetic Diversity of African and Worldwide Strains of Ralstonia solanacearum as Determined by PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis of the hrp Gene Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poussier, Stephane; Vandewalle, Peggy; Luisetti, Jacques

    1999-01-01

    The genetic diversity among a worldwide collection of 120 strains of Ralstonia solanacearum was assessed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of amplified fragments from the hrp gene region. Five amplified fragments appeared to be specific to R. solanacearum. Fifteen different profiles were identified among the 120 bacterial strains, and a hierarchical cluster analysis distributed them into eight clusters. Each cluster included strains belonging to a single biovar, except for strains of biovars 3 and 4, which could not be separated. However, the biovar 1 strains showed rather extensive diversity since they were distributed into five clusters whereas the biovar 2 and the biovar 3 and 4 strains were gathered into one and two clusters, respectively. PCR-RFLP analysis of the hrp gene region confirmed the results of previous studies which split the species into an “Americanum” division including biovar 1 and 2 strains and an “Asiaticum” division including biovar 3 and 4 strains. However, the present study showed that most of the biovar 1 strains, originating from African countries (Reunion Island, Madagascar, Zimbabwe, and Angola) and being included in a separate cluster, belong to the “Asiaticum” rather than to the “Americanum” division. These African strains could thus have evolved separately from other biovar 1 strains originating from the Americas. PMID:10224018

  15. Comprehensive Definition of the SigH Regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Transcriptional Control of Diverse Stress Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared D Sharp

    Full Text Available Expression of SigH, one of 12 Mycobacterium tuberculosis alternative sigma factors, is induced by heat, oxidative and nitric oxide stresses. SigH activation has been shown to increase expression of several genes, including genes involved in maintaining redox equilibrium and in protein degradation. However, few of these are known to be directly regulated by SigH. The goal of this project is to comprehensively define the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and operons that are directly controlled by SigH in order to gain insight into the role of SigH in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. We used ChIP-Seq to identify in vivo SigH binding sites throughout the M. tuberculosis genome, followed by quantification of SigH-dependent expression of genes linked to these sites and identification of SigH-regulated promoters. We identified 69 SigH binding sites, which are located both in intergenic regions and within annotated coding sequences in the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. 41 binding sites were linked to genes that showed greater expression following heat stress in a SigH-dependent manner. We identified several genes not previously known to be regulated by SigH, including genes involved in DNA repair, cysteine biosynthesis, translation, and genes of unknown function. Experimental and computational analysis of SigH-regulated promoter sequences within these binding sites identified strong consensus -35 and -10 promoter sequences, but with tolerance for non-consensus bases at specific positions. This comprehensive identification and validation of SigH-regulated genes demonstrates an extended SigH regulon that controls an unexpectedly broad range of stress response functions.

  16. The new pLAI (lux regulon based auto-inducible expression system for recombinant protein production in Escherichia coli

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    Nocadello Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After many years of intensive research, it is generally assumed that no universal expression system can exist for high-level production of a given recombinant protein. Among the different expression systems, the inducible systems are the most popular for their tight regulation. However, induction is in many cases less favorable due to the high cost and/or toxicity of inducers, incompatibilities with industrial scale-up or detrimental growth conditions. Expression systems using autoinduction (or self-induction prove to be extremely versatile allowing growth and induction of recombinant proteins without the need to monitor cell density or add inducer. Unfortunately, almost all the actual auto inducible expression systems need endogenous or induced metabolic changes during the growth to trigger induction, both frequently linked to detrimental condition to cell growth. In this context, we use a simple modular approach for a cell density-based genetic regulation in order to assemble an autoinducible recombinant protein expression system in E. coli. Result The newly designed pLAI expression system places the expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli under control of the regulatory genes of the lux regulon of Vibrio fischeri's Quorum Sensing (QS system. The pLAI system allows a tight regulation of the recombinant gene allowing a negligible basal expression and expression only at high cell density. Sequence optimization of regulative genes of QS of V. fischeri for expression in E. coli upgraded the system to high level expression. Moreover, partition of regulative genes between the plasmid and the host genome and introduction of a molecular safety lock permitted tighter control of gene expression. Conclusion Coupling gene expression to cell density using cell-to-cell communication provides a promising approach for recombinant protein production. The system allows the control of expression of the target recombinant gene

  17. Comprehensive Definition of the SigH Regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Transcriptional Control of Diverse Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jared D; Singh, Atul K; Park, Sang Tae; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Peterson, Matthew W; Gomes, Antonio L C; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Raman, Sahadevan; Galagan, James E; Husson, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Expression of SigH, one of 12 Mycobacterium tuberculosis alternative sigma factors, is induced by heat, oxidative and nitric oxide stresses. SigH activation has been shown to increase expression of several genes, including genes involved in maintaining redox equilibrium and in protein degradation. However, few of these are known to be directly regulated by SigH. The goal of this project is to comprehensively define the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and operons that are directly controlled by SigH in order to gain insight into the role of SigH in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. We used ChIP-Seq to identify in vivo SigH binding sites throughout the M. tuberculosis genome, followed by quantification of SigH-dependent expression of genes linked to these sites and identification of SigH-regulated promoters. We identified 69 SigH binding sites, which are located both in intergenic regions and within annotated coding sequences in the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. 41 binding sites were linked to genes that showed greater expression following heat stress in a SigH-dependent manner. We identified several genes not previously known to be regulated by SigH, including genes involved in DNA repair, cysteine biosynthesis, translation, and genes of unknown function. Experimental and computational analysis of SigH-regulated promoter sequences within these binding sites identified strong consensus -35 and -10 promoter sequences, but with tolerance for non-consensus bases at specific positions. This comprehensive identification and validation of SigH-regulated genes demonstrates an extended SigH regulon that controls an unexpectedly broad range of stress response functions.

  18. Diverse Genetic Regulon of the Virulence-Associated Transcriptional Regulator MucR in Brucella abortus 2308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, Clayton C.; Elhassanny, Ahmed E. M.; Planchin, Emilie E.; Roux, Christelle M.; Weeks-Gorospe, Jenni N.; Ficht, Thomas A.; Dunman, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The Ros-type regulator MucR is one of the few transcriptional regulators that have been linked to virulence in Brucella. Here, we show that a Brucella abortus in-frame mucR deletion strain exhibits a pronounced growth defect during in vitro cultivation and, more importantly, that the mucR mutant is attenuated in cultured macrophages and in mice. The genetic basis for the attenuation of Brucella mucR mutants has not been defined previously, but in the present study the genes regulated by MucR in B. abortus have been elucidated using microarray analysis and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). In B. abortus 2308, MucR regulates a wide variety of genes whose products may function in establishing and maintaining cell envelope integrity, polysaccharide biosynthesis, iron homeostasis, genome plasticity, and transcriptional regulation. Particularly notable among the MucR-regulated genes identified is arsR6 (nolR), which encodes a transcriptional regulator previously linked to virulence in Brucella melitensis 16 M. Importantly, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) determined that a recombinant MucR protein binds directly to the promoter regions of several genes repressed by MucR (including arsR6 [nolR]), and in Brucella, as in other alphaproteobacteria, MucR binds to its own promoter to repress expression of the gene that encodes it. Overall, these studies have uncovered the diverse genetic regulon of MucR in Brucella, and in doing so this work has begun to define the MucR-controlled genetic circuitry whose misregulation contributes to the virulence defect of Brucella mucR mutants. PMID:23319565

  19. Identification of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0092 (RpoE) Regulon and Its Implications for Pathogen Persistence in the Host and Syphilis Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisenko, Oleg; Tompa, Martin; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria often respond to harmful environmental stimuli with the induction of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma (σ) factors that in turn direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific groups of response genes (or regulons) to minimize cellular damage and favor adaptation to the changed extracellular milieu. In Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the agent of syphilis, the TP0092 gene is predicted to code for the pathogen's only annotated ECF σ factor, homologous to RpoE, known in Escherichia coli to control a key transduction pathway for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. Here we have shown that TP0092 is highly transcribed during experimental syphilis. Furthermore, TP0092 transcription levels significantly increase as infection progresses toward immune clearance of the pathogen, suggesting a role for TP0092 in helping T. pallidum respond to harmful stimuli in the host environment. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the TP0092 regulon at two different time points during infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 22 chromosomal regions, all containing putative TP0092-binding sites and corresponding to as many T. pallidum genes, were identified. Noteworthy among them are the genes encoding desulfoferrodoxin and thioredoxin, involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because T. pallidum does not possess other enzymes for ROS detoxification, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase, our results suggest that the TP0092 regulon is important in protecting the syphilis spirochete from damage caused by ROS produced at the site of infection during the inflammatory response. PMID:23243302

  20. Identification of the sigmaB regulon of Bacillus cereus and conservation of sigmaB-regulated genes in low-GC-content gram-positive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, Willem; van der Voort, Menno; Molenaar, Douwe; Moezelaar, Roy; de Vos, Willem M; Abee, Tjakko

    2007-06-01

    The alternative sigma factor sigma(B) has an important role in the acquisition of stress resistance in many gram-positive bacteria, including the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus. Here, we describe the identification of the set of sigma(B)-regulated genes in B. cereus by DNA microarray analysis of the transcriptome upon a mild heat shock. Twenty-four genes could be identified as being sigma(B) dependent as witnessed by (i) significantly lower expression levels of these genes in mutants with a deletion of sigB and rsbY (which encode the alternative sigma factor sigma(B) and a crucial positive regulator of sigma(B) activity, respectively) than in the parental strain B. cereus ATCC 14579 and (ii) increased expression of these genes upon a heat shock. Newly identified sigma(B)-dependent genes in B. cereus include a histidine kinase and two genes that have predicted functions in spore germination. This study shows that the sigma(B) regulon of B. cereus is considerably smaller than that of other gram-positive bacteria. This appears to be in line with phylogenetic analyses where sigma(B) of the B. cereus group was placed close to the ancestral form of sigma(B) in gram-positive bacteria. The data described in this study and previous studies in which the complete sigma(B) regulon of the gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus were determined enabled a comparison of the sets of sigma(B)-regulated genes in the different gram-positive bacteria. This showed that only three genes (rsbV, rsbW, and sigB) are conserved in their sigma(B) dependency in all four bacteria, suggesting that the sigma(B) regulon of the different gram-positive bacteria has evolved to perform niche-specific functions.

  1. d-Allose Catabolism of Escherichia coli: Involvement of alsI and Regulation of als Regulon Expression by Allose and Ribose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Tim S.; Chang, Ying-Ying; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1999-01-01

    Genes involved in allose utilization of Escherichia coli K-12 are organized in at least two operons, alsRBACE and alsI, located next to each other on the chromosome but divergently transcribed. Mutants defective in alsI (allose 6-phosphate isomerase gene) and alsE (allulose 6-phosphate epimerase gene) were Als−. Transcription of the two allose operons, measured as β-galactosidase activity specified by alsI-lacZ+ or alsE-lacZ+ operon fusions, was induced by allose. Ribose also caused derepression of expression of the regulon under conditions in which ribose phosphate catabolism was impaired. PMID:10559180

  2. Freezing-sensitive tomato has a functional CBF cold response pathway, but a CBF regulon that differs from that of freezing-tolerant Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Fowler, Sarah G; Cheng, Hongmei; Lou, Yigong; Rhee, Seung Y; Stockinger, Eric J; Thomashow, Michael F

    2004-09-01

    Many plants increase in freezing tolerance in response to low temperature, a process known as cold acclimation. In Arabidopsis, cold acclimation involves action of the CBF cold response pathway. Key components of the pathway include rapid cold-induced expression of three homologous genes encoding transcriptional activators, CBF1, 2 and 3 (also known as DREB1b, c and a, respectively), followed by expression of CBF-targeted genes, the CBF regulon, that increase freezing tolerance. Unlike Arabidopsis, tomato cannot cold acclimate raising the question of whether it has a functional CBF cold response pathway. Here we show that tomato, like Arabidopsis, encodes three CBF homologs, LeCBF1-3 (Lycopersicon esculentum CBF1-3), that are present in tandem array in the genome. Only the tomato LeCBF1 gene, however, was found to be cold-inducible. As is the case for Arabidopsis CBF1-3, transcripts for LeCBF1-3 did accumulate in response to mechanical agitation, but not in response to drought, ABA or high salinity. Constitutive overexpression of LeCBF1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants induced expression of CBF-targeted genes and increased freezing tolerance indicating that LeCBF1 encodes a functional homolog of the Arabidopsis CBF1-3 proteins. However, constitutive overexpression of either LeCBF1 or AtCBF3 in transgenic tomato plants did not increase freezing tolerance. Gene expression studies, including the use of a cDNA microarray representing approximately 8000 tomato genes, identified only four genes that were induced 2.5-fold or more in the LeCBF1 or AtCBF3 overexpressing plants, three of which were putative members of the tomato CBF regulon as they were also upregulated in response to low temperature. Additional experiments indicated that of eight tomato genes that were likely orthologs of Arabidopsis CBF regulon genes, none were responsive to CBF overexpression in tomato. From these results, we conclude that tomato has a complete CBF cold response pathway, but that the

  3. Constitutive Activity of the Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 Confers Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Drives Robust Immune Responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lang, Julien

    2017-08-02

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are known to be important mediators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a recent report, we enlarged the understanding of the Arabidopsis thaliana MPK3 functions showing that the expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of the protein led to auto-immune phenotypes. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarf and display defense responses that are characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid and phytoalexins as well as by the upregulation of several defense genes. Consistently with these data, we present here results demonstrating that, compared to wild type controls, CA-MPK3 plants are more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Based on our previous work, we also discuss the mechanisms of robust plant immunity controlled by sustained MPK3 activity, focusing especially on the roles of disease resistance proteins.

  4. [Increased Size of Epidermal Cells in Syringa josikaea Jacq. Smaller Leaf Side as an Adaptive Mechanism for Reducing Its Asymmetry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonskii, V I; Polyakova, I S

    2015-01-01

    Comparative study of quantitative anatomy of the epidermis in Syringa josikaea Jacq. leaf halves of different width was conducted in order to analyze the possible mechanism of formation of the value of fluctuating leaf asymmetry. A regular decrease in the density of main epidermal cells in the smaller leaf half compared with the bigger one was traced during leaf ontogeny. Stomatal index was equal in different-sized leaf halves. Adaptive response was found in fully formed leaves; it was aimed at reducing leaf blade fluctuating asymmetry by 23% on average and consisted of compensatory growth--further elongation of main epidermal cells in the smaller half of the leaf. It was concluded that the level of fluctuating leaf asymmetry in Hungary lilac is mainly due to a lower rate of cell division, as well as due to their greater elongation in the smaller half of adult leaf compared with the bigger half.

  5. Bigger is not always better: transmission and fitness burden of ∼1MB Pseudomonas syringae megaplasmid pMPPla107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Artur; Jones, Corbin D; Karkare, Kedar; Moore, Autumn; Smith, Brian A; Jones, Chelsea; Dougherty, Kevin; Baltrus, David A

    2014-05-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a widespread process that enables the acquisition of genes and metabolic pathways in single evolutionary steps. Previous reports have described fitness costs of HGT, but have largely focused on the acquisition of relatively small plasmids. We have previously shown that a Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans strain recently acquired a cryptic megaplasmid, pMPPla107. This extrachromosomal element contributes hundreds of new genes to P. syringae and increases total genomic content by approximately 18%. However, this early work did not directly explore transmissibility, stability, or fitness costs associated with acquisition of pMPPla107. Here, we show that pMPPla107 is self-transmissible across a variety of diverse pseudomonad strains, on both solid agar and within shaking liquid cultures, with conjugation dependent on a type IV secretion system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest self-transmissible megaplasmid known outside of Sinorhizobium. This megaplasmid can be lost from all novel hosts although the rate of loss depends on medium type and genomic background. However, in contrast, pMPPla107 is faithfully maintained within the original parent strain (Pla107) even under direct negative selection during laboratory assays. These results suggest that Pla107 specific stabilizing mutations have occurred either on this strain's chromosome or within the megaplasmid. Lastly, we demonstrate that acquisition of pMPPla107 by strains other than Pla107 imparts severe (20%) fitness costs under competitive conditions in vitro. We show that pMPPla107 is capable of transmitting and maintaining itself across multiple Pseudomonas species, rendering it one of the largest conjugative elements discovered to date. The relative stability of pMPPla107, coupled with extensive fitness costs, makes it a tractable model system for investigating evolutionary and genetic mechanisms of megaplasmid maintenance and a unique testing ground to explore

  6. Extensive remodeling of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. avellanae type III secretome associated with two independent host shifts onto hazelnut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Brien Heath E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hazelnut (Corylus avellana decline disease in Greece and Italy is caused by the convergent evolution of two distantly related lineages of Pseudomonas syringae pv. avellanae (Pav. We sequenced the genomes of three Pav isolates to determine if their convergent virulence phenotype had a common genetic basis due to either genetic exchange between lineages or parallel evolution. Results We found little evidence for horizontal transfer (recombination of genes between Pav lineages, but two large genomic islands (GIs have been recently acquired by one of the lineages. Evolutionary analyses of the genes encoding type III secreted effectors (T3SEs that are translocated into host cells and are important for both suppressing and eliciting defense responses show that the two Pav lineages have dramatically different T3SE profiles, with only two shared putatively functional T3SEs. One Pav lineage has undergone unprecedented secretome remodeling, including the acquisition of eleven new T3SEs and the loss or pseudogenization of 15, including five of the six core T3SE families that are present in the other Pav lineage. Molecular dating indicates that divergence within both of the Pav lineages predates their observation in the field. This suggest that both Pav lineages have been cryptically infecting hazelnut trees or wild relatives for many years, and that the emergence of hazelnut decline in the 1970s may have been due to changes in agricultural practice. Conclusions These data show that divergent lineages of P. syringae can converge on identical disease etiology on the same host plant using different virulence mechanisms and that dramatic shifts in the arsenal of T3SEs can accompany disease emergence.

  7. Extensive remodeling of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. avellanae type III secretome associated with two independent host shifts onto hazelnut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Heath E; Thakur, Shalabh; Gong, Yunchen; Fung, Pauline; Zhang, Jianfeng; Yuan, Lijie; Wang, Pauline W; Yong, Choseung; Scortichini, Marco; Guttman, David S

    2012-07-16

    Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) decline disease in Greece and Italy is caused by the convergent evolution of two distantly related lineages of Pseudomonas syringae pv. avellanae (Pav). We sequenced the genomes of three Pav isolates to determine if their convergent virulence phenotype had a common genetic basis due to either genetic exchange between lineages or parallel evolution. We found little evidence for horizontal transfer (recombination) of genes between Pav lineages, but two large genomic islands (GIs) have been recently acquired by one of the lineages. Evolutionary analyses of the genes encoding type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) that are translocated into host cells and are important for both suppressing and eliciting defense responses show that the two Pav lineages have dramatically different T3SE profiles, with only two shared putatively functional T3SEs. One Pav lineage has undergone unprecedented secretome remodeling, including the acquisition of eleven new T3SEs and the loss or pseudogenization of 15, including five of the six core T3SE families that are present in the other Pav lineage. Molecular dating indicates that divergence within both of the Pav lineages predates their observation in the field. This suggest that both Pav lineages have been cryptically infecting hazelnut trees or wild relatives for many years, and that the emergence of hazelnut decline in the 1970s may have been due to changes in agricultural practice. These data show that divergent lineages of P. syringae can converge on identical disease etiology on the same host plant using different virulence mechanisms and that dramatic shifts in the arsenal of T3SEs can accompany disease emergence.

  8. Mycobacterial WhiB6 Differentially Regulates ESX-1 and the Dos Regulon to Modulate Granuloma Formation and Virulence in Zebrafish

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    Zhenkang Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of infection, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is exposed to diverse redox stresses that trigger metabolic and physiological changes. How these stressors are sensed and relayed to the Mtb transcriptional apparatus remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that WhiB6 differentially regulates the ESX-1 and DosR regulons through its Fe-S cluster. When challenged with NO, WhiB6 continually activates expression of the DosR regulons but regulates ESX-1 expression through initial activation followed by gradual inhibition. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of the holo- and reduced apo-WhiB6 complemented strains confirms these results and also reveals that WhiB6 controls aerobic and anaerobic metabolism, cell division, and virulence. Using the Mycobacterium marinum zebrafish infection model, we find that holo- and apo-WhiB6 modulate levels of mycobacterial infection, granuloma formation, and dissemination. These findings provide fresh insight into the role of WhiB6 in mycobacterial infection, dissemination, and disease development.

  9. Common fur and mystacial vibrissae parallel sensory pathways: /sup 14/C 2-deoxyglucose and WGA-HRP studies in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.; Morgan, C.W.; Morton, M.T.; Sharp, J.W.

    1988-04-15

    Stimulation of mystacial vibrissae in rows A,B, and C increased (14C) 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) uptake in spinal trigeminal nucleus pars caudalis (Sp5c) mostly in ventral portions of laminae III-IV with less activation of II and V. Stimulation of common fur above the whiskers mainly activated lamina II, with less activation in deeper layers. The patterns of activation were compatible with an inverted head, onion skin Sp5c somatotopy. Wheatgerm Agglutinin-Horseradish Peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections into common fur between mystacial vibrissae rows A-B and B-C led to anterograde transganglionic labeling only of Sp5c, mainly of lamina II with less label in layer V, and very sparse label in III and IV. WGA-HRP skin injections appear to primarily label small fibers, which along with larger fibers, were metabolically activated during common fur stimulation. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation increased 2DG uptake in ventral ipsilateral spinal trigeminal nuclei pars interpolaris (Sp5i) and oralis (Sp5o) and principal trigeminal sensory nucleus (Pr5). Common fur stimulation above the whiskers slightly increased 2DG uptake in ventral Sp5i, Sp5o, and possibly Pr5. The most dorsal aspect of the ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus of thalamus was activated contralateral to whisker stimulation. Stimulation of the common fur dorsal to the whiskers activated a region of dorsal VPM caudal to the VPM region activated during whisker stimulation. This is consistent with previous data showing that ventral whiskers and portions of the face are represented rostrally in VPM, and more dorsal whiskers and dorsal portions of the face are represented progressively more caudally in VPM. Mystacial vibrissae stimulation activated the contralateral primary sensory SI barrelfield cortex and a separate region in the second somatosensory SII cortex.

  10. Optimizing the HRP-2 in vitro malaria drug susceptibility assay using a reference clone to improve comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates

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    Rutvisuttinunt Wiriya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apparent emerging artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Southeast Asia requires development of practical tools to monitor for resistant parasites. Although in vitro anti-malarial susceptibility tests are widely used, uncertainties remain regarding interpretation of P. falciparum field isolate values. Methods Performance parameters of the W2 P. falciparum clone (considered artemisinin “sensitive” were evaluated as a reference for the HRP-2 immediate ex vivo assay. Variability in W2 IC50s was assessed, including intra- and inter-assay variability among and between technicians in multiple experiments, over five freeze-thaw cycles, over five months of continuous culture, and before and after transport of drug-coated plates to remote field sites. Nominal drug plate concentrations of artesunate (AS and dihydroartemisinin (DHA were verified by LC-MS analysis. Plasmodium falciparum field isolate IC50s for DHA from subjects in an artemisinin-resistant area in Cambodia were compared with W2 susceptibility. Results Plate drug concentrations and day-to-day technical assay performance among technicians were important sources of variability for W2 IC50s within and between assays. Freeze-thaw cycles, long-term continuous culture, and transport to and from remote sites had less influence. Despite variability in W2 susceptibility, the median IC50s for DHA for Cambodian field isolates were higher (p Conclusion The W2 reference clone improved the interpretability of field isolate susceptibility from the immediate ex vivo HRP-2 assay from areas of artemisinin resistance. Methods to increase the reproducibility of plate coating may improve overall assay interpretability and utility.

  11. Validation of RT-qPCR Approaches to Monitor Pseudomonas syringae Gene Expression During Infection and Exposure to Pattern-Triggered Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy; Lovelace, Amelia H; Kvitko, Brian H

    2018-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is an important model plant pathogen, with a fully annotated genome and multiple compatible plant hosts. Very few studies have examined the regulation of DC3000 gene expression in vivo. We developed a quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay to monitor transcriptional changes in DC3000 inoculated into Arabidopsis thaliana leaves during disease and exposure to pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). In our approach, bacterial RNA concentrations in total tissue RNA are standardized using P. syringae-specific 16S ribosomal RNA primers. We validated multiple stable reference genes for normalization in calculating the relative expression of genes of interest. We used empirically derived rates of amplification efficiency to calculate relative expression of key marker genes for virulence-associated regulation. We demonstrated that exposure to PTI alters DC3000 expression of type III secretion system, coronatine synthesis genes, and flagellar marker genes.

  12. Sources of resistance to races R0 and R1 of Pseudomonas syringae PV. tomato - agent of bacterial speck on tomato

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    Ganeva Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tomato breeding lines with fruit colour different from the traditional red colour were studied in order to search for sources of resistance to races R0 and R1 of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. As a result of selection of healthy plants with hypersensitive response (HR, the resistance was stabilized and perspective lines gene-carriers of resistance to bacterial speck were chosen. Lines L1078 and L1083 with brown-red (black coloured fruits and line L1130 with purple-red fruits possess a complex resistance to races R0 and R1. It was established that two of the lines with rose-coloured tomato fruits (L1088 and L584 were resistant to race 1 of P. syringae pv. tomato. These lines possessed valuable economic and morphological characters and they could be used in combinative and heterosis breeding for development of resistance to bacterial speck varieties.

  13. One shot-two pathogens blocked: exposure of Arabidopsis to hexadecane, a long chain volatile organic compound, confers induced resistance against both Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyo Bee; Lee, Boyoung; Kloepper, Joseph W; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-07-01

    Bacteria and plant derived volatile organic compounds have been reported as the chemical triggers that elicit induced resistance in plants. Previously, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, were found to be emitted from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Bacillus subtilis GB03, which had been shown to elicit ISR and plant growth promotion. More recently, we reported data that stronger induced resistance could be elicited against Pseudomonas syringae pv maculicola ES4326 in plants exposed to C13 VOC from another PGPR Paenibacillus polymyxa E681 compared with that of strain GB03. Here, we assessed whether another long hydrocarbon C16 hexadecane (HD) conferred protection to Arabidopsis from infection of a biotrophic pathogen, P. syringae pv maculicola and a necrotrophic pathogen, Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum. Collectively, long-chain VOCs can be linked to a plant resistance activator for protecting plants against both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens at the same time.

  14. Comparison of PfHRP-2/pLDH ELISA, qPCR and microscopy for the detection of plasmodium events and prediction of sick visits during a malaria vaccine study.

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    Ismail Mahat Bashir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compared to expert malaria microscopy, malaria biomarkers such as Plasmodium falciparum histidine rich protein-2 (PfHRP-2, and PCR provide superior analytical sensitivity and specificity for quantifying malaria parasites infections. This study reports on parasite prevalence, sick visits parasite density and species composition by different diagnostic methods during a phase-I malaria vaccine trial. METHODS: Blood samples for microscopy, PfHRP-2 and Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH ELISAs and real time quantitative PCR (qPCR were collected during scheduled (n = 298 or sick visits (n = 38 from 30 adults participating in a 112-day vaccine trial. The four methods were used to assess parasite prevalence, as well as parasite density over a 42-day period for patients with clinical episodes. RESULTS: During scheduled visits, qPCR (39.9%, N = 119 and PfHRP-2 ELISA (36.9%, N = 110 detected higher parasite prevalence than pLDH ELISA (16.8%, N = 50 and all methods were more sensitive than microscopy (13.4%, N = 40. All microscopically detected infections contained P. falciparum, as mono-infections (95% or with P. malariae (5%. By qPCR, 102/119 infections were speciated. P. falciparum predominated either as monoinfections (71.6%, with P. malariae (8.8%, P. ovale (4.9% or both (3.9%. P. malariae (6.9% and P. ovale (1.0% also occurred as co-infections (2.9%. As expected, higher prevalences were detected during sick visits, with prevalences of 65.8% (qPCR, 60.5% (PfHRP-2 ELISA, 21.1% (pLDH ELISA and 31.6% (microscopy. PfHRP-2 showed biomass build-up that climaxed (1813±3410 ng/mL SD at clinical episodes. CONCLUSION: PfHRP-2 ELISA and qPCR may be needed for accurately quantifying the malaria parasite burden. In addition, qPCR improves parasite speciation, whilst PfHRP-2 ELISA is a potential predictor for clinical disease caused by P. falciparum. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00666380.

  15. HPLC-NNE13CNMR coupling fingerprint analysis technology and its application in a study of Syringa pubescens Turcz and its activity against hepatic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang ZX; Yin WP; Liu P; Zhao TZ

    2013-01-01

    Zhixin Zhang,1 Weiping Yin,1 Pu Liu,1 Tianzeng Zhao2 1School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Natural Products, Henan Academy of Sciences, Zhengzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: This study describes the active ingredients of Syringa pubescens Turcz which has been identified as being able to protect against hepatic fibrosis. Here we report the characteristic...

  16. Identification of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae strains causing bacterial canker of kiwifruit in the Anhui Province of China, and determination of their streptomycin sensitivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Yi, X-K; Chen, Y; Zhang, A-F; Zhang, J-Y; Gao, Z-H; Qi, Y-J; Xu, Y-L

    2015-07-27

    Bacterial canker, caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae, is one of the most severe diseases of kiwifruit. It has become an international pandemic and threatens the sustainable development of kiwifruit production in all main kiwi-growing regions worldwide. Streptomycin has been the major bactericide for the control of kiwifruit canker, especially in Anhui Province, one of the main kiwifruit production regions in China. However, until now, no studies on the baseline sensitivity to streptomycin of field isolates of P. syringae pv. actinidiae from China have been available. During 2012-2013, a total of 102 single-colony P. syringae pv. actinidiae strains were isolated: 36, 12, 13, 26, and 15 strains from Yuexi, Jinzhai, Huoshan, Qianshan, and Taihu counties, respectively. All strains were confirmed by production of a 280-bp fragment using the specific primers PsaF1/R2 upon polymerase chain reaction amplification, followed by an assay for confirmation of pathogenicity to fulfill Koch's postulates. In this study, the streptomycin sensitivity of the 102 isolated strains was determined. The half-maximal effective concentration values for inhibition of growth by streptomycin were 0.03-0.42 μg/mL (average 0.12 ± 0.06 μg/mL). The baseline sensitivity curve was unimodal, representing range-of-variation factors of 14.0. No resistant subpopulation was identified among the strains used in the study. Thus, these sensitivity data could be used as a baseline for monitoring the shift in sensitivity of P. syringae pv. actinidiae populations to streptomycin in Anhui Province. Continuous resistance monitoring should be carried out, as streptomycin is an at-risk bactericide agent.

  17. Arabidopsis CaM binding protein CBP60g contributes to MAMP-induced SA accumulation and is involved in disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae.

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    Lin Wang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid (SA-induced defense responses are important factors during effector triggered immunity and microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP-induced immunity in plants. This article presents evidence that a member of the Arabidopsis CBP60 gene family, CBP60g, contributes to MAMP-triggered SA accumulation. CBP60g is inducible by both pathogen and MAMP treatments. Pseudomonas syringae growth is enhanced in cbp60g mutants. Expression profiles of a cbp60g mutant after MAMP treatment are similar to those of sid2 and pad4, suggesting a defect in SA signaling. Accordingly, cbp60g mutants accumulate less SA when treated with the MAMP flg22 or a P. syringae hrcC strain that activates MAMP signaling. MAMP-induced production of reactive oxygen species and callose deposition are unaffected in cbp60g mutants. CBP60g is a calmodulin-binding protein with a calmodulin-binding domain located near the N-terminus. Calmodulin binding is dependent on Ca(2+. Mutations in CBP60g that abolish calmodulin binding prevent complementation of the SA production and bacterial growth defects of cbp60g mutants, indicating that calmodulin binding is essential for the function of CBP60g in defense signaling. These studies show that CBP60g constitutes a Ca(2+ link between MAMP recognition and SA accumulation that is important for resistance to P. syringae.

  18. Variation in extragenic repetitive DNA sequences in Pseudomonas syringae and potential use of modified REP primers in the identification of closely related isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Çepni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Pseudomonas syringe pathovars isolated from olive, tomato and bean were identified by species-specific PCR and their genetic diversity was assessed by repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP-PCR. Reverse universal primers for REP-PCR were designed by using the bases of A, T, G or C at the positions of 1, 4 and 11 to identify additional polymorphism in the banding patterns. Binding of the primers to different annealing sites in the genome revealed additional fingerprint patterns in eight isolates of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and two isolates of P. syringae pv. tomato. The use of four different bases in the primer sequences did not affect the PCR reproducibility and was very efficient in revealing intra-pathovar diversity, particularly in P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi. At the pathovar level, the primer BOX1AR yielded shared fragments, in addition to five bands that discriminated among the pathovars P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and P. syringae pv. tomato. REP-PCR with a modified primer containing C produced identical bands among the isolates in a pathovar but separated three pathovars more distinctly than four other primers. Although REP-and BOX-PCRs have been successfully used in the molecular identification of Pseudomonas isolates from Turkish flora, a PCR based on inter-enterobacterial repetitive intergenic concensus (ERIC sequences failed to produce clear banding patterns in this study.

  19. HPLC-NNE13CNMR coupling fingerprint analysis technology and its application in a study of Syringa pubescens Turcz and its activity against hepatic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZX

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhixin Zhang,1 Weiping Yin,1 Pu Liu,1 Tianzeng Zhao2 1School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Key Laboratory of Natural Products, Henan Academy of Sciences, Zhengzhou, People's Republic of China Abstract: This study describes the active ingredients of Syringa pubescens Turcz which has been identified as being able to protect against hepatic fibrosis. Here we report the characteristics of high performance liquid chromatography and non-nuclear overhauser effect carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (HPLC-NNE13CNMR technology developed for coupling fingerprint analysis. The major contribution of this new method is the development of an efficient technology and a useful tool for analysis of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine using chromatography and spectral coupling fingerprint technology. Isolation of secoiridoid glycosides and investigation of their structure-activity relationship showed that these derivatives are the active ingredients of Syringa pubescens Turcz, and account for the activity of this plant against hepatic fibrosis. The active compounds were identified as oleuropein, 10-hydroxyoleuropein, oleoside-11-methylester, (8Z-ligstroside, and echinacoside by HPLC-NNE13CNMR coupling fingerprint analysis. A concentration-response relationship was also demonstrated for the HPLC-NNE13CNMR coupling fingerprint method. Keywords: HPLC-NNE13CNMR, coupling fingerprint, hepatic fibrosis, Syringa pubescens Turcz, analysis technology

  20. Humoral Responses to Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR Regulon-Encoded Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Individuals with Latent Tuberculosis Infection

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    Simon G. Kimuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI is evidence of immunological control of tuberculosis. Dormancy survival regulator (DosR regulon-encoded proteins may have a role in the maintenance of LTBI. T cell responses to Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR regulon-encoded proteins were found to be most frequent among household contacts of TB cases from Uganda compared to other DosR proteins, but antibody responses were not described. We characterized antibody responses to these proteins in individuals from Uganda. Antibodies to Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR regulon-encoded proteins were measured in 68 uninfected individuals, 62 with LTBI, and 107 with active pulmonary tuberculosis (APTB cases. There were no differences in the concentrations of antibodies to Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c DosR regulon-encoded proteins between individuals with LTBI and APTB and those who were uninfected. LTBI was associated with higher concentrations of antibodies to Rv1733c in female participants [adjusted geometric mean ratio: 1.812, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.105 2.973, and p=0.019] but not in males (p value for interaction = 0.060. Antibodies to the four DosR regulon-encoded proteins investigated may not serve as good biomarkers of LTBI in the general population. More of the M.tb proteome needs to be screened to identify proteins that induce strong antibody responses in LTBI.

  1. TheListeria monocytogenesBile Stimulon under Acidic Conditions Is Characterized by Strain-Specific Patterns and the Upregulation of Motility, Cell Wall Modification Functions, and the PrfA Regulon.

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    Guariglia-Oropeza, Veronica; Orsi, Renato H; Guldimann, Claudia; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2018-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes uses a variety of transcriptional regulation strategies to adapt to the extra-host environment, the gastrointestinal tract, and the intracellular host environment. While the alternative sigma factor SigB has been proposed to be a key transcriptional regulator that facilitates L. monocytogenes adaptation to the gastrointestinal environment, the L. monocytogenes ' transcriptional response to bile exposure is not well-understood. RNA-seq characterization of the bile stimulon was performed in two L. monocytogenes strains representing lineages I and II. Exposure to bile at pH 5.5 elicited a large transcriptomic response with ~16 and 23% of genes showing differential transcription in 10403S and H7858, respectively. The bile stimulon includes genes involved in motility and cell wall modification mechanisms, as well as genes in the PrfA regulon, which likely facilitate survival during the gastrointestinal stages of infection that follow bile exposure. The fact that bile exposure induced the PrfA regulon, but did not induce further upregulation of the SigB regulon (beyond that expected by exposure to pH 5.5), suggests a model where at the earlier stages of gastrointestinal infection (e.g., acid exposure in the stomach), SigB-dependent gene expression plays an important role. Subsequent exposure to bile induces the PrfA regulon, potentially priming L. monocytogenes for subsequent intracellular infection stages. Some members of the bile stimulon showed lineage- or strain-specific distribution when 27 Listeria genomes were analyzed. Even though sigB null mutants showed increased sensitivity to bile, the SigB regulon was not found to be upregulated in response to bile beyond levels expected by exposure to pH 5.5. Comparison of wildtype and corresponding Δ sigB strains newly identified 26 SigB-dependent genes, all with upstream putative SigB-dependent promoters.

  2. OsdR ofStreptomyces coelicolorand the Dormancy Regulator DevR ofMycobacterium tuberculosisControl Overlapping Regulons.

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    Urem, Mia; van Rossum, Teunke; Bucca, Giselda; Moolenaar, Geri F; Laing, Emma; Świątek-Połatyńska, Magda A; Willemse, Joost; Tenconi, Elodie; Rigali, Sébastien; Goosen, Nora; Smith, Colin P; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2016-01-01

    Two-component regulatory systems allow bacteria to respond adequately to changes in their environment. In response to a given stimulus, a sensory kinase activates its cognate response regulator via reversible phosphorylation. The response regulator DevR activates a state of dormancy under hypoxia in Mycobacterium tuberculosis , allowing this pathogen to escape the host defense system. Here, we show that OsdR (SCO0204) of the soil bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor is a functional orthologue of DevR. OsdR, when activated by the sensory kinase OsdK (SCO0203), binds upstream of the DevR-controlled dormancy genes devR , hspX , and Rv3134c of M. tuberculosis . In silico analysis of the S. coelicolor genome combined with in vitro DNA binding studies identified many binding sites in the genomic region around osdR itself and upstream of stress-related genes. This binding correlated well with transcriptomic responses, with deregulation of developmental genes and genes related to stress and hypoxia in the osdR mutant. A peak in osdR transcription in the wild-type strain at the onset of aerial growth correlated with major changes in global gene expression. Taken together, our data reveal the existence of a dormancy-related regulon in streptomycetes which plays an important role in the transcriptional control of stress- and development-related genes. IMPORTANCE Dormancy is a state of growth cessation that allows bacteria to escape the host defense system and antibiotic challenge. Understanding the mechanisms that control dormancy is of key importance for the treatment of latent infections, such as those from Mycobacterium tuberculosis . In mycobacteria, dormancy is controlled by the response regulator DevR, which responds to conditions of hypoxia. Here, we show that OsdR of Streptomyces coelicolor recognizes the same regulatory element and controls a regulon that consists of genes involved in the control of stress and development. Only the core regulon in the direct vicinity

  3. Identification of genes for small non-coding RNAs that belong to the regulon of the two-component regulatory system CiaRH in Streptococcus

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    Hakenbeck Regine

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional regulation by small RNAs (sRNAs in bacteria is now recognized as a wide-spread regulatory mechanism modulating a variety of physiological responses including virulence. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, the first sRNAs to be described were found in the regulon of the CiaRH two-component regulatory system. Five of these sRNAs were detected and designated csRNAs for cia-dependent small RNAs. CiaRH pleiotropically affects β-lactam resistance, autolysis, virulence, and competence development by yet to be defined molecular mechanisms. Since CiaRH is highly conserved among streptococci, it is of interest to determine if csRNAs are also included in the CiaRH regulon in this group of organisms consisting of commensal as well as pathogenic species. Knowledge on the participation of csRNAs in CiaRH-dependent regulatory events will be the key to define the physiological role of this important control system. Results Genes for csRNAs were predicted in streptococcal genomes and data base entries other than S. pneumoniae by searching for CiaR-activated promoters located in intergenic regions that are followed by a transcriptional terminator. 61 different candidate genes were obtained specifying csRNAs ranging in size from 51 to 202 nt. Comparing these genes among each other revealed 40 different csRNA types. All streptococcal genomes harbored csRNA genes, their numbers varying between two and six. To validate these predictions, S. mitis, S. oralis, and S. sanguinis were subjected to csRNA-specific northern blot analysis. In addition, a csRNA gene from S. thermophilus plasmid pST0 introduced into S. pneumoniae was also tested. Each of the csRNAs was detected on these blots and showed the anticipated sizes. Thus, the method applied here is able to predict csRNAs with high precision. Conclusions The results of this study strongly suggest that genes for small non-coding RNAs, csRNAs, are part of

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR Regulon Gene Rv2004c Encodes a Novel Antigen with Pro-inflammatory Functions and Potential Diagnostic Application for Detection of Latent Tuberculosis

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    Sankara Narayana Doddam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1.7 billion people in the world harbor latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb with a substantial risk of progression to clinical outcome. Containment of these seed beds of Mtb is essential to eliminate tuberculosis completely in high burden settings such as India. Hence, there is an urgent need for the identification of new serological markers for detection or vaccine candidates to prevent latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI. DosR regulon antigens of Mtb might serve as attractive targets for LTBI diagnosis or vaccine development as they are specifically expressed and are upregulated during latent phase. In this study, we investigated the role of Rv2004c, a member of DosR regulon (exclusive to Mtb complex, in host–pathogen interaction and its immunogenic potential in LTBI, active TB, and healthy control cohorts. Rv2004c elicited strong antibody response in individuals with LTBI compared to active TB patients and healthy cohorts. Recombinant Rv2004c induced pro-inflammatory cytokine response in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and THP-1 cells via NF-κB phosphorylation. Interaction of Rv2004c with toll-like receptor (TLR-2 was confirmed using HEK-Blue hTLR-2 and pull-down assays. Rv2004c enhanced the surface expression of TLR-2 at mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 cells. Our findings revealed that Rv2004c induces strong humoral and cell mediated immune responses. Given these observations, we propose Rv2004c to be a potential diagnostic marker or an attractive vaccine candidate that can be useful against LTBI.

  5. The Identification of Genes Important in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola Plant Colonisation Using In Vitro Screening of Transposon Libraries.

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    Bharani Manoharan

    Full Text Available The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph colonises the surface of common bean plants before moving into the interior of plant tissue, via wounds and stomata. In the intercellular spaces the pathogen proliferates in the apoplastic fluid and forms microcolonies (biofilms around plant cells. If the pathogen can suppress the plant's natural resistance response, it will cause halo blight disease. The process of resistance suppression is fairly well understood, but the mechanisms used by the pathogen in colonisation are less clear. We hypothesised that we could apply in vitro genetic screens to look for changes in motility, colony formation, and adhesion, which are proxies for infection, microcolony formation and cell adhesion. We made transposon (Tn mutant libraries of Pph strains 1448A and 1302A and found 106/1920 mutants exhibited alterations in colony morphology, motility and biofilm formation. Identification of the insertion point of the Tn identified within the genome highlighted, as expected, a number of altered motility mutants bearing mutations in genes encoding various parts of the flagellum. Genes involved in nutrient biosynthesis, membrane associated proteins, and a number of conserved hypothetical protein (CHP genes were also identified. A mutation of one CHP gene caused a positive increase in in planta bacterial growth. This rapid and inexpensive screening method allows the discovery of genes important for in vitro traits that can be correlated to roles in the plant interaction.

  6. JMJ27, an Arabidopsis H3K9 histone demethylase, modulates defense against Pseudomonas syringae and flowering time.

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    Dutta, Aditya; Choudhary, Pratibha; Caruana, Julie; Raina, Ramesh

    2017-09-01

    Histone methylation is known to dynamically regulate diverse developmental and physiological processes. Histone methyl marks are written by methyltransferases and erased by demethylases, and result in modification of chromatin structure to repress or activate transcription. However, little is known about how histone methylation may regulate defense mechanisms and flowering time in plants. Here we report characterization of JmjC DOMAIN-CONTAINING PROTEIN 27 (JMJ27), an Arabidopsis JHDM2 (JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase 2) family protein, which modulates defense against pathogens and flowering time. JMJ27 is a nuclear protein containing a zinc-finger motif and a catalytic JmjC domain with conserved Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate binding sites, and displays H3K9me1/2 demethylase activity both in vitro and in vivo. JMJ27 is induced in response to virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathogens and is required for resistance against these pathogens. JMJ27 is a negative modulator of WRKY25 (a repressor of defense) and a positive modulator of several pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Additionally, loss of JMJ27 function leads to early flowering. JMJ27 negatively modulates the major flowering regulator CONSTANS (CO) and positively modulates FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Taken together, our results indicate that JMJ27 functions as a histone demethylase to modulate both physiological (defense) and developmental (flowering time) processes in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Vitamin B6 contributes to disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yafen; Jin, Xiaoyi; Ouyang, Zhigang; Li, Xiaohui; Liu, Bo; Huang, Lei; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Fengming; Li, Dayong

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin B6 (VB6) is an important cofactor for numerous enzymatic reactions and plays an important role in abiotic stress tolerance. However, direct molecular evidence supporting a role for VB6 in plant disease resistance remains lacking. In this study, we explored the possible function of VB6 in disease resistance by analyzing disease phenotypes of Arabidopsis mutants with defects in de novo biosynthetic pathway and salvage pathway of VB6 biosynthesis against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea. Mutations in AtPDX1.2 and AtPDX1.3 genes involved in the de novo pathway, and in AtSOS4 gene involved in the salvage pathway led to increased levels of diseases caused by Pst DC3000 and B. cinerea. The pdx1.2 and pdx1.3 plants had reduced VB6 contents and showed a further reduction in VB6 contents after infection by Pst DC3000 or B. cinerea. Our preliminary results suggest an important role for VB6 in plant disease resistance against different types of pathogens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Decreased abundance of type III secretion system-inducing signals in Arabidopsis mkp1 enhances resistance against Pseudomonas syringae

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    Anderson, Jeffrey C.; Wan, Ying; Kim, Young-Mo; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Peck, Scott C.

    2014-04-21

    Many phytopathogenic bacteria use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject defense-suppressing effector proteins into host cells. Genes encoding the T3SS are induced at the start of infection, yet host signals that initiate T3SS gene expression are poorly understood. Here we identify several plant-derived metabolites that induce the T3SS in the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. In addition, we report that mkp1 (mapk phosphatase 1), an Arabidopsis mutant that is more resistant to bacterial infection, produces decreased levels of these T3SS-inducing metabolites. Consistent with the observed decrease in these metabolites, T3SS effector delivery by DC3000 was impaired in mkp1. Addition of the bioactive metabolites to the mkp1-DC3000 interaction fully restored T3SS effector delivery and suppressed enhanced resistance in mkp1. Together, these results demonstrate that DC3000 perceives multiple signals derived from plants to initiate their virulence program, and reveal a new layer of molecular communication between plants and these pathogenic bacteria.

  9. Pollen as a possible pathway for the dissemination of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinide and bacterial canker of kiwifruit

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    Rodanthi TONTOU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pollen collected in a kiwifruit orchard with symptoms of bacterial canker and naturally contaminated by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa, was used to pollinate an experimental orchard, in order to confirm its role, under commercial orchard conditions, in disseminating the pathogen and, possibly, contributing to disease spread. A pollen lot, certified free from Psa, was used with the same methods as a control. Two pollination techniques were used: dusting (dry pollen and spraying (pollen suspension in water. The orchard was monitored during 2 years from experimental pollination, with regular sampling of flowers, fruits, leaves, and vines, to check for Psa as an epiphyte or endophyte, and for bacterial canker symptoms. Psa was recovered from flowers, fruitlets and leaves during the first season, mainly in plots where contaminated pollen had been sprayed in water suspension. From early August until harvesting time (mid-October, Psa detection was possible only on leaves. No symptoms developed during the first season after pollination. No endophytic Psa was detected in pruned vines in the following winter. During the second season, detection and isolation of Psa was erratic, but direct isolation was achieved from four plots. During the second season after pollination, typical leaf symptoms were observed on a few vines, and Psa was isolated and identified. Our results suggest that Psa could be disseminated via contaminated kiwifruit pollen as a pathway for spread of bacterial canker. However, further pollination experiments are needed to establish, beyond any doubt, whether contaminated pollen may contribute to possible disease outbreaks.

  10. The kiwifruit emerging pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae does not produce AHLs but possesses three luxR solos.

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    Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Ferrante, Patrizia; Covaceuszach, Sonia; Lamba, Doriano; Scortichini, Marco; Venturi, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is an emerging phytopathogen causing bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit plants worldwide. Quorum sensing (QS) gene regulation plays important roles in many different bacterial plant pathogens. In this study we analyzed the presence and possible role of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing in Psa. It was established that Psa does not produce AHLs and that a typical complete LuxI/R QS system is absent in Psa strains. Psa however possesses three putative luxR solos designated here as PsaR1, PsaR2 and PsaR3. PsaR2 belongs to the sub-family of LuxR solos present in many plant associated bacteria (PAB) that binds and responds to yet unknown plant signal molecules. PsaR1 and PsaR3 are highly similar to LuxRs which bind AHLs and are part of the canonical LuxI/R AHL QS systems. Mutation in all the three luxR solos of Psa showed reduction of in planta survival and also showed additive effect if more than one solo was inactivated in double mutants. Gene promoter analysis revealed that the three solos are not auto-regulated and investigated their possible role in several bacterial phenotypes.

  11. Effects of stomatal development on stomatal conductance and on stomatal limitation of photosynthesis in Syringa oblata and Euonymus japonicus Thunb.

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    Wu, Bing-Jie; Chow, Wah Soon; Liu, Yu-Jun; Shi, Lei; Jiang, Chuang-Dao

    2014-12-01

    During leaf development, the increase in stomatal conductance cannot meet photosynthetic demand for CO2, thus leading to stomatal limitation of photosynthesis (Ls). Considering the crucial influences of stomatal development on stomatal conductance, we speculated whether stomatal development limits photosynthesis to some extent. To test this hypothesis, stomatal development, stomatal conductance and photosynthesis were carefully studied in both Syringa oblata (normal greening species) and Euonymus japonicus Thunb (delayed greening species). Our results show that the size of stomata increased gradually with leaf expansion, resulting in increased stomatal conductance up to the time of full leaf expansion. During this process, photosynthesis also increased steadily. Compared to that in S. oblata, the development of chloroplasts in E. japonicus Thunb was obviously delayed, leading to a delay in the improvement of photosynthetic capacity. Further analysis revealed that before full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation increased rapidly in both S. oblata and E. japonicus Thunb; after full leaf expansion, stomatal limitation continually increased in E. japonicus Thunb. Accordingly, we suggested that the enhancement of photosynthetic capacity is the main factor leading to stomatal limitation during leaf development but that stomatal development can alleviate stomatal limitation with the increase of photosynthesis by controlling gas exchange. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Elicitation of Induced Resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae by Specific Individual Compounds Derived from Native Korean Plant Species

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    Choong-Min Ryu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed general and specific defense mechanisms for protection against various enemies. Among the general defenses, induced resistance has distinct characteristics, such as broad-spectrum resistance and long-lasting effectiveness. This study evaluated over 500 specific chemical compounds derived from native Korean plant species to determine whether they triggered induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum supsp. carotovorum (Pcc in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst in Arabidopsis thaliana. To select target compound(s with direct and indirect (volatile effects, a new Petri-dish-based in vitro disease assay system with four compartments was developed. The screening assay showed that capsaicin, fisetin hydrate, jaceosidin, and farnesiferol A reduced the disease severity significantly in tobacco. Of these four compounds, capsaicin and jaceosidin induced resistance against Pcc and Pst, which depended on both salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA signaling, using Arabidopsis transgenic and mutant lines, including npr1 and NahG for SA signaling and jar1 for JA signaling. The upregulation of the PR2 and PDF1.2 genes after Pst challenge with capsaicin pre-treatment indicated that SA and JA signaling were primed. These results demonstrate that capsaicin and jaceosidin can be effective triggers of strong induced resistance against both necrotrophic and biotrophic plant pathogens.

  13. Elicitation of induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum and Pseudomonas syringae by specific individual compounds derived from native Korean plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Geun Cheol; Ryu, Shi Yong; Kim, Young Sup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Jung Sup; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2013-10-16

    Plants have developed general and specific defense mechanisms for protection against various enemies. Among the general defenses, induced resistance has distinct characteristics, such as broad-spectrum resistance and long-lasting effectiveness. This study evaluated over 500 specific chemical compounds derived from native Korean plant species to determine whether they triggered induced resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum supsp. carotovorum (Pcc) in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in Arabidopsis thaliana. To select target compound(s) with direct and indirect (volatile) effects, a new Petri-dish-based in vitro disease assay system with four compartments was developed. The screening assay showed that capsaicin, fisetin hydrate, jaceosidin, and farnesiferol A reduced the disease severity significantly in tobacco. Of these four compounds, capsaicin and jaceosidin induced resistance against Pcc and Pst, which depended on both salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling, using Arabidopsis transgenic and mutant lines, including npr1 and NahG for SA signaling and jar1 for JA signaling. The upregulation of the PR2 and PDF1.2 genes after Pst challenge with capsaicin pre-treatment indicated that SA and JA signaling were primed. These results demonstrate that capsaicin and jaceosidin can be effective triggers of strong induced resistance against both necrotrophic and biotrophic plant pathogens.

  14. Biogenetic studies in Syringa vulgaris L.: synthesis and bioconversion of deuterium-labeled precursors into lilac aldehydes and lilac alcohols.

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    Kreck, Mirjam; Püschel, Susen; Wüst, Matthias; Mosandl, Armin

    2003-01-15

    Syringa vulgaris L. inflorescences were fed with aqueous solutions of regioselectively deuterated compounds assumed to be precursors of lilac aldehyde and lilac alcohol, respectively. Volatiles were extracted by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and analyzed using enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (enantio-MDGC/MS); deuterium-labeled lilac aldehydes and lilac alcohols were separated from unlabeled stereoisomers on a fused silica capillary column, coated with heptakis(2,3-di-O-methyl-6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (DIME-beta-CD) (30%) in SE 52 (70%), as the chiral stationary phase. Feeding experiments with [5,5-(2)H(2)]mevalonic acid lactone 22 and [5,5-(2)H(2)]deoxy-d-xylose 23 indicate that the novel mevalonate independent 1-deoxy-d-xylose 5-phosphate/2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway is the dominant metabolic route for biosynthesis in lilac flowers. Additionally, bioconversion of deuterium-labeled d(5)-(R/S)-linalool 3, d(6)-(R)-linalool 21, d(5)-(R/S)-8-hydroxylinalool 6, d(5)-(R/S)-8-oxolinalool 7, d(5)-lilac aldehydes 8-11 and d(5)-lilac alcohols 12-15 into lilac during in vivo feeding experiments was investigated and the metabolic pathway is discussed. Incubation of petals with an aqueous solution of deuterated d(5)-(R/S)-linalool 3 indicates an autonomic terpene biosynthesis of lilac flavor compounds in the flower petals of lilac.

  15. Fabrication and Optimization of ChE/ChO/HRP-AuNPs/c-MWCNTs Based Silver Electrode for Determining Total Cholesterol in Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Kusum; Dhull, Vikas; Hooda, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    The developed method used three enzymes comprised of cholesterol esterase, cholesterol oxidase, and peroxidase for fabrication of amperometric biosensor in order to determine total cholesterol in serum samples. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (cMWCNTs) were used to design core of working electrode, having covalently immobilized ChO, ChE, and HRP. Polyacrylamide layer was finally coated on working electrode in order to prevent enzyme leaching. Chemically synthesised Au nanoparticles were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for analysing the shape and size of the particles. Working electrode was subjected to FTIR and XRD. The combined action of AuNP and c-MWCNT showed enhancement in electrocatalytic activity at a very low potential of 0.27 V. The pH 7, temperature 40°C, and response time of 20 seconds, respectively, were observed. The biosensor shows a broad linear range from 0.5 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL (0.01 mM-5.83 mM) with minimum detection limit being 0.5 mg/dL (0.01 mM). The biosensor showed reusability of more than 45 times and was stable for 60 days. The biosensor was successfully tested for determining total cholesterol in serum samples amperometrically with no significant interference by serum components.

  16. Fabrication and Optimization of ChE/ChO/HRP-AuNPs/c-MWCNTs Based Silver Electrode for Determining Total Cholesterol in Serum

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    Kusum Lata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed method used three enzymes comprised of cholesterol esterase, cholesterol oxidase, and peroxidase for fabrication of amperometric biosensor in order to determine total cholesterol in serum samples. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs and carboxylated multiwall carbon nanotubes (cMWCNTs were used to design core of working electrode, having covalently immobilized ChO, ChE, and HRP. Polyacrylamide layer was finally coated on working electrode in order to prevent enzyme leaching. Chemically synthesised Au nanoparticles were subjected to transmission electron microscopy (TEM for analysing the shape and size of the particles. Working electrode was subjected to FTIR and XRD. The combined action of AuNP and c-MWCNT showed enhancement in electrocatalytic activity at a very low potential of 0.27 V. The pH 7, temperature 40°C, and response time of 20 seconds, respectively, were observed. The biosensor shows a broad linear range from 0.5 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL (0.01 mM–5.83 mM with minimum detection limit being 0.5 mg/dL (0.01 mM. The biosensor showed reusability of more than 45 times and was stable for 60 days. The biosensor was successfully tested for determining total cholesterol in serum samples amperometrically with no significant interference by serum components.

  17. The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpt2 functions downstream or independently of SA to promote virulence on Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongying; Kloek, Andrew P; Cuzick, Alayne; Moeder, Wolfgang; Tang, Dingzhong; Innes, Roger W; Klessig, Daniel F; McDowell, John M; Kunkel, Barbara N

    2004-02-01

    AvrRpt2, a Pseudomonas syringae type III effector protein, functions from inside plant cells to promote the virulence of P. syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (PstDC3000) on Arabidopsis thaliana plants lacking a functional copy of the corresponding RPS2 resistance gene. In this study, we extended our understanding of AvrRpt2 virulence activity by exploring the hypothesis that AvrRpt2 promotes PstDC3000 virulence by suppressing plant defenses. When delivered by PstDC3000, AvrRpt2 suppresses pathogen-related (PR) gene expression during infection, suggesting that AvrRpt2 suppresses defenses mediated by salicylic acid (SA). However, AvrRpt2 promotes PstDC3000 growth on transgenic plants expressing the SA-degrading enzyme NahG, indicating that AvrRpt2 does not promote bacterial virulence by modulating SA levels during infection. AvrRpt2 general virulence activity does not depend on the RPM1 resistance gene, as mutations in RPM1 had no effect on AvrRpt2-induced phenotypes. Transgenic plants expressing AvrRpt2 displayed enhanced susceptibility to PstDC3000 strains defective in type III secretion, indicating that enhanced susceptibility of these plants is not because of suppression of defense responses elicited by other type III effectors. Additionally, avrRpt2 transgenic plants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to Peronospora parasitica and Erysiphe cichoracearum, suggesting that AvrRpt2 virulence activity is specific to P. syringae.

  18. Integration Host Factor (IHF binds to the promoter region of the phtD operon involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121

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    Álvarez-Morales Ariel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causal agent of halo blight disease in beans, produces a toxin known as phaseolotoxin, in whose synthesis participate a group of genes organized within the genome in a region known as the "Pht cluster". This region, which is thought to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer, includes 5 transcriptional units, two monocistronic (argK, phtL and three polycistronic (phtA, phtD, phtM, whose expression is temperature dependent. So far, the regulatory mechanisms involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis have not been elucidated and the only well-established fact is the requirement of low temperatures for its synthesis. In this work, we searched for regulatory proteins that could be involved in phaseolotoxin synthesis, focusing on the regulation of the phtD operon. Results In this study we identified the global regulator IHF (Integration Host Factor, which binds to the promoter region of the phtD operon, exerting a negative effect on the expression of this operon. This is the first regulatory protein identified as part of the phaseolotoxin synthesis system. Our findings suggest that the Pht cluster was similarly regulated in the ancestral cluster by IHF or similar protein, and integrated into the global regulatory mechanism of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola, after the horizontal gene transfer event by using the host IHF protein. Conclusion This study identifies the IHF protein as one element involved in the regulation of phaseolotoxin synthesis in P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 and provides new insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in phaseolotoxin production.

  19. Impaired Chloroplast Biogenesis in Immutans, an Arabidopsis Variegation Mutant, Modifies Developmental Programming, Cell Wall Composition and Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

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    Gennady V Pogorelko

    Full Text Available The immutans (im variegation mutation of Arabidopsis has green- and white- sectored leaves due to action of a nuclear recessive gene. IM codes for PTOX, a plastoquinol oxidase in plastid membranes. Previous studies have revealed that the green and white sectors develop into sources (green tissues and sinks (white tissues early in leaf development. In this report we focus on white sectors, and show that their transformation into effective sinks involves a sharp reduction in plastid number and size. Despite these reductions, cells in the white sectors have near-normal amounts of plastid RNA and protein, and surprisingly, a marked amplification of chloroplast DNA. The maintenance of protein synthesis capacity in the white sectors might poise plastids for their development into other plastid types. The green and white im sectors have different cell wall compositions: whereas cell walls in the green sectors resemble those in wild type, cell walls in the white sectors have reduced lignin and cellulose microfibrils, as well as alterations in galactomannans and the decoration of xyloglucan. These changes promote susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Enhanced susceptibility can also be explained by repressed expression of some, but not all, defense genes. We suggest that differences in morphology, physiology and biochemistry between the green and white sectors is caused by a reprogramming of leaf development that is coordinated, in part, by mechanisms of retrograde (plastid-to-nucleus signaling, perhaps mediated by ROS. We conclude that variegation mutants offer a novel system to study leaf developmental programming, cell wall metabolism and host-pathogen interactions.

  20. The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato is genetically monomorphic and under strong selection to evade tomato immunity.

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    Rongman Cai

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, genome sequencing of many isolates of genetically monomorphic bacterial human pathogens has given new insights into pathogen microevolution and phylogeography. Here, we report a genome-based micro-evolutionary study of a bacterial plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only 267 mutations were identified between five sequenced isolates in 3,543,009 nt of analyzed genome sequence, which suggests a recent evolutionary origin of this pathogen. Further analysis with genome-derived markers of 89 world-wide isolates showed that several genotypes exist in North America and in Europe indicating frequent pathogen movement between these world regions. Genome-derived markers and molecular analyses of key pathogen loci important for virulence and motility both suggest ongoing adaptation to the tomato host. A mutational hotspot was found in the type III-secreted effector gene hopM1. These mutations abolish the cell death triggering activity of the full-length protein indicating strong selection for loss of function of this effector, which was previously considered a virulence factor. Two non-synonymous mutations in the flagellin-encoding gene fliC allowed identifying a new microbe associated molecular pattern (MAMP in a region distinct from the known MAMP flg22. Interestingly, the ancestral allele of this MAMP induces a stronger tomato immune response than the derived alleles. The ancestral allele has largely disappeared from today's Pto populations suggesting that flagellin-triggered immunity limits pathogen fitness even in highly virulent pathogens. An additional non-synonymous mutation was identified in flg22 in South American isolates. Therefore, MAMPs are more variable than expected differing even between otherwise almost identical isolates of the same pathogen strain.

  1. Modeling and mapping the current and future distribution of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae under climate change in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rulin; Li, Qing; He, Shisong; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Mingtian; Jiang, Gan

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial canker of kiwifruit caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa) is a major threat to the kiwifruit industry throughout the world and accounts for substantial economic losses in China. The aim of the present study was to test and explore the possibility of using MaxEnt (maximum entropy models) to predict and analyze the future large-scale distribution of Psa in China. Based on the current environmental factors, three future climate scenarios, which were suggested by the fifth IPCC report, and the current distribution sites of Psa, MaxEnt combined with ArcGIS was applied to predict the potential suitable areas and the changing trend of Psa in China. The jackknife test and correlation analysis were used to choose dominant climatic factors. The receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) drawn by MaxEnt was used to evaluate the accuracy of the simulation. The results showed that under current climatic conditions, the area from latitude 25° to 36°N and from longitude 101° to 122°E is the primary potential suitable area of Psa in China. The highly suitable area (with suitability between 66 and 100) was mainly concentrated in Northeast Sichuan, South Shaanxi, most of Chongqing, West Hubei and Southwest Gansu and occupied 4.94% of land in China. Under different future emission scenarios, both the areas and the centers of the suitable areas all showed differences compared with the current situation. Four climatic variables, i.e., maximum April temperature (19%), mean temperature of the coldest quarter (14%), precipitation in May (11.5%) and minimum temperature in October (10.8%), had the largest impact on the distribution of Psa. The MaxEnt model is potentially useful for forecasting the future adaptive distribution of Psa under climate change, and it provides important guidance for comprehensive management.

  2. Arabidopsis HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER protein methylates a glucosinolate breakdown product and functions in resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatoshi, Yukari; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2009-07-17

    Almost all of the chlorine-containing gas emitted from natural sources is methyl chloride (CH(3)Cl), which contributes to the destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer. Tropical and subtropical plants emit substantial amounts of CH(3)Cl. A gene involved in CH(3)Cl emission from Arabidopsis was previously identified and designated HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER (hereafter AtHOL1) based on the mutant phenotype. Our previous studies demonstrated that AtHOL1 and its homologs, AtHOL2 and AtHOL3, have S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase activities. However, the physiological functions of AtHOLs have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, our comparative kinetic analyses with possible physiological substrates indicated that all of the AtHOLs have low activities toward chloride. AtHOL1 was highly reactive to thiocyanate (NCS(-)), a pseudohalide, synthesizing methylthiocyanate (CH(3)SCN) with a very high k(cat)/K(m) value. We demonstrated in vivo that substantial amounts of NCS(-) were synthesized upon tissue damage in Arabidopsis and that NCS(-) was largely derived from myrosinase-mediated hydrolysis of glucosinolates. Analyses with the T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis mutants (hol1, hol2, and hol3) revealed that only hol1 showed increased sensitivity to NCS(-) in medium and a concomitant lack of CH(3)SCN synthesis upon tissue damage. Bacterial growth assays indicated that the conversion of NCS(-) into CH(3)SCN dramatically increased antibacterial activities against Arabidopsis pathogens that normally invade the wound site. Furthermore, hol1 seedlings showed an increased susceptibility toward an Arabidopsis pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. Here we propose that AtHOL1 is involved in glucosinolate metabolism and defense against phytopathogens. Moreover, CH(3)Cl synthesized by AtHOL1 could be considered a byproduct of NCS(-) metabolism.

  3. The levels of nitrite and nitrate, proline and protein profiles in tomato plants infected with pseudomonas syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berber, I.; Onlu, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the contents of nitrite-nitrate and free L-proline, and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in tomato plants following inoculation with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain were examined. The results of the nitrite and nitrate indicated that there was a reduction in the levels of nitrate in the infected tomato plants through 1-8 study days, compared with the healthy plants. On the other hands, when the nitrite amounts increased in the first and second days, the nitrite concentrations reduced in infected plants at subsequent time periods, compared with uninfected plants. The accumulation of free proline increased in the infected plants, according to control plants. The whole-cell protein profiles displayed that the levels of the protein bands of molecular masses 204.6 kDa and 69.9 kDa significantly increased in infected and uninfected plants during 2-10 study days. In additionally, in the quantities of the protein bands of molecular weights 90.3 and 79.4 kDa were observed an increase in the infected and healthy plants after the fourth day. However, the protein band of molecular weight 54.3 kDa was visible only in uninfected plants for the fourth and eighth days. Finally, the study suggest that there were the sophisticate relationships among the proline accumulation, the conversion of nitrate to nitrite and the induction of PR protein genes in the regulation of defense mechanisms toward microbial invaders. Our results also indicated that the increases in nitrite and proline contents might be useful indicator for the response toward pathogen attacks. (author)

  4. Arabidopsis AtERF15 positively regulates immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea

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    Huijuan eZhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Upon pathogen infection, activation of immune response requires effective transcriptional reprogramming that regulates inducible expression of a large set of defense genes. A number of ethylene-responsive factor transcription factors have been shown to play critical roles in regulating immune responses in plants. In the present study, we explored the functions of Arabidopsis AtERF15 in immune responses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000, a (hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen, and Botrytis cinerea, a necrotrophic fungal pathogen. Expression of AtERF15 was induced by infection of Pst DC3000 and B. cinerea and by treatments with salicylic acid (SA and methyl jasmonate. Biochemical assays demonstrated that AtERF15 is a nucleus-localized transcription activator. The AtERF15-overexpressing (AtERF15-OE plants displayed enhanced resistance while the AtERF15-RNAi plants exhibited decreased resistance against Pst DC3000 and B. cinerea. Meanwhile, Pst DC3000- or B. cinerea-induced expression of defense genes was upregulated in AtERF15-OE plants but downregulated in AtERF15-RNAi plants, as compared to the expression in wild type plants. In response to infection with B. cinerea, the AtERF15-OE plants accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS while the AtERF15-RNAi plants accumulated more ROS. The flg22- and chitin-induced oxidative burst was abolished and expression levels of the pattern-triggered immunity-responsive genes AtFRK1 and AtWRKY53 were suppressed in AtER15-RNAi plants upon treatment with flg22 or chitin. Furthermore, SA-induced defense response was also partially impaired in the AtERF15-RNAi plants. These data demonstrate that AtERF15 is a positive regulator of multiple layers of the immune responses in Arabidopsis.

  5. Allelic variation in two distinct Pseudomonas syringae flagellin epitopes modulates the strength of plant immune responses but not bacterial motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christopher R.; Chinchilla, Delphine; Hind, Sarah R.; Taguchi, Fumiko; Miki, Ryuji; Ichinose, Yuki; Martin, Gregory B.; Leman, Scotland; Felix, Georg; Vinatzer, Boris A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The bacterial flagellin (FliC) epitopes flg22 and flgII-28 are microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). While flg22 is recognized by many plant species via the pattern recognition receptor FLS2, neither the flgII-28 receptor nor the extent of flgII-28 recognition by different plant families is known.Here we tested the significance of flgII-28 as a MAMP and the importance of allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 in plant–pathogen interactions using purified peptides and a Pseudomonas syringae ΔfliC mutant complemented with different fliC alleles.Plant genotype and allelic diversity in flg22 and flgII-28 were found to significantly affect the plant immune response but not bacterial motility. Recognition of flgII-28 is restricted to a number of Solanaceous species. While the flgII-28 peptide does not trigger any immune response in Arabidopsis, mutations in both flg22 and flgII-28 have FLS2-dependent effects on virulence. However, expression of a tomato allele of FLS2 does not confer to Nicotiana benthamiana the ability to detect flgII-28 and tomato plants silenced for FLS2 are not altered in flgII-28 recognition.Therefore, MAMP diversification is an effective pathogen virulence strategy and flgII-28 appears to be perceived by a yet unidentified receptor in the Solanaceae although it has an FLS2-dependent virulence effect in Arabidopsis. PMID:23865782

  6. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of chalcone synthase from Syringa oblata Lindl. in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Dou, Ying; Wang, Rui; Guan, Xuelian; Hu, Zenghui; Zheng, Jian

    2017-11-30

    The flower color of Syringa oblata Lindl., which is often modulated by the flavonoid content, varies and is an important ornamental feature. Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first key step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. However, little is known about the role of S. oblata CHS (SoCHS) in flavonoid biosynthesis in this species. Here, we isolate and analyze the cDNA (SoCHS1) that encodes CHS in S. oblata. We also sought to analyzed the molecular characteristics and function of flavonoid metabolism by SoCHS1. We successfully isolated the CHS-encoding genomic DNA (gDNA) in S. oblata (SoCHS1), and the gene structural analysis indicated it had no intron. The opening reading frame (ORF) sequence of SoCHS1 was 1170bp long and encoded a 389-amino acid polypeptide. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were in the deduced amino acid sequence of SoCHS1. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the protein structure of SoCHS1 is highly similar to that of FnCHS1 in Freesia hybrida. The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed to detect the SoCHS1 transcript expression levels in flowers, and other tissues revealed the expression was significantly correlated with anthocyanin accumulation during flower development. The ectopic expression results of Nicotiana tabacum showed that SoCHS1 overexpression in transgenic tobacco changed the flower color from pale pink to pink. In conclusion, these results suggest that SoCHS1 plays an essential role in flavonoid biosynthesis in S. oblata, and could be used to modify flavonoid components in other plant species. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Protection of Arabidopsis thaliana against leaf-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae by Sphingomonas strains in a controlled model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innerebner, Gerd; Knief, Claudia; Vorholt, Julia A

    2011-05-01

    Diverse bacterial taxa live in association with plants without causing deleterious effects. Previous analyses of phyllosphere communities revealed the predominance of few bacterial genera on healthy dicotyl plants, provoking the question of whether these commensals play a particular role in plant protection. Here, we tested two of them, Methylobacterium and Sphingomonas, with respect to their ability to diminish disease symptom formation and the proliferation of the foliar plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 on Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants were grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the absence or presence of the potential antagonists and then challenged with the pathogen. No effect of Methylobacterium strains on disease development was observed. However, members of the genus Sphingomonas showed a striking plant-protective effect by suppressing disease symptoms and diminishing pathogen growth. A survey of different Sphingomonas strains revealed that most plant isolates protected A. thaliana plants from developing severe disease symptoms. This was not true for Sphingomonas strains isolated from air, dust, or water, even when they reached cell densities in the phyllosphere comparable to those of the plant isolates. This suggests that plant protection is common among plant-colonizing Sphingomonas spp. but is not a general trait conserved within the genus Sphingomonas. The carbon source profiling of representative isolates revealed differences between protecting and nonprotecting strains, suggesting that substrate competition plays a role in plant protection by Sphingomonas. However, other mechanisms cannot be excluded at this time. In conclusion, the ability to protect plants as shown here in a model system may be an unexplored, common trait of indigenous Sphingomonas spp. and may be of relevance under natural conditions.

  8. Genomic analysis of the Kiwifruit pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae provides insight into the origins of an emergent plant disease.

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    Honour C McCann

    Full Text Available The origins of crop diseases are linked to domestication of plants. Most crops were domesticated centuries--even millennia--ago, thus limiting opportunity to understand the concomitant emergence of disease. Kiwifruit (Actinidia spp. is an exception: domestication began in the 1930s with outbreaks of canker disease caused by P. syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa first recorded in the 1980s. Based on SNP analyses of two circularized and 34 draft genomes, we show that Psa is comprised of distinct clades exhibiting negligible within-clade diversity, consistent with disease arising by independent samplings from a source population. Three clades correspond to their geographical source of isolation; a fourth, encompassing the Psa-V lineage responsible for the 2008 outbreak, is now globally distributed. Psa has an overall clonal population structure, however, genomes carry a marked signature of within-pathovar recombination. SNP analysis of Psa-V reveals hundreds of polymorphisms; however, most reside within PPHGI-1-like conjugative elements whose evolution is unlinked to the core genome. Removal of SNPs due to recombination yields an uninformative (star-like phylogeny consistent with diversification of Psa-V from a single clone within the last ten years. Growth assays provide evidence of cultivar specificity, with rapid systemic movement of Psa-V in Actinidia chinensis. Genomic comparisons show a dynamic genome with evidence of positive selection on type III effectors and other candidate virulence genes. Each clade has highly varied complements of accessory genes encoding effectors and toxins with evidence of gain and loss via multiple genetic routes. Genes with orthologs in vascular pathogens were found exclusively within Psa-V. Our analyses capture a pathogen in the early stages of emergence from a predicted source population associated with wild Actinidia species. In addition to candidate genes as targets for resistance breeding programs, our findings

  9. Genome-Scale Co-Expression Network Comparison across Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Reveals Significant Conservation at the Regulon Level of Local Regulators Despite Their Dissimilar Lifestyles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrineh, Peyman; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Hosseinkhan, Nazanin; Narimani, Zahra; Marchal, Kathleen; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Availability of genome-wide gene expression datasets provides the opportunity to study gene expression across different organisms under a plethora of experimental conditions. In our previous work, we developed an algorithm called COMODO (COnserved MODules across Organisms) that identifies conserved expression modules between two species. In the present study, we expanded COMODO to detect the co-expression conservation across three organisms by adapting the statistics behind it. We applied COMODO to study expression conservation/divergence between Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Bacillus subtilis. We observed that some parts of the regulatory interaction networks were conserved between E. coli and S. enterica especially in the regulon of local regulators. However, such conservation was not observed between the regulatory interaction networks of B. subtilis and the two other species. We found co-expression conservation on a number of genes involved in quorum sensing, but almost no conservation for genes involved in pathogenicity across E. coli and S. enterica which could partially explain their different lifestyles. We concluded that despite their different lifestyles, no significant rewiring have occurred at the level of local regulons involved for instance, and notable conservation can be detected in signaling pathways and stress sensing in the phylogenetically close species S. enterica and E. coli. Moreover, conservation of local regulons seems to depend on the evolutionary time of divergence across species disappearing at larger distances as shown by the comparison with B. subtilis. Global regulons follow a different trend and show major rewiring even at the limited evolutionary distance that separates E. coli and S. enterica. PMID:25101984

  10. HRP2 and pLDH-Based Rapid Diagnostic Tests, Expert Microscopy, and PCR for Detection of Malaria Infection during Pregnancy and at Delivery in Areas of Varied Transmission: A Prospective Cohort Study in Burkina Faso and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Jane; Angutoko, Patrick; Ategeka, John; Compaoré, Yves-Daniel; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Somé, Fabrice A.; Ouattara, Aminata; Rouamba, Noél; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Hopkins, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Background Intermittent screening and treatment (IST) of malaria during pregnancy has been proposed as an alternative to intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy (IPTp), where IPTp is failing due to drug resistance. However, the antenatal parasitaemias are frequently very low, and the most appropriate screening test for IST has not been defined. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a multi-center prospective study of 990 HIV-uninfected women attending ANC in two different malaria transmission settings at Tororo District Hospital, eastern Uganda and Colsama Health Center in western Burkina Faso. Women were enrolled in the study in the second or third trimester of pregnancy and followed to delivery, generating 2,597 blood samples for analysis. Screening tests included rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) targeting histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) and parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) and microscopy, compared to nPCR as a reference standard. At enrolment, the proportion of pregnant women who were positive for P. falciparum by HRP2/pan pLDH RDT, Pf pLDH/pan pLDH RDT, microscopy and PCR was 38%, 29%, 36% and 44% in Uganda and 21%, 16%, 15% and 35% in Burkina Faso, respectively. All test positivity rates declined during follow-up. In comparison to PCR, the sensitivity of the HRP2/pan pLDH RDT, Pf pLDH/pan pLDH RDT and microscopy was 75.7%, 60.1% and 69.7% in Uganda, 55.8%, 42.6% and 55.8% in Burkina Faso respectively for all antenatal visits. Specificity was greater than 96% for all three tests. Comparison of accuracy using generalized estimating equation revealed that the HRP2- detecting RDT was the most accurate test in both settings. Conclusions/Significance The study suggests that HRP2-based RDTs are the most appropriate point-of-care test currently available for use during pregnancy especially for symptomatic women, but will still miss some PCR-positive women. The clinical significance of these very low density infections needs to be better defined. PMID

  11. Direct comparison of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests in Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Tyner, Stuart D; Lon, Chanthap; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Ruttvisutinunt, Wiriya; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Sai-gnam, Piyaporn; Johnson, Jacob D; Walsh, Douglas S; Saunders, David L; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2013-07-12

    Performance of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR Green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests were directly compared using Plasmodium falciparum reference strains and fresh ex vivo isolates from Cambodia against a panel of standard anti-malarials. The objective was to determine which of these two common assays is more appropriate for studying drug susceptibility of "immediate ex vivo" (IEV) isolates, analysed without culture adaption, in a region of relatively low malaria transmission. Using the HRP-2 and MSF methods, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against a panel of malaria drugs were determined for P. falciparum reference clones (W2, D6, 3D7 and K1) and 41 IEV clinical isolates from an area of multidrug resistance in Cambodia. Comparison of the IC50 values from the two methods was made using Wilcoxon matched pair tests and Pearson's correlation. The lower limit of parasitaemia detection for both methods was determined for reference clones and IEV isolates. Since human white blood cell (WBC) DNA in clinical samples is known to reduce MSF assay sensitivity, SYBR Green I fluorescence linearity of P. falciparum samples spiked with WBCs was evaluated to assess the relative degree to which MSF sensitivity is reduced in clinical samples. IC50 values correlated well between the HRP-2 and MSF methods when testing either P. falciparum reference clones or IEV isolates against 4-aminoquinolines (chloroquine, piperaquine and quinine) and the quinoline methanol mefloquine (Pearson r = 0.85-0.99 for reference clones and 0.56-0.84 for IEV isolates), whereas a weaker IC50 value correlation between methods was noted when testing artemisinins against reference clones and lack of correlation when testing IEV isolates. The HRP-2 ELISA produced a higher overall success rate (90% for producing IC50 best-fit sigmoidal curves), relative to only a 40% success rate for the MSF assay, when evaluating ex

  12. Early changes in apoplast composition associated with defence and disease in interactions between Phaseolus vulgaris and the halo blight pathogen Pseudomonas syringae Pv. phaseolicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Brendan M; Neale, Helen C; Geilfus, Christoph-Martin; Jackson, Robert W; Arnold, Dawn L; Preston, Gail M

    2016-10-01

    The apoplast is the arena in which endophytic pathogens such as Pseudomonas syringae grow and interact with plant cells. Using metabolomic and ion analysis techniques, this study shows how the composition of Phaseolus vulgaris leaf apoplastic fluid changes during the first six hours of compatible and incompatible interactions with two strains of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) that differ in the presence of the genomic island PPHGI-1. Leaf inoculation with the avirulent island-carrying strain Pph 1302A elicited effector-triggered immunity (ETI) and resulted in specific changes in apoplast composition, including increases in conductivity, pH, citrate, γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and K(+) , that are linked to the onset of plant defence responses. Other apoplastic changes, including increases in Ca(2+) , Fe(2/3+) Mg(2+) , sucrose, β-cyanoalanine and several amino acids, occurred to a relatively similar extent in interactions with both Pph 1302A and the virulent, island-less strain Pph RJ3. Metabolic footprinting experiments established that Pph preferentially metabolizes malate, glucose and glutamate, but excludes certain other abundant apoplastic metabolites, including citrate and GABA, until preferred metabolites are depleted. These results demonstrate that Pph is well-adapted to the leaf apoplast metabolic environment and that loss of PPHGI-1 enables Pph to avoid changes in apoplast composition linked to plant defences. © 2016 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Media pH and media type can significantly affect the reliability of in vitro copper-tolerance assessments of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Karina; Brown, Philip; Gambley, Cherie

    2018-03-07

    There are inconsistencies with in vitro copper-tolerance screening methodology for Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in the current literature, particularly in relation to the appropriate medium to use, copper-tolerance thresholds and reporting medium pH and/or pH adjustment steps. This study investigates the effect of medium and pH on copper-tolerance results, including the potential use of 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer to stabilise media pH. Copper-tolerance methodology was investigated through in vitro and in vivo testing of P. syringae pv. tomato. Four different media were tested, Nutrient Agar (NA), Casitone Yeast Extract Glycerol Agar (CYEG), King's B medium (KB) and Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA). Highly variable copper-tolerance profiles were observed for different isolates on the media tested. A pH range of 5.8-7.0 produced consistent copper-tolerance data; outside of this range the data was unreliable. Addition of MES to media, buffered the pH to within the acceptable levels. Copper-tolerance thresholds with different media can vary significantly and the lowering effect of copper sulfate on media pH must be considered in media preparation. Methodology presented in the study can be extrapolated to copper-tolerance testing for other pathogenic plant bacteria, particularly other pseudomonads. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Eggplant and related species are promising genetic resources to dissect the plant immune response to Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and to identify new resistance determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christopher R; Hayes, Byron W; Runde, Brendan J; Wicker, Emmanuel; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2014-10-01

    The apparent lack of durability of many resistance (R) genes highlights the need for the constant identification of new genetic sources of resistance for the breeding of new disease-resistant crop cultivars. To this end, we screened a collection of accessions of eggplant and close relatives for resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xeu), foliar plant pathogens of many solanaceous crops. Both pathogens caused substantial disease on most genotypes of eggplant and its relatives. Promisingly, however, some of the genotypes were fully or partially resistant to either of the pathogens, suggesting the presence of effective resistance determinants in these genotypes. Segregation of resistance to the growth of Xeu following infiltration in F2 progeny from a cross of a resistant and susceptible genotype suggests that resistance to Xeu is inherited as a multigenic trait. With regard to Pto, a mutant strain lacking all 28 functional type III secreted effectors, and a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain expressing a P. syringae type III secretion system (T3SS), both elicit a strong cell death response on most eggplant lines. Several genotypes thus appear to harbour a mechanism for the direct recognition of a component of the T3SS. Therefore, eggplant and its close relatives are promising resources to unravel novel aspects of plant immunity and to identify new candidate R genes that could be employed in other Solanaceae in which Xeu and Pto cause agriculturally relevant diseases. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  15. Constitutive activation of jasmonate signaling in an Arabidopsis mutant correlates with enhanced resistance to Erysiphe cichoracearum, Pseudomonas syringae, and Myzus persicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Christine; Karafyllidis, Ioannis; Turner, John G

    2002-10-01

    In Arabidopsis spp., the jasmonate (JA) response pathway generally is required for defenses against necrotrophic pathogens and chewing insects, while the salicylic acid (SA) response pathway is generally required for specific, resistance (R) gene-mediated defenses against both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. For example, SA-dependent defenses are required for resistance to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum UCSC1 and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and also are expressed during response to the green peach aphid Myzus persicae. However, recent evidence indicates that the expression of JA-dependent defenses also may confer resistance to E. cichoracearum. To confirm and to extend this observation, we have compared the disease and pest resistance of wild-type Arabidopsis plants with that of the mutants coil, which is insensitive to JA, and cev1, which has constitutive JA signaling. Measurements of the colonization of these plants by E. cichoracearum, P. syringae pv. maculicola, and M. persicae indicated that activation of the JA signal pathway enhanced resistance, and was associated with the activation of JA-dependent defense genes and the suppression of SA-dependent defense genes. We conclude that JA and SA induce alternative defense pathways that can confer resistance to the same pathogens and pests.

  16. NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C plays a role in nonhost disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pathogens by regulating chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ishiga

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts are cytoplasmic organelles for photosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. In addition, recent studies have shown that chloroplasts have a critical role in plant innate immunity against invading pathogens. Hydrogen peroxide is a toxic by-product from photosynthesis, which also functions as a signaling compound in plant innate immunity. Therefore, it is important to regulate the level of hydrogen peroxide in response to pathogens. Chloroplasts maintain components of the redox detoxification system including enzymes such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, and NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC. However, the significance of 2-Cys Prxs and NTRC in the molecular basis of nonhost disease resistance is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of Prxs and NTRC using knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis in response to nonhost Pseudomonas syringae pathogens. Plants lacking functional NTRC showed localized cell death (LCD accompanied by the elevated accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in response to nonhost pathogens. Interestingly, the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant showed enhanced bacterial growth and disease susceptibility of nonhost pathogens. Furthermore, the expression profiles of the salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA-mediated signaling pathways and phytohormone analyses including SA and JA revealed that the Arabidopsis ntrc mutant shows elevated JA-mediated signaling pathways in response to nonhost pathogen. These results suggest the critical role of NTRC in plant innate immunity against nonhost P. syringae pathogens.

  17. Arabidopsis GH3-LIKE DEFENSE GENE 1 is required for accumulation of salicylic acid, activation of defense responses and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeeswaran, Guru; Raina, Surabhi; Acharya, Biswa R; Maqbool, Shahina B; Mosher, Stephen L; Appel, Heidi M; Schultz, Jack C; Klessig, Daniel F; Raina, Ramesh

    2007-07-01

    In Arabidopsis, the GH3-like gene family consists of 19 members, several of which have been shown to adenylate the plant hormones jasmonic acid, indole acetic acid and salicylic acid (SA). In some cases, this adenylation has been shown to catalyze hormone conjugation to amino acids. Here we report molecular characterization of the GH3-LIKE DEFENSE GENE 1 (GDG1), a member of the GH3-like gene family, and show that GDG1 is an important component of SA-mediated defense against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Expression of GDG1 is induced earlier and to a higher level in response to avirulent pathogens compared to virulent pathogens. gdg1 null mutants are compromised in several pathogen defense responses, including activation of defense genes and resistance against virulent and avirulent bacterial pathogens. Accumulation of free and glucoside-conjugated SA (SAG) in response to pathogen infection is compromised in gdg1 mutants. All defense-related phenotypes of gdg1 can be rescued by external application of SA, suggesting that gdg1 mutants are defective in the SA-mediated defense pathway(s) and that GDG1 functions upstream of SA. Our results suggest that GDG1 contributes to both basal and resistance gene-mediated inducible defenses against P. syringae (and possibly other pathogens) by playing a critical role in regulating the levels of pathogen-inducible SA. GDG1 is allelic to the PBS3 (avrPphB susceptible) gene.

  18. Induction of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 MexAB-OprM multidrug efflux pump by flavonoids is mediated by the repressor PmeR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Paola; Felipe, Antonia; Michán, Carmen; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the expression of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 mexAB-oprM efflux pump operon and of the regulatory gene pmeR, and we have investigated the role of the PmeR protein on transcription from both promoters. We demonstrate that mexAB-oprM and pmeR are expressed in vivo at a relatively high and moderate basal level, respectively, which, in both cases, increases in the presence of different flavonoids and other compounds, such as butyl and methylparaben. We show that PmeR is the local repressor of the mexAB-oprM promoter and is able to regulate its own expression. The mechanism for this regulation includes binding to a pseudopalindromic operator site which overlaps both mexAB-oprM and pmeR promoters. We have also proven that flavonoids are able to interact with PmeR and induce a conformational change that interferes with the DNA binding ability of PmeR, thereby modulating mexAB-oprM and pmeR expression. Finally, we demonstrate by in vivo experiments that the PmeR/MexAB-OprM system contributes to the colonization of tomato plants. These results provide new insight into a transcriptional regulator and a transport system that play essential roles in the ability of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 to resist the action of flavonoids produced by the host.

  19. The organization of the fuc regulon specifying L-fucose dissimilation in Escherichia coli K12 as determined by gene cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y M; Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1987-12-01

    In Escherichia coli the six known genes specifying the utilization of L-fucose as carbon and energy source cluster at 60.2 min and constitute a regulon. These genes include fucP (encoding L-fucose permease), fucI (encoding L-fucose isomerase), fucK (encoding L-fuculose kinase), fucA (encoding L-fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase), fucO (encoding L-1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase), and fucR (encoding the regulatory protein). In this study the fuc genes were cloned and their positions on the chromosome were established by restriction endonuclease and complementation analyses. Clockwise, the gene order is: fucO-fucA-fucP-fucI-fucK-fucR. The operons comprising the structural genes and the direction of transcription were determined by complementation analysis and Southern blot hybridization. The fucPIK and fucA operons are transcribed clockwise. The fucO operon is transcribed counterclockwise. The fucR gene product activates the three structural operons in trans.

  20. An insight into the photodynamic approach versus copper formulations in the control of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae in kiwi plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Vânia; Martins, Diana; Branco, Tatiana; Valério, Nádia; Neves, Maria G P M S; Faustino, Maria A F; Reis, Luís; Barreal, Esther; Gallego, Pedro P; Almeida, Adelaide

    2018-02-14

    In the last decade, the worldwide production of kiwi fruit has been highly affected by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), a phytopathogenic bacterium; this has led to severe economic losses that are seriously affecting the kiwi fruit trade. The available treatments for this disease are still scarce, with the most common involving frequently spraying the orchards with copper derivatives, in particular cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O). However, these copper formulations should be avoided due to their high toxicity; therefore, it is essential to search for new approaches for controlling Psa. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) may be an alternative approach to inactivate Psa. aPDT consists in the use of a photosensitizer molecule (PS) that absorbs light and by transference of the excess of energy or electrons to molecular oxygen forms highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can affect different molecular targets, thus being very unlikely to lead to the development of microbe resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of aPDT to photoinactivate Psa, using the porphyrin Tetra-Py + -Me and different light intensities. The degree of inactivation of Psa was assessed using the PS at 5.0 μM under low irradiance (4.0 mW cm -2 ). Afterward, ex vivo experiments, using artificially contaminated kiwi leaves, were conducted with a PS at 50 μM under 150 mW cm -2 and sunlight irradiation. A reduction of 6 log in the in vitro assays after 90 min of irradiation was observed. In the ex vivo tests, the decrease was lower, approximately 1.8 log reduction at an irradiance of 150 mW cm -2 , 1.2 log at 4.0 mW cm -2 , and 1.5 log under solar radiation. However, after three successive cycles of treatment under 150 mW cm -2 , a 4 log inactivation was achieved. No negative effects were observed on leaves after treatment. Assays using Cu 2 O were also performed at the recommended concentration by law (50 g h L -1 ) and at concentrations 10 times

  1. A genetic screen reveals Arabidopsis stomatal and/or apoplastic defenses against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

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    Weiqing Zeng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of plants often begins with colonization of the plant surface, followed by entry into the plant through wounds and natural openings (such as stomata, multiplication in the intercellular space (apoplast of the infected tissues, and dissemination of bacteria to other plants. Historically, most studies assess bacterial infection based on final outcomes of disease and/or pathogen growth using whole infected tissues; few studies have genetically distinguished the contribution of different host cell types in response to an infection. The phytotoxin coronatine (COR is produced by several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae. COR-deficient mutants of P. s. tomato (Pst DC3000 are severely compromised in virulence, especially when inoculated onto the plant surface. We report here a genetic screen to identify Arabidopsis mutants that could rescue the virulence of COR-deficient mutant bacteria. Among the susceptible to coronatine-deficient Pst DC3000 (scord mutants were two that were defective in stomatal closure response, two that were defective in apoplast defense, and four that were defective in both stomatal and apoplast defense. Isolation of these three classes of mutants suggests that stomatal and apoplastic defenses are integrated in plants, but are genetically separable, and that COR is important for Pst DC3000 to overcome both stomatal guard cell- and apoplastic mesophyll cell-based defenses. Of the six mutants defective in bacterium-triggered stomatal closure, three are defective in salicylic acid (SA-induced stomatal closure, but exhibit normal stomatal closure in response to abscisic acid (ABA, and scord7 is compromised in both SA- and ABA-induced stomatal closure. We have cloned SCORD3, which is required for salicylic acid (SA biosynthesis, and SCORD5, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein, AtGCN20/AtABCF3, predicted to be involved in stress-associated protein translation control. Identification of SCORD5 begins to

  2. Characterization of the SigD regulon of C. difficile and its positive control of toxin production through the regulation of tcdR.

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    Imane El Meouche

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile intestinal disease is mediated largely by the actions of toxins A (TcdA and B (TcdB, whose production occurs after the initial steps of colonization involving different surface or flagellar proteins. In B. subtilis, the sigma factor SigD controls flagellar synthesis, motility, and vegetative autolysins. A homolog of SigD encoding gene is present in the C.difficile 630 genome. We constructed a sigD mutant in C. difficile 630 ∆erm to analyze the regulon of SigD using a global transcriptomic approach. A total of 103 genes were differentially expressed between the wild-type and the sigD mutant, including genes involved in motility, metabolism and regulation. In addition, the sigD mutant displayed decreased expression of genes involved in flagellar biosynthesis, and also of genes encoding TcdA and TcdB as well as TcdR, the positive regulator of the toxins. Genomic analysis and RACE-PCR experiments allowed us to characterize promoter sequences of direct target genes of SigD including tcdR and to identify the SigD consensus. We then established that SigD positively regulates toxin expression via direct control of tcdR transcription. Interestingly, the overexpression of FlgM, a putative anti-SigD factor, inhibited the positive regulation of motility and toxin synthesis by SigD. Thus, SigD appears to be the first positive regulator of the toxin synthesis in C. difficile.

  3. The cyclic AMP receptor protein, CRP, is required for both virulence and expression of the minimal CRP regulon in Yersinia pestis biovar microtus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lingjun; Han, Yanping; Yang, Lei; Geng, Jing; Li, Yingli; Gao, He; Guo, Zhaobiao; Fan, Wei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a bacterial regulator that controls more than 100 promoters, including those involved in catabolite repression. In the present study, a null deletion of the crp gene was constructed for Yersinia pestis bv. microtus strain 201. Microarray expression analysis disclosed that at least 6% of Y. pestis genes were affected by this mutation. Further reverse transcription-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analyses disclosed a set of 37 genes or putative operons to be the direct targets of CRP, and thus they constitute the minimal CRP regulon in Y. pestis. Subsequent primer extension and DNase I footprinting assays mapped transcriptional start sites, core promoter elements, and CRP binding sites within the DNA regions upstream of pla and pst, revealing positive and direct control of these two laterally acquired plasmid genes by CRP. The crp disruption affected both in vitro and in vivo growth of the mutant and led to a >15,000-fold loss of virulence after subcutaneous infection but a pestis and, particularly, is more important for infection by subcutaneous inoculation. It can further be concluded that the reduced in vivo growth phenotype of the crp mutant should contribute, at least partially, to its attenuation of virulence by both routes of infection. Consistent with a previous study of Y. pestis bv. medievalis, lacZ reporter fusion analysis indicated that the crp deletion resulted in the almost absolute loss of pla promoter activity. The plasminogen activator encoded by pla was previously shown to specifically promote Y. pestis dissemination from peripheral infection routes (subcutaneous infection [flea bite] or inhalation). The above evidence supports the notion that in addition to the reduced in vivo growth phenotype, the defect of pla expression in the crp mutant will greatly contribute to the huge loss of virulence of this mutant strain in subcutaneous infection.

  4. Cationic antimicrobial peptides serve as activation signals for the Salmonella Typhimurium PhoPQ and PmrAB regulons in vitro and in vivo

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    Susan M Richards

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRSs to respond to environmental stimuli. Upon infection, the TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB are activated by environmental signals detected in the lumen of the intestine and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression leads to upregulation of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP resistance. This research expands on previous studies which have shown that CAMPs can activate Salmonella TCRSs in vitro. The focus of this work was to determine if CAMPs can act as environmental signals for PhoPQ- and PmrAB-mediated gene expression in vitro, during infection of macrophages and in a mouse model of infection. Monitoring of PhoPQ and PmrAB activation using RIVET, alkaline phosphtase and β-galactosidase reporter fusion constructs demonstrated that S. Typhimurium PhoQ can sense CAMPs in vitro. In mouse macrophages, the cathelecidin CRAMP does not activate the PhoPQ regulon. Acidification of the Salmonella-containing vacuole activates PhoP- and PmrA-regulated loci but blocking acidification still does not reveal a role for CRAMP in TCRS activation in mouse macrophages. However, assays performed in susceptible wild type (WT, CRAMP knockout (KO and matrilysin (a metalloproteinase necessary for activating murine α-defensins KO mice suggest CRAMP, but not α-defensins, serve as a putative direct TCRS activation signal in the mouse intestine. These studies provide a better understanding of the in vivo environments that result in activation of these virulence-associated TCRSs.

  5. Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, Patrick

    2010-11-25

    Abstract Background Catabolite repression control (CRC) is an important global control system in Pseudomonas that fine tunes metabolism in order optimise growth and metabolism in a range of different environments. The mechanism of CRC in Pseudomonas spp. centres on the binding of a protein, Crc, to an A-rich motif on the 5\\' end of an mRNA resulting in translational down-regulation of target genes. Despite the identification of several Crc targets in Pseudomonas spp. the Crc regulon has remained largely unexplored. Results In order to predict direct targets of Crc, we used a bioinformatics approach based on detection of A-rich motifs near the initiation of translation of all protein-encoding genes in twelve fully sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. As expected, our data predict that genes related to the utilisation of less preferred nutrients, such as some carbohydrates, nitrogen sources and aromatic carbon compounds are targets of Crc. A general trend in this analysis is that the regulation of transporters is conserved across species whereas regulation of specific enzymatic steps or transcriptional activators are often conserved only within a species. Interestingly, some nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) such as HU and IHF are predicted to be regulated by Crc. This finding indicates a possible role of Crc in indirect control over a subset of genes that depend on the DNA bending properties of NAPs for expression or repression. Finally, some virulence traits such as alginate and rhamnolipid production also appear to be regulated by Crc, which links nutritional status cues with the regulation of virulence traits. Conclusions Catabolite repression control regulates a broad spectrum of genes in Pseudomonas. Some targets are genus-wide and are typically related to central metabolism, whereas other targets are species-specific, or even unique to particular strains. Further study of these novel targets will enhance our understanding of how Pseudomonas bacteria integrate

  6. Overexpression of SAMDC1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana increases expression of defense-related genes as well as resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis

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    Francisco eMarco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously described that elevation of endogenous spermine levels in Arabidopsis could be achieved by transgenic overexpression of S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC or Spermine synthase (SPMS. In both cases, spermine accumulation had an impact on the plant transcriptome, with up-regulation of a set of genes enriched in functional categories involved in defense-related processes against both biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, the response of SAMDC1-overexpressing plants against bacterial and oomycete pathogens has been tested. The expression of several pathogen defense-related genes was induced in these plants as well as in wild type plants exposed to an exogenous supply of spermine. SAMDC1-overexpressing plants showed an increased tolerance to infection by Pseudomonas syringae and by Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Both results add more evidence to the hypothesis that spermine plays a key role in plant resistance to biotic stress.

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Cinnamaldehyde and Estragole Extracted from Plant Essential Oils against Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Causing Bacterial Canker Disease in Kiwifruit

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    Yu-Rim Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa causes bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit. Antibacterial activity of plant essential oils (PEOs originating from 49 plant species were tested against Psa by a vapor diffusion and a liquid culture assays. The five PEOs from Pimenta racemosa, P. dioica, Melaleuca linariifolia, M. cajuputii, and Cinnamomum cassia efficiently inhibited Psa growth by either assays. Among their major components, estragole, eugenol, and methyl eugenol showed significant antibacterial activity by only the liquid culture assay, while cinnamaldehyde exhibited antibacterial activity by both assays. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of estragole and cinnamaldehyde by the liquid culture assay were 1,250 and 2,500 ppm, respectively. The MIC of cinnamaldehyde by the vapor diffusion assay was 5,000 ppm. Based on the formation of clear zones or the decrease of optical density caused by these compounds, they might kill the bacterial cells and this feature might be useful for managing the bacterial canker disease in kiwifruit.

  8. The observation of mitochondrial movement and ATG5 position in Arabidopsis during the process of infection with virulent and avirulent P. syringae strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Ma, Chao; Chen, Wen li

    2012-03-01

    Infection of plants with pathogens leads to programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. In this study, the effects of infection by virulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and strains harboring avirulence factors AvrRps4 on the induction of HR-PCD were compared. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants as materials, which expressed green fluorescent protein labeled mitochondria (mito-GFP) and green fluorescent protein tagged ATG5 (ATG5-GFP), these GFP are instantaneous expression. We found both Pst DC3000 and Pst-avrRps4 could induce mitochondria to assemble, the effect of Pst DC3000 was more obvious. ATG5 was located in chloroplasts after infection with Pst DC3000 or Pst-avrRps4. Under the condition of Pst-avrRps4, the expression of ATG5 was stronger than Pst DC3000 treatment.

  9. Biogenetic studies in Syringa vulgaris L.: bioconversion of (18)O(2H)-labeled precursors into lilac aldehydes and lilac alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Dirk; Mosandl, Armin

    2003-12-03

    Syringa vulgaris L. inflorescences, petals, and chloroplasts, isolated from lilac flower petals, were fed with aqueous solutions of (18)O-labeled linalool and [5,5-(2)H(2)]-deoxy-d-xylose (DOX). The chloroplasts of lilac flower petals were isolated after feeding experiments with labeled precursors. Volatiles from the chloroplasts were extracted by stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) and analyzed using enantioselective multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (enantio-MDGC-MS). Feeding experiments with DOX indicate that the novel mevalonate-independent 1-deoxy-d-xylose 5-phosphate/2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (DOX/MEP) is the decisive pathway of lilac aldehyde and lilac alcohol, respectively. Bioconversion of [(18)O]linalool into lilac aldehyde and lilac alcohol during in vivo feeding experiments was monitored, and the metabolic pathways are discussed.

  10. Transgenic expression of antimicrobial peptide D2A21 confers resistance to diseases incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci and Xanthomonas citri, but not Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

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    Guixia Hao

    Full Text Available Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB associated with 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las and citrus canker disease incited by Xanthomonas citri are the most devastating citrus diseases worldwide. To control citrus HLB and canker disease, we previously screened over forty antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in vitro for their potential application in genetic engineering. D2A21 was one of the most active AMPs against X. citri, Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Sinorhizobium meliloti with low hemolysis activity. Therefore, we conducted this work to assess transgenic expression of D2A21 peptide to achieve citrus resistant to canker and HLB. We generated a construct expressing D2A21 and initially transformed tobacco as a model plant. Transgenic tobacco expressing D2A21 was obtained by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Successful transformation and D2A21 expression was confirmed by molecular analysis. We evaluated disease development incited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci in transgenic tobacco. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing D2A21 showed remarkable disease resistance compared to control plants. Therefore, we performed citrus transformations with the same construct and obtained transgenic Carrizo citrange. Gene integration and gene expression in transgenic plants were determined by PCR and RT-qPCR. Transgenic Carrizo expressing D2A21 showed significant canker resistance while the control plants showed clear canker symptoms following both leaf infiltration and spray inoculation with X. citri 3213. Transgenic Carrizo plants were challenged for HLB evaluation by grafting with Las infected rough lemon buds. Las titer was determined by qPCR in the leaves and roots of transgenic and control plants. However, our results showed that transgenic plants expressing D2A21 did not significantly reduce Las titer compared to control plants. We demonstrated that transgenic expression of D2A21 conferred resistance to diseases incited by P. syringae pv. tabaci and X. citri

  11. Functional analysis of endo-1,4-β-glucanases in response to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae reveals their involvement in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finiti, I; Leyva, M O; López-Cruz, J; Calderan Rodrigues, B; Vicedo, B; Angulo, C; Bennett, A B; Grant, M; García-Agustín, P; González-Bosch, C

    2013-09-01

    Plant cell wall modification is a critical component in stress responses. Endo-1,4-β-glucanases (EGs) take part in cell wall editing processes, e.g. elongation, ripening and abscission. Here we studied the infection response of Solanum lycopersicum and Arabidopsis thaliana with impaired EGs. Transgenic TomCel1 and TomCel2 tomato antisense plants challenged with Pseudomonas syringae showed higher susceptibility, callose priming and increased jasmonic acid pathway marker gene expression. These two EGs could be resistance factors and may act as negative regulators of callose deposition, probably by interfering with the defence-signalling network. A study of a set of Arabidopsis EG T-DNA insertion mutants challenged with P. syringae and Botrytis cinerea revealed that the lack of other EGs interferes with infection phenotype, callose deposition, expression of signalling pathway marker genes and hormonal balance. We conclude that a lack of EGs could alter plant response to pathogens by modifying the properties of the cell wall and/or interfering with signalling pathways, contributing to generate the appropriate signalling outcomes. Analysis of microarray data demonstrates that EGs are differentially expressed upon many different plant-pathogen challenges, hormone treatments and many abiotic stresses. We found some Arabidopsis EG mutants with increased tolerance to osmotic and salt stress. Our results show that impairing EGs can alter plant-pathogen interactions and may contribute to appropriate signalling outcomes in many different biotic and abiotic plant stress responses. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Field evaluation of a PfHRP-2/pLDH rapid diagnostic test and light microscopy for diagnosis and screening of falciparum malaria during the peak seasonal transmission in an endemic area in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alareqi, Lina M Q; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Lau, Yee-Ling; Fong, Mun-Yik; Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Ali, Arwa A; Cheong, Fei-Wen; Tawfek, Rehab; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-28

    Malaria is a public health threat in Yemen, with 149,451 cases being reported in 2013. Of these, Plasmodium falciparum represents 99%. Prompt diagnosis by light microscopy (LM) and rapid diagnostic tests (RTDs) is a key element in the national strategy of malaria control. The heterogeneous epidemiology of malaria in the country necessitates the field evaluation of the current diagnostic strategies, especially RDTs. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate LM and an RDT, combining both P. falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP-2) and Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH), for falciparum malaria diagnosis and survey in a malaria-endemic area during the transmission season against nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as the reference method. A household-based, cross-sectional malaria survey was conducted in Mawza District, a malaria-endemic area in Taiz governorate. A total of 488 participants were screened using LM and PfHRP-2/pLDH RDT. Positive samples (160) and randomly selected negative samples (52) by both RDT and LM were further analysed using 18S rRNA-based nested PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the RDT were 96.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 90.9-98.3), 56.0% (95% CI: 44.7-66.8), 76.3% (95% CI: 69.0-82.3), and 90.4% (95% CI: 78.8-96.8), respectively. On the other hand, LM showed sensitivity of 37.6% (95% CI: 29.6-46.3), specificity of 97.6% (95% CI: 91.7-99.7), PPV of 95.9% (95% CI: 86.3-98.9), and NPV of 51.3% (95% CI: 43.2-59.2). The sensitivity of LM dropped to 8.5% for detecting asymptomatic malaria. Malaria prevalence was 32.8% (32.1 and 37.5% for ≥10 and <10 years, respectively) with the RDT compared with 10.7% (10.8 and 9.4% for age groups of ≥10 and <10 years, respectively) with LM. Among asymptomatic malaria individuals, LM and RDT-based prevalence rates were 1.6 and 25.6%, respectively. However, rates of 88.2 and 94.1% of infection with P. falciparum were found

  13. The NifA-RpoN Regulon of Mesorhizobium loti Strain R7A and Its Symbiotic Activation by a Novel LacI/GalR-Family Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John T.; Brown, Steven D.; Ronson, Clive W.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valerie

    2013-01-07

    Mesorhizobium loti is the microsymbiont of Lotus species, including the model legume L. japonicus. M. loti differs from other rhizobia in that it contains two copies of the key nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nifA, nifA1 and nifA2, both of which are located on the symbiosis island ICEMlSymR7A. M. loti R7A also contains two rpoN genes, rpoN1 located on the chromosome outside of ICEMlSymR7A and rpoN2 that is located on ICEMlSymR7A. The aims of the current work were to establish how nifA expression was activated in M. loti and to characterise the NifA-RpoN regulon. The nifA2 and rpoN2 genes were essential for nitrogen fixation whereas nifA1 and rpoN1 were dispensable. Expression of nifA2 was activated, possibly in response to an inositol derivative, by a novel regulator of the LacI/GalR family encoded by the fixV gene located upstream of nifA2. Other than the well-characterized nif/fix genes, most NifA2-regulated genes were not required for nitrogen fixation although they were strongly expressed in nodules. The NifA-regulated nifZ and fixU genes, along with nifQ which was not NifA-regulated, were required in M. loti for a fully effective symbiosis although they are not present in some other rhizobia. The NifA-regulated gene msi158 that encodes a porin was also required for a fully effective symbiosis. Several metabolic genes that lacked NifA-regulated promoters were strongly expressed in nodules in a NifA2-dependent manner but again mutants did not have an overt symbiotic phenotype. In summary, many genes encoded on ICEMlSymR7A were strongly expressed in nodules but not free-living rhizobia, but were not essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. It seems likely that some of these genes have functional homologues elsewhere in the genome and that bacteroid metabolism may be sufficiently plastic to adapt to loss of certain enzymatic functions.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of the PreA/PreB (QseB/QseC regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

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    Bhatiya Aditi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Salmonella PreA/PreB two-component system (TCS is an ortholog of the QseBC TCS of Escherichia coli. In both Salmonella and E. coli, this system has been shown to affect motility and virulence in response to quorum-sensing and hormonal signals, and to affect the transcription of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium pmrAB operon, which encodes an important virulence-associated TCS. Results To determine the PreA/PreB regulon in S. Typhimurium, we performed DNA microarrays comparing the wild type strain and various preA and/or preB mutants in the presence of ectopically expressed preA (qseB. These data confirmed our previous findings of the negative effect of PreB on PreA gene regulation and identified candidate PreA-regulated genes. A proportion of the activated loci were previously identified as PmrA-activated genes (yibD, pmrAB, cptA, etc. or were genes located in the local region around preA, including the preAB operon. The transcriptional units were defined in this local region by RT-PCR, suggesting three PreA activated operons composed of preA-preB, mdaB-ygiN, and ygiW-STM3175. Several putative virulence-related phenotypes were examined for preAB mutants, resulting in the observation of a host cell invasion and slight virulence defect of a preAB mutant. Contrary to previous reports on this TCS, we were unable to show a PreA/PreB-dependent effect of the quorum-sensing signal AI-2 or of epinephrine on S. Typhimurium with regard to bacterial motility. Conclusion This work further characterizes this unorthadox OmpR/EnvZ class TCS and provides novel candidate regulated genes for further study. This first in-depth study of the PreA/PreB regulatory system phenotypes and regulation suggests significant comparative differences to the reported function of the orthologous QseB/QseC in E. coli.

  15. The NifA-RpoN regulon of Mesorhizobium loti strain R7A and its symbiotic activation by a novel LacI/GalR-family regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Sullivan

    Full Text Available Mesorhizobium loti is the microsymbiont of Lotus species, including the model legume L. japonicus. M. loti differs from other rhizobia in that it contains two copies of the key nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nifA, nifA1 and nifA2, both of which are located on the symbiosis island ICEMlSym(R7A. M. loti R7A also contains two rpoN genes, rpoN1 located on the chromosome outside of ICEMlSym(R7A and rpoN2 that is located on ICEMlSym(R7A. The aims of the current work were to establish how nifA expression was activated in M. loti and to characterise the NifA-RpoN regulon. The nifA2 and rpoN2 genes were essential for nitrogen fixation whereas nifA1 and rpoN1 were dispensable. Expression of nifA2 was activated, possibly in response to an inositol derivative, by a novel regulator of the LacI/GalR family encoded by the fixV gene located upstream of nifA2. Other than the well-characterized nif/fix genes, most NifA2-regulated genes were not required for nitrogen fixation although they were strongly expressed in nodules. The NifA-regulated nifZ and fixU genes, along with nifQ which was not NifA-regulated, were required in M. loti for a fully effective symbiosis although they are not present in some other rhizobia. The NifA-regulated gene msi158 that encodes a porin was also required for a fully effective symbiosis. Several metabolic genes that lacked NifA-regulated promoters were strongly expressed in nodules in a NifA2-dependent manner but again mutants did not have an overt symbiotic phenotype. In summary, many genes encoded on ICEMlSym(R7A were strongly expressed in nodules but not free-living rhizobia, but were not essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. It seems likely that some of these genes have functional homologues elsewhere in the genome and that bacteroid metabolism may be sufficiently plastic to adapt to loss of certain enzymatic functions.

  16. The Role of OmpR in the Expression of Genes of the KdgR Regulon Involved in the Uptake and Depolymerization of Oligogalacturonides in Yersinia enterocolitica

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    Marta Nieckarz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Oligogalacturonide (OGA-specific porins of the KdgM family have previously been identified and characterized in enterobacterial plant pathogens. We found that deletion of the gene encoding response regulator OmpR causes the porin KdgM2 to become one of the most abundant proteins in the outer membrane of the human enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. Reporter gene fusion and real-time PCR analysis confirmed that the expression of kdgM2 is repressed by OmpR. We also found that kdgM2 expression is subject to negative regulation by KdgR, a specific repressor of genes involved in the uptake and metabolism of pectin derivatives in plant pathogens. The additive effect of kdgR and ompR mutations suggested that KdgR and OmpR regulate kdgM2 expression independently. We confirmed that kdgM2 occurs in an operon with the pelP gene, encoding the periplasmic pectate lyase PelP. A pectinolytic assay showed strong upregulation of PelP production/activity in a Y. enterocolitica strain lacking OmpR and KdgR, which corroborates the repression exerted by these regulators on kdgM2. In addition, our data showed that OmpR is responsible for up regulation of the kdgM1 gene encoding the second specific oligogalacturonide porin KdgM1. This indicates the involvement of OmpR in the reciprocal regulation of both KdgM1 and KdgM2. Moreover, we demonstrated the negative impact of OmpR on kdgR transcription, which might positively affect the expression of genes of the KdgR regulon. Binding of OmpR to the promoter regions of the kdgM2-pelP-sghX operon, and kdgM1 and kdgR genes was confirmed using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay, suggesting that OmpR can directly regulate their transcription. We also found that the overexpression of porin KdgM2 increases outer membrane permeability. Thus, OmpR-mediated regulation of the KdgM porins may contribute to the fitness of Y. enterocolitica in particular local environments.

  17. A two-genome microarray for the rice pathogens Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola and its use in the discovery of a difference in their regulation of hrp genes

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    Lin Ye

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo and X. oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc are bacterial pathogens of the worldwide staple and grass model, rice. Xoo and Xoc are closely related but Xoo invades rice vascular tissue to cause bacterial leaf blight, a serious disease of rice in many parts of the world, and Xoc colonizes the mesophyll parenchyma to cause bacterial leaf streak, a disease of emerging importance. Both pathogens depend on hrp genes for type III secretion to infect their host. We constructed a 50–70 mer oligonucleotide microarray based on available genome data for Xoo and Xoc and compared gene expression in Xoo strains PXO99A and Xoc strain BLS256 grown in the rich medium PSB vs. XOM2, a minimal medium previously reported to induce hrp genes in Xoo strain T7174. Results Three biological replicates of the microarray experiment to compare global gene expression in representative strains of Xoo and Xoc grown in PSB vs. XOM2 were carried out. The non-specific error rate and the correlation coefficients across biological replicates and among duplicate spots revealed that the microarray data were robust. 247 genes of Xoo and 39 genes of Xoc were differentially expressed in the two media with a false discovery rate of 5% and with a minimum fold-change of 1.75. Semi-quantitative-RT-PCR assays confirmed differential expression of each of 16 genes each for Xoo and Xoc selected for validation. The differentially expressed genes represent 17 functional categories. Conclusion We describe here the construction and validation of a two-genome microarray for the two pathovars of X. oryzae. Microarray analysis revealed that using representative strains, a greater number of Xoo genes than Xoc genes are differentially expressed in XOM2 relative to PSB, and that these include hrp genes and other genes important in interactions with rice. An exception was the rax genes, which are required for production of the host resistance elicitor AvrXa21

  18. Plant innate immunity induced by flagellin suppresses the hypersensitive response in non-host plants elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi.

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    Chia-Fong Wei

    Full Text Available A new pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. averrhoi (Pav, which causes bacterial spot disease on carambola was identified in Taiwan in 1997. Many strains of this pathovar have been isolated from different locations and several varieties of hosts. Some of these strains, such as HL1, are nonmotile and elicit a strong hypersensitive response (HR in nonhost tobacco leaves, while other strains, such as PA5, are motile and elicit a weak HR. Based on the image from a transmission electron microscope, the results showed that HL1 is flagellum-deficient and PA5 has normal flagella. Here we cloned and analyzed the fliC gene and glycosylation island from Pav HL1 and PA5. The amino acid sequences of FliC from HL1 and PA5 are identical to P. s. pvs. tabaci (Pta, glycinea and phaseolicola and share very high similarity with other pathovars of P. syringae. In contrast to the flagellin mutant PtaΔfliC, PA5ΔfliC grows as well as wild type in the host plant, but it elicits stronger HR than wild type does in non-host plants. Furthermore, the purified Pav flagellin, but not the divergent flagellin from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, is able to impair the HR induced by PA5ΔfliC. PA5Δfgt1 possessing nonglycosylated flagella behaved as its wild type in both bacterial growth in host and HR elicitation. Flagellin was infiltrated into tobacco leaves either simultaneously with flagellum-deficient HL1 or prior to the inoculation of wild type HL1, and both treatments impaired the HR induced by HL1. Moreover, the HR elicited by PA5 and PA5ΔfliC was enhanced by the addition of cycloheximide, suggesting that the flagellin is one of the PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns contributed to induce the PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. Taken together, the results shown in this study reveal that flagellin in Pav is capable of suppressing HR via PTI induction during an incompatible interaction.

  19. Evolutionary relationship of disease resistance genes in soybean and Arabidopsis specific for the Pseudomonas syringae effectors AvrB and AvrRpm1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfield, Tom; Redditt, Thomas; Russell, Andrew; Kessens, Ryan; Rodibaugh, Natalie; Galloway, Lauren; Kang, Qing; Podicheti, Ram; Innes, Roger W

    2014-09-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the Pseudomonas syringae effector proteins AvrB and AvrRpm1 are both detected by the RESISTANCE TO PSEUDOMONAS MACULICOLA1 (RPM1) disease resistance (R) protein. By contrast, soybean (Glycine max) can distinguish between these effectors, with AvrB and AvrRpm1 being detected by the Resistance to Pseudomonas glycinea 1b (Rpg1b) and Rpg1r R proteins, respectively. We have been using these genes to investigate the evolution of R gene specificity and have previously identified RPM1 and Rpg1b. Here, we report the cloning of Rpg1r, which, like RPM1 and Rpg1b, encodes a coiled-coil (CC)-nucleotide-binding (NB)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein. As previously found for Rpg1b, we determined that Rpg1r is not orthologous with RPM1, indicating that the ability to detect both AvrB and AvrRpm1 evolved independently in soybean and Arabidopsis. The tightly linked soybean Rpg1b and Rpg1r genes share a close evolutionary relationship, with Rpg1b containing a recombination event that combined a NB domain closely related to Rpg1r with CC and LRR domains from a more distantly related CC-NB-LRR gene. Using structural modeling, we mapped polymorphisms between Rpg1b and Rpg1r onto the predicted tertiary structure of Rpg1b, which revealed highly polymorphic surfaces within both the CC and LRR domains. Assessment of chimeras between Rpg1b and Rpg1r using a transient expression system revealed that AvrB versus AvrRpm1 specificity is determined by the C-terminal portion of the LRR domain. The P. syringae effector AvrRpt2, which targets RPM1 INTERACTOR4 (RIN4) proteins in both Arabidopsis and soybean, partially blocked recognition of both AvrB and AvrRpm1 in soybean, suggesting that both Rpg1b and Rpg1r may detect these effectors via modification of a RIN4 homolog. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Expression of Vitis amurensis VaERF20 in Arabidopsis thaliana Improves Resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengnan; Zhu, Yanxun; Han, Rui; Yin, Wuchen; Guo, Chunlei; Li, Zhi; Wang, Xiping

    2018-03-01

    Ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factors play important roles in regulating immune responses in plants. In our study, we characterized a member of the ERF transcription factor family, VaERF20 , from the Chinese wild Vitis genotype, V. amurensis Rupr "Shuangyou". Phylogenetic analysis indicated that VaERF20 belongs to group IXc of the ERF family, in which many members are known to contribute to fighting pathogen infection. Consistent with this, expression of VaERF20 was induced by treatment with the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea ) in "Shuangyou" and V. vinifera "Red Globe". Arabidopsis thaliana plants over-expressing VaERF20 displayed enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato ( Pst ) DC3000. Patterns of pathogen-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation were entirely distinct in B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 inoculated plants. Examples of both salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) responsive defense genes were up-regulated after B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 inoculation of the VaERF20 -overexpressing transgenic A. thaliana plants. Evidence of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), callose accumulation and stomatal defense, together with increased expression of PTI genes, was also greater in the transgenic lines. These data indicate that VaERF20 participates in various signal transduction pathways and acts as an inducer of immune responses.

  1. Expression of Vitis amurensis VaERF20 in Arabidopsis thaliana Improves Resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000

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    Mengnan Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene response factor (ERF transcription factors play important roles in regulating immune responses in plants. In our study, we characterized a member of the ERF transcription factor family, VaERF20, from the Chinese wild Vitis genotype, V. amurensis Rupr “Shuangyou”. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that VaERF20 belongs to group IXc of the ERF family, in which many members are known to contribute to fighting pathogen infection. Consistent with this, expression of VaERF20 was induced by treatment with the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea in “Shuangyou” and V. vinifera “Red Globe”. Arabidopsis thaliana plants over-expressing VaERF20 displayed enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000. Patterns of pathogen-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation were entirely distinct in B. cinerea and PstDC3000 inoculated plants. Examples of both salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET responsive defense genes were up-regulated after B. cinerea and PstDC3000 inoculation of the VaERF20-overexpressing transgenic A. thaliana plants. Evidence of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI, callose accumulation and stomatal defense, together with increased expression of PTI genes, was also greater in the transgenic lines. These data indicate that VaERF20 participates in various signal transduction pathways and acts as an inducer of immune responses.

  2. The Arabidopsis Elongator complex is required for nonhost resistance against the bacterial pathogens Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chuanfu; Wang, Chenggang; Mou, Zhonglin

    2017-05-01

    Although in recent years nonhost resistance has attracted considerable attention for its broad spectrum and durability, the genetic and mechanistic components of nonhost resistance have not been fully understood. We used molecular and histochemical approaches including quantitative PCR, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine and aniline blue staining. The evolutionarily conserved histone acetyltransferase complex Elongator was identified as a major component of nonhost resistance against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) and Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psp) NPS3121. Mutations in Elongator genes inhibit Xcc-, Psp NPS3121- and/or flg22-induced defense responses including defense gene expression, callose deposition, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. Mutations in Elongator also attenuate the ROS-SA amplification loop. We show that suppressed ROS and SA accumulation in Elongator mutants is correlated with reduced expression of the Arabidopsis respiratory burst oxidase homologue AtrbohD and the SA biosynthesis gene ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 (ICS1). Furthermore, we found that the Elongator subunit ELP2 is associated with the chromatin of AtrbohD and ICS1 and is required for maintaining basal histone H3 acetylation levels in these key defense genes. As both AtrbohD and ICS1 contribute to nonhost resistance against Xcc, our results reveal an epigenetic mechanism by which Elongator regulates nonhost resistance in Arabidopsis. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. The Arabidopsis thaliana cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK20 modulates host responses to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 infection

    KAUST Repository

    Ederli, Luisa

    2011-10-01

    In plants, the cysteine-rich repeat kinases (CRKs) are a sub-family of receptor-like protein kinases that contain the DUF26 motif in their extracellular domains. It has been shown that in Arabidopsis thaliana, CRK20 is transcriptionally induced by pathogens, salicylic acid and ozone (O3). However, its role in responses to biotic and abiotic stress remains to be elucidated. To determine the function of CRK20 in such responses, two CRK20 loss-of-function mutants, crk20-1 and crk20-2, were isolated from public collections of Arabidopsis T-DNA tagged lines and examined for responses to O3 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000. crk20-1 and crk20-2 showed similar O3 sensitivities and no differences in the expression of defense genes when compared with the wild-type. However, pathogen growth was significantly reduced, while there were no differences in the induction of salicylic acid related defense genes or salicylic acid accumulation. Furthermore, correlation analysis of CRK20 gene expression suggests that it has a role in the control of H2O and/or nutrient transport. We therefore propose that CRK20 promotes conditions that are favorable for Pst DC3000 growth in Arabidopsis, possibly through the regulation of apoplastic homeostasis, and consequently, of the environment of this biotrophic pathogen. © 2011 Elsevier GmbH.

  4. A possible role for acetylated intermediates in diaminopimelate and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The deduced product of an open reading frame (ORF3) located in the tabtoxinine-beta-lactam (T beta L) biosynthetic region of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 (BR2.024) has significant sequence homology to the dapD products of other bacteria. dapD encodes L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate succinyl coenzyme A succinyltransferase (THDPA-ST), an enzyme in the diaminopimelate (DAP) and lysine biosynthetic pathway. Complementation studies, in vitro transcription-translation experiments, and enzymatic assays indicated that ORF3 encodes a product with THDPA-ST activity in Escherichia coli dapD mutant beta 274. However, a BR2.024 mutant with an insert in ORF3 was prototrophic, and only basal THDPA-ST activity was detected in extracts of both parent and mutant. This finding suggested that ORF3 was not required for DAP biosynthesis and that it did not encode a product with THDPA-ST activity. The results of enzymatic studies, indicating that BR2.024 uses acetylated intermediates for DAP biosynthesis, are consistent with the hypothesis that BR2.024 does not need THDPA-ST for DAP biosynthesis. The ORF3 mutant produced reduced levels of tabtoxin, indicating that ORF3 may have a role in T beta L biosynthesis. We have named the gene tabB and have proposed a possible function for the gene product. PMID:9294453

  5. Characterization of dapB, a gene required by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024 for lysine and tabtoxinine-beta-lactam biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Shaw, P D

    1997-01-01

    The dapB gene, which encodes L-2,3-dihydrodipicolinate reductase, the second enzyme of the lysine branch of the aspartic amino acid family, was cloned and sequenced from a tabtoxin-producing bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci BR2.024. The deduced amino acid sequence shared 60 to 90% identity to known dapB gene products from gram-negative bacteria and 19 to 21% identity to the dapB products from gram-positive bacteria. The consensus sequence for the NAD(P)H binding site [(V/I)(A/G)(V/I)XGXXGXXG)] and the proposed substrate binding site (HHRHK) were conserved in the polypeptide. A BR2.024 dapB mutant is a diaminopimelate auxotroph and tabtoxin negative. The addition of a mixture of L-,L-, D,D-, and meso-diaminopimelate to defined media restored growth but not tabtoxin production. Cloned DNA fragments containing the parental dapB gene restored the ability to grow in defined media and tabtoxin production to the dapB mutant. These results indicate that the dapB gene is required for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis, thus providing the first genetic evidence that the biosynthesis of tabtoxin proceeds in part along the lysine biosynthetic pathway. These data also suggest that L-2,3,4,5-tetrahydrodipicolinate is a common intermediate for both lysine and tabtoxin biosynthesis. PMID:8990304

  6. Mutations in LACS2, a long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase, enhance susceptibility to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae but confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dingzhong; Simonich, Michael T; Innes, Roger W

    2007-06-01

    We identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, sma4 (symptoms to multiple avr genotypes4), that displays severe disease symptoms when inoculated with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, although bacterial growth is only moderately enhanced compared to wild-type plants. The sma4 mutant showed a normal susceptible phenotype to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Significantly, the sma4 mutant was highly resistant to a necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Germination of B. cinerea spores on sma4 mutant leaves was inhibited, and penetration by those that did germinate was rare. The sma4 mutant also showed several pleiotropic phenotypes, including increased sensitivity to lower humidity and salt stress. Isolation of SMA4 by positional cloning revealed that it encodes LACS2, a member of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. LACS2 has previously been shown to be involved in cutin biosynthesis. We therefore tested three additional cutin-defective mutants for resistance to B. cinerea: att1 (for aberrant induction of type three genes), bodyguard, and lacerata. All three displayed an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Our results indicate that plant cutin or cuticle structure may play a crucial role in tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress and in the pathogenesis of B. cinerea.

  7. The indoleacetic acid-lysine synthetase gene of Pseudomonas syringae subsp. savastanoi induces developmental alterations in transgenic tobacco and potato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, A; Prinsen, E; Fladung, M; Schulze, S C; Van Onckelen, H

    1991-06-01

    The iaaL gene of Pseudomonas syringae subsp. savastanoi encodes an indoleacetic acid-lysine synthetase that conjugates lysine to indoleacetic acid. A chimaeric gene consisting of the iaaL coding region under the control of the 35S RNA promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (35SiaaL) has been used to test if iaaL gene expression leads to morphological alterations in tobacco and potato. Transgenic tobacco plantlets bearing this construct have been shown to synthesize IAA-[14C]lysine when fed with [14C]lysine. In late stages of development, their leaves show an increased nastic curvature (epinasty) of the petiole and midvein, a finding suggestive of an abnormal auxin metabolism. The alteration is transmitted to progeny as a dominant Mendelian trait cosegregating with the kanamycin resistance marker. Transgenic potato plants harbouring the construct are also characterized by petiole epinasty. Moreover, 35SiaaL transgenic plants have an increased internode length in potato and decreased root growth in both tobacco and potato. An increased content of IAA-conjugates in leaf blade was found to correlate with the epinastic alterations caused by iaaL gene expression in tobacco leaves. These data provide evidence that IAA conjugation is able to modulate hormone action, suggesting that the widespread endogenous auxin-conjugating activities are of physiological importance.

  8. Gaseous 3-pentanol primes plant immunity against a bacterial speck pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato via salicylic acid and jasmonic acid-dependent signaling pathways in Arabidopsis

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    Geun Cheol eSong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Pentanol is an active organic compound produced by plants and is a component of emitted insect sex pheromones. A previous study reported that drench application of 3-pentanol elicited plant immunity against microbial pathogens and an insect pest in crop plants. Here, we evaluated whether 3-pentanol and the derivatives 1-pentanol and 2-pentanol induced plant systemic resistance using the in vitro I-plate system. Exposure of Arabidopsis seedlings to 10 M and 100 nM 3-pentanol evaporate elicited an immune response to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. We performed quantitative real-time PCR to investigate the 3-pentanol-mediated Arabidopsis immune responses by determining Pathogenesis-Related (PR gene expression levels associated with defense signaling through SA, JA, and ethylene signaling pathways. The results show that exposure to 3-pentanol and subsequent pathogen challenge upregulated PDF1.2 and PR1 expression. Selected Arabidopsis mutants confirmed that the 3-pentanol-mediated immune response involved salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA signaling pathways and the NPR1 gene. Taken together, this study indicates that gaseous 3-pentanol triggers induced resistance in Arabidopsis by priming SA and JA signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a volatile compound of an insect sex pheromone triggers plant systemic resistance against a bacterial pathogen.

  9. The Vibrio cholerae var regulon encodes a metallo-β-lactamase and an antibiotic efflux pump, which are regulated by VarR, a LysR-type transcription factor.

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    Hong-Ting Victor Lin

    Full Text Available The genome sequence of V. cholerae O1 Biovar Eltor strain N16961 has revealed a putative antibiotic resistance (var regulon that is predicted to encode a transcriptional activator (VarR, which is divergently transcribed relative to the putative resistance genes for both a metallo-β-lactamase (VarG and an antibiotic efflux-pump (VarABCDEF. We sought to test whether these genes could confer antibiotic resistance and are organised as a regulon under the control of VarR. VarG was overexpressed and purified and shown to have β-lactamase activity against penicillins, cephalosporins and carbapenems, having the highest activity against meropenem. The expression of VarABCDEF in the Escherichia coli (ΔacrAB strain KAM3 conferred resistance to a range of drugs, but most significant resistance was to the macrolide spiramycin. A gel-shift analysis was used to determine if VarR bound to the promoter regions of the resistance genes. Consistent with the regulation of these resistance genes, VarR binds to three distinct intergenic regions, varRG, varGA and varBC located upstream and adjacent to varG, varA and varC, respectively. VarR can act as a repressor at the varRG promoter region; whilst this repression was relieved upon addition of β-lactams, these did not dissociate the VarR/varRG-DNA complex, indicating that the de-repression of varR by β-lactams is indirect. Considering that the genomic arrangement of VarR-VarG is strikingly similar to that of AmpR-AmpC system, it is possible that V. cholerae has evolved a system for resistance to the newer β-lactams that would prove more beneficial to the bacterium in light of current selective pressures.

  10. Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing Analysis Shows that WhiB Is a Transcription Factor That Cocontrols Its Regulon with WhiA To Initiate Developmental Cell Division in Streptomyces

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    Matthew J. Bush

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available WhiB is the founding member of a family of proteins (the WhiB-like [Wbl] family that carry a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster and play key roles in diverse aspects of the biology of actinomycetes, including pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, and the control of development. In Streptomyces, WhiB is essential for the process of developmentally controlled cell division that leads to sporulation. The biochemical function of Wbl proteins has been controversial; here, we set out to determine unambiguously if WhiB functions as a transcription factor using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq in Streptomyces venezuelae. In the first demonstration of in vivo genome-wide Wbl binding, we showed that WhiB regulates the expression of key genes required for sporulation by binding upstream of ~240 transcription units. Strikingly, the WhiB regulon is identical to the previously characterized WhiA regulon, providing an explanation for the identical phenotypes of whiA and whiB mutants. Using ChIP-seq, we demonstrated that in vivo DNA binding by WhiA depends on WhiB and vice versa, showing that WhiA and WhiB function cooperatively to control expression of a common set of WhiAB target genes. Finally, we show that mutation of the cysteine residues that coordinate the [4Fe-4S] cluster in WhiB prevents DNA binding by both WhiB and WhiA in vivo.

  11. RNA-seq analysis reveals the role of red light in resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, You-Xin; Wang, Meng-Meng; Yin, Yan-Ling; Onac, Eugen; Zhou, Guo-Fu; Peng, Sheng; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong

    2015-02-25

    Plants attenuate their responses to a variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens, leading to higher incidences of pathogen infection at night. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism responsible for the light-induced defence response; transcriptome data would likely facilitate the elucidation of this mechanism. In this study, we observed diurnal changes in tomato resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pto DC3000), with the greatest susceptibility before midnight. Nightly light treatment, particularly red light treatment, significantly enhanced the resistance; this effect was correlated with increased salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and defence-related gene transcription. RNA-seq analysis revealed that red light induced a set of circadian rhythm-related genes involved in the phytochrome and SA-regulated resistance response. The biosynthesis and signalling pathways of multiple plant hormones (auxin, SA, jasmonate, and ethylene) were co-ordinately regulated following Pto DC3000 infection and red light, and the SA pathway was most significantly affected by red light and Pto DC3000 infection. This result indicates that SA-mediated signalling pathways are involved in red light-induced resistance to pathogens. Importantly, silencing of nonexpressor of pathogensis-related genes 1 (NPR1) partially compromised red light-induced resistance against Pto DC3000. Furthermore, sets of genes involved in redox homeostasis (respiratory burst oxidase homologue, RBOH; glutathione S-transferases, GSTs; glycosyltransferase, GTs), calcium (calmodulin, CAM; calmodulin-binding protein, CBP), and defence (polyphenol oxidase, PPO; nudix hydrolase1, NUDX1) as well as transcription factors (WRKY18, WRKY53, WRKY60, WRKY70) and cellulose synthase were differentially induced at the transcriptional level by red light in response to pathogen challenge. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a diurnal change in susceptibility to Pto DC3000 with greatest

  12. Natural variation for responsiveness to flg22, flgII-28, and csp22 and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in heirloom tomatoes.

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    Selvakumar Veluchamy

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is susceptible to many diseases including bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Bacterial speck disease is a serious problem worldwide in tomato production areas where moist conditions and cool temperatures occur. To enhance breeding of speck resistant fresh-market tomato cultivars we identified a race 0 field isolate, NC-C3, of P. s. pv. tomato in North Carolina and used it to screen a collection of heirloom tomato lines for speck resistance in the field. We observed statistically significant variation among the heirloom tomatoes for their response to P. s. pv. tomato NC-C3 with two lines showing resistance approaching a cultivar that expresses the Pto resistance gene, although none of the heirloom lines have Pto. Using an assay that measures microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, we investigated whether the heirloom lines showed differential responsiveness to three bacterial-derived peptide MAMPs: flg22 and flgII-28 (from flagellin and csp22 (from cold shock protein. Significant differences were observed for MAMP responsiveness among the lines, although these differences did not correlate strongly with resistance or susceptibility to bacterial speck disease. The identification of natural variation for MAMP responsiveness opens up the possibility of using a genetic approach to identify the underlying loci and to facilitate breeding of cultivars with enhanced disease resistance. Towards this goal, we discovered that responsiveness to csp22 segregates as a single locus in an F2 population of tomato.

  13. The Arabidopsis thaliana lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is required for full resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and affects jasmonate signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagué, Claudine; Gouget, Anne; Bouchez, Olivier; Souriac, Camille; Haget, Nathalie; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Govers, Francine; Roby, Dominique; Canut, Hervé

    2017-09-01

    On microbial attack, plants can detect invaders and activate plant innate immunity. For the detection of pathogen molecules or cell wall damage, plants employ receptors that trigger the activation of defence responses. Cell surface proteins that belong to large families of lectin receptor kinases are candidates to function as immune receptors. Here, the function of LecRK-I.9 (At5g60300), a legume-type lectin receptor kinase involved in cell wall-plasma membrane contacts and in extracellular ATP (eATP) perception, was studied through biochemical, gene expression and reverse genetics approaches. In Arabidopsis thaliana, LecRK-I.9 expression is rapidly, highly and locally induced on inoculation with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst). Two allelic lecrk-I.9 knock-out mutants showed decreased resistance to Pst. Conversely, over-expression of LecRK-I.9 led to increased resistance to Pst. The analysis of defence gene expression suggests an alteration of both the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathways. In particular, LecRK-I.9 expression during plant-pathogen interaction was dependent on COI1 (CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1) and JAR1 (JASMONATE RESISTANT 1) components, and JA-responsive transcription factors (TFs) showed altered levels of expression in plants over-expressing LecRK-I.9. A similar misregulation of these TFs was obtained by JA treatment. This study identified LecRK-I.9 as necessary for full resistance to Pst and demonstrated its involvement in the control of defence against pathogens through a regulation of JA signalling components. The role of LecRK-I.9 is discussed with regard to the potential molecular mechanisms linking JA signalling to cell wall damage and/or eATP perception. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  14. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C.; Butler, Margi I.; Poulter, Russell T. M.; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M.; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples. PMID:26262683

  15. Co-silencing of tomato S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase genes confers increased immunity against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and enhanced tolerance to drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiao Hui

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH, catalyzing the reversible hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine to adenosine and homocysteine, is a key enzyme that maintain the cellular methylation potential in all organisms. We report here the biological functions of tomato SlSAHHs in stress response. The tomato genome contains three SlSAHH genes that encode SlSAHH proteins with high level of sequence identity. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that SlSAHHs responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 and Botrytis cinerea as well as to defense signaling hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-based knockdown of individual SlSAHH gene did not affect the growth performance and the response to Pst DC3000. However, co-silencing of three SlSAHH genes using a conserved sequence led to significant inhibition of vegetable growth. The SlSAHH-co-silenced plants displayed increased resistance to Pst DC3000 but did not alter the resistance to B. cinerea. Co-silencing of SlSAHHs resulted in constitutively activated defense responses including elevated SA level, upregulated expression of defense-related and PAMP-triggered immunity marker genes and increased callose deposition and H2O2 accumulation. Furthermore, the SlSAHH-co-silenced plants also exhibited enhanced drought stress tolerance although they had relatively small roots. These data demonstrate that, in addition to the functions in growth and development, SAHHs also play important roles in regulating biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants.

  16. Tomato Sl3-MMP, a member of the Matrix metalloproteinase family, is required for disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Qiuming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Shixia; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Song, Fengming

    2015-06-14

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases. MMPs have been characterized in detail in mammals and shown to play key roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Although MMPs in some plant species have been identified, the function of MMPs in biotic stress responses remains elusive. A total of five MMP genes were identified in tomato genome. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of Sl-MMP genes was induced with distinct patterns by infection of Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and by treatment with defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene precursor 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based knockdown of individual Sl-MMPs and disease assays indicated that silencing of Sl3-MMP resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, whereas silencing of other four Sl-MMPs did not affect the disease resistance against these two pathogens. The Sl3-MMP-silenced tomato plants responded with increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and alerted expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea. Transient expression of Sl3-MMP in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana led to an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and upregulated expression of defense-related genes. Biochemical assays revealed that the recombinant mature Sl3-MMP protein had proteolytic activities in vitro with distinct preferences for specificity of cleavage sites. The Sl3-MMP protein was targeted onto the plasma membrane of plant cells when transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. VIGS-based knockdown of Sl3-MMP expression in tomato and gain-of-function transient expression of Sl3-MMP in N. benthamiana demonstrate that Sl3-MMP functions as a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000.

  17. The Arabidopsis lectin receptor kinase LecRK-V.5 represses stomatal immunity induced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Desclos-Theveniau

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Stomata play an important role in plant innate immunity by limiting pathogen entry into leaves but molecular mechanisms regulating stomatal closure upon pathogen perception are not well understood. Here we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana L-type lectin receptor kinase-V.5 (LecRK-V.5 negatively regulates stomatal immunity. Loss of LecRK-V.5 function increased resistance to surface inoculation with virulent bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000. Levels of resistance were not affected after infiltration-inoculation, suggesting that LecRK-V.5 functions at an early defense stage. By contrast, lines overexpressing LecRK-V.5 were more susceptible to Pst DC3000. Enhanced resistance in lecrk-V.5 mutants was correlated with constitutive stomatal closure, while increased susceptibility phenotypes in overexpression lines were associated with early stomatal reopening. Lines overexpressing LecRK-V.5 also demonstrated a defective stomatal closure after pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP treatments. LecRK-V.5 is rapidly expressed in stomatal guard cells after bacterial inoculation or treatment with the bacterial PAMP flagellin. In addition, lecrk-V.5 mutants guard cells exhibited constitutive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibition of ROS production opened stomata of lecrk-V.5. LecRK-V.5 is also shown to interfere with abscisic acid-mediated stomatal closure signaling upstream of ROS production. These results provide genetic evidences that LecRK-V.5 negatively regulates stomatal immunity upstream of ROS biosynthesis. Our data reveal that plants have evolved mechanisms to reverse bacteria-mediated stomatal closure to prevent long-term effect on CO(2 uptake and photosynthesis.

  18. Overexpression of Nictaba-Like Lectin Genes from Glycine max Confers Tolerance towards Pseudomonas syringae Infection, Aphid Infestation and Salt Stress in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Van Holle

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved a sophisticated immune system that allows them to recognize invading pathogens by specialized receptors. Carbohydrate-binding proteins or lectins are part of this immune system and especially the lectins that reside in the nucleocytoplasmic compartment are known to be implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. The class of Nictaba-like lectins (NLL groups all proteins with homology to the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum lectin, known as a stress-inducible lectin. Here we focus on two Nictaba homologs from soybean (Glycine max, referred to as GmNLL1 and GmNLL2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy of fusion constructs with the green fluorescent protein either transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves or stably transformed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells revealed a nucleocytoplasmic localization for the GmNLLs under study. RT-qPCR analysis of the transcript levels for the Nictaba-like lectins in soybean demonstrated that the genes are expressed in several tissues throughout the development of the plant. Furthermore, it was shown that salt treatment, Phytophthora sojae infection and Aphis glycines infestation trigger the expression of particular NLL genes. Stress experiments with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the NLLs from soybean yielded an enhanced tolerance of the plant towards bacterial infection (Pseudomonas syringae, insect infestation (Myzus persicae and salinity. Our data showed a better performance of the transgenic lines compared to wild type plants, indicating that the NLLs from soybean are implicated in the stress response. These data can help to further elucidate the physiological importance of the Nictaba-like lectins from soybean, which can ultimately lead to the design of crop plants with a better tolerance to changing environmental conditions.

  19. Analysis of volatile compounds emitted from fresh Syringa oblata flowers in different florescence by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zu-Guang; Lee, Maw-Rong; Shen, De-Long

    2006-08-18

    In this study, a simple and solvent-free method was developed for determination of the volatile compounds from fresh flowers of Syringa oblata using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The SPME parameters were studied, the optimum conditions of a 65mum polydimethylsiloxan/divinylbenezene (PDMS/DVB), extraction temperature of 25 degrees C and extraction time of 30 min were obtained and applied to extraction of the volatile compounds emitted from fresh flowers of S. oblata. The volatile compounds released from fresh flowers of S. oblata were separated and identified by GC-MS. Lilac aldehyde A, lilac aldehyde B, lilac aldehyde C, lilac aldehyde D, lilac alcohol A, lilac alcohol B, lilac alcohol C, lilac alcohol D, alpha-pinene, sabinene, beta-pinene, myrcene, d-limonene, eucalyptol, cis-ocimene, benzaldehyde, terpinolene, linalool, benzene acetaldehyde, alpha-terpineol, p-methoxyanisole, p-anisaldehyde, (Z,E)-alpha-farnesene and (E,E)-alpha-farnesene were the most abundant volatiles released from fresh flowers of S. oblata var. alba. The relative contents of main volatile fragrance were found to be different in emissions from two varieties of S. oblata flowers (white or purple in color). The four isomers of lilac alcohol and four isomer lilac aldehyde were the characteristic components of the scent of fresh flowers of S. oblata. The main volatile fragrance from fresh flowers of S. oblata var. alba in different florescence ((A) flower buds; (B) at the early stage of flower blooming; (C) during the flower blooming; (D) at the end of flower blooming; (E) senescence) were studied in this paper. The results demonstrated that headspace SPME-GC-MS is a simple, rapid and solvent-free method suitable for analysis of volatile compounds emitted from fresh flowers of S. oblata in different florescence.

  20. Quantitative Interactor Screening with next-generation Sequencing (QIS-Seq identifies Arabidopsis thaliana MLO2 as a target of the Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopZ2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Jennifer D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein-protein interactions is a fundamental aspect of understanding protein function. A commonly used method for identifying protein interactions is the yeast two-hybrid system. Results Here we describe the application of next-generation sequencing to yeast two-hybrid interaction screens and develop Quantitative Interactor Screen Sequencing (QIS-Seq. QIS-Seq provides a quantitative measurement of enrichment for each interactor relative to its frequency in the library as well as its general stickiness (non-specific binding. The QIS-Seq approach is scalable and can be used with any yeast two-hybrid screen and with any next-generation sequencing platform. The quantitative nature of QIS-Seq data make it amenable to statistical evaluation, and importantly, facilitates the standardization of experimental design, data collection, and data analysis. We applied QIS-Seq to identify the Arabidopsis thaliana MLO2 protein as a target of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector protein HopZ2. We validate the interaction between HopZ2 and MLO2 in planta and show that the interaction is required for HopZ2-associated virulence. Conclusions We demonstrate that QIS-Seq is a high-throughput quantitative interactor screen and validate MLO2 as an interactor and novel virulence target of the P. syringae type III secreted effector HopZ2.

  1. Analyses of wrky18 wrky40 plants reveal critical roles of SA/EDS1 signaling and indole-glucosinolate biosynthesis for Golovinomyces orontii resistance and a loss-of resistance towards Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato AvrRPS4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Moritz; Töller, Armin; Diezel, Celia; Roth, Charlotte; Westphal, Lore; Wiermer, Marcel; Somssich, Imre E

    2013-07-01

    Simultaneous mutation of two WRKY-type transcription factors, WRKY18 and WRKY40, renders otherwise susceptible wild-type Arabidopsis plants resistant towards the biotrophic powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces orontii. Resistance in wrky18 wrky40 double mutant plants is accompanied by massive transcriptional reprogramming, imbalance in salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling, altered ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) expression, and accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin. Genetic analyses identified SA biosynthesis and EDS1 signaling as well as biosynthesis of the indole-glucosinolate 4MI3G as essential components required for loss-of-WRKY18 WRKY40-mediated resistance towards G. orontii. The analysis of wrky18 wrky40 pad3 mutant plants impaired in camalexin biosynthesis revealed an uncoupling of pre- from postinvasive resistance against G. orontii. Comprehensive infection studies demonstrated the specificity of wrky18 wrky40-mediated G. orontii resistance. Interestingly, WRKY18 and WRKY40 act as positive regulators in effector-triggered immunity, as the wrky18 wrky40 double mutant was found to be strongly susceptible towards the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 expressing the effector AvrRPS4 but not against other tested Pseudomonas strains. We hypothesize that G. orontii depends on the function of WRKY18 and WRKY40 to successfully infect Arabidopsis wild-type plants while, in the interaction with P. syringae AvrRPS4, they are required to mediate effector-triggered immunity.

  2. PsasM2I, a type II restriction-modification system in Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: differential distribution of carrier strains in the environment and the evolutionary history of homologous RM systems in the Pseudomonas syringae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Tamara; Moscetti, Ilaria; Marchi, Guido

    2014-11-01

    A type II restriction-modification system was found in a native plasmid of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi MLLI2. Functional analysis of the methyltransferase showed that the enzyme acts by protecting the DNA sequence CTGCAG from cleavage. Restriction endonuclease expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cells resulted in mutations in the REase sequence or transposition of insertion sequence 1A in the coding sequence, preventing lethal gene expression. Population screening detected homologous RM systems in other P. savastanoi strains and in the Pseudomonas syringae complex. An epidemiological survey carried out by sampling olive and oleander knots in two Italian regions showed an uneven diffusion of carrier strains, whose presence could be related to a selective advantage in maintaining the RM system in particular environments or subpopulations. Moreover, carrier strains can coexist in the same orchards, plants, and knot tissues with non-carriers, revealing unexpected genetic variability on a very small spatial scale. Phylogenetic analysis of the RM system and housekeeping gene sequences in the P. syringae complex demonstrated the ancient acquisition of the RM systems. However, the evolutionary history of the gene complex also showed the involvement of horizontal gene transfer between related strains and recombination events.

  3. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. The Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 MucR1 Global Regulator Is Connected With the nod Regulon and Is Required for Efficient Symbiosis With Lotus burttii and Glycine max cv. Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Jurado, Sebastián; Alias-Villegas, Cynthia; Navarro-Gómez, Pilar; Zehner, Susanne; Murdoch, Piedad Del Socorro; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Soto, María J; Ollero, Francisco-Javier; Ruiz-Sainz, José E; Göttfert, Michael; Vinardell, José-María

    2016-09-01

    Sinorhizobium fredii HH103 is a rhizobial strain showing a broad host range of nodulation. In addition to the induction of bacterial nodulation genes, transition from a free-living to a symbiotic state requires complex genetic expression changes with the participation of global regulators. We have analyzed the role of the zinc-finger transcriptional regulator MucR1 from S. fredii HH103 under both free-living conditions and symbiosis with two HH103 host plants, Glycine max and Lotus burttii. Inactivation of HH103 mucR1 led to a severe decrease in exopolysaccharide (EPS) biosynthesis but enhanced production of external cyclic glucans (CG). This mutant also showed increased cell aggregation capacity as well as a drastic reduction in nitrogen-fixation capacity with G. max and L. burttii. However, in these two legumes, the number of nodules induced by the mucR1 mutant was significantly increased and decreased, respectively, with respect to the wild-type strain, indicating that MucR1 can differently affect nodulation depending on the host plant. RNA-Seq analysis carried out in the absence and the presence of flavonoids showed that MucR1 controls the expression of hundreds of genes (including some related to EPS production and CG transport), some of them being related to the nod regulon.

  5. Definition of a second Bacillus subtilis pur regulon comprising the pur and xpt-pbuX operons plus pbuG, nupG (yxjA), and pbuE (ydhL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, L.E.; Nygaard, P.; Lassen, C.

    2003-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis expression of genes or operons encoding enzymes and other proteins involved in purine synthesis is affected by purine bases and nucleosides in the growth medium. The genes belonging to the PurR regulon (purR, purA, glyA, guaC, pbuO, pbuG, and the pur, yqhZ-folD, and xpt......-pbuX operons) are controlled by the PurR repressor, which inhibits transcription initiation. Other genes are regulated by a less-well-described transcription termination mechanism that responds to the presence of hypoxanthine and guanine. The pur operon and the xpt-pbuX operon, which were studied here......, are regulated by both mechanisms. We isolated two mutants resistant to 2-fluoroadenine in which the pur operon and the xpt-pbuX operon are expressed at increased levels in a PurR-independent manner. The mutations were caused by deletions that disrupted a potential transcription terminator structure located...

  6. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  7. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  8. Use of the rep technique for allele replacement to construct mutants with deletions of the pstSCAB-phoU operon: evidence of a new role for the PhoU protein in the phosphate regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, P M; Wanner, B L

    1993-01-01

    The phosphate regulon is negatively regulated by the PstSCAB transporter and PhoU protein by a mechanism that may involve protein-protein interaction(s) between them and the Pi sensor protein, PhoR. In order to study such presumed interaction(s), mutants with defined deletions of the pstSCAB-phoU operon were made. This was done by construction of M13 recombinant phage carrying these mutations and by recombination of them onto the chromosome by using a rep host (which cannot replicate M13) for allele replacement. These mutants were used to show that delta (pstSCAB-phoU) and delta (pstB-phoU) mutations abolished Pi uptake by the PstSCAB transporter, as expected, and that delta phoU mutations had no effect on uptake. Unexpectedly, delta phoU mutations had a severe growth defect, and this growth defect was (largely) alleviated by a compensatory mutation in the pstSCAB genes or in the phoBR operon, whose gene products positively regulate expression of the pstSCAB-phoU operon. Because delta phoU mutants that synthesize a functional PstSCAB transporter constitutively grew extremely poorly, the PhoU protein must have a new role, in addition to its role as a negative regulator. A role for the PhoU protein in intracellular Pi metabolism is proposed. Further, our results contradict those of M. Muda, N. N. Rao, and A. Torriani (J. Bacteriol. 174:8057-8064, 1992), who reported that the PhoU protein was required for Pi uptake. Images PMID:8226621

  9. KpnEF, a New Member of the Klebsiella pneumoniae Cell Envelope Stress Response Regulon, Is an SMR-Type Efflux Pump Involved in Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamohan, Govindan

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae has been frequently associated with nosocomial infections. Efflux systems are ubiquitous transporters that also function in drug resistance. Genome analysis of K. pneumoniae strain NTUH-K2044 revealed the presence of ∼15 putative drug efflux systems. We discuss here for the first time the characterization of a putative SMR-type efflux pump, an ebrAB homolog (denoted here as kpnEF) with respect to Klebsiella physiology and the multidrug-resistant phenotype. Analysis of hypermucoviscosity revealed direct involvement of kpnEF in capsule synthesis. The ΔkpnEF mutant displayed higher sensitivity to hyperosmotic (∼2.8-fold) and high bile (∼4.0-fold) concentrations. Mutation in kpnEF resulted in increased susceptibility to cefepime, ceftriaxone, colistin, erythromycin, rifampin, tetracycline, and streptomycin; mutated strains changed from being resistant to being susceptible, and the resistance was restored upon complementation. The ΔkpnEF mutant displayed enhanced sensitivity toward structurally related compounds such as sodium dodecyl sulfate, deoxycholate, and dyes, including clinically relevant disinfectants such as benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine, and triclosan. The prevalence of kpnEF in clinical strains broadens the diversity of antibiotic resistance in K. pneumoniae. Experimental evidence of CpxR binding to the efflux pump promoter and quantification of its expression in a cpxAR mutant background demonstrated kpnEF to be a member of the Cpx regulon. This study helps to elucidate the unprecedented biological functions of the SMR-type efflux pump in Klebsiella spp. PMID:23836167

  10. The dual transcriptional regulator CysR in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 controls a subset of genes of the McbR regulon in response to the availability of sulphide acceptor molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Daniel J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of sulphur metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 has been studied intensively in the last few years, due to its industrial as well as scientific importance. Previously, the gene cg0156 was shown to belong to the regulon of McbR, a global transcriptional repressor of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. This gene encodes a putative ROK-type regulator, a paralogue of the activator of sulphonate utilisation, SsuR. Therefore, it is an interesting candidate for study to further the understanding of the regulation of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Results Deletion of cg0156, now designated cysR, results in the inability of the mutant to utilise sulphate and aliphatic sulphonates. DNA microarray hybridisations revealed 49 genes with significantly increased and 48 with decreased transcript levels in presence of the native CysR compared to a cysR deletion mutant. Among the genes positively controlled by CysR were the gene cluster involved in sulphate reduction, fpr2 cysIXHDNYZ, and ssuR. Gel retardation experiments demonstrated that binding of CysR to DNA depends in vitro on the presence of either O-acetyl-L-serine or O-acetyl-L-homoserine. Mapping of the transcription start points of five transcription units helped to identify a 10 bp inverted repeat as the possible CysR binding site. Subsequent in vivo tests proved this motif to be necessary for CysR-dependent transcriptional regulation. Conclusion CysR acts as the functional analogue of the unrelated LysR-type regulator CysB from Escherichia coli, controlling sulphide production in response to acceptor availability. In both bacteria, gene duplication events seem to have taken place which resulted in the evolution of dedicated regulators for the control of sulphonate utilisation. The striking convergent evolution of network topology indicates the strong selective pressure to control the metabolism of the essential but often toxic sulphur

  11. Mutations in LACS2, a Long-Chain Acyl-Coenzyme A Synthetase, Enhance Susceptibility to Avirulent Pseudomonas syringae But Confer Resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis1[OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dingzhong; Simonich, Michael T.; Innes, Roger W.

    2007-01-01

    We identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, sma4 (symptoms to multiple avr genotypes4), that displays severe disease symptoms when inoculated with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, although bacterial growth is only moderately enhanced compared to wild-type plants. The sma4 mutant showed a normal susceptible phenotype to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Significantly, the sma4 mutant was highly resistant to a necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Germination of B. cinerea spores on sma4 mutant leaves was inhibited, and penetration by those that did germinate was rare. The sma4 mutant also showed several pleiotropic phenotypes, including increased sensitivity to lower humidity and salt stress. Isolation of SMA4 by positional cloning revealed that it encodes LACS2, a member of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. LACS2 has previously been shown to be involved in cutin biosynthesis. We therefore tested three additional cutin-defective mutants for resistance to B. cinerea: att1 (for aberrant induction of type three genes), bodyguard, and lacerata. All three displayed an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Our results indicate that plant cutin or cuticle structure may play a crucial role in tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress and in the pathogenesis of B. cinerea. PMID:17434992

  12. An untargeted global metabolomic analysis reveals the biochemical changes underlying basal resistance and priming in Solanum lycopersicum, and identifies 1-methyltryptophan as a metabolite involved in plant responses to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camañes, Gemma; Scalschi, Loredana; Vicedo, Begonya; González-Bosch, Carmen; García-Agustín, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we have used untargeted global metabolomic analysis to determine and compare the chemical nature of the metabolites altered during the infection of tomato plants (cv. Ailsa Craig) with Botrytis cinerea (Bot) or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), pathogens that have different invasion mechanisms and lifestyles. We also obtained the metabolome of tomato plants primed using the natural resistance inducer hexanoic acid and then infected with these pathogens. By contrasting the metabolomic profiles of infected, primed, and primed + infected plants, we determined not only the processes or components related directly to plant defense responses, but also inferred the metabolic mechanisms by which pathogen resistance is primed. The data show that basal resistance and hexanoic acid-induced resistance to Bot and Pst are associated with a marked metabolic reprogramming. This includes significant changes in amino acids, sugars and free fatty acids, and in primary and secondary metabolism. Comparison of the metabolic profiles of the infections indicated clear differences, reflecting the fact that the plant's chemical responses are highly adapted to specific attackers. The data also indicate involvement of signaling molecules, including pipecolic and azelaic acids, in response to Pst and, interestingly, to Bot. The compound 1-methyltryptophan was shown to be associated with the tomato-Pst and tomato-Bot interactions as well as with hexanoic acid-induced resistance. Root application of this Trp-derived metabolite also demonstrated its ability to protect tomato plants against both pathogens. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Identification of virulence factors and type III effectors of Phylotype I ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HP2000

    1987). The hrp regulon is so named because it induces a hypersensitive response (HR) in non-host or resistant plants and ... Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, Salmonella etc. Many T3Es are validated and .... mutated due to the presence of transposable elements within the gene thus leading to its disruption or due to errors in ...

  14. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Liu, Shixia; Tian, Limei; Dai, Yi; Cao, Zhongye; Huang, Lihong; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs, and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g., salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and a precursor of ethylene). Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7, and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  15. Virus-induced Gene Silencing-based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g. salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4 or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  16. Probing Pseudomonas syringae host interactions using metatranscriptomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transcriptome analyses during the interaction of plants and pathogens can be used to provide insights into molecular mechanisms of plant resistance as well as the mechanisms used by bacteria to adapt to hosts and cause disease. We performed a dual in planta RNA-Seq experiment to profile RNA expressi...

  17. 10 CFR 712.11 - General requirements for HRP certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or recertification; (7) A psychological evaluation consisting of a generally accepted psychological assessment (test) and a semi-structured interview; (8) An initial drug test and random drug tests for the use... test and random alcohol tests at least once each 12 months using an evidential-grade breath alcohol...

  18. Cell individuality: the bistable gene expression of the type III secretion system in Dickeya dadantii 3937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Quan; Laiosa, Michael D; Steeber, Douglas A; Biddle, Eulandria M; Peng, Quan; Yang, Ching-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii 3937 is a gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium that expresses genes encoding a type III secretion system (T3SS) in a bistable pattern when cultured in a homogeneous minimal media. In this work, we further characterized the bistable gene expression of T3SS at the single-cell level. We demonstrated that bistable expression of the HrpL-regulon genes, such as hrpA and hrpN, is controlled by the same regulatory mechanism. We also showed that the expression level of the T3SS master regulatory gene hrpL plays an important role in the development of the bistable expression of hrpA. A high expression level of hrpL is required but unable to guarantee the high-state expression of hrpA in a cell. In addition, bistable expression patterns of T3SS genes in other gram-negative pathogens of the Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonadaceae families were also described in this study. This suggests that the T3SS bistability might be a conserved population behavior in several gram-negative bacterial pathogens.

  19. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...

  20. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...... we show here that almost 400 genes (15%) are influenced by the clpX deletion. Furthermore, ClpX not only regulates many virulence factors, but rather serves as a global regulator of central functions for S. aureus lifestyle and pathogenicity....

  1. PrhN, a putative marR family transcriptional regulator, is involved in positive regulation of type III secretion system and full virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang eYong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The MarR-family of transcriptional regulators are involved in various cellular processes, including resistance to multiple antibiotics and other toxic chemicals, adaptation to different environments and pathogenesis in many plant and animal pathogens. Here, we reported a new MarR regulator PrhN, which was involved in the pathogenesis of Ralstonia solanacearum. prhN mutant exhibited significantly reduced virulence and stem colonization compared to that of wild type in tomato plants. prhN mutant caused identical hypersensitive response (HR on resistant plants to the wild type. Deletion of prhN gene substantially reduced the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS in vitro and in planta (mainly in tomato plants, which is essential for pathogenicity of R. solanacearum, and the complemented PrhN could restore its virulence and T3SS expression to that of wild type. T3SS is directly controlled by AraC-type transcriptional regulator HrpB, and the transcription of hrpB is activated by HrpG and PrhG. HrpG and PrhG are homologues but are regulated by the PhcA positively and negatively respectively. Deletion of prhN gene also abolished the expression of hrpB and prhG, but didn't change the expression of hrpG and phcA. Together, these results indicated that PrhN positively regulates T3SS expression through PrhG and HrpB. PrhN and PhcA should regulate prhG expression in a parallel way. This is the first report on the pathogenesis of MarR regulator in R. solanacearum, and this new finding will improve our understanding on the various biological functions of MarR regulator and the complex regulatory network on hrp regulon in R. solanacearum.

  2. Nanobody based immunoassay for human soluble epoxide hydrolase detection using polyHRP for signal enhancement—the rediscovery of polyHRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is a potential pharmacological target for treating hypertension, vascular inflammation, cancer, pain and multiple cardiovascular related diseases. A variable domain of a heavy chain only antibody (termed sdAb, nanobody or VHH) possesses advantages of small size, high ...

  3. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels.

  4. HrpNEa-induced deterrent effect on phloem feeding of the green

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Beibei Lü1 Weiwei Sun1 Shuping Zhang1 Chunling Zhang1 Jun Qian1 Xiaomeng Wang1 Rong Gao1 Hansong Dong1. State Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory for Monitoring and Management of Crop Pathogens and Insect Pests, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China ...

  5. HrpNEa-induced deterrent effect on phloem feeding of the green ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clogging inside the capillary food canal. Therefore, saliva- tion is a crucial event during the phloem-feeding process for insects to overcome a number ...... by grants (2009ZX08002-004B and 2008ZX08002-001) from the National Novel Transgenic Organisms Breeding. Project in China. References. Alonso JM, Hirayama T, ...

  6. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels

  7. Integrated Mecical Model (IMM) 4.0 Verification and Validation (VV) Testing (HRP IWS 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M; Kerstman, E.; Arellano, J.; Boley, L.; Reyes, D.; Young, M.; Garcia, Y.; Saile, L.; Myers, J.

    2016-01-01

    Timeline, partial treatment, and alternate medications were added to the IMM to improve the fidelity of this model to enhance decision support capabilities. Using standard design reference missions, IMM VV testing compared outputs from the current operational IMM (v3) with those from the model with added functionalities (v4). These new capabilities were examined in a comparative, stepwise approach as follows: a) comparison of the current operational IMM v3 with the enhanced functionality of timeline alone (IMM 4.T), b) comparison of IMM 4.T with the timeline and partial treatment (IMM 4.TPT), and c) comparison of IMM 4.TPT with timeline, partial treatment and alternative medication (IMM 4.0).

  8. HRP II - The Development of a New Vehicle for Studying Deep Ocean Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    places them at the center of the sensed volume. The Druck pressure sensor is mounted directly on the lower endcap. The sample rate is 25 Hz, and a...precision 24 bit) pressure Druck (model PDCR 1820-9082) Temperature Thermometrics (model, SP60DA202MAI) with stainless pressure housing Conductivity...1 0.9X41.51 Y-50.15Z40.63*33 $C47.5P-3.6R-1 0.5X41.39Y-49.91 Z40.74* 3D $C47.5P-3.4R-1 0.1 X41.25Y-49.69Z41.09*3A $C47.3P-3.2R-9.6X41.26Y-49.43Z41.37

  9. NASA HRP Plans for Collaboration at the IBMP Ground-Based Experimental Facility (NEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and IBMP are planning research collaborations using the IBMP Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK offers unique capabilities to study the effects of isolation on behavioral health and performance as it relates to spaceflight. The NEK is comprised of multiple interconnected modules that range in size from 50-250m(sup3). Modules can be included or excluded in a given mission allowing for flexibility of platform design. The NEK complex includes a Mission Control Center for communications and monitoring of crew members. In an effort to begin these collaborations, a 2-week mission is planned for 2017. In this mission, scientific studies will be conducted to assess facility capabilities in preparation for longer duration missions. A second follow-on 2-week mission may be planned for early in 2018. In future years, long duration missions of 4, 8 and 12 months are being considered. Missions will include scenarios that simulate for example, transit to and from asteroids, the moon, or other interplanetary travel. Mission operations will be structured to include stressors such as, high workloads, communication delays, and sleep deprivation. Studies completed at the NEK will support International Space Station expeditions, and future exploration missions. Topics studied will include communication, crew autonomy, cultural diversity, human factors, and medical capabilities.

  10. Subchronic mild noise stress increases HRP permeability in rat small intestine in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, P. B.; van Raaij, M. T.; Dobbe, C. J.; Timmerman, A.; Kiliaan, A. J.; Taminiau, J. A.; Groot, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Recently we reported an increased trans- and paracellular protein permeability in rat small intestine after acute cold restraint stress. In the present study, we applied randomized 95- or 105-dB white noise pulses during 45 min/h, 12 h/day, duration 8 days, as a milder, but more chronic stressor to

  11. Evidence for the Involvement of an Oxidative Stress in the Initiation of Infection of Pear by Erwinia amylovora1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venisse, Jean-Stéphane; Gullner, Gabor; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2001-01-01

    Involvement of an oxidative burst, usually related to incompatible plant/pathogen interactions leading to hypersensitive reactions, was investigated with Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight of Maloideae subfamily of Rosaceae, in interaction with pear (Pyrus communis; compatible situation) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum; incompatible situation). As expected, this necrogenic bacterium induced in tobacco a sustained production of superoxide anion, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, and concomitant increases of several antioxidative enzymes (ascorbate peroxidases, glutathion reductases, glutathion-S-transferases, and peroxidases), in contrast to the compatible pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci, which did not cause such reactions. In pear leaves, however, inoculations with both the disease- and the hypersensitive reaction-inducing bacteria (E. amylovora and P. syringae pv tabaci, respectively) resulted in superoxide accumulation, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, and enzyme induction at similar rates and according to equivalent time courses. The unexpected ability of E. amylovora to generate an oxidative stress even in compatible situation was linked to its functional hrp (for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) cluster because an Hrp secretion mutant of the bacteria did not induce any plant response. It is suggested that E. amylovora uses the production of reactive oxygen species as a tool to provoke host cell death during pathogenesis to invade plant tissues. The bacterial exopolysaccharide could protect this pathogen against the toxic effects of oxygen species since a non-capsular mutant of E. amylovora induced locally the same responses than the wild type but was unable to further colonize the plant. PMID:11299395

  12. Identification of common motifs in unaligned DNA sequences: application to Escherichia coli Lrp regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Y M; Mandel, Y; Friedberg, D; Margalit, H

    1995-08-01

    We describe a relatively simple method for the identification of common motifs in DNA sequences that are known to share a common function. The input sequences are unaligned and there is no information regarding the position or orientation of the motif. Often such data exists for protein-binding regions, where genetic or molecular information that defines the binding region is available, but the specific recognition site within it is unknown. The method is based on the principle of 'divide and conquer'; we first search for dominant submotifs and then build full-length motifs around them. This method has several useful features: (i) it screens all submotifs so that the results are independent of the sequence order in the data; (ii) it allows the submotifs to contain spacers; (iii) it identifies an existing motif even if the data contains 'noise'; (iv) its running time depends linearly on the total length of the input. The method is demonstrated on two groups of protein-binding sequences: a well-studied group of known CRP-binding sequences, and a relatively newly identified group of genes known to be regulated by Lrp. The Lrp motif that we identify, based on 23 gene sequences, is similar to a previously identified motif based on a smaller data set, and to a consensus sequence of experimentally defined binding sites. Individual Lrp sites are evaluated and compared in regard to their regulation mode.

  13. Structural basis of the transcriptional regulation of the proline utilization regulon by multifunctional PutA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Larson, John D; Bottoms, Christopher A; Arturo, Emilia C; Henzl, Michael T; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Nix, Jay C; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2008-08-01

    The multifunctional Escherichia coli proline utilization A (PutA) flavoprotein functions both as a membrane-associated proline catabolic enzyme and as a transcriptional repressor of the proline utilization genes putA and putP. To better understand the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by PutA, we have mapped the put-regulatory region, determined a crystal structure of the PutA ribbon-helix-helix domain (PutA52, a polypeptide corresponding to residues 1-52 of E. coli PutA) complexed with DNA, and examined the thermodynamics of DNA binding to PutA52. Five operator sites, each containing the sequence motif 5'-GTTGCA-3', were identified using gel-shift analysis. Three of the sites are shown to be critical for repression of putA, whereas the two other sites are important for repression of putP. The 2.25-A-resolution crystal structure of PutA52 bound to one of the operators (operator 2; 21 bp) shows that the protein contacts a 9-bp fragment corresponding to the GTTGCA consensus motif plus three flanking base pairs. Since the operator sequences differ in flanking bases, the structure implies that PutA may have different affinities for the five operators. This hypothesis was explored using isothermal titration calorimetry. The binding of PutA52 to operator 2 is exothermic, with an enthalpy of -1.8 kcal/mol and a dissociation constant of 210 nM. Substitution of the flanking bases of operator 4 into operator 2 results in an unfavorable enthalpy of 0.2 kcal/mol and a 15-fold-lower affinity, showing that base pairs outside of the consensus motif impact binding. Structural and thermodynamic data suggest that hydrogen bonds between Lys9 and bases adjacent to the GTTGCA motif contribute to transcriptional regulation by fine-tuning the affinity of PutA for put control operators.

  14. Global Analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis Quorum Sensing-Controlled Regulon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. PMID:24464461

  15. Identification of a glycolytic regulon in the Archaea Pyrococcus and Thermococcus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.; Verhees, C.H.; Akerboom, A.P.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The glycolytic pathway of the hyperthermophilic archaea that belong to the order Thermococcales (Pyrococcus, Thermococcus and Palaeococcus) differs significantly from the canonical Embden-Meyerhof pathway in bacteria and eukarya. This archaeal glycolysis variant consists of several novel enzymes,

  16. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e σB regulon

    OpenAIRE

    Hain, Torsten; Hossain, Hamid; Chatterjee, Som S; Machata, Silke; Volk, Ute; Wagner, Sandra; Brors, Benedikt; Haas, Stefan; Kuenne, Carsten T; Billion, Andre; Otten, Sonja; Pane-Farre, Jan; Engelmann, Susanne; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The opportunistic food-borne gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can exist as a free-living microorganism in the environment and grow in the cytoplasm of vertebrate and invertebrate cells following infection. The general stress response, controlled by the alternative sigma factor, σB, has an important role for bacterial survival both in the environment and during infection. We used quantitative real-time PCR analysis and immuno-blot analysis to examine σB express...

  17. Integrative food-grade expression system based on the lactose regulon of Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosalbes, M J; Esteban, C D; Galán, J L; Pérez-Martínez, G

    2000-11-01

    The lactose operon from Lactobacillus casei is regulated by very tight glucose repression and substrate induction mechanisms, which made it a tempting candidate system for the expression of foreign genes or metabolic engineering. An integrative vector was constructed, allowing stable gene insertion in the chromosomal lactose operon of L. casei. This vector was based on the nonreplicative plasmid pRV300 and contained two DNA fragments corresponding to the 3' end of lacG and the complete lacF gene. Four unique restriction sites were created, as well as a ribosome binding site that would allow the cloning and expression of new genes between these two fragments. Then, integration of the cloned genes into the lactose operon of L. casei could be achieved via homologous recombination in a process that involved two selection steps, which yielded highly stable food-grade mutants. This procedure has been successfully used for the expression of the E. coli gusA gene and the L. lactis ilvBN genes in L. casei. Following the same expression pattern as that for the lactose genes, beta-glucuronidase activity and diacetyl production were repressed by glucose and induced by lactose. This integrative vector represents a useful tool for strain improvement in L. casei that could be applied to engineering fermentation processes or used for expression of genes for clinical and veterinary uses.

  18. Streptococcus mutans copes with heat stress by multiple transcriptional regulons modulating virulence and energy metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Niu, Yulong; Zhou, Xuedong; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Shida; Guo, Qiang; Li, Yuqing; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Yang, Yi; Ding, Yi; Lamont, Richard J.; Xu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the virulence of Streptococcus mutans. The virulence expression of S. mutans is linked to its stress adaptation to the changes in the oral environment. In this work we used whole-genome microarrays to profile the dynamic transcriptomic responses of S. mutans during physiological heat stress. In addition, we evaluated the phenotypic changes, including, eDNA release, initial biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharides generation, acid production/acid tolerance, and ATP turnover of S. mutans during heat stress. There were distinct patterns observed in the way that S. mutans responded to heat stress that included 66 transcription factors for the expression of functional genes being differentially expressed. Especially, response regulators of two component systems (TCSs), the repressors of heat shock proteins and regulators involved in sugar transporting and metabolism co-ordinated to enhance the cell’s survival and energy generation against heat stress in S. mutans. PMID:26251057

  19. Deep Sequencing Whole Transcriptome Exploration of the σ Regulon in Neisseria meningitidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis in 't Veld, R.A.G.; Willemsen, A.M.; van Kampen, A.H.C.; Bradley, E.J.; Baas, F.; Pannekoek, Y.; van den Ende, A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria live in an ever-changing environment and must alter protein expression promptly to adapt to these changes and survive. Specific response genes that are regulated by a subset of alternative σ(70)-like transcription factors have evolved in order to respond to this changing environment.

  20. A bistable gene switch for antibiotic biosynthesis: the butyrolactone regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Mehra

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Many microorganisms, including bacteria of the class Streptomycetes, produce various secondary metabolites including antibiotics to gain a competitive advantage in their natural habitat. The production of these compounds is highly coordinated in a population to expedite accumulation to an effective concentration. Furthermore, as antibiotics are often toxic even to their producers, a coordinated production allows microbes to first arm themselves with a defense mechanism to resist their own antibiotics before production commences. One possible mechanism of coordination among individuals is through the production of signaling molecules. The gamma-butyrolactone system in Streptomyces coelicolor is a model of such a signaling system for secondary metabolite production. The accumulation of these signaling molecules triggers antibiotic production in the population. A pair of repressor-amplifier proteins encoded by scbA and scbR mediates the production and action of one particular gamma-butyrolactone, SCB1. Based on the proposed interactions of scbA and scbR, a mathematical model was constructed and used to explore the ability of this system to act as a robust genetic switch. Stability analysis shows that the butyrolactone system exhibits bistability and, in response to a threshold SCB1 concentration, can switch from an OFF state to an ON state corresponding to the activation of genes in the cryptic type I polyketide synthase gene cluster, which are responsible for production of the hypothetical polyketide. The switching time is inversely related to the inducer concentration above the threshold, such that short pulses of low inducer concentration cannot switch on the system, suggesting its possible role in noise filtering. In contrast, secondary metabolite production can be triggered rapidly in a population of cells producing the butyrolactone signal due to the presence of an amplification loop in the system. S. coelicolor was perturbed experimentally by varying concentrations of SCB1, and the model simulations match the experimental data well. Deciphering the complexity of this butyrolactone switch will provide valuable insights into how robust and efficient systems can be designed using "simple" two-protein networks.

  1. PePPER : A webserver for prediction of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, A.; Pietersma, H.; Cordes, M.; Kuipers, O.P.; Kok, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Accurate prediction of DNA motifs that are targets of RNA polymerases, sigma factors and transcription factors (TFs) in prokaryotes is a difficult mission mainly due to as yet undiscovered features in DNA sequences or structures in promoter regions. Improved prediction and comparison

  2. PePPER : a webserver for prediction of prokaryote promoter elements and regulons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anne; Pietersma, Hilco; Cordes, Martijn; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Accurate prediction of DNA motifs that are targets of RNA polymerases, sigma factors and transcription factors (TFs) in prokaryotes is a difficult mission mainly due to as yet undiscovered features in DNA sequences or structures in promoter regions. Improved prediction and comparison

  3. Variation in the group B Streptococcus CsrRS regulon and effects on pathogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Sheng-Mei; Ishmael, Nadeeza; Hotopp, Julie Dunning; Puliti, Manuela; Tissi, Luciana; Kumar, Nikhil; Cieslewicz, Michael J.; Tettelin, Herve; Wesselsl, Michael R.

    CsrRS (or CovRS) is a two-component regulatory system that controls expression of multiple virulence factors in the important human pathogen group B Streptococcus (GBS). We now report global gene expression studies in GBS strains 2603V/R and 515 and their isogenic csrR and csrS mutants. Together

  4. Quantitative and temporal definition of the Mla transcriptional regulon during barley-powdery mildew interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barley Mildew resistance locus a (Mla) is a major determinant of immunity to the powdery mildew pathogen, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Alleles of Mla encode cytoplasmic- and membrane-localized coiled-coil, nucleotide binding site, leucine-rich repeat proteins that mediate resistance when complem...

  5. A Bistable Gene Switch for Antibiotic Biosynthesis : The Butyrolactone Regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, Sarika; Charaniya, Salim; Takano, Eriko; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2008-01-01

    Many microorganisms, including bacteria of the class Streptomycetes, produce various secondary metabolites including antibiotics to gain a competitive advantage in their natural habitat. The production of these compounds is highly coordinated in a population to expedite accumulation to an effective

  6. Activation of Silent gal Genes in the lac-gal Regulon of Streptococcus thermophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaughan, Elaine E.; Bogaard, Patrick T.C. van den; Catzeddu, Pasquale; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus strain CNRZ 302 is unable to ferment galactose, neither that generated intracellularly by lactose hydrolysis nor the free sugar. Nevertheless, sequence analysis and complementation studies with Escherichia coli demonstrated that strain CNRZ 302 contained structurally

  7. Activation of silent gal genes in the lac-gal regulon of Streptococcus thermophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaughan, E.E.; Bogaard, van den P.T.C.; Catzeddu, P.; Kuipers, O.P.; Vos, de W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus thermophilus strain CNRZ 302 is unable to ferment galactose, neither that generated intracellularly by lactose hydrolysis nor the free sugar. Nevertheless, sequence analysis and complementation studies with Escherichia coli demonstrated that strain CNRZ 302 contained structurally

  8. METABOLISMO DEL FOSFATO EN ACIDITHIOBACILLUS FERROOXIDANS: CARACTERIZACION DE UN POSIBLE REGULON PHO

    OpenAIRE

    VERA VELIZ, MARIO ANDRES; VERA VELIZ, MARIO ANDRES

    2006-01-01

    El microorganismo quimiolitoautotrófico Acidithiobaci/Ius ferrooxidans es de gran importancia en la hiominería. Durante el proceso de biolixiviación de minerales pueden producirse diversos tipos de estrés como cambios de pH y temperatura, además de la car 106p.

  9. Global analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-04-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

  10. Global Analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis Quorum Sensing-Controlled Regulon

    OpenAIRE

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D.; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that gene...

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Hfq-Regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrero, Patricio; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Lanner, Ulrike; Schlosser, Andreas; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with 15N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold) in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti. PMID:23119037

  12. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Marcelletti

    Full Text Available The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches.

  13. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana) is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches. PMID:26147218

  14. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Pilar Castañeda-Ojeda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts.

  15. Suppression of Plant Immune Responses by the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 Type III Effector Tyrosine Phosphatases HopAO1 and HopAO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Ojeda, María Pilar; Moreno-Pérez, Alba; Ramos, Cayo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    The effector repertoire of the olive pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 includes two members of the HopAO effector family, one of the most diverse T3E families of the P. syringae complex. The study described here explores the phylogeny of these dissimilar members, HopAO1 and HopAO2, among the complex and reveals their activities as immune defense suppressors. Although HopAO1 is predominantly encoded by phylogroup 3 strains isolated from woody organs of woody hosts, both HopAO1 and HopAO2 are phylogenetically clustered according to the woody/herbaceous nature of their host of isolation, suggesting host specialization of the HopAO family across the P. syringae complex. HopAO1 and HopAO2 translocate into plant cells and show hrpL-dependent expression, which allows their classification as actively deployed type III effectors. Our data also show that HopAO1 and HopAO2 possess phosphatase activity, a hallmark of the members of this family. Both of them exert an inhibitory effect on early plant defense responses, such as ROS production and callose deposition, and are able to suppress ETI responses induced by the effectorless polymutant of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000D28E) in Nicotiana. Moreover, we demonstrate that a ΔhopAO1 mutant of P. savastanoi NCPBB 3335 exhibits a reduced fitness and virulence in olive plants, which supports the relevance of this effector during the interaction of this strain with its host plants. This work contributes to the field with the first report regarding functional analysis of HopAO homologs encoded by P. syringae or P. savastanoi strains isolated from woody hosts. PMID:28529516

  16. Effects of Two Years of Teriparatide, Denosumab, or Both on Bone Microarchitecture and Strength (DATA-HRpQCT study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, J N; Uihlein, A V; Burnett-Bowie, S M; Neer, R M; Derrico, N P; Lee, H; Bouxsein, M L; Leder, B Z

    2016-05-01

    In postmenopausal osteoporosis, combining denosumab and teriparatide increases hip and spine bone mineral density more than either monotherapy. The objective of the study was to determine the effects of 2 years of combination therapy on bone microarchitecture and estimated strength. This was an open-label, randomized controlled trial. We performed high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal tibia and radius in 94 postmenopausal osteoporotic women randomized to 2 years of teriparatide 20 μg sc daily, denosumab 60 mg sc every 6 months, or both. Total volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at the radius and tibia, trabecular vBMD at the radius, and cortical vBMD at the tibia all increased more in the combination group than both monotherapy groups (P teriparatide group but was stable in both other groups (P teriparatide vs both other groups). Trabecular vBMD at the tibia increased similarly in all groups, whereas radius trabecular vBMD increased more in the combination group than the other groups (P teriparatide and denosumab improves bone microarchitecture and estimated strength more than the individual treatments, particularly in cortical bone. These findings suggest that this regimen may be beneficial in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  17. [HRP/WHO: special program of research, development and research training in human reproduction, of the World Health Organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavín, P

    1998-07-01

    The history, objectives and aims of this programme are described in detail. The principal goals achieved on anticonception, reproductive biology and abortion are analyzed, with special reference to the research done in Chile. The strengthening of research capabilities at national level was pointed out with special mention to the Chilean case.

  18. One pot glucose detection by [Fe(III)(biuret-amide)] immobilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticles: an efficient HRP mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvi, Bharmana; Panda, Chakadola; Dhar, Basab B; Gupta, Sayam Sen

    2012-05-28

    An [Fe(III)(biuret-amide)] complex has been immobilized onto mesoporous silica nanoparticles via Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne click chemistry. This hybrid material functions as an efficient peroxidase mimic and was successfully used for the quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose via a one-pot colorimetric assay. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  19. Laterality and grip strength influence hand bone micro-architecture in modern humans, an HRpQCT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Trousdale, William H; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Braga, José

    2017-06-01

    It is widely hypothesized that mechanical loading, specifically repetitive low-intensity tasks, influences the inner structure of cancellous bone. As such, there is likely a relationship between handedness and bone morphology. The aim of this study is to determine patterns in trabecular bone between dominant and non-dominant hands in modern humans. Seventeen healthy patients between 22 and 32 years old were included in the study. Radial carpal bones (lunate, capitate, scaphoid, trapezium, trapezoid, 1st, 2nd and 3rd metacarpals) were analyzed with high-resolution micro-computed tomography. Additionally, crush and pinch grip were recorded. Factorial analysis indicated that bone volume ratio, trabeculae number (Tb.N), bone surface to volume ratio (BS.BV), body weight, stature and crush grip were all positively correlated with principal components 1 and 2 explaining 78.7% of the variance. Volumetric and trabecular endostructural parameters (BV/TV, BS/BV or Tb.Th, Tb.N) explain the observed inter-individual variability better than anthropometric or clinical parameters. Factors analysis regressions showed correlations between these parameters and the dominant side for crush strength for the lunate (r 2 = 0.640, P modern human wrist. © 2017 Anatomical Society.

  20. Supramolecular Structure and Functional Analysis of the Type III Secretion System in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Qun; Liu, Xingzhong; Wei, Hai-Lei

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in non-pathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus, and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homolog protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS.

  1. Supramolecular structure and functional analysis of the type III secretion system in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping eLiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in nonpathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homologue protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS.

  2. Evolution, genomics and epidemiology of Pseudomonas syringae: Challenges in Bacterial Molecular Plant Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrus, David A; McCann, Honour C; Guttman, David S

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable shift in our understanding of plant-pathogenic bacteria is underway. Until recently, nearly all research on phytopathogenic bacteria was focused on a small number of model strains, which provided a deep, but narrow, perspective on plant-microbe interactions. Advances in genome sequencing technologies have changed this by enabling the incorporation of much greater diversity into comparative and functional research. We are now moving beyond a typological understanding of a select collection of strains to a more generalized appreciation of the breadth and scope of plant-microbe interactions. The study of natural populations and evolution has particularly benefited from the expansion of genomic data. We are beginning to have a much deeper understanding of the natural genetic diversity, niche breadth, ecological constraints and defining characteristics of phytopathogenic species. Given this expanding genomic and ecological knowledge, we believe the time is ripe to evaluate what we know about the evolutionary dynamics of plant pathogens. © 2016 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Pseudomonas syringae evades host immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, Michiel J C; van Dijken, Anja J H; Bardoel, Bart W; Seidl, Michael F; van der Ent, Sjoerd; van Strijp, Jos A G; Pieterse, Corné M J

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of

  4. Pseudomonas syringae evades host Immunity by degrading flagellin monomers with alkaline protease AprA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, M.J.C.; Van Dijken, A.J.H.; Bardoel, B.W.; Seidl, M.F; Van der Ent, S.; Van Strijp, J.A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial flagellin molecules are strong inducers of innate immune responses in both mammals and plants. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an alkaline protease called AprA that degrades flagellin monomers. Here, we show that AprA is widespread among a wide variety of

  5. Population genomic insights into the emergence, crop-adaptation and dissemination of Pseudomonas syringae pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although pathogen strains that cause disease outbreaks are often well characterized, relatively little is known about the reservoir populations from which they emerge. Genomic comparison of outbreak strains with isolates of reservoir populations can give new insight into mechanisms of disease emerge...

  6. Abscisic Acid-Cytokinin Antagonism Modulates Resistance Against Pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grosskinsky, D. K.; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 12 (2015), s. 1283-1288 ISSN 0031-949X Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Nicotiana tabacum * plant-pathogen interaction Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2015

  7. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pečenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 3 (2017), s. 437-446 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-14886S; GA ČR GA14-09685S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Arabidopsis * dde2/ein2/pad4/sid2 * exocyst * Flg22 * Pseudomonas * Root hair * vesicle trafficking Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 4.041, year: 2016

  8. Leaf roll-necrosis complex of lilacs in an urban environment. [Syringa vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibben, C.R.; Walker, J.T.

    1966-01-01

    Lilacs in the metropolitan New York area have developed a foliar disorder characterized by leaf roll, interveinal and marginal necrosis, chlorosis, bronzing, and early leaf abscission that is sometimes followed by a break in dormancy of terminal buds. Investigations indicate that this disorder is not due to plant nutrition, Anthropod infestation, or plant pathogens. Air pollutants, including ozone, are implicated.

  9. Inferring condition-specific modulation of transcription factor activity in yeast through regulon-based analysis of genomewide expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boorsma, A.; Lu, X.-J.; Zakrzewska, A.; Klis, F.M.; Bussemaker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: A key goal of systems biology is to understand how genomewide mRNA expression levels are controlled by transcription factors (TFs) in a condition-specific fashion. TF activity is frequently modulated at the post-translational level through ligand binding, covalent modification, or

  10. Structural features of PhoX, one of the phosphate-binding proteins from Pho regulon of Xanthomonas citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Santos, Rodrigo M. L.; Medrano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-Binding Cassette transporter for phosphate is encoded by the pstSCAB operon. PstS is the periplasmic component responsible for affinity and specificity of the system and has also been related to a regulatory role and chemotaxis during depletion of phosphate. Xanthomonas citri has two phosphate-binding proteins: PstS and PhoX, which are differentially expressed under phosphate limitation. In this work, we focused on PhoX characterization and comparison with PstS. The PhoX three-dimensional structure was solved in a closed conformation with a phosphate engulfed in the binding site pocket between two domains. Comparison between PhoX and PstS revealed that they originated from gene duplication, but despite their similarities they show significant differences in the region that interacts with the permeases. PMID:28542513

  11. The Quorum-Sensing Regulon of Vibriofischeri: Novel Components of the Autoinducer/LuxR Regulatory Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    obvious parallel between virulence factors and symbiosis factors, non-lux genetic loci that are transcriptionally regulated by autoinducer/luxR have not...from several unlinked genetic loci to control multiple functions [4]. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, for example, controls the production of elastase...Southern (55) hybridization analyses, the Genius nonradioactive DNA labelling and detection kit (Boehringer Mannheim Biochemicals, India- napolis

  12. Convergent Transcription in the Butyrolactone Regulon in Streptomyces coelicolor Confers a Bistable Genetic Switch for Antibiotic Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anushree; Drews, Laurie; Mehra, Sarika; Takano, Eriko; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2011-01-01

    cis-encoded antisense RNAs (cis asRNA) have been reported to participate in gene expression regulation in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Its presence in Streptomyces coelicolor has also been reported recently; however, its role has yet to be fully investigated. Using mathematical modeling we explore the role of cis asRNA produced as a result of convergent transcription in scbA-scbR genetic switch. scbA and scbR gene pair, encoding repressor–amplifier proteins respectively, mediates the synthesis of a signaling molecule, the γ-butyrolactone SCB1 and controls the onset of antibiotic production. Our model considers that transcriptional interference caused by convergent transcription of two opposing RNA polymerases results in fatal collision and transcriptional termination, which suppresses transcription efficiency. Additionally, convergent transcription causes sense and antisense interactions between complementary sequences from opposing strands, rendering the full length transcript inaccessible for translation. We evaluated the role of transcriptional interference and the antisense effect conferred by convergent transcription on the behavior of scbA-scbR system. Stability analysis showed that while transcriptional interference affects the system, it is asRNA that confers scbA-scbR system the characteristics of a bistable switch in response to the signaling molecule SCB1. With its critical role of regulating the onset of antibiotic synthesis the bistable behavior offers this two gene system the needed robustness to be a genetic switch. The convergent two gene system with potential of transcriptional interference is a frequent feature in various genomes. The possibility of asRNA regulation in other such gene-pairs is yet to be examined. PMID:21765930

  13. Exposure to Glycolytic Carbon Sources Reveals a Novel Layer of Regulation for the MalT Regulon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia A. Reimann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria adapt to changing environments by means of tightly coordinated regulatory circuits. The use of synthetic lethality, a genetic phenomenon in which the combination of two nonlethal mutations causes cell death, facilitates identification and study of such circuitry. In this study, we show that the E. coli ompR malTcon double mutant exhibits a synthetic lethal phenotype that is environmentally conditional. MalTcon, the constitutively active form of the maltose system regulator MalT, causes elevated expression of the outer membrane porin LamB, which leads to death in the absence of the osmoregulator OmpR. However, the presence and metabolism of glycolytic carbon sources, such as sorbitol, promotes viability and unveils a novel layer of regulation within the complex circuitry that controls maltose transport and metabolism.

  14. Quantitative and qualitative stem rust resistance factors in barley are associated with transcriptional suppression of defense regulons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscou, Matthew J; Lauter, Nick; Steffenson, Brian; Wise, Roger P

    2011-07-01

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici; Pgt) is a devastating fungal disease of wheat and barley. Pgt race TTKSK (isolate Ug99) is a serious threat to these Triticeae grain crops because resistance is rare. In barley, the complex Rpg-TTKSK locus on chromosome 5H is presently the only known source of qualitative resistance to this aggressive Pgt race. Segregation for resistance observed on seedlings of the Q21861 × SM89010 (QSM) doubled-haploid (DH) population was found to be predominantly qualitative, with little of the remaining variance explained by loci other than Rpg-TTKSK. In contrast, analysis of adult QSM DH plants infected by field inoculum of Pgt race TTKSK in Njoro, Kenya, revealed several additional quantitative trait loci that contribute to resistance. To molecularly characterize these loci, Barley1 GeneChips were used to measure the expression of 22,792 genes in the QSM population after inoculation with Pgt race TTKSK or mock-inoculation. Comparison of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) between treatments revealed an inoculation-dependent expression polymorphism implicating Actin depolymerizing factor3 (within the Rpg-TTKSK locus) as a candidate susceptibility gene. In parallel, we identified a chromosome 2H trans-eQTL hotspot that co-segregates with an enhancer of Rpg-TTKSK-mediated, adult plant resistance discovered through the Njoro field trials. Our genome-wide eQTL studies demonstrate that transcript accumulation of 25% of barley genes is altered following challenge by Pgt race TTKSK, but that few of these genes are regulated by the qualitative Rpg-TTKSK on chromosome 5H. It is instead the chromosome 2H trans-eQTL hotspot that orchestrates the largest inoculation-specific responses, where enhanced resistance is associated with transcriptional suppression of hundreds of genes scattered throughout the genome. Hence, the present study associates the early suppression of genes expressed in this host-pathogen interaction with enhancement of R-gene mediated resistance.

  15. Quantitative and qualitative stem rust resistance factors in barley are associated with transcriptional suppression of defense regulons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Moscou

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici; Pgt is a devastating fungal disease of wheat and barley. Pgt race TTKSK (isolate Ug99 is a serious threat to these Triticeae grain crops because resistance is rare. In barley, the complex Rpg-TTKSK locus on chromosome 5H is presently the only known source of qualitative resistance to this aggressive Pgt race. Segregation for resistance observed on seedlings of the Q21861 × SM89010 (QSM doubled-haploid (DH population was found to be predominantly qualitative, with little of the remaining variance explained by loci other than Rpg-TTKSK. In contrast, analysis of adult QSM DH plants infected by field inoculum of Pgt race TTKSK in Njoro, Kenya, revealed several additional quantitative trait loci that contribute to resistance. To molecularly characterize these loci, Barley1 GeneChips were used to measure the expression of 22,792 genes in the QSM population after inoculation with Pgt race TTKSK or mock-inoculation. Comparison of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL between treatments revealed an inoculation-dependent expression polymorphism implicating Actin depolymerizing factor3 (within the Rpg-TTKSK locus as a candidate susceptibility gene. In parallel, we identified a chromosome 2H trans-eQTL hotspot that co-segregates with an enhancer of Rpg-TTKSK-mediated, adult plant resistance discovered through the Njoro field trials. Our genome-wide eQTL studies demonstrate that transcript accumulation of 25% of barley genes is altered following challenge by Pgt race TTKSK, but that few of these genes are regulated by the qualitative Rpg-TTKSK on chromosome 5H. It is instead the chromosome 2H trans-eQTL hotspot that orchestrates the largest inoculation-specific responses, where enhanced resistance is associated with transcriptional suppression of hundreds of genes scattered throughout the genome. Hence, the present study associates the early suppression of genes expressed in this host-pathogen interaction with enhancement of R-gene mediated resistance.

  16. The PurR regulon in Lactococcus lactis – transcriptional regulation of the purine nucleotide metabolism and translational machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    to a conserved PurBox motif present on the DNA at a fixed distance from the promoter -10 element. PurR contains a PRPP-binding site, and activation occurs when the intracellular PRPP pool is high as a consequence of low exogenous purine nucleotide pools. By an iterative approach of bioinformatics searches...... and motif optimization, 21 PurR-regulated genes were identified and used in a redefinition of the PurBox consensus sequence. In the process a new motif, the double-PurBox, which is present in a number of promoters and contains two partly overlapping PurBox motifs, was established. Transcriptional fusions...... were used to analyse wild-type promoters and promoters with inactivating PurBox mutations to confirm the relevance of the PurBox motifs as PurR-binding sites. The promoters of several operons were shown to be devoid of any -35 sequence, and found to be completely dependent on PurR-mediated activation...

  17. [Reimbursement. Case report: Medical implication as precondition for reimbursement by German health insurance on the example of HRpQCT diagnosis of osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Endress, S; Nothaas, R

    2011-10-01

    The main condition that has to be met for reimbursement is the medical implication of the chosen method. This issue is discussed based on the case of a 72-year-old patient suffering from osteoporotic fractures of the spine. Drug treatment of osteoporosis was observed with a high-resolution peripheral CT (HR-pQCT/XtremeCT). A German court came to the conclusion that there is no added value of the procedure in comparison with the well-established DXA. Judges rejected the need for reimbursement in that particular case and ruled in favor of the insurance company, which had originally refused the refund. 

  18. Corticothalamic and corticotectal somatosensory projections from the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (SIV cortex) in neonatal cats: an anatomical demonstration with HRP and /sup 3/H-leucine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHaffie, J.G.; Kruger, L.; Clemo, H.R.; Stein, B.E.

    1988-08-01

    Corticothalamic and corticotectal projections from the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES) in neonatal cats were studied with anterograde and retrograde neuroanatomical techniques. When the injection site was relatively restricted to the sulcal walls and fundus of the rostral AES (i.e., the SIV cortex), heavy ipsilateral thalamic label was observed in the medial subdivision of the posterior group, in the suprageniculate nucleus, and in the external medullary lamina. No terminal label was seen in the contralateral thalamus although the contralateral homotopic cortex was heavily labeled. Within the ventrobasal complex (VB), dense axonal label was observed in fascicles that traversed VB, but only light terminal label was observed within VB itself. However, in cases where the tracer spread into adjacent SII, terminal label in VB was pronounced. Similarly, when the injection site extended into auditory cortex, terminal label was observed in the lateral and intermediate subdivisions of the posterior group. Rostral AES injections produced distinct, predominantly ipsilateral, terminal label in the superior colliculus that was distributed in two tiers: a discontinuous band in the stratum griseum intermedium and a more diffuse band in stratum griseum profundum. Caudally, dense terminal label was seen in the intercollicular zone and dorsolateral periaqueductal gray. When the injection site did not include rostral AES, no label was observed in the superior colliculus. Horseradish peroxidase injections into the superior colliculus of neonates produced retrogradely labeled neurons throughout the AES, but none was found on the crown of the gyrus where SII is located. Thus, the neonatal corticotectal somatosensory projection arises exclusively from AES and parallels that found in adults.

  19. Optimizing the HRP-2 In Vitro Malaria Drug Susceptibility Assay Using a Reference Clone to Improve Comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    and artesunate (AS), as well as key long-acting agents, including mefloquine (MQ) and chloroquine (CQ), which were used as drug susceptible and...Table 1). The W2 clone was resistant to CQ but susceptible to mefloquine when compared to other commonly used clones D6 and 3D7, while 3D7 was less...Decreased in vitro susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates to artesunate, mefloquine , chloroquine, and quinine in Cambodia from 2001 to 2007

  20. Secondary vestibulocerebellar projections to the flocculus and uvulo-nodular lobule of the rabbit: a study using HRP and double fluorescent tracer techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Epema; N.M. Gerrits (N.); J. Voogd (Jan)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractThe distribution of vestibular neurons projecting to the flocculus and the nodulus and uvula of the caudal vermis (Larsell's lobules X and IX) was investigated with retrograde axonal transport of horseradish peroxidase and the fluorescent tracers Fast Blue, Nuclear Yellow and Diamidino

  1. Comparative effects of teriparatide, denosumab, and combination therapy on peripheral compartmental bone density, microarchitecture, and estimated strength: the DATA-HRpQCT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Joy N; Uihlein, Alexander V; Burnett-Bowie, Sherri-Ann M; Neer, Robert M; Zhu, Yuli; Derrico, Nicholas; Lee, Hang; Bouxsein, Mary L; Leder, Benjamin Z

    2015-01-01

    Combined teriparatide and denosumab increases spine and hip bone mineral density more than either drug alone. The effect of this combination on skeletal microstructure and microarchitecture, however, is unknown. Because skeletal microstructure and microarchitecture are important components of skeletal integrity, we performed high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) assessments at the distal tibia and radius in postmenopausal osteoporotic women randomized to receive teriparatide 20 µg daily (n = 31), denosumab 60 mg every 6 months (n = 33), or both (n = 30) for 12 months. In the teriparatide group, total volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) did not change at either anatomic site but increased in both other groups at both sites. The increase in vBMD at the tibia was greater in the combination group (3.1 ± 2.2%) than both the denosumab (2.2 ± 1.9%) and teriparatide groups (-0.3 ± 1.9%) (p teriparatide group, whereas it increased in both other groups at both sites. Tibia cortical vBMD increased more in the combination group (1.5 ± 1.5%) than both monotherapy groups (p teriparatide group but increased in both other groups. The increase in cortical thickness at the tibia was greater in the combination group (5.4 ± 3.9%) than both monotherapy groups (p teriparatide group, radial cortical porosity increased by 20.9 ± 37.6% and by 5.6 ± 9.9% at the tibia but did not change in the other two groups. Bone stiffness and failure load, as estimated by finite element analysis, did not change in the teriparatide group but increased in the other two groups at both sites. Together, these findings suggest that the use of denosumab and teriparatide in combination improves HR-pQCT measures of bone quality more than either drug alone and may be of significant clinical benefit in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  2. Sequence variation does not confound the measurement of plasma PfHRP2 concentration in African children presenting with severe malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramutton Thiranut

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein PFHRP2 measurement is used widely for diagnosis, and more recently for severity assessment in falciparum malaria. The Pfhrp2 gene is highly polymorphic, with deletion of the entire gene reported in both laboratory and field isolates. These issues potentially confound the interpretation of PFHRP2 measurements. Methods Studies designed to detect deletion of Pfhrp2 and its paralog Pfhrp3 were undertaken with samples from patients in seven countries contributing to the largest hospital-based severe malaria trial (AQUAMAT. The quantitative relationship between sequence polymorphism and PFHRP2 plasma concentration was examined in samples from selected sites in Mozambique and Tanzania. Results There was no evidence for deletion of either Pfhrp2 or Pfhrp3 in the 77 samples with lowest PFHRP2 plasma concentrations across the seven countries. Pfhrp2 sequence diversity was very high with no haplotypes shared among 66 samples sequenced. There was no correlation between Pfhrp2 sequence length or repeat type and PFHRP2 plasma concentration. Conclusions These findings indicate that sequence polymorphism is not a significant cause of variation in PFHRP2 concentration in plasma samples from African children. This justifies the further development of plasma PFHRP2 concentration as a method for assessing African children who may have severe falciparum malaria. The data also add to the existing evidence base supporting the use of rapid diagnostic tests based on PFHRP2 detection.

  3. Functional and computational analysis of amino acid patterns predictive of type III secretion system substrates in Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs) deliver proteins called effectors into eukaryotic cells. Although N-terminal amino acid sequences are required for translocation, the mechanism of substrate recognition by the T3SS is unknown. Almost all actively deployed T3SS substrates in the plant path...

  4. Characterization of antioxidant phenolics in Syringa vulgaris L. flowers and fruits by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Gergő; Barabás, Csenge; Tóth, Anita; Kéry, Ágnes; Béni, Szabolcs; Boldizsár, Imre; Varga, Erzsébet; Noszál, Béla

    2016-06-01

    In this study the polyphenolic composition of lilac flowers and fruits was determined for the first time. For the identification of compounds, accurate molecular masses and formulas, acquired by LC and ESI-TOF-MS and fragmentation pattern given by LC-ESI/MS/MS analyses, were used. Our chromatographic system in conjunction with tandem MS was found to be valuable in the rapid separation and determination of the multiple constituents in methanolic extracts of lilac flowers and fruits. Altogether 34 phenolics, comprising 18 secoiridoids, seven phenylpropanoids, four flavonoids and five low-molecular-weight phenols, were identified. As marker compounds two secoiridoids (oleuropein and nuzhenide), two phenylpropanoids (acteoside and echinacoside) and rutin were quantified by validated methods. As a result of quantitative analysis, it was confirmed that flowers contain significant amounts of phenylpropanoids (acteoside, 2.48%; echinacoside, 0.75%) and oleuropein (0.95%), while in fruits secoiridoid oleuropein (1.09%) and nuzhenide (0.42%) are the major secondary metabolites. The radical scavenging activities of the extracts and the constituents were investigated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and ABTS [2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] assays. Both extracts show remarkable antioxidant activities. Our results clearly show that lilac flowers and fruits are inexpensive, readily available natural sources of phenolic compounds with pharmacological and cosmetic applications. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Comparative genomics of pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato reveals novel chemotaxis pathways associated with motility and plant pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The majority of bacterial foliar plant pathogens must invade the apoplast of host plants through points of ingress, such as stomata or wounds, replicate to high population density and cause disease. How pathogens navigate plant surfaces to locate invasion sites remains poorly understood. Many bacter...

  6. Cytokinins mediate resistance against Pseudomonas syringae in tobacco through increased antimicrobial phytoalexin synthesis independent of salicylic acid signaling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grosskinsky, D. K.; Naseem, M.; Abdelmohsen, U. R.; Plickert, N.; Engelke, T.; Griebel, T.; Zeier, J.; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Pfeifhofer, H.; van der Graaff, E.; Simon, U.; Roitsch, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 157, č. 2 (2011), s. 815-830 ISSN 0032-0889 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : TANDEM MASS-SPECTROMETRY * PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY * GROWTH-PROMOTING BACTERIA * HYPERSENSITIVE RESPONSE * TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 6.535, year: 2011

  7. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grosskinsky, D. K.; Tafner, R.; Moreno, M. V.; Stenglein, S. A.; Garcia de Salamone, I. E.; Nelson, L. M.; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, MAR 17 (2016), s. 23310 ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204; GA ČR GA15-22322S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : GROWTH-PROMOTING RHIZOBACTERIA * PLANT-GROWTH * SALICYLIC-ACID Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  8. A microarray for screening the variability of 16S–23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer in Pseudomonas syringae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lenz, Ondřej; Beran, Pavel; Fousek, Jan; Mráz, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 1 (2010), s. 90-94 ISSN 0167-7012 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP522/07/P338 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : microarray * ITS1 * mosaicism Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.018, year: 2010

  9. Dual regulation role of GH3.5 in salicylic acid and auxin signaling during Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongqin; Li, Qun; Li, Zhimiao; Staswick, Paul E; Wang, Muyang; Zhu, Ying; He, Zuhua

    2007-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a central role in plant disease resistance, and emerging evidence indicates that auxin, an essential plant hormone in regulating plant growth and development, is involved in plant disease susceptibility. GH3.5, a member of the GH3 family of early auxin-responsive genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), encodes a protein possessing in vitro adenylation activity on both indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and SA. Here, we show that GH3.5 acts as a bifunctional modulator in both SA and auxin signaling during pathogen infection. Overexpression of the GH3.5 gene in an activation-tagged mutant gh3.5-1D led to elevated accumulation of SA and increased expression of PR-1 in local and systemic tissues in response to avirulent pathogens. In contrast, two T-DNA insertional mutations of GH3.5 partially compromised the systemic acquired resistance associated with diminished PR-1 expression in systemic tissues. The gh3.5-1D mutant also accumulated high levels of free IAA after pathogen infection and impaired different resistance-gene-mediated resistance, which was also observed in the GH3.6 activation-tagged mutant dfl1-D that impacted the auxin pathway, indicating an important role of GH3.5/GH3.6 in disease susceptibility. Furthermore, microarray analysis showed that the SA and auxin pathways were simultaneously augmented in gh3.5-1D after infection with an avirulent pathogen. The SA pathway was amplified by GH3.5 through inducing SA-responsive genes and basal defense components, whereas the auxin pathway was derepressed through up-regulating IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating auxin repressor genes. Taken together, our data reveal novel regulatory functions of GH3.5 in the plant-pathogen interaction.

  10. CrcZ and CrcX regulate carbon utilization in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are important components of many regulatory pathways in bacteria and play key roles in regulating factors important for virulence. Carbon catabolite repression control is modulated by small RNAs (crcZ or crcZ and crcY) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas putida. ...

  11. WtsE, an AvrE-family type III effector protein of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, causes cell death in non-host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Jong Hyun; Majerczak, Doris; Ewert, Sophie; Sreerekha, Mysore-Venkatarau; Mackey, David; Coplin, David

    2008-09-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss) causes Stewart's bacterial wilt of sweet corn and leaf blight of maize. The pathogenicity of Pnss depends on synthesis of extracellular polysaccharide and an Hrp type III secretion system. WtsE, a type III secreted effector protein, is essential for the virulence of Pnss on corn. It belongs to the AvrE family of effectors, which includes DspA/E from Erwinia amylovora and AvrE1 from Pseudomonas syringae. Previously, WtsE was shown to cause disease-associated cell death in its host plant, sweet corn. Here, we examine the biological activity of WtsE in several non-host plants. WtsE induced cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco, beet and Arabidopsis thaliana when it was transiently produced in plant cells following agroinfiltration or translocated into plant cells from Pnss, Escherichia coli or Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph). WtsE-induced cell death in N. benthamiana, tobacco and beet resembled a hypersensitive response and in N. benthamiana it was delayed by cycloheximide. Interestingly, WtsE strongly promoted the growth of Pnss in N. benthamiana prior to the onset of cell death. Deletion derivatives of WtsE that failed to induce cell death in N. benthamiana and tobacco also did not complement wtsE mutants of Pnss for virulence in sweet corn, indicating a correlation between the two activities. WtsE also induced cell death in A. thaliana, where it suppressed basal defences induced by Pph. Thus, WtsE has growth-promoting, defence-suppressing and cell death-inducing activities in non-host plants. Expression of WtsE also prevented the growth of yeast, possibly due to an innate toxicity to eukaryotic cells.

  12. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svintradze, David V. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Peterson, Darrell L. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0614 (United States); Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P. [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States); Wright, H. Tonie, E-mail: xrdproc@vcu.edu [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23219-1540 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0614 (United States); Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298-0566 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each.

  13. Functional analysis of 14 genes that constitute the purine catabolic pathway in Bacillus subtilis and evidence for a novel regulon controlled by the PucR transcription activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Nygaard, P.; Saxild, Hans Henrik

    2001-01-01

    expression of five genes (pucA, pucB, pucC, pucD, and pucE). Uricase activity is encoded by the pucL and pucM genes, and a uric acid transport system is encoded by pucJ and pucK. Allantoinase is encoded by the pucH gene, and allantoin permease is encoded by the pucI gene. Allantoate amidohydrolase is encoded...... acid, allantoin, and uric acid were all found to function as effector molecules for PucR-dependent regulation of puc gene expression. When cells were grown in the presence of glutamate plus allantoin, a 3- to 10-fold increase in expression was seen for most of the genes. However, expression of the puc...

  14. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svintradze, David V.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P.; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-01-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each

  15. A direct link between the global regulator PhoP and the Csr regulon in Y. pseudotuberculosis through the small regulatory RNA CsrC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Aaron M; Schuster, Franziska; Kathrin Heroven, Ann; Heine, Wiebke; Pisano, Fabio; Dersch, Petra

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the influence of the global response regulator PhoP on the complex regulatory cascade controlling expression of early stage virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis via the virulence regulator RovA. Our analysis revealed the following novel features: (1) PhoP activates expression of the CsrC RNA in Y. pseudotuberculosis, leading to activation of RovA synthesis through the CsrABC-RovM cascade, (2) activation of csrC transcription is direct and PhoP is shown to bind to two separate PhoP box-like sites, (3) PhoP-mediated activation results in transcription from two different promoters closely downstream of the PhoP binding sites, leading to two distinct CsrC RNAs, and (4) the stability of the CsrC RNAs differs significantly between the Y. pseudotuberculosis strains YPIII and IP32953 due to a 20 nucleotides insertion in CsrC(IP32953), which renders the transcript more susceptible to degradation. In summary, our study showed that PhoP-mediated influence on the regulatory cascade controlling the Csr system and RovA in Y. pseudotuberculosis varies within the species, suggesting that the Csr system is a focal point to readjust and adapt the genus to different hosts and reservoirs.

  16. Truncation of Gal4p explains the inactivation of the GAL/MEL regulon in both Saccharomyces bayanus and some Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulermo, Rémi; Legras, Jean-Luc; Brunel, François; Devillers, Hugo; Sarilar, Véronique; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2016-09-01

    In the past, the galactose-negative (Gal(-)) phenotype was a key physiological character used to distinguish Saccharomyces bayanus from S. cerevisiae In this work, we investigated the inactivation of GAL gene networks in S. bayanus, which is an S. uvarum/S. eubayanus hybrid, and in S. cerevisiae wine strains erroneously labelled 'S. bayanus'. We made an inventory of their GAL genes using genomes that were either available publicly, re-sequenced by us, or assembled from public data and completed with targeted sequencing. In the S. eubayanus/S. uvarum CBS 380(T) hybrid, the GAL/MEL network is composed of genes from both parents: from S. uvarum, an otherwise complete set that lacks GAL4, and from S. eubayanus, a truncated version of GAL4 and an additional copy of GAL3 and GAL80 Similarly, two different truncated GAL4 alleles were found in S. cerevisiae wine strains EC1118 and LalvinQA23. The lack of GAL4 activity in these strains was corrected by introducing a full-length copy of S. cerevisiae GAL4 on a CEN4/ARS plasmid. Transformation with this plasmid restored galactose utilisation in Gal(-) strains, and melibiose fermentation in strain CBS 380(T) The melibiose fermentation phenotype, formerly regarded as characteristic of S. uvarum, turned out to be widespread among Saccharomyces species. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. d-Allose Catabolism of Escherichia coli: Involvement of alsI and Regulation of als Regulon Expression by Allose and Ribose

    OpenAIRE

    Poulsen, Tim S.; Chang, Ying-Ying; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1999-01-01

    Genes involved in allose utilization of Escherichia coli K-12 are organized in at least two operons, alsRBACE and alsI, located next to each other on the chromosome but divergently transcribed. Mutants defective in alsI (allose 6-phosphate isomerase gene) and alsE (allulose 6-phosphate epimerase gene) were Als−. Transcription of the two allose operons, measured as β-galactosidase activity specified by alsI-lacZ+ or alsE-lacZ+ operon fusions, was induced by allose. Ribose also caused derepress...

  18. Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma(54) regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kaiser, D.

    2005-01-01

    of these genes, Mx4885, caused a cell autonomous aggregation and sporulation defect. In-frame deletion mutants showed that the FHA domain is necessary for proper Mx4885 function. The altered pattern of developmental gene expression in the mutant implied that Mx4885 is on the pathway of response...... donor cell. Because FHA domains respond to phosphothreonine-containing proteins, these results suggest a regulatory link to the abundant Ser/Thr protein kinases in M. xanthus.......-binding proteins. Here we report the finding of an unusual group of 12 genes encoding sigma(54)-dependent enhancer-binding proteins containing a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as their N-terminal sensory domain. FHA domains in other proteins recognize phosphothreonine residues. An insertion mutation in one...

  19. Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator QseA is essential for the expression of multiple virulence regulons of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction and Objectives: QseA is one of several transcriptional regulators that regulates the virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 through quorum sensing. QseA has been shown to regulate the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), non-LEE...

  20. Enhancer-binding proteins with a forkhead-associated domain and the sigma(54) regulon in Myxococcus xanthus fruiting body development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lars; Givskov, Michael Christian; Kaiser, D.

    2005-01-01

    In response to starvation, Myxococcus xanthus initiates a developmental program that results in the formation of spore-filled, multicellular fruiting bodies. Many developmentally regulated genes in M. xanthus are transcribed from sigma(54) promoters, and these genes require enhancer......-binding proteins. Here we report the finding of an unusual group of 12 genes encoding sigma(54)-dependent enhancer-binding proteins containing a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain as their N-terminal sensory domain. FHA domains in other proteins recognize phosphothreonine residues. An insertion mutation in one...

  1. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  2. The Global Regulon sarA Regulates β-Lactam Antibiotic Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro and in Endovascular Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Cheung, Ambrose; Bayer, Arnold S; Chen, Liang; Abdelhady, Wessam; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Yeaman, Michael R; Xiong, Yan Q

    2016-11-01

     The global regulator sarA modulates virulence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) via regulation of principal virulence factors (eg, adhesins and toxins) and biofilm formation. Resistance of S. aureus strains to β-lactam antibiotics (eg, oxacillin) depends on the production of penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), encoded by mecA METHODS:  In the present study, we investigated the impact of sarA on the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of oxacillin resistance both in vitro and in an experimental endocarditis model, using prototypic healthcare- and community-associated MRSA parental and their respective sarA mutant strain sets.  All sarA mutants (vs respective MRSA parental controls) displayed significant reductions in oxacillin resistance and biofilm formation in vitro and oxacillin persistence in an experimental endocarditis model in vivo. These phenotypes corresponded to reduced mecA expression and PBP2a production and an interdependency of sarA and sigB regulators. Moreover, RNA sequencing analyses showed that sarA mutants exhibited significantly increased levels of primary extracellular proteases and suppressed pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway, argininosuccinate lyase-encoding, and ABC transporter-related genes as compared to the parental strain.  These results suggested that sarA regulates oxacillin resistance in mecA-positive MRSA. Thus, abrogation of this regulator represents an attractive and novel drug target to potentiate efficacy of existing antibiotic for MRSA therapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Evaluation of Design Strategies for Time Course Experiments in Genetic Networks: Case Study of the XlnR Regulon in Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omony, J.; Mach-Aigner, A.R.; Graaff, de L.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges in genetic network reconstruction is finding experimental designs that maximize the information content in a data set. In this paper, the information value of mRNA transcription time course experiments was used to compare experimental designs. The study concerns the dynamic

  4. ORF Sequence: NC_004578 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000] MKRLSFLTLRPRHLSFLTLQRRNALRDALRHRSAPRRAFRIGRRASRTACDAERRTIVRLSFRALQPRRLS...LLTLQRRNALRDALRHRSAPRRVFRIGRRASRTACDAQRCTIVRLSFRALQPRRLSFLTLQRRSALRDALHHKSAPRCTFKIGRGASRTACDAERRTIVRLSFRALQPRRLS...FLTLQRRNALGDALRHKSAPRCTFKIGREASRTACDAERRTIVRLSFRALQPRRLSFLTLQRRNALRDALRHKSAPRRAFRIGRRASRTACDAERRTIVSQISLNA

  5. Differential modulation of plant immune responses by diverse members of the Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi HopAF type III effector family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Ojeda, M Pilar; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Ramos, Cayo

    2017-06-01

    The Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 type III secretion system (T3SS) effector repertoire includes 33 candidates, seven of which translocate into host cells and interfere with plant defences. The present study was performed to investigate the co-existence of both plasmid- and chromosomal-encoded members of the HopAF effector family, HopAF1-1 and HopAF1-2, respectively, in the genome of NCPPB 3335. Here, we show that the HopAF1 paralogues are widely distributed in the Pseudomonas syringae complex, where HopAF1-1 is most similar to the homologues encoded by other P. syringae pathovars infecting woody hosts that belong to phylogroups 1 and 3. We show that the expression of both HopAF1-1 and HopAF-2 is transcriptionally dependent on HrpL and demonstrate their delivery into Nicotiana tabacum leaves. Although the heterologous delivery of either HopAF1-1 or HopAF1-2 significantly suppressed the production of defence-associated reactive oxygen species levels, only HopAF1-2 reduced the levels of callose deposition. Moreover, the expression of HopAF1-2 by functionally effectorless P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000D28E completely inhibited the hypersensitive response in tobacco and significantly increased the competitiveness of the strain in Nicotiana benthamiana. Despite their functional differences, subcellular localization studies reveal that green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to either HopAF1-1 or HopAF1-2 are targeted to the plasma membrane when they are expressed in plant cells, a process that is completely dependent on the integrity of their N-myristoylation motif. Our results further support the notion that highly similar T3SS effectors might differentially interact with diverse plant targets, even when they co-localize in the same cell compartment. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. Expression of Vitis amurensis VaERF20 in Arabidopsis thaliana Improves Resistance to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000

    OpenAIRE

    Mengnan Wang; Yanxun Zhu; Rui Han; Wuchen Yin; Chunlei Guo; Zhi Li; Xiping Wang

    2018-01-01

    Ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factors play important roles in regulating immune responses in plants. In our study, we characterized a member of the ERF transcription factor family, VaERF20, from the Chinese wild Vitis genotype, V. amurensis Rupr “Shuangyou”. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that VaERF20 belongs to group IXc of the ERF family, in which many members are known to contribute to fighting pathogen infection. Consistent with this, expression of VaERF20 was induced by t...

  7. Deletions in the repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion effector genes reveal functional overlap among effectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals disarm and remodel host cells by injecting large repertoires of effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS). The repertoires of individual strains appear to function as robust systems that can tolerate loss of individual effectors with little or ...

  8. Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato the causal of black spots on leaves and scabs of tomato fruits in condition of greenhouse production

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrev, Sasa; Pejcinovski, Filip

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of nine selected strains (D-41, D-42, D-43, D-44, D-45, D-46, D-47, D-48 and D-49) were investigated in this study. The strains were isolated from diseased tomato plants and fruits from greenhouse in Prosenikovo vilage, near Strumica surroinding. The first symptoms on tomato plants were note in the beggining of February. On the basis of investigated morphological, pathogenic, biochemical, physiological and nutritional characteristics, we could conclude that the mention...

  9. The 7B-1 mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) confers a blue light-specific lower sensitivity to coronatine, a toxin produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bergougnoux, V.; Hlaváčková, V.; Plotzová, R.; Novák, Ondřej; Fellner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2009), s. 1219-1230 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Blue light-specific response * COI1 * cor onatine Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.271, year: 2009

  10. Direct Comparison of the Histidine-rich Protein-2 Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and Malaria SYBR Green I Fluorescence (MSF) Drug Sensitivity Tests in Plasmodium falciparum Reference Clones and Fresh ex vivo Field Isolates from Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    mefloquine (Pearson r = 0.85-0.99 for reference clones and 0.56-0.84 for IEV isolates), whereas a weaker IC50 value correlation between methods was noted...strains with varying drug susceptibility profiles: W2 and K1 (susceptible to mefloquine , and resistant to chloroquine), D6 (susceptible to chloroquine, and...resistant to mefloquine ), and 3D7 (susceptible to chloroquine, but less susceptible to mefloquine than W2). From the IC50 profiles of all parasite

  11. Electrochemical properties of seamless three-dimensional carbon nanotubes-grown graphene modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Kikuo; Terse-Thakoor, Trupti; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2016-10-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was immobilized through sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the surface of a seamless three-dimensional hybrid of carbon nanotubes grown at the graphene surface (HRP-SDS/CNTs/G) and its electrochemical properties were investigated. Compared with graphene alone electrode modified with HRP via SDS (HRP-SDS/G electrode), the surface coverage of electroactive HRP at the CNTs/G electrode surface was approximately 2-fold greater because of CNTs grown at the graphene surface. Based on the increase in the surface coverage of electroactive HRP, the sensitivity to H2O2 at the HRP-SDS/CNTs/G electrode was higher than that at the HRP-SDS/G electrode. The kinetics of the direct electron transfer from the CNTs/G electrode to compound I and II of modified HRP was also analyzed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    (2008) describes a unique interaction of a plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae and filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. It was a serendipitous finding. The authors observed a N. crassa. hetC homologue in the genome of P. syringae by analysing the genome sequence of several P. syringae strains.

  13. Clipboard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    (2008) describes a unique interaction of a plant pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae and filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. It was a serendipitous finding. The authors observed a N. crassa. hetC homologue in the genome of P. syringae by analysing the genome sequence of several P. syringae strains.

  14. Role of 9-lipoxygenase and α-dioxygenase oxylipin pathways as modulators of local and systemic defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Jorge; Cascón, Tomás; Vicedo, Begonya; García-Agustín, Pilar; Hamberg, Mats; Castresana, Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Plant 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX) and α-dioxygenases (α-DOX) initiate the synthesis of oxylipins after bacterial infection. Here, the role of these enzymes in plants' defense was investigated using individual Arabidopsis thaliana lox1 and dox1 mutants and a double lox1 dox1 mutant. Studies with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) revealed the enhanced susceptibility of lox1 to the virulent strain Pst DC3000 and the partial impairment of lox1 and dox1 mutants to activate systemic acquired resistance. Notably, both defects were enhanced in the lox1 dox1 plants as compared with individual mutants. We found that pre-treatment with 9-LOX- and α-DOX-generated oxylipins protected plant tissues against bacterial infection. The strongest effect in this respect was exerted by 9-ketooctadecatrienoic acid (9-KOT), which is produced from linolenic acid by 9-LOX. Quantification of 9-KOT revealed its accumulation after bacterial infection. The levels were reduced in lox1 and lox1 dox1 plants but strongly increased in the dox1 mutant due to metabolic interaction of the two pathways. Transcriptional analyses indicated that 9-KOT pre-treatment modifies hormone homeostasis during bacterial infection. The nature of the changes detected suggested that 9-KOT interferes with the hormonal changes caused by bacterial effectors. This notion was substantiated by the finding that 9-KOT failed to reduce the growth of PstDC3000hrpA, a mutant compromised in effector secretion, and of the avirulent strain Pst DC3000 avrRpm1. Further support for the action of the 9-LOX- and α-DOX-oxylipin pathways as modulators of hormone homeostasis was the observation that lox1 dox1 seedlings are hypersensitive to the growth-inhibitory effect of ABA and showed enhanced activation of ABA-inducible marker genes as compared with wild-type plants.

  15. Brucella melitensis VjbR and C12-HSL regulons: contributions of the N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone signaling molecule and LuxR homologue VjbR to gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garner Harold R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a communication system that regulates gene expression in response to population density and often regulates virulence determinants. Deletion of the luxR homologue vjbR highly attenuates intracellular survival of Brucella melitensis and has been interpreted to be an indication of a role for QS in Brucella infection. Confirmation for such a role was suggested, but not confirmed, by the demonstrated in vitro synthesis of an auto-inducer (AI by Brucella cultures. In an effort to further delineate the role of VjbR to virulence and survival, gene expression under the control of VjbR and AI was characterized using microarray analysis. Results Analyses of wildtype B. melitensis and isogenic ΔvjbR transciptomes, grown in the presence and absence of exogenous N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (C12-HSL, revealed a temporal pattern of gene regulation with variances detected at exponential and stationary growth phases. Comparison of VjbR and C12-HSL transcriptomes indicated the shared regulation of 127 genes with all but 3 genes inversely regulated, suggesting that C12-HSL functions via VjbR in this case to reverse gene expression at these loci. Additional analysis using a ΔvjbR mutant revealed that AHL also altered gene expression in the absence of VjbR, up-regulating expression of 48 genes and a luxR homologue blxR 93-fold at stationary growth phase. Gene expression alterations include previously un-described adhesins, proteases, antibiotic and toxin resistance genes, stress survival aids, transporters, membrane biogenesis genes, amino acid metabolism and transport, transcriptional regulators, energy production genes, and the previously reported fliF and virB operons. Conclusions VjbR and C12-HSL regulate expression of a large and diverse number of genes. Many genes identified as virulence factors in other bacterial pathogens were found to be differently expressed, suggesting an important contribution to intracellular survival of Brucella. From these data, we conclude that VjbR and C12-HSL contribute to virulence and survival by regulating expression of virulence mechanisms and thus controlling the ability of the bacteria to survive within the host cell. A likely scenario occurs via QS, however, operation of such a mechanism remains to be demonstrated.

  16. Identification of VceA and VceC, two members of the VjbR regulon that are translocated into macrophages by the Brucella type IV secretion system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Maarten F.; Sun, Yao-Hui; den Hartigh, Andreas B.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Tsolis, Renee M.

    2008-01-01

    Survival and replication inside host cells by Brucella spp. requires a type IV secretion system (T4SS), encoded by the virB locus. However, the identity of the molecules secreted by the T4SS has remained elusive. We hypothesized that proteins translocated by the T4SS would be co-regulated with the

  17. 10 CFR 712.38 - Maintenance of medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...). (b) The psychological record of HRP candidates and HRP-certified individuals is a component of the medical record. The psychological record must: (1) Contain any clinical reports, test protocols and data...

  18. Vision Hampton Roads : strategy committee minutes & attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-22

    February 20, 2009 : HRP Executive Committee Meeting, Looking Back, Looking Forward : March 20, 2009 : HRP Board Meeting, Accolades & Action, Doing Things Jointly with Comprehensive : Economic Development Strategies : April 17,...

  19. Harm reduction program use, psychopathology and medical severity in patients with methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Luna, Nieves Gudelia; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Esojo, Abderraman; Palma-Álvarez, Raúl Felipe; Robles-Martínez, María; Grau-López, Lara; Perea, Marta; Roncero, Carlos

    2018-01-15

    Methadone maintenance programs (MMP) for opioid dependence treatment have been widely used due to their effective therapeutic outcomes. Harm reduction programs (HRP) are complementary programs for severe patients with high risk behaviors and when abstinence is not possible. This study aims to compare patients in MMP that use HRP (MMP-HRP) and patients in MMP who do not use HRP (MMP-NO HRP). The sample was composed of 143 patients (MMP-HRP = 42 vs. MMP-NO HRP = 101). An additional subanalysis was performed with patients under 45 years of age (n = 116; MMP-HRP = 38 vs. MMP-NO HRP = 78). All patients were assessed with an ad hoc socio-demographic questionnaire, EuropASI, SCID-I, and SCID-II. Results show that MMP-HRP patients were younger with more frequent use of intravenous drugs and with a high prevalence of Cluster B personality disorders. MMP-NO HRP patients had lower methadone doses compared to MMP-HRP patients and preferred to use drugs by smoked route more frequently. In the subanalysis of patients under 45, MMP-HRP patients were younger, had a higher prevalence of liver diseases, more intravenous drug use, greater severity on the drug use scale, less social and family support in the suescales of EUROP-ASI than compared to patients under 45 years in the group MMP-NO HRP. In conclusion, MMP-HRP patients are younger compared to MMP-NO HRP patients, they also receive higher doses of methadone and had more intravenous use. The above findings imply that the early onset of high risk drug use and long-term exposure to heroin have more severe outcomes such as higher comorbidities (e.g. infectious diseases, medical and psychiatric disorders), and consequently, these patients are a more vulnerable group with a worse prognosis.

  20. Enzymatic removal of phenol and p-chlorophenol in enzyme reactor: Horseradish peroxidase immobilized on magnetic beads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayramoglu, Guelay; Arica, M. Yakup

    2008-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase was immobilized on the magnetic poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-methylmethacrylate) (poly(GMA-MMA)), via covalent bonding and used for the treatment of phenolic wastewater in continuous systems. For this purposes, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was covalently immobilized onto magnetic poly(GMA-MMA) beds using glutaraldehyde (GA) as a coupling agent. The maximum HRP immobilization capacity of the magnetic poly(GMA-MMA)-GA beads was 3.35 mg g -1 . The immobilized HRP retained 79% of the activity of the free HRP used for immobilization. The immobilized HRP was used for the removal of phenol and p-chlorophenol via polymerization of dissolved phenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The effect of pH and temperature on the phenol oxidation rate was investigated. The results were compared with the free HRP, which showed that the optimum pH value for the immobilized HRP is similar to that for the free HRP. The optimum pH value for free and immobilized HRP was observed at pH 7.0. The optimum temperature for phenols oxidation with immobilized HRP was between 25 and 35 deg. C and the immobilized HRP has more resistance to temperature inactivation than that of the free form. Finally, the immobilized HRP was operated in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed reactor, and phenols were successfully removed in the enzyme reactor

  1. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 is a novel angiogenic factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle E LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein-3 (Hdgfrp3 or HRP-3 was recently reported as a neurotrophic factor and is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma to promote cancer cell survival. Here we identified HRP-3 as a new endothelial ligand and characterized its in vitro and in vivo functional roles and molecular signaling. We combined open reading frame phage display with multi-round in vivo binding selection to enrich retinal endothelial ligands, which were systematically identified by next generation DNA sequencing. One of the identified endothelial ligands was HRP-3. HRP-3 expression in the retina and brain was characterized by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Cell proliferation assay showed that HRP-3 stimulated the growth of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. HRP-3 induced tube formation of HUVECs in culture. Wound healing assay indicated that HRP-3 promoted endothelial cell migration. HRP-3 was further confirmed for its in vitro angiogenic activity by spheroid sprouting assay. HRP-3 extrinsically activated the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase ½ (ERK1/2 pathway in endothelial cells. The angiogenic activity of HRP-3 was independently verified by mouse cornea pocket assay. Furthermore, in vivo Matrigel plug assay corroborated HRP-3 activity to promote new blood vessel formation. These results demonstrated that HRP-3 is a novel angiogenic factor.

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-10-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-10-0002 gb|AAX58577.1| HrpW [Pseudomonas viridiflava] gb|AAX58585.1| HrpW [Pseudomonas... viridiflava] gb|AAX58587.1| HrpW [Pseudomonas viridiflava] AAX58577.1 0.035 31% ...

  3. Visualization of dynamics of plant-pathogen interaction by novel combination of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging and statistical analysis: differential effects of virulent and avirulent strains of P-syringae and of oxylipins on A-thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benediktyová, Zuzana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2007), s. 797-806 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : PHOTOSYNTHETIC ACTIVITY Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.917, year: 2007

  4. [Equilibrium and kinetic parameters of interaction between peroxidase conjugates of strophanthin and anti-peroxidase antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, E I; Karaseva, E I; Metelitsa, D I

    1997-01-01

    Interactions of three horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-strophanthin conjugates containing one, two, or three glycoside molecules (HRP-Str1, 2, or 3, respectively) with polyclonal anti-HRP antibodies were studied by homogeneous enzyme immunoassay. The total peroxidase activity of free conjugates and their immune complexes was estimated from the oxidation of o-phenylenediamine. The dissociation constants of the immune complexes and the rate constants of their dissociation and formation were determined. The equilibrium and kinetic parameters were determined for the interactions of the HRP-Str2 immune complex with anti-strophanthin and anti-HRP antibodies. The determined equilibrium and kinetic parameters of the HRP-Str interactions with anti-HRP antibodies depended on the molecular weights, sizes, and structures of the antigens studied.

  5. ORF Alignment: NC_004578 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... [Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000] ... Length = 161 ... Query: 199 DIRFALGESSLGSILVATSR...KGICAISLGDDPDALIQGFQDQFPNANLIGADAQFEALIA 258 ... DIRFALGESSLGSILVATSRKGICA...ISLGDDPDALIQGFQDQFPNANLIGADAQFEALIA Sbjct: 1 ... DIRFALGESSLGSILVATSRKGICAISLGDDPDALIQGFQDQFPNANLIGADAQFEALIA

  6. sigma(54)-mediated control of the mannose phosphotransferase sytem in Lactobacillus plantarum impacts on carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Marc J. A.; Molenaar, Douwe; de Jong, Anne; De Vos, Willem M.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    Sigma factors direct specific binding of the bacterial RNA polymerase to the promoter. Here we present the elucidation of the sigma(54) regulon in Lactobacillus plantarum. A sequence-based regulon prediction of sigma(54)-dependent promoters revealed an operon encoding a mannose phosphotransferase

  7. Insights into horizontal acquisition patterns of dormancy and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specific analysis of the genesbelonging to dormancy/reactivation regulons across 14 mycobacterial genomes indicated that horizontal acquisition isspecifically restricted to important accessory proteins. The results also revealed Burkholderia species to be a probablesource of HGT genes belonging to these regulons.

  8. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator NunF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 and synthesized by nonribosomal synthetases (NRPS) located on two gene clusters designated the nun-nup regulon. Organization of the regulon is similar to clusters found in other CLP-p...

  9. Cloning, sequence analysis, and characterization of the genes involved in isoprimeverose metabolism in Lactobacillus pentosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaillou, S.; Lokman, B.C.; Leer, R.J.; Posthuma, C.; Postma, P.W.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Two genes, xylP and xylQ, from the xylose regulon of Lactobacillus pentosus were cloned and sequenced. Together with the repressor gene of the regulon, xylR, the xylPQ genes form an operon which is inducible by xylose and which is transcribed from a promoter located 145 bp upstream of xylP. A

  10. Monitoring the ethanol stress response of a sigZ deletion strain of B. cereus ATCC 14579.

    OpenAIRE

    Voort, van der, M.

    2008-01-01

    The stress response of as sigZ deletion strain of B. cereus ATCC 14579 is monitored true time by use of microarrays. The sigZ regulon in ethanol stress response was determined and compared with the regulon determined by micorarray analysis of overexpression of sigZ.

  11. ORF Alignment: NC_006348 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006348 gi|53724326 >1g8eA 1 97 1 98 8e-23 ... ref|YP_109907.1| flagellar regulon master...|CAH37324.1| flagellar regulon master regulator ... subunit FlhD [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] ...

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_006350 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NC_006350 gi|53720921 >1g8eA 1 97 1 98 8e-23 ... ref|YP_109907.1| flagellar regulon master...|CAH37324.1| flagellar regulon master regulator ... subunit FlhD [Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243] ...

  13. Gclust Server: 85869 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available equence length 496 Representative annotation D-lactate dehydrogenase, part of the retrograde regulon which c...rograde regulon which consists of genes whose expression is stimulated by damage to...85869 SCE_YEL071W=DLD3 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(271) 496 D-lactate dehydrogenase, part of the ret

  14. A comparative approach to recombinantly produce the plant enzyme horseradish peroxidase in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundinger, Thomas; Spadiut, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used in various biotechnological and medical applications. Since its isolation from plant provides several disadvantages, the bacterium Escherichia coli was tested as recombinant expression host in former studies. However, neither production from refolded inclusion bodies nor active enzyme expression in the periplasm exceeded final titres of 10 mg per litre cultivation broth. Thus, the traditional way of production of HRP from plant still prevails. In this study, we revisited the recombinant production of HRP in E. coli and investigated and compared both strategies, (a) the production of HRP as inclusion bodies (IBs) and subsequent refolding and (b) the production of active HRP in the periplasm. In fact, we were able to produce HRP in E. coli either way. We obtained a refolding yield of 10% from IBs giving a final titre of 100 mg L−1 cultivation broth, and were able to produce 48 mg active HRP per litre cultivation broth in the periplasm. In terms of biochemical properties, soluble HRP showed a highly reduced catalytic activity and stability which probably results from the fusion partner DsbA used in this study. Refolded HRP showed similar substrate affinity, an 11-fold reduced catalytic efficiency and 2-fold reduced thermal stability compared to plant HRP. In conclusion, we developed a toolbox for HRP engineering and production. We propose to engineer HRP by directed evolution or semi-rational protein design, express HRP in the periplasm of E. coli allowing straight forward screening for improved variants, and finally produce these variants as IB in high amounts, which are then refolded. PMID:28288816

  15. Expression of Hepatoma-derived growth factor family members in the adult central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouzied Mekky M

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF belongs to a polypeptide family containing five additional members called HDGF related proteins 1–4 (HRP-1 to -4 and Lens epithelial derived growth factor. Whereas some family members such as HDGF and HRP-2 are expressed in a wide range of tissues, the expression of others is very restricted. HRP-1 and -4 are only expressed in testis, HRP-3 only in the nervous system. Here we investigated the expression of HDGF, HRP-2 and HRP-3 in the central nervous system of adult mice on the cellular level by immunohistochemistry. In addition we performed Western blot analysis of various brain regions as well as neuronal and glial cell cultures. Results HDGF was rather evenly expressed throughout all brain regions tested with the lowest expression in the substantia nigra. HRP-2 was strongly expressed in the thalamus, prefrontal and parietal cortex, neurohypophysis, and the cerebellum, HRP-3 in the bulbus olfactorius, piriform cortex and amygdala complex. HDGF and HRP-2 were found to be expressed by neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. In contrast, strong expression of HRP-3 in the adult nervous system is restricted to neurons, except for very weak expression in oligodendrocytes in the brain stem. Although the majority of neurons are HRP-3 positive, some like cerebellar granule cells are negative. Conclusion The coexpression of HDGF and HRP-2 in glia and neurons as well as the coexpression of all three proteins in many neurons suggests different functions of members of the HDGF protein family in cells of the central nervous system that might include proliferation as well as cell survival. In addition the restricted expression of HRP-3 point to a special function of this family member for neuronal cells.

  16. Sequence and Role in Virulence of the Three Plasmid Complement of the Model Tumor-Inducing Bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaji, Leire; Pérez-Martínez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Sundin, George W.; Ramos, Cayo; Murillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 is a model for the study of the molecular basis of disease production and tumor formation in woody hosts, and its draft genome sequence has been recently obtained. Here we closed the sequence of the plasmid complement of this strain, composed of three circular molecules of 78,357 nt (pPsv48A), 45,220 nt (pPsv48B), and 42,103 nt (pPsv48C), all belonging to the pPT23A-like family of plasmids widely distributed in the P. syringae complex. A total of 152 coding sequences were predicted in the plasmid complement, of which 38 are hypothetical proteins and seven correspond to putative virulence genes. Plasmid pPsv48A contains an incomplete Type IVB secretion system, the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector gene hopAF1, gene ptz, involved in cytokinin biosynthesis, and three copies of a gene highly conserved in plant-associated proteobacteria, which is preceded by a hrp box motif. A complete Type IVA secretion system, a well conserved origin of transfer (oriT), and a homolog of the T3SS effector gene hopAO1 are present in pPsv48B, while pPsv48C contains a gene with significant homology to isopentenyl-diphosphate delta-isomerase, type 1. Several potential mobile elements were found on the three plasmids, including three types of MITE, a derivative of IS801, and a new transposon effector, ISPsy30. Although the replication regions of these three plasmids are phylogenetically closely related, their structure is diverse, suggesting that the plasmid architecture results from an active exchange of sequences. Artificial inoculations of olive plants with mutants cured of plasmids pPsv48A and pPsv48B showed that pPsv48A is necessary for full virulence and for the development of mature xylem vessels within the knots; we were unable to obtain mutants cured of pPsv48C, which contains five putative toxin-antitoxin genes. PMID:22022435

  17. Tyrosine-610 in the Receptor Kinase BAK1 Does Not Play a Major Role in Brassinosteroid Signaling or Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayata Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1 functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1, which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2 and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR, respectively, which are involved in immunity. BAK1 is a dual specificity protein kinase that can autophosphorylate on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues. It was previously reported that phosphorylation of Tyr-610 in the carboxy-terminal domain of BAK1 is required for its function in BR signaling and immunity. However, the functional role of Tyr-610 in vivo has recently come under scrutiny. Therefore, we have generated new BAK1 (Y610F transgenic plants for functional studies. We first produced transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing BAK1 (Y610F-Flag in the homozygous bak1-4 bkk1-1 double null background. In a complementary approach, we expressed untagged BAK1 and BAK1 (Y610F in the bak1-4 null mutant. Neither BAK1 (Y610F transgenic line had any obvious growth phenotype when compared to wild-type BAK1 expressed in the same background. In addition, the BAK1 (Y610F-Flag plants responded similarly to plants expressing BAK1-Flag in terms of brassinolide (BL inhibition of root elongation, and there were only minor changes in gene expression between the two transgenic lines as monitored by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. In terms of plant immunity, there were no significant differences between plants expressing BAK1 (Y610F-Flag and BAK1-Flag in the growth of the non-pathogenic hrpA- mutant of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Furthermore, untagged BAK1 (Y610F transgenic plants were as responsive as plants expressing BAK1 (in the bak1-4 background and wild-type Col-0 plants toward treatment with the EF-Tu- and flagellin-derived peptide epitopes elf18- and flg22, respectively, as measured by reactive

  18. Human Reliability Program Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landers, John; Rogers, Erin; Gerke, Gretchen

    2014-05-18

    A Human Reliability Program (HRP) is designed to protect national security as well as worker and public safety by continuously evaluating the reliability of those who have access to sensitive materials, facilities, and programs. Some elements of a site HRP include systematic (1) supervisory reviews, (2) medical and psychological assessments, (3) management evaluations, (4) personnel security reviews, and (4) training of HRP staff and critical positions. Over the years of implementing an HRP, the Department of Energy (DOE) has faced various challenges and overcome obstacles. During this 4-day activity, participants will examine programs that mitigate threats to nuclear security and the insider threat to include HRP, Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Enhancement, and Employee Assistance Programs. The focus will be to develop an understanding of the need for a systematic HRP and to discuss challenges and best practices associated with mitigating the insider threat.

  19. Characterisation of bacterial brown spot pathogen from dry bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss) causes bacterial brown spot (BBS) of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), with yield losses of up to 55% in South Africa. Pss has a wide host range and for many of these, the pathogen has been biochemically and genetically characterised. However, few studies have been conducted on ...

  20. A rapid seedling resistance assay identifies wild tomato lines that are resistant to Psuedomonas syringe pv. tomato race 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae has historically been controlled by the Pto/Prf gene cluster. Emerging strains like P. syringae pv. tomato race 1 overcome resistance conferred by Pto/Prf, and can cause serious crop loss under appropriate environmental conditions. We developed a rapid ...

  1. Expression of WRKY and MYB genes during infection with powdery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moamar

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... cucumber lines with different powdery mildew resistance (resistant line 'JIN5-508' and susceptible line. 'D8') were investigated during the ... resistance triggered by a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain was enhanced in ... Atwrky18 mutant when challenged by virulent P. syringae strains. Xu (2006) used ...

  2. Isolation and identification of bacterial glum blotch and leaf blight on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . atrofaciens and P. syringae pv. syringae respectively are the bacterial diseases of wheat in Iran. The disease causes damage on wheat which leads to lots of yield and crop losses in the host plants. During the spring and summer of ...

  3. Horseradish Peroxidase-Carrying Electrospun Nonwoven Fabrics for the Treatment of o-Methoxyphenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carboxyl-functionalized polystyrene (poly(styrene-co-methacrylic acid, PSMAA nanofibers with average diameters of 250 ± 20 nm was prepared by electrospinning. PSMAA nanofibrous membrane were employed for immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP enzyme on the fibrous surface by a chemical method. The parameters about immobilizing HRP on the PSMAA nanofibers were studied and the influence on the activity of the HRP is discussed. This study showed that soap-free emulsion method is an ideal technology to modify the polystyrene surface and ultimately achieve enzyme immobilization on electrospun PSMAA nanofibers surfaces. Compared with free HRP, the acid-base stability, thermal stability, and storage stability of HRP were increased after the immobilization. The immobilized HRP maintained about 60% of its initial activity during a 20-day storage period. However, the free HRP maintained only 40% of its initial activity. The removal percentages of o-methoxyphenol (OMP reached 80.2% after 120 min for immobilized HRP. These results suggest that the proposed scheme for immobilization of HRP has potential in industrial applications for the treatment of phenolic wastewater.

  4. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure and delays hypersensitive response cell death induced by nonhost bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonghee Lee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is the most widespread bacterial pathogen in plants. Several strains of P. syringae produce a phytotoxin, coronatine (COR, which acts as a jasmonic acid mimic and inhibits plant defense responses and contributes to disease symptom development. In this study, we found that COR inhibits early defense responses during nonhost disease resistance. Stomatal closure induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tabaci, was disrupted by COR in tomato epidermal peels. In addition, nonhost HR cell death triggered by P. syringae pv. tabaci on tomato was remarkably delayed when COR was supplemented along with P. syringae pv. tabaci inoculation. Using isochorismate synthase (ICS-silenced tomato plants and transcript profiles of genes in SA- and JA-related defense pathways, we show that COR suppresses SA-mediated defense during nonhost resistance.

  5. Size-dependent tuning of horseradish peroxidase bioreactivity by gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Liu, Yi; Li, Meng; Chong, Yu; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the α-helicity of the enzyme to extents inversely related to their size. Au-5 nm inhibited both HRP peroxidase activity toward 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine and HRP compound I/II reactivity toward 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide. Au-5 nm enhanced the HRP peroxidase activity toward ascorbic acid and the HRP compound I/II reactivity toward redox-active residues in the HRP protein moiety. Further, Au-5 nm also decreased the catalase- and oxidase-like activities of HRP. Au-10 nm showed similar, but weaker effects, while Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm had no effect. Results suggest that AuNPs can size-dependently enhance or inhibit HRP bioreactivity toward substrates with different redox potentials via a mechanism involving extension of the HRP substrate access channel and decline in the redox potentials of HRP catalytic intermediates.Molecules with diverse biological functions, such as heme peroxidases, can be useful tools for identifying potential biological effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) at the molecular level. Here, using UV-Vis, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, we report tuning of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) bioactivity by reactant-free AuNPs with diameters of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 nm (Au-5 nm, Au-10 nm, Au-15 nm, Au-30 nm and Au-60 nm). HRP conjugation to AuNPs was observed with only Au-5 nm and Au-10 nm prominently increasing the

  6. Human Research Program 2010 Chair Standing Review Panel Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The 13 Human Research Program (HRP) Standing Review Panel (SRP) Chairs, and in some cases one or two additional panel members (see section XIV, roster) referred to as the Chair (+1) SRP throughout this document, met at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on December 7, 2010 to allow the HRP Elements and Projects to report on their progress over the past year, their current status, and their plans for the upcoming year based on NASA's current goals and objectives for human space exploration. A large focus of the meeting was also used to discuss integration across the HRP scientific disciplines based on a recommendation from the 2009 HRP SRP review. During the one-day meeting, each of the HRP Elements and Projects presented the changes they made to the HRP Integrated Research Plan (IRP Rev. B) over the last year, and what their top three areas of integration are between other HRP Elements/Projects. The Chair (+1) SRP spent sufficient time addressing the panel charge, either as a group or in a separate closed session, and the Chair (+1) SRP and the HRP presenters and observers, in most cases, had sufficient time to discuss during and after the presentations. The SRP made a final debriefing to the HRP Program Scientist, Dr. John B. Charles, prior to the close of the meeting on December 7, 2010. Overall, the Chair (+1) SRP concluded that most of the HRP Elements/Projects did a commendable job during the past year in addressing integration across the HRP scientific disciplines with the available resources. The Chair (+1) SRP agreed that the idea of integration between HRP Elements/Projects is noble, but believes all parties involved should have the same definition of integration, in order to be successful. The Chair (+1) SRP also believes that a key to successful integration is communication among the HRP Elements/Projects which may present a challenge. The Chair (+1) SRP recommends that the HRP have a workshop on program integration (with HRP Element

  7. Definition of the Bacillus subtilis PurR operator using genetic and bioinformatic tools and expansion of the PurR regulon with glyA, guaC, pbuG, xpt-pbuX, yqhZ-folD, and pbuO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saxild, Hans Henrik; Brunstedt, K.; Nielsen, K.I.

    2001-01-01

    of PurR, named the PurBox, has been suggested (M. Kilstrup, S.G. Jessing, S.B. Wichmand-Jorgensen, M. Madsen, and D. Nilsson, J. Bacteriol. 180:3900-3906, 1998). To determine whether the expression of other genes might be regulated by PurR, we performed a search for PurBox sequences in the B. subtilis......The expression of the pur operon, which encodes enzymes of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus subtilis, is subject to control by the purR gene product (PurR) and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate. This control is also exerted on the purA and purR genes. A consensus sequence for the binding...... genome sequence and found several candidate PurBoxes. By the use of transcriptional lacZ fusions, five selected genes or operons (glyA, yumD, yebB, xpt-pbuX, and yqhZ-folD), all having a putative PurBox in their upstream regulatory regions, were found to be regulated by PurR. Using a machine...

  8. Oxidative cross-linking of casein by horseradish peroxidase and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... lyzed by HRP was studied. The cross-linking of casein treated with HRP was demonstrated by the analysis of the casein samples with capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The degree of cross-linking of casein in the casein sam- ples was also measured by CZE with peak area normali- zation methodology.

  9. A new gene in A. rubens: A sea star Ig kappa gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Nadine; Osteras, Magne; Otten, Patricia; Leclerc, Michel

    2014-12-01

    The sea star Asterias rubens reacts specifically to the antigen:HRP (horse-radish peroxydase) and produces an antibody anti-HRP. We previously identified a candidate Ig kappa gene corresponding to this manuscript. We show