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Sample records for synovitis

  1. [Silastic implant and synovitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennwald, G

    1989-07-22

    The silastic implant based on siloxane polymere induces granulomatous synovitis in certain predisposed individuals, a reaction which may continue even after removal of the implant. This is also true of a prosthesis of the trapezium in two of our patients, though to a lesser degree. This is probably the reason why the problem has not yet been widely recognized. The hypothesis is put forward that an enzymatic predisposition may allow chemical degradation of the fragmented silastic implant into a toxic component responsible for the pathologic condition. The slow progression of the lesions is a challenge for the future and puts in question the further use of silastic implants.

  2. True bursal pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry; Kenan, Samuel; Steiner, German C.; Abdul-Quader, Mohammed

    2002-01-01

    We describe two cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis affecting true bursae. This study was also designed to discuss the term ''pigmented villonodular bursitis'', not confined to true synovial bursae, sometimes creating misunderstanding. (orig.)

  3. True bursal pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry [Department of Radiology, New York Methodist Hospital, Affiliated with New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Kenan, Samuel [Department of Orthopedics, New York University Medical Center, NY (United States); Steiner, German C. [Department of Pathology, Hospital for Joint Diseases/Orthopedic Institute, New York, NY (United States); Abdul-Quader, Mohammed [Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2002-06-01

    We describe two cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis affecting true bursae. This study was also designed to discuss the term ''pigmented villonodular bursitis'', not confined to true synovial bursae, sometimes creating misunderstanding. (orig.)

  4. Pigmented villonodular synovitis: MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soler, R.; Rivera, E.; Perez Fontan, F.J.; Yebra, T.; Fuente, C. de la

    1994-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is an un-common lesion of the synovium that typically involves diffusely the knee. We present the MR findings of two cases involving the knee,one of them diffuse and the other one localized in the supra patellar bursa. (Author)

  5. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a consensus-based ultrasound (US) definition and quantification system for synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: A multistep, iterative approach was used to: (1) evaluate the baseline agreement on defining and scoring synovitis according to the usual practice...

  6. Possible alendronate-induced polyarticular synovitis

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    K Gökkus

    2016-01-01

    The patient had no evidence of rheumatoid arthritis, pyrophosphate arthropathy, or seronegative/seropositive arthritis. Our main aim in this study is to highlight the potential adverse effects of alendronate and to warn orthopedic surgeons about the possibility of such a side effect that might lead orthopedic surgeons to administer wrong and unnecessary treatments like arthrocentesis. The withdrawal of alendronate is found to be the treatment of choice. Alendronate should be considered as a possible cause of synovitis or polyarthritis in patients treated with this agent in the absence of any other pathology. An association between alendronate and synovitis has rarely been described in the literature. We present a patient who developed polyarticular synovitis after treatment with alendronate and responded to its withdrawal.

  7. MRI diagnosis of pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Zhongpu; Sui Zhengyan; Xue Jianrong; Song Cuizhi; Liu Yuekui; Li Jinwang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI characteristics of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Methods: MRI and clinic data of 14 patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis proved by pathology were reviewed retrospectively. Results: MRI showed diffusible lesions in all 14 cases. 12 cases were located in knee joint, 2 in hip. MRI revealed nodules and masses formed by villis hyperplasia in the joints. MRI demonstrated the nodules with slightly low signal intensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI in 13 cases, the destruction of the cartilage in 8 cases, the destruction of the ligament in 5 cases, and the hydropsy in joint cavity in 10 cases, the destruction of the meniscus in 2 cases. Conclusion: The typical features of pigmented villonodular synovitis on MRI revealed the nodules formed by villis hyperplasia in the joint. Hemosiderin in the nodules demonstrated slightly low signal intensity on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI, with the presence of typical features like 'foam rubber cushion' sign and 'lichen' sign. (authors)

  8. MR imaging of transient synovitis: differentiation from septic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.; Im, S.A.; Lim, G.Y.; Chun, H.J.; Jung, N.Y.; Sung, M.S.; Choi, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    Transient synovitis is the most common cause of acute hip pain in children. However, MR imaging findings in transient synovitis and the role of MR imaging in differentiating transient synovitis from septic arthritis have not been fully reported. To describe the MR findings of transient synovitis and to determine whether the MR characteristics can differentiate this disease entity from septic arthritis. Clinical findings and MR images of 49 patients with transient synovitis (male/female 36/13, mean age 6.1 years) and 18 patients with septic arthritis (male/female 10/8, mean age 4.9 years) were retrospectively reviewed. MR findings of transient synovitis were symptomatic joint effusion, synovial enhancement, contralateral joint effusion, synovial thickening, and signal intensity (SI) alterations and enhancement in surrounding soft tissue. Among these, SI alterations and enhancement in bone marrow and soft tissue, contralateral joint effusion, and synovial thickening were statistically significant MR findings in differentiating transient synovitis from septic arthritis. The statistically significant MR findings in transient synovitis are contralateral (asymptomatic) joint effusions and the absence of SI abnormalities of the bone marrow. It is less common to have SI alterations and contrast enhancement of the soft tissues. The statistically significant MR findings in septic arthritis are SI alterations of the bone marrow, and SI alterations and contrast enhancement of the soft tissue. Ipsilateral effusion and synovial thickening and enhancement are present in both diseases

  9. Concentric joint space narrowing of the hip associated with hemosiderotic synovitis (HS) including pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS)

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    Abrahams, T.G.; Pavlov, H.; Bansal, M.; Bullough, P.

    1988-01-01

    Concentric joint space narrowing of the hip is an expected radiographic finding in cases of inflammatory arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis or sepsis. However, similar joint space narrowing is associated with chronic hemorrhagic conditions that produce hemosiderotic synovitis. Hemosiderotic synovitis results from chronic intraarticular bleeding such as occurs in pigmented villonodular synovitis, generalized bleeding diathesis, synovial hemangioma, and chronic trauma. Five hips in five patients with concentric joint space narrowing not associated with inflammatory arthritis or with hemophilia were reviewed clinically, radiographically, and pathologically. All patients had a hemosiderotic synovitis. The definitive diagnosis of pigmented villonodular synovitis was made pathologically in two cases that demonstrated nodular areas of giant cell proliferation, collagen production, and lipid-laden histiocytes on histologic samples. (orig.)

  10. Hypertrophic Synovitis of the Facet Joint Causing Root Pain

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    Koichi Iwatsuki M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritic changes in the facet joints are common in the presence of degenerative disc disease. Changes in the joint capsule accompany changes in the articular surfaces. Intraspinal synovial cysts that cause radicular pain, cauda equina syndrome, and myelopathy have been reported; however, there have been few reports in orthopedic or neurosurgical literature regarding hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint presenting as an incidental para-articular mass. Here, we report a case of hypertrophic synovitis causing root pain. We describe the case of a 65-year-old man suffering from right sciatica and right leg pain in the L5 nerve-root dermatome for 1 year; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed an enhanced mass around the L4–5 facet joint. We investigated this mass pathologically. After right medial facetectomy, the symptoms resolved. Pathological investigation revealed this mass was hypertrophic synovitis. Hypertrophic synovitis of the facet joint might cause root pain.

  11. Effect of chondroitin sulphate on synovitis of knee osteoarthritic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tío, Laura; Orellana, Cristobal; Pérez-García, Selene; Piqueras, Laura; Escudero, Paula; Juarranz, Yasmina; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Montañés, Francisco; Farran, Aina; Benito, Pere; Gomariz, Rosa P; Sanz, María-Jesús; Monfort, Jordi

    2017-07-07

    To evaluate by ultrasonography the effect of chondroitin sulfate (CS) on synovitis in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). To collaborate in the understanding of the biochemical mechanisms involved in the synovial inflammation process. Randomized, single-blind, controlled trial involving 70 patients with primary KOA treated for 6 months with CS or acetaminophen (ACT). Evaluation of KOA status at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months included: ultrasonography to assess synovitis (following the OMERACT expertise group definition), visual analogue scale and Lequesne index to measure pain and function, and ELISA to quantify inflammatory mediators in serum and synovial fluid. Synovitis presence was reduced by 50% in the CS group while a 123% increase was observed in ACT group. Conversely, patients without initial synovitis and treated with ACT reached 85.71% synovitis onset, but only 25% in CS group. Both therapies improved articular function, but only CS resulted in significant pain improvement at the end of the treatment. Changes in RANTES and UCN synovial fluid concentration were associated with CS treatment. Treatment with CS had a sustained beneficial effect, preventing synovitis onset or reducing its presence as well as reducing KOA symptoms. ACT ameliorated clinical symptoms but had no effect on inflammation. The CS anti-inflammatory effect could be related to the observed changes in RANTES and UCN concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Total knee replacement in patients with diffuse villonodular synovitis

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    Lucio Flávio Biondi Pinheiro Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This paper reports a case of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (DPVNS, associated with advanced gonarthrosis, submitted to total knee replacement. The patient had progressive pain and swelling. She had two previous surgeries, firstly arthroscopic , synovectomy and subsequently open synovectomy associated with radiotherapy, with recurrence of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse synovitis, advanced arthrosis, and bone cysts. The patient was submitted to a total knee replacement and synovectomy. There was a good postoperative clinical course, with improvement of pain, function, and joint edema on examination. The patient will be followed regarding the possibility of disease recurrence and implant survival.,

  13. Villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motamedi, Kambiz; Murphey, Mark D.; Fetsch, John F.; Furlong, Mary A.; Vinh, Tinhoa N.; Sweet, Donald E.; Laskin, William B.

    2005-01-01

    To describe the imaging features of spinal pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS). We retrospectively reviewed 15 cases of pathologically proven spinal PVNS. Patient demographics and clinical presentation were reviewed. Radiologic studies were evaluated by consensus of two musculoskeletal radiologists for spinal location, spinal segments affected, lesion center, detection of facet origin and intrinsic characteristics on radiography (n =11), myelography (n =7), CT (n =6) and MR imaging (n =6). Women (64%) were more commonly affected than men (36%) with an average age of 28 years. Clinical symptoms were pain (45%), neurologic (9%) or both (36%). Lesions most frequently affected the cervical spine (53%) followed by the thoracic (27%) and lumbar regions (20%). The majority of lesions (93%) were centered in the posterior elements with frequent involvement of the pedicle (67%), neural foramina (73%), lamina (67%) and facets (93%). No lesions showed calcification. Determination of a facet origin by imaging was dependent on imaging modality and lesion size. A facet origin could be determined in 45% of cases by radiography vs 67% of patients by CT (n=6) and MR (n=6). Large lesions (greater than 3 cm in at least one dimension) obscured the facet origin in all cases with CT and/or MR imaging (44%,n=4). Small lesions (less than 3 cm in any dimension) demonstrated an obvious facet origin in all cases by CT and/or MR imaging (56%,n=5). Low-to-intermediate signal intensity was seen in all cases on T2-weighted MR images resulting from hemosiderin deposition with ''blooming effect'' in one case with gradient echo MR images. PVNS of the spine is rare. Large lesions obscure the facet origin and simulate an aggressive intraosseous neoplasm. Patient age, a solitary noncystic lesion centered in the posterior elements, lack of mineralization and low-to-intermediate signal intensity on all MR pulse sequences may suggest the diagnosis in these cases. Small lesions demonstrate a facet

  14. Kei Apple Plant Thorn Synovitis | Nyamohanga | Annals of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It can present as a diagnostic difficulty because of its insidious onset after an apparently trivial injury, which may not be reported. Historically, thorn synovitis has been considered aseptic and treated with removal of the intra-articular foreign body and the affected synovial ring. We present a child with Kei apple thorn that had ...

  15. Treatment of persistent knee synovitis with Yttrium 90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyoucef, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Management of persistent knee synovitis includes both systemic and local articular treatment relevant to specific etiology. Local treatment may involve attempts to control inflammation and pain in knee joints by intra articular application of analgesics or glucocorticoids. However, in many patients these fail to reduce significantly the synovitis phenomenon and moreover they may lead to severe side effects. Radiosynoviorthesis with Y90 has been in use for many years in several joint pathologies. Indications of Radiosynoviorthesis include various inflammatory and degenerative diseases and its use should be envisaged when other conservative methods have failed like intra articular injections of long acting corticosteroids. Persistent knee synovitis is defined by the presence of hydrops in the joint or functional impairment with warmth, pain and local signs and symptoms requiring intra articular injection of glucocorticoids. In this study, 151 knees with persistent knee synovitis have been treated with Y 90 and have had all a minimum of one year follow up. Many parameters have been identified to measure efficiency of the RSO including pain, hydarthrosis, mobility, as well as global perception of the patients. Excellent and good responses have been appreciated through pain at rest, pain at stress, volume of effusion, and articular mobility. Results showed that percentage of excellent and good response is superior to 80% at three and six months. Success of Y 90 appears to be higher for rheumatoid arthritis as well as for oligoarthritis. Whatever the etiology, intensity of the inflammatory process appears one the major parameters which could better predict the outcomes of yttrium 90 in persistent knee synovitis. (author)

  16. Quantifying peri-meniscal synovitis and its relationship to meniscal pathology in osteoarthritis of the knee

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    Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds General Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom); Rhodes, Laura A. [Leeds General Infirmary, Academic Unit of Medical Physics, The University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Keenan, Anne-Maree; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G. [Leeds General Infirmary, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    The objectives of this study were to validate a semiquantitative scoring system for estimating perimeniscal synovitis in osteoarthritic (OA) knees and to examine the relationship between the extent of synovitis and the degree of meniscal pathology using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Forty-three subjects with clinically diagnosed OA knee were assessed for peri-meniscal synovitis using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. Quantitative measurements of synovitis were made by summing areas in consecutive slices within generated regions of interest, and the synovitis was also scored semi-quantitatively using a 0-3 scale. Meniscal pathology (extrusion, degeneration and tearing) was also scored semiquantitatively. Establishment of a correlative relationship was undertaken using Spearman's rho ({rho}). A total of 86 sites were assessed. The semi-quantitative synovitis score correlated well with the quantitative synovitis score ({rho}>0.9). A moderate association between medial meniscal extrusion and synovitis was demonstrated ({rho}=0.762, P<0.000), although this association was not as strong in the lateral compartment ({rho}=0.524, P<0.000). The results suggest the semiquantitative scoring system is valid for assessing perimeniscal synovitis. The relationship between meniscal pathology and adjacent synovitis requires further study. (orig.)

  17. Scintimetry in transient synovitis of the hip in the child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yukiharu; Wingstrand, H.; Gustafson, T.

    1988-01-01

    Fifty-five consecutive children presenting with transient synovitis of the hip were examined with 99m Tc-MDP scintigraphy and pin-hole collimator technique. Quantitative assessment was performed along a profile of interest across the hip joint. The criteria for the normal scintimetric pattern in the child's hip were established and the pathologic pattern of uptake in the acute phase, as well as in the follow-up after synovitis, was described. A decrease in isotope uptake in the proximal femoral epiphysis was observed in 13 children. This was correlated with a reduced uptake in the growth-plate, indicating a disturbance of blood supply to these regions. A characteristic pattern of isotope uptake with duration of symptoms was observed: a decrease in uptake during the first week followed by rebound hyperemia within 1 month. One child developed osteonecrosis (Legg-Calve-Perthes disease). (author)

  18. Localized nodular synovitis of the infrapatellar fat pad

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    Jong-Hoon Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of localized nodular synovitis of the infrapatellar fat pad impinging on the patellofemoral joint causing limitation of extension. Arthroscopy involved use of a superolateral portal because location of lesion hindered access via a conventional anterior portal. The infrapatellar mass impinged in the patellofemoral joint upon knee extension and retracted upon flexion. Superior-superior triangulation allowed for complete excision of the mass.

  19. Management of chronic hemophilic synovitis in children by phonophoresis

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    Saraf S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical cascades in hemophilia like hemarthrosis and its sequelae like chronic synovitis can be managed better by repeated factor transfusions or radiotherapy or injectable rifampicin, however, the non-availability and high cost of these modalities of therapy prompted us to look into other innovative methods, which could be effective and economical. Methods: Drug induced pulse ultrasound therapy (phonophoresis using Betamethasone ointment was used in patients of chronic hemophilic synovitis on alternate day for an average duration of six minutes. Ten to 15 such sittings were given during the course of treatment. The objective parameters for the evaluation of results included changes in the degree of swelling, range of movements, frequency of joint bleed and joint tenderness. Subjective assessment was the grading of response by the patient viz. significant, moderate or poor. Results: The study included 21 patients of synovitis knee (24 knees in children of 6-15 yrs. As per Caviglia classification, four knees were graded gr. I, thirteen as gr. II and seven as gr. III. There was significant reduction in the joint swelling. The range of movements also increased satisfactorily with decrease in the frequency of joint bleed in the follow up. Results were adjudged as good in nine, fair in nine and poor in six; response being better in grade I and grade II. Conclusion: Low dose pulse ultrasound does not produce heat, rather changes permeability of membrane, and reduces pain and hematoma. The introduction of local steroidal drug with ultrasound further helps in the colloidochemical action. Phonophoresis relies on perturbation of the tissues encouraging absorption of the drug. Phonophoresis using betamethasone showed significantly good results in short term follow up in chronic hemophilic synovitis of knee. This modality of treatment can be valuable in developing countries where factor replacement is a problem and other modalities of

  20. Three-Phase Bone Scintigraphic Diagnosis of Acute Transient Synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Soo Kyo; Lee, Myung Hee; Kim, Choon Yul; Bahk, Yong Whee

    1985-01-01

    Acute transient synovitis of the hip presents clinically pain and limping. But in the majority of the cases, definite positive findings are not manifest in roentgenogram in its early phase. However radionuclide bone imaging combines with the assessment of vascularization and bone tracer uptake is of great value in solving this diagnostic problem. The materials for this study consisted of 29 children with acute transient synovitis of the hip, characterized by symptoms and physical signs of an arthritis, negative X-ray findings and disappearance of all symptoms and signs within a short period of time. They were twenty males and 9 females and age ranged from 1 to 12 years. We took pelvic roentgenogram in AP and frog-leg views. After intravenous bolus injection of 10 to 15 mCi of 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate, 24 sequential image of the pelvis was taken at 2-second interval for blood flow study. The scintigrams were made using a gamma camera with high resolution parallel hole collimator. Blood pool imaging was obtained at 2 minutes after tracer administration. After 3 hours, static images were taken and then close-up image of the hip using pin-hole collimator was followed. The results were as follows: 1) Bone scintigram was much more sensitive than conventional roentgenogram in diagnosis of acute transient synovitis of the hip. 2) Three-phase imagings showed increased vascular activities in blood pool scintigrams in 96%. 3) Pin-hole imaging showed increased tracer uptake in the regional bones of the hip, particularly in the medial aspect of femoral head and acetabulum. 4) We confirmed that three-phase imaging reinforced with pin-hale technique were very useful in diagnose of acute transient synovitis of the hip.

  1. MR findings of transient synovitis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Sea; Na, Jae Boem; Yoo, Jin Jong; Ahn, In Oak; Chung, Sung Hoon

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of transient synovitis of the hip in children. Between 1993 and 1997, MR imaging was performed in 30 children (male:female 22:8) in whom transient synovitis had been clinically diagnosed. In 20 of these 30 patients, Gd-enhanced study was also performed. The signal intensity of bone marrow of the femur, the synovial enhancement pattern and the amount of hip joint effusion in affected hips were evaluated; the last -mentioned was determined using the volume measurement method. In 29 patients (97%), no abnormal signal intensity was seen in bone marrow of the femur in affected hips. Gd-enhanced MR imaging revealed synovial enhancement of affected hip joints, as follows: minimal enhancement in eight patients (40%), moderate enhancement in eight (40%), and strong enhancement in four (20%). No abnormal enhancement was demonstrated in bone marrow of the femur or adjacent soft tissue. The mean amount of joint effusion of affected hips was 2.7±1.7 (range, 0.2-18.9)ml; statistically, this was much greater than that of contralateral hip (p less than 0.01). The MR findings of transient synovitis of the hip in children were normal bone marrow signal intensity of the femoral head, moderate or strong synovial enhancement, and asymmetric hip joint effusion. (author)

  2. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 1: Synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrant, J.M.; O'Connor, P.J.; Grainger, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis long after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs, there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and a need to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques, and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  3. Synovitis in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease. Evaluation with MR imaging in 84 hips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochbergs, P.; Jonsson, K.; Eckerwall, G.; Wingstrand, H.; Egund, N.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, by means of MR imaging, the degree and persistence of synovitis in the hip joint in Legg-Calve-Perthes disease and to correlate the degree of synovitis with the degree of epiphyseal necrosis. Material and Methods: A total of 170 MR images in 72 patients (84 hips) were examined. The T2-weighted MR images were taken in the coronal plane in order to evaluate the degree of synovitis in the hip joint. Results: MR revealed synovitis in all cases in the early phase of the disease. In Catterall group II, synovitis was discreet to moderate for up to 6 months after diagnosis. Hips with more severe necrosis, Catterall groups III and IV, had moderate or intense degrees of synovitis. There was a correlation between the degree of synovitis and the lateral pillar classification according to Herring et al. Also, there was a good correlation between the extent of signal changes in the epiphysis on MR imaging and the degree of synovitis. There was no difference when signal changes were evaluated on T1- or T2-weighted images. Signs of synovitis could be seen for up to 30 months after diagnosis in Catterall group I hips, and in Catterall groups II and III for up to 36 months, and in 2 cases even longer. Some Catterall group IV hips had discreet or mild synovitis for 60 months or more, after diagnosis. Conclusion: The degree of synovitis on MR imaging correlates to the extent of epiphyseal necrosis seen on radiographs or MR imaging as well as to the lateral pillar classification, i.e. to a poor clinical outcome. In Catterall group IV hips, synovitis can even persist for up to 60 months after diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. US Assessment of Hip Joint Synovitis in Rheumatic Diseases A comparison with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soini, I.; Kotaniemi, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Kauppi, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the significance of ultrasonography (US) in detecting hip joint synovitis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Material and Methods: Forty patients with rheumatic disease and suspected hip joint synovitis underwent MRI and US of the hip joint. In addition to the throughout MRI evaluation, the anterior collum-capsule distance (CCD) was determined by both MRI and US. Thirteen healthy volunteers were examined with MRI to establish the criteria for normal findings in MRI when classifying hip joints to those with synovitis and those without. MRI was used as a gold standard. Results: Synovitis was found using MRI in 31 hips of 22 patients (9 patients had bilateral synovitis). The intraclass correlation was 0.61 between MRI and US in measuring CCD. In classifying hip joint synovitis with US, the sensitivity of the method was 87% and specificity 42%, when the CCD criterion for synovitis was determined to be 7 mm. If the cut-off point was raised to 9 mm, the sensitivity decreased to 61% while specificity increased to 94%. A difference in CCD of 1 mm between the hips as an additional criterion for synovitis increased the number of false-positive findings. Conclusion: Measurement of CCD with US proved to be a rather inaccurate method to point out synovitis in rheumatic patients when using MRI as a reference. The main reason for this result was the thickened capsule, which US could not differentiate from a thickened synovium

  5. Associations Between Knee Effusion-synovitis and Joint Structural Changes in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Blizzard, Leigh; Antony, Benny; Han, Weiyu; Zhu, Zhaohua; Cicuttini, Flavia; Wluka, Anita E; Winzenberg, Tania; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2017-11-01

    To describe the associations between effusion-synovitis and joint structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) over 24 months. A posthoc analysis using data from a randomized controlled trial in 413 patients with symptomatic OA (aged 63 ± 7 yrs, 208 women). Knee effusion-synovitis volume and score, cartilage defects, cartilage volume, and bone marrow lesions (BML) were assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed using radiograph. Least significant change criterion was used to define change in effusion-synovitis volume. Knee symptoms were assessed by Western Ontario and McMaster University OA Index. Multivariable linear/logistic regression and multilevel generalized mixed-effects models were used in longitudinal analyses. Total effusion-synovitis volume increased modestly from baseline (8.0 ± 8.5 ml) to followup (9.0 ± 10.5 ml). Baseline BML, cartilage defect, JSN, and osteophyte scores were positively associated with change in effusion-synovitis volume (p effusion-synovitis score (p effusion-synovitis score nor volume consistently predicted change in the above structures except cartilage volume. In the mixed-effects models, knee effusion-synovitis was positively associated with BML (volume: β = 1.19 ml/grade; score: OR = 1.75/grade) and cartilage defects (volume: β = 1.87 ml/grade; score: OR = 2.22/grade), while negatively associated with cartilage volume loss. Change in effusion-synovitis volume was positively correlated with changes in knee pain and stiffness scores (p effusion-synovitis, but effusion-synovitis did not predict knee structural changes. These findings suggest that synovial inflammation is likely the result of joint structural abnormalities in established OA. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01176344. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12610000495022.

  6. Chronic proliferative synovitis of the equine metacarpophalangeal joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannegieter, N.J.

    1990-01-01

    Chronic proliferative synovitis of 27 metacarpophalangeal joints in 16 horses is described. The diagnosis was based on a history of lameness and, or, poor performance, pain on flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joint, the response to intra-articular anaesthesia, and plain and contrast radiography. Radiographic findings included concavity of the distal dorsal metacarpus proximal to the sagittal ridge, and an increase in size of the synovial tissue adjacent to the proximal, dorsal attachment of the joint capsule. Mineralisation of the synovial tissue was present in some joints, and chip fractures from the dorsal aspect of the proximal phalanx were also occasionally seen. Treatment by arthroscopic resection of the tissue gave excellent results

  7. Limping in toddlers: pelvic abscess presenting with transient synovitis picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topoz, Irina; Manole, Mioara D

    2011-12-01

    Limping is a common presenting pediatric complaint, caused by conditions originating in the lower extremities as well as in anatomical areas surrounding the hip joint. Pathologic processes presenting with limping include trauma, inflammation, infection, and malignancy. In this report, we present a case of pelvic abscess presenting with limping in a toddler. We review common conditions presenting with limping in this age group, and discuss laboratory and radiographic evaluation of limping in toddlers. A 20-month-old previously healthy boy presented for evaluation of limping and history of fever. The physical examination was suggestive of transient synovitis. Radiological evaluation revealed normal hip X-ray study, a normal complete blood count, and a moderately increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Due to the persistence of limping, tenderness over the inguinal area and subsequent development of edema over the inguinal area, magnetic resonance images of the hip and pelvis were obtained, which revealed a pelvic abscess. The patient improved after ultrasound-guided drainage of the abscess and a course of intravenous antibiotics. Although transient synovitis is the most common pathology that causes limping in toddlers, limping can also be a presentation of pelvic pathology. Thus, in this age group, a detailed physical examination of the patient with special emphasis on structures adjacent to the hip joint is extremely important. Laboratory evaluation and additional imaging help confirm the suspected diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (ppairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  9. Serum Matrix Metalloproteinase-3 as a Noninvasive Biomarker of Histological Synovitis for Diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Jian-Da Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the correlation between matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- 3 and histological synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods. Serum MMP-3 of 62 patients with active RA was detected by ELISA. Serial synovial tissue sections from all RA patients, 13 osteoarthritis, and 10 orthopedic arthropathies patients were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemically for MMP-3, CD3, CD20, CD38, CD68, and CD15. Results. The percentage of lining MMP3+ cells was significantly higher in RA patients especially with high grade synovitis and it was significantly correlated with Krenn’s synovitis score r=0.574, P<0.001 and sublining inflammatory cells. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis revealed that the association of the percentage of lining MMP3+ cells with activation of synovial stroma, sublining CD68+ macrophages, and CD15+ neutrophils was stronger than other histological indicators. The percentage of lining MMP3+ cells was significantly correlated with serum MMP-3 in RA r=0.656, P<0.001. Serum MMP-3 was higher in RA patients with high grade synovitis than that of low grade synovitis and significantly correlated with synovitis score and activation of synovial stroma subscore (all P<0.05. Conclusion. Serum MMP-3 may be an alternative noninvasive biomarker of histological synovitis and RA diagnosis.

  10. Imaging by magnetic resonance of pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Moreno, L.; Lafuente Martinez, J.; Marti Bonmati, L.; Perez Diaz, M.; Vilar Samper, J.; Paniagua, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) has become the method of choice for evaluating a large number of musculoskeletal disorders, especially because of its capacity to provide multiplanar tomographic sections and its greater contrast resolution as compared to other imaging methods. This report present seven cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVS) located in joints. In six cases, the diagnosis was suggested by MR on the basis of the fact that the lesions showed hypointense areas with no signal in both the T1 and T2-weighted sequences. This is due to hemosiderin deposition in the lesion. In addition to its diagnostic value, in this disorder, MR is an excellent method for assessing the exact extension and location of the lesions, as well as the follow-up to these patients and the detection of possible recurrences. (Author) 17 refs

  11. Follistatin Alleviates Synovitis and Articular Cartilage Degeneration Induced by Carrageenan

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    Jun Yamada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activins are proinflammatory cytokines which belong to the TGFβ superfamily. Follistatin is an extracellular decoy receptor for activins. Since both activins and follistatin are expressed in articular cartilage, we hypothesized that activin-follistatin signaling participates in the process of joint inflammation and cartilage degeneration. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of follistatin in a carrageenan-induced mouse arthritis model. Synovitis induced by intra-articular injection of carrageenan was significantly alleviated by preinjection with follistatin. Macrophage infiltration into the synovial membrane was significantly reduced in the presence of follistatin. In addition, follistatin inhibited proteoglycan erosion induced by carrageenan in articular cartilage. These data indicate that activin-follistatin signaling is involved in joint inflammation and cartilage homeostasis. Our data suggest that follistatin can be a new therapeutic target for inflammation-induced articular cartilage degeneration.

  12. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL SCALE AND SYNOVITIS ALGORITHM – 15 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE: EVALUATION AND FOLLOWING PROGRESS

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    V. Krenn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic  histopathology scales are mainly  the  multilevel  evaluation systems. The same principle  is lying in the  basis of synovitis  scale elaboration. This  scale gradually  and  semi-quantitatively assesses the  inflammatory and immunological changes in case of synovitis  considering  three  synovial components: thickness  of synovial cellular layer, cellular  stroma  density  and  severity  of inflammatory infiltration. The  scale comprises  four semi-quantitative  grades: normal 0, mild, moderate  and severe. Scale points from 0 to 9 are summated. Such sum evaluation allows to identify high and low degree synovitis.  Scale points  from 1 to ≤4 correspond to low degree synovitis  which determines and includes the following diagnosis: arthritis associated  synovitissynovitis  associated  with  meniscus  pathology;  hemochromatosis associated  synovitis.  Scale points  from ≥5 to  9 determine high  degree  synovitis  including  diagnosis  like rheumatoid arthritis; psoriatic  arthritis; Lyme arthritis; post  infection  (reactive arthritis and  peripheral arthritis in Bekhterev’s disease. Thus, the synovitis scale allows to assess degenerative or posttraumatic (low degree synovitis and inflammatoryrheumatoid pathology  (high  degree  synovitis based  on histopathological diagnostics with  sensitivity of 61,7% and specificity  of 96,1%. The scale is characterized by a good diagnostics significance  by ROC  analysis (area  under  curve: 0,8–0,9.  Two versions of synovitis  scale was published:  first in 2002, second reworked  in 2006 and the latter includes the concept  of subdivision  into two groups of high and low degree synovitis.  Thanking to both  versions a national  and international recognition of histological  evaluation during  15 years was gained.   To clarity  diagnosis description using synovitis  scale particularly in rheumatology various

  13. Hip Joint Effusion-Synovitis Is Associated With Hip Pain and Sports/Recreation Function in Female Professional Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Cook, Jill

    2018-03-23

    To compare hip joint effusion-synovitis prevalence in professional ballet dancers with nondancing athletes and to evaluate the relationship between effusion-synovitis and clinical measures and cartilage defects. Case-control study. Elite ballet and sport. Forty-nine professional ballet dancers and 49 age-matched and sex-matched athletes. Group (dancers/athletes), sex, age, years of training, Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Scores (HAGOSs), hip rotation range of motion (ROM), generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), and hip cartilage defect scores. Hip joint effusion-synovitis (absent, grade 1 = 2-4 mm, grade 2 = >4 mm) scored with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Hip joint effusion-synovitis was found in 22 (45%) dancers and 13 (26.5%) athletes (P = 0.06). Grade 2 effusion-synovitis was only found in dancers (n = 8, r = 0.31, P = 0.009). The prevalence of effusion-synovitis was similar in men (n = 11, 26%) and women (n = 24, 43%, P = 0.09). Female dancers with effusion-synovitis had lower HAGOS pain (r = 0.63, P = 0.001) and sports/recreation scores (r = 0.66, P = 0.001) compared with those without effusion-synovitis. The HAGOS scores were not related to effusion-synovitis in male dancers or female and male athletes (P > 0.01 for all). Effusion-synovitis was not related to hip ROM, GJH, or cartilage defect scores (P > 0.05 for all). Hip joint effusion-synovitis was related to higher levels of pain and lower sports/recreation function in female ballet dancers. Effusion-synovitis was not related to hip rotation ROM, GJH or cartilage defects. Larger sized joint effusion-synovitis was exclusively found in dancers.

  14. Synovitis maps for the assessment of inflammatory diseases of the hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlo, Christoph; Zanetti, Marco; Stolzmann, Paul; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Brunner, Florian

    2011-01-01

    To compare accuracy and review times of FLASH-MRI-derived synovitis maps (SM) with conventional MR images (cMRI) in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. 80 hands in 40 patients (mean age, 48 years; range, 15-72 years) were assessed for synovitis on cMRI and SM by two readers independently. Reporting times and diagnostic confidence (scale: 1 = least, 5 = most confident) were measured. Results from an assessment of a panel of senior musculoskeletal radiologists served as the standard of reference. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of articular synovitis were 0.91/1.00 (R1) and 1.00/0.67 (R2) on cMRI and 0.87/0.75 (R1) and 0.91/0.45 (R2) on SM and for the detection of tenosynovitis 0.95/0.63 (R1) and 0.67/0.79 (R2) on cMRI and 0.67/0.89 (R1) and 0.38/1.00 (R2) on SM. Mean review times (cMRI/SM, sec) were 142/37 (R1) and 167/25 (R2). Mean diagnostic confidence (cMRI/SM) was 3.7/3.4 (R1) and 3.2/3.5 (R2) for articular synovitis and 4.0/4.0 (R1), 3.3/3.7 (R2) for tenosynovitis. Synovitis maps provide a comparable diagnostic accuracy to conventional MR images in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. Because of short review times, synovitis maps provide a fast overview of locations with synovial enhancement. (orig.)

  15. Synovitis maps for the assessment of inflammatory diseases of the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph [Kantonsspital Luzern, Department of Radiology, Luzern (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco; Stolzmann, Paul; Hodler, Juerg; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Department of Radiology, Luzern (Switzerland); Brunner, Florian [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    To compare accuracy and review times of FLASH-MRI-derived synovitis maps (SM) with conventional MR images (cMRI) in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. 80 hands in 40 patients (mean age, 48 years; range, 15-72 years) were assessed for synovitis on cMRI and SM by two readers independently. Reporting times and diagnostic confidence (scale: 1 = least, 5 = most confident) were measured. Results from an assessment of a panel of senior musculoskeletal radiologists served as the standard of reference. Sensitivity and specificity for the detection of articular synovitis were 0.91/1.00 (R1) and 1.00/0.67 (R2) on cMRI and 0.87/0.75 (R1) and 0.91/0.45 (R2) on SM and for the detection of tenosynovitis 0.95/0.63 (R1) and 0.67/0.79 (R2) on cMRI and 0.67/0.89 (R1) and 0.38/1.00 (R2) on SM. Mean review times (cMRI/SM, sec) were 142/37 (R1) and 167/25 (R2). Mean diagnostic confidence (cMRI/SM) was 3.7/3.4 (R1) and 3.2/3.5 (R2) for articular synovitis and 4.0/4.0 (R1), 3.3/3.7 (R2) for tenosynovitis. Synovitis maps provide a comparable diagnostic accuracy to conventional MR images in the assessment of articular synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hand. Because of short review times, synovitis maps provide a fast overview of locations with synovial enhancement. (orig.)

  16. As a Rare Site of Invasive Fungal Infection, Chronic Granulomatous Aspergillus Synovitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Canbolat Ayhan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus can causes invasive disease of various organs especially in patients with weakened immune systems. Aspergillus synovitis and arthritis are uncommon types of involvement due to this infection. Approches to fungal osteoarticular infections are based on only case reports. This paper presents a rare case of chronic granulomatous Aspergillus synovitis in an immunocompromised 5-year old girl who was treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  17. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip in systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

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    Anders Hans-Joachim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare disease of unknown etiology mostly affecting the knee and foot. Until now an association with autoimmune diseases has not been reported. Case presentation The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus was made in a 15-year-old Caucasian girl based on otherwise unexplained fatigue, arthralgia, tenosynovitis, leukopenia, low platelets and the presence of antinuclear and deoxyribonucleic antibodies. At the age of 20 a renal biopsy revealed lupus nephritis class IV and she went into complete remission with mycophenolate mofetil and steroids. She was kept on mycophenolate mofetil for maintenance therapy. At the age of 24 she experienced a flare-up of lupus nephritis with nephrotic syndrome and new onset of pain in her right hip. Magnetic resonance imaging, arthroscopy and subtotal synovectomy identified pigmented villonodular synovitis as the underlying diagnosis. Although her systemic lupus erythematosus went into remission with another course of steroids and higher doses of mycophenolate mofetil, the pigmented villonodular synovitis persisted and she had to undergo open synovectomy to control her symptoms. Conclusion Systemic lupus erythematosus is associated with many different musculoskeletal manifestations including synovitis and arthritis. Pigmented villonodular synovitis has not previously been reported in association with systemic lupus erythematosus, but as its etiology is still unknown, the present case raises the question about a causal relationship between systemic lupus erythematosus and pigmented villonodular synovitis.

  18. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey P Little

    Full Text Available Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+ macrophages, CD3(+ T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p0.34, p0.31, p<0.05. Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could be used in longitudinal clinical trials to monitor synovial responses to disease-modifying therapy.

  19. Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis Causing Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Mimura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 27-year-old man with pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip joint with coincident osteonecrosis of the femoral head. According to our review of the English-language literature, no detailed report of osteonecrosis of the femoral head complicated with pigmented villonodular synovitis has been published. Preoperative X-ray images showed joint narrowing and severe multiple bone erosions at the acetabulum and femoral neck. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a low-intensity band attributable to osteonecrosis of the femoral head and massive diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis lesions. Comparison of a three-dimensional computed tomographic image of this patient with an angiographic image of a normal individual demonstrated proximity of the pigmented villonodular synovitis-induced bone erosions to the medial and lateral femoral circumflex arteries and retinacular arteries, suggesting likely the compromise of the latter by the former. We propose that the massive pigmented villonodular synovitis may have contributed to the pathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in this patient. We performed open synovectomy and total hip arthroplasty. No operative complications occurred, and no recurrence of the pigmented villonodular synovitis was detected for 3 years after the operation.

  20. Synovitis assessed on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and its association with pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Robert Gabriel Coumine; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury and osteoarthr......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury...

  1. [Villonodular synovitis of the knee: about 20 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margad, Omar; Boukhris, Jalal; Azriouil, Ouahb; Daoudi, Mohamed; Mortaji, Aziz; Koulali, Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare benign proliferation of synovial joints, serous bursa, tendinous sheaths of unknown etiopathogeny. We here report 20 cases of PVNS of the knee recorded at the Avicenne Military Hospital, Marrakech over a period of 9 years, from January 2000 to December 2009. This study aimed to identify the specific features of this lesion and to examine its anatomoclinic and prognostic aspects. Annual incidence was 2.2 cases per year: 15 men and 5 women. The average age was 32.5 years. It occurred in the right-hand in 55%, 18 patients had monoarticular presentation of the disease while 1 patient had biarticular presentation of the disease. 80% of cases had pain and swelling, palpable mass was detected in 1 case, meniscal syndrome in 1 case, monoseptic arthritis in 3 cases while popliteal cyst in 2 cases. 14 cases (70%) had diffuse involvement, 6 cases had localized involvement. MRI was evocative in 3 patients out of 5; 2 patients underwent diagnostic arthroscopy. Diagnosis was based on anatomo-pathological examination. Treatment was based on subtotal synovectomy in 15 cases and on tumor excision in patients with localized involvement. 2 cases with osteocartilaginous destruction underwent arthroplasty. Patients' evolution was marked by 2 diffuse recurrences after a mean follow-up of 3-7 years. 3 patients had stiffness associated with quadriceps atrophy, therefore arthrolysis was performed. One case of histologically confirmed PVNS had proved to be a monophasic synovial sarcoma invading the bone 5 months after total synovectomy. Hence, the indication for amputation.

  2. Pigmented villonodular synovitis: a retrospective multicenter study of 237 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-ping Xie

    Full Text Available To review clinical characteristics of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS in China.Electronic medical records (EMR of four Chinese institutes were queried for patients with histologically proven PVNS between January 2005 and February 2014. Their data were collected including gender, age at diagnosis, clinical presentation, affected site, symptom duration, comorbidities, treatment strategy, recurrence and routine laboratories.A total of 237 patients with biopsy-proven PVNS were investigated. The gender ratio was 1.35 for a female predominance (101 males and 136 females. The average age was 36 years (range, 2 to 83 years. The median delay from initial clinical symptom to diagnosis was 18 months. Main affected areas were the knee (73.84% and the hip (18.14%. Forty patients had a clear history of joint trauma. Six patients were concurrently diagnosed with PVNS and avascular necrosis (AVN. Five patients suffered from PVNS following implantation of orthopaedic devices including artificial prosthesis, plate and wire. One hundred and twenty-nine patients underwent arthroscopic synovectomy and 108 open synovectomy. Altogether 48 patients (26 males and 22 females had recurrence of disease. The relapse rate was 24% (knee and 6.98% (hip, 20.93% (open surgery and 19.44% (arthroscopy, respectively. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP rate were elevated in 45.83% and 38.41% of the patients respectively.To our knowledge, this study is the largest sample size of PVNS patients reported as well as the largest sample of PVNS with concurrent AVN reported to date. Our outcomes suggest that PVNS shows a female predominance, occurs mostly between 20-40 years and favors the knee and hip. Recurrence is frequent, particularly in the knee. Serum ESR and CRP may be elevated in some patients. Additionally, the present study supports the theory of an association between PVNS and orthopedic surgery, which is not limited to joint replacement.

  3. Synovitis in dogs with stable stifle joints and incipient cranial cruciate ligament rupture: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleedorn, Jason A; Greuel, Erin N; Manley, Paul A; Schaefer, Susan L; Markel, Mark D; Holzman, Gerianne; Muir, Peter

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate stifle joints of dogs for synovitis, before development of joint instability and cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR). Cross-sectional study. Dogs (n = 16) with CrCLR and stable contralateral stifles; 10 control dogs with intact CrCL. Arthritis and tibial translation were graded radiographically. Synovitis severity and cruciate pathology were assessed arthroscopically. Presence of inflammatory cells in synovial membrane biopsies was scored histologically. CrCLR stifle pairs and control stifles were compared. Radiographic evidence of arthritis, cranial tibial translation, and arthroscopic synovitis were increased in unstable stifles, when compared with stable contralateral stifles in CrCLR dogs (P < .05). Arthroscopic synovitis in both joints of CrCLR dogs was increased compared with controls, was correlated with radiographic arthritis (S(R) = 0.71, P < .05), and was present in all stable contralateral stifles. Arthroscopically, 75% of stable stifle joints had CrCL fiber disruption, which correlated with severity of synovitis (S(R) = 0.56, P < .05). Histologic evidence of synovitis was identified in all CrCLR dogs, but was only significantly correlated with arthroscopic observations in stable stifles (r(2) = 0.57, P < .005). Synovitis is an early feature of the CrCLR arthropathy in dogs before development of joint instability clinically. Severity of synovitis is correlated with radiographic arthritis in joints with minimal to no clinically detectable CrCL damage. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. FDG-PET/CT Findings in a Patient with Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Accompanying Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Hess, Søren; Jørgensen, Erik Øster

    2016-01-01

    Background: Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare, but well-defined syndrome comprising polyarthritis with symmetrical synovitis of the small joints in hands and feet accompanied by marked pitting edema. It is often considered a paraneoplastic syndrome...

  5. Sensitization and serological biomarkers in knee osteoarthritis patients with different degrees of synovitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kristian Kjær; Siebuhr, Anne S.; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    was scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). The pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed over the KOA-affected knee. Serological biomarkers were measured in fasting serum: high-sensitive C-reactive protein, matrix metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of CRP, and matrix metalloproteinase-mediated.......03), and reduced PPTs (Pmoderate to severe (BLOKS 2&3) synovitis had significantly lower PPTs compared with mild synovitis (BLOKS 1). Significantly negative correlations were found between VAS and PPTs. No correlations were found between BLOKS and the VAS, PPT, or biomarkers....... DISCUSSION: Patients without and with moderate to severe synovitis demonstrated local pressure hyperalgesia and increased degrees of: (1) systemic inflammation, (2) connective tissue degradation, (3) cartilage degradation, and (4) decreased synovial membrane degradation as compared with controls....

  6. An animal experimental study of transient synovitis of hip using three phase bone imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jiugen; Lu Bing; Lu Xiaohu; Liu Shangli

    1994-01-01

    A model of transient synovitis was established by means of injecting noradrenaline (NA) into the joint cavity of young dogs. Radionuclide three phase bone imaging was then used to observe the local blood supply of femoral head and histological examination was used to understand the natural course of the disease process. The result showed that there were transient synovitis of the hip and decrease of blood supply in the affected femoral head after NA injection, but the changes gradually returned to normal after 4 weeks. No evidence of femoral head necrosis had been noticed. It is suggested that serial quantitative analysis of three phase bone imaging may have good clinical value in the early diagnosis transient hip synovitis, as well as in the assessment of the stage of the disease etc

  7. Treatment of knee diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis under the arthroscopy with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Wei; Huang Xunwu; Guan Changyong; Yu Fangyuan; Zhang Bo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate arthroscopy plus radiotherapy in the treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee. Methods: A total of 10 cases of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee were treated under the arthroscopy combined with postoperative radiotherapy. These patients were followed up for 12-36 months, and were evaluated as to the effect of treatment. Results: According to the Lysholm criteria, the score was (53.5 ± 11.6) and(85.7 ± 10.7) respectively before surgery and at the last followup. Conclusion: Arthroscopical synovectomy with a combined application of postoperative radiotherapy is an effective treatment for diffuse pigmented vilionoclular synovitis of the knee. (authors)

  8. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE syndrome

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    Neslihan Gokcen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema is a rare rheumatological disorder that presents with symmetrical hand and/or foot edema resembling rheumatoid arthritis. It is generally seen in male patients in older age, but atypical cases in different age groups have been documented. Although no clear mechanism has been described, certain genetic and environmental factors have been suggested for etiopathogenesis. Medical treatment is mainly focused on glucocorticoid therapy. This article aims to discuss the Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema syndrome and to review the current literature. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 147-154

  9. Tuberculous synovitis of the knee in a 65-year-old man

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    Ciobanu Laura D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tuberculous (TB synovitis is a rare, treatable, potentially lethal form of extrapulmonary TB resulting from massive lymphohematogenous dissemination of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis. We presented a case of TB synovitis of the knee in a Caucasian HIV negative man from Romania, a high TB incidence country. Case report. A 65-year old man presented with cough, high fever, mild wheezing, and swelling of the left knee. Chest radiography was normal. Sputum smears were Acid Fast Bacilli negative and Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J culture negative for M. tuberculosis. Tuberculin skin test was negative. Respiratory symptoms disappeared in a week under antibiotics. Positive L-J cultures of knee punctation and favourable treatment outcome following standardized antituberculous treatment regimen confirmed the diagnosis of specific synovitis, which was also demonstrated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Conclusion. Tuberculous synovitis is important differencial diagnosis in patients with arthropathies and risk factors for TB in all the countries and all patients' ages even when tuberculin skin test is negative.

  10. Pigmented villonodular synovitis. A case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Juan P; Pilar M Maria

    2010-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a benign neoplasm with synovial proliferation and hemosiderin deposition. It occurs usually between 3th and 4th decades of life. Typically, it is monoarticular and can affect any joint but most commonly involves the large joints of the lower extremity. Treatment is based on the eradication of the tumor by surgery or radiotherapy.

  11. Summary findings of a systematic review of the ultrasound assessment of synovitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshua, Fredrick; Lassere, Marissa; Bruyn, George A

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recent systematic review performed by the OMERACT Ultrasound Group on the metric properties of ultrasound for the detection of synovitis in inflammatory arthritis. Reviews were conducted for the hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder, knee, ankle, and foot; most reports...

  12. CLINICAL AND SONOGRAPHIC ASSESSMENT OF SYNOVITIS ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS DURING THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory process in the synovial membrane (SM, which may be a main cause of chronic pain in many patients, is one of the most significant components in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA.Objective: to study the time course of clinical and sonographic changes in patients with knee OA who used different symptomatic slow-acting agents, such as chondroitin sulfate (CS, glucosamine sulfate (GS, and diacerein, during an 18-month follow-up period in general clinical practice.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 86 knee OA patients who took CS and/or GS in combination with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and/or paracetamol in an outpatient setting for 12 months. Clinical and ultrasound (US studies of the affected knee joints (KJ were performed at the study inclusion and 12 and 18 months after follow-up initiation. The signs of active synovitis were considered to be increased synovial thickness of up to at least 3 mm and articular fluid accumulation, as evidenced by KJ US study. After 12 months, 36 patients in whom the clinical and sonographic signs of active synovitis persisted were divided into two groups: 1 19 patients took diacerein instead of CS/GS for the following 6 months; 2 17 patients in whom the treatment regimen remained unchanged.Results and discussion. 60.4% of the patients with knee OA were observed to have the sonographic signs of active synovitis, which were weakly correlated with the sizes of osteophytes and the thickness of the hyaline cartilage (r < 0.37. The rate of synovitis decreased to 41.9% during 12-month CS/GS therapy. The patients with persistent sonographically active synovitis had higher visual analogue scale and WOMAC pain scores (p < 0.05, as well as high C-reactive protein levels. They needed the more frequent and longer intake of NSAIDs and paracetamol. During the following 6 months, there was a reduction in the signs of active synovitis, as evidenced by US study, in 78

  13. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Associations between Knee Joint Effusion Synovitis and Knee Pain in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Jin, Xingzhong; Han, Weiyu; Cao, Yuelong; Halliday, Andrew; Blizzard, Leigh; Pan, Faming; Antony, Benny; Cicuttini, Flavia; Jones, Graeme; Ding, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    To describe the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between knee regional effusion synovitis and knee pain in older adults. Data from a population-based random sample (n = 880, mean age 62 yrs, 50% women) were used. Baseline knee joint effusion synovitis was graded (0-3) using T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the suprapatellar pouch, central portion, posterior femoral recess, and subpopliteal recess. Effusion synovitis of the whole joint was defined as a score of ≥ 2 in any subregion. Other knee structural (including cartilage, bone marrow, and menisci) lesions were assessed by MRI at baseline. Knee pain was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaire at baseline and 2.6 years later. Multivariable analyses were performed after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and other structural lesions. The prevalence of effusion synovitis was 67%. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis was significantly and independently associated with increased total and nonweight-bearing knee pain in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses (for an increase in total knee pain of ≥ 5, RR 1.26 per grade, 95% CI 1.04-1.52), and increased weight-bearing knee pain in longitudinal analysis only. Effusion synovitis in posterior femoral recess and central portion were independently associated with increases in nonweight-bearing pain (RR 1.63 per grade, 95% CI 1.32-2.01 and RR 1.29 per grade, 95% CI 1.01-1.65, respectively) in longitudinal analyses only. Knee joint effusion synovitis has independent associations with knee pain in older adults. Suprapatellar pouch effusion synovitis is associated with nonweight-bearing and weight-bearing knee pain, while posterior femoral recess and central portion effusion synovitis are only associated with nonweight-bearing pain.

  14. Anterior joint capsule of the normal hip and in children with transient synovitis: US study with anatomic and histologic correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.F. Robben (Simon); M.H. Lequin (Maarten); A.F.M. Diepstraten (Ad); J.C. den Hollander (Jan); C.A. Entius; M. Meradji

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: To study the anatomic components of the anterior joint capsule of the normal hip and in children with transient synovitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six cadaveric specimens were imaged with ultrasonography (US) with special attention to the anterior

  15. Knee effusion-synovitis volume measurement and effects of vitamin D supplementation in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Cicuttini, F; Jin, X; Wluka, A E; Han, W; Zhu, Z; Blizzard, L; Antony, B; Winzenberg, T; Jones, G; Ding, C

    2017-08-01

    To develop a measure of knee joint effusion-synovitis volume and to examine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on effusion-synovitis in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and low vitamin D levels over 24 months. Symptomatic knee OA patients with low 25-(OH)D levels (12.5-60 nmol/l) were recruited for a multi-centre, randomised, placebo-controlled and double-blind trial. Participants (age 63 ± 7 years, 208 females) were allocated to either 50,000 IU monthly vitamin D 3 (n = 209) or placebo (n = 204) for 24 months. Knee effusion-synovitis volume in suprapatellar and other regions was measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using OsiriX software. The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to test inter- and intra-rater reliabilities. The least significant change criterion was used to define the increase/decrease in effusion-synovitis volume. The reproducibilities of effusion-synovitis volume measurement were high with ICCs ranging from 0.93 to 0.99. Over 24 months, effusion-synovitis volume remained stable in the vitamin D group but increased in placebos with a significant between-group difference (-1.94 ml, 95% confidence interval (CI): -3.54, -0.33). This effect was evident in those with baseline effusion-synovitis and with suprapatellar effusion-synovitis. The proportion with an increase in effusion-synovitis volume was lower in the vitamin D group than placebo (risk ratio (RR): 0.87, 95% CI: 0.77, 0.97). This highly reproducible effusion-synovitis volume measurement could be a promising outcome measure in OA trials. Vitamin D supplementation could retard the progression of effusion-synovitis which can potentially benefit people with an inflammatory OA phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Automated assessment of joint synovitis activity from medical ultrasound and power doppler examinations using image processing and machine learning methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Cupek

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease with arthritis, and causes substantial functional disability in approximately 50% patients after 10 years. Accurate measurement of the disease activity is crucial to provide an adequate treatment and care to the patients. The aim of this study is focused on a computer aided diagnostic system that supports an assessment of synovitis severity. Material and methods : This paper focus on a computer aided diagnostic system that was developed within joint Polish–Norwegian research project related to the automated assessment of the severity of synovitis. Semiquantitative ultrasound with power Doppler is a reliable and widely used method of assessing synovitis. Synovitis is estimated by ultrasound examiner using the scoring system graded from 0 to 3. Activity score is estimated on the basis of the examiner’s experience or standardized ultrasound atlases. The method needs trained medical personnel and the result can be affected by a human error. Results : The porotype of a computer-aided diagnostic system and algorithms essential for an analysis of ultrasonic images of finger joints are main scientific output of the MEDUSA project. Medusa Evaluation System prototype uses bone, skin, joint and synovitis area detectors for mutual structural model based evaluation of synovitis. Finally, several algorithms that support the semi-automatic or automatic detection of the bone region were prepared as well as a system that uses the statistical data processing approach in order to automatically localize the regions of interest. Conclusions : Semiquantitative ultrasound with power Doppler is a reliable and widely used method of assessing synovitis. Activity score is estimated on the basis of the examiner’s experience and the result can be affected by a human error. In this paper we presented the MEDUSA project which is focused on a computer aided diagnostic system that supports an

  17. Power Doppler sonography and ultrasound contrast agent in assessing rheumatoid synovitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Salaffi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pannus formation is a fundamental event in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and its hypervascularisation seems to be crucial to the development of joint damage. High-resolution greyscale ultrasonography is a safe, quick, and inexpensive imaging tool that allows an accurate detection of even minimal morphostructural changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including joint effusion, thickening of synovial membrane and bone erosions. More recently, power Doppler sonography has proved to be a reliable tool for semiquantitative assessment of the vascularity of the synovial tissue. The contrast-enhanced power Doppler sonography seems to be a helpful adjunct in assessing synovitis and the therapeutic response to the different therapies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this radiological vignette was to show a representative example of use of power Doppler sonography with contrast agent in assessing rheumatoid synovitis.

  18. Metatarsalgia located by synovitis and uncertainty of the articulation metatarsus-phalanges of the II toe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerstner G, Juan Bernardo

    2002-01-01

    The synovitis and the uncertainty of the articulation metatarsus-phalanges (MP) of the II toe they are the causes more frequent of metatersalgia located in this articulation of the foot, frequently bad diagnosed and not well managed by the general orthopedist. The natural history understands stadiums so precocious as the synovitis without alteration of peri-articular structures, going by the frank uncertainty, and finishing with the angular deformities and the complete luxation of the articulation MP. The meticulous and directed interrogation, the physical exam specifies and the classification of the diagnostic they are the keys for the successful handling of the pathology. The surgical correction of this condition should always be associated to the correction of associate deformities as the hallux valgus and the fingers in claw

  19. The relationship between limited MRI section analyses and volumetric assessment of synovitis in knee osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, L.A.; Keenan, A.-M.; Grainger, A.J.; Emery, P.; McGonagle, D.; Conaghan, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether simple, limited section analysis can replace detailed volumetric assessment of synovitis in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-five patients with clinical and radiographic OA of the knee were assessed for synovitis using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The volume of enhancing synovium was quantitatively assessed in four anatomical sites (the medial and lateral parapatellar recesses, the intercondylar notch and the suprapatellar pouch) by summing the volumes of synovitis in consecutive sections. Four different combinations of section analysis were evaluated for their ability to predict total synovial volume. RESULTS: A total of 114 intra-articular sites were assessed. Simple linear regression demonstrated that the best predictor of total synovial volume was the analysis containing the inferior, mid and superior sections of each of the intra-articular sites, which predicted between 40-80% (r 2 =0.396, p 2 =0.818, p<0.001 for medial parapatellar recess) of the total volume assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a three-section analysis on axial post-gadolinium sequences provides a simple surrogate measure of synovial volume in OA knees

  20. The relationship between limited MRI section analyses and volumetric assessment of synovitis in knee osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, L.A. [Academic Unit of Medical Physics, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: lar@medphysics.leeds.ac.uk; Keenan, A.-M. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, A.J. [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, P. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); McGonagle, D. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom); Calderdale Royal Hospital, Salterhebble, Halifax (United Kingdom); Conaghan, P.G. [Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal Disease, University of Leeds and Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    AIM: To assess whether simple, limited section analysis can replace detailed volumetric assessment of synovitis in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-five patients with clinical and radiographic OA of the knee were assessed for synovitis using gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The volume of enhancing synovium was quantitatively assessed in four anatomical sites (the medial and lateral parapatellar recesses, the intercondylar notch and the suprapatellar pouch) by summing the volumes of synovitis in consecutive sections. Four different combinations of section analysis were evaluated for their ability to predict total synovial volume. RESULTS: A total of 114 intra-articular sites were assessed. Simple linear regression demonstrated that the best predictor of total synovial volume was the analysis containing the inferior, mid and superior sections of each of the intra-articular sites, which predicted between 40-80% (r {sup 2}=0.396, p<0.001 for notch; r {sup 2}=0.818, p<0.001 for medial parapatellar recess) of the total volume assessment. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a three-section analysis on axial post-gadolinium sequences provides a simple surrogate measure of synovial volume in OA knees.

  1. Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome presenting a primary sternal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Carlos A.; Leani, Marcelo J.; Rieu, Juan; Serrano, Santiago O.; Dettano, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    SAPHO syndrome-acronym for synovitis, acne, pustules, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a nosological entity including multiple affections with cutaneous and osteoarticular involvement. We report the case of a 59 years old female patient that consulted due to an acute sternal pain. After some months the patient showed a palm-plantar pustular exanthem, acne and fever. SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed based on a CT, an osseous gammagraphy and a biopsy of cutaneous lesions. The current actual tendency is to consider the SAPHO syndrome as a seronegative arthropathy with a similar pathophysiology to Reiter's syndrome. (author)

  2. A study of 153Sm-citrate-hydroxyapatite synovectomy in knee synovitis with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yanggang; Li Guohua; Yao Guozhong; Zhang Qingcheng; Li Guangming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of 153 Sm-citrate-hydroxyapatite (HA) synovectomy in knee synovitis with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: In 43 RA patients ineffective to routine anti-rheumatic drugs (DMMARDs) therapy, radiation synovectomy was performed by 153 Sm-citrate-HA in 67 joints and its efficacy and safety were evaluated. Results: Radioactivity was evenly distributed as observed by gamma camera after injection. In 8 cases leakage of radioactivity was detected after 24 h, and accounted to 153 Sm-citrate-HA synovectomy is effective after short-term and medium-term follow-up and it is a safe procedure. (authors)

  3. Tuberculosis of the hip as the presenting sign of HIV and simulating pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Damron, Timothy A.; Ambrose, Lee J.; Rose, Frederick B.

    2002-01-01

    A 36-year old man, with no prior known exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or tuberculosis, presented with monoarticular pain and a decreased range of motion in his left hip. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed bony erosive lesions, juxta-articular cysts, a large effusion, and juxta-articular edema. The initial clinical and radiographic diagnosis was pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the left hip. However, what was initially felt to be a chronic proliferative inflammatory process was later determined to be tuberculous arthritis. This case emphasizes the importance of including tuberculous arthritis in the differential diagnosis of patients with monoarticular destructive joint disease radiologically suggestive of PVNS. (orig.)

  4. Fluorescence optical imaging and 3T-MRI for detection of synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in comparison to a composite standard of reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuermel, Klaus; Neumann, Jan; Jungmann, Pia M; Schäffeler, Christoph; Waldt, Simone; Heinze, Alexander; Beckmann, Alexander; Hauser, Christine; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Wildgruber, Moritz; Clotten, Sigrun; Sievert, Matti; Haller, Bernhard; Woertler, Klaus; Harasser, Norbert; Rummeny, Ernst J; Meier, Reinhard

    2017-05-01

    To address whether Indocyanine Green (ICG) enhanced fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) is more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of synovitis of the wrist and finger joints in rheumatoid arthritis and to analyze the performance of FOI depending on the grade of synovitis. Twenty patients with highly active rheumatoid arthritis (mean DAS28-ESR 5.25±1.0) and thirteen healthy volunteers underwent clinical examination, FOI and contrast-enhanced 3T-MRI. Joints were rated by three independent readers semiquantitatively (grade 0-3: no, low, moderate and high grade synovitis) and compared to a semiquantitative composite standard of reference (cSOR, grade 0-3) that incorporated clinical parameters, FOI and MRI results. 2.868 evaluations in 956 joints were performed. FOI had an overall sensitivity of 57.3% and a specificity of 92.1%, whereas MRI had a sensitivity of 89.2% and a specificity of 92.6%. The sensitivity of FOI increased with the degree of synovitis to 65.0% for moderate and severe synovitis (specificity 88.1%) and 76,3% for severe synovitis (specificity 80.5%). The performance of FOI decreased with the degree of synovitis with false negative results predominantly for mild (156/343, 45.5%) and moderate (160/343, 46.6%) synovitis and false positive FOI evaluations predominantly based on weak (grade 1) signals (133/163, 81,6%). FOI has a lower sensitivity than 3T-MRI in the detection of synovitis of the hand and finger joints. The diagnostic performance of FOI decreases with the degree of synovitis and with the strength of FOI signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the activity of synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: Value of power Doppler ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Joong Mo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Koh, Eun Mi; Kim, Jin Seok; Cha, Hoon Suk

    2001-01-01

    To correlate the grades on power Doppler ultrasonography with clinical disease activity indices and acute phase reactant values for assessing the activity of synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed on the basis of American College of power Doppler ultrasonography. Two experienced radiologists evaluated, in consensus, the power Doppler signals as follows: grade I=no flow or minimal flow, grade 2=mild flow, grade 3=moderate flow and grade 4= marked flow. The clinical disease activity indices consisted of the counts of tender joints and swollen joints, patient's assessment of pain, patient's global assessment of disease activity, physician's globe assessment of disease activity and patient's assessment of physical function. Acute-phase reactants included CRP and ESR. The grades on power Doppler ultrasonography were correlated with clinical disease activity indices as well as acute-phases reactant values by a use of Spearman rank correlation coefficient. The grades on power Doppler ultrasonography showed a statistically significant correlation with tender joint count (rs=.835; p<.05), swollen joint count (rs=.833; p<.05), physician's global assessment of disease activity (rs=.857; p<.05), CRP (rs=.838; P<.05) and ESR (rs=.838; p<.05). The power Doppler ultrasonography is an useful diagnostic modality for assessing the activity of synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  6. A Case of Paraneoplastic Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema Syndrome Improved by Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Sakamoto

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 69-year-old male who had started experiencing acute-onset pain in both shoulder joints and edema of both hands and feet. His symptoms progressively worsened within 1 month. Laboratory data indicated elevated CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate despite the normal range of antinuclear antibodies and rheumatoid factor and normal organ function. Furthermore, imaging data of the hand indicated synovitis without bone erosions. Meanwhile, chest CT revealed a lung tumor, leading to a diagnosis of primary lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutation (cT2aN3M0, stage IIIB. Based on these findings, he was diagnosed as suffering from paraneoplastic remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE syndrome. Thereafter, his symptoms disappeared as the tumor size was rapidly decreased by gefitinib therapy for lung adenocarcinoma. Currently, RS3PE syndrome can be classified as a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-associated disorder. Given that his symptoms improved by chemotherapy, the present case further supported the possible hypothesis that paraneoplastic RS3PE syndrome might be caused by tumor-induced VEGF. Therefore, the present case suggested that the symptoms of acute-onset joint pain accompanied by pitting edema in elderly patients should be considered suspicious for a malignant tumor, thereby warranting a detailed full-body examination.

  7. Toxic Synovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... might be taken from the joint for a culture (a lab test to detect bacteria). The doctor ... However, participation in activities like gym class or sports will have to wait until your child fully ...

  8. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI--a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eshed, Iris; Krabbe, Simon; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. RESULTS: Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38--0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis...... is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. KEY POINTS...

  9. The effects of intra-articular glucocorticoids and exercise on pain and synovitis assessed on static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, R G C; Henriksen, M; Klokker, L

    2017-01-01

    ) investigate if any of the changes in patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) were associated with changes in MRI-measures of synovitis. DESIGN: We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluating the effects of intra-articular corticosteroid vs placebo injections given......-articular corticosteroids over intra-articular saline when combined with an exercise program for reduction of synovitis in KOA. The improvement in pain and function following the intervention with intra-articular corticosteroids/saline and exercise could not be explained by a decrease in synovitis on MRI indicating other...... pain causing/relieving mechanisms in KOA....

  10. Syndrome of remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A N Varshney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema (RS3PE is a rare clinical entity that is easily missed due to lack of knowledge. It was formerly considered as a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, but is now regarded as a distinct disease/syndrome. The diagnosis of RS3PE is not easy, as it is always hindered by the lack of definite diagnostic criteria and presence of other much common rheumatological disorders that mimic it. We report a series of seven cases that attended our clinic in the last year, which highlight the salient features of the disease. The disease was found to have a heterogeneous presentation. Immunogenetic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and possible etiological factors and associations with the neoplasm are described, as also other peculiar presentations. Finally, a comparison with other common rheumatological disorders is made to alert the clinician about this rare, but easily treatable disease.

  11. Results of Total Knee Arthroplasty in Patients with Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis-Reporting Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The knee is the most commonly affected joint in the pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS. If misdiagnosed or mismanaged, PVNS, especially the diffused form can destroy joints and can result in terminal degenerative joint disease. Case Presentation We report 3 cases of diffuse form of PVNS with grade 3 osteoarhtritis that IS treated by total synovectomy and total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The mean duration of the follow-up was 46.5 (9, 11, 120 months. In 2 cases, staged posterior then anterior synovectomy and TKA were done with excellent results. In 1 case, simultaneous synovectomy and TKA was performed with hematoma formation postoperatively and quadriceps tendon rupture 10 weeks later with fair final result. Conclusions TKA in PVNS is a challenging procedure. We recommend open posterior synovectomy then anterior synovectomy and TKA in 2 separate operations. Quadriceps mechanism must be protected during synovectomy.

  12. All-Arthroscopic Treatment of Intra- and Extra-Articular Localized Villonodular Synovitis of Knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetta, Roberto; Florio, Michela; Familiari, Filippo; Gasparini, Giorgio; Rosa, Michele Attilio

    2017-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, benign, proliferative neoplastic condition affecting synovial-lined anatomic spaces. PVNS is characterized by hypertrophy of a synovial membrane by villous, nodular, and villonodular proliferation, with pigmentation secondary to hemosiderin deposition. The two forms of PVNS that have been described are diffuse (DPVNS) and localized (LPVNS). The knee is the most commonly involved anatomic location, followed by hip, ankle, shoulder, and elbow. Diagnosis of PVNS is not always obvious clinically. Various imaging modalities are often necessary to exclude other conditions and narrow the diagnosis. Magnetic resonance imaging has become the modality of choice for diagnosing PVNS. We present a case of intra-articular LPVNS with an extra-articular extension through the posterior capsule that has been successfully removed in an all-arthroscopic fashion.

  13. Association of Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema, Polymyalgia Rheumatica, and Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Hess, Soeren; Gildberg-Mortensen, Rannveig

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare condition that occurs in elderly individuals. It can present alone or in association with various rheumatic or malignant diseases. CASE REPORT An 83-year-old man presented with anemia, hyper......-sedimentation, and pitting edema of the back of the hands. The patient complained of pain and stiffness of the shoulder and hip girdles, especially in the morning. He was previously diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate. After 3 years of watchful waiting, treatment with goserelin, a gonadotropin releasing hormone...... of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of RS3PE that presented twice with 2 different diagnoses in the same patient....

  14. Syndrome of remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, A N; Singh, N K

    2015-01-01

    Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema (RS3PE) is a rare clinical entity that is easily missed due to lack of knowledge. It was formerly considered as a subset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but is now regarded as a distinct disease/syndrome. The diagnosis of RS3PE is not easy, as it is always hindered by the lack of definite diagnostic criteria and presence of other much common rheumatological disorders that mimic it. We report a series of seven cases that attended our clinic in the last year, which highlight the salient features of the disease. The disease was found to have a heterogeneous presentation. Immunogenetic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and possible etiological factors and associations with the neoplasm are described, as also other peculiar presentations. Finally, a comparison with other common rheumatological disorders is made to alert the clinician about this rare, but easily treatable disease.

  15. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension: A case series and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Taemin; Sun, Matthew Z; Parsa, Andrew T; McDermott, Michael W; El-Sayed, Ivan H; Bloch, Orin

    2015-08-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare proliferative disorder of the synovial membrane. PVNS generally affects large joints but occasionally involves the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), with occasional extension into the middle cranial fossa. The purpose of this study was to report our experience with PVNS along with a focused literature review. Patients with PVNS of the TMJ treated at the University of California - San Francisco from 2007 to 2013 were reviewed. A PubMed search was performed to identify additional cases. Five patients underwent surgical resection, with 1 recurrence at 61 months. A literature review identified 58 patients, 19 of which had intracranial involvement. Interestingly, intracranial extension was more common in men. Intracranial extension was not associated with an increased rate of recurrence. PVNS of the TMJ is a rare entity associated with excellent outcomes, even with intracranial extension. Management should consist of maximal resection, with radiotherapy reserved for extensive or recurrent lesions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Sinovite vilonodular pigmentada localizada: relato de caso Localized pigmented villonodular synovitis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Andrea de Carvalho Godoy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O caso em questão é o de uma paciente do sexo feminino que apresentava queixa de dor na região anterior do joelho esquerdo durante e após atividades esportivas, seguidas de bloqueio articular havia três meses. Exames de imagem: radiografias simples do joelho normais e ressonância magnética mostrando formação expansiva sólida podendo corresponder a condroma de partes moles ou a sinovite nodular focal. Realizada ressecção artroscópica da lesão com diagnóstico de tumor de células gigantes difuso símile/sinovite vilonodular pigmentada localizada (SVNPL após resultado do exame anatomopatológico. A paciente apresenta boa evolução clínica com desaparecimento dos sintomas e retorno às atividades físicas.This case concerned a female patient with a complaint of pain in the anterior region of her left knee during and after sports activities, followed by joint blockage three months ago. From imaging examinations, simple radiography of the knee was normal and magnetic resonance showed a solid expansive mass, possibly corresponding to soft-tissue chondroma or focal nodular synovitis. Arthroscopic resection of the lesion was performed, and the diagnosis of diffuse giant cell tumor resembling localized pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS was made from the result of the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of symptoms and return to physical activities.

  17. The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and non-specific synovitis by intra-articular injection of radioactive colloidal gold (198Au)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this study, thirty-nine knee and three ankle effusions and pains unresponsive to the usual methods of therapy were treated by intra-articular injection of radioactive colloidal gold from November 1964 to January 1979 and followed up. Thirteen cases had classical rheumatoid arthritis: fifteen non-specific synovitis: two pigmented villonodular synovitis: one post-synovectomy, and one tuberculous arthritis. The results were as follows: 1) In eleven cases (84.6 %) of rheumatoid arthritis fourteen cases (93.3 %) of non-specific synovitis, and five cases (50.0 %) of osteoarthritis, the effusion disappeared. 2) In twelve cases (92.3 %) of rheumatoid arthritis, thirteen cases (86.7 %) of non-specific synovitis, and only two cases (20.0 %) of oseoarthritis, the pain disappeared. 3) As a whole, in thirty-three cases (78.6 %), the effusion disappeared and in twenty-eight cases (66.7 %) the pain disappeared. (author)

  18. Diagnostic performance of three-dimensional MR maximum intensity projection for the assessment of synovitis of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xubin, E-mail: lixb@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Reseaech Center for Cancer, Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China); Liu, Xia; Du, Xiangke [Department of Radiology, Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing 100044 (China); Ye, Zhaoxiang [Department of Radiology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Reseaech Center for Cancer, Tianjin, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin 300060 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of three-dimensional (3D) MR maximum intensity projection (MIP) in the assessment of synovitis of the hand and wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients with RA underwent MR examinations. 3D MR MIP images were derived from the enhanced images. MR images were reviewed by two radiologists for the presence and location of synovitis of the hand and wrist. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 3D MIP were, respectively, calculated with the reference standard 3D CE-MRI. Results: In all subjects, 3D MIP images yielded directly and clearly the presence and location of synovitis with just one image. Synovitis demonstrated high signal intensity on MIP images. The k-values for the detection of articular synovitis indicated excellent interobserver agreements using 3D MIP images (k = 0.87) and CE-MR images (k = 0.91), respectively. 3D MIP demonstrated a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 91.07%, 98.57% and 96.0%, respectively, for the detection of synonitis. Conclusion: 3D MIP can provide a whole overview of lesion locations and a reliable diagnostic performance in the assessment of articular synovitis of the hand and wrist in patients with RA, which has potential value of clinical practice.

  19. Multicenter study of radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical outcome in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, H.; Lohmann, K.; Spitz, J.; Franke, C.; Goretzki, G.; Lemb, M.A.; Mueller, J.; Panholzer, P.J.; Stelling, E.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: evaluation of the effectiveness of radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis versus rheumatoid arthritis by means of a standardized questionnaire. Patients, methods: 803 RSO treatments were monitored in 691 patients by standardized questionnaires of 7 centers in 3 countries. Patients were assigned to 3 groups according to their age (20-40, 41-60, 61-80 years). Additionally, the data were analyzed separately for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (group A) and those with osteoarthritis, psoriasis arthritis, pigmental villonodular synovitis or persistent effusions after joint replacement (group B). Results: ameliorations of joint pain, swelling/effusion or flexibility were found in 80% of group A and 56% of group B (p [de

  20. Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the Hip: Sudden-Onset Pain Caused by Torsion of the Tumor Pedicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyokazu Fukui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare, benign, but potentially locally aggressive disease that should be considered in younger patients who present with monoarticular joint symptoms and pathology. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with a mass arising from her right hip joint that was examined using a multimodal radiological approach. Because her clinical presentation mimicked that of synovial osteochondromatosis of the hip, surgical dislocation was performed. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of localized pigmented villonodular synovitis, with the mass consisting of proliferation of fibrohistiocytic cells, abundant hemosiderin, foamy histiocytes, and occasional giant cells. Because of the presence of tumor necrosis, we hypothesize that torsion of the tumor pedicle was the cause of acute presentation.

  1. Ankle and subtalar synovitis in a ball-and-socket ankle joint causing posterolateral painful coarse crepitus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ka Yuk; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl with bilateral ball-and-socket ankles reported left medial heel pain. Her left heel had gone into a varus position on tiptoeing, and a painful clunk had occurred when returning to normal standing. The clunk persisted after physiotherapy and treatment with an orthosis. Subtalar arthroscopy and peroneal tendoscopy showed mild diffuse synovitis of the ankle joint, especially over the posterior capsule, and a patch of inflamed and fibrotic synovium at the posterolateral corner of the subtalar joint. The clunk subsided immediately after arthroscopic synovectomy and had not recurred during 5 years of follow-up. We found no other reported cases of ankle and subtalar synovitis occurring in patients with a ball-and-socket ankle joint. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A rare case of localised pigmented villonodular synovitis in the knee of a 24-year-old female soccer player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falster, Casper; Stockmann Poulsen, Simon; Joergensen, Uffe

    2017-01-01

    Localised pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) of the knee is a rare diagnosis, with clinical signs and symptoms mimicking meniscal damage or other common knee injuries. We report the case of a 24-year-old female soccer player, seeking treatment after 7 months of persisting knee pain...... analyses confirmed the diagnosis of localised PVNS. The patient was subsequently free of symptoms with no signs of recurrence on MRI and had resumed soccer practice at the 1-year follow-up appointment....

  3. The association between histological, macroscopic and magnetic resonance imaging assessed synovitis in end-stage knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, R G C; Gudbergsen, H; Simonsen, O

    2017-01-01

    the DCE-MRI variable MExNvoxel (surrogate of the volume and degree of synovitis) and the macroscopic score showed correlations above the pre-specified threshold for acceptance with histological inflammation. The maximum R2-value obtained in Model 1 was R2 = 0.39. In Model 2, where the CE......-MRI-variables were added, the highest R2 = 0.52. In Model 3, a four-variable model consisting of the gender, one CE-MRI and two DCE-MRI-variables yielded a R2 = 0.71. CONCLUSION: DCE-MRI is correlated with histological synovitis in end-stage KOA and the combination of CE and DCE-MRI may be a useful, non......-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI prior to (TKR) and correlated with microscopic and macroscopic assessments of synovitis obtained intraoperatively. Multiple bivariate correlations were used with a pre-specified threshold of 0.70 for significance. Also, multiple...

  4. Power Doppler ultrasonography and synovitis: correlating ultrasound imaging with histopathological findings and evaluating the performance of ultrasound equipments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, J M; Saarakkala, S; Helle, M; Hakulinen, U; Heikkinen, J O; Hermunen, H

    2006-12-01

    To examine the validity of power Doppler ultrasound imaging to identify synovitis, using histopathology as gold standard, and to assess the performance of ultrasound equipments. 44 synovial sites in small and large joints, bursae and tendon sheaths were depicted with ultrasound. A synovial biopsy was performed on the site depicted and a synovial sample was taken for histopathological evaluation. The performance of three ultrasound devices was tested using flow phantoms. A positive Doppler signal was detected in 29 of 35 (83%) of the patients with active histological inflammation. In eight additional samples, histological examination showed other pathological synovial findings and a Doppler signal was detected in five of them. No significant correlation was found between the amount of Doppler signal and histological synovitis score (r = 0.239, p = NS). The amount of subsynovial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes and surface fibrin correlated significantly with the amount of power Doppler signal: r = 0.397 (pultrasound devices differed in showing the smallest detectable flow. A negative Doppler signal does not exclude the possibility of synovitis. A positive Doppler signal in the synovium is an indicator of an active synovial inflammation in patients. A Doppler signal does not correlate with the extent of the inflammation and it can also be seen in other synovial reactions. It is important that the quality measurements of ultrasound devices are reported, because the results should be evaluated against the quality of the device used.

  5. Efficacy of Radiation Synovectomy with Y-90 in chronic knee joint synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roiz, C.; Raigoso, P.; Suarez, J.P.; Llana, B.; Zeidan, N.; Dominguez, M.L.; Bernardo, L.; Fernandez, J.A.; Nunez, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficiency of Radiation Synovectomy (RSO) with Y-90 in knee joints of patients with chronic synovitis (CS) resistant to classical conventional therapy, and assess its long-term prognosis. Material and Methods: 22 patients (7 males,15 females, mean age 50, range 12-81) with CS of the knees, of a duration ranging from 2 to 48 years, were included in the study. All patients had suffered from CS for more than 6 months, and were resistant to anti-inflammatory drugs, immunosuppressants and intraarticular (IA) steroid therapy. The cases included:10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 5 psoriatic arthritis (PA), 3 pigmented villonodular synovitis, 2 seronegative oligo-polyarthritis and 2 chronic mono arthritis. We used an IA dose of 3 to 5 mCi (37-185 MBq)of Y-90. The effect of the therapy with Y-90 on 22 knees was evaluated from 3 to 12 months after the RSO. Patients' response was assess and classified according to the results of plain radiology and following conventional rheumatological criteria as: A) Excellent (E) with a visual improvement (VI) of 80-100mm, no pain in motion, little or no palpable swelling, no inflammation; B) Good (G) VI of 60-90mm, minimal pain in motion, little palpable swelling; C) Mild (M) VI of 20-59mm, moderate reduction of pain, obvious swelling; D) Bad (B) VI of only 0-19 mm, no changes or an increase of pain in the swollen joints. Results: The response observed was classified as: E in 5 patients (23%); G in 10 patients (45%); M in 3 patients (14%); and B in 4(18%). The 4 patients with a response B, had all of them joint erosion on plain radiology. Furthermore, one of the patients was a failure from prior surgical synovectomy (SS). The other 3 patients subsequently had SS. In contrast, all the responses E and G were obtained exclusively in patients with RA or PA. No short or long-term adverse side effects were noted. Conclusion: RSO is an effective treatment for patients with persistent CS, specially in RA and PA. The

  6. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint: MR findings in four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Han, Moon Hee E-mail: hanmh@radcom.snu.ac.kr; Park, Sun-Won; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jae, Hwan Jun; Kang, Joon Won; Chang, Kee Hyun

    2004-03-01

    Objective: Although it is a rare condition, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) may involve temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of PVNS of the TMJ. Methods and material: Between April 1992 and August 2000, four patients (two men and two women, 22-58-year-old) who had histologically proven diagnoses of PVNS in their TMJ were found in our institution. Their MR findings were reviewed retrospectively, and were correlated with pathologic findings. Results: In all four patients, MR images invariably showed profound hypointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted sequences. This finding was seen diffusely and homogeneously throughout the lesion, and was considered to be due to paramagnetic effect attributed to heavy hemosiderin pigmentation, which was revealed by histopathological examination. MR images also showed aggressive nature of the lesions with adjacent skull base destruction and intracranial extension in two of them. Conclusion: As is the case in the other anatomic site, PVNS of the TMJ can be confidently diagnosed on MR imaging on the basis of the presence of hemosiderin. MR imaging also plays a pivotal role in surgical planning by precise and detailed localization of the lesion.

  7. Pigmented villonodular synovitis: a crowdsourcing study of two hundred and seventy two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Piner, Sheila R; van de Sande, Michiel Adrianus Josephus

    2016-12-01

    We aimed to ascertain the feasibility of crowdsourcing via Facebook for medical research purposes; by investigating surgical, oncological and functional outcome and quality-of-life (QOL) in patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) enrolled in a Facebook community (1112 members). Patients completed online open surveys on demographics, surgery and clinical outcomes (group 1); and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) including knee-injury osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS), hip-disability osteoarthritis outcome score (HOOS), Toronto extremity salvage score (TESS) and SF-36 (group 2). Mean follow-up was 70 months (12-374). Consistency checks were performed with Cohen's kappa statistic for intra-rater agreement. The first survey was completed by 272 patients (group 1) and 72 patients completed the second (group 2). In group 1, recurrence-rate was 58 % (69/118) after arthroscopic, 36 % (35/97) after open and 50 % (5/10) after combined synovectomy (p = 0.003). In group 2, recurrence-rate was 67 % (26/39) after arthroscopic and 51 % (17/33) after open synovectomy (p = 0.19). Recurrence-risk was increased for diffuse disease (OR = 16; 95%CI = 3.2-85; p crowdsourcing seems a promising and innovative way of evaluating rare diseases including PVNS.

  8. Clinical trial of {sup 166}Ho-CHICO in the treatment of rheumatoid knee synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Yoo, D. H.; Bae, S. C.; Lee, I. H.; Jung, S. S.; Jun, J. B.; Kim, T. H.; Kim, S. S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The untreated, chronic synovial inflammation leads to pannus formation and eventual destruction of the articular cartilage. In cases where medical therapy was unsuccessful, surgical of radiation synovectomy over surgical synovectomy are (1) greater destruction of diseased synovium, (2) reduced Potential for blood clots and infection, (3) no requirement for anesthesia, and (4) less costly and less time consuming. Recently KAERI developed Dy-165 HMA, which was characterized by the absence of iron and a higher concentration of dysprosium. And then more recently KAERI also developed {sup 16H}o-CHICO, which was characterized by relatively longer half-life (26.8 hr), more biological due to organic nature of chitosan, more even spatial distribution due to colloidal solution, and more absorbable to synovium than Dy-165 HMA. These long-term follow-up results indicate that the {sup 166}Ho-CHICO is an effective and safe agent for radiation synovectomy for knee synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as the other chronic arthritides. But further large scaled and controlled study are required. 16 refs. (Author)

  9. MRI evaluation of infectious and non-infectious synovitis: preliminary studies in a rabbit model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, P.J.; DiPietro, M.A.; Teo, E.L.H.J.; Londy, F.; Chrisp, C.E.; Doi, K.

    1999-01-01

    Background. Literature on magnetic resonance imaging (MR) evaluation of inflammatory joint effusions is sparse. Objective. To describe an animal model for studying infectious and non-infectious joint effusions with magnetic resonance imaging. Materials and methods. Ten rabbit knees with septic arthritis and four with talc synovitis were imaged with MR. Contralateral knees injected with saline served as controls. Fat saturation T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images were assessed for joint effusion, and periarticular and adjacent intraosseous increased signal or enhancement. Each knee was cultured and underwent pathologic examination. Results. Both Staphylococcus aureus and talc produced effusions in all knees. The degree of periarticular signal and enhancement was greater in infected knees than talc-injected knees. No abnormal enhancement was seen within bone. Pathologic examination showed a greater degree of inflammation and joint destruction in the infected knees, but no evidence of osteomyelitis. Conclusion. A greater degree of abnormal signal and enhancement seen on MR suggests a more vigorous inflammatory process, as seen with septic arthritis. In spite of advanced septic arthritis, no enhancement was evident within bone, suggesting that enhancement within bone is not an expected finding in isolated septic arthritis and should raise concern for osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  10. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used

  11. Calprotectin and TNF trough serum levels identify power Doppler ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis patients in remission or with low disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inciarte-Mundo, José; Ramirez, Julio; Hernández, Maria Victoria; Ruiz-Esquide, Virginia; Cuervo, Andrea; Cabrera-Villalba, Sonia Raquel; Pascal, Mariona; Yagüe, Jordi; Cañete, Juan D; Sanmarti, Raimon

    2016-07-08

    Serum levels of calprotectin, a major S100 leucocyte protein, are associated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Higher drug trough serum levels are associated with good response in patients treated with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi). Power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) synovitis is predictive of flare and progression of structural damage in patients in clinical remission. The purpose of this study was to analyse the accuracy of calprotectin and TNFi trough serum levels in detecting PDUS synovitis in RA and PsA patients in clinical remission or with low disease activity who were receiving TNFi. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 92 patients (42 with RA, 50 with PsA) receiving adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETN) or infliximab who were in remission or had low disease activity (28-joint Disease Activity Score based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate ultrasound scores (all r coefficients >0.50 in RA). Calprotectin correlated with the PDUS synovitis score in patients treated with ADA and ETN. Using PDUS synovitis (yes or no) as the reference variable, calprotectin had an AUC of 0.826. The best cut-off was ≥1.66 μg/ml, with a likelihood ratio of 2.77. C-reactive protein (AUC 0.673) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (AUC 0.731) had a lower discriminatory capacity. TNFi trough serum levels were significantly associated with PDUS synovitis (OR 0.67, 95 % CI 0.52-0.85, p < 0.001) but their accuracy (AUC <0.5) was less than that of calprotectin. TNFi trough serum levels were inversely correlated with calprotectin and PDUS synovitis in RA and PsA patients receiving ADA and ETN. Calprotectin and TNFi trough serum levels may help identify PDUS synovitis in RA and PsA patients in clinical remission or with low disease activity.

  12. Is synovitis detected on non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging associated with serum biomarkers and clinical signs of effusion? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveza, L A; Kraus, V B; Collins, J E; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F W; Nevitt, M C; Hunter, D J

    2017-09-20

    To determine the relationship between synovitis detected on non-contrast-enhanced (non-CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical markers of inflammation, and clinical assessment of effusion in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined data from the OA Biomarkers Consortium within the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 600). Non-CE MRIs were semi-quantitatively scored (grades 0-3) for severity of Hoffa synovitis and effusion synovitis. Serum (s) matrix metalloproteinase-3 (sMMP-3), hyaluronic acid (sHA), and nitrated epitope of the α-helical region of type II collagen (sColl2-1NO2) were quantified. The bulge and patellar tap clinical tests were performed at baseline and performance characteristics were assessed for the detection of effusion synovitis on MRI. Multinomial logistic regression adjusted for covariates was used to assess the association between biochemical and imaging markers at baseline and over 12 and 24 months. At baseline, sHA and sMMP-3 were associated with moderate to large (score ≥ 2, n = 117) effusion synovitis, with odds ratio = 1.35 and 1.30 per 1 standard deviation in biochemical markers (95% confidence intervals 1.07, 1.71 and 1.00, 1.69), c-statistics 0.640 and 0.626, respectively. The c-statistics for the presence of Hoffa synovitis (score ≥ 2) were 0.693, 0.694, and 0.694 for sHA, sMMP-3, and sColl2-1NO2, respectively. There was no significant association between biochemical markers (baseline and 12 and 24 month time-integrated concentrations) and changes in MRI markers. The bulge and patellar tap signs were 22.0% and 4.3% sensitive and 88.8% and 94.8% specific, respectively, for detecting effusion synovitis (score ≥ 1) on MRI. sHA and sMMP-3 were modestly associated with effusion synovitis at baseline. Clinical signs of effusion are insensitive but highly specific for the presence of any effusion synovitis on non-CE MRI.

  13. Imaging manifestations and its clinical significance in patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Lin Qiang; Yao Jinpeng; Chang Yinjuan; Zhou Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical and imaging manifestations of patients with synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteomyelitis (SAPHO) syndrome, and to analyze the diagnostic importance of different clinical and imaging manifestations for SAPHO syndrome. Methods: Seventeen patients (7 males and 10 females) with SAPHO syndrome were recruited in this study. Age ranged from 36 to 67 years with a mean age of (48 ± 8) years. All patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of Benhamou. Serum HLA B27 antigen records were reviewed for all patients. Imaging data of the abnormal bone sites were collected by conventional radiograph in all patients, CT in 13 patients as well as MR in 3 patients. Average time to take for a definite diagnosis of the syndrome was 3.7 years (ranged from O.5 to 13 years). Results: Serum HLA B27 antigen was positive in all patients. Both skin and bone abnormalities were found in all patients. Ten patients had skin palmoplantar pustulosis and two patients had acne. Involving sites of bone and joints include sacroiliac joints, anterior chest and limbs. Sacroiliac joints were asymmetrically involved with imaging features in all patients. Eight patients exhibited anterior chest wall involvement. Five patients had osteomyelitis at limbs. For all images of 17 patients, CT was superior to conventional radiography in detecting abnormal changes of bone erosion and soft tissue swelling. MR imaging was able to depict edema changes that was not detectable by CT and radiography. Conclusion: SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease, but for patients with skin and bone-joint abnormalities, especially with skin palmoplantar pustulosis, acne as well as with imaging features at the sacroiliac joint and anterior chest wall, SAPHO syndrome should be taken into a diagnostic consideration. (authors)

  14. Subclinical Synovitis Measured by Ultrasound in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients With Clinical Remission Induced by Synthetic and Biological Modifying Disease Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Marcos; Al Snih, Soham; Serra-Bonett, Natalí; Rivas, Juan C

    2017-10-09

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with disease in clinical remission might show subclinical synovitis, which can be related to the progress of structural joint damage. To determine and compare the degree of synovial inflammation by ultrasound (US) in patients with RA in clinical remission, treated with DMARD or combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF. Hospital-based cross-sectional study of 58 patients with RA in sustained remission for at least 6 months by DAS28 <2.6, who attended the Rheumatology Service at the Hospital Universitario de Caracas. Patients underwent clinical, functional, and laboratory assessments. Ultrasound was performed in hands measuring synovial effusion, synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal; using a semiquantitative 4-point scale of 0=none to 3=severe. Chi-square and t-test were used to compare the clinical, functional, laboratory and US assessments between the DMARD (N=37) and combination therapy with DMARD and anti-TNF (N=21) groups. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Out of 58 patients, 25.9% had remission by US and 74.1% had synovial effusion or hypertrophy or positive power Doppler signal. Non-significant differences in US synovitis between the two groups were found. Persistent US activity was evident in a high percentage of rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical remission by DAS28. No differences in subclinical synovitis measured by US were found between patients with DMARD and anti-TNF-induced clinical remission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  15. Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis and Osteitis (SAPHO) and chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO): Role of imaging in diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, Uma; Blacksin, Marcia; Beebe, Kathleen; Neilson, J.C.; Dashefsky, Barry; Tagoylo, Gino

    2012-01-01

    There is a spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders which can be associated with dermatologic findings, the fundamental component of which is a nonbacterial osteitis. CRMO (Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis) and SAPHO syndrome (Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis and Osteitis) describe paediatric and adult conditions, respectively, of inflammatory osteitis that can be associated with palmoplantar pustulosis and acne. Imaging findings are similar and a key component to the diagnosis in both conditions. This report describes two patients with strikingly similar radiologic presentations of clavicular osteitis in whom the diagnosis was made predominantly on the basis of imaging findings. The typical imaging features and radiographic hallmarks of both conditions will also be discussed.

  16. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI - a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshed, Iris [The Sheba Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Krabbe, Simon; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Oestergaard, Mikkel [Copenhagen University Hospital Glostrup, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark); Boeyesen, Pernille [Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); Moeller, Jakob M. [Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Therkildsen, Flemming [Metropolitan University College, Copenhagen (Denmark); Madsen, Ole Rintek [Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Department of Rheumatology/C, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-04-01

    To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2{sup nd}-5{sup th} metacarpophalangeal joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38-0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis was very high per person (0.80-1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63-0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50-0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87-1.0). Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. (orig.)

  17. Influence of field strength, coil type and image resolution on assessment of synovitis by unenhanced MRI - a comparison with contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshed, Iris; Krabbe, Simon; Axelsen, Mette; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Oestergaard, Mikkel; Boeyesen, Pernille; Moeller, Jakob M.; Therkildsen, Flemming; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-01-01

    To explore if the reliability of synovitis assessment by unenhanced MRI is influenced by different MRI field-strengths, coil types and image resolutions in RA patients. Forty-one RA patients and 12 healthy controls underwent hand MRI (wrist and 2 nd -5 th metacarpophalangeal joints) at 4 different field-strengths (0.23 T/0.6 T/1.5 T/3.0 T) on the same day. Seven protocols using a STIR sequence with different field-strengths, coils (flex coils/dedicated phased-array extremity coils) and resolution were applied and scored blindly for synovitis (OMERACT-RAMRIS method). A 1.5 T post-contrast T1-weighted sequence was used as gold standard reference. Fair-good agreement (ICC=0.38-0.72) between the standard reference and the different STIR protocols (best agreement with extremity coil and small voxel size at 1.5 T). The accuracy for presence/absence of synovitis was very high per person (0.80-1.0), and moderate-high per joint (0.63-0.85), whereas exact agreements on scores were moderate (0.50-0.66). The intrareader agreement (15 patients and 3 controls) on presence/absence of synovitis was very high (0.87-1.0). Unenhanced MRI using STIR sequence is only moderately reliable for assessing hand synovitis in RA, when contrast-enhanced MRI is considered the gold standard reference. Contrast injection, field strength and coil type influence synovitis assessment, and should be considered before performing MRI in clinical trials and practice. (orig.)

  18. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging as marker of synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy: a one year follow up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Ejbjerg, B; Stoltenberg, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: By repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study synovial membrane regeneration and recurrence of synovitis after arthroscopic knee joint synovectomy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other (non-RA) causes of persistent knee joint synovitis. METHODS: Contrast enhanced...... at two months. No significant differences between volumes in RA and non-RA knees were seen. Synovial membrane volumes at two months were significantly inversely correlated with the duration of clinical remission, for all knees considered together (Spearman's correlation r(s)=-0.67; p

  19. An ultrasonographic study of metatarsophalangeal joint pain: synovitis, structural pathology and their relationship to symptoms and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Helen I; Redmond, Anthony; Wakefield, Richard J; Freeston, Jane; Grainger, Andrew J; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G

    2011-12-01

    Pain in the first metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) is common, though the link between pathology and symptoms is poorly understood. To examine the relationship between pain, function and ultrasound (US)-detected pathology in the first MTPJ. 33 subjects with first MTPJ pain and 20 asymptomatic controls completed questionnaires about pain and function, then underwent clinical examination, US examination and objective assessment of function using a motion tracking system. Low-level grey scale synovitis and osteophytes were common in patients and controls. Osteophytes were more prevalent in symptomatic first MTPJ [24/33 (73%) vs. 7/20 (35%), p=0.007], and greater osteophyte numbers were weakly associated with higher levels of pain [increase in pain VAS per osteophyte (95% CI)=13.78mm (0.12mm-27.43mm), p=0.048]. A power Doppler (PD) signal was present in a fifth of painful first MTPJs and absent in controls. A PD signal was associated with osteophytes and joint space narrowing but was not independently related to target joint pain. For all first MTPJs, osteophytes and the presence of a PD signal was associated with worse patient-reported function. US features did not predict objective function. Osteophytes, representing subchondral bone remodelling, were associated with the presence of first MTPJ pain and, together with more severe (PD) synovitis, also contributed to poorer function. Detailed imaging of bone may provide more information on peripheral pain associations.

  20. Assessment of patients with diffuse pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of Knee before and after radio-synovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca, G.; Ozsoy, H.; Atilgan, H.I.; Baskin, A.; Koray, D.; Fakioglu, O.; Korkmaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the aim of this study was to evaluate subjective and objective findings of patients with diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (DPVNS) of knee before and after treatment with Yttrium-90 (Y-90) radio-synovectomy. Materials and methods: between years 2005 and 2013, 23 patients, 15 female and 8 male, who had adjuvant radio-synovectomy after arthroscopic surgery were included to our study. 5 mCi of Y-90 radiocolloid was administered under local anesthesia at least 6 weeks after arthroscopic surgery. The patients were reevaluated 6 months after radio-synovectomy. All the patients were assigned a Lysholm knee score prior to surgery, prior to radio-synovectomy and 6 months after radio-synovectomy. Lysholm score was calculated according to patients' pain, swelling, instability, locking, limping, support, climbing the stairs, squatting and the highest evaluation score was 100. In addition modified Marshall scoring system was calculated according to objective and subjective findings of the patients prior to surgery and six months after radio-synovectomy. The highest evaluation score was 30 in modified Marshall scoring system where 19 points were provided by objective findings and 11 points were provided by subjective findings. Scores higher than 26 were defined as very good, between 21-25 was good, between 16-20 was medium, and values less than 16 points are considered to be poor. The obtained points using scoring systems were evaluated statistically. Results: the mean age was (31.7 ± 13.2) years. The average time period between the operation and radio-synovectomy was (12.8 ± 8.14) weeks. The calculated Lysholm scores prior to surgery, prior to radio-synovectomy and 6 months after radio-synovectomy were (38.8 ± 4.1), (60.0 ± 4.4) and (82.9 ± 6.5), respectively (p <0.001). Modified Marshall scores prior to surgery, and 6 months after radio-synovectomy, was (12.4 ± 2.7) and (25.5 ± 3.1) respectively (p <0.001). Conclusion

  1. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors in peripheral synovitis and down-regulation by tumor necrosis factor alpha blockade in spondylarthropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandooren, Bernard; Kruithof, Elli; Yu, David T. Y.; Rihl, Markus; Gu, Jieruo; de Rycke, Leen; van den Bosch, Filip; Veys, Eric M.; de Keyser, Filip; Baeten, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in spondylarthropathy (SpA) synovitis. METHODS: Paired samples of synovial biopsy tissue as well as serum and synovial fluid (SF) from 41 patients with SpA and 20

  2. Quantification of synovitis in the cranio-cervical region: Dynamic contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis-A feasibility follow up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeromel, M., E-mail: miran.jeromel@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, Department for Neuroradiology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, V., E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si [Medical Faculty Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, I., E-mail: igor.sersa@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ambrozic, A., E-mail: ales.ambrozic@mf.uni-lj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, M., E-mail: matija.tomsic@kclj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To test the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCEI) and diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying synovitis of the cranio-cervical (C-C) region in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and neck pain at the beginning and at a six month follow up. Methods: 27 patients with duration of RA of less than 24 months and neck pain were studied with standard qualitative MRI evaluation and two quantitative MRI methods (DCEI and DWI) at the level of atlantoaxial joints. Rate of early enhancement (REE), enhancement gradient (Genh) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were extracted from DCEI and DWI data. MRI was coupled with clinical assessment and radiographic imaging. Results: Using standard qualitative MRI evaluation, unequivocal active synovitis (grade 2 or 3 contrast enhancement) was proved in 16 (59%) patients at baseline and 14 (54%) at follow up. DCEI and DWI measurements confirmed active synovitis in 25 (93%) patients at baseline and 24 (92%) at follow up. Average REE, Genh and ADC values decreased during follow up, however the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both qualitative and quantitative MRI methods confirmed active inflammatory disease in the C-C region following therapy although all clinical criteria showed signs of improvement of the peripheral disease. Conclusions: The study proved the feasibility of DCEI and DWI MRI for quantifying synovitis of the C-C region in patients with early RA and neck pain. Both techniques can be used as additional method for evaluation of synovitis of the C-C region in RA.

  3. Quantification of synovitis in the cranio-cervical region: Dynamic contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis—A feasibility follow up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeromel, M.; Jevtič, V.; Serša, I.; Ambrožič, A.; Tomšič, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCEI) and diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying synovitis of the cranio-cervical (C-C) region in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and neck pain at the beginning and at a six month follow up. Methods: 27 patients with duration of RA of less than 24 months and neck pain were studied with standard qualitative MRI evaluation and two quantitative MRI methods (DCEI and DWI) at the level of atlantoaxial joints. Rate of early enhancement (REE), enhancement gradient (Genh) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were extracted from DCEI and DWI data. MRI was coupled with clinical assessment and radiographic imaging. Results: Using standard qualitative MRI evaluation, unequivocal active synovitis (grade 2 or 3 contrast enhancement) was proved in 16 (59%) patients at baseline and 14 (54%) at follow up. DCEI and DWI measurements confirmed active synovitis in 25 (93%) patients at baseline and 24 (92%) at follow up. Average REE, Genh and ADC values decreased during follow up, however the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both qualitative and quantitative MRI methods confirmed active inflammatory disease in the C-C region following therapy although all clinical criteria showed signs of improvement of the peripheral disease. Conclusions: The study proved the feasibility of DCEI and DWI MRI for quantifying synovitis of the C-C region in patients with early RA and neck pain. Both techniques can be used as additional method for evaluation of synovitis of the C-C region in RA.

  4. Application of rhenium 186 radiosynovectomy in elbow diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis: Case report with multiple joint involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koca, Go Khan; Ozsoy, Ha Kan; Atilgan, Hasan Ikbal; Demirel, Koray; Dincel, Veysel Ercan; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2012-01-01

    After surgical therapy of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis (DPVNS), recurrence is seen in almost half of the patients. The effectiveness of radiosynovectomy (RSV)in preventing recurrence and complaints of DPVNS is well known. Elbow involvement in DPVNS is a very rare condition; therefore, RSV in elbow hasn't been experienced widely. The aim of this case report is to show the effectiveness of RSV with rhenium 186 (Re 186)sulfide colloid. We applied Re 186 sulfide colloid to the elbow joint of DPVNS patients six weeks after arthroscopic synovectomy. As a result, the patient did not have any complaints, and our findings are compatible with residue or recurrence on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)in sixth and twentieth month controls after administration. We concluded that Re 186 is an effective adjuvant therapy for the prevention of recurrence and complaints

  5. A case of bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia associated with SAPHO (synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Fawad; Steer, Henry

    2017-08-01

    A 57-year-old woman with SAPHO (synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis) syndrome presented with recurrent episodes of pneumonia. She was treated with multiple courses of antibiotics with no success. The transbronchial biopsy undertaken via bronchoscopy revealed organising pneumonia (OP). She was treated with steroids and responded well with full clinical recovery and normalisation of her chest X-ray.To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of OP in association with SAPHO syndrome. This case report highlights the importance of considering OP in patients with SAPHO syndrome who present with chest infection. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Clinical utility of eco-color-power Doppler ultrasonography and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for interpretation and quantification of joint synovitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotti, Marina; Galeazzi, Vittoria; Catucci, Francesca; Zappia, Marcello; Arrigoni, Francesco; Barile, Antonio; Giovagnoni, Andrea

    2018-01-19

    With the introduction of new biologics such as anti-TNF-alpha antibodies and other therapies in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, capable of halting joint destruction and functional disability, there are new pressures on diagnostic and prognostic imaging. Early demonstration of pre-erosive inflammatory features and monitoring of the long-term effects of treatment are becoming increasingly important. Early detection of synovitis offers advantages in terms of allowing early instigation of therapy and may allow the identification of those patients displaying more aggressive disease who might benefit from early intervention with expensive DMARD therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and allow early diagnosis of inflammatory arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Synovitis represents a potential surrogate measure of disease activity that can be monitored using either MRI or US; the techniques have, generally, focused on monitoring synovial volume or quality as assessed by its vascularity. However to achieve these goals, standardisation and validation of US and MRI are required to ensure accurate diagnosis, reproducibility and reliability. Each modality has different strengths and weaknesses and levels of validation. This article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists and rheumatologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses the role of US and colour or power Doppler sonography (PDUS) in the detection and monitoring of synovitis in inflammatory arthropathies. The second part will look at advanced MR imaging and Dynamic contrast

  7. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: proposal of a paediatric synovitis score by a consensus of an international working group. Results of a multicentre reliability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Mattiuz, Chiara; Magnano, GianMichele; Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo; Pistorio, Angela; Bracaglia, Claudia; Boavida, Peter; Ording, Lil Sophie Mueller; Juhan, Karen Lambot; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-01-01

    MRI is a sensitive tool for the evaluation of synovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel MRI-based score for synovitis in children and to examine its inter- and intraobserver variability in a multi-centre study. Wrist MRI was performed in 76 children with JIA. On postcontrast 3-D spoiled gradient-echo and fat-suppressed T2-weighted spin-echo images, joint recesses were scored for the degree of synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation independently by two paediatric radiologists. Total-enhancement and inflammation-synovitis scores were calculated. Interobserver agreement was poor to moderate for enhancement and inflammation in all recesses, except in the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints. Intraobserver agreement was good to excellent. For enhancement and inflammation scores, mean differences (95 % CI) between observers were -1.18 (-4.79 to 2.42) and -2.11 (-6.06 to 1.83). Intraobserver variability (reader 1) was 0 (-1.65 to 1.65) and 0.02 (-1.39 to 1.44). Intraobserver agreement was good. Except for the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints, interobserver agreement was not acceptable. Therefore, the proposed scoring system requires further refinement. (orig.)

  8. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: proposal of a paediatric synovitis score by a consensus of an international working group. Results of a multicentre reliability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Malattia, Clara; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Mattiuz, Chiara; Pistorio, Angela; Bracaglia, Claudia; Barbuti, Domenico; Boavida, Peter; Juhan, Karen Lambot; Ording, Lil Sophie Mueller; Rosendahl, Karen; Martini, Alberto; Magnano, GianMichele; Tomà, Paolo

    2012-09-01

    MRI is a sensitive tool for the evaluation of synovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel MRI-based score for synovitis in children and to examine its inter- and intraobserver variability in a multi-centre study. Wrist MRI was performed in 76 children with JIA. On postcontrast 3-D spoiled gradient-echo and fat-suppressed T2-weighted spin-echo images, joint recesses were scored for the degree of synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation independently by two paediatric radiologists. Total-enhancement and inflammation-synovitis scores were calculated. Interobserver agreement was poor to moderate for enhancement and inflammation in all recesses, except in the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints. Intraobserver agreement was good to excellent. For enhancement and inflammation scores, mean differences (95 % CI) between observers were -1.18 (-4.79 to 2.42) and -2.11 (-6.06 to 1.83). Intraobserver variability (reader 1) was 0 (-1.65 to 1.65) and 0.02 (-1.39 to 1.44). Intraobserver agreement was good. Except for the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints, interobserver agreement was not acceptable. Therefore, the proposed scoring system requires further refinement.

  9. The effects of joint aspiration and intra-articular corticosteroid injection on flexion reflex excitability, quadriceps strength and pain in individuals with knee synovitis: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, David Andrew; McNair, Peter John; Lewis, Gwyn Nancy; Dalbeth, Nicola

    2015-07-28

    Substantial weakness of the quadriceps muscles is typically observed in patients with arthritis. This is partly due to ongoing neural inhibition that prevents the quadriceps from being fully activated. Evidence from animal studies suggests enhanced flexion reflex excitability may contribute to this weakness. This prospective observational study examined the effects of joint aspiration and intra-articular corticosteroid injection on flexion reflex excitability, quadriceps muscle strength and knee pain in individuals with knee synovitis. Sixteen patients with chronic arthritis and clinically active synovitis of the knee participated in this study. Knee pain flexion reflex threshold, and quadriceps peak torque were measured at baseline, immediately after knee joint aspiration alone and 5 ± 2 and 15 ± 2 days after knee joint aspiration and the injection of 40 mg of methylprednisolone acetate. Compared to baseline, knee pain was significantly reduced 5 (p = 0.001) and 15 days (p = 0.009) post intervention. Flexion reflex threshold increased immediately after joint aspiration (p = 0.009) and 5 (p = 0.01) and 15 days (p = 0.002) post intervention. Quadriceps peak torque increased immediately after joint aspiration (p = 0.004) and 5 (p = 0.001) and 15 days (p knee synovitis.

  10. MRI of the wrist in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: proposal of a paediatric synovitis score by a consensus of an international working group. Results of a multicentre reliability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damasio, Maria Beatrice; Mattiuz, Chiara; Magnano, GianMichele [Ospedale Pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto [University of Genova, Department of Paediatrics, Genova (Italy); Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; Barbuti, Domenico; Toma, Paolo [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Pistorio, Angela [Ospedale pediatrico Gaslini, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Genova (Italy); Bracaglia, Claudia [Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesu, Department of Rheumatology, Rome (Italy); Boavida, Peter; Ording, Lil Sophie Mueller [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Juhan, Karen Lambot [Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Rosendahl, Karen [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway)

    2012-09-15

    MRI is a sensitive tool for the evaluation of synovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel MRI-based score for synovitis in children and to examine its inter- and intraobserver variability in a multi-centre study. Wrist MRI was performed in 76 children with JIA. On postcontrast 3-D spoiled gradient-echo and fat-suppressed T2-weighted spin-echo images, joint recesses were scored for the degree of synovial enhancement, effusion and overall inflammation independently by two paediatric radiologists. Total-enhancement and inflammation-synovitis scores were calculated. Interobserver agreement was poor to moderate for enhancement and inflammation in all recesses, except in the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints. Intraobserver agreement was good to excellent. For enhancement and inflammation scores, mean differences (95 % CI) between observers were -1.18 (-4.79 to 2.42) and -2.11 (-6.06 to 1.83). Intraobserver variability (reader 1) was 0 (-1.65 to 1.65) and 0.02 (-1.39 to 1.44). Intraobserver agreement was good. Except for the radioulnar and radiocarpal joints, interobserver agreement was not acceptable. Therefore, the proposed scoring system requires further refinement. (orig.)

  11. Subclinical synovitis and tenosynovitis by ultrasonography (US) 7 score in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with synthetic drugs, in clinical remission by DAS28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Sánchez Bringas, Guadalupe; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Cruz-Arenas, Esteban; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén

    2017-11-29

    To identify synovitis and tenosynovitis active by using the Ultrasound 7 (US 7) scoring system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical remission induced by synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This is a multicentric, cross-sectional, observational study including 94 RA patients >18 years old who were in remission as defined by the 28-joints disease activity score (DAS28) <2.6 induced by synthetic DMARD during at least 6 months. Patients with a previous or current history of biologic DMARD treatment were not included in the study. Demographic and clinical data were collected by the local rheumatologist; the US evaluation was performed by a calibrated rheumatologist, who intended to detect grayscale synovitis and power Doppler (PD) using the 7-joint scale. Intra and inter-reader exercises of images between 2 ultrasonographers were realized. Patients' mean age was 49.1±13.7 years; 83% were women. The mean disease duration was 8±7 years and remission lasted for 27.5±31.8 months. The mean DAS28 score was 1.9±0.66. Grayscale synovitis was present in 94% of cases; it was mild in 87.5% and moderate in 12.5%. Only 12.8% of the patients had PD. The metatarsophalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, and carpal joints of the dominant hand were the joints more frequently affected by synovitis. Tenosynovitis by grayscale was observed in 9 patients (9.6%). The intra and inter-reading kappa value were 0.77, p<0.003 (CI 95%, 0.34-0.81) and 0.81, p<0.0001 (CI 95%, 0.27-0.83) respectively. Low percentage of synovitis and tenosynovitis active were founded according to PD US by 7 score in RA patients under synthetic DMARDs during long remission. This score has benefit because evaluate tenosynovitis, another element of subclinical disease activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Consensus-based identification of factors related to false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovitis and tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kei; Narita, Akihiro; Ogasawara, Michihiro; Ohno, Shigeru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsushita, Isao; Suzuki, Takeshi; Misaki, Kenta; Ogura, Takehisa; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Seto, Yohei; Nakahara, Ryuichi; Kaneko, Atsushi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Henmi, Mihoko; Fukae, Jun; Nishida, Keiichiro; Sumida, Takayuki; Koike, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify causes of false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovial/tenosynovial/bursal inflammation and provide corresponding imaging examples. We first performed systematic literature review to identify previously reported causes of false-positives. We next determined causes of false-positives and corresponding example images for educational material through Delphi exercises and discussion by 15 experts who were an instructor and/or a lecturer in the 2013 advanced course for musculoskeletal ultrasound organized by Japan College of Rheumatology Committee for the Standardization of Musculoskeletal Ultrasonography. Systematic literature review identified 11 articles relevant to sonographic false-positives of synovial/tenosynovial inflammation. Based on these studies, 21 candidate causes of false-positives were identified in the consensus meeting. Of these items, 11 achieved a predefined consensus (≥ 80%) in Delphi exercise and were classified as follows: (I) Gray-scale assessment [(A) non-specific synovial findings and (B) normal anatomical structures which can mimic synovial lesions due to either their low echogenicity or anisotropy]; (II) Doppler assessment [(A) Intra-articular normal vessels and (B) reverberation)]. Twenty-four corresponding examples with 49 still and 23 video images also achieved consensus. Our study provides a set of representative images that can help sonographers to understand false-positives in ultrasound scanning of synovitis and tenosynovitis.

  13. Efficacy of radio-synovectomy in the treatment of chronic knee synovitis: systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakavi, S.; Norouzbeigi, N.; Ayati, N.; Sadeghi, R.; Farahati, J.; Mirfeizi, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objective: knee joints are commonly involved with various inflammatory and non-inflammatory rheumatoid diseases. Radio-synovectomy is being used as a local therapeutic option to alleviate pain and swelling in involved joints. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of radio-synovectomy for treatment of chronic knee synovitis. Methods: through a search of Medline and SCOPUS with (Radiosynovectomy OR radio-synovectomy OR 'radio synovectomy' OR 'radiation synovectomy' OR radiosynoviorthesis OR radio-synoviorthesis OR synoviorthesis OR 'radiochemical synovectomy' OR 'radioisotope synovectomy') AND (Re-188 OR Y-90 OR SM-153 OR P-32) as key words, 9 RCTs were enrolled in the analysis. The outcomes of interest were odds ratio and risk difference of improvement in the radio-synovectomy group compared to the control group. Results: odds ratio and risk difference for SM 153 plus corticosteroid subgroup was 1.959[0.571-6.725, P=0.285] and 14.9% [-17.1%-47%, P=0.362] respectively. The subgroup of Y 90 plus corticosteroids showed pooled odds ratio and risk difference of 2.366[0.779-7.188, P=0.129] and 23.9% [-1.7%-49.4%, P=0.67] and in the subgroup Y 90 alone were 0.851[0.356-2.036, P=0.717] and -2.3% [-23.3%-18.7%, P=0.829] respectively. Conclusion: Combination of Y 90 colloid or Sm 153 with corticosteroids in radio-synovectomy have higher response rate compared to each of radioisotope or corticosteroid therapy alone. (authors)

  14. The role of computed tomography in evaluation of subchondral osseous lesions in seven horses with chronic synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, J.A.; Seeherman, H.J.; Kirker-Head, C.A.; O'Callaghan, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    Seven horses with severe, persistent lameness of sudden onset were evaluated with scintigraphy and/or computed tomography. The lameness was localised to the front fetlock joint in 2 horses and to the tibiotarsal joint in 5 horses. Five of the horses had a history of intra-articular injections of the involved joint prior to presentation. All horses had effusion of the affected joint and were positive to flexion tests. Intraarticular anaesthesia eliminated or improved the lameness in 4 cases and a nerve conduction block proximal to the affected joint improved the lameness in another. Cytology examination of fluid from affected joints identified normal joint fluid (one horse) or elevations in nucleated cell counts of 0.9 x 10(9)/l-36.8 x 10(9)/l and total protein 20-42 g/l (6 horses). The joint fluid of 2 of these horses cultured positive for bacteria. Initial radiographs were either normal (4 cases) or the changes seen were not sufficient to explain the degree of lameness. In the 6 cases where scintigraphy was performed, intense focal isotope uptake was found in the suspected region, which corresponded to the proximal portion of the first phalanx (2 cases), distal tibia (2 cases), or talus (3 cases). Computed tomography (CT) was performed because occult fracture or osteomyelitis was suspected; and knowledge of the precise anatomical location of the lesion was considered necessary to assess the need for surgery and to plan the surgical approach. Hypodense focal lesions with hyperdense haloes were found in the subchondral bone deep to the sagittal groove of the first phalanx (P1) (2 cases) in the cochlea of the distal tibia (2 cases), and in the intertrochlear portion of the talus (3 cases). Communication between the lesion and the joint space was demonstrated by CT in 5 cases. Post mortem examination of one case revealed synovitis and a chronic bone abscess (Brodie's abscess) communicating with the joint space

  15. Distinguishing Pediatric Lyme Arthritis of the Hip from Transient Synovitis and Acute Bacterial Septic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Aristides I; Anari, Jason B; Ramirez, Jose M; Sankar, Wudbhav N; Baldwin, Keith D

    2018-01-25

    Objective Lyme arthritis is an increasingly recognized clinical entity that often prompts orthopaedic evaluation in pediatric patients. While Lyme arthritis is most common in the knee, the clinical presentation of Lyme arthritis of the hip can be similar to both acute bacterial septic arthritis and transient synovitis. Accurately distinguishing these clinical entities is important since the definitive treatment of each is distinct. Because there is limited literature on monoarticular Lyme arthritis of the hip, the purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters associated with Lyme arthritis (LA) of the hip and compare them to septic arthritis (SA) and transient synovitis (TS).  Study design A systematic review of the literature was performed using the following search terms, including the variants and plural counterparts "hip" and "Lyme arthritis." A final database of individual patients was assembled from the published literature and direct author correspondence, when available. A previously published cohort of patients with hip transient synovitis or septic arthritis was used for comparative analysis. A comparative statistical analysis was performed to the assembled database to assess differences in laboratory and clinical variables between the three diagnoses.  Results Data on 88 patients diagnosed with Lyme arthritis of the hip was collected and consolidated from the 12 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The average age of patients presenting with Lyme arthritis was 7.5 years (± 3.5 years), the mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and the C-reactive protein (CRP) was 41 mm/hr and 3.9 mg/L, respectively. Peripheral white blood cell (WBC) count averaged 10.6 x 10 9 cells/L with the synovial WBC count averaging 55,888 cells/mm 3 . Compared to a previous cohort of patients with confirmed transient synovitis or septic arthritis, the 95% confidence interval for ESR was 21 - 33 mm

  16. Clinical synovitis in a particular joint is associated with progression of erosions and joint space narrowing in that same joint, but not in patients initially treated with infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenbeek, N B; Güler-Yüksel, M; van der Heijde, D M F M; Hulsmans, H M J; Kerstens, P J S M; Molenaar, T H E; de Sonnaville, P B J; Huizinga, T W J; Dijkmans, B A C; Allaart, C F

    2010-12-01

    To assess the relationship between joint tenderness, swelling and joint damage progression in individual joints and to evaluate the influence of treatment on these relationships. First-year data of the Behandel Strategieën (BeSt) study were used, in which patients recently diagnosed as having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were randomly assigned into four different treatment strategies. Baseline and 1-year x-rays of the hands and feet were assessed using the Sharp-van der Heijde score (SHS). With generalised estimating equations, 3-monthly assessments of tender and swollen joints of year 1 were related to erosion progression, joint space narrowing (JSN) progression and total SHS progression at the individual joint level (definition > 0.5 SHS units) in year 1, corrected for potential confounders and within-patient correlation for multiple joints per patient. During year 1, 59% of all 13 959 joints analysed were ever tender and 45% ever swollen, 2.1% showed erosion progression, 1.9% JSN progression and 3.6% SHS progression. Swelling and tenderness were both independently associated with erosion and JSN progression with comparable OR, although with higher OR in the hands than in the feet. Local swelling and tenderness were not associated with local damage progression in patients initially treated with infliximab. Clinical signs of synovitis are associated with erosion and JSN progression in individual joints after 1 year in RA. A disconnect between synovitis and joint damage progression was observed at joint level in patients who were treated with methotrexate and infliximab as initial treatment, confirming the disconnect between synovitis and the development of joint damage in tumour necrosis factor blockers seen at patient level.

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced, extremity-dedicated MRI identifies synovitis changes in the follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with rituximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco A; Parodi, Massimiliano; Zampogna, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    according to the 1987 ACR criteria were treated with a single course of RTX (2 infusions of 1000 mg, 15 days apart). MRI of the dominant hand was performed with a 0.2T extremity-dedicated machine using pre and post contrast T1 weighted SE, turbo 3D, and STIR sequences at baseline, and after 4 and 24 weeks....... MRI was analysed using the OMERACT-RAMRIS score and the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) technique for wrist synovitis, which calculates the enhancement ratio as both rate of early enhancement (REE) and relative enhancement (RE). The corresponding ME and IRE parameters were calculated also through...

  18. Organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risk estimates due to radiotherapy for benign pigmented villonodular synovitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2016-09-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a benign disease affecting synovial membranes of young and middle-aged adults. The aggressive treatment of this disorder often involves external-beam irradiation. This study was motivated by the lack of data relating to the radiation exposure of healthy tissues and radiotherapy-induced cancer risk. Monte Carlo methodology was employed to simulate a patient’s irradiation for PVNS in the knee and hip joints with a 6 MV photon beam. The average radiation dose received by twenty-two out-of-field critical organs of the human body was calculated. These calculations were combined with the appropriate organ-, age- and gender-specific risk coefficients of the BEIR-VII model to estimate the lifetime probability of cancer development. The risk for carcinogenesis to colon, which was partly included in the treatment fields used for hip irradiation, was determined with a non-linear mechanistic model and differential dose-volume histograms obtained by CT-based 3D radiotherapy planning. Risk assessments were compared with the nominal lifetime intrinsic risk (LIR) values. Knee irradiation to 36 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 0.2-24.6 mGy. The corresponding range from hip radiotherapy was 1.2-455.1 mGy whereas the organ equivalent dose for the colon was up to 654.9 mGy. The organ-specific cancer risks from knee irradiation for PVNS were found to be inconsequential since they were at least 161.5 times lower than the LIRs irrespective of the patient’s age and gender. The bladder and colon cancer risk from radiotherapy in the hip joint was up to 3.2 and 6.6 times smaller than the LIR, respectively. These cancer risks may slightly elevate the nominal incidence rates and they should not be ignored during the patient’s treatment planning and follow-up. The probabilities for developing any other solid tumor were more than 20 times lower than the LIRs and, therefore, they may be considered as small.

  19. [Studies on the correlation between the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 and the synovitis of the temporomandibular joint in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jingjing; Wu, Qingting; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yingying; Lin, Xuefen; Ji, Ping

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the expression of the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) in temporo-mandibular joint synovitis in rats, and to discuss the correlation between the expression of TLR-4 and the synovitis. Sixty male wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups, 12 each. Group A was the control group in which the rats were given normal diet.In Group B, the rats' bilateral masseter muscles were cut off (masseter resection group). In Group C, An cast metal crown were bonded on the mandibular right first molar of each rat (occlusal interference group). In Group D, occlusal pad were bonded on maxillary molars of each rat (occlusal dimension increase group). In Group E, rats' bilateral masseter muscles were re-sected and occlusal pads were bonded on their maxillary molars (masseter resection and occlusal dimension increase group). Pathological changes of synovium were observed using hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stains and pathology scores were evaluated. The expression of TLR- 4 were determined by immunohistochemical stains, and the expression of TLR-4 mRNA were determined by real-time PCR. The correlation between the expression of TLR-4, TLR-4 mRNA and the pathological score were analyzed using Spearman analysis. The pathological scores of Group A-E were 0.5 ± 0.5, 2.5 ± 1.0, 2.7 ± 1.0, 3.0 ± 0.9, 5.3 ± 1.2 respectively. The expression of TLR-4 were (3.2 ± 1.5)%, (16.± 2.6)%, (15.8 ± 2.1)%, (17.5 ± 2.4)%, (38.2 ± 4.4) %. The expression of TLR-4 mRNA were 1.07 ± 0.09, 2.12 ± 0.33, 2.07 ± 0.29, 2.17 ± 0.34, 4.53 ± 0.46. Compared with group A, groups B- E showed significant higher pathology score (P < 0.05) and increased expression of both TLR-4 (P < 0.05) and TLR-4 mRNA (P < 0.05). An significant positive correlation was found between the expression of TLR- 4 and the pathology score (r = 0.785, P < 0.05), and between the expression of TLR- 4 mRNA and the pathology score (r = 0.720, P < 0.05). TLR-4 may be closely associated with the development of the synovitis

  20. Use of yttrium-90 hydroxyapatite radiosynovectomy as a primary modality of treatment in diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee joint: A first case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppusamy; Rajan, David; Krishnan, Boopathi; Gounder, Thirumalaisamy Subbaih; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kalarickal, Radhakrishnan; Mohanan, Vyshakh; Shinto, Ajit Sugunan

    2015-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare, relatively benign, intra-articular lesion characterized by a slowly progressive proliferation of synovial tissue. Knee is the most frequently involved joint. Localized and diffuse forms of synovial involvement were reported. In extensive diffuse cases, total synovectomy is needed, almost impossible to achieve. Hence, other treatment modalities such as intra-articular injection of yttrium-90 have been tried and shown to be effective in reducing the rate of local recurrence with “acceptable” joint damage. Radiosynovectomy is based on the irradiation of the joint synovium by the intra-articular administration of various β-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. We describe the first case report of use of yttrium-90 hydroxyapatite particulates in a 33-year-old male who presented with diffuse PVNS of knee joint as a primary modality of treatment

  1. Synovitis in mice with inflammatory arthritis monitored with quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced NIR fluorescence imaging using iRGD-targeted liposomes as fluorescence probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hao Wu,1,2,* Haohan Wu,1,2,* Yanni He,1 Zhen Gan,2 Zhili Xu,1,2 Meijun Zhou,1,2 Sai Liu,1,2 Hongmei Liu1 1Department of Ultrasonography, Guangdong Second Provincial General Hospital Affiliated to Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China; 2Department of Ultrasonography, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common inflammatory disorder characterized primarily by synovitis and pannus formation in multiple joints, causing joints destruction and irreversible disability in most cases. Early diagnosis and effective therapy monitoring of RA are of importance for achieving the favorable prognosis. Methods: We first prepared the targeted fluorescence probes, and then explored the feasibility of near-infrared (NIR fluorescence molecular imaging to detect and evaluate the RA via the targeted fluorescence probes by quantitative analysis in this study. Results: The targeted fluorescence probes (indocyanine green-liposomes decorated with iRGD peptide [iLPs] was successfully prepared. The quantitative analysis found that strong fluorescence signal was detected in inflamed paws and the fluorescence signal in iLPs group was 3.03-fold higher than that in non-targeted (indocyanine green-liposomes decorated without iRGD peptide [LPs] group (P<0.01 at 15 min after injection, whereas the fluorescence signal from iLPs signal can almost not be observed in the non-inflamed paws, showing the high sensitivity and accuracy for arthritis by the NIR fluorescence imaging based on iLPs. Conclusion: The NIR fluorescence imaging by iLPs may facilitate improved arthritis diagnosis and early assessment of the disease progression by providing an in vivo characterization of angiogenesis in inflammatory joint diseases. Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, synovitis, diagnosis, near-infrared fluorescence imaging, iRGD-targeted probes

  2. Computer-aided and manual quantifications of MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss in rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haitao [The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Chongqing (China); University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rivoire, Julien; Hoppe, Michael; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan [University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Srikhum, Waraporn [University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Thammasat University, Department of Radiology, Pathumthani (Thailand); Imboden, John [San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, Department of Medicine, San Francisco and Division of Rheumatology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-12-10

    To investigate the reliability and validity of computer-aided automated and manual quantification as well as semiquantitative analysis for MRI synovitis, bone marrow edema-like lesions, erosion and cartilage loss of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) compared to the OMERACT-RAMRIS. Wrist MRI was performed at 3 T in 16 patients with RA. Synovial volume and perfusion, bone marrow edema-like lesion (BMEL) volume, signal intensity and perfusion, and erosion dimensions were measured manually and using an in-house-developed automated software algorithm; findings were correlated with the OMERAC-RAMRIS gradings. In addition, a semiquantitative MRI cartilage loss score system was developed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to test the reproducibility of these quantitative and semiquantitative techniques. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between lesion quantifications and RAMRIS and between the MRI cartilage score and radiographic Sharp van der Heijde joint space narrowing scores. The intra- and interobserver ICCs were excellent for synovial, BMEL and erosion quantifications and cartilage loss grading (all >0.89). The synovial volume, BMEL volume and signal intensity, and erosion dimensions were significantly correlated with the corresponding RAMRIS (r = 0.727 to 0.900, p < 0.05). Synovial perfusion parameter maximum enhancement (Emax) was significantly correlated with synovitis RAMRIS (r = 0.798). BMEL perfusion parameters were not correlated with the RAMRIS BME score. Cartilage loss gradings from MRI were significantly correlated with the Sharp joint space narrowing scores (r = 0.635, p = 0.008). The computer-aided, manual and semiquantitative methods presented in this study can be used to evaluate MRI pathologies in RA with excellent reproducibility. Significant correlations with standard RAMRIS were found in the measurements using these methods. (orig.)

  3. Correlation between computer-aided dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI assessment of inflammation and semi-quantitative synovitis and bone marrow oedema scores of the wrist in patients with rheumatoid arthritis--a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Kubassova, Olga; Bouert, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To test the correlation between assessment of inflammation using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) analysed by a novel computer-aided approach and semi-quantitative scores of synovitis and bone marrow oedema (BME) using the OMERACT-RA MRI Scoring (RAMRIS) system, in the wrist...... extended region of interest (ROI) placed around the wrist joint (semi-automated approach) and (iii) within a small ROI placed in the area with most visual enhancement (semi-automated approach). Time spent on each procedure was noted. Spearman's rank correlation test was applied to assess the correlation...... between RAMRIS and the computer-generated dynamic parameters. Results. RAMRIS synovitis (range 2-9), BME (range 0-39) and the dynamic parameters reflecting the number of enhancing voxels were significantly correlated, especially when an extended ROI around the wrist was used (¿¿=¿0.74; P¿...

  4. Differential association of the N-propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) and collagen II C-telopeptide (CTX-II) with synovitis and erosions in early and longstanding rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A F; Lottenburger, T; Lindegaard, H

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the N-terminal propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) in early and established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to study the association with collagen II degradation assessed by its C-telopeptide (CTX-II), x-ray status and disease activity measures. METHODS: Two cohorts of RA......-ray progression (p=0.84). There was no correlation between PIIANP and CTX-II. CONCLUSION: Declining PIIANP with increasing RA duration and persistently increased CTX-II indicate that cartilage anabolic and degradative pathways are unbalanced from clinical RA onset. Furthermore, that collagen II depletion in RA...... is both mediated by anti-anabolic effects unassociated with synovitis (decreased PIIANP) and by excess collagen II degradation linked to synovitis (increased CTX-II)....

  5. Ultrasound-detected bone erosion is a relapse risk factor after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose ultrasound power Doppler synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashiri, Shin-Ya; Fujikawa, Keita; Nishino, Ayako; Okada, Akitomo; Aramaki, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Umeda, Masataka; Fukui, Shoichi; Suzuki, Takahisa; Koga, Tomohiro; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mami; Mizokami, Akinari; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Ueki, Yukitaka; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Takahiro; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-05-25

    In the present study, we explored the risk factors for relapse after discontinuation of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose ultrasound power Doppler (PD) synovitis activity and clinical disease activity were well controlled. In this observational study in clinical practice, the inclusion criteria were based on ultrasound disease activity and clinical disease activity, set as low or remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate Ultrasound was performed in 22 joints of bilateral hands at discontinuation for evaluating synovitis severity and presence of bone erosion. Patients with a maximum PD score ≤1 in each joint were enrolled. Forty patients with RA were consecutively recruited (November 2010-March 2015) and discontinued bDMARD therapy. Variables at the initiation and discontinuation of bDMARD therapy that were predictive of relapse during the 12 months after discontinuation were assessed. The median patient age was 54.5 years, and the median disease duration was 3.5 years. Nineteen (47.5%) patients relapsed during the 12 months after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy. Logistic regression analysis revealed that only the presence of bone erosion detected by ultrasound at discontinuation was predictive of relapse (OR 8.35, 95% CI 1.78-53.2, p = 0.006). No clinical characteristics or serologic biomarkers were significantly different between the relapse and nonrelapse patients. The ultrasound synovitis scores did not differ significantly between the groups. Our findings are the first evidence that ultrasound bone erosion may be a relapse risk factor after the discontinuation of bDMARD therapy in patients with RA whose PD synovitis activity and clinical disease activity are well controlled.

  6. Extensive plasma cell infiltration with crystal IgG inclusions and mutated IgV(H) gene in an osteoarthritis patient with lymphoplasmacellular synovitis. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Raquel; Gehrke, Thorsten; Souto-Carneiro, Maria M; Kriegsmann, Jörg; Krenn, Veit

    2002-01-01

    The presence of immunoglobulin crystal inclusions in plasma cells from plasmacytomas and B-NHLs (linked to overstimulation and overproduction) has been frequently reported. Our case describes a lymphoplasmacellular synovitis in a patient with osteoarthritis (OA) showing an unusually high plasma cell infiltration and for the first time crystals in plasma cells. Using immunohistochemistry. these crystals were identified as being IgG with a balanced lambda/kappa ratio. IgV(H) gene analysis (n = 5 clones) showed that they were somatically mutated (R/S of CDR > 3): in one case, an insertion of 9 nucleotides on the CDR2 region was observed. High R/S values in the CDR indicated antigen selectivity and affinity (4/5). Since no germinal centers could be detected and the analyzed B cells showed antigen selectivity, it may be concluded that already antigenically activated B cells migrated into the synovium and locally differentiated into plasma cells, leading to the extensive infiltration observed. Rheumatoid fibroblasts were shown to support terminal B cell differentiation. Our data suggests that the ability of fibroblasts to activate B cells is not only restricted to RA, but also occurs in OA. The intense plasma cell infiltration contributed to further cartilage damage by altering the microenvironment of the nourishing synovial tissue or by the local production of pathogenic autoantibodies.

  7. Clinical trial of {sup 165}Dy-HMA and {sup 166}Ho-CHICO in the treatment of Rheumatoid knee synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. Y.; Yoo, D. H.; Bae, S. C.; Jun, J. B. [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, S. M.; Hong, S. W.; Lee, S. Y.; Cheon, D. G.; Kim, S. J. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The untreated, chronic synovial inflammation leads to pannus formation and eventual destruction of the articular cartilage. In cases where medical therapy was unsuccessful, surgical or radiation synovectomy is necessary especially in the knee joints. The advantages of radiation synovectomy over surgical synovectomy are (1) greater destruction of diseased synovium, (2) reduced potential for blood clots and infection, (3) no requirement for anesthesia, and (4) less costly and less time consuming. Recently KAERI developed Dy-165 HMA, which was characterized by the absence of iron and a higher concentration of dysprosium. And then more recently KAERI also developed {sup 166}Ho-CHICO, which was characterized by relatively longer half-life(26.8 hr), more biological due to organic nature of chitosan, more even spatial distribution due to colloidal solution and more absorbable to synovium than Dy-165 HMA. We studied to evaluate the efficacy and safety of radiation synovectomy with Dy-165 HMA and {sup 166}Ho-CHICO in chronic rheumatoid synovitis with knee. The present study indicates that the Dy-165 HMA and {sup 166}Ho-CHICO are an effective and safe agent for radiation synovectomy. But further large scaled long-term follow up study and controlled study with steroid only are required. 15 refs. (author)

  8. Adenosine A2A Receptors Mediate Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Electroacupuncture on Synovitis in Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-hui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the role of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA on synovitis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, C57BL/6 mice were divided into five treatment groups: Sham-control, CIA-control, CIA-EA, CIA-SCH58261 (A2AR antagonist, and CIA-EA-SCH58261. All mice except those in the Sham-control group were immunized with collagen II for arthritis induction. EA treatment was administered using the stomach 36 and spleen 6 points, and stimulated with a continuous rectangular wave for 30 min daily. EA treatment and SCH58261 were administered daily from days 35 to 49 (n=10. After treatment, X-ray radiography of joint bone morphology was established at day 60 and mouse blood was collected for ELISA determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α levels. Mice were sacrificed and processed for histological examination of pathological changes of joint tissue, including hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry of A2AR expression. EA treatment resulted in significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α concentrations, and bone damage X-ray scores. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effect of EA treatment was reversed by coadministration of SCH58261. Thus, EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect resulting in significant protection of cartilage by activation of A2AR in the synovial tissue of CIA.

  9. Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema associated with parvovirus B19 infection: two new cases and review of the comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Francesco; Ciccarese, Giulia; Agnoletti, Arianna F; Cogorno, Ludovica; Muda, Alessandro; Cozzani, Emanuele; Parodi, Aurora

    2015-10-01

    Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) is a rare syndrome consisting of acute symmetrical tenosynovitis of the hands and wrists associated with pain and marked pitting edema of the dorsum of the hands or the feet. Persistent rheumatoid factor seronegativity and elevated acute phase reactants are the rule, while radiographic findings are characterized by the absence of bony erosions. The syndrome has occasionally been associated with a wide range of diseases including solid and hematological malignancies, polymyalgia rheumatica, and other inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Two patients with skin eruption on hands and feet associated with arthromyalgias have been investigated to confirm diagnosis of RS3PE and to detect comorbidities. A revision of all the possible medical conditions correlated to RS3PE has been performed. We report two cases of RS3PE associated with Parvovirus B19 infection/reactivation. There are very few reports on the association between RS3PE and infectious agents, and in only one case the syndrome has been correlated to parvovirus infection. We want to underline the importance for patients with RS3PE to be seen by dermatologists who should become familiar with this syndrome and remark that Parvovirus B19 infection may be a potential cause of RS3PE. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. 18F-FDG PET imaging of rheumatoid knee synovitis correlates with dynamic magnetic resonance and sonographic assessments as well as with the serum level of metalloproteinase-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckers, Catherine; Foidart, Jacqueline; Hustinx, Roland; Jeukens, Xavier; Marcelis, Stefaan; Ribbens, Clio; Andre, Beatrice; Leclercq, Philippe; Kaiser, Marie-Joelle; Malaise, Michel G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis with positron emission tomography (PET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) in comparison with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US). Sixteen knees in 16 patients with active RA were assessed with PET, MRI and US at baseline and 4 weeks after initiation of anti-TNF-α treatment. All studies were performed within 4 days. Visual and semi-quantitative (standardised uptake value, SUV) analyses of the synovial uptake of FDG were performed. The dynamic enhancement rate and the static enhancement were measured after i.v. gadolinium injection and the synovial thickness was measured in the medial, lateral patellar and suprapatellar recesses by US. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) were also measured. PET was positive in 69% of knees while MRI and US were positive in 69% and 75%. Positivity on one imaging technique was strongly associated with positivity on the other two. PET-positive knees exhibited significantly higher SUVs, higher MRI parameters and greater synovial thickness compared with PET-negative knees, whereas serum CRP and MMP-3 levels were not significantly different. SUVs were significantly correlated with all MRI parameters, with synovial thickness and with serum CRP and MMP-3 levels at baseline. Changes in SUVs after 4 weeks were also correlated with changes in MRI parameters and in serum CRP and MMP-3 levels, but not with changes in synovial thickness. (orig.)

  11. Um caso de sinovite vilonodular do ombro em adolescente: diagnóstico por imagem e anatomopatológico A case of villonodular synovitis of the shoulder in an adolescent: imaging and pathologic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Lavras Costallat

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Em quadros de monoartrite crônica devem ser investigadas doenças inflamatórias como a artrite reumatoide (AR, doenças infecciosas como a tuberculose e outras doenças que causem espessamento sinovial e derrame articular como sinovite vilonodular pigmentada (SVNP, hemangioma sinovial, osteocondromatose sinovial e lipoma arborescente sinovial. Relatamos o caso de uma jovem paciente com quadro de monoartrite em ombro, cujo exame por imagem mostrou sinovite e cujo exame histopatológico obtido através de artroscopia com biópsia revelou tratar-se de SVNP. RELATO DO CASO: J C M, 15 anos, sexo feminino, branca, estudante, foi encaminhada ao reumatologista com hipótese diagnóstica de artrite idiopática juvenil (AIJ pauciarticular. Apresentava, há um ano, dor no ombro D, que melhorava com o uso de anti-inflamatório não-esteroidal (AINE em dois dias. Teve nesse período de cinco a seis destes episódios que duravam poucos dias. Negava outras queixas articulares ou sistêmicas. Trazia exames normais ou negativos: hemograma, VHS, proteína C reativa, fator reumatoide, sedimento de urina. O FAN era positivo 1/80, pontilhado fino. Trazia Ressonância Magnética do ombro indicativa de sinovite glenoumeral com derrame articular com conteúdo expansivo de tecidos moles na bursa subescapular, segundo o laudo, podendo corresponder a pannus. Como história e exame físico não eram compatíveis com AIJ, foi realizada outra RM que mostrou aumento da lesão já descrita. Foi então encaminhada à artroscopia para biópsia, que revelou SVNP. Durante o procedimento, foi realizada sinovectomia, e uma nova RM feita após nove meses mostrou ausência de sinovite. A SVNP do ombro é incomum e a sinovectomia foi curativa nesse caso.Chronic monoarthritis demand an investigation of inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, infectious diseases like tuberculosis; and other diseases that cause synovitis and joint effusion, such as pigmented

  12. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein associates differentially with erosions and synovitis and has a different temporal course in cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody (anti-CCP)-positive versus anti-CCP-negative early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne F; Lindegaard, Hanne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    -suppressive effect. We aimed to compare circulating cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), a marker of cartilage turnover, in untreated anti-CCP-positive and anti-CCP-negative RA, and to study the temporal pattern of COMP through 4 years of treatment, including the relationship to imaging and clinical findings.......048). In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP exhibited a parabolic course over 4 years, while COMP in anti-CCP-negative patients had an almost linear course. In anti-CCP-positive patients, COMP was associated with MRI edema and erosion score, while COMP was correlated with synovitis score in anti...

  13. Ablation of Perlecan Domain 1 Heparan Sulfate Reduces Progressive Cartilage Degradation, Synovitis, and Osteophyte Size in a Preclinical Model of Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Cindy C; Jackson, Miriam T; Smith, Margaret M; Smith, Susan M; Penm, Steven; Lord, Megan S; Whitelock, John M; Little, Christopher B; Melrose, James

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the role of the heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycan perlecan (HSPG-2) in regulating fibroblast growth factor (FGF) activity, bone and joint growth, and the onset and progression of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (OA) in a mouse gene-knockout model. Maturational changes were evaluated histologically in the knees of 3-, 6-, and 12-week-old wild-type (WT) mice and Hspg2(Δ3-/Δ3-) mice (Hspg2 lacking domain 1 HS, generated by ablation of exon 3 of perlecan). Cartilage damage, subchondral bone sclerosis, osteophytosis, and synovial inflammation were scored at 4 and 8 weeks after surgical induction of OA in WT and Hspg2(Δ3-/Δ3-) mice. Changes in cartilage expression of FGF-2, FGF-18, HSPG-2, FGF receptor 1 (FGFR-1), and FGFR-3 were examined immunohistochemically. Femoral head cartilage from both mouse genotypes was cultured in the presence or absence of interleukin-1α (IL-1α), FGF-2, and FGF-18, and the content and release of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for key matrix molecules, enzymes, and inhibitors were quantified. No effect of perlecan HS ablation on growth plate or joint development was detected. After induction of OA, Hspg2(Δ3-/Δ3-) mice had significantly reduced cartilage erosion, osteophytosis, and synovitis. OA-induced loss of chondrocyte expression of FGF-2, FGF-18, and HSPG-2 occurred in both genotypes. Expression of FGFR-1 after OA induction was maintained in WT mice, while FGFR-3 loss after OA induction was significantly reduced in Hspg2(Δ3-/Δ3-) mice. There were no genotypic differences in GAG content or release between unstimulated control cartilage and IL-1α-stimulated cartilage. However, IL-1α-induced cartilage expression of Mmp3 mRNA was significantly reduced in Hspg2(Δ3-/Δ3-) mice. Cartilage GAG release in either the presence or absence of IL-1α was unaltered by FGF-2 in both genotypes. In cartilage cultures with FGF-18, IL-1α-stimulated GAG loss was significantly reduced only in Hspg2(Δ3

  14. Paradoxical arthritis occurring during anti-TNF in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: histological and immunological features of a complex synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivernini, Stefano; Pugliese, Daniela; Tolusso, Barbara; Bui, Laura; Petricca, Luca; Guidi, Luisa; Mirone, Luisa; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Federico, Francesco; Ferraccioli, Gianfranco; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Gremese, Elisa

    2018-01-01

    Paradoxical arthritis under tumour necrosis factor inhibitor (TNF-i) for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been described. This study aims to evaluate the histological features of paired synovial tissue (ST) and colonic mucosa (CM) tissue in patients with IBD developing paradoxical arthritis under TNF-i. Patients with IBD without history of coexisting joint involvement who developed arthritis under TNF-i were enrolled. Each patient underwent ST biopsy and ileocolonoscopy with CM biopsies. ST and CM paired samples were stained through immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68, CD21, CD20, CD3 and CD117. Clinical and immunological parameters (anticitrullinated peptides antibodies (ACPA)-immunoglobulin (Ig)M/IgA rheumatoid factor (RF)) were collected. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ACPA/IgM-RF/IgA-RF negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were enrolled as comparison. 10 patients with IBD (age 46.0±9.7 years, 13.2±9.9 years of disease duration, 2.5±1.6 years of TNF-i exposure, six with Crohn's disease and four with ulcerative colitis, respectively) were studied. At ST level, IHC revealed that patients with IBD with paradoxical arthritis showed more similar histological findings in terms of synovial CD68 + , CD21 + , CD20 + , CD3 + and CD117 + cells compared with PsA than ACPA/IgM-RF/IgA-RF negative RA. Analysing the CM specimens, patients with IBD showed the presence of CD68 + , CD3 + , CD117 + and CD20 + cells in 100%, 70%, 60% and 50% of cases, respectively, despite endoscopic remission. Finally, addition of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and switch to ustekinumab were more effective than swapping into different TNF-i in patients with IBD with paradoxical arthritis. Patients with IBD may develop histologically proven synovitis during TNF-i, comparable to PsA. The inhibition of inflammatory pathways alternative to TNF (IL12/1L23) may be an effective therapeutic option for severe paradoxical articular manifestations.

  15. Kei Apple Plant Thorn Synovitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We noted 2 visible pieces of broken thorn within the joint space (Figure. 1). The pieces were retrieved and upon examination found to be thorns of Kei apple plant .The child was allowed home on the 3rd post operative day on antibiotics for 6 weeks. He has been reviewed 2 weeks post operatively with better range of motion.

  16. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the- ...

  17. Osteoarthritis : the role of synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, Marion Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a prevalent disease causing pain and disability. It’s aetiology is unknown and no curative treatment is available. Osteoarthritis research is complicated due to heterogeneity of the disease, slow progression and poor association of clinical features with radiographic

  18. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of (177)Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K K; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K; Thirumalaisamy, S G; Karthik, S; Nagaprabhu, V N; Vimalnath, K V; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using (177)Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite ((177)Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of (177)Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of (177)Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than those with more advanced changes (Steinbrocker's Grades III and IV) in terms of VAS improvement (75% vs. 45.8%) (P level was not different before and after RSV. RSV side-effects assessed for the whole follow-up period were minor and not significant. RSV with (177)Lu-HA was safe and effective in patients with knee joint chronic painful synovitis of rheumatoid origin. It exhibited significant therapeutic effect after 6 months follow-up period with no significant side-effects. The preliminary investigations reveal that (177)Lu-labeled HA particles hold considerable promise as a cost-effective agent for RSV. More elaborate and

  19. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy - a single centre, open-label study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-27

    Abstract Introduction With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with PsA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsies and MRI scans of an inflamed knee joint at baseline and 12 weeks after starting treatment with either anakinra (first 10 patients) or etanercept (subsequent 15 patients) in two sequential studies of identical design. DAS28 scores were measured at both time points. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, CD68 and Factor VIII (FVIII) was performed on synovial samples and scored by digital image analysis (DIA). MRI scans performed at baseline and at 12 weeks were scored for synovitis semi-quantitatively. The ΔDAS28 of the European League Against Rheumatism good response definition (>1.2) was chosen to divide patients into responder and non-responder groups. Differences between groups (Mann Whitney U test) and correlations between ΔDAS28 with change in immunohistochemical and MRI synovitis scores (Spearman\\'s rho test) were calculated. Results Paired synovial samples and MRI scans were available for 21 patients (8 anakinra, 13 etanercept) and 23 patients (8 anakinra, 15 etanercept) respectively. Change in CD3 (ΔCD3) and CD68 expression in the synovial sublining layer (ΔCD68sl) was significantly greater in

  20. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy--a single centre, open-label study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-01

    With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent.

  1. Comparing the effects of tofacitinib, methotrexate and the combination, on bone marrow oedema, synovitis and bone erosion in methotrexate-naive, early active rheumatoid arthritis: results of an exploratory randomised MRI study incorporating semiquantitative and quantitative techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G.; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Bowes, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of tofacitinib-an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-with or without methotrexate (MTX), on MRI endpoints in MTX-naive adult patients with early active RA and synovitis in an index wrist or hand. METHODS: In this exploratory......, phase 2, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study, patients received tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily + MTX, tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily + placebo (tofacitinib monotherapy), or MTX + placebo (MTX monotherapy), for 1 year. MRI endpoints (Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials RA MRI score...... differences in RAMRIS bone marrow oedema (BME) at month 6 were -1.55 (90% CI -2.52 to -0.58) for tofacitinib + MTX and -1.74 (-2.72 to -0.76) for tofacitinib monotherapy (both ptofacitinib + MTX...

  2. Comparing the effects of tofacitinib, methotrexate and the combination, on bone marrow oedema, synovitis and bone erosion in methotrexate-naive, early active rheumatoid arthritis: results of an exploratory randomised MRI study incorporating semiquantitative and quantitative techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bowes, Michael A; Wu, Chunying; Fuerst, Thomas; van der Heijde, Désirée; Irazoque-Palazuelos, Fedra; Soto-Raices, Oscar; Hrycaj, Pawel; Xie, Zhiyong; Zhang, Richard; Wyman, Bradley T; Bradley, John D; Soma, Koshika; Wilkinson, Bethanie

    2016-06-01

    To explore the effects of tofacitinib-an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-with or without methotrexate (MTX), on MRI endpoints in MTX-naive adult patients with early active RA and synovitis in an index wrist or hand. In this exploratory, phase 2, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study, patients received tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily + MTX, tofacitinib 10 mg twice daily + placebo (tofacitinib monotherapy), or MTX + placebo (MTX monotherapy), for 1 year. MRI endpoints (Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials RA MRI score (RAMRIS), quantitative RAMRIS (RAMRIQ) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI) were assessed using a mixed-effect model for repeated measures. Treatment differences with ptofacitinib + MTX and -1.74 (-2.72 to -0.76) for tofacitinib monotherapy (both ptofacitinib + MTX and -0.52 (-1.46 to 0.41) for tofacitinib monotherapy (both p>0.05 vs MTX monotherapy). Treatment differences in RAMRIQ synovitis were statistically significant at month 3, consistent with DCE MRI findings. Less deterioration of RAMRIS and RAMRIQ erosive damage was seen at months 6 and 12 in both tofacitinib groups versus MTX monotherapy. These results provide consistent evidence using three different MRI technologies that tofacitinib treatment leads to early reduction of inflammation and inhibits progression of structural damage. NCT01164579. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Radiosynovectomy of Painful Synovitis of Knee Joints Due to Rheumatoid Arthritis by Intra-Articular Administration of 177Lu-Labeled Hydroxyapatite Particulates: First Human Study and Initial Indian Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinto, Ajit S.; Kamaleshwaran, K. K.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vyshakh, K.; Thirumalaisamy, S. G.; Karthik, S.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Vimalnath, K. V.; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of Radiosynovectomy (RSV) using 177 Lu-labeled hydroxyapatite ( 177 Lu-HA) in the treatment of painful synovitis and recurrent joint effusion of knee joints in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Ten patients, diagnosed with RA and suffering from chronic painful resistant synovitis of the knee joints were referred for RSV. The joints were treated with 333 ± 46 MBq of 177 Lu-HA particles administered intra-articularly. Monitoring of activity distribution was performed by static imaging of knee joint and whole-body gamma imaging. The patients were evaluated clinically before RSV and at 6 months after the treatment by considering the pain improvement from baseline values in terms of a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS), the improvement of knee flexibility and the pain remission during the night. RSV response was classified as poor (VAS < 25), fair (VAS ≥ 25-50), good (VAS ≥ 50-75) and excellent (VAS ≥ 75), with excellent and good results considered to be success, while fair and poor as failure and also by range of motion. Three phase bone scan (BS) was repeated after 6 months and changes in the second phase of BS3 were assessed visually, using a four-degree scale and in the third phase, semiquantitatively with J/B ratio to see the response. Biochemical analysis of C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen was repeated after 48 h, 4 and 24 weeks. In all 10 patients, no leakage of administered activity to nontarget organs was visible in the whole-body scan. Static scans of the joint at 1 month revealed complete retention of 177 Lu-HA in the joints. All patients showed decreased joint swelling and pains, resulting in increased joint motion after 6 months. The percentage of VAS improvement from baseline values was 79.5 ± 20.0% 6 months after RS and found to be significantly related to patients' age (P = 0.01) and duration of the disease (P = 0.03). Knees with Steinbrocker's Grades 0 and I responded better than

  4. Multicenter study of radiosynoviorthesis. Clinical outcome in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis in comparison with rheumatoid arthritis; Multizenterstudie zur Radiosynoviorthese: Klinische Ergebnisse bei aktivierten Arthrosen und anderen Gelenkerkrankungen mit chronischer Synovialitis im Vergleich zur rheumatoiden Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, H.; Lohmann, K.; Spitz, J. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, am Staedtischen Klinikum Wiesbaden (Germany); Franke, C. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Hamburg (Germany); Goretzki, G. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Bielefeld (Germany); Lemb, M.A. [Praxis fuer Nuklearmedizin, Bremen (Germany); Mueller, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Kantonspital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Panholzer, P.J. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Endokrinologie, PET-Zentrum, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria); Stelling, E. [Praxis fuer diagnostische und therapeutische Nuklearmedizin, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Aim: evaluation of the effectiveness of radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis versus rheumatoid arthritis by means of a standardized questionnaire. Patients, methods: 803 RSO treatments were monitored in 691 patients by standardized questionnaires of 7 centers in 3 countries. Patients were assigned to 3 groups according to their age (20-40, 41-60, 61-80 years). Additionally, the data were analyzed separately for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (group A) and those with osteoarthritis, psoriasis arthritis, pigmental villonodular synovitis or persistent effusions after joint replacement (group B). Results: ameliorations of joint pain, swelling/effusion or flexibility were found in 80% of group A and 56% of group B (p <0.01). Quality of life improved in 78% of group A and 59% of group B (p <0.01). The response rate was similar for small- and large-sized joints in group A, but significantly higher for large-sized joints in group B (p <0.01). The positive effects on joint pain, swelling/effusion or flexibility lasted longer in group A (p <0.01). Repeated RSOs were as effective as initial ones. The clinical outcome was neither influenced by age, nor gender, nor transient immobilisation for 48 hours after RSO. Conclusion: although slightly more efficient in rheumatoid arthritis, RSO represents an effective treatment option also in osteoarthritis and other disorders with concomitant synovitis. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Effektivitaetsvergleich der Radiosynoviorthese (RSO) bei aktivierter Arthrose und anderen Gelenkerkrankungen mit chronischer Synovialitis versus rheumatoider Arthritis. Ueberpruefung der Eignung eines standardisierten Fragebogens fuer Multizenterstudien. Patienten, Methoden: Bei 691 Patienten wurden 803 RSO-Behandlungsverlaeufe von 7 Zentren in 3 Laendern mit Hilfe eines standardisierten Fragebogens erfasst. Die Patienten wurden 3 Alterskategorien (20-40, 41-60 und 61-80 Jahre) zugeordnet. Ausserdem wurden

  5. Scoring ultrasound synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Naredo, Esperanza; Aegerter, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the reliability of new ultrasound (US) definitions and quantification of synovial hypertrophy (SH) and power Doppler (PD) signal, separately and in combination, in a range of joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using the European League Against Rheumatisms...

  6. Effects of lidocaine on lipopolysaccharide-induced synovitis in horses Efeitos da lidocaína em sinovite induzida por lipopolissacarídeo, em eqüinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Campebell

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine (100mg 2% injected into the carpal joint was used to evaluate the inflammatory response induced by injection (1.5ng of intra-articular E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS endotoxin. Seventeen male Mangalarga horses aged two to three years were divided into three groups and in all animals was injected 0.9% saline (SAL in the left carpus (LC, and in the right carpus (RC one of the following combinations were injected: group A (n=6 LPS plus SAL; group B (n=6 LPS plus lidocaine; group C (n=5 lidocaine plus SAL. Synovial fluid and blood samples were collected immediately before the injection of LPS (T0, and at 1.5 (T1, 3 (T2, 6 (T3, 12 (T4 and 36 hours (T5 after the injection. Clinical and physical variables and cellular and biochemical characteristics of the synovial fluid were evaluated at the same time. The local and systemic inflammatory response was evaluated by measurement of mean serum and synovial fluid TNF-alpha concentration. A rise in TNF-alpha concentration in LPS injected joints at 3h in group A and from 1.5h to 3h in group B was observed. It is concluded that LPS triggered an inflammatory process and that lidocaine did not inhibit or attenuate the LPS-induced synovitis nor the synthesis and release of TNF-alpha .Injetou-se lidocaína (100mg 2% na articulação do carpo para avaliar a resposta inflamatória induzida pela injeção (1,5ng intra-articular de lipopolissacarídeo (LPS de E. coli. Utilizaram-se 17 cavalos Mangalarga não castrados, entre dois e três anos, divididos em três grupos. No carpo esquerdo (CE administrou-se solução fisiológica a 0,9% (SAL e no carpo direito (CD uma das seguintes combinações: grupo A (n=6 LPS mais SAL, grupo B (n=6 LPS mais lidocaína e grupo C (n=5 lidocaína mais SAL. Amostras do líquido sinovial e de sangue foram colhidas imediatamente antes da injeção de LPS (T0 e às 1,30 (T1, 3 (T2, 6 (T3, 12 (T4 e 36 horas (T5 após a injeção. Variáveis clínicas e físicas, e caracter

  7. Effects of lidocaine on lipopolysaccharide-induced synovitis in horses

    OpenAIRE

    Campebell,R.C.; Peiró,J.R.; Valadão,C.A.A.; Santana,A.E.; Cunha,F.Q.

    2004-01-01

    Lidocaine (100mg 2%) injected into the carpal joint was used to evaluate the inflammatory response induced by injection (1.5ng) of intra-articular E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin. Seventeen male Mangalarga horses aged two to three years were divided into three groups and in all animals was injected 0.9% saline (SAL) in the left carpus (LC), and in the right carpus (RC) one of the following combinations were injected: group A (n=6) LPS plus SAL; group B (n=6) LPS plus lidocaine; gro...

  8. Kei Apple Plant Thorn Synovitis | Nyamohanga | Annals of African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of African Surgery. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 12, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  9. Pigmented villonodular synovitis of the knee: a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nervous systems was essentially normal. Her past medical and family history were unremarkable. case rePort. Examination findings: The general physical examination was unremarkable, except for the presence of a left sided antalgic gait. Local examination of the left knee revealed generalized swelling and increased local.

  10. B lymphocyte autoimmunity in rheumatoid synovitis is independent of ectopic lymphoid neogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantaert, Tineke; Kolln, Johanna; Timmer, Trieneke; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke C.; Vandooren, Bernard; Thurlings, Rogier M.; Cañete, Juan D.; Catrina, Anca I.; Out, Theo; Verweij, Cor L.; Zhang, Yiping; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocyte autoimmunity plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. The local production of autoantibodies and the presence of ectopic lymphoid neogenesis in the rheumatoid synovium suggest that these dedicated microenvironments resembling canonical lymphoid follicles may

  11. Knee Enthesitis and Synovitis on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Psoriasis without Arthritic Symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emad, Y.; Ragab, Y.; Gheita, Tamer; Anbar, Ashraf; Kamal, Hoda; Saad, Ahmed; Darweesh, Hanan; El Shaarawy, Nashwa; Azab, Amr; Ismail, Ahmed; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This case-control study was designed to evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of knee joints in patients with psoriasis without clinical peripheral or axial joint involvement, and to correlate MRI findings with disease and demographic variables. Methods. In total 48 patients

  12. Scintimetric assessment of synovitis activity during treatment with disease modifying antirheumatic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, N; Halberg, P; Halskov, O

    1988-01-01

    In a double blind trial of 36 patients with rheumatoid arthritis a new scintimetric method was applied to three comparable patient groups before and after eight months' treatment with levamisole, penicillamine, or azathioprine. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate scintigraphy of both hands was performed...

  13. The influence of radionuclides on synovitis and its assessment by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shortkroff, S

    2000-06-01

    Radionuclide synovectomy uses radiation attached to a carrier injected directly into the joint space to ablate excess synovial tissue in a rheumatoid joint. This procedure has met with criticism since its inception and remains controversial today. The main concern has been the potential for leakage of radioactivity from the joint space to nontarget organs. With persistent immune driven inflammation and increasing evidence of an altered fibroblastic population persistent in the rheumatoid joint, there is renewed impetus to reassess this treatment as an alternative to surgical intervention. Until novel treatments can be devised to target these altered, invasive fibroblasts, their removal is of primary significance to safeguarding the rheumatoid joint from destruction. On the premise that a micron size particle will decrease leakage to non-target organs, the initial aim of this thesis was to assess leakage rates of a number of potential biodegradable carriers for radionuclide synovectomy, as alternatives to {sup 90}Y-silicate. Analyses of a new carrier, hydroxyapatite (HA) labeled with {sup 90}Y, were performed. In vitro experiments indicated that despite cellular absorption of HA, the majority of the radioactivity remained associated with the particle and/or the cell, consistent with the leakage results. In vivo studies investigated short-term effects of radionuclides injected into the joint and the potential of magnetic resonance imaging for a non-invasive estimation of the degree of inflammation. The antigen induced arthritis (AIA) rabbit model was used to compare histology with joint diameter measurements and MRI analysis before and three days after treatment with {sup 90}Y-HA, intra-articular corticosteroid or both. Joint diameters decreased by 75% with corticosteroid and with combined treatment but remained unchanged for {sup 90}Y-HA. Similarly, the histologic inflammatory scores were 1.6, 2.0 and 2.9 for steroid, steroid/{sup 90}Y-HA and {sup 90}Y-HA, respectively. There was synovial necrosis, but also unaffected areas, in all {sup 90}Y-HA treated joints. MRI successfully showed treatment efficacy as a decrease in the percent of maximal fluid enhancement for the steroid and steroid/{sup 90}Y-HA treated groups and no difference for the {sup 90}Y-HA treated joints compared with the AIA pre-treatment group. (author)

  14. Results of radiosynoviorthesis with yttrium 90 in cases of chronic synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuette, H.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this study was to answer the following questions: Is the outcome of radiosynoviorthesis with 90 Y in patients who suffer from a chronic polyarthritis dependent on the stage according to Steinbrocker and does this dependency change when the results are measured 1/2 to 3 years later? Is there a difference between the effect of 90 Y on the joints of seropositive and seronegative patients? How are the results of radiosynoviorthesis in patients who suffer under other chronic joint diseases? What is the success distribution of re-synoviorthesis in evaluated patients? Is there a difference in the effectiveness of radiosynoviorthesis between joints in stage I and stage II and is the outcome dependent on whether or not degenerative changes are already present? Is the effect of radiosynoviorthesis, measured after one year, dependent on the duration of the disease in the treated joint or on the process activity of the disease? Is there a connection between the outcome of radiosynoviorthesis and the laboratory parameters of blood sedimentation and hemoglobin content? Does radiosynoviorthesis influence the number of medically induced, intra-articular injections and punctures in the treated joint? Is there a connection between radiosynoviorthesis outcomes and common therapy outcomes? What side effects of radiosynoviorthesis therapy were observed? (orig./MG) [de

  15. Hemophilic Chronic Synovitis: Therapy of Hemarthrosis using Endovascular Embolization of Knee and Elbow Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, E.; Baques, A.; Moretti, N.; Candela, M.; Caviglia, H.

    2013-01-01

    PurposeCongenital hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that affects 1 in 5,000 males and is characterized by repetitive musculoskeletal bleeding episodes. Selective embolization of the knee and elbow arteries can prevent bleeding episodes. To evaluate the long-term efficacy of these procedures, we assessed the outcomes of 30 procedures performed in our center.MethodsWe performed 30 procedures in 27 hemophilic patients, including 23 knee, and 7 elbow procedures. To evaluate the efficacy of selective embolization of knee and elbow arteries in people with hemophilia, we analyzed the number of bleeding episodes during 12 months before the procedure compared with the amount of episodes that occurred 3, 6, and 12 months after embolization.ResultsTwenty-nine of 30 procedures were classified as successful. The median of 1.25 episodes per month (range 0–3) observed before the procedure was reduced to 0 (range 0–1.67; p < 0.001) at 3 months, 0.17 (range 0–1.67; p < 0.001) at 6 months, and 0.33 (range 0–1.67; p = 0.024) at 12 months. Three patients remained free of bleeding events for more than 6 months. Additionally, after the procedure there was a significant reduction in factor FVIII usage that sustained up to 12 months after the procedures. No serious adverse events were observed.ConclusionsSelective angiographic embolization of knee and elbow arteries is a feasible procedure that can prevent repetitive bleedings, which would translate in better joint outcomes for these patients

  16. Hemophilic Chronic Synovitis: Therapy of Hemarthrosis using Endovascular Embolization of Knee and Elbow Arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, E., E-mail: emgalli1@yahoo.com.ar [CABA, Hospital de Agudos ' Juan A. Fernandez' (Argentina); Baques, A.; Moretti, N.; Candela, M. [CABA, Fundacion de la Hemofilia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Caviglia, H. [CABA, Hospital de Agudos ' Juan A. Fernandez' (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeCongenital hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that affects 1 in 5,000 males and is characterized by repetitive musculoskeletal bleeding episodes. Selective embolization of the knee and elbow arteries can prevent bleeding episodes. To evaluate the long-term efficacy of these procedures, we assessed the outcomes of 30 procedures performed in our center.MethodsWe performed 30 procedures in 27 hemophilic patients, including 23 knee, and 7 elbow procedures. To evaluate the efficacy of selective embolization of knee and elbow arteries in people with hemophilia, we analyzed the number of bleeding episodes during 12 months before the procedure compared with the amount of episodes that occurred 3, 6, and 12 months after embolization.ResultsTwenty-nine of 30 procedures were classified as successful. The median of 1.25 episodes per month (range 0-3) observed before the procedure was reduced to 0 (range 0-1.67; p < 0.001) at 3 months, 0.17 (range 0-1.67; p < 0.001) at 6 months, and 0.33 (range 0-1.67; p = 0.024) at 12 months. Three patients remained free of bleeding events for more than 6 months. Additionally, after the procedure there was a significant reduction in factor FVIII usage that sustained up to 12 months after the procedures. No serious adverse events were observed.ConclusionsSelective angiographic embolization of knee and elbow arteries is a feasible procedure that can prevent repetitive bleedings, which would translate in better joint outcomes for these patients.

  17. Surgical treatment for diffused-type giant cell tumor (pigmented villonodular synovitis) about the ankle joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingchen; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Xiangyang

    2017-11-14

    Diffused-type giant cell tumor(Dt-GCT) is a rare, aggressive disorder of the joint synovium, bursa and tendon sheaths. Osseous erosions and subchondral cysts may develop as the result of synovium infiltration in Dt-GCT. We present a retrospective study of a series of patients who are diagnosed with Dt-GCT about the ankle joint, there clinical outcome is evaluated in this study. Fifteen patients with radiologically and histologically confirmed Dt-GCT about the ankle joint were identified in our foot and ankle department. Patients were managed with open synovectomy for the tumor tissue and bone grafting for bony erosions. X-rays and MRI scans were used for evaluation of the tumor and bony erosions pre- and post-operatively. Pre- and post-operative ankle function was assessed using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society -Ankle and Hindfoot (AOFAS-AH) score and the Muscularskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. The mean follow-up duration was 37.4 months (range 25 to 50 months). There were 6 males and 9 females, with a mean age of 35 years old (range 18 to 65 years). All patients had talar erosion with the average size of 10.1*9.1*8.2 mm, distal tibia was affected in 5 patients with the average size of 6.2*5.6*5.8 mm. 7 patients had tendon involvement, 2 patients had recurrence and progression of ankle osteoarthritis. Both of them underwent ankle fusion. At the time of last follow-up, the mean AOFAS-AH score increased from 49 to 80 points (p ankle joint. Fusion is recommended for failed and severe cartilage destruction of the ankle joint.

  18. Disease-specific and inflammation-independent stromal alterations in spondylarthritis synovitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeremenko, Nataliya; Noordenbos, Troy; Cantaert, Tineke; van Tok, Melissa; van de Sande, Marleen; Cañete, Juan D.; Tak, Paul P.; Baeten, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The molecular processes driving the distinct patterns of synovial inflammation and tissue remodeling in spondylarthritis (SpA) as compared to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain largely unknown. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and unsuspected disease-specific pathways in SpA by a systematic and

  19. Treadmill Running Ameliorates Destruction of Articular Cartilage and Subchondral Bone, Not Only Synovitis, in a Rheumatoid Arthritis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Shimomura

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the influence of treadmill running on rheumatoid arthritis (RA joints using a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA rat model. Eight-week-old male Dark Agouti rats were randomly divided into four groups: The control group, treadmill group (30 min/day for 4 weeks from 10-weeks-old, CIA group (induced CIA at 8-weeks-old, and CIA + treadmill group. Destruction of the ankle joint was evaluated by histological analyses. Morphological changes of subchondral bone were analyzed by μ-CT. CIA treatment-induced synovial membrane invasion, articular cartilage destruction, and bone erosion. Treadmill running improved these changes. The synovial membrane in CIA rats produced a large amount of tumor necrosis factor-α and Connexin 43; production was significantly suppressed by treadmill running. On μ-CT of the talus, bone volume fraction (BV/TV was significantly decreased in the CIA group. Marrow star volume (MSV, an index of bone loss, was significantly increased. These changes were significantly improved by treadmill running. Bone destruction in the talus was significantly increased with CIA and was suppressed by treadmill running. On tartrate-resistant acid phosphate and alkaline phosphatase (TRAP/ALP staining, the number of osteoclasts around the pannus was decreased by treadmill running. These findings indicate that treadmill running in CIA rats inhibited synovial hyperplasia and joint destruction.

  20. Quantitative power Doppler ultrasound measures of peripheral joint synovitis in poor prognosis early rheumatoid arthritis predict radiographic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreerangaiah, Dee; Grayer, Michael; Fisher, Benjamin A; Ho, Meilien; Abraham, Sonya; Taylor, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    To assess the value of quantitative vascular imaging by power Doppler US (PDUS) as a tool that can be used to stratify patient risk of joint damage in early seropositive RA while still biologic naive but on synthetic DMARD treatment. Eighty-five patients with seropositive RA of power Doppler volume and 2D vascularity scores were the most useful US predictors of deterioration. These variables were modelled in two equations that estimate structural damage over 12 months. The equations had a sensitivity of 63.2% and specificity of 80.9% for predicting radiographic structural damage and a sensitivity of 54.2% and specificity of 96.7% for predicting structural damage on ultrasonography. In seropositive early RA, quantitative vascular imaging by PDUS has clinical utility in predicting which patients will derive benefit from early use of biologic therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Chromic phosphate synoviortheses without age restriction, as a firsts option for treatment of chronic active haemophilic synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llinas, Adolfo; Silva, Mauricio; Duarte, Monica; Cuervo, Pilar; Ninno, Dora; Ucros, Gonzalo; Cerquera, Angela Maria; Bernal, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the work was to demonstrate that clinical results obtained with synovectomies using active chromic phosphate without receiving dose of prophylactic factor concentrate before or after procedure are comparable to those obtained by a 3-month of post procedure prohylasis. the effectiveness of the synovectomy using chromic phosphate (32P) in the control of chronic hemarthroses in haemophilic patients to prevent the evolution of the arthropathy and its complications was also assessed

  2. Correlative BOLD MR imaging of stages of synovitis in a rabbit model of antigen-induced arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Crawley, Adrian; Gahunia, Harpal; Rayner, Tammy; Tassos, Vivian; Zhong, Anguo; Moineddin, Rahim; Pritzker, Kenneth; Mendes, Maria; Jong, Roland; Salter, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the ability of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess blood oxygenation changes within the microvasculature, this technique holds potential for evaluating early perisynovial changes in inflammatory arthritis. To evaluate the feasibility of BOLD MRI to detect interval perisynovial changes in knees of rabbits with inflammatory arthritis. Rabbit knees were injected with albumin (n=9) or saline (n=6) intra-articularly, or were not injected (control knees, n=9). Except for two rabbits (albumin-injected, n=2 knees; saline-injected, n=2 knees) that unexpectedly died on days 7 and 21 of the experiment, respectively, all other animals were scanned with BOLD MRI on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after induction of arthritis. T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI was performed during alternate 30 s of normoxia/hyperoxia. BOLD MRI measurements were compared with clinical, laboratory and histological markers. Percentage of activated voxels was significantly greater in albumin-injected knees than in contralateral saline-injected knees (P=0.04). For albumin-injected knees (P < 0.05) and among different categories of knees (P=0.009), the percentage of activated BOLD voxels varied over time. A quadratic curve for on-and-off BOLD difference was delineated for albumin- and saline-injected knees over time (albumin-injected, P=0.047; saline-injected, P=0.009). A trend toward a significant difference in synovial histological scores between albumin-injected and saline-injected knees was noted only for acute scores (P=0.07). As a proof of concept, BOLD MRI can depict perisynovial changes during progression of experimental arthritis. (orig.)

  3. Correlative BOLD MR imaging of stages of synovitis in a rabbit model of antigen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Gahunia, Harpal; Rayner, Tammy; Tassos, Vivian; Zhong, Anguo [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Pritzker, Kenneth; Mendes, Maria; Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Salter, Robert B. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Because of the ability of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess blood oxygenation changes within the microvasculature, this technique holds potential for evaluating early perisynovial changes in inflammatory arthritis. To evaluate the feasibility of BOLD MRI to detect interval perisynovial changes in knees of rabbits with inflammatory arthritis. Rabbit knees were injected with albumin (n=9) or saline (n=6) intra-articularly, or were not injected (control knees, n=9). Except for two rabbits (albumin-injected, n=2 knees; saline-injected, n=2 knees) that unexpectedly died on days 7 and 21 of the experiment, respectively, all other animals were scanned with BOLD MRI on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after induction of arthritis. T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI was performed during alternate 30 s of normoxia/hyperoxia. BOLD MRI measurements were compared with clinical, laboratory and histological markers. Percentage of activated voxels was significantly greater in albumin-injected knees than in contralateral saline-injected knees (P=0.04). For albumin-injected knees (P < 0.05) and among different categories of knees (P=0.009), the percentage of activated BOLD voxels varied over time. A quadratic curve for on-and-off BOLD difference was delineated for albumin- and saline-injected knees over time (albumin-injected, P=0.047; saline-injected, P=0.009). A trend toward a significant difference in synovial histological scores between albumin-injected and saline-injected knees was noted only for acute scores (P=0.07). As a proof of concept, BOLD MRI can depict perisynovial changes during progression of experimental arthritis. (orig.)

  4. Power Doppler ultrasonography for assessment of synovitis in the metacarpophalangeal joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Court-Payen, M; Strandberg, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) for assessing inflammatory activity in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reference method. METHODS: PDUS and dynamic...... MRI were performed on 54 MCP joints of 15 patients with active RA and on 12 MCP joints of 3 healthy controls. PDUS was performed with a LOGIQ 500 unit by means of a 7-13-MHz linear array transducer. Later the same day, MRI was performed with a 1.0T MR unit. A series of 24 coronal T1-weighted images...

  5. Power Doppler ultrasonography for assessment of synovitis in the metacarpophalangeal joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Court-Payen, M; Strandberg, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS) for assessing inflammatory activity in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reference method. METHODS: PDUS and dynamic ...

  6. Comparison of the manual and computer-aided techniques for evaluation of wrist synovitis using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI on a dedicated scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Kubassova, Olga; Parodi, Massimiliano

    2011-01-01

    Traditional methods for assessment of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis such as clinical examination, immunohistology of bioptic samples, scintigraphy, and radiography have several limitations, including lack of sensitivity, need of invasive techniques, and administration of radioacti...

  7. Co je nového v archeogenetice. Stárnoucí Adam a jeho (ne)zdatní synové

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 4 (2015), s. 153-154 ISSN 0044-4812 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : archaeogenetics * phylogeography Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology http://ziva.avcr.cz/files/ziva/pdf/co-je-noveho-v-archeogenetice-starnouci-adam-a-jeh.pdf

  8. A placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of Benorylate tablets in the treatment of bursitis and synovitis due to sports injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, G

    1977-08-01

    In this two-week study, Benoral tablets, at a 4.5 g daily dosage were compared with a matching placebo in 20 patients suffering from sports injury. Four assessments were made: pain at rest, pain on movement, tenderness and soft tissue swelling. In each case the active treatment group (benorylate) was statistically greater than that in the placebo group at one week and after two weeks' treatment.

  9. Validity of ultrasonography and measures of adult shoulder function and reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder synovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using magnetic resonance imaging as a gold standard.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2010-08-01

    To assess the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) in detecting inflammatory shoulder changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and to determine the agreement between US and the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a gold standard.

  10. A treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular triamcinolone with or without adalimumab effectively reduces MRI synovitis, osteitis and tenosynovitis and halts structural damage progression in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Eshed, Iris; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy with methotrexate and intra-articular glucocorticosteroid injections suppresses MRI inflammation and halts structural damage progression in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA), and whether adalimumab provides an additional effect....

  11. Significant improvement in synovitis, osteitis, and bone erosion following golimumab and methotrexate combination therapy as compared with methotrexate alone: A magnetic resonance imaging study of 318 methotrexate-naive rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of golimumab on inflammation/structural damage detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To evaluate the effects of golimumab on inflammation/structural damage detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  12. [Arthur Vick Prize 2017 of the German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, L; Niemeier, A; Krenn, V

    2018-03-01

    The German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology (DGORh) honored Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn (MVZ-ZHZMD-Trier) with the Arthur Vick Prize 2017. With this award, scientific results with high impact on the diagnosis, therapy and pathogenetic understanding of rheumatic diseases are honored. In cooperation with pathologists and colleagues from various clinical disciplines Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn developed several histopathologic scoring systems which contribute to the diagnosis and pathogenetic understanding of degenerative and rheumatic diseases. These scores include the synovitis score, the meniscal degeneration score, the classification of periprosthetic tissues (SLIM classification), the arthrofibrosis score, the particle score and the CD15 focus score. Of highest relevance for orthopedic rheumatology is the synovitis score which is a semiquantitative score for evaluating immunological and inflammatory changes of synovitis in a graded manner. Based on this score, it is possible to divide results into low-grade synovitis and high-grade synovitis: a synovitis score of 1-4 is called low-grade synovitis and occurs for example in association with osteoarthritis (OA), post-trauma, with meniscal lesions and hemochromatosis. A synovitis score of 5-9 is called high-grade synovitis, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Lyme arthritis, postinfection and reactive arthritis as well as peripheral arthritis with Bechterew's disease (sensitivity 61.7%, specificity 96.1%). The first publication (2002) and an associated subsequent publication (2006) of the synovitis score has led to national and international acceptance of this score as the standard for histopathological assessment of synovitis. The synovitis score provides a diagnostic, standardized and reproducible histopathological evaluation method for joint diseases, particularly when this score is applied in the context with the joint pathology algorithm.

  13. Interreader agreement in the assessment of magnetic resonance images of rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints--an international multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette; Lassere, M

    2001-01-01

    and iv Gd (Techniques A and C), these rates were 86% (synovitis) and 97% (bone lesions). Corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients (quadratic weighted kappas) were 0.44-0.68, mean 0.58 (synovitis), and 0.44-0.69, mean 0.62 (bone lesion), i.e., in the moderate to good range. Unweighted kappa...... values were in the low to moderate range, generally lowest for JSN (... in assessing synovitis and bone destruction in RA multicenter studies....

  14. Interreader agreement in the assessment of magnetic resonance images of rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints--an international multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette; Lassere, M

    2001-01-01

    and iv Gd (Techniques A and C), these rates were 86% (synovitis) and 97% (bone lesions). Corresponding intraclass correlation coefficients (quadratic weighted kappas) were 0.44-0.68, mean 0.58 (synovitis), and 0.44-0.69, mean 0.62 (bone lesion), i.e., in the moderate to good range. Unweighted kappa...

  15. Role of ultrasound in managing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Terslev, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a valid and reliable imaging tool for evaluation of joint and tendon inflammation as well as cartilage and erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovitis is usually scored semiquantitatively for both gray scale synovitis and power Doppler activity, and use...

  16. Reliability and sensitivity to change of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score in a multireader, longitudinal setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, ea; Østergaard, Mikkel; Kvan, NP

    2005-01-01

    , erosion, and bone marrow edema status and for change scores. RESULTS: Intrareader ICCs were generally very high, both for status scores (median baseline and followup 0.89 and 0.90 for synovitis, 0.91 and 0.90 for erosion, and 0.90 and 0.98 for edema) and for change scores (median 0.80 for synovitis, 0...

  17. Effect of a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate and intra-articular betamethasone with or without additional cyclosporin on MRI-assessed synovitis, osteitis, tenosynovitis, bone erosion, and joint space narrowing in early rheumatoid arthritis: results from a 2-year randomized double

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Bisgaard, S.; Ejbjerg, B. J.; Eshed, I.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular (IA) betamethasone suppresses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined measures of disease activity and reduces joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) patients, and to i......Objectives: To investigate whether a treat-to-target strategy based on methotrexate (MTX) and intra-articular (IA) betamethasone suppresses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-determined measures of disease activity and reduces joint destruction in early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) patients......, and to investigate whether concomitant cyclosporin A (CyA) provides an additional effect.Method: In the 2-year randomized, double-blind, treat-to-target trial CIMESTRA, 160 patients with eRA (intra-articular betamethasone and CyA, or placebo CyA. A total of 129 patients participated...

  18. and rheumatologic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C viru

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enas Abdallah El-attar

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... Immunological profile rheumatoid factor RF, ANA, C3, C4. Cryoglobulins. ..... standing disease process as 32% of our studied patients had liver cirrhosis. ..... graphic synovitis and predict power Doppler persistence in early.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis and hand surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  20. Reumatoid artritis og håndkirurgi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peretz, Anne Sofie Rosenborg; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Brogren, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis results in characteristic deformities of the hand. Medical treatment has undergone a remarkable development. However, not all patients achieve remission or tolerate the treatment. Patients who suffer from deformities and persistent synovitis may be candidates for hand surgery...

  1. CHONDROPROTECTIVE DRUG ALFLUTOP IN THE TREATMENT OF OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Lukina

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary Aljlutup is an effective and well tolerable drug which not only decreases pains and other clinical manifestations of secondary synovitis but also has positive effect on the structure of articular cartilage.

  2. Arthroscopy and Endoscopy of the Ankle and Hindfoot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    Ankle arthroscopy provides the surgeon with a minimally invasive treatment option for a wide variety of indications such as impingement, osteochondral defects, loose bodies, ossicles, synovitis, adhesions, and instability. Posterior ankle pathology can be treated using endoscopic hindfoot portals.

  3. Development and validation of modified disease activity scores in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G; Smolen, Josef S

    2014-01-01

    -CDAI) were generated for each subject in the validation cohort. The M-DAS28, M-SDAI, and M-CDAI scores were compared to conventional scores of disease activity with regard to associations with MRI measures of synovitis and radiographic progression, assessed using Pearson's and Spearman's correlations, linear......OBJECTIVE: To develop and validate composite disease activity scores, based on widely available clinical measures, that would demonstrate improved correlation with detection of synovitis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and radiographic progression, in comparison with conventional measures.......15 × SJC28 + 0.22 × EvGA + 1 and M-SDAI = CRP + SJC28 + EvGA. Both modified and conventional disease activity scores correlated significantly with MRI measures of synovitis. Modified scores showed superior correlation with synovitis, as compared to conventional scores, at all time points (P

  4. The use of differential scintigraphy in the clinical diagnosis of osseous and soft tissue changes affecting the diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, H.J.; Jacobs, A.M.; Oloff, L.; Drago, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Prompt recognition of cellulitis, osteomyelitis, diabetic osteolysis, Charcot neuroarthropathy, septic synovitis, and deep plantar abscesses in the diabetic foot is essential because the therapy is drastically different. Differential diagnosis has been greatly facilitated by recently developed scanning techniques

  5. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; de Rycke, Leen; Boots, Anemieke M.; Mielants, Herman; Veys, Eric M.; de Keyser, Filip

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes

  6. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stomp, Wouter; Krabben, Annemarie; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients wer...

  7. Quantification of synovistis by MRI: correlation between dynamic and static gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and microscopic and macroscopic signs of synovial inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic and static gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid(Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated as measures of joint inflammation in arthritis, by a comparison with macroscopic and microscopic signs of synovitis. Furthermore, the importance of the size...

  8. Intraarticular glucocorticoid, morphine and bupivacaine reduces pain and convalescence after arthroscopic ankle surgery: a randomized study of 36 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    In a double-blind randomized study, 36 patients undergoing arthroscopic removal of bony spurs and synovitis causing impingement of the ankle were allocated to intraarticular saline or bupivacaine 15 mg + morphine 5 mg + intraarticular methylprednisolone 40 mg. Combined methylprednisolone, bupivac......In a double-blind randomized study, 36 patients undergoing arthroscopic removal of bony spurs and synovitis causing impingement of the ankle were allocated to intraarticular saline or bupivacaine 15 mg + morphine 5 mg + intraarticular methylprednisolone 40 mg. Combined methylprednisolone...

  9. Ultrasonographic examination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis is better than clinical examination for identification of intraarticular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Erik; Strandberg, Charlotte; Andersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA.......The diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is formally based on clinical examination, but ultrasound (US) examination is used increasingly. Our purpose was to compare US and clinical examination in the assessment of synovitis in JIA....

  10. Case report 140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shives, T.C.; Ivins, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    This case illustrates the importance of familiarity with the radiological features of pigmented villonodular synovitis in a relatively uncommon location. The rather typical appearance of the juxta-articular lesions in bone, characterized by well-defined lyctic areas with sclerotic borders on both sides of a joint, with no appreciable periarticular osteoporosis and little if any joint cartilage thinning, particularly in a young adult, should alert the radiologist and orthopedic clinician to the likely diagnosis of pigmented villonodular synovitis. (orig./MG)

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of articular and extraarticular synovial structures of the hands in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Barbieri, Francesca; Boesen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), the quantification of enhancement within the synovial membrane and bone by extracting curves using fast T1-weighted sequences during intravenous administration of contrast agent, evaluates synovitis and bone marrow edema in psoriati...... arthritis (PsA). In this pilot study, we looked at possible differences between joint synovitis and tenosynovitis in PsA as compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  12. From a formal training program in musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) to a high reproducibility for Doppler ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Orlando; Diaz, Mario; Ceron, Carmen; Moller, Ingrid; Naredo, Esperanza; Saaibi, Diego Luis

    2017-07-28

    To assess the intra- and inter-observer reliability of ultrasound (US) in scoring B-mode, Doppler synovitis and combined B-mode and Doppler synovitis scores in different peripheral joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Four rheumatologists with a formal training in musculoskeletal US (MSKUS) particularly focus on definitions and scoring synovitis on B-mode and Doppler mode participated in a patient-based reliability exercise on 16 active RA patients. The four rheumatologists independently and consecutively performed a B-mode and power Doppler (PD) US assessment of 7 joints of each patient in two rounds in a blinded fashion. Each joint was semi quantitatively scored from 0 to 3 for B-mode synovitis (BS), Doppler synovitis (DS), and combined B-mode/Doppler synovitis (CS). Intraobserver reliability was assessed by Cohen's κ. Interobserver reliability was assessed by unweight Light's κ. The mean prevalence of synovitis on B-mode was 83% of joints; scores ranging from grade 1 in 18% of joints, to grade 3 in 33%. In 55% of joints synovial PD signal was detected and the distribution of scores range from 14% of joints for grade 3, to 26% for grade 2. After a total of 448 joints scanned with 896 adquired images our intraobserver and interobserver reliability was good to excellent for most of the joints. Formal, structured and continuous training in musculoskeletal ultrasound would bring a good to excellent reproducibility in rheumatological hands with a high reliability in real time acquisition BS, DS and CS modalities for scoring synovitis in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Smith, Hans-Joergen; Arvidsson, Linda Z.; Larheim, Tore A.; Flatoe, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O.

    2016-01-01

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  14. Disk abnormality coexists with any degree of synovial and osseous abnormality in the temporomandibular joints of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkhus, Eva; Smith, Hans-Joergen [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Arvidsson, Linda Z.; Larheim, Tore A. [University of Oslo, Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, Oslo (Norway); Flatoe, Berit; Hetlevik, Siri O. [Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Department of Rheumatology, Oslo (Norway); University of Oslo, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Oslo (Norway)

    2016-03-15

    MRI manifestation of temporomandibular joint arthritis is frequently reported in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, little attention has been paid to temporomandibular joint disk abnormalities. To assess combinations of MRI findings in the symptomatic temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with focus on disk abnormalities. This was a retrospective study of 46 patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, mean age 12 years (range: 5-17 years). Mean disease duration was 70 months (standard deviation: 61 months). MR images of 92 temporomandibular joints were scored for thickness of abnormally enhancing synovium (synovitis), joint effusion, bone marrow oedema, abnormal bone shape, bone erosion and disk abnormalities. The 92 temporomandibular joints were categorized as A: No synovitis and normal bone shape (30/92; 33%), B: Synovitis and normal bone shape (14/92: 15%), C: Synovitis and abnormal bone shape (38/92; 41%) and D: No synovitis but abnormal bone shape (10/92; 11%). Thirty-six of the 46 patients (78%) had synovitis and 33/46 (72%) had abnormal bone shape, most frequently in combination (30/46; 65%). Disk abnormalities (flat disk, fragmented disk, adherent disk and displaced disk) were found in 29/46 patients (63%). Disk abnormalities were found in all categories of juvenile idiopathic arthritis involved temporomandibular joints (B: 8/14 [57%]; C: 25/38 [66%] and D: 7/10 [70%]). Disk displacement was found in half of the joints (7/14) in category B. Synovitis was most pronounced in this category. Disk abnormalities were frequent. Disk displacement also occurred in joints with early temporomandibular joint arthritis, i.e., with normal bone shape. Other disk abnormalities were found in joints with bone abnormalities. Attention should be paid to disk abnormalities both in early and long-standing temporomandibular joint arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. (orig.)

  15. EVALUATION OF ULTRASOUND REMISSION CRITERIA IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS DURING TOCILIZUMAB THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Aleksandrovna Osipyants

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the association of ultrasound (US remission criteria with the clinical and laboratory indicators of inflammatory activity, functional status, and X-ray changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA during tocilizumab (TCZ therapy.Subjects and methods. The trial included 36 patients with RA (meeting the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR criteria who had received TCZ for 6 months. The authors made a clinical and laboratory assessment of RA activity (DAS28-CRP, and SDAI, functional impairments (HAQ index and US verification of wrist joint synovitis (a Voluson-i device, GE, 4-13-MHz linear transducer at baseline and 6 months after therapy. No signs of grey-scale (B-mode and power Doppler (PD synovitis (B = 0; PD = 0 or minimal B-mode synovitis, and not more one PD hypervascular signal (В ≤1; PD ≤1 were arbitrarily taken as US remission criteria. Destruction changes were evaluated by hand and foot X-ray using the Sharp method modified by van der Heijde (SHS.Results. After 6 months of therapy, about 80% of the patients in clinical remission retained moderate or significant synovitis, as evidenced by US studies. There were no clinical differences in clinical activity indices and functional impairments between the patients who were and were not in US remission (p > 0.05. The 12-month follow-up SHS score was significantly higher with the preservation of 6-month therapy signs of B-mode synovitis and PD hypervascularization (of not more than one signal than that in US remission (p < 0.05. There was no relationship of X-ray progression to the clinical and functional statuses (p > 0.05.Conclusion. Subclinical synovitis is observed even in clinical remission of RA. Destruction progression is significantlyrelated to synovitis persistence, as shown by ultrasonography.

  16. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, P.O. Box 9600, Leiden (Netherlands); Oestergaard, Mikkel [University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen Center for Arthritis Research, Center for Rheumatology and Spinal Diseases, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  17. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowbotham, Emma L. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Freeston, Jane E. [Department of Rheumatology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds (United Kingdom); Emery, Paul [University of Leeds, Arthritis Research UK, Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, LTHT Leeds Institute of Rheumatic Musculoskeletal Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Grainger, Andrew J. [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Leeds (United Kingdom); Chapel Allerton Hospital, NIHR Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  18. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade, Amsterdam (Netherlands); St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  19. Aiming for a simpler early arthritis MRI protocol: can Gd contrast administration be eliminated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomp, Wouter; Bloem, Johan L.; Reijnierse, Monique; Krabben, Annemarie; Heijde, Desiree van der; Huizinga, Tom W.J.; Helm-van Mil, Annette H.M. van der; Oestergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether intravenous gadolinium (Gd) contrast administration can be eliminated when evaluating synovitis and tenosynovitis in early arthritis patients, thereby decreasing imaging time, cost, and invasiveness. Wrist MRIs of 93 early arthritis patients were evaluated by two readers for synovitis of the radioulnar, radiocarpal, and intercarpal joints, according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring method (RAMRIS), and for tenosynovitis in ten compartments. Scores of MRI images without Gd contrast enhancement were compared to scores obtained when evaluating all, including contrast-enhanced, MRI images as reference. Subsequently, a literature review and pooled analysis of data from the present and two previous studies were performed. At the individual joint/tendon level, sensitivity to detect synovitis without Gd contrast was 91 % and 72 % for the two readers, respectively, with a specificity of 51 % and 81 %. For tenosynovitis, the sensitivity was 67 % and 54 %, respectively, with a specificity of 87 % and 91 %. Pooled data analysis revealed an overall sensitivity of 81 % and specificity of 50 % for evaluation of synovitis. Variations in tenosynovitis scoring systems hindered pooled analyses. Eliminating Gd contrast administration resulted in low specificity for synovitis and low sensitivity for tenosynovitis, indicating that Gd contrast administration remains essential for an optimal assessment. (orig.)

  20. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowbotham, Emma L.; Freeston, Jane E.; Emery, Paul; Grainger, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was recorded alongside MCP joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis and ulnar drift. Twenty-one (47.7 %) patients with RA showed interosseous tendon tenosynovitis. Fifty-two (14.8 %) interosseous tendons showed tenosynovitis amongst the RA patients. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more commonly seen in association with adjacent MCP joint synovitis (p < 0.001), but nine MCP joints (5.1 %) showed adjacent interosseous tenosynovitis in the absence of joint synovitis. Interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was more frequently seen in fingers which also showed flexor tendon tenosynovitis (p < 0.001) and in patients with ulnar drift of the fingers (p = 0.01). Tenosynovitis of the hand interosseous tendons was found in 47.7 % of patients with RA. In the majority of cases this was adjacent to MCP joint synovitis; however, interosseous tendon tenosynovitis was also seen in isolation. (orig.)

  1. Contrast-enhanced MRI features in the early diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den; Dolman, Koert M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether clinical, laboratory or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measures differentiate Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) from other forms of active childhood arthritis. We prospectively collected data of 80 treatment-naive patients clinically suspected of JIA with active non-infectious arthritis of (at least) one knee for <12 months duration. Upon presentation patients underwent clinical and laboratory assessments and contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI was not used as a diagnostic criterion. Forty-four (55 %) patients were clinically diagnosed with JIA, whereas in 36 (45 %) patients the diagnosis of JIA was discarded on clinical or laboratory findings. MRI-based synovitis was present in 27 (61.4 %) JIA patients and in 7 (19.4 %) non-JIA patients (P < 0.001). Five factors (male gender, physician's global assessment of overall disease activity, joints with limited range of motion, HLA-B27, MRI-based synovitis) were associated with the onset of JIA. In multivariate analysis MRI-based synovitis proved to be independently associated with JIA (OR 6.58, 95 % CI 2.36-18.33). In patients with MRI-based synovitis, the RR of having JIA was 3.16 (95 % CI 1.6-6.4). The presence of MRI-based synovitis is associated with the clinical onset of JIA. Physical examination could be supported by MRI, particularly to contribute in the early differentiation of different forms of non-infectious childhood arthritis. (orig.)

  2. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naredo, Esperanza

    2011-09-01

    This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability of ultrasound detecting and scoring synovitis in different joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); (2) systematic review of previous ultrasound scoring systems of synovitis in RA; (3) enthesitis systematic review and Delphi definition exercise in spondyloarthritis enthesitis; (4) enthesitis intra- and interobserver reliability exercise; and (5) Delphi definition exercise in hand osteoarthritis, and reliability exercises. Study conclusions were discussed, and a future research agenda was approved, notably further validation of an OMERACT ultrasound global synovitis score (GLOSS) in RA, emphasizing the importance of testing feasibility, predictive value, and added value over standard clinical variables. Future research areas will include validating scoring systems for enthesitis and osteoarthritis, and testing the metric qualities of ultrasound for evaluating tenosynovitis and structural damage in RA.

  3. Monitoring anti-TNF{alpha} treatment in RA: Responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography of the dominant wrist compared to conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, Hilde Berner

    2008-01-01

    months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means (SRM). Accepted thresholds were applied to classify responsiveness as trivial, low, moderate or good. RESULTS: MRI synovitis (SRM between -0.79 and -0.92) and the MRI total inflammation score comprising synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone...... marrow edema (SRM between -1.05 and -1.24) were highly responsive. Moderate to high responsiveness was found for MRI tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, all the composite indices (DAS28, SDAI and CDAI) and the 28-swollen joint count. US displayed low to moderate responsiveness. The MRI erosion score...... was a composite measure comprising MRI synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, and this may be a promising outcome measure in clinical studies....

  4. The OMERACT ultrasound task force--status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; Wakefield, Richard J; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2011-01-01

    - and interobserver reliability exercise; and (5) Delphi definition exercise in hand osteoarthritis, and reliability exercises. Study conclusions were discussed, and a future research agenda was approved, notably further validation of an OMERACT ultrasound global synovitis score (GLOSS) in RA, emphasizing......This article reports the most recent work of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Task Force, and highlights the future research priorities discussed at the OMERACT 10 meeting. Results of the following studies were presented: (1) intra- and interobserver reliability...... of ultrasound detecting and scoring synovitis in different joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); (2) systematic review of previous ultrasound scoring systems of synovitis in RA; (3) enthesitis systematic review and Delphi definition exercise in spondyloarthritis enthesitis; (4) enthesitis intra...

  5. Value of ultrasonography as a marker of early response to abatacept in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to methotrexate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Wakefield, Richard J; Berner-Hammer, Hilde

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the responsiveness of a combined power Doppler and greyscale ultrasound (PDUS) score for assessing synovitis in biologic-naïve patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) starting abatacept plus methotrexate (MTX). METHODS: In this open-label, multicentre, single-arm study......, patients with RA (MTX inadequate responders) received intravenous abatacept (∼10 mg/kg) plus MTX for 24 weeks. A composite PDUS synovitis score, developed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-European League Against Rheumatism (OMERACT-EULAR)-Ultrasound Task Force, was used to evaluate individual joints......-week treatment period. The earliest PDUS sign of improvement in synovitis was at week 1 (mean change in GLOESS (MCPs 2-5): -0.7 (95% CIs -1.2 to -0.1)), with continuous improvement to week 24. Early improvement was observed in the component scores (power Doppler signal at week 1, synovial hyperplasia...

  6. Study of radiation synovectomy using 188Re-sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gang; Li Peiyong; Jiang Xufeng; Zhang Liying; Wang Xuefeng; Sun Zhenming; Zhang Huan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the radiation synovectomy with 188 Re-sulfide. Methods: Thirty cases were divided into 2 groups, the group with hemophilia and the group with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with joint synovitis were injected different doses of 188 Re-sulfide, 222 - 444 MBq intra-articular. MRI was taken before and 3 - 6 months after the radiation synovectomy to evaluate the treatment efficacy, and the symptoms were also evaluated. Results: MRI study showed that after the treatment the synovium became thiner and the edema was reduced in the lesioned joint. The symptoms were improved with the pain relieved and duration of intra-articular hemorrhage reduced. Conclusions: Radiation synovectomy using 188 Re-sulfide has effects on synovitis. It can be used clinically to improve the symptoms of joint synovitis and reduce the duration of intra-articular hemorrhage

  7. Preliminary validation of 2 magnetic resonance image scoring systems for osteoarthritis of the hip according to the OMERACT filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Cibere, Jolanda; Loeuille, Damien; Weber, Ulrich; Zubler, Veronika; Roemer, Frank W; Jaremko, Jacob L; Sayre, Eric C; Lambert, Robert G W

    2014-02-01

    Development of a validated magnetic resonance image (MRI) scoring system is essential in hip OA because radiographs are insensitive to change. We assessed the feasibility and reliability of 2 previously developed scoring methods: (1) the Hip Inflammation MRI Scoring System (HIMRISS) and (2) the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring System (HOAMS). Six readers (3 radiologists, 3 rheumatologists) participated in 2 reading exercises. In Reading Exercise 1, MRI of the hip of 20 subjects were read at a single time point followed by further standardization of methodology. In Reading Exercise 2, MRI of the hip of 18 subjects from a randomized controlled trial, assessed at 2 timepoints, and 27 subjects from a cross-sectional study were read for HIMRISS and HOAMS bone marrow lesions (BML) and synovitis. Reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa statistics. Both methods were considered feasible. For Reading 1, HIMRISS ICC were 0.52, 0.61, 0.70, and 0.58 for femoral BML, acetabular BML, effusion, and total scores, respectively; and for HOAMS, summed BML and synovitis ICC were 0.52 and 0.46, respectively. For Reading 2, HIMRISS and HOAMS ICC for BML and synovitis-effusion improved substantially. Interobserver reliability for change scores was 0.81 and 0.71 for HIMRISS femoral and HOAMS summed BML, respectively. Responsiveness and discrimination was moderate to high for synovitis-effusion. Significant associations were noted between BML or synovitis scores and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index pain scores for baseline values (p ≤ 0.001). The BML and synovitis-effusion components of both HIMRISS and HOAMS scoring systems are feasible and reliable, and should be validated further.

  8. Associations between MRI-defined structural pathology and generalized and localized knee pain - the Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaukinen, P; Podlipská, J; Guermazi, A; Niinimäki, J; Lehenkari, P; Roemer, F W; Nieminen, M T; Koski, J M; Arokoski, J P A; Saarakkala, S

    2016-09-01

    To determine the associations between multi-feature structural pathology assessed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the presence of knee pain, and to determine the associations between the locations of structural changes and different knee pain patterns. Eighty symptomatic subjects with knee pain and suspicion or diagnosis of knee OA and 63 asymptomatic subjects underwent knee MRI. Severity of structural changes was graded by MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) in separate knee locations. The associations between cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), osteophytes, Hoffa's synovitis, effusion-synovitis, meniscal damage and structural pathologies in ligaments, tendons and bursas and both the presence of pain and the knee pain patterns were assessed. The presence of Hoffa's synovitis (adjusted RR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-1.3) and osteophytes in any region (2.07, 1.19-3.60) was significantly associated with the presence of pain. Any Hoffa's synovitis was associated with patellar pain (adjusted RR 4.70, 95% CI 1.19-3.60) and moderate-to-severe Hoffa's synovitis with diffuse pain (2.25, 1.13-4.50). Medial knee pain was associated with cartilage loss in the medial tibia (adjusted RR 2.66, 95% CI 1.22-5.80), osteophytes in the medial tibia (2.66, 1.17-6.07) and medial femur (2.55, 1.07-6.09), medial meniscal maceration (2.20, 1.01-4.79) and anterior meniscal extrusions (2.78, 1.14-6.75). Hoffa's synovitis and osteophytes were strongly associated with the presence of knee pain. Medial pain was associated most often with medially located structural pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging of the knee joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbert, Fabian; Sauer, Alexander; Koestler, Herbert [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Holl-Wieden, Annette [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Paediatrics, Wuerzburg (Germany); Neubauer, Henning [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); University Hospital Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    MRI of synovitis relies on use of a gadolinium-based contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) visualises thickened synovium but is of limited use in the presence of joint effusion. To investigate the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of diffusion-weighted MRI with intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) for diagnosing synovitis in the knee joint of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Twelve consecutive children with confirmed or suspected juvenile idiopathic arthritis (10 girls, median age 11 years) underwent MRI with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging and DWI at 1.5 T. Read-out segmented multi-shot DWI was acquired at b values of 0 s/mm{sup 2}, 200 s/mm{sup 2}, 400 s/mm{sup 2} and 800 s/mm{sup 2}. We calculated the IVIM parameters perfusion fraction (f) and tissue diffusion coefficient (D). Diffusion-weighted images at b=800 s/mm{sup 2}, f parameter maps and post-contrast T1-weighted images were retrospectively assessed by two independent readers for synovitis using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system. Seven (58%) children showed synovial hypertrophy on contrast-enhanced imaging. Diagnostic ratings for synovitis on DWI and on f maps were fully consistent with contrast-enhanced imaging, the diagnostic reference. Two children had equivocal low-confidence assessments on DWI. Median f was 6.7±2.0% for synovitis, 2.1±1.2% for effusion, 5.0±1.0% for muscle and 10.6±5.7% for popliteal lymph nodes. Diagnostic confidence was higher based on f maps in three (25%) children and lower in one child (8%), as compared to DWI. DWI with IVIM reliably visualises synovitis of the knee joint. Perfusion fraction maps differentiate thickened synovium from joint effusion and hence increase diagnostic confidence. (orig.)

  10. Responsiveness in rheumatoid arthritis. a report from the OMERACT 11 ultrasound workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Wakefield, Richard; Bruyn, George A W; Collado, Paz; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Finzel, Stephanie; Ohrndorf, Sarah; Delle Sedie, Andrea; Backhaus, Marina; Berner-Hammer, Hilde; Gandjbakhch, Frederique; Kaeley, Gurjit; Loeuille, Damien; Moller, Ingrid; Terslev, Lene; Aegerter, Philippe; Aydin, Sibel; Balint, Peter V; Filippucci, Emilio; Mandl, Peter; Pineda, Carlos; Roth, Johannes; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Tzaribachev, Niolay; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Conaghan, Philip G; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2014-02-01

    To summarize the work performed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound (US) Task Force on the validity of different US measures in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presented during the OMERACT 11 Workshop. The Task Force is an international group aiming to iteratively improve the role of US in arthritis clinical trials. Recently a major focus of the group has been the assessment of responsiveness of a person-level US synovitis score in RA: the US Global Synovitis Score (US-GLOSS) combines synovial hypertrophy and power Doppler signal in a composite score detected at joint level. Work has also commenced examining assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and the role of US in JIA. The US-GLOSS was tested in a large RA cohort treated with biologic therapy. It showed early signs of improvement in synovitis starting at Day 7 and increasing to Month 6, and demonstrated sensitivity to change of the proposed grading. Subsequent voting questions concerning the application of the US-GLOSS were endorsed by > 80% of OMERACT delegates. A standardized US scoring system for detecting and grading severity of RA tenosynovitis and tendon damage has been developed, and acceptable reliability data were presented from a series of exercises. A preliminary consensus definition of US synovitis in pediatric arthritis has been developed and requires further testing. At OMERACT 11, consensus was achieved on the application of the US-GLOSS for evaluating synovitis in RA; and work continues on development of RA tenosynovitis scales as well as in JIA synovitis.

  11. Uncoupling of collagen II metabolism in newly diagnosed, untreated rheumatoid arthritis is linked to inflammation and antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Christgau, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    . METHODS: One hundred sixty patients with newly diagnosed, untreated RA entered the Cyclosporine, Methotrexate, Steroid in RA (CIMESTRA) trial. Disease activity and radiograph status were measured at baseline and 4 years. The N-terminal propeptide of collagen IIA (PIIANP) and the cross-linked C...... associations of collagen II anabolism (PIIANP) and collagen II degradation (CTX-II) with anti-CCP, synovitis, and radiographic progression indicate that at this early stage of RA, cartilage collagen degradation is mainly driven by synovitis, while anti-CCP antibodies may interfere with cartilage regeneration...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of synovial inflammation of the hindfoot in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillefert, Jean Francis E-mail: jean-francis.maillefert@chu-dijon.fr; Dardel, Pascal; Cherasse, Anne; Mistrih, Rami; Krause, Denis; Tavernier, Christian

    2003-07-01

    Objectives: To describe the localisation of synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hindfoot observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis, and to correlate the findings of physical examination and MRI. Methods: Patients with chronic polyarthritis, and one or two painful hindfoot were included. On physical examination and on MRI, the tibio-talar, talo-calcaneal, and talo-navicular and calcaneo-cuboidal joints were adjudged to have or not synovitis, and the tibialis anterior and posterior, the peroneus longus and brevis, the flector digitorum and hallucis longus tendons to have or not tenosynovitis. Criteria for synovitis and tenosynovitis were a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection, in the joint area, and around the tendon, respectively. The correlation between the findings of physical examination and those of MRI were evaluated using the Kappa statistics. Results: 12 patients (three men, nine women, mean age of 55.5 years{+-}11.4 S.D.) with chronic polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA): nine, ankylosing spondylitis: one; psoriatic arthritis: one, unclassified: one) were included. All presented with one (7 patients) or two (5 patients) painful hindfeet (and swelling for 16 out of 17 hindfeet). On physical examination, 25 joints and eight tendons were adjudged to have synovitis and tenosynovitis. MRI showed synovitis in 12 out of 25 of these joints (48%), and tenosynovotis in three out of eight of these tendons (37.5%). Moreover, MRI showed ten and seven clinically unsuspected synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. The proportion of agreements between physical examination and MRI were 54.9% (kappa=0.1) and 88.2% (kappa=0.27) for synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. Conclusion: A weak correlation was observed between the findings of physical examination and MRI in patients with chronic polyarthritis and a painful hindfoot. MRI

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of synovial inflammation of the hindfoot in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other polyarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillefert, Jean Francis; Dardel, Pascal; Cherasse, Anne; Mistrih, Rami; Krause, Denis; Tavernier, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the localisation of synovitis and tenosynovitis of the hindfoot observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with chronic polyarthritis, and to correlate the findings of physical examination and MRI. Methods: Patients with chronic polyarthritis, and one or two painful hindfoot were included. On physical examination and on MRI, the tibio-talar, talo-calcaneal, and talo-navicular and calcaneo-cuboidal joints were adjudged to have or not synovitis, and the tibialis anterior and posterior, the peroneus longus and brevis, the flector digitorum and hallucis longus tendons to have or not tenosynovitis. Criteria for synovitis and tenosynovitis were a high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, a low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and enhancement after Gd-DTPA injection, in the joint area, and around the tendon, respectively. The correlation between the findings of physical examination and those of MRI were evaluated using the Kappa statistics. Results: 12 patients (three men, nine women, mean age of 55.5 years±11.4 S.D.) with chronic polyarthritis (rheumatoid arthritis (RA): nine, ankylosing spondylitis: one; psoriatic arthritis: one, unclassified: one) were included. All presented with one (7 patients) or two (5 patients) painful hindfeet (and swelling for 16 out of 17 hindfeet). On physical examination, 25 joints and eight tendons were adjudged to have synovitis and tenosynovitis. MRI showed synovitis in 12 out of 25 of these joints (48%), and tenosynovotis in three out of eight of these tendons (37.5%). Moreover, MRI showed ten and seven clinically unsuspected synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. The proportion of agreements between physical examination and MRI were 54.9% (kappa=0.1) and 88.2% (kappa=0.27) for synovitis and tenosynovitis, respectively. Conclusion: A weak correlation was observed between the findings of physical examination and MRI in patients with chronic polyarthritis and a painful hindfoot. MRI

  14. Knee arthroscopy after yttrium or osmic acid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guaydier-Souquieres, C.; Beguin, J.; Ollivier, D.; Loyau, G.

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the macroscopic and histologic results of 35 knee arthroscopies performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis, some months after an yttrium or osmic acid intraarticular injection. The procedure was most often performed after a failure of the injection or a relapse of synovitis. Arthroscopy provides an understanding of the cause of synoviorthesis failure--insufficient action of the product on the synovitis or its poor diffusion, fibri-nonecrotic deposits, or cartilaginous lesions--and may be used both diagnostically and therapeutically

  15. MR imaging of knee arthritides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, D.W.; Genant, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    T1- and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in five patients with hemophilia, 19 patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, two patients with adult rheumatoid arthritis, four patients with pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and one patient with lyme arthritis, synovial osteochondromatosis, and Glanzman thrombocytopenia. Pannus formation in synovial hypertrophy imaged low to intermediate in signal intensity on T1- and T2-weighted images. Hemosiderin deposits in PVNS and hemophilia maintained low signal intensity regardless of the pulsing sequence. Early articular erosions and synovitis with irregularity of Hoffa infrapatellar fat pad were detected at an earlier stage and more accurately by MR

  16. Exploring a new ultrasound score as a clinical predictive tool in patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting abatacept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta; Boers, Maarten; Wakefield, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To explore whether changes in a composite ( power Doppler/greyscale ultrasound (PDUS)) synovitis score, developed by the OMERACT-EULAR-Ultrasound Task Force, predict disease activity outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA who were methotrexate inadequate...

  17. [Epiphyseal osteoid osteoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villas, C; Garbayo, A J; Martínez Denegri, J; Cañadell, J

    1990-01-01

    Three more cases of osteoid osteoma located in epiphysis are presented. All of them had special features, as a reactive synovitis due to the proximity of the lesion to the joint and the lower movility arch of these joints. The x-ray was essential for the diagnosis and definitive treatment was surgical resection.

  18. Joint Involvement in Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome: An Ultrasound “Target Area Approach to Arthritis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Amezcua-Guerra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize the ultrasound (US pattern of joint involvement in primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. Methods. Seventeen patients with pSS, 18 with secondary Sjögren’s syndrome (sSS, and 17 healthy controls underwent US examinations of various articular regions. Synovitis (synovial hypertrophy/joint effusion, power Doppler (PD signals, and erosions were assessed. Results. In patients with pSS, synovitis was found in the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCP, 76%, wrists (76%, and knees (76%, while the proximal interphalangeal joints, elbows, and ankles were mostly unscathed. Intra-articular PD signals were occasionally detected in wrists (12%, elbows (6%, and knees (6%. Erosions were evident in the wrists of three (18% patients with pSS, one of these also having anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies. While US synovitis does not discriminate between sSS and pSS, demonstration of bone erosions in the 2nd MCP joints showed 28.8% sensitivity and 100% specificity for diagnosing sSS; in comparison, these figures were 72.2 and 94.1% for circulating anti-CCP antibodies. Conclusions. In pSS, the pattern of joint involvement by US is polyarticular, bilateral, and symmetrical. Synovitis is the US sign most commonly found in patients with pSS, especially in MCP joints, wrists, and knees, and bone erosions also may occur.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of methanol extracts of hemp leaf in IL-1β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the effectiveness of some hemp (Canabis sativa) leaf extracts as an antiinflammatory agent on synovitis in vitro. Methods: Synovial fibroblast cell line SW982 was induced with 5 ng/mL of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β) to trigger cellular inflammation. The cells were then treated with prepared extracts of hemp ...

  20. EULAR definition of arthralgia suspicious for progression to rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Aletaha, Daniel; Beaart-van de Voorde, Liesbeth J J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the transition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) many patients pass through a phase characterised by the presence of symptoms without clinically apparent synovitis. These symptoms are not well-characterised. This taskforce aimed to define the clinical characteristics of patients wit...

  1. Microbiology and pathology of fibrinous pericarditis in Danish slaughter pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, J.; Friis, N.F.; Aalbaek, B.

    1997-01-01

    . Parvovirus was found in one case in the pericardium and in two cases in the spleen. Forty-five cases mere subacute co chronic. The gross pathological examination showed that bronchopneumonia, chronic pleuritis and synovitis or a low grade arthritis occurred in most cases. Only the arthritic lesions...

  2. Scintigraphy with 99mTc labelled polyclonal human IgG in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanchev, V.; Batalov, A.; Atanasov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The study design to assess the diagnostic relevance of scintigraphy with 99m Tc labelled polyclonal human IgG (HIG) for detecting active synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Fifteen patients presenting rheumatoid arthritis and 3 healthy volunteers are studied on digital camera (Diacam, Siemens). Following iv injection of 500 MBq 99m Tc - HIG, a 3- phase scintigraphy of the knee joints is performed and 4 hours later multiple planar views of the peripheral joint are recorded. Scintigraphic data are comparatively studied with the clinical indicators pointing to active synovitis - joint swellings and pain. Markedly expressed 99m Tc - HIG uptake is noted in joints apparently the most actively involved in the arthritis process clinically, whereas most of the joints without evidence of active synovitis revealed background activity only. The obtained scintigraphic results correlate strongly with the clinical indicator joint swelling (93.2%), and somewhat less with the presence of pain (81.5%). 13.5 per cent of the joints without clinically detectable swelling and 25.6% those free of pain are HIG-positive. 99m Tc - HIG scintigraphy is a highly sensitive noninvasive method of detecting active synovitis, promoting objective assessment of the joint inflammatory process in the course of treatment and follow-up study of rheumatoid arthritis patients

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: dedicated low-field (0.25-T) versus high-field (3.0-T) MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan K.L.; Griffith, James F.; Wang, D.F.; Yeung, David K.W. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Shi, L. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Division of Neurology, Hong Kong, SAR (China); Li, Edmund K.; Tam, L.S. [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Prince Of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the assessment of wrist synovitis severity, synovial volume and synovial perfusion parameters on a dedicated low-field (0.25-T) to that of a high-field (3-T) whole-body MR system in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-one patients (mean age 50.0 ± 9.8 years) with active RA were recruited prospectively. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examination of the most severely affected wrist was performed at both 0.25 T and 3 T. Three MRI-derived parameters, synovitis severity (RAMRIS grade), synovial volume (ml{sup 3}) and synovial perfusion indices (maximum enhancement and enhancement slope), were compared. Comparing 0.25- and 3-T MRI, there was excellent agreement for semiquantitative assessment (r: 0.80, p < 0.00001) of synovitis (RAMRIS) as well as quantitative assessment (r: 0.94, p < 0.00001) of synovial volume. Good agreement for synovial Emax (r: 0.6, p = 0.002) and fair agreement (r: 0.5, p = 0.02) for synovial Eslope was found. Imaging of the RA wrist at 0.25 T yields excellent correlation with 3 T with regard to the synovitis activity score (RAMRIS) and synovial volume measurement. Fair to good correlation between low- (0.25-T) and high-field (3-T) MR systems was found for perfusion parameters, being better for Emax than for Eslope. (orig.)

  4. Is early rheumatoid arthritis the same disease process as late rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tak, P. P.

    2001-01-01

    Thoughts on treatment for the early control of synovitis have stimulated research on pathobiological events at the site of inflammation in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis. Several studies have thus been conducted to examine synovial biopsy samples at various stages of the disease. The most

  5. Relationship of patient-reported outcomes with MRI measures in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Joshua F; Conaghan, Philip G.; Emery, Paul

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed whether MRI measures of synovitis, osteitis and bone erosion were associated with patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in a longitudinal clinical trial setting among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: This longitudinal cohort of 291 patients with RA was derived from...

  6. Overview of the radiology of connective tissue disorders in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlon, R.; King, S

    2000-02-01

    This review article describes the imaging finding of the connective tissue disorders in children. The radiological features of the following conditions are described; the spondyloarthropathics, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, scleroderma, the vasculitides, Kawasaki disease, synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO), and focal myositis. The features on several integrated imaging techniques are described.

  7. ISSN 2073-9990 East Cent. Afr. J. s East Cent. Afr. J. s

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Its other synonyms are pigmented villonodular tenosynovitis, fibrous histiocytoma of the synovium, tenosynovial giant cell tumour, localized nodular synovitis, benign synovioma and fibrous xanthoma of the synovium. The recurrence rates have been shown to be as high as 45% in some series 11,12. In our series all tumours ...

  8. Distribution pattern of MRI abnormalities within the knee and wrist of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients: signature of disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Schonenberg, Dieneke; Dolman, Koert M.; van Rossum, Marion A. J.; van den Berg, J. Merlijn; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Maas, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study in clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) was to assess the frequency and distribution pattern of synovitis as hallmark of disease and additional soft-tissue and bony abnormalities on MRI in the knee and wrist as two target joints. MRI datasets of 153 clinically

  9. Rice body formation in bicipito-radial bursitis: ultrasound, CT, and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spence, L.D.; Adams, J.; Eustace, S.; Gibbons, D.; Mason, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    The bicipito-radial bursa, which lies at the biceps tendon insertion on the radial tuberosity, is a rare site of chronic bursitis. We describe the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings in a case complicated by multiple rice body formation. In so doing, we describe MR appearances that allow discrimination of this entity from both synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis. (orig.)

  10. Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Interspinous FDG Uptake on PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, H.; Raijmakers, P.G.H.M.; Smulders, Y.M.

    2012-01-01

    Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is an inflammatory disease with macrophage infiltration and CD4 T-lymphocytes-related mild synovitis commonly causing neck, shoulder, and hip stiffness in patients older than 50 years. Closely related to giant cell arthritis (GCA), PMR symptoms can be similar to

  11. Case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    15 mars 2016 ... Médecine et Chirurgie du Pied. 2011; 27(4):106-108. PubMed | Google Scholar. 2. Jaffe HL, Lichtenstein L, Sutro CJ. Pigmented villonodularsynovitis,bursitis and tenosynovitis. Archives. Pathology.1941;31(3):731-765. PubMed | Google Scholar. 3. Myers BW, Masi AT. Pigmented villonodular synovitis and.

  12. CASE REPORT CASE Atypical tuberculosis of the knee joint CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRI of TB arthritis can present with a wide range of findings.2. These include bone marrow oedema, synovitis, cartilage/bony destruc- tion, myositis, cellulitis, granulation tissue, abscess-fistula, tenosynovitis, bursitis, fibrosis, etc.2. Findings which should alert one to the possibility of TB include. T1WI hyperintense soft tissue, ...

  13. Locomotor diseases among male long-haul truck drivers and other professional drivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Kaerlev, Linda; Tüchsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    -249) and for other truck drivers (SHR: 130, 95% CI: 108-156) compared to bus drivers (SHR: 110, 95% CI: 79-149). All drivers had high SHR for lesions of the ulnar nerve (SHR: 159, 95% CI: 119-207), especially bus drivers (SHR: 197, 95% CI: 116-311). Long-haul truck drivers had high SHRs for synovitis and bursitis...

  14. [Benign tumors and pseudotumors of temporo-mandibular joint: radiologic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, L; Caputo, M; Buffone, A; Casullo, A; Perrone, A; Sassi, S; Impara, L; Luppi, G; Mazza, D; Marini, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions that involve temporo mandibular joint are very rare. Those more frequent are osteochondroma, chondroma, osteoma, pigmented villonodular synovitis and synovial chondromatosis. The Authors report six cases of patients affected by these pathologies in which imaging, such as TC, MRI and/or ortopantomography have been useful to have a diagnosis.

  15. Hand assessment with the E-Cone in rheumatoid arthritis and hand osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merendonk, N.; van Alebeek, V.; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Spreeuwers, D.; Kroon, P.J.; Roorda, L.; Dekker, J.; Hoeksma, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory, progressive disease resulting in deformities of the hand. Besides synovitis, tenosynovitis of the extrinsic flexor tendons is one of the initial features of RA, leading to friction and consequently to an imbalanced coordination of the

  16. Obesity and osteoarthritis, more than just wear and tear: pivotal roles for inflamed adipose tissue and dyslipidaemia in obesity-induced osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, E.; Caam, A.P. van; Kraan, P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    OA is a degenerative joint disease characterized by articular cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, synovitis, and subchondral bone sclerosis. One of OAs main risk factors is obesity. To date, it is not fully understood how obesity results in OA. Historically, this link was ascribed to

  17. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubassove, Olga; Boesen, Mikael; Cimmino, Marco A

    2009-01-01

    and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA...

  18. Musculoskeletal ultrasound on the hand and wrist in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Ultrasound was more accurate than clinical examination and conventional radiography in the detection of subclinical synovitis, tenosynovitis, and the underlying fibrotic changes of tendon friction rub. In SSc patients, on using MSUS, articular involvement was found to be less frequent compared with that in RA patients, with specific appearance of sclerosing tenosynovitis in SSc patients.

  19. MRI quantification of rheumatoid arthritis: current knowledge and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Østergaard, Mikkel; Cimmino, Marco A

    2009-01-01

    for detecting and quantifying joint damage in RA. However, radiographs only show late disease manifestations as joint space narrowing and bone erosions, whereas it cannot detect synovitis and bone marrow oedema, i.e., inflammation in the synovium or the bone, which may be visualized by magnetic resonance...

  20. Rotator cuff degeneration in the rheumatoid shoulder : 'the issue is soft tissue'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sande, Michiel Adrianus Josephus van de

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that shoulder pain, caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), can lead to disuse of the affected shoulder joint. In addition to the structural changes caused by rotator cuff tears, tendonitis or synovitis disuse may play an important role in the aetiology of fatty degeneration (FD) of the

  1. Locomotion and muscle mass measures in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, A.; Hulsman, J.; Garssen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by chronic poly-arthritis, synovial hyperplasia, erosive synovitis, progressive cartilage and bone destruction accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in the skeletal muscle and

  2. Etiología del quiste óseo unicameral

    OpenAIRE

    Gascó Gómez, J.; Pino Ortiz, J. M. del

    1986-01-01

    A 6 year-old gírl with a solitary unicameral cyst is reported. Three months before the patient had been diagnosticated of transient synovitis of the hip with a normal X-Ray pieture. This retrospective foIlouw-up suggests the tumor vascular theory.

  3. EULAR definition of arthralgia suspicious for progression to rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Aletaha, Daniel; Beaart-van de Voorde, Liesbeth J J; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Codreanu, Catalin; Combe, Bernard; Fonseca, João E; Hetland, Merete L; Humby, Frances; Kvien, Tore K; Niedermann, Karin; Nuño, Laura; Oliver, Sue; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Raza, Karim; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Schett, Georg; De Smet, Liesbeth; Szücs, Gabriella; Vencovský, Jirí; Wiland, Piotr; de Wit, Maarten; Landewé, Robert L; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    BACKGROUND: During the transition to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) many patients pass through a phase characterised by the presence of symptoms without clinically apparent synovitis. These symptoms are not well-characterised. This taskforce aimed to define the clinical characteristics of patients with

  4. Social Media Empowerment (III)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cox

    2011-01-01

    full text via link. Synovate heeft de afgelopen twee jaar onderzoek verricht op dit terrein. Anita Cox, Emile Rikken en Stephan van Velthoven zetten op basis daarvan zaken op een rij in een serie van 5 artikelen, hier op Molblog te lezen. In dit artikel staat brand-building via social media

  5. Overview of the radiology of connective tissue disorders in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, R.; King, S.

    2000-01-01

    This review article describes the imaging finding of the connective tissue disorders in children. The radiological features of the following conditions are described; the spondyloarthropathics, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, scleroderma, the vasculitides, Kawasaki disease, synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, osteitis (SAPHO), and focal myositis. The features on several integrated imaging techniques are described

  6. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells contribute to synovial inflammation in spondylarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordenbos, Troy; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Gofita, Ioana; van de Sande, Marleen; Tak, Paul P.; Caňete, Juan D.; Baeten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Objective Studies comparing spondylarthritis (SpA) to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis suggest that innate immune cells may play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of SpA. Recent observations have indicated a marked synovial mast cell infiltration in psoriatic SpA. We therefore undertook the

  7. Ultrasonography of the painful hip in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.F. Robben (Simon)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractThere are many diseases in childhood that affect the hip joint. Some diseases are systemic in origin and initially may present themselves as hip disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis. other diseases are localized specifically in the hip joint, such as transient synovitis and Perthes'

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis As a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Events Following Hospitalized Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland-Fischer, Mette; Tarp, Ulrik; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Purpose: AxSpA and PsA are core members of the spondyloarthritis complex. One cardinal characteristic shared by these two conditions is increased remodeling of bone and soft connective tissue in and around peripheral joints, axial skeleton and entheseal insertions leading to synovitis,...

  9. 21 CFR 558.415 - Novobiocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... susceptible to novobiocin; treatment of acute outbreaks of fowl cholera caused by strains of Pasteurella... lb. body weight per day. (a) Indications for use. Aid in the treatment of breast blisters associated.... body weight per day. (a) Indications for use. Treatment of staphylococcal synovitis and generalized...

  10. [New methodological aspects in the use of cryotherapy, ultrasound, magnetotherapy and therapeutic physical exercise in the rehabilitation of gonarthrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, V D; Fedorova, N E

    1996-01-01

    Gonarthritis complicated by synovitis was treated by cryo-ultrasound or cryo-magnetotherapy in combination with therapeutic exercise. The comparison of the response has shown that both complexes are highly effective. In the absence of concomitant diseases and contraindications to ultrasound it is better to use cryo-ultrasound and exercise, otherwise cryo-magnetotherapy and exercise is preferential.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  12. Significance of magnetic resonance imaging for early rheumatoid arthritis activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Y Pogozeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess possibility of magnetic resonance image (MRI application for rheu- matoid arthritis (RA activity and severity assessment.Material and methods. 100 pts with RA who fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria with disease duration less than 12 months were included. Standard clinical examination with evaluation of tender and swollen joint counts, acute phase markers, hand and foot X-ray and hand MRI with 0,2 T Artoscan apparatus (ESAOTE Biomedica, Italy were performed.Results. MRI showed hand joint synovitis in 94,5%, erosions – in 67,3% of cases. X-ray examination revealed erosions in only 20,8% of pts. Localization of erosions revealed by X-ray and MRI coincided in 36,4% of cases and in 61,8% of pts erosions were detected only by MRI. MRI confirmed clinical conclusion about presence or absence of metacarpophalangeal and wrist joint synovitis in 64,5% and 74,5% of cases respectively. In8,2% and 21,8% MRI revealed signs of synovitis in clinically intact joints. MRI synovitis score correlated with clinical and laboratory measures of disease activity – DAS 28 (r=0,37, p=0,001, CRP(r=0,30, p=0,001, ESR (r=0,42, p=0,001, HAQ (r=0,24, p=0,001. Weak correlation was revealed between ESR and presence of erosions (r=0,29, CRP, ESR and MRI signs of bone marrow edema (r=0,27, p=0,005 and r=0,29, p=0,002 respectively. Relationship between laboratory and clinical features was weaker and referred only to CRP level and swollen joint count (p=0,05.Conclusion. MRI signs may be used as additional and independent measures of inflammatory activity (particularly synovitis score and severity of RA

  13. Hydroxychloroquine effectiveness in reducing symptoms of hand osteoarthritis (HERO): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis, causing significant joint pain and disability. It is already a major cause of healthcare expenditure and its incidence will further increase with the ageing population. Current treatments for OA have major limitations and new analgesic treatments are needed. Synovitis is prevalent in OA and is associated with pain. Hydroxychloroquine is used in routine practice for treating synovitis in inflammatory arthritides, such as rheumatoid arthritis. We propose that treating patients with symptomatic hand OA with hydroxychloroquine will be a practical and safe treatment to reduce synovitis and pain. Methods/design HERO is an investigator-initiated, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 252 subjects with symptomatic hand OA will be recruited across primary and secondary care sites in the UK and randomized on a 1:1 basis to active treatment or placebo for 12 months. Daily medication dose will range from 200 to 400 mg according to ideal body weight. The primary endpoint is change in average hand pain during the previous two weeks (measured on a numerical rating scale (NRS)) between baseline and six months. Secondary endpoints include other self-reported pain, function and quality-of-life measures and radiographic structural change at 12 months. A health economics analysis will also be performed. An ultrasound substudy will be conducted to examine baseline levels of synovitis. Linear and logistic regression will be used to compare changes between groups using univariable and multivariable modelling analyses. All analyses will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Discussion The HERO trial is designed to examine whether hydroxychloroquine is an effective analgesic treatment for OA and whether it provides any long-term structural benefit. The ultrasound substudy will address whether baseline synovitis is a predictor of therapeutic response. This will potentially

  14. Pain sensation in human osteoarthritic knee joints is strongly enhanced by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitner, Annett; Pester, Julia; Vogel, Franziska; Marintschev, Ivan; Lehmann, Thomas; Hofmann, Gunther O; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2017-09-01

    The major burden of knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) is pain. Since in elder patients diabetes mellitus is an important comorbidity of OA, we explored whether the presence of diabetes mellitus has a significant influence on pain intensity at the end stage of knee OA, and we aimed to identify factors possibly related to changes of pain intensity in diabetic patients. In 23 diabetic and 47 nondiabetic patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty, we assessed the pain intensity before the operation using the "Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score". Furthermore, synovial tissue, synovial fluid (SF), cartilage, and blood were obtained. We determined the synovitis score, the concentrations of prostaglandin E2 and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the SF and serum, and of C-reactive protein and HbA1c and other metabolic parameters in the serum. We performed multivariate regression analyses to study the association of pain with several parameters. Diabetic patients had on average a higher Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score pain score than nondiabetic patients (P Knee joints from diabetic patients exhibited on average higher synovitis scores (P = 0.024) and higher concentrations of IL-6 in the SF (P = 0.003) than knee joints from nondiabetic patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed that patients with higher synovitis scores had more intense pain independent of all investigated confounders, and that the positive association between pain intensities and IL-6 levels was dependent on diabetes mellitus and/or synovitis. These data suggest that diabetes mellitus significantly increases pain intensity of knee OA, and that in diabetic patients higher pain intensities were determined by stronger synovitis.

  15. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxfield, W. S. [Dept, of Radiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States); Weiss, T. E.; Tutton, R. H.; Hidalgo, J. U. [Ochsner Clinic and Ochsner Foundation Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1969-05-15

    Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, {sup 131}I human serum albumin (25 {mu}Ci/10 lb), {sup 99m}Tc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), {sup 131}I iodipamide (40 {mu}Ci/10 lb), and {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate and an Anger camera have made joint scanning a practical technique for clinical use. A review of the accuracy of joint scanning in 130 cases as compared to roentgenograms is presented. (author)

  16. La influencia de la superficie articular y la membrana sinovial en la evolución de pacientes afectos por bloqueo crónico de la articulación temporomandibular tratados mediante artroscopia Influence of the joint surface and the synovial membrane on the evolution of patients affected by chronic temporomandibular joint block who were treated with arthroscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. González-García

    2010-03-01

    joints met the criteria for chronic block of the TMJ. One hundred and seventy-two patients with unilateral affectation were selected for this study. Synovitis and chondromalacia are the parameters chosen to evaluate the synovitis membrane and joint surface, respectively. Two groups of patients were formed: a patients with light affectation: level I/II synovitis and level I/II chondromalacia, and b patients with severe affectation: level III/IV synovitis and level III/ IV chondromalacia. The dependent variables were pain and interincisal maximum oral opening (MOO. All of the patients had post operative follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The "t" Student test was used before and after surgery to match evidence to compare the average values of visual analogical scale (VAS and function (MOO. The "t" Student test was used for independent samples to compare the different groups that were established. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Level I/II synovitis was seen using arthroscopy in 87 (50.58% patients, and level III/ IV synovitis was seen in 54 (31.39% of patients, while level I/II chondromalacia was observed in 66 (38.37% patients and level III/IV chondromalacia was observed in 54 (31.39%. During the follow-up period a significant decrease in pain and a parallel increase in oral opening were observed after arthroscopy in patients affected by level I/II and III/IV synovitis and level I/II and III/IV chondromalacia. There was a significant statistical difference in relation to observed pain in patients with level I/II synovitis and in patients with level III/IV synovitis in the sixth month after surgery. However this difference did not continue in the rest of the follow-up period. Nor were there any statistical differences related to the MOO related to synovitis during follow-up. There were no differences in pain or oral opening between patients with level I/II chondromalacia and patients with level III/IV chondromalacia at any time

  17. The SAPHO syndrome revisited with an emphasis on spinal manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Casale, Roberto; Magarelli, Nicola; Semprini, Alessia; Colosimo, Cesare [Catholic University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Shropshire, England (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome includes a group of chronic, relapsing, inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders with similar manifestations, in particular synovitis, hyperostosis, and osteitis, which may or may not be associated with neutrophilic skin eruptions such as palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. The syndrome occurs at any age, can involve any skeletal site, and its imaging appearances are variable, depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. The diagnosis is difficult if there is no skin disease. Awareness of the imaging appearances, especially in the spine, may help the radiologist in avoiding misdiagnosis (e.g., infection, tumor) and unnecessary invasive procedures, while facilitating early diagnosis and selection of an effective treatment. In this article, we provide an overview of the radiological appearances of SAPHO syndrome, focusing on the magnetic resonance imaging findings of vertebral involvement, and present relevant clinical and pathological features that assist early diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. The SAPHO syndrome revisited with an emphasis on spinal manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Casale, Roberto; Magarelli, Nicola; Semprini, Alessia; Colosimo, Cesare; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N.

    2015-01-01

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome includes a group of chronic, relapsing, inflammatory musculoskeletal disorders with similar manifestations, in particular synovitis, hyperostosis, and osteitis, which may or may not be associated with neutrophilic skin eruptions such as palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. The syndrome occurs at any age, can involve any skeletal site, and its imaging appearances are variable, depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. The diagnosis is difficult if there is no skin disease. Awareness of the imaging appearances, especially in the spine, may help the radiologist in avoiding misdiagnosis (e.g., infection, tumor) and unnecessary invasive procedures, while facilitating early diagnosis and selection of an effective treatment. In this article, we provide an overview of the radiological appearances of SAPHO syndrome, focusing on the magnetic resonance imaging findings of vertebral involvement, and present relevant clinical and pathological features that assist early diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Hip ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.martinoli@libero.it [Radiologia, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Garello, Isabella; Marchetti, Alessandra; Palmieri, Federigo; Altafini, Luisa [Radiologia, DISC, Università di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Valle, Maura [Radiologia, Gaslini Children Hospital, Genova (Italy); Tagliafico, Alberto [Radiologia, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    In newborns, US has an established role in the detection and management of developmental dysplasia of the hip. Later in childhood, when the limping child is a major diagnostic dilemma, US is extremely helpful in the identification of the varied disease processes underlying this condition, as transient synovitis, septic arthritis, Perthes disease and slipped femoral capital epiphysis. In adolescent practicing sporting activities, US is an excellent means to identify apophyseal injures about the pelvic ring, especially when avulsions are undisplaced and difficult-to-see radiographically. Later on, in the adulthood, US is an effective modality to diagnose tendon and muscle injuries about the hip and pelvis, identify effusion or synovitis within the hip joint or its adjacent bursae and guide the treatment of these findings. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the most common pathologic conditions about the hip, in which the contribution of US is relevant for the diagnostic work-up.

  20. Ultrasonography of the pediatric hip and spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeo Ryang; Koo, Joon Bun [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful screening method for the diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and congenital spinal anomalies in infants. In addition, US is a useful, noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of transient synovitis in children. The early detection of DDH leads to a better prognosis without surgical intervention. Moreover, spinal US allows the detection of congenital malformations and can also demonstrate normal anatomy and normal variants that may resemble disorders. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar with the sonographic anatomy of the normal infant hip, scanning and measurement techniques for DDH, the US features of transient synovitis in children, spinal US techniques, and the US features of normal anatomical structures, normal variants, and congenital spinal anomalies.

  1. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Ehara, Shigeru; Hitachi, Shin; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  2. The effect of endotoxin and anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Gottschalk

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a commercially available equine hyperimmune anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters were evaluated in an induced synovitis model in normal horses. Four groups of 3 horses each received lipopolysaccharide (LPS plus hyperimmune antiendotoxin (anti-LPS, LPS, anti-LPS, and Ringers lactate (control respectively injected into the left intercarpal joint. Synovial fluid parameters were measured at 4, 8, 24 and 72 h. It was found that anti-LPS had no attenuating effect on the LPS and that it induced a synovitis almost equivalent to that induced by LPS alone. The introduction of sterile Ringers lactate solution into the carpal joint together with repeated aseptic arthrocentesis induces a mild inflammatory response.

  3. Intra-articular morphine in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Casper

    separated by a three week washout period. Before each treatment, radiocarpal synovitis was induced by IA injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For each of the two 168-hours study periods, local and systemic measures of pain and inflammation as well as blood and synovial fluid (SF) samples...... for pharmacological analysis were obtained repeatedly. Pain was evaluated by degree of lameness as well as using a visual analogue scale of pain intensity (VAS) and a composite measure pain scale (CMPS), developed for this purpose. Intra-articular injection of LPS elicited a marked synovitis resulting in lameness...... and pain. Intra-articularly administered morphine showed a significant analgesic effect as measured by reduced lameness scores, less administered rescue analgesia and lower pain scores. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was demonstrated by reduced joint swelling, reduced SF serum amyloid A (SAA...

  4. Clinical outcome and imaging changes after intraarticular (IA) application of etanercept or methylprednisolone in rheumatoid arthritis: Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound-Doppler show no effect of IA injections in the wrist after 4 weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M.; Boesen, L.; Jensen, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) changes in the wrist of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) 4 weeks after an US guided intraarticular (IA) injection. Methods. Contrast enhanced MRI and US-Doppler were performed at baseline and 4 weeks after IA....... Conclusion. In contrast to the clinical evaluation, imaging measures of relevance for the estimation of inflammation, US-Doppler, US RI, MRI synovitis, and bone-marrow edema did not change 4 weeks after a single IA injection of either methylprednisolone or etanercept in the wrist. Within the same period...... target joint score (p 4 weeks. Baseline MRI synovitis score was mean 5.08 (range 3-9) and was unchanged at followup in the whole group (p = 0.52) and between treatment groups (p = 0.43). MRI edema score (mean 4.46, range 0...

  5. Interobserver reliability in musculoskeletal ultrasonography: results from a "Teach the Teachers" rheumatologist course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, ee.; Møller, I.; Moragues, C.

    2006-01-01

    , tendon lesions, bursitis, and power Doppler signal. Afterwards they compared the ultrasound findings and re-examined the patients together while discussing their results. RESULTS: Overall agreements were 91% for joint effusion/synovitis and tendon lesions, 87% for cortical abnormalities, 84......: The shoulder, wrist/hand, ankle/foot, or knee of 24 patients with rheumatic diseases were evaluated by 23 musculoskeletal ultrasound experts from different European countries randomly assigned to six groups. The participants did not reach consensus on scanning method or diagnostic criteria before...... the investigation. They were unaware of the patients' clinical and imaging data. The experts from each group undertook a blinded ultrasound examination of the four anatomical regions. The ultrasound investigation included the presence/absence of joint effusion/synovitis, bony cortex abnormalities, tenosynovitis...

  6. Clinical and radiological study of osteoarticular manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, E.S.; Rocha Correa Fernandes, A. da; Wichrowski, M.

    1990-01-01

    The ostearticular involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the most frequent manifestation of this illness, which develops with activity and remission periods. In spite of the recurrence, it presents without clinic sequelae in great part of the cases. The objective of this study was to evaluate patients with prolonged osteoarticular involvement, remaining with or without sequelae. Within a total of 115 patients with SLE there have been studied 21 patients that presented clinic evidences of chronic synovitis, deforming arthropathy with the presence of cysts, erosions, narrowing of the articular space, periepiphyseal osteopenia, and 4 cases with deforming arthropathy alone. In just 2 cases of chronic synovitis with radiologic changes there have been association with deforming arthropathy. Asseptic necrosis occurred in 8 cases being multiple and symmetric in 7 cases. The association with previous corticosteroid use was found in all patients, as well as an important systemic activity of the illness in the precedent period of the asseptic necrosis diagnosis. (author) [pt

  7. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasonography of the pediatric hip and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeo Ryang; Koo, Joon Bun

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful screening method for the diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and congenital spinal anomalies in infants. In addition, US is a useful, noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of transient synovitis in children. The early detection of DDH leads to a better prognosis without surgical intervention. Moreover, spinal US allows the detection of congenital malformations and can also demonstrate normal anatomy and normal variants that may resemble disorders. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar with the sonographic anatomy of the normal infant hip, scanning and measurement techniques for DDH, the US features of transient synovitis in children, spinal US techniques, and the US features of normal anatomical structures, normal variants, and congenital spinal anomalies

  9. Pathology of the region of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-01-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis. (orig.) [de

  10. Vertebral involvement in SAPHO syndrome: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigal, A.; Cardinal, E.; Bureau, N.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada); Sainte-Marie, L.G. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada); Milette, F. [Department of Pathology, Univ. de Montreal, QC (Canada)

    1999-03-01

    We report on the MRI findings in the vertebrae and surrounding soft tissues in two patients with the SAPHO syndrome (Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis, Hyperostosis, Osteitis). The MRI findings include abnormal bone marrow signal, either focal or diffuse, of the vertebral bodies and posterior elements; hyperintense paravertebral soft tissue swelling and abnormal signal of the intervertebral discs. These changes are consistent with discitis and osteitis. (orig.) With 6 figs., 17 refs.

  11. SAPHO: What radiologists should know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depasquale, R.; Kumar, N.; Lalam, R.K.; Tins, B.J.; Tyrrell, P.N.M.; Singh, J. [Radiology Department, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospitals NHS Trust, Gobowen, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom); Cassar-Pullicino, V.N., E-mail: victor.pullicino@rjah.nhs.uk [Radiology Department, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospitals NHS Trust, Gobowen, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is an umbrella acronym for inflammatory clinical conditions whose common denominator is aseptic osteoarticular involvement with characteristic skin lesions. It involves all ages, can involve any skeletal site, and has variable imaging appearances depending on the stage/age of the lesion and imaging method. It mimics important differentials including infection and neoplasia. Awareness of the imaging features, especially in the spine, facilitates early diagnosis, prevents repeated biopsies, and avoids unnecessary surgery, while initiating appropriate treatment.

  12. 166Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok

    1998-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It has been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies. In this study, we developed experimental animal model for radiation synovectomy. A model system in which a single injection of ovalbumin into the knee joints of previously sensitized rabbits consistently produced a chronic arthritis which was histologically similiar to human rheumatoid arthritis. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  13. Non-neoplastic conditions presenting as soft-tissue tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crundwell, N. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); O' Donnell, P. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Review of referrals to our unit over the last 7 years showed that of approximately 750 cases referred as soft-tissue tumours, 132 were subsequently diagnosed as non-neoplastic lesions. The imaging characteristics of these lesions are presented to differentiate them from neoplasms. The most common diagnoses were myositis ossificans, ganglion cyst, abscess/infection, bursitis and synovitis. The imaging features of other rarer conditions will also be discussed.

  14. Medical Services: Medical Record Administration and Health Care Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-03

    medical condition caused by it. Explain conditions, such as traumatic bursitis, traumatic neuritis, traumatic myositis , or traumatic synovitis, by... histopathologic findings have a direct bearing on diagnosis and treatment (AR 40-31/BUMEDINST 6510.2F/AFR 160-55). In such cases, the attending physician...Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and Armed Forces Histopathology Centers AR 40–35 Preventive Dentistry AR 40–48 Nonphysician Health Care Providers

  15. Localized tenosynovial giant cell tumor in both knee joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Su; Kwon, Jong Won; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Chang, Moon Jong; Cho, Eun Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor, previously called pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), is a rare benign neoplastic process that may involve the synovium of the joint. The disorder is usually monoarticular and only a few cases have been reported on polyarticular involvement. Herein, we present a case of localized intra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumor in a 29-year-old man involving both knee joints with a description of the MR imaging and histological findings. (orig.)

  16. Pathology of the region of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufdermaur, M.

    1981-09-01

    Radiological, clinical and pathologic-anatomical findings seen in four types of disorders of the region of the knee jointare described. An attempt is made to explain the clinical symptomatology on the basis of pathologic-anatomical findings. It is demonstrated that the histology of a giant cell neoplasm does not permit conclusions as to prognosis. Etiology and pathogenesis of villonodular synovitis and of chondrocalcinosis are unexplained. Pathologic-anatomical findings of chondromalacia patellae are those of early osteoarthrosis.

  17. Detailed Joint Region Analysis of the 7-Joint Ultrasound Score: Evaluation of an Arthritis Patient Cohort over One Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ohrndorf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the 7-joint ultrasound (US7 score by detailed joint region analysis of an arthritis patient cohort. Methods. The US7 score examines the clinically most affected wrist, MCP and PIP II, III, MTP II, and V joints for synovitis, tenosynovitis/paratenonitis, and erosions. Forty-five patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (84.4% and spondyloarthritis with polyarticular peripheral arthritis (PsA 13.3%; AS 2.2% with a median disease duration of 6.5 yrs (range 7.5 mths–47.6 yrs were included and examined at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after starting or changing therapy (DMARD/biologic. In this study, detailed US7 score joint region analysis was firstly performed. Results. The joint region analysis performed at baseline disclosed synovitis in 95.6% of affected wrists in the dorsal aspect by greyscale (GS US where Grade 2 (moderate was most often (48.9% detected. Palmar wrist regions presented Grade 1 (minor capsule elevation in 40% and Grade 2 (moderate synovitis in 37.8%. Tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU tendon was found in 40%, with PD activity in 6.6%. Most of the erosions in MCP II were detected in the radial (68.9%, followed by the dorsal (48.9% and palmar (44.4% aspects. In MTP V, erosions were seen in 75.6% from lateral. Conclusions. Synovitis in GSUS was more often detected in the wrist in the dorsal than in the palmar aspect. ECU tendon involvement was frequent. Most erosions were found in the lateral scan of MTP V and the medial (radial scan of MCP II.

  18. Impact of hepatitis C virus infection on disease activity, functional status and ultrasonography findings in Egyptian rheumatoid arthritis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Abd EI-Hamid Gohar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the most frequently encountered public health problems in Egypt. It is associated with many autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Aim of the work: To assess the impact of HCV infection in rheumatoid arthritis (RA Egyptian patients; its relation to disease activity, functional status and ultrasonography findings. Patients and methods: The study included 155 RA patients further classified according to the presence of concomitant HCV infection into 2 groups; rheumatoid arthritis (RA and rheumatoid arthritis/hepatitis C virus (RA/HCV groups. All patients were subjected to full history taking, thorough clinical examination, laboratory investigations, assessment of disease activity using the disease activity score 28 (DAS28 and assessment of functional status using the modified health assessment questionnaire (MHAQ. Ultrasonography (US assessment was done using the German US7 score. Results: Both DAS28 and MHAQ scores showed significant differences between both the RA and the RA/HCV groups (p < 0.001, with higher mean values observed in the RA/HCV group (5.4 ± 1.1 and 1.05 ± 0.79 respectively. Significantly higher US7 synovitis scores were found in the RA/HCV group compared to the RA group (p = 0.03. US7 synovitis tenosynovitis scores revealed significant correlations with DAS28 and US7 synovitis scores correlated with MHAQ in both groups. Conclusion: Concomitant HCV infection in RA patients had an impact on disease activity. RA patients with concomitant HCV infection (RA/HCV had higher DAS28 and MHAQ scores, with higher US7 synovitis scores compared to RA patients. US7 score is a valuable objective tool for the assessment of RA disease activity. Keywords: Rheumatoid arthritis, HCV infection, Ultrasonography, DAS28, MHAQ

  19. The prevalence of tenosynovitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowbotham, EL; Freeston, JE; Emery, P; Grainger, AJ

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of tenosynovitis affecting the interosseous tendons of the hand in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) population and to assess for association with metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint synovitis, flexor tendon tenosynovitis or ulnar drift. METHODS: Forty-four patients with RA underwent hand MRI along with 20 normal controls. Coronal 3D T1 VIBE sequences pre- and post-contrast were performed and reconstructed. The presence of interosseous tendon t...

  20. Rice body formation in bicipito-radial bursitis: ultrasound, CT, and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, L.D.; Adams, J.; Eustace, S. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, One Boston Medical Center Place, Boston MA 02118 (United States); Gibbons, D. [Department of Pathology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mason, M.D. [Department of Orthopedics, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The bicipito-radial bursa, which lies at the biceps tendon insertion on the radial tuberosity, is a rare site of chronic bursitis. We describe the clinical, radiological, and pathological findings in a case complicated by multiple rice body formation. In so doing, we describe MR appearances that allow discrimination of this entity from both synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 8 refs.

  1. Non-neoplastic conditions presenting as soft-tissue tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crundwell, N.; O'Donnell, P.; Saifuddin, A.

    2007-01-01

    Review of referrals to our unit over the last 7 years showed that of approximately 750 cases referred as soft-tissue tumours, 132 were subsequently diagnosed as non-neoplastic lesions. The imaging characteristics of these lesions are presented to differentiate them from neoplasms. The most common diagnoses were myositis ossificans, ganglion cyst, abscess/infection, bursitis and synovitis. The imaging features of other rarer conditions will also be discussed

  2. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee, Jong Seok [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It has been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthropathies. In this study, we developed experimental animal model for radiation synovectomy. A model system in which a single injection of ovalbumin into the knee joints of previously sensitized rabbits consistently produced a chronic arthritis which was histologically similiar to human rheumatoid arthritis. (author). 8 refs., 8 figs

  3. Assessment of Biomarkers Associated with Joint Injury and Subsequent Post Traumatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    quantitative scales, and osteophyte score. Parametric analyses were performed for bone morphological measures and histological assessment. Mankin...p=0.0204) and the medial tibia (p=0.0015). Subchondral bone thickening was significantly increased in the C57BL/6 mice compared to the MRL/MpJ mice...modified synovitis score with semi-quantitative scales, and osteophyte score [1,5,6,7,8]. Parametric analyses were performed for bone morphological

  4. Histopathological subgroups in knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, L A; Moreton, B J; Mapp, P I; Wilson, D; Hill, R; Ferguson, E; Scammell, B E; Walsh, D A

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a heterogeneous, multi-tissue disease. We hypothesised that different histopathological features characterise different stages during knee OA progression, and that discrete subgroups can be defined based on validated measures of OA histopathological features. Medial tibial plateaux and synovium were from 343 post-mortem (PM) and 143 OA arthroplasty donations. A 'chondropathy/osteophyte' group (n = 217) was classified as PM cases with osteophytes or macroscopic medial tibiofemoral chondropathy lesions ≥grade 3 to represent pre-surgical (early) OA. 'Non-arthritic' controls (n = 48) were identified from the remaining PM cases. Mankin histopathological scores were subjected to Rasch analysis and supplemented with histopathological scores for subchondral bone marrow replacement and synovitis. Item weightings were derived by principle components analysis (PCA). Histopathological subgroups were sought using latent class analysis (LCA). Chondropathy, synovitis and osteochondral pathology were each associated with OA at arthroplasty, but each was also identified in some 'non-arthritic' controls. Tidemark breaching in the chondropathy/osteophyte group was greater than in non-arthritic controls. Three histopathological subgroups were identified, characterised as 'mild OA', or 'severe OA' with mild or moderate/severe synovitis. Presence and severity of synovitis helps define distinct histopathological OA subgroups. The absence of a discrete 'normal' subgroup indicates a pathological continuum between normality and OA status. Identifying specific pathological processes and their clinical correlates in OA subgroups has potential to accelerate the development of more effective therapies. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Empirical evaluation of the inter-relationship of articular elements involved in the pathoanatomy of knee osteoarthritis using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Dennis S; Losina, Elena; Neumann, Gesa; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Lang, Philipp K; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2009-10-29

    In this cross-sectional study, we conducted a comprehensive assessment of all articular elements that could be measured using knee MRI. We assessed the association of pathological change in multiple articular structures involved in the pathoanatomy of osteoarthritis. Knee MRI scans from patients over 45 years old were assessed using a semi-quantitative knee MRI assessment form. The form included six distinct elements: cartilage, bone marrow lesions, osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, joint effusion and synovitis. Each type of pathology was graded using an ordinal scale with a value of zero indicating no pathology and higher values indicating increasingly severe levels of pathology. The principal dependent variable for comparison was the mean cartilage disease score (CDS), which captured the aggregate extent of involvement of articular cartilage. The distribution of CDS was compared to the individual and cumulative distributions of each articular element using the Chi-squared test. The correlations between pathological change in the various articular structures were assessed in a Spearman correlation table. Data from 140 patients were available for review. The cohort had a median age of 61 years (range 45-89) and was 61% female. The cohort included a wide spectrum of OA severity. Our analysis showed a statistically significant trend towards pathological change involving more articular elements as CDS worsened (p-value for trend osteophytes (p-value for trend subchondral sclerosis (p = 0.009), but not joint effusion or synovitis. There was a moderate correlation between cartilage damage, osteophytes and BMLs as well as a moderate correlation between joint effusion and synovitis. However, cartilage damage and osteophytes were only weakly associated with synovitis or joint effusion. Our results support an inter-relationship of multiple articular elements in the pathoanatomy of knee OA. Prospective studies of OA pathogenesis in humans are needed to correlate these

  6. The importance of bone scintigraphy in children from a surgical and orthopedic point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, A.D.; Carro, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty children with Legg-Perthes disease (19), bone tumor (27), osteogenesis imperfecta (7), osteomyelitis (5) and transient synovitis (2) were studied using sup(99m)Tc labeled diphosphonate. A number of benign or malign bone diseases of children need early detection in order to institute the best form - the fine form - of treatment. We recommende the bone scintigraphy in the initial screening of children with signs and symptoms of bone pathology. (orig.) [de

  7. Importance of bone scintigraphy in children from a surgical and orthopedic point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.D.; Carro, G.A.

    Sixty children with Legg-Perthes disease (19), bone tumor (27), osteogenesis imperfecta (7), osteomyelitis (5) and transient synovitis (2) were studied using sup(99m)Tc labeled diphosphonate. A number of benign or malign bone diseases of children need early detection in order to institute the best form - the fine form - of treatment. We recommend the bone scintigraphy in the initial screening of children with signs and symptoms of bone pathology.

  8. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma synoviae strains originating from Central and Eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Kreizinger, Zsuzsa; Grózner, Dénes; Sulyok, Kinga M.; Nilsson, Kristin; Hrivnák, Veronika; Benčina, Dušan; Gyuranecz, Miklós

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma synoviae causes infectious synovitis and respiratory diseases in chickens and turkeys and may lead to egg shell apex abnormalities in chickens; hence possesses high economic impact on the poultry industry. Control of the disease consists of eradication, vaccination or medication. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vitro susceptibility to 14 different antibiotics and an antibiotic combination of M. synoviae strains originating from Hungary and other coun...

  9. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Inflammatory Rheumatoid Synovial Tissues Using Anti-Human Podoplanin Monoclonal Antibody Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomoto; Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Liu, Xing; Honma, Ryusuke; Naganuma, Yasushi; Goodman, Stuart B; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Takagi, Michiaki

    2018-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, which is expressed in several normal tissues and malignant tumors. Although PDPN expression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been reported, the role of PDPN in RA and other arthritic conditions has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined PDPN expression in inflammatory synovial tissues using an anti-human PDPN (hPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) panel to select the most useful one for evaluation of synovitis. Synovial tissue samples were obtained from 11 RA patients and 9 osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergoing joint surgery. PDPN-positive cells were immunostained by a panel of PDPN mAbs (NZ-1, LpMab-3, LpMab-7, LpMab-10, LpMab-12, LpMab-13, and LpMab-17), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell counting of PDPN-positivity by a quantitative analyzer. Immunohistochemistry showed that PDPN was markedly expressed in both macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B lining cells of the hyperplastic synovial lining cell layer, and macrophages and fibroblasts in the stroma of RA. Among anti-PDPN mAbs, LpMab-12 showed the highest score. In inflammatory OA synovium, PDPN expression was also detectable. Although LpMab-12 also showed the highest score in OA, the difference was not statistically significant. The inflammatory synovitis score of RA was significantly higher than that of OA. PDPN was expressed in inflammatory lining cells and sublining stroma of RA and OA synovium. In the seven anti-hPDPN antibodies examined, LpMab-12 was the most stainable antibody for PDPN in RA synovitis. Thus, LpMab-12 for PDPN has a possible and promising specific biomarker for evaluating synovitis in RA and inflammatory OA.

  10. Targeting interleukin-15 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a proof-of-concept study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, Bo; Tvede, Niels; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is a proinflammatory, innate response cytokine that mediates pleiotropic effector function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) inflammatory synovitis. Our objective was to study the ability of HuMax-IL15, a human IgG1 anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, to neutralize exogenous...... and endogenous IL-15 activity in vitro and to perform a phase I-II dose-escalation trial with HuMax-IL15 in patients with active RA....

  11. Chip fractures from the distal lateral trochlear ridge of the talus of a quarter horse gelding: a veterinary medicine clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, L

    2005-09-05

    An eighteen-month old quarter horse gelding was diagnosed with chip fractures from the distal lateral trochlear ridge of the talus. The horse presented with the symptom of persistent synovitis. The diagnosis was based on radiographic evidence. The horse was treated initially with arthroscopic surgery. He was given a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent, and a chondroprotective agent to prevent further damage to, and aid in the healing of, the damaged joint.

  12. Radiosynovectomy in rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław B. Ćwikła

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiosynovectomy is a safe and repeatable treatment method of chronic synovitis with synovial overgrowth and refractory chronic or acute inflammatory joint effusion. It consist in the intraarticular administration of a radioactive isotope in the form of a colloid causing the extinguishing of active synovitis. The radiocolloid causes permanent irradiation of the synovium with beta ray electron beams, which ultimately leads to its fibrosis and extinguishes the inflammatory process destroying the joint. The main indications for radiosynovectomy include chronic and acute arthritis in the course of systemic diseases, intraarticular bleeding in hemorrhagic diatheses (hemophilia, selected cases of osteoarthritis, recurrent effusions following surgery, e.g. arthroplasty, or other iatrogenic post-surgery complications causing arthritis. Radiosynovectomy is also performed in pigmented villonodular synovitis and crystal synovitis. The most common method used to determine the eligibility for radiosynovectomy is an ultrasound, which shows the location and activity of the thickened synovium. The administration of a radiocolloid into the joint, sheath or bursa should also be performed under the control of the ultrasound image, as this ensures a precise location of the puncture needle and full control of the isotope administration process. Clinical efficacy of radiosynovectomy depends on the proper qualification of patients for the procedure. The success rate of radiosynovectomy in common indications is 65–80%. It is confirmed by the visualization of avascular (fibrotic synovium in follow-up ultrasound tests. The aim of this article is to present techniques and indications for the radiosynovectomy treatment.

  13. Evaluation of a novel 7-joint ultrasound score in daily rheumatologic practice: a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, M; Ohrndorf, S; Kellner, H; Strunk, J; Backhaus, T M; Hartung, W; Sattler, H; Albrecht, K; Kaufmann, J; Becker, K; Sörensen, H; Meier, L; Burmester, G R; Schmidt, W A

    2009-09-15

    To introduce a new standardized ultrasound score based on 7 joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot (German US7 score) implemented in daily rheumatologic practice. The ultrasound score included the following joints of the clinically dominant hand and foot: wrist, second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal, and second and fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. Synovitis and synovial/tenosynovial vascularity were scored semiquantitatively (grade 0-3) by gray-scale (GS) and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Tenosynovitis and erosions were scored for presence. The scoring range was 0-27 for GS synovitis, 0-39 for PD synovitis, 0-7 for GS tenosynovitis, 0-21 for PD tenosynovitis, and 0-14 for erosions. Patients with arthritis were examined at baseline and after the start or change of disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) and/or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibitor therapy 3 and 6 months later. C-reactive protein level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide, Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28), and radiographs of the hands and feet were performed. One hundred twenty patients (76% women) with rheumatoid arthritis (91%) and psoriatic arthritis (9%) were enrolled. In 52 cases (43%), erosions were seen in radiography at baseline. Patients received DMARDs (41%), DMARDs plus TNFalpha inhibitors (41%), or TNFalpha inhibitor monotherapy (18%). At baseline, the mean DAS28 was 5.0 and the synovitis scores were 8.1 in GS ultrasound and 3.3 in PD ultrasound. After 6 months of therapy, the DAS28 significantly decreased to 3.6 (Delta = 1.4), and the GS and PD ultrasound scores significantly decreased to 5.5 (-32%) and 2.0 (-39%), respectively. The German US7 score is a viable tool for examining patients with arthritis in daily rheumatologic practice because it significantly reflects therapeutic response.

  14. Foot related impairments and disability in juvenile idiopathic arthritis persist despite modern day treatment paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Hendry, Gordon J; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Watt, Gordon F; Woodburn, Jim; McColl, John H; Sturrock, Roger D

    2011-01-01

    Background: Foot problems such as synovitis, growth disturbance and deformity are considered common in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and have been previously reported in over 90% of cases. The medical management of JIA appears to have improved recently however little is known about the impact of new regimes on localised joints such as in the foot. This pilot study aimed to investigate the prevalence of foot related impairments and disability, and survey the medical and podiatric managem...

  15. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 2: Erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrant, J.M.; O'Connor, P.J.; Grainger, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis late after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quanitification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists to this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. This first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responsiveness in Active Psoriatic Arthritis at Multiple Timepoints during the First 12 Weeks of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feletar, Marie; Hall, Stephen; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of high- and low-field extremity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables at multiple timepoints in the first 12 weeks post-antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy initiation in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and active dactylitis. Twelve patients with active PsA and clinical evidence of dactylitis involving at least 1 digit were recruited. Patients underwent sequential high-field conventional (1.5 Tesla) and extremity low-field MRI (0.2 Tesla) of the affected hand or foot, pre- and postgadolinium at baseline (pre-TNF), 2 weeks (post-TNF), 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. A blinded observer scored all images on 2 occasions using the PsA MRI scoring system. Eleven patients completed the study, but only 6 patients completed all high-field and low-field MRI assessments. MRI scores demonstrated rapid response to TNF inhibition with score reduction in tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis at 2 weeks. Intraobserver reliability was good to excellent for all variables. High-field MRI demonstrated greater sensitivity to tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis and greater responsiveness to change posttreatment. Treatment responses were maintained to 12 weeks. This study demonstrates the use of MRI in detecting early response to biologic therapy. MRI variables of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis demonstrated responsiveness posttherapy with high-field scores more responsive to change than low-field scores.

  17. Power Doppler Ultrasound Evaluation of Peripheral Joint, Entheses, Tendon, and Bursa Abnormalities in Psoriatic Patients: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanjiao; Yang, Yujia; Xiang, Xi; Wang, Liyun; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2018-04-15

    To evaluate the prevalence rates of peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities by power Doppler (PD) ultrasonic examination in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), psoriatic patients without clinical signs of arthritis (non-PsA psoriasis group), and healthy individuals, to detect subclinical PsA. A total of 253 healthy volunteers, 242 non-PsA psoriatic patients, and 86 patients with PsA were assessed by 2-dimensional and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound. Peripheral joint, enthesis, tendon, and bursa abnormalities were observed, characterizing abnormal PD. The affected patients and sites with abnormalities in various ages were compared among groups; PD signal grades for the abnormalities were also compared. In the PsA group, significantly higher percentages of sites showing joint effusion/synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in all age groups, and markedly higher rates of sites with bursitis were found in young and middle age groups, compared with the non-PsA and control groups (all p the non-PsA group showed significantly higher rates of joint effusion/synovitis and enthesitis sites, and elevated PD signal grades of synovitis, enthesitis, and tenosynovitis in comparison with the control group, both in young and middle age groups (all p tenosynovitis.

  18. Infrapatellar bursitis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqanatish, Jubran T; Petty, Ross E; Houghton, Kristin M; Guzman, Jaime; Tucker, Lori B; Cabral, David A; Cairns, Robyn A

    2011-02-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may infrequently present with localized anterior knee pain or swelling, in addition to generalize knee pain induced by JIA. We report five cases of deep infrapatellar bursitis in children with JIA. The clinical features, radiological findings, management, and outcome of five children with JIA and deep infrapatellar bursitis are reviewed. Three boys and two girls with a mean age of 9.8 years (range 6-14 years) were reviewed. Four children had persistent oligoarticular JIA, and one child had extended oligoarticular JIA. The presentation of deep infrapatellar bursitis was variable. In only one patient was the bursal swelling painful. Knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in four patients and demonstrated coexistent knee joint synovitis in three. Treatment included targeted corticosteroid injections into the deep infrapatellar bursa in two cases with complete resolution. One case was treated with corticosteroid injection by an outside health care provider with poor clinical response. Two cases are being treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and methotrexate. Deep infrapatellar bursitis can occur as an isolated finding or concurrently with knee joint synovitis in patients with JIA. Awareness of this entity is important because direct injection of the bursa may be needed for treatment, as the bursa does not communicate with the knee joint. Furthermore, when bursitis is suspected in JIA, MRI can be helpful to confirm the diagnosis, detect concurrent knee joint synovitis, and exclude other pathologies.

  19. A chondroblastoma versus a giant cell tumor: emphasis on the MR imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jee Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Na Ra; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    To assess the MR imaging features in differentiating a chondroblastoma (CB) from a giant cell tumor (GCT), with an emphasis on the accompanying peritumoral bone marrow edema. MR imaging findings in 20 patients with CB were compared with the imaging features of 22 patients with GCT. The location of the lesion, signal intensity, adjacent cortical change, degree of accompanying bone marrow edema, synovitis in the adjacent joint and cystic change were analyzed. The findings of CB and GCT were examined statistically with use of Fisher's exact test. The incidence ratios of MR imaging findings were as follows (CB:GCT). Metaphyseal dominant involvement (2:21), partial cortical disruption (2:14), extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor (14:0) and synovitis in the adjacent joint (11:2) were statistically different in incidence between CB and GCT ({rho} < 0.01). The inhomogeneous signal intensity (17:17) and cystic change (10:15) were not different in incidence between a CB and GCT. The presence of metaphyseal dominant involvement and cortical disruption favors a diagnosis of a GCT rather than a CB. In contrast, extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor and synovitis in the adjacent joint are highly indicative of a CB.

  20. A chondroblastoma versus a giant cell tumor: emphasis on the MR imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Jee Won; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Kim, Na Ra; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2007-01-01

    To assess the MR imaging features in differentiating a chondroblastoma (CB) from a giant cell tumor (GCT), with an emphasis on the accompanying peritumoral bone marrow edema. MR imaging findings in 20 patients with CB were compared with the imaging features of 22 patients with GCT. The location of the lesion, signal intensity, adjacent cortical change, degree of accompanying bone marrow edema, synovitis in the adjacent joint and cystic change were analyzed. The findings of CB and GCT were examined statistically with use of Fisher's exact test. The incidence ratios of MR imaging findings were as follows (CB:GCT). Metaphyseal dominant involvement (2:21), partial cortical disruption (2:14), extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor (14:0) and synovitis in the adjacent joint (11:2) were statistically different in incidence between CB and GCT (ρ < 0.01). The inhomogeneous signal intensity (17:17) and cystic change (10:15) were not different in incidence between a CB and GCT. The presence of metaphyseal dominant involvement and cortical disruption favors a diagnosis of a GCT rather than a CB. In contrast, extensive bone marrow edema surrounding the tumor and synovitis in the adjacent joint are highly indicative of a CB

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have be......, and financial context of the study in question. We review the extent to which MRI assessments of joint erosion, bone edema, and synovitis fulfil these criteria, particularly as they relate to proof-of-concept RA clinical trials.......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...... developed and validated by several groups. The OMERACT criteria require that outcome measures demonstrate adequate validity, discriminative power, and feasibility if they are to be useful in clinical trials. Specific performance targets for these criteria depend on the scientific, regulatory, logistical...

  2. Subacute posteromedial impingement of the ankle in athletes: MR imaging evaluation and ultrasound guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messiou, Christina; Robinson, Philip; O'Connor, Philip J.; Grainger, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    To describe the use of MR imaging and efficacy of ultrasound-guided steroid injection in the diagnosis and management of athletes with clinical posteromedial impingement of the ankle. A retrospective analysis of imaging findings on MR was undertaken in nine elite athletes with clinical posteromedial ankle impingement. MR studies from six professional athletes with posterolateral pain were also reviewed as an imaging control group. The two reviewing radiologists were blinded to the clinical details and the proportion of control and study subjects. The nine study athletes also underwent diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided injection of steroid and anaesthetic into the posteromedial capsular abnormality. Follow-up was by telephone interview. Posteromedial capsular thickening was seen only in athletes with posteromedial impingement (7/9). Posteromedial synovitis was present in all athletes with posteromedial impingement; however, posterior and posterolateral synovitis was also seen in these athletes. Mild posteromedial synovitis was present in two control athletes. Ultrasound identified abnormal posteromedial soft tissue thickening deep to tibialis posterior between the medial malleolus and talus in all nine athletes. After injection all athletes returned to their previous level of sport, with eight of the nine not experiencing any residual or recurrent symptoms. If MR imaging excludes significant coexistent abnormality, ultrasound can localise posteromedial soft tissue abnormality and guide injection therapy, allowing return to athletic activity without surgical intervention. (orig.)

  3. Significance of clinical evaluation of the metacarpophalangeal joint in relation to synovial/bone pathology in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Millicent A; White, Lawrence M; Gladman, Dafna D; Inman, Robert D; Chaya, Sam; Lax, Matthew; Salonen, David; Weber, Deborah A; Guthrie, Judy A; Pomeroy, Emma; Podbielski, Dominik; Keystone, Edward C

    2009-12-01

    Rheumatologists base many clinical decisions regarding the management of inflammatory joint diseases on joint counts performed at clinic. We investigated the reliability and accuracy of physically examining the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints to detect inflammatory synovitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the gold standard. MCP joints 2 to 5 in both hands of 5 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 5 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) were assessed by 5 independent examiners for joint-line swelling (visually and by palpation); joint-line tenderness by palpation (tender joint count, TJC) and stress pain; and by MRI (1.5 Tesla superconducting magnet). Interrater reliability was assessed using kappa statistics, and agreement between examination and corresponding MRI assessment was assessed by Fisher's exact tests (p 0.8) and positive predictive value (= 0.8). For PsA, significant associations exist between TJC and MRI synovitis scores (p < 0.01) and stress pain and MRI edema scores (p < 0.04). Assessment of swelling by palpation was not significantly associated with synovitis or edema as determined by MRI in RA or PsA (p = 0.54-1.0). In inflammatory arthritis, disease activity in MCP joints can be reliably assessed at the bedside by examining for joint-line tenderness (TJC) and visual inspection for swelling. Clinical assessment may have to be complemented by other methods for evaluating disease activity in the joint, such as MRI, particularly in patients with PsA.

  4. Infiltration of the synovial membrane with macrophage subsets and polymorphonuclear cells reflects global disease activity in spondyloarthropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Dominique; Kruithof, Elli; De Rycke, Leen; Boots, Anemieke M; Mielants, Herman; Veys, Eric M; De Keyser, Filip

    2005-01-01

    Considering the relation between synovial inflammation and global disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and the distinct but heterogeneous histology of spondyloarthropathy (SpA) synovitis, the present study analyzed whether histopathological features of synovium reflect specific phenotypes and/or global disease activity in SpA. Synovial biopsies obtained from 99 SpA and 86 RA patients with active knee synovitis were analyzed for 15 histological and immunohistochemical markers. Correlations with swollen joint count, serum C-reactive protein concentrations, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were analyzed using classical and multiparameter statistics. SpA synovitis was characterized by higher vascularity and infiltration with CD163+ macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and by lower values for lining-layer hyperplasia, lymphoid aggregates, CD1a+ cells, intracellular citrullinated proteins, and MHC-HC gp39 complexes than RA synovitis. Unsupervised clustering of the SpA samples based on synovial features identified two separate clusters that both contained different SpA subtypes but were significantly differentiated by concentration of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Global disease activity in SpA correlated significantly with lining-layer hyperplasia as well as with inflammatory infiltration with macrophages, especially the CD163+ subset, and with PMNs. Accordingly, supervised clustering using these synovial parameters identified a cluster of 20 SpA patients with significantly higher disease activity, and this finding was confirmed in an independent SpA cohort. However, multiparameter models based on synovial histopathology were relatively poor predictors of disease activity in individual patients. In conclusion, these data indicate that inflammatory infiltration of the synovium with CD163+ macrophages and PMNs as well as lining-layer hyperplasia reflect global disease activity in SpA, independently of the SpA subtype

  5. Polymyalgia rheumatica: observations of disease evolution without corticosteroid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brawer AE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arthur E Brawer Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Monmouth Medical Center, Long Branch, NJ, USA Objectives: The diagnostic diversity of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR can easily be obscured by the widespread use of corticosteroids (CSs early in the disease course. This study observed the course of PMR without CSs and determined whether alternative medication could be useful. Methods: Seventy patients with new-onset PMR comprised phase 1. Eight were removed with specific diagnoses (four with giant cell arteritis [GCA]. The remaining 62 were treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs alone until enough time had elapsed to ascertain whether their PMR had evolved into another rheumatologic inflammatory condition. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ was then added to their regimen. Twenty-five additional patients with PMR comprised phase 2. Twenty-two were immediately treated with HCQ prior to the anticipated disease progression. Results: In phase 1, 52/62 developed synovitis in multiple other joints 9 months from PMR onset; 48/52 received HCQ, and 42/48 (87.5% achieved complete remission. In phase 2, during HCQ induction, 21 patients developed similar synovitis; after 6 months of HCQ use, 80% achieved remission. In 73/95 (77%, a definite diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA could be made on average 8.5 months from PMR onset. Only 12/95 (13% stayed true to form with their PMR and did not develop another specific diagnosis. Conclusion: In this study, true PMR was infrequent in the absence of GCA. PMR in most patients evolved into seronegative RA, which was dramatically responsive to HCQ use. Treatment of acute PMR with HCQ was a rational alternative to CS use even if progressive additive synovitis had not yet occurred. Keywords: polymyalgia rheumatica, rheumatoid arthritis, corticosteroids

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-T magnetic resonance imaging: a method for quantifying disease activity in early polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navalho, Marcio [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Rheumatology Research Unit, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital da Luz, Radiology Department, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital da Luz, Centro de Imagiologia, Lisbon (Portugal); Resende, Catarina [Hospital da Luz, Rheumatology Department, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital de Santa Maria, Rheumatology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisbon (Portugal); Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Canhao, Helena [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Rheumatology Research Unit, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital de Santa Maria, Rheumatology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisbon (Portugal); Gaspar, Augusto [Hospital da Luz, Radiology Department, Lisbon (Portugal); Campos, Jorge [Hospital de Santa Maria, Radiology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2012-01-15

    To determine whether measurement of synovial enhancement and thickness quantification parameters with 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) can reliably quantify disease activity in patients with early polyarthritis. Eighteen patients (16 women, 2 men; mean age 46 years) with early polyarthritis with less than 12 months of symptoms were included. MRI examination using 3-T device was performed by a new approach including both wrists and hands simultaneously in the examination field-of-view. MRI scoring of disease activity included quantification of synovial enhancement with simple measurements such as rate of early enhancement (REE; REE{sub 57} = S{sub 57}/S{sub 200}, where S{sub 57} and S{sub 200} are the signal intensities 57 s and 200 s after gadolinium injection) and rate of relative enhancement (RE; RE = S{sub 200} - S{sub 0}). Both wrists and hands were scored according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS) for synovitis. Disease activity was clinically assessed by the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). DAS28 score was strongly correlated with RE (r = 0.8331, p < 0.0001), REE (r = 0.8112, p < 0.0001), and RAMRIS score for synovitis (r = 0.7659, p < 0.0002). An REE score above 0.778 accurately identified patients with clinically active disease (sensitivity 92%; specificity 67%; p < 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed in the RE, REE, and RAMRIS scores for synovitis between patients with active and inactive disease (p < 0.05). Our findings support the use of 3-T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for precise quantification of disease activity and for discriminating active disease from inactive disease in early polyarthritis. (orig.)

  7. Hand and wrist involvement in systemic sclerosis: US features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Véronique; Bazeli, Ramin; Elhai, Muriel; Campagna, Raphaël; Pessis, Éric; Avouac, Jérôme; Allanore, Yannick; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Guérini, Henri

    2013-12-01

    To characterize ultrasonographic (US) features in the hand of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to evaluate the sensitivity of US in the detection of calcinosis and acroosteolysis. The local ethics committee approved this study, and oral informed consent was obtained. A total of 44 consecutive patients with SSc (34 women; mean age, 56.1 years ± 12.1 [standard deviation]; 10 men; mean age, 45.0 years ± 14.0) and 30 healthy control subjects (20 women; mean age, 46.3 years ± 12.1; 10 men; mean age, 39.6 years ± 10.8) were included between October 2010 and December 2011. Bilateral US, including Doppler assessment of the wrists, hands, and fingers, was performed, and presence of synovitis, tenosynovitis with or without a layered appearance, calcifications, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization was recorded. Radiography of both hands was performed to assess for acroosteolysis and calcinosis. Frequency of US features, sensitivity of US for calcinosis and acroosteolysis, and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Synovitis was found in 17 patients (39%). Tenosynovitis was found in 12 patients (27%), and it had a layered pattern in 15 (41%) of 37 cases. Calcinosis was found in 17 patients (39%) with US, with a sensitivity of 89%. Acroosteolysis was found in nine (20%) patients with US and in 10 (23%) patients with radiography, with 90% sensitivity for US. Distal vascularization was detected in 26 patients (59%) and 30 control subjects (100%) and was in contact with the acroosteolysis bed in seven (78%) of nine patients with SSc. US can be used to assess features of SSc, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, calcinosis, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization and is sensitive for calcinosis and acroosteolysis detection. A layered pattern (similar to the appearance of an artichoke heart) of tenosynovitis was seen commonly. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  8. Development and Reliability of a Preliminary Foot Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Jill; Martín-Hervás, Carmen; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; McGonagle, Dennis; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Redmond, Anthony C; Conaghan, Philip G

    2017-08-01

    Foot osteoarthritis (OA) is very common but underinvestigated musculoskeletal condition and there is little consensus as to common magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features. The aim of this study was to develop a preliminary foot OA MRI score (FOAMRIS) and evaluate its reliability. This preliminary semiquantitative score included the hindfoot, midfoot, and metatarsophalangeal joints. Joints were scored for joint space narrowing (JSN; 0-3), osteophytes (0-3), joint effusion/synovitis, and bone cysts (present/absent). Erosions and bone marrow lesions (BML) were scored (0-3) and BML were evaluated adjacent to entheses and at sub-tendon sites (present/absent). Additionally, tenosynovitis (0-3) and midfoot ligament pathology (present/absent) were scored. Reliability was evaluated in 15 people with foot pain and MRI-detected OA using 3.0T MRI multi-sequence protocols, and assessed using ICC as an overall score and per anatomical site. Intrareader agreement (ICC) was generally good to excellent across the foot in joint features (JSN 0.90, osteophytes 0.90, effusion/synovitis 0.46, cysts 0.87), bone features (BML 0.83, erosion 0.66, BML entheses 0.66, BML sub-tendon 0.60) and soft tissue features (tenosynovitis 0.83, ligaments 0.77). Interreader agreement was lower for joint features (JSN 0.43, osteophytes 0.27, effusion/synovitis 0.02, cysts 0.48), bone features (BML 0.68, erosion 0.00, BML entheses 0.34, BML sub-tendon 0.13), and soft tissue features (tenosynovitis 0.35, ligaments 0.33). This preliminary FOAMRIS demonstrated good intrareader reliability and fair interreader reliability when assessing the total feature scores. Further development is required in cohorts with a range of pathologies and to assess the psychometric measurement properties.

  9. ACR/EULAR Definitions of Remission Are Associated with Lower Residual Inflammatory Activity Compared with DAS28 Remission on Hand MRI in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Solano, Albert; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Salman-Monte, Tarek Carlos; Maymó, Joan

    2016-09-01

    To determine the level of residual inflammation [synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), tenosynovitis, and total inflammation] quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (h-MRI) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission according to 3 different definitions of clinical remission, and to compare these remission definitions. A cross-sectional study. To assess the level of residual MRI inflammation in remission, cutoff levels associated to remission and median scores of MRI residual inflammatory lesions were calculated. Data from an MRI register of patients with RA who have various levels of disease activity were used. These were used for the analyses: synovitis, BME according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring system, tenosynovitis, total inflammation, and disease activity composite measures recorded at the time of MRI. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was used to identify the best cutoffs associated with remission for each inflammatory lesion on h-MRI. Median values of each inflammatory lesion for each definition of remission were also calculated. A total of 388 h-MRI sets of patients with RA with different levels of disease activity, 130 in remission, were included. Cutoff values associated with remission according to the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI) ≤ 3.3 and the Boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism (ACR/EULAR) definitions for BME and tenosynovitis (1 and 3, respectively) were lower than BME and tenosynovitis (2 and 5, respectively) for the Disease Activity Score on 28 joints (DAS28) ≤ 2.6. Median scores for synovitis, BME, and total inflammation were also lower for the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR remission criteria compared with DAS28. Patients with RA in remission according to the SDAI and Boolean ACR/EULAR definitions showed lower levels of MRI-detected residual inflammation compared with DAS28.

  10. Ultrasound resistive index, power Doppler, and clinical parameters in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Melissa Cláudia; do Prado, Aline Defaveri; Piovesan, Deise Marcela; Bredemeier, Markus; da Silveira, Inês Guimarães; Mendonça, José Alexandre; Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful tool for the evaluation of sinovial vascularization and proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accordingly, resistive index (RI) on spectral Doppler (sD) US provides a quantitative analysis of vascular inflammation, but its utility in the evaluation of RA activity has not been established. Our objective was to determine the association of RI with other US parameters of synovitis and with clinical disease activity in established RA. Patients with positive power Doppler (pD) were included in a prospective cross-sectional study. Disease activity and disability were evaluated using the Disease Activity Score in 28-joints (DAS28) and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), respectively. Gray scale (GS) synovitis, pD, and sD analyses were performed by one of two examiners in wrists and the second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints. The 10-joint GS and 10-joint pD scores and mean RI were then calculated. Weighted kappa (WK) values were employed to assess interobserver reability, and correlations were tested using the Spearman coefficient. Ninety-five RA patients (median duration of disease of 7 years and mean DAS28 of 4.32 ± 1.66) were included. WK values in real-time US were 0.77 for synovitis, 0.87 for pD, and 0.68 for RI. There were no significant correlations of RI with 10-joint GS, 10-joint pD, DAS28, joint counts, or HAQ (P > 0.10 for all tests). Patients in remission had a mean RI similar to those with high disease activity (0.62 ± 0.10, n = 15 versus 0.63 ± 0.13, n = 34, respectively). The addition of the RI score did not seem to improve US performance in patients with established RA.

  11. Exploring cartilage damage in gout using 3-T MRI: distribution and associations with joint inflammation and tophus deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, I. [University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Dalbeth, N. [University of Auckland, Department of Medicine, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland District Health Board, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand); Doyle, A.; Reeves, Q. [Auckland District Health Board, Department of Radiology, Auckland (New Zealand); McQueen, F.M. [University of Auckland, Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, 85 Park Road, Grafton, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland District Health Board, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2014-07-15

    Few imaging studies have investigated cartilage in gout. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can image cartilage damage and also reveals other features of gouty arthropathy. The objective was to develop and validate a system for quantifying cartilage damage in gout. 3-T MRI scans of the wrist were obtained in 40 gout patients. MRI cartilage damage was quantified using an adaptation of the radiographic Sharp van der Heijde score. Two readers scored cartilage loss at 7 wrist joints: 0 (normal), 1 (partial narrowing), 2 (complete narrowing) and concomitant osteoarthritis was recorded. Bone erosion, bone oedema and synovitis were scored (RAMRIS) and tophi were assessed. Correlations between radiographic and MRI cartilage scores were investigated, as was the reliability of the MRI cartilage score and its associations. The GOut MRI Cartilage Score (GOMRICS) was highly correlated with the total Sharp van der Heijde (SvdH) score and the joint space narrowing component (R = 0.8 and 0.71 respectively, p < 0.001). Reliability was high (intraobserver, interobserver ICCs = 0.87 [0.57-0.97], 0.64 [0.41-0.79] respectively), and improved on unenhanced scans; interobserver ICC = 0.82 [0.49-0.95]. Cartilage damage was predominantly focal (82 % of lesions) and identified in 40 out of 280 (14 %) of joints. Cartilage scores correlated with bone erosion (R = 0.57), tophus size (R = 0.52), and synovitis (R = 0.55), but not bone oedema scores. Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to investigate cartilage in gout. Cartilage damage was relatively uncommon, focal, and associated with bone erosions, tophi and synovitis, but not bone oedema. This emphasises the unique pathophysiology of gout. (orig.)

  12. Exploring cartilage damage in gout using 3-T MRI: distribution and associations with joint inflammation and tophus deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovich, I.; Dalbeth, N.; Doyle, A.; Reeves, Q.; McQueen, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Few imaging studies have investigated cartilage in gout. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can image cartilage damage and also reveals other features of gouty arthropathy. The objective was to develop and validate a system for quantifying cartilage damage in gout. 3-T MRI scans of the wrist were obtained in 40 gout patients. MRI cartilage damage was quantified using an adaptation of the radiographic Sharp van der Heijde score. Two readers scored cartilage loss at 7 wrist joints: 0 (normal), 1 (partial narrowing), 2 (complete narrowing) and concomitant osteoarthritis was recorded. Bone erosion, bone oedema and synovitis were scored (RAMRIS) and tophi were assessed. Correlations between radiographic and MRI cartilage scores were investigated, as was the reliability of the MRI cartilage score and its associations. The GOut MRI Cartilage Score (GOMRICS) was highly correlated with the total Sharp van der Heijde (SvdH) score and the joint space narrowing component (R = 0.8 and 0.71 respectively, p < 0.001). Reliability was high (intraobserver, interobserver ICCs = 0.87 [0.57-0.97], 0.64 [0.41-0.79] respectively), and improved on unenhanced scans; interobserver ICC = 0.82 [0.49-0.95]. Cartilage damage was predominantly focal (82 % of lesions) and identified in 40 out of 280 (14 %) of joints. Cartilage scores correlated with bone erosion (R = 0.57), tophus size (R = 0.52), and synovitis (R = 0.55), but not bone oedema scores. Magnetic resonance imaging can be used to investigate cartilage in gout. Cartilage damage was relatively uncommon, focal, and associated with bone erosions, tophi and synovitis, but not bone oedema. This emphasises the unique pathophysiology of gout. (orig.)

  13. Reliability of ultrasound grading traditional score and new global OMERACT-EULAR score system (GLOESS): results from an inter- and intra-reading exercise by rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Ríos, Lucio; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Ferrusquia-Toríz, Diana; Cruz-Arenas, Esteban; Rodríguez-Henríquez, Pedro; Alvarez Del Castillo, Ana Laura; Campaña-Parra, Alfredo; Canul, Efrén; Guerrero Yeo, Gerardo; Mendoza-Ruiz, Juan Jorge; Pérez Cristóbal, Mario; Sicsik, Sandra; Silva Luna, Karina

    2017-12-01

    This study aims to test the reliability of ultrasound to graduate synovitis in static and video images, evaluating separately grayscale and power Doppler (PD), and combined. Thirteen trained rheumatologist ultrasonographers participated in two separate rounds reading 42 images, 15 static and 27 videos, of the 7-joint count [wrist, 2nd and 3rd metacarpophalangeal (MCP), 2nd and 3rd interphalangeal (IPP), 2nd and 5th metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints]. The images were from six patients with rheumatoid arthritis, performed by one ultrasonographer. Synovitis definition was according to OMERACT. Scoring system in grayscale, PD separately, and combined (GLOESS-Global OMERACT-EULAR Score System) were reviewed before exercise. Reliability intra- and inter-reading was calculated with Cohen's kappa weighted, according to Landis and Koch. Kappa values for inter-reading were good to excellent. The minor kappa was for GLOESS in static images, and the highest was for the same scoring in videos (k 0.59 and 0.85, respectively). Excellent values were obtained for static PD in 5th MTP joint and for PD video in 2nd MTP joint. Results for GLOESS in general were good to moderate. Poor agreement was observed in 3rd MCP and 3rd IPP in all kinds of images. Intra-reading agreement were greater in grayscale and GLOESS in static images than in videos (k 0.86 vs. 0.77 and k 0.86 vs. 0.71, respectively), but PD was greater in videos than in static images (k 1.0 vs. 0.79). The reliability of the synovitis scoring through static images and videos is in general good to moderate when using grayscale and PD separately or combined.

  14. Symptomatic and asymptomatic interphalageal osteoarthritis: An ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usón, Jacqueline; Fernández-Espartero, Cruz; Villaverde, Virginia; Condés, Emilia; Godo, Javier; Martínez-Blasco, Maria Jesus; Miguélez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    To date few studies have examined whether ultrasonography can depict morphologic differences in painful and painless osteoarthritis (OA). This study describes and compares the clinical, radiographic and ultrasonographic findings of patients with both painful and painless proximal interphalgeal (PIP) and/or distal interphalgeal (DIP) OA. Patients with PIP and/or DIP OA (ACR criteria) were prospectively recruited. The clinical rheumatologist chose up to 3 painful joints and up to 3 painless symmetric joints in each patient to define 2 cohorts of OA: symptomatic (SG) and asymptomatic (ASG). A conventional postero-anterior hand x ray was performed and read by one rheumatologist following the OARSI atlas, blinded to clinical and sonographic data. Ultrasound (US) was performed by an experienced rheumatologist, blinded to both clinical and radiographic data in joints previously selected by the clinical rheumatologist. US-pathology was assessed as present or absent as defined in previous reports: osteophytes, joint space narrowing, synovitis, intra-articular power doppler signal, intra-articular bony erosion, and visualization of cartilage. Radiographic and ultrasonographic intrareader reliability test was performed. A total of 50 joints in the SG and ASG were included from 20 right handed women aged 61.85 (46-73) years with PIP and DIP OA diagnosed 6.8 (1-17) years ago. 70% SG joints and ASG were right and left sided respectively. The SG showed significantly more osteophytes, synovitis and non-visualization of joint cartilage. Intrareader radiographic and ultrasonographic agreement was excellent. This study demonstrates that painful PIP and/or DIP OA have more ultrasonographic structural changes and synovitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Synovial inflammation in patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Răzvan; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana; Ene, Patricia; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Cîrstoiu, Florin Cătălin

    2015-01-01

    The synovium is an intra-articular mesenchymal tissue and essential for the normal joint function. It is involved in many pathological characteristic processes and sometimes specific for this distinctive tissue. In this study, we refer to synovial proliferative disorders according to the stage of osteoarthritis (OA) disease. Forty-three patients with knee OA were treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency University Hospital of Bucharest, Romania, in the last two years. In all cases, we used at least five criteria for the knee OA: knee pain, knee joint tenderness, no palpable warmth over the knee, stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. In all the cases the synovial tissue was selected by the orthopedic surgeon. X-ray examination was taken in every case of the affected joint. Patients who were considered to have early OA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsy of the symptomatic joint. Synovial tissue samples from patients with late OA were obtained at the time of knee joint arthroplasty. Microscopic examination in early osteoarthritis revealed for more than half of patients with synovial biopsy through arthroscopic technique having synovitis lesions with mononuclear infiltrates, diffuse fibrosis, thickening of the lining layer, macrophages appearance and neoformation vessels also. The synovitis seen in advanced OA knees tends to be diffuse and is not mandatory localized to areas of chondral defects, although an association has been reported between chondral defects and associated synovitis in the knee medial tibio-femoral compartment. The overexpression of mediators of inflammation and the increased mononuclear cell infiltration were seen in early OA, compared with late OA.

  16. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    in real-time and facilitates diagnostic and therapeutic interventions such as joint aspiration and injection. Exciting experimental modalities are also being developed with the potential to provide not just morphological but functional imaging. Techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET......) and high-resolution computerized tomography. Erosions are very clearly depicted using these modalities and MRI also allows imaging of soft tissues with assessment of joint inflammation. High-resolution ultrasound is a convenient clinical technique for the assessment of erosions, synovitis and tenosynovitis...

  17. Strenuous running exacerbates knee cartilage erosion induced by low amount of mono-iodoacetate in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Ryusuke; Muneta, Takeshi; Ozeki, Nobutake; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Udo, Mio; Yanagisawa, Katsuaki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Tomita, Makoto; Koga, Hideyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Background It is still debated whether strenuous running in the inflammatory phase produces beneficial or harmful effect in rat knees. We examined (1) the dropout rate of rats during a 30-km running protocol, (2) influences of strenuous running and/or low amounts of mono-iodoacetate injection on cartilage, and (3) the effect of strenuous running on synovitis. Methods Rats were forced to run 30?km over 6?weeks and the dropout rate was examined. One week after 0.1?mg mono-iodoacetate was inject...

  18. Case report 393: Extraskeletal chondroma of the soft tissue of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, G.; Tripi, D.

    1986-10-01

    An interesting case of extraskeletal intra-articular chondroma is described. The radiological appearance was that of a soft tissue mass of the wrist on the ulnar side, together with osteopenia and erosions of the pisiform and triquetrum bones. No calcification was noted. The most likely diagnosis was pigmented villonodular synovitis; synovial osteochondromatosis was also considered. However, at operation a single cartilaginous intra-articular nodule, firmly attached to the synovium, proved to be an extraskeletal chondroma. The authors offer speculative theories about the origins of such lesions and describe the various radiological and pathological features of a chondroma of soft tissues.

  19. Efficacy and safety of radiosynovectomy. Editorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Peter (Toronto Univ., Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Medicine)

    Radiosynovectomy using injections of gold 198, yttrium 90 or phosphorus 32 colloiperformeds has been performed in cases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other degenerative joint diseases. A review of the literature shows that despite uncontrolled evidence that radiosynovectomy is a useful procedure for intractable synovitis (mainly of the larger joints), both the short and long term benefits in RA and the seronegative arthritides need to be clarified through carefully controlled, prospective studies. The procedure in experienced hands is safe, and therefore, except in the very young and those with a very thick synovium, is preferred to surgical synovectomy. The introduction of new isotopes for this treatment should be viewed with caution.

  20. Case report 393: Extraskeletal chondroma of the soft tissue of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perri, G.; Tripi, D.

    1986-01-01

    An interesting case of extraskeletal intra-articular chondroma is described. The radiological appearance was that of a soft tissue mass of the wrist on the ulnar side, together with osteopenia and erosions of the pisiform and triquetrum bones. No calcification was noted. The most likely diagnosis was pigmented villonodular synovitis; synovial osteochondromatosis was also considered. However, at operation a single cartilaginous intra-articular nodule, firmly attached to the synovium, proved to be an extraskeletal chondroma. The authors offer speculative theories about the origins of such lesions and describe the various radiological and pathological features of a chondroma of soft tissues. (orig.)

  1. Approaches to the evaluation of the child with a limp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poznanski, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    This course addresses the radiologic approach to evaluating the child with a limp and the integration of various imaging modalities for this purpose, particularly radionuclide bone scans, CT, US, and MR imaging. The use of these modalities in the various abnormalities that cause a limp in children is discussed. These abnormalities include congenital disorders; inflammatory problems such as transient toxic synovitis, septic arthritis, or osteomyelitis; neoplastic entities such as osteoid osteoma, leukemia, and neuroblastoma; trauma, such as may be seen in association with stress fracture, the battered child, cartilagenous or ligamentous injury; and other conditions such as Perthes disease, Gaucher disease, steroid arthropathy, slipped capital femoral epiphyses, the arthritides, reflex sympathetic dystrophy

  2. Validation of the OMERACT Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) for the Hand and Foot in a Randomized Placebo-controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinatsi, Daniel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess changes following treatment and the reliability and responsiveness to change of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (PsAMRIS) in a randomized controlled trial. Methods. Forty patients with PsA randomized to either...... placebo or abatacept (ABA) had MRI of either 1 hand (n = 20) or 1 foot (n = 20) at baseline and after 6 months. Images were scored blindly twice by 3 independent readers according to the PsAMRIS (for synovitis, tenosynovitis, periarticular inflammation, bone edema, bone erosion, and bone proliferation...

  3. Vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamani, I.; Syed, I.; Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Green, R.; MacSweeney, F

    2004-10-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is most commonly due to pyogenic or granulomatous infection and typically results in the combined involvement of the intervertebral disc and adjacent vertebral bodies. Non-infective causes include the related conditions of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome. Occasionally, these conditions may present purely within the vertebral body, resulting in various combinations of vertebral marrow oedema and sclerosis, destructive lesions of the vertebral body and pathological vertebral collapse, thus mimicking neoplastic disease. This review illustrates the imaging features of vertebral osteomyelitis without disc involvement, with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings.

  4. Exploration of the S.A.P.H.O. syndrome: PET/CT with {sup 18}FNa vs planar osseous scintigraphy; Exploration du syndrome SAPHO: TEP/TDM au {sup 18}FNa vs scintigraphie osseuse planaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Ali, K.; Poisson, T.; Hayem, G.; Lebtahi, R.; Sarda-Mantel, L.; Burg, S.; Meyer, O.; Le Guludec, D. [Groupe hospitalier Bichat-Claude-Bernard, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    Our purpose was to study the interest of the PET/CT with {sup 18}FNa (F Na-PET/CT) in the assessment of the lesions synovitis acne pustulosis hyperostosis osteitis (S.A.P.H.O.) syndrome compared to bone planar scintigraphy with hydroxy-methylene diphosphonate (H.M.D.P.) labelled with {sup 99m}Tc. The preliminary results suggest an increase of sensitivity of the F Na-PET/CT compared to bone scintigraphy in the S.A.P.H.O. syndrome exploration ( particularly for the rachis injuries, tips and enthesopathies), without loss of specificity. (N.C.)

  5. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Botchu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  6. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchu, Rajesh; Khan, Aman; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  7. [Ankle arthroscopy in clinical application: a preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J S

    1989-01-01

    The results of arthroscopy or arthroscopic synovectomy on 31 ankle joints in 24 cases were reported. All the patients were followed for 2 to 10 months with an average of 6 months. The results were as follows of the 26 rheumatoid arthritis: excellent in 5 ankles (19.2%), good in 8 (30.8%), fair in 7 (26.9%), and poor in 6 (23.6%), of the three traumatic arthritis: good in one and fair in two; of the remaining 2: good in 1 tuberculous synovitis and fair in 1 chronic pyogenic arthritis. The operative procedure, indications and value of ankle arthroscopy together with its advantages were discussed in detail.

  8. MR arthrography: Basics, technique, and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, P.C.; Engel, A.; Kramer, J.; Imhof, H.

    1988-01-01

    Following evidence that intraarticular Gd-DTPA does not induce synovitis and is not stored in normal or chondropathic joint cartilage, the authors injected various concentrations of Gd-DTPA into 40 cadaveric and 40 in vivo knees. All in vivo knees underwent total prosthetic knee replacement, followed by a histologic workup. Results showed that MR arthrography greatly enhances the visibility of normal and pathologic structures and is a safe procedure. Moreover, MR arthrography seems to allow correct assessment and staging of various types of chondropathies

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis following ciguatera poisoning: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Ryuichi; Shimabukuro, Akira; Kinjo, Mitsuyo

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To report the first case of ciguatera-associated rheumatoid arthritis in Japan. Patient: A 53-year-old man presented to our clinic with morning stiffness and pain in the fingers and wrists. Results: For six months, he had suffered from chronic pain in both hands and shoulders caused by ciguatera poisoning. He was referred to a local general hospital and diagnosed with RA. Conclusion: When synovitis becomes evident in chronic ciguatera poisoning, reevaluation is necessary, including investigation of chronic arthritis, which might be associated with the onset of RA.

  10. Synovis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome: A case of spine, pelvis, and anterior chest wall involvement, with overlooked plantar pustulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Jeong, Soh Yong; Lee, Sujin; Baek, In Woon; Park, Jeongmi

    2017-01-01

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is an inflammatory clinical condition with aseptic bone lesions and characteristic skin manifestations. A 63-year-old woman presented with vague musculoskeletal symptoms including chronic buttock pain. The clinical work-up revealed multiple spine and osteoarticular involvement. Multilevel bone marrow edema and cortical erosions involving the spine, asymmetric sacroiliitis, and osteosclerosis of the sternoclavicular joint were consistent with a diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. Considering SAPHO syndrome in the differential diagnosis, subsequent skin inspection revealed plantar pustulosis. Despite the unique feature of accompanying skin and skeletal lesions, skin lesions could be overlooked if not suspected

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in psoriatic arthritis: a review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F.M.; Lassere, M.; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2006-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a diverse condition that may be characterized by peripheral inflammatory arthritis, axial involvement, dactylitis and enthesitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows visualization of soft tissue, articular and entheseal lesions, and provides a unique picture of the dise....../sacroiliitis and subclinical arthropathy. Comparisons have been drawn with the more extensive literature describing the MRI features of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis....... of the disease process that cannot be gained using other imaging modalities. This review focuses on the literature on MRI in psoriatic arthritis published from 1996 to July 2005. The MRI features discussed include synovitis, tendonitis, dactylitis, bone oedema, bone erosions, soft tissue oedema, spondylitis...

  12. Synovis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome: A case of spine, pelvis, and anterior chest wall involvement, with overlooked plantar pustulosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Jeong, Soh Yong; Lee, Sujin; Baek, In Woon; Park, Jeongmi [Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is an inflammatory clinical condition with aseptic bone lesions and characteristic skin manifestations. A 63-year-old woman presented with vague musculoskeletal symptoms including chronic buttock pain. The clinical work-up revealed multiple spine and osteoarticular involvement. Multilevel bone marrow edema and cortical erosions involving the spine, asymmetric sacroiliitis, and osteosclerosis of the sternoclavicular joint were consistent with a diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. Considering SAPHO syndrome in the differential diagnosis, subsequent skin inspection revealed plantar pustulosis. Despite the unique feature of accompanying skin and skeletal lesions, skin lesions could be overlooked if not suspected.

  13. Inflammatory arthritis mimicking Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) in a child: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilmez, Zeliha; Turgut, Selin Turan; Icagasioglu, Afitap; Bicakci, Irem

    2016-01-01

    Joint complaints in childhood are seen frequently and differential diagnosis can be difficult. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatological disease of childhood. It involves peripheral joint arthritis, chronic synovitis, and extra-articular manifestations. Accurate diagnosis can take a long time and sometimes multiple diagnoses are used while following the patient until a final diagnosis can be reached. Arthritis may be triggered by trauma and confused with other diseases like complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), in which trauma plays a role in the etiology. In the present case, ankle pain in an 8-year-old girl was misdiagnosed as CRPS.

  14. Arthroscintigraphy in diagnosis of relapses after early synovectomy of the knee joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubovski, G.A.; Abasov, Eh.Sh.; Smirnov, Yu.N.

    1980-01-01

    The authors studied differential diagnostic possibilities of scintigraphy with the use of sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate to reveal relapses after early synovectomy of the knee joints in 40 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. High informativeness of the method was established. The authors succeded in diagnosing the subclinical variant of rheumatoid synovitis in the operated joints by means of scintigraphy. The computer-arthroscintigraphy method with sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate is recommended for a wide use in arthrological practice to ensure an objective assessment of the condition of the operated joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to conduct timely adequate therapy for the prevention of the relapses

  15. Tuberculous arthritis of the appendicular skeleton: MR imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Hemant E-mail: parurad@hotmail.com; Shah, Jeshil; Patkar, Deepak; Singrakhia, Manoj; Patankar, Tufail; Hutchinson, Charles

    2004-12-01

    Tuberculosis [TB] of the appendicular skeleton is an uncommon infection caused by the tuberculous bacilli and constitutes only 1-3% of all tuberculosis infections. MR imaging features of tuberculous arthritis include bone marrow oedema, cortical erosions, synovitis, joint effusion, tenosynovitis, soft tissue collections, and myositis. These imaging features are at times non-specific, but in the correct clinical context help in diagnosis of tuberculosis. We present the various pathological manifestations of TB arthritis involving the different joints of appendicular skeleton and discuss their MR imaging appearances.

  16. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutry, Nathalie; Khalil, Chadi; Jaspart, Matthieu; Marie-Helene, Vieillard; Demondion, Xavier; Cotten, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  17. The ultrasound assessment of the psoriatic arthritis: from joint to skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ariani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing number of papers investigating the diagnostic potential of ultrasonography in the assessment of patients with psoriatic arthritis and supporting its higher sensitivity over clinical examination in the diagnosis of synovitis, enthesitis and tenosynovitis. Less attention has been paid on both skin and nail, frequently involved in this condition. The aim of this paper is to show the potential of ultrasound in a multi-target assessment (joints, tendons, entesis, skin and nails in patients with psoriatic arthritis, using the last generation ultrasound equipment.

  18. Spontaneous Rupture of the Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon due to Unusual Etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Taş

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the extensor pollicis longus tendon includes systemic or local steroid injections, wrist fracture, tenosynovitis, synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and repetitive wrist motions. Case Report: We encountered a case of extensor pollicis longus tendon rupture with an unusual etiology, cow milking. In this case, transfer of the extensor indicis proprius tendon was performed successfully. At 1 year after surgery, extension of the thumb was sufficient. Conclusion: It appears that patients with occupations involving repetitive motions are at a high risk of closed tendon ruptures.

  19. Tuberculous arthritis of the appendicular skeleton: MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Hemant; Shah, Jeshil; Patkar, Deepak; Singrakhia, Manoj; Patankar, Tufail; Hutchinson, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Tuberculosis [TB] of the appendicular skeleton is an uncommon infection caused by the tuberculous bacilli and constitutes only 1-3% of all tuberculosis infections. MR imaging features of tuberculous arthritis include bone marrow oedema, cortical erosions, synovitis, joint effusion, tenosynovitis, soft tissue collections, and myositis. These imaging features are at times non-specific, but in the correct clinical context help in diagnosis of tuberculosis. We present the various pathological manifestations of TB arthritis involving the different joints of appendicular skeleton and discuss their MR imaging appearances

  20. Soft tissue changes in the metacarpal region of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis causes changes in the soft tissues in the metacarpal portion of the hand which can be demonstrated by low Kv exposures. Indirect signs of inflammation consist of oedema extending from the synovial compartments to the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the intermuscular fat septa and the peritendinous tissue. Increased blood flow leads to dilatation of veins. Direct signs of inflammation consists of tenosynovitis and synovitis of the joints, with enlargement of the corresponding compartments. Limited mobility of the hand over a long period, or improvement in motility are paralleled by changes in muscle mass.

  1. Soft tissue changes in the metacarpal region of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arhtritis causes changes in the soft tissues in the metacarpal portion of the hand which can be demonstrated by low Kv exposures. Indirect signs of inflammation consist of oedema extending from the synovial compartments to the skin, the subcutaneous tissues, the intermuscular fat septa and the peritendinous tissue. Increased blood flow leads to dilatation of veins. Direct signs of inflammation consists of tenosynovitis and synovitis of the joints, with enlargement of the corresponding compartments. Limited mobility of the hand over a long period, or improvement in motility are paralleled by changes in muscle mass. (orig.) [de

  2. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2016.

  3. Imaging of the hip in patients with rheumatic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutry, Nathalie [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)]. E-mail: nboutry@chru-lille.fr; Khalil, Chadi [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Jaspart, Matthieu [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Marie-Helene, Vieillard [Department of Rheumatology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Demondion, Xavier [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France); Cotten, Anne [Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Roger Salengro Hospital, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Lille (France)

    2007-07-15

    Hip joint abnormalities are commonly encountered in patients with rheumatic disorders. Although conventional radiography remains the mainstay for diagnosis of joint damage and subsequent follow-up, magnetic resonance imaging and, to a lesser extent, ultrasound have afforded the ability to detect early signs of articular involvement (i.e., synovitis and bone erosions), and to assess disease activity in treated patients. In more advanced stages of rheumatic disorders, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound are both useful in assessing paraarticular involvement (i.e., bursitis and synovial cysts)

  4. [Differential diagnosis of polyarthritis pain syndrome of the locomotor apparatus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninger, H

    1998-02-28

    Widespread pain syndromes of the musculoskeletal system present to general practitioners, internists, neurologists and orthopedic surgeons every day. The syndromes may result both from organic diseases (inflammatory joint diseases, rheumatic manifestations of organ diseases) as well as dysfunctional syndromes, the latter including mainly biomechanically induced syndromes and fibromyalgia. The approach is predominantly clinically oriented and requires laboratory means or technical procedures only in a limited extend. The duration of history, the recognition of synovitis and of myofascial trigger points or of integumental tender points allow in most patients to achieve appropriate diagnostic criteria.

  5. Associations of anatomical measures from MRI with radiographically defined knee osteoarthritis score, pain, and physical functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Maryfran; Karvonen-Gutierrez, Carrie A; Jacobson, Jon A; Jiang, Yebin; Yosef, Matheos

    2011-02-02

    The prevalence of knee osteoarthritis is traditionally based on radiographic findings, but magnetic resonance imaging is now being used to provide better visualization of bone, cartilage, and soft tissues as well as the patellar compartment. The goal of this study was to estimate the prevalences of knee features defined on magnetic resonance imaging in a population and to relate these abnormalities to knee osteoarthritis severity scores based on radiographic findings, physical functioning, and reported knee pain in middle-aged women. Magnetic resonance images of the knee were evaluated for the location and severity of cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, meniscal and/or ligamentous tears, effusion, and synovitis among 363 middle-aged women (724 knees) from the Michigan Study of Women's Health Across the Nation. These findings were related to Kellgren-Lawrence osteoarthritis severity scores from radiographs, self-reported knee pain, self-reported knee injury, perception of physical functioning, and physical performance measures to assess mobility. Radiographs, physical performance assessment, and interviews were undertaken at the 1996 study baseline and again (with the addition of magnetic resonance imaging assessment) at the follow-up visit during 2007 to 2008. The prevalence of moderate-to-severe knee osteoarthritis changed from 3.7% at the baseline assessment to 26.7% at the follow-up visit eleven years later. Full-thickness cartilage defects of the medial, lateral, and patellofemoral compartments were present in 14.5% (105 knees), 4.6% (thirty-three knees), and 26.2% (190 knees), respectively. Synovitis was identified in 24.7% (179) of the knees, and joint effusions were observed in 70% (507 knees); 21.7% (157) of the knees had complex or macerated meniscal tears. Large osteophytes, marked synovitis, macerated meniscal tears, and full-thickness tibial cartilage defects were associated with increased odds of knee pain and with

  6. Development and Reliability of the OMERACT Thumb Base Osteoarthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Féline P B; Conaghan, Philip G; Foltz, Violaine

    2017-01-01

    : The TOMS assessed the first carpometacarpal (CMC-1) and scaphotrapeziotrapezoid (STT) joints for synovitis, subchondral bone defects (including erosions, cysts, and bone attrition), osteophytes, cartilage, and bone marrow lesions on a 0-3 scale (normal to severe). Subluxation was evaluated only in the CMC......, with better performance for subchondral bone defects, subluxation, and bone marrow lesions. CONCLUSION: A thumb base OA MRI scoring system has been developed. The OMERACT TOMS demonstrated good intrareader and interreader reliability. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate reliability of change...

  7. The OMERACT Ultrasound Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terslev, Lene; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Bruyn, George A W

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update from the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound Working Group on the progress for defining ultrasound (US) minimal disease activity threshold at joint level in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and for standardization of US application in juvenile idiopathic......) and power Doppler (PD). Synovial effusion (SE) was scored a binary variable. For JIA, a Delphi approach and subsequent validation in static images and patient-based exercises were used to developed preliminary definitions for synovitis and a scoring system. RESULTS: For minimal disease activity, 7% HC had...

  8. Leukocytapheresis (LCAP) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis on a maintenance hemodialysis patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, I; Ohi, H; Maruyama, T; Hamada, H; Tomino, Y

    2007-08-01

    A 57-year-old-woman, who was treated with regular maintenance hemodialysis (HD), newly contracted rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Oral predonisolone was effective for alleviating her arthralgia but the RA activity became steroid-dependent. For treatment of poorly controlled synovitis leukocytapheresis (LCAP) showed excellent efficacy in the treatment of her joint pain. No serious adverse effects were observed. Serological markers such as CRP, serum amyloid A, matrix metalloproteinase 3 and peripheral blood lymphocyte count fluctuated with her clinical symptoms. We recommend LCAP as candidate therapy for steroid-dependent patients with RA who are on maintenance HD.

  9. The joint in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Mahta; Thiele, Ralph; Ritchlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, is notable for diversity in disease presentation, course and response to treatment. Equally varied are the types of musculoskeletal involvement which include peripheral and axial joint disease, dactylitis and enthesitis. In this review, we focus on the psoriatic joint and discuss pathways that underlie synovial, cartilage and bone inflammation and highlight key histopathologic features. The pivotal inflammatory mechanisms and pathobiology of PsA parallel findings in other forms of spondyloarthritis but are distinct from disease pathways described in rheumatoid synovitis and bone disease. The diagnosis of PsA from both a clinical and imaging perspective is also discussed.

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Early diagnosis and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory progressive disease which in the absence of appropriate treatment can lead to joint destruction and disability. Prognosis of RA may be predicted based on the presence of some clinical and laboratory evidences. New criteria for classification of RA provide opportunity for earlier treatment. Initiation of treatment particularly by combination of DMARDs concurrent with short duration of corticosteroid is expected to prevent progressive course and even change the natural course of RA. At present any patients with clinical synovitis in at least one joint may have definite RA, requiring agressive treatment.

  11. Obesity and rates of clinical remission and low MRI inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    George, Michael D.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives O besity has been proposed as a risk factor for refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of obesity on achieving clinical and imaging definitions of low disease activity. Methods T his study evaluated 470 patients with RA from GO-BEFORE and GO-FORWARD randomised...... clinical trials. Included patients had blinded clinical disease activity measures and MRI at baseline, 24 and 52 weeks. Synovitis, osteitis and total inflammation scores were determined using the RA MRI scoring system. Multivariable logistic regression analyses compared odds of achieving Disease Activity...

  12. Computed tomography of the soft tissues of the shoulder. Pt. 3. Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dihlmann, W.; Bandick, J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography of the soft tissue of the shoulder in cases of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff provides the following information: 1. Localisation of the calcium deposits within the rotator cuff. 2. Contours and density of the calcium deposits correlated with the clinical findings as described by Uhthoff et al. Ill-defined contours and non-homogeneous deposits are associated with more severe clinical features. 3. Computed tomography shows that apatite particles, which are not visible radiologically, may penetrate into the shoulder joint and produce synovitis with an effusion. This is of importance in local therapy.

  13. Computed tomography of the soft tissues of the shoulder. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Bandick, J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography of the soft tissue of the shoulder in cases of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff provides the following information: 1. Localisation of the calcium deposits within the rotator cuff. 2. Contours and density of the calcium deposits correlated with the clinical findings as described by Uhthoff et al. Ill-defined contours and non-homogeneous deposits are associated with more severe clinical features. 3. Computed tomography shows that apatite particles, which are not visible radiologically, may penetrate into the shoulder joint and produce synovitis with an effusion. This is of importance in local therapy. (orig.) [de

  14. Bone formation rather than inflammation reflects Ankylosing Spondylitis activity on PET-CT: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijnen, Stefan TG; van der Weijden, Mignon AC; Klein, Joannes P; Hoekstra, Otto S; Boellaard, Ronald; van Denderen, J Christiaan; Dijkmans, Ben AC; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E; van der Laken, Conny J

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Positron Emission Tomography - Computer Tomography (PET-CT) is an interesting imaging technique to visualize Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) activity using specific PET tracers. Previous studies have shown that the PET tracers [18F]FDG and [11C](R)PK11195 can target inflammation (synovitis) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and may therefore be useful in AS. Another interesting tracer for AS is [18F]Fluoride, which targets bone formation. In a pilot setting, the potential of PET-CT in ima...

  15. Tenosynovial giant cell tumor of the posterior arch of C1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Tuite, Michael J.; Koplin, Stephanie A.; Salamat, M.S.; Hafez, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor, also called pigmented villonodular synovitis, is a disease typically of the joints and which uncommonly involves the spine. We present a case of a mass of the posterior C1 arch which eroded bone and did not arise from the facet joint. The imaging findings of spinal tenosynovial giant cell tumor will be reviewed as well as the imaging findings in this case, where tenosynovial giant cell tumor arose presumably within a small bursa. One's understanding of the imaging characteristics can lead to the correct diagnosis and avoid an unnecessary work-up. (orig.)

  16. A computer-aided detection system for rheumatoid arthritis MRI data interpretation and quantification of synovial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubassove, Olga; Boesen, Mikael; Cimmino, Marco A

    2009-01-01

    RATIONAL AND OBJECTIVE: Disease assessment and follow-up of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients require objective evaluation and quantification. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has a large potential to supplement such information for the clinician, however, time spent on data reading...... and interpretation slow down development in this area. Existing scoring systems of especially synovitis are too rigid and insensitive to measure early treatment response and quantify inflammation. This study tested a novel automated, computer system for analysis of dynamic MRI data acquired from patients with RA......, Dynamika-RA, which incorporates efficient data processing and analysis techniques....

  17. Low-field magnetic resonance imaging or combined ultrasonography and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody improve correct classification of individuals as established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens K; Lorenzen, Tove; Ejbjerg, Bo

    2014-01-01

    (RA). METHODS: In 53 individuals from a population-based, cross-sectional study, historic fulfilment of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1987 criteria ("classification") or RA diagnosed by a rheumatologist ("diagnosis") were used as standard references. The sensitivity, specificity and Area....../specificity) was 78% (62%/94%) (classification) and 85% (69%/100%) (diagnosis), while for the total synovitis score of MCP joints plus wrist (cut-off ≥10) it was 78% (62%/94%) (both classification and diagnosis). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the ACR 1987 criteria, low-field MRI alone or adapted criteria incorporating...

  18. Intra-articular distribution pattern after ultrasound-guided injections in wrist joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Jensen, Karl Erik; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution of an ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) injection in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: An ultrasound-guided IA drug injection into the wrist joint was performed in 17 patients with 1 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg...... with the MRI OMERACT synovitis score (r=0.60, p=0.014), but not with the erosions, bonemarrow oedema scores or any clinical parameters. CONCLUSION: The distribution of contrast on MRI showed patient specific and random patterns after IA injections in active RA wrist joints. The degree of distribution increased...

  19. Combined chondroprotectors in the treatment of osteoartritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Derymedvid

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a polyethiologic disease, the emergence and development of which is determined by a number of genetic, mechanical, hormonal and metabolic factors that violate the stability of hyaline cartilage and its physiological regeneration under the influence of loading. A characteristic feature is the destruction of articular cartilage and bone adjacent to it, pain, synovitis, violation or restriction of functional activity of the joints. Osteoarthritis pharmacotherapy includes analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptomatic slow acting drugs that modify cartilage structure (glucosamine, chondroitin, etc..

  20. [A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy in patients with osteoarthrosis deformans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivonenko, V G; Syvolap, V D; Porada, L V; Medvedeva, V N; Boev, S S; Morozov, A I; Slin'ko, V G; Berest, S M; Garbuz, L N; Sholokh, S G

    1997-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of efficacy of magneto- and laser therapy was carried out in 82 patients with osteoarthrosis deformans. The magnetic field and laser irradiation dispelled the pain syndrome and synovitis manifestations. It is recommendable that the multiple-modality therapy of patients with osteoarthrosis deformans should involve magneto- and laser therapy (15 to 20 procedures per one course) that improve results of the treatment being received and allow the time of hospitalization to be reduced at an average by 5 bed-days. Laser appeared to be a very effective mode of treatment. No unfavourable side effects were recordable.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging-determined synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis: comparison with the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the synovium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Stoltenberg, M; Løvgreen-Nielsen, P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes determined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and macroscopic and microscopic synovial pathologic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Synovial biopsies...... were performed, and macroscopic grades of synovitis assigned, at preselected knee sites during arthroscopy or arthrotomy in 17 knees with RA and 25 with OA. Synovial inflammation and 9 separate tissue characteristics were graded histologically. Synovial membrane and joint effusion volumes were...... membrane and effusion volumes may be sensitive markers and/or predictors of disease activity and treatment outcome in RA....

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of unclassified arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Østergaard, M; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the value in clinical practice of hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and whole body bone scintigraphy in the differential diagnosis of patients with unclassified arthritis. METHODS: 41 patients with arthritis (> or = 2 swollen joints, > 6 months' duration) which...... to psoriatic arthritis (RF negative + psoriasis); one to non-specific self-limiting arthritis). No patients classified as non-RA at baseline had fulfilled the ACR criteria after 2 years. The presence of MRI synovitis, MRI erosion and bone scintigraphic pattern compatible with RA showed 100% specificity...

  3. Importance of timing of post-contrast MRI in rheumatoid arthritis: what happens during the first 60 minutes after IV gadolinium-DTPA?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Klarlund, Mette

    2001-01-01

    compromises the differentiation of synovium from joint fluid. OBJECTIVE: To determine the time period after IV MRI contrast (gadolinium-DTPA (Gd)) injection in which synovial membrane volume determination is reliable. METHODS: MRI of five RA knees with clinical synovitis was carried out, with axial, T(1...... threshold. Thereafter, the measured volumes remained practically unchanged. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that MR image acquisition in arthritic knee joints should be performed within the initial approximately 10 minutes after gadolinium contrast injection to achieve the most accurate distinction between...

  4. [Rheumatoid arthritis as a connective tissue disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targońska-Stępniak, Bożena

    2018-01-01

    The available data indicate that seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops as a result of systemic, autoimmune reaction directed against a range of "self" peptides/proteins that have undergone specific forms of post-translational modification. The development and progress of autoimmunity may be triggered by non-specific, local inflammatory processes outside the joints, for example in the oral or respiratory mucous membrane. The disease occurs in genetically susceptible individuals under the influence of environmental risk factors that promote autoimmunity and consequently the inflammatory process. Smoking is particularly linked with RA pathogenesis. Synovitis of multiple, symmetrical, peripheral joints is the most typical feature of RA which results in irreversible damage to joints structure and as a consequence in disability of patients. However, the inflammatory process in the course of RA has a systemic, constitutional nature. Therefore, extra-articular symptoms with internal organ involvement may occur additionally to synovitis, what is an unfavorable prognostic factor. Extra-articular manifestations of RA are associated with the high disease activity both inflammatory and immunological. They occur in patients with severe form of the disease and contribute to a significant lifespan reduction. This is usually associated with progressive atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. The systemic inhibition of an abnormal immune system activity is the mainstay of the effective RA treatment. The currently used disease modifying antirheumatic drugs affect the activity and function of different constituents of the immune system, including B and T lymphocytes and the main pro-inflammatory cytokines, and contribute to autoimmune and inflammatory processes.

  5. Molecular aspects in inflammatory events of temporomandibular joint: Microarray-based identification of mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ogura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Synovial inflammation (synovitis frequently accompanies intracapsular pathologic conditions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ such as internal derangement (ID and/or osteoarthritis (OA, and is suggested to be associated with symptom severity. To identify the putative factors associated with synovitis, we investigated interleukin (IL-1β- and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-responsive genes of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS from patients with ID and/or OA of TMJ using microarray analysis. In this review, we first summarize the FLS of TMJ and the signaling pathways of IL-1β and TNF-α. Next, we show the up-regulated genes in FLS after stimulation with IL-1β or TNF-α, and summarize the gene functions based on recent studies. Among the top 10 up-regulated factors, molecules such as IL-6 and cycrooxygense-2 have been well characterized and investigated in the inflammatory responses and tissue destruction associated with joint diseases such as RA and OA, but the roles of some molecules remain unclear. The FLS reaction can lead to the synthesis and release of a wide variety of inflammatory mediators. Some of these mediators are detected in joint tissues and synovial fluids under intracapsular pathologic conditions, and may represent potential targets for therapeutic interventions in ID and/or OA of TMJ.

  6. Synovial response to intraarticular injections of hyaluronate in frozen shoulder. A quantitative assessment with dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, Kazuya; Mashitori, Hirotaka; Ohno, Wataru; Hamada, Jun'ichiro; Sakai, Hiroya; Saotome, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the response of frozen shoulder (FS) to intraarticular injections of high-molecular-weight sodium hyaluronate (HA), a mixture of 2.5 ml of HA and 1.5 ml of 1% lidocaine was injected into the glenohumeral joint of 11 patients with FS, 8 of whom received five weekly injections. The patients were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association shoulder score (JOA score) before the first injection, 1 week after the first injection, and 1 week after the final injection. Following each clinical evaluation, the patients underwent dynamic magnetic resonance imaging enhanced with Gd-DTPA, and the coefficient of enhancement (CE) in the glenohumeral synovium was calculated, with the examiners blinded to the clinical information. The JOA score tended to be greater and the CE smaller after injection than before injection. The changes in the CE following both single and repeated injections were negatively correlated with changes in the JOA score. Thus, clinical improvement in patients with FS was associated with a decrease in the CE. Because the CE depends on the degree of synovitis, the therapeutic effect of intraarticular HA injection for FS results, at least in part, from suppression of synovitis in the glenohumeral joint through an antiinflammatory effect. (author)

  7. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  8. Clinical efficacy of radiation synovectomy in digital joint osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kampen, Willm Uwe; Hellweg, Leif; Massoudi-Nickel, Schirin; Czech, Norbert; Henze, Eberhard; Brenner, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy was developed for local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the long-term efficacy of radiation synovectomy was retrospectively evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (activated arthrosis) of the digital joints using an algofunctional score. Fifty-three digital joints in 29 patients (mean age 64.8 years) were treated by intra-articular injection of 169 Er citrate. All joints were painful despite pharmacotherapy and showed an elevated blood pool pattern in a pretherapeutic three-phase bone scan, indicative for local synovitis. The patients were asked to classify their complaints with respect to different daily manual activities on a ten-step pain scale from 1 (total disability) to 10 (lack of any impairment) prior to and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 41 months. Local signs of osteoarthritis such as joint swelling or pain were additionally evaluated and were scored from progression of complaints to excellent improvement based on patient self-evaluation. All patients reported a pronounced improvement in their manual activities. The mean total score of 4.73±0.58 for all activities prior to treatment increased significantly to 6.79±0.47 after radiation synovectomy (p<0.05). The best results were obtained in the thumb base joints, whereas distal interphalangeal joints were frequently resistant to therapy. Radiation synovectomy is highly effective in digital joint osteoarthritis with concomitant local synovitis. (orig.)

  9. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the femoral head: associated imaging findings and predictors of clinical progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackney, Lauren A.; Joseph, Gabby B.; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lee, Min Hee [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Vail, Thomas P. [University of California, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    To characterize the morphology and imaging findings of femoral head subchondral insufficiency fractures (SIF), and to investigate clinical outcomes in relation to imaging findings. Fifty-one patients with hip/pelvis magnetic resonance (MR) images and typical SIF characteristics were identified and reviewed by two radiologists. Thirty-five patients had follow-up documentation allowing assessment of clinical outcome. Subgroup comparisons were performed using regression models adjusted for age and body mass index. SIF were frequently associated with cartilage loss (35/47, 74.5 %), effusion (33/42, 78.6 %), synovitis (29/44, 66 %), and bone marrow oedema pattern (BMEP) (average cross-sectional area 885.7 ± 730.2 mm{sup 2}). Total hip arthroplasty (THA) was required in 16/35 patients, at an average of 6 months post-MRI. Compared to the THA cohort, the non-THA group had significantly (p < 0.05) smaller overlying cartilage defect size (10 mm vs. 29 mm), smaller band length ratio and fracture diameters, and greater incidence of parallel fracture morphology (p < 0.05). Male gender and increased age were significantly associated with progression, p < 0.05. SIF were associated with synovitis, cartilage loss, effusion, and BMEP. Male gender and increased age had a significant association with progression to THA, as did band length ratio, fracture diameter, cartilage defect size, and fracture deformity/morphology. (orig.)

  10. Effect of radiosynovectomy in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, S.; Klutmann, S.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Clausen, M.; Sawula, J.A.; Brenner, W.; Henze, E.

    1999-01-01

    Aim: Effect of radiosynovectomy (RS) should be evaluated both by subjective and objective parameters in patients with osteoarthritis and in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A total of 98 joints in 61 patients were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group included 35 patients with therapy-resistant effusions caused by severe osteoarthritis (46 joints). The second group consisted of 26 patients (52 joints) with ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis, and recurrent synovitis following surgery. Effect of RS was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire and quantified by T/B-ratios derived from blood pool images prior to and after RS. Results: Within the first patient group suffering from osteoarthritis, 40% showed a good or excellent improvement of clinical symptoms, 51% were unchanged, and in 9% symptoms worsened. Similar results were found in the second patient group. The majority of unchanged results were small finger joints. In contrast, wrist and knee joints showed a better improvement. Good correlation between results of bone scan and patients subjective impression was found in 38% and 67% in the first and the second patient group, respectively. Conclusion: Radiosynovectomy might be an effective treatment in osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.) [de

  11. Scintiscanning of arthritis and analysis of build-up curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Tsuneo; Omori, Shigeo; Miyawaki, Haruo; Maniwa, Masato; Yoshizaki, Kenichi

    1975-01-01

    In the present study 40 knee joints with rheumatoid arthritis, 23 knee joints with osteoarthrosis deformans, 3 knee joints with non-synovitis, one knee joint with pyogenic arthritis and 4 normal knee joints were scanned. By analysis of build-up curves obtained immediately after the intravenous injection of sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, the rate of accumulation of radioactivity (t 1/2) in the affected joints was simultaneously estimated in order to compare them with clinical findings. 1. Scintiscanning of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthrosis deformans of the knee joint, non-specific synovitis, and pyogenic arthritis of the knee joint, yielded a positive scan for all of the joint diseases. 2. In the scintigram of healthy knee joints, there are no areas of RI accumulation or right to left difference. 3. In some instances abnormal uptake of RI was seen on scintigrams of arthritis even after normal clinical and laboratory findings had been achieved with therapy. 4. sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate, a radionuclide with a short half-life, allows repeated scans and provides a useful radiologic means of evaluating therapeutic course and effectiveness. 5. Analysis of build-up curves revealed that the rate of accumulation of RI was faster in rheumatoid arthritis than in osteoarthrosis deformans. (auth.)

  12. Arthroscopic management of painful first metatarsophalangeal joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthroscopy of the great toe MTP joint has been practiced with favourable outcomes. A range of indications have been described ranging from synovitis to osteochondral defects. The purpose of the present study was to describe our technique and to assess the functional outcome following arthroscopic management of Hallux MTP disorders using AOFAS scoring system. Methods: We describe the technique of Hallux MTP joint arthroscopy in twenty patients. Indications included hallux rigidus with osteophytes, chondromalacia, OCDs, loose bodies, arthrofibrosis, synovitis, tophaceous gout arthritis and intra-articular fractures of MTP joint. All patients had been evaluated clinically and radiologically with record of their AOFAS scores pre-operatively. At a minimum follow-up of two years the clinical assessment was carried out with AOFAS scores. Results: The mean pre-operative and post-operative AOFAS score were 47 (range 10-78 and 97 (87 -100 respectively. The patient with intra-articular fracture had an excellent outcome following arthroscopic reduction of the fracture. Conclusion: Arthroscopic management of painful hallucial MTP joint is a specialized technique, which if performed for the right indications, gives a favourable outcome with minimal complications.

  13. Synoviorthesis with colloidal /sup 32/P chromic phosphate for hemophilic arthropathy: clinical follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, G.E.; Girard, M.; Lamarre, C.; Jutras, M.; Danais, S.; Guay, J.P.; Belanger, R.D.

    1985-11-01

    Thirty-one synoviortheses were performed in 22 joints of 14 hemophilic patients (aged 12 to 28 years) with chronic synovitis and for whom conventional treatments were considered ineffective. Except for patients with inhibitors, conventional treatments included three to six months of adequate prophylactic therapy with the missing coagulation factors, intensive physiotherapy and, when indicated, antiinflammatory agents and orthosis. Colloidal /sup 32/P chromic phosphate was injected intraarticularly in doses of 1.0 mCi for knees and of 0.5 mCi for the other joints. Time of follow-up ranged from two to five years. Frequency and importance of bleeding decreased in all patients. Effect on range of motion was best in knees. In elbows, flexion-extension was improved in four cases, unchanged in five and decreased in one; pronation-supination was decreased in four cases. The results of 13 synoviortheses in four hemophilic patients with high titer factor VIII inhibitors were comparable to those in hemophiliacs with no inhibitors. However, in three of the four patients synoviorthesis had to be repeated after two to four years for recurrence of synovitis. Extraarticular escape of radioactivity was monitored 62 times for 17 synoviortheses in 12 patients; extraarticular counts never exceeded 4% of the intraarticular counts. Chromosome aberrations were found not to be increased after treatment in the seven patients in whom adequate analysis could be done.

  14. Ablation of synovial pannus using microbubble-mediated ultrasonic cavitation in antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Lingyan; Wang, Lei; Luo, Yan

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the ablative effectiveness of microbubble-mediated ultrasonic cavitation for treating synovial pannus and to determine a potential mechanism using the antigen-induced arthritis model (AIA). Ultrasonic ablation was performed on the knee joints of AIA rabbits using optimal ultrasonic ablative parameters. Rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis were randomly assigned to 4 groups: (1) the ultrasound (US) + microbubble group; (2) the US only group; (3) the microbubble only group, and (4) the control group. At 1 h and 14 days after the first ablation, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) monitoring and pathology synovitis score were used to evaluate the therapeutic effects. Synovial necrosis and microvascular changes were also measured. After the ablation treatment, the thickness of synovium and parameters of time intensity curve including derived peak intensity and area under curve were measured using CEUS, and the pathology synovitis score in the ultrasound + microbubble group was significantly lower than that found in the remaining groups. No damage was observed in the surrounding normal tissues. The mechanism underlying the ultrasonic ablation was related to microthrombosis and microvascular rupture that resulted in synovial necrosis. The results suggest that microbubble-mediated ultrasonic cavitation should be applied as a non-invasive strategy for the treatment of synovial pannus in arthritis under optimal conditions.

  15. Hand osteoarthritis: diagnosis, pathogenesis, treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Balabanova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of synovitis, early-stage hand osteoarthritis (HOA mimics hand joint injury in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. However, the topography of synovitis is diverse in these diseases:  distal interphalangeal and thumb joints are involved in the process in HOA. In the latter, tests are negative for immunological markers  (anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, which is typical of RA.  The differences between HOA and RA are prominent, as evidenced  by hand X-rays and magnetic resonance imaging. Investigations  suggest that cytokine profile imbalance is implicated in the  pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, which brings it closer to RA. However, therapy for HOA has not been practically developed; there are only a few works on the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and  biological agents in these patients. It is necessary to work out Russian guidelines for the treatment of HOA.

  16. Repeatability and response to therapy of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis in a large multicentre trial setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterton, John C. [University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Ho, Meilien [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Nordenmark, Lars H. [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Moelndal (Sweden); Jenkins, Martin [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Cambridge (United Kingdom); DiCarlo, Julie; Peterfy, Charles [Spire Sciences Inc, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Guillard, Gwenael; Bowes, Michael A. [Imorphics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Roberts, Caleb; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni [Bioxydyn, Manchester (United Kingdom); Parker, Geoffrey J.M. [University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bioxydyn, Manchester (United Kingdom); Kellner, Herbert [Private Practice and Division of Rheumatology KHI Neuwittelsbach, Muenchen (Germany); Taylor, Peter C. [University of Oxford, Kennedy Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the repeatability and response to therapy of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI biomarkers of synovitis in the hand and wrist of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and in particular the performance of the transfer constant K{sup trans}, in a multicentre trial setting. DCE-MRI and RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) were performed with meticulous standardisation at baseline and 6 and 24 weeks in a substudy of fostamatinib monotherapy in reducing synovitis compared with placebo or adalimumab. Analysis employed statistical shape modelling to avoid biased regions-of-interest, kinetic modelling and heuristic analyses. Repeatability was also evaluated. At early study termination, DCE-MRI data had been acquired from 58 patients in 19 imaging centres. K{sup trans} intra-subject coefficient of variation (N = 14) was 30%. K{sup trans} change demonstrated inferiority of fostamatinib (N = 11) relative to adalimumab (N = 10) after 6 weeks (treatment ratio = 1.92, p = 0.003), and failed to distinguish fostamatinib from placebo (N = 10, p = 0.79). RAMRIS showed superiority of fostamatinib relative to placebo at 6 weeks (p = 0.023), and did not distinguish fostamatinib from adalimumab at either 6 (p = 0.175) or 24 (p = 0.230) weeks. This demonstrated repeatability of K{sup trans} and its ability to distinguish treatment groups show that DCE-MRI biomarkers are suitable for use in multicentre RA trials. (orig.)

  17. What drives osteoarthritis?-synovial versus subchondral bone pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügle, Thomas; Geurts, Jeroen

    2017-09-01

    Subchondral bone and the synovium play an important role in the initiation and progression of OA. MRI often permits an early detection of synovial hypertrophy and bone marrow lesions, both of which can precede cartilage damage. Newer imaging modalities including CT osteoabsorptiometry and hybrid SPECT-CT have underlined the importance of bone in OA pathogenesis. The subchondral bone in OA undergoes an uncoupled remodelling process, which is notably characterized by macrophage infiltration and osteoclast formation. Concomitant increased osteoblast activity leads to spatial remineralization and osteosclerosis in end-stage disease. A plethora of metabolic and mechanical factors can lead to synovitis in OA. Synovial tissue is highly vascularized and thus exposed to systemic influences such as hypercholesterolaemia or low grade inflammation. This review aims to describe the current understanding of synovitis and subchondral bone pathology and their connection in OA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Brachygnathia superior and degenerative joint disease: a new lethal syndrome in Angus calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayo, M; Leipold, H W; Dennis, S M; Eldridge, F E

    1987-03-01

    Brachygnathia superior and generalized diarthrodial degenerative joint disease were seen in 17 related, purebred Angus calves ranging in age from 2 days to 4 months. Craniometrical studies revealed decreased maxillary and palatine bone lengths and increased cranial, skull, and facial indices. Radiological evaluation of major appendicular joints demonstrated lipping of the joint margins with osteophyte formation, sclerosis of subchondral bone, and narrowing of joint spaces. Synovial fluid evaluation indicated joint degeneration but no etiologic agent. Rheumatoid factor analysis of plasma was negative. Grossly, all major appendicular joints were defective including the atlanto-occipital articulation. Lesions ranged from loss of surface luster to erosions and deep ulcers with eburnation of the subchondral bone and secondary proliferative synovitis. Histological changes were degeneration of the articular cartilage matrix, chondrocyte necrosis, flaking and fibrillation, chondrone formation, erosions and ulcers of the articular cartilage with subchondral bone sclerosis, vascular invasion with fibrosis, and chronic, nonsuppurative, proliferative synovitis. Growth plates had defective chondrocyte proliferation and hypertrophy with aberrant ossification of calcified cartilaginous matrix. Histochemical analysis of cartilage and bone failed to incriminate which component was defective, glycosaminoglycan or collagen, but indicated different distribution or absence of one or the other. Genealogic studies revealed a genetic basis for the new defect.

  19. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)], E-mail: sunarerdem@yahoo.com; Tekin, Nilgun Solak [Department of Dermatology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Sarikaya, Selda [Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey); Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen [Department of Radiology, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, School of Medicine, Zonguldak (Turkey)

    2008-09-15

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot.

  20. MR imaging features of foot involvement in patients with psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, C. Zuhal; Tekin, Nilgun Solak; Sarikaya, Selda; Erdem, L. Oktay; Gulec, Sezen

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine alterations of the soft tissues, tendons, cartilage, joint spaces, and bones of the foot using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with psoriasis. Materials and methods: Clinical and MR examination of the foot was performed in 26 consecutive patients (52 ft) with psoriasis. As a control group, 10 healthy volunteers (20 ft) were also studied. Joint effusion/synovitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retroachilles bursitis, Achilles tendonitis, soft-tissue edema, para-articular enthesophytes, bone marrow edema, sinus tarsi syndrome, enthesopathy at the Achilles attachment and at the plantar fascia attachment, plantar fasciitis, tenosynovitis, subchondral cysts, and bone erosions, joint space narrowing, subchondral signal changes, osteolysis, luxation, and sub-luxation were examined. Results: Clinical signs and symptoms (pain and swelling) due to foot involvement were present in none of the patients while frequency of involvement was 92% (24/26) by MR imaging. The most common MR imaging findings were Achilles tendonitis (acute and peritendinitis) (57%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (50%), joint effusion/synovitis (46%), soft-tissue edema (46%), and para-articular enthesophytes (38%). The most commonly involved anatomical region was the hindfoot (73%). Conclusion: Our data showed that the incidence of foot involvement was very high in asymptomatic patients with psoriasis on MR imaging. Further MR studies are needed to confirm these data. We conclude that MR imaging may be of importance especially in early diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory changes in the foot

  1. Yttrium synovectomy: a meta-analysis of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.

    1993-01-01

    Yttrium synovectomy for chronic synovitis of the knee enjoys widespread usage in Australia with approximately 400 patients receiving yttrium-90 in 1991. Despite abundant anecdotal evidence of its efficacy there is a paucity of controlled trials and those that have been done have produced conflicting results and have been of insufficient sample size. To critically and quantitatively evaluate the published English literature on comparative trials of yttrium-90 therapy for chronic synovitis of the knee, the technique of meta-analysis was utilised. The literature search was carried out using the MeSH terms of synovectomy and knee; and yttrium. This was augmented by referring to reviews, current textbooks and back-references. Outcome measures varied between trials but could be grouped as treatment success. The Peto modification of Mantel and Haenszl was used for statistical pooling of data yielding a pooled odds ratio (OR). The literature search revealed ten controlled trials of which two were excluded from further analysis. It was found that yttrium was superior to placebo (OR 2.42, 95% CI 1.02-5.73) but it is recommended that this result should be interpreted with caution due to possible publication bias. It is concluded that there is insufficient evidence from comparative trials of yttrium in the English literature to show that yttrium synovectomy is convincingly superior to triamcinolone (OR 1.89, 95% CI 0.81-10.55) or other active modalities (OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.72-1.52). 25 refs., 4 tabs

  2. Analysis of synovial fluid components of hydrarthrosis in long-term hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, E; Maekawa, M; Ohtani, M

    1999-01-01

    The synovial fluid components in long-term hemodialysis patients (HD; 43 knees in 43 patients) were investigated and compared with those in patients with osteoarthritis (OA; 21 knees in 21 patients) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA; 26 knees in 26 patients). The average ages in the three groups were, respectively, 60.7 years (range, 34-79 years), 63.2 years (range, 48-88 years), and 59.7 years (range, 37-76 years). The duration of hemodialysis in the HD group averaged 14.0 years (range, 4-24 years). The concentrations of hyaluronic acid, protein, and isomers of chondroitin sulfate (chondroitin 6-sulfate [C6S] and chondroitin 4-sulfate [C4S]) in the synovial fluid, and its viscosity were measured. Differences in each of the parameters were investigated according to disease clinical stage, roentgenological grade, and periods of dialysis in the HD group. The viscosity of the synovial fluid and the concentration of hyaluronic acid in HD patients were similar to those in OA patients; however, the C6S/C4S ratio in the synovial fluid of HD patients was similar to that in RA patients. The latter finding suggests that synovitis may be present in the hydrarthrosis of HD patients. The cause of this synovitis in HD patients remains to be elucidated.

  3. Clinical efficacy of radiation synovectomy in digital joint osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kampen, Willm Uwe; Hellweg, Leif; Massoudi-Nickel, Schirin; Czech, Norbert; Henze, Eberhard [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Kiel (Germany); Brenner, Winfried [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Radiation synovectomy was developed for local treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the long-term efficacy of radiation synovectomy was retrospectively evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis (activated arthrosis) of the digital joints using an algofunctional score. Fifty-three digital joints in 29 patients (mean age 64.8 years) were treated by intra-articular injection of{sup 169}Er citrate. All joints were painful despite pharmacotherapy and showed an elevated blood pool pattern in a pretherapeutic three-phase bone scan, indicative for local synovitis. The patients were asked to classify their complaints with respect to different daily manual activities on a ten-step pain scale from 1 (total disability) to 10 (lack of any impairment) prior to and after treatment, with a mean follow-up of 41 months. Local signs of osteoarthritis such as joint swelling or pain were additionally evaluated and were scored from progression of complaints to excellent improvement based on patient self-evaluation. All patients reported a pronounced improvement in their manual activities. The mean total score of 4.73{+-}0.58 for all activities prior to treatment increased significantly to 6.79{+-}0.47 after radiation synovectomy (p<0.05). The best results were obtained in the thumb base joints, whereas distal interphalangeal joints were frequently resistant to therapy. Radiation synovectomy is highly effective in digital joint osteoarthritis with concomitant local synovitis. (orig.)

  4. Characterisation of intra-articular soft tissue tumours and tumour-like lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Matthew E. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, The Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, Asif [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, The Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom); The London Bone and Soft Tissue Tumour Service, London (United Kingdom); University College London, The Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study was to describe a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification system for intra-articular soft tissue tumours based on the morphology of the lesion, with the aim to aid the differential diagnosis. We performed a retrospective review of 52 consecutive patients presenting to a specialist musculoskeletal oncology unit with a suspected intra-articular tumour. Lesions were categorised into one of four groups according to a simple classification system based on their morphological features on MRI. Distinct groupings of pathologies emerged corresponding to each of the morphological categories. Particularly when combined with radiographic features of calcification and bone erosion, certain patterns were found to be characteristic of specific diagnoses. For example multifocal, calcified lesions were found exclusively in synovial osteochondromatosis and diffuse synovitis with hypointense T2-weighted signal intensity was typical of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Certain combinations of imaging features such as diffuse solid lesions and focal lesions with bone erosion were commonly associated with malignant lesions. We suggest that by classifying intra-articular masses according to their morphological features on MRI, particularly when combined with simple radiographic features, an additional parameter may be generated to aid the radiologist in making a diagnosis. In addition, particular combinations of features provide 'red flags' to increase the index of suspicion for malignancy. (orig.)

  5. Cartilage quantification using contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of rheumatoid arthritis: cartilage loss is associated with bone marrow edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Motoshi; Nakamura, Satoko; Hasegawa, Kiminori; Ikeno, Kunihiro; Ichikawa, Shota; Sutherland, Kenneth; Kamishima, Tamotsu

    2017-08-01

    To quantify wrist cartilage using contrast MRI and compare with the extent of adjacent synovitis and bone marrow edema (BME) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 18 patients with RA underwent post-contrast fat-suppressed T 1 weighted coronal imaging. Cartilage area at the centre of the scaphoid-capitate and radius-scaphoid joints was measured by in-house developed software. We defined cartilage as the pixels with signal intensity between two thresholds (lower: 0.4, 0.5 and 0.6 times the muscle signal, upper: 0.9, 1.0, 1.1, 1.2 and 1.3 times the muscle signal). We investigated the association of cartilage loss with synovitis and BME score derived from RA MRI scoring system. Cartilage area was correlated with BME score when thresholds were adequately set with lower threshold at 0.6 times the muscle signal and upper threshold at 1.2 times the muscle signal for both SC (r s =-0.469, p cartilage in the wrist and BME associated with cartilage loss in patients with RA. Advances in knowledge: Our software can quantify cartilage using conventional MR images of the wrist. BME is associated with cartilage loss in RA patients.

  6. Quantitative MR characterization of disease activity in the knee in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a longitudinal pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workie, Dagnachew W.; Graham, T.B.; Laor, Tal; Racadio, Judy M.; Rajagopal, Akila; O'Brien, Kendall J.; Bommer, Wendy A.; Shire, Norah J.; Dardzinski, Bernard J.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a quantifiable and noninvasive method of monitoring disease activity and response to therapy is vital for arthritis management. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) based on pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling to evaluate disease activity in the knee and correlate the results with the clinical assessment in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A group of 17 children with JIA underwent longitudinal clinical and laboratory assessment and DCE-MRI of the knee at enrollment, 3 months, and 12 months. A PK model was employed using MRI signal enhancement data to give three parameters, K trans ' (min -1 ), k ep (min -1 ), and V p ' and to calculate synovial volume. The PK parameters, synovial volumes, and clinical and laboratory assessments in most children were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) at 12 months when compared to the enrollment values. There was excellent correlation between the PK and synovial volume and the clinical and laboratory assessments. Differences in MR and clinical parameter values in individual subjects illustrate persistent synovitis when in clinical remission. A decrease in PK parameter values obtained from DCE-MRI in children with JIA likely reflects diminution of disease activity. This technique may be used as an objective follow-up measure of therapeutic efficacy in patients with JIA. MR imaging can detect persistent synovitis in patients considered to be in clinical remission. (orig.)

  7. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Resveratrol through Classic Models in Mice and Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangxi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation and pain are closely related to humans’ and animals’ health. Resveratrol (RSV is a natural compound with various biological activities. The current study is aimed to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of RSV in vivo. Materials and Methods. The analgesic effects were assessed by the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate tests. The anti-inflammatory effects were determined using the xylene-induced mouse ear oedema, the acetic acid-induced rat pleurisy, and carrageenan-induced rat synovitis tests, respectively. Results. The analgesic results showed that RSV could significantly inhibit the number of writhes and improve the time and pain threshold of mice standing on hot plate. The anti-inflammatory results showed that RSV could inhibit the ear oedema of mice. In acetic acid-induced pleurisy test, RSV could significantly inhibit the WBC and pleurisy exudates, could decrease the production of NO, and elevate the activity of SOD in serum. In carrageenan-induced synovitis test, RSV could reduce the content of MDA and elevate the T-SOD activity in serum; RSV could inhibit the expressions of TP, PGE2, NO, and MDA. Conclusion. Shortly, these results indicated that RSV had potent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities and could be a potential new drug candidate for the treatment of inflammation and pain.

  8. Prevention of the Musculoskeletal Complications of Hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Rodriguez-Merchan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilia is an inherited disorder of clotting factor deficiencies resulting in musculoskeletal bleeding, including hemarthroses, leading to musculoskeletal complications. The articular problems of hemophiliac patients begin in infancy. These include: recurrent hemarthroses, chronic synovitis, flexion deformities, hypertrophy of the growth epiphyses, damage to the articular cartilage, and hemophilic arthropathy. The most commonly affected joints are the ankle, the knee, and the elbow. Hematologic prophylactic treatment from ages 2 to 18 years could avoid the development of hemophilic arthropathy if the concentration of the patient's deficient factor is prevented from falling below 1% of normal. Hemarthroses can be prevented by the administration of clotting factor concentrates (prophylaxis. However, high costs and the need for venous access devices in younger children continue to complicate recommendations for universal prophylaxis. Prevention of joint arthropathy needs to focus on prevention of hemarthroses through prophylaxis, identifying early joint disease through the optimal use of cost-effective imaging modalities and the validation of serological markers of joint arthropathy. Screening for effects on bone health and optimal management of pain to improve quality of life are, likewise, important issues. Major hemarthrosis and chronic hemophilic synovitis should be treated aggressively to prevent hemophilic arthropathy.

  9. Contrast-enhanced MRI compared with the physical examination in the evaluation of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Veenendaal, Mira van; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Dolman, Koert M.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Berg, J.M. van den

    2014-01-01

    To assess the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in discriminating between active and inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and to compare physical examination outcomes with MRI outcomes in the assessment of disease status in JIA patients. Consecutive JIA patients with knee involvement were prospectively studied using an open-bore MRI. Imaging findings from 146 JIA patients were analysed (59.6 % female; mean age, 12.9 years). Patients were classified as clinically active or inactive. MRI features were evaluated using the JAMRIS system, comprising validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. Inter-reader reliability was good for all MRI features (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.87-0.94). No differences were found between the two groups regarding MRI scores of bone marrow oedema, cartilage lesions or bone erosions. Synovial hypertrophy scores differed significantly between groups (P = 0.016). Nonetheless, synovial hypertrophy was also present in 14 JIA patients (35.9 %) with clinically inactive disease. Of JIA patients considered clinically active, 48.6 % showed no signs of MRI-based synovitis. MRI can discriminate between clinically active and inactive JIA patients. However, physical examination is neither very sensitive nor specific in evaluating JIA disease activity compared with MRI. Subclinical synovitis was present in >35 % of presumed clinically inactive patients. (orig.)

  10. Radiosynovectomy of the knee joint in chronic arthritis; An easy and useful treatment. Radiosynoviectomie van de knie bij chronische artritis; Een eenvoudige en zinvolle behandeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerbooms, A.M.T.; Putte, L.B.A. van de (Academisch Ziekenhuis St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Nteherlands). Afdeling Reumatologie); Corstens, F.H.M.; Buijs, W.C.A.M. (Academisch Ziekenhuis St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands). Afdeling Nucleaire Geneeskunde); Bruyn, G.A.W. (Medisch Centrum, Leeuwarden (Netherlands). Afdeling Reumatologie)

    1992-05-09

    185 MBq (5 mCi) colloidal 198-aurothioglucose ({sup 198}Au) or colloidal yttrium-90-silicate ({sup 90}Y) in 10 ml 0.9% NaCl was injected into knee joint cavity after aspiration of joint fluid. After that the patient stayed in bed for 3 days. Clinical examination, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate uptake measurements and radiographs of the knee joints were performed at baseline and during follow-up. Main results, group 1. evaluation after 6 months and after 3 years showed significantly better results in the group of knee joints with no minimal pre-existing radiological abnormalities compared with the group of knee joints with moderate or severe radiological abnormalities (p<0.05). Group 2. 24 months (mean) after treatment with {sup 90}Y, 50% of the treated knees showed clinical improvement of the synovitis. Group 3. a significant reduction of haemarthrotic episodes of all 6 joints treated and a reduction of pain in 4 during a follow-up of 2.5 years.It is concluded that radiosynovectomy is a valuable and simple form of treatment for therapy-resistant chronic synovitis. (author). 20 refs.; 3 tabs.

  11. Characterisation of intra-articular soft tissue tumours and tumour-like lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Matthew E.; Saifuddin, Asif

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) classification system for intra-articular soft tissue tumours based on the morphology of the lesion, with the aim to aid the differential diagnosis. We performed a retrospective review of 52 consecutive patients presenting to a specialist musculoskeletal oncology unit with a suspected intra-articular tumour. Lesions were categorised into one of four groups according to a simple classification system based on their morphological features on MRI. Distinct groupings of pathologies emerged corresponding to each of the morphological categories. Particularly when combined with radiographic features of calcification and bone erosion, certain patterns were found to be characteristic of specific diagnoses. For example multifocal, calcified lesions were found exclusively in synovial osteochondromatosis and diffuse synovitis with hypointense T2-weighted signal intensity was typical of pigmented villonodular synovitis. Certain combinations of imaging features such as diffuse solid lesions and focal lesions with bone erosion were commonly associated with malignant lesions. We suggest that by classifying intra-articular masses according to their morphological features on MRI, particularly when combined with simple radiographic features, an additional parameter may be generated to aid the radiologist in making a diagnosis. In addition, particular combinations of features provide 'red flags' to increase the index of suspicion for malignancy. (orig.)

  12. High resolution ultrasonography in ankle joint pain: Where does it stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennatallah Hatem Shalaby

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ankle is frequently injured in trauma, overuse syndrome and inflammatory processes. Different imaging modalities assess the ankle, including plain radiography, computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and ultrasonography (US. Purpose: Our objective is to assess the role of high resolution US as a valuable tool in the depiction of causes of ankle joint pain. Patients and methods: The study included 28 patients presented with ankle pain ranging in age from 17 to 60 years. They were examined by US and findings were correlated with MRI. Results: US was capable to detect various lesions (synovitis, arthritis, plantar fasciitis, tendon and ligamentous lesions. It had a sensitivity of 95.4%, a specificity of 83.3% and an overall accuracy of 92.8%. US had a limited value in detection of avascular necrosis (AVN, bone marrow oedema and fractures. Conclusion: US can be used as a first step diagnostic tool in cases of ankle pain. MRI should be spared to cases with negative or equivocal US findings. Keywords: High resolution ultrasound, Ankle joint pain, Tendons, Ligaments, Synovitis, Arthritis

  13. Aplicação do laser 808nm na dor articular crônica de ratos Wistar Aplication of 808nm laser in chronic joint pain in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladson Ricardo Flor Bertolini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Durante o processo inflamatório, alguns tipos de células predominam e estão envolvidos com a produção de dor. O laser de baixa potência mostra-se útil no controle de mediadores inflamatórios, mas a ampla divergência nos parâmetros dosimétricos, conduz a variações nos resultados positivos. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar o uso do laser 808nm, na dor articular crônica e edema de ratos Wistar submetidos a sinovite. Foram utilizados 10 ratos Wistar, divididos em dois grupos: GC - indução de sinovite em joelho direito e tratamento placebo; GT - indução de sinovite e irradiado com laser 10J/cm². Para a produção de sinovite foram injetados 100µl de formalina a 5%, no espaço articular tibiofemoral direito. A avaliação da dor ocorreu pelo tempo de elevação da pata (TEP. No 10º dia após a indução de sinovite, iniciou-se o tratamento com laser sobre a face articular medial do joelho, procedimento mantido no decorrer de 10 dias. Os resultados mostraram que o laser apresentou efeitos analgésicos, visto que, para o grupo tratado, houve redução significativa nos valores de TEP, indicando redução da dor, quando comparados os valores pós-tratamento com os pré-tratamento, o que não ocorreu para o grupo que recebeu tratamento placebo; para o edema, o laser também mostrou redução significativa do mesmo. Concluiu-se que o laser 808nm, com 10J/cm², é eficaz na redução da dor articular crônica e edema, em animais submetidos a sinovite experimental.During the inflammatory process some kinds of cells are predominant and are involved with pain production. Low power laser seems to be useful in the control of inflammatory mediators, but wide divergence in the dosemetric parameters leads to variations in its positive results. The aim of this study was to assess the use of the 808nm laser in the chronic joint pain and edema of Wistar rats submitted to synovitis. Sample was composed of 10 Wistar rats divided in two groups

  14. The role of pre-treatment MRI in established cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tins, Bernhard; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor; McCall, Iain

    2009-01-01

    Background: Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) often results in functional impairment and premature osteoarthritis despite surgical treatment. Treatment decisions are commonly based on the clinical history and radiographic appearance. This study assesses the pre-treatment features of SCFE and correlates them to the clinical history to: (1) define the underlying pathological mechanisms; (2) correlate the morphological hip abnormalities with the clinical classifications; (3) identify specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that could carry prognostic implications for treatment approach and outcome. Methods: Clinical history and pre- and posttreatment radiographs and pre-treatment MRIs of 14 patients with 15 affected hips were reviewed. Alignment, impingement, fulcrum formation, remodelling, osteopenia, synovitis, joint effusion, bone marrow and soft tissue oedema and status of the physis and the periosteal sleeve were assessed and related to the clinical history, in particular history of trauma, duration of clinical symptoms and ability to bear weight. Results: Bone marrow oedema around the growth plate and joint effusion occurred in all patients. Synovitis occurred in 13/15 patients. 6 patients had a fall before presenting with SCFE. 5/6 had periarticular soft tissue oedema, complete disruption of the physis and partial periosteal sleeve disruption. 9 patients had no fall prior to presentation, physis and periost were intact in 7/9; periarticular oedema was not seen. 14/15 showed evidence of chronic remodelling. Despite an acute clinical history remodelling was present. A fulcrum-like alignment, impingement of the epiphysis on the metaphysis with a small area of physical contact, was seen in 8 patients, 6/8 had a prior fall. There was no case of avascular necrosis. Spontaneous reduction of SCFE occurred in 1 case, the only case without chronic remodelling. With MRI as gold standard radiographs underestimate the severity of SCFE. Conclusion

  15. Readout-segmented multi-shot diffusion-weighted MRI of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Alexander; Li, Mengxia; Holl-Wieden, Annette; Pabst, Thomas; Neubauer, Henning

    2017-10-12

    Diffusion-weighted MRI has been proposed as a new technique for imaging synovitis without intravenous contrast application. We investigated diagnostic utility of multi-shot readout-segmented diffusion-weighted MRI (multi-shot DWI) for synovial imaging of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Thirty-two consecutive patients with confirmed or suspected JIA (21 girls, median age 13 years) underwent routine 1.5 T MRI with contrast-enhanced T1w imaging (contrast-enhanced MRI) and with multi-shot DWI (RESOLVE, b-values 0-50 and 800 s/mm 2 ). Contrast-enhanced MRI, representing the diagnostic standard, and diffusion-weighted images at b = 800 s/mm 2 were separately rated by three independent blinded readers at different levels of expertise for the presence and the degree of synovitis on a modified 5-item Likert scale along with the level of subjective diagnostic confidence. Fourteen (44%) patients had active synovitis and joint effusion, nine (28%) patients showed mild synovial enhancement not qualifying for arthritis and another nine (28%) patients had no synovial signal alterations on contrast-enhanced imaging. Ratings by the 1st reader on contrast-enhanced MRI and on DWI showed substantial agreement (κ = 0.74). Inter-observer-agreement was high for diagnosing, or ruling out, active arthritis of the knee joint on contrast-enhanced MRI and on DWI, showing full agreement between 1st and 2nd reader and disagreement in one case (3%) between 1st and 3rd reader. In contrast, ratings in cases of absent vs. little synovial inflammation were markedly inconsistent on DWI. Diagnostic confidence was lower on DWI, compared to contrast-enhanced imaging. Multi-shot DWI of the knee joint is feasible in routine imaging and reliably diagnoses, or rules out, active arthritis of the knee joint in paediatric patients without the need of gadolinium-based i.v. contrast injection. Possibly due to "T2w shine-through" artifacts, DWI does not reliably

  16. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The ''rheumatoid'' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with PsA of

  17. Our first clinical experience with radiosynoviorthesis by means of (166)Ho-holmium-boro-macroaggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Otakar; Kasparek, R; Ullmann, V; Melichar, F; Kropacek, M; Mirzajevov, M

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the therapeutic and adverse effects of the application of 166-holmium-boro-macroaggregates (HMBA) in radiosynovectomy (RSO) of the knees. We assessed the efficacy and safety of (166)Ho-HBMA in a prospective clinical trial in patients suffering from chronic synovitis. An effective component of radiopharmaceutical (166)Ho-boro-macroaggregates is radionuclide (166)Ho which has both beta-emission and gamma-emission. The physical half-life time of 166 Ho is 26.8 hours. After application of the radiopharmaceutical into a joint cavity, the effect of beta-emission causes radiation necrosis of pathologically changed (inflamed) synovial membrane. From 15th April 2005, we have started RSO of knees by means of new radiopharmaceutical (166)Ho-boro-macroaggregates in patients with gonarthrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic synovitis, psoriatic arthritis, gout arthropathy. Seventeen intra-articular injections were performed in fifteen patients receiving a mean activity of 972 MBq (range: 904-1,057 MBq) (166)Ho-HMBA. The patients were hospitalized for three days. Side effects were evaluated during hospital stay and after 6-8 weeks. Static scintigraphy of knee joints and measurements of blood radioactivity were performed. Therapeutic effects were evaluated after 6-8 weeks. In 2 hours and 2 days after application, we proved, by means of knee and inguinal scintigraphy, only insignificant radiopharmaceutical leakage from the joint cavity to the inguinal lymph nodes in four patients. In treated patients, no serious adverse effects occurred. Nine patients were without complaints; 4 patients had slight knee exsudation and 2 patients had great exsudation. Therapeutic effects after 6-8 weeks were as follows: 2 patients were without pain, 9 with lower pain, 3 with the same pain and 1 patient with increased pain. Joint motion was improved in 7 patients, remained the same in 7 patients and was impaired in 1 patient. Analgesics consumption was lower in 5 patients

  18. The role of pre-treatment MRI in established cases of slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tins, Bernhard [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY 10 7 AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Bernhard.Tins@rjah.nhs.uk; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor; McCall, Iain [Department of Radiology, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic and District Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire SY 10 7 AG (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    Background: Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) often results in functional impairment and premature osteoarthritis despite surgical treatment. Treatment decisions are commonly based on the clinical history and radiographic appearance. This study assesses the pre-treatment features of SCFE and correlates them to the clinical history to: (1) define the underlying pathological mechanisms; (2) correlate the morphological hip abnormalities with the clinical classifications; (3) identify specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that could carry prognostic implications for treatment approach and outcome. Methods: Clinical history and pre- and posttreatment radiographs and pre-treatment MRIs of 14 patients with 15 affected hips were reviewed. Alignment, impingement, fulcrum formation, remodelling, osteopenia, synovitis, joint effusion, bone marrow and soft tissue oedema and status of the physis and the periosteal sleeve were assessed and related to the clinical history, in particular history of trauma, duration of clinical symptoms and ability to bear weight. Results: Bone marrow oedema around the growth plate and joint effusion occurred in all patients. Synovitis occurred in 13/15 patients. 6 patients had a fall before presenting with SCFE. 5/6 had periarticular soft tissue oedema, complete disruption of the physis and partial periosteal sleeve disruption. 9 patients had no fall prior to presentation, physis and periost were intact in 7/9; periarticular oedema was not seen. 14/15 showed evidence of chronic remodelling. Despite an acute clinical history remodelling was present. A fulcrum-like alignment, impingement of the epiphysis on the metaphysis with a small area of physical contact, was seen in 8 patients, 6/8 had a prior fall. There was no case of avascular necrosis. Spontaneous reduction of SCFE occurred in 1 case, the only case without chronic remodelling. With MRI as gold standard radiographs underestimate the severity of SCFE. Conclusion

  19. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  20. Gouty involvement of the patella and extensor mechanism of the knee mimicking aggressive neoplasm. A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kester, Christopher; Wallace, Matthew T; Jelinek, James; Aboulafia, Albert

    2018-06-01

    Gout is a common inflammatory crystal deposition disease that occurs in many joints throughout the body. Active gout is most often associated with painful synovitis causing searing joint pains, but gout can also produce large masses of space-occupying deposits called tophi. Tophi are most frequently seen in juxta-articular locations with or without bony erosion and are often misdiagnosed as degenerative joint disease. Soft tissue deposits and tendon involvement are also known manifestations of gout, but can present with indeterminate and alarming findings on imaging. We present three cases of tophaceous gout mimicking aggressive neoplasms in the extensor mechanism of the knee. All cases presented as extensor tendon masses eroding into the patella, with imaging findings initially concerning for primary musculoskeletal malignancy.

  1. Arthroscopic cartilage debridement by excimer laser in chondromalacia of the knee joint. A prospective randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunest, J; Löhnert, J

    1990-01-01

    A new operative technique in arthroscopic treatment of chondromalacia using ultraviolet laser systems is introduced. The postoperative results are evaluated in a prospective and randomized clinical trial. One hundred and forty patients stage II or III chondromalacia according to Outerbridge were randomly assigned to arthroscopic operation using either laser or mechanical instruments. After a 6-month follow-up period the clinical results were compared, guided by a specially designed modification of the Lysholm scoring scale. In the short-term follow-up laser surgery gave superior results in regard to reducing pain (P less than 0.05) and leading to a lower incidence of reactive synovitis (P less than 0.01). No difference was found in respect of disability and functional impairment. Our results lead to the conclusion that arthroscopic laser application seems to be a successful procedure in the treatment of degenerative cartilage disorders, providing precise ablation of tissue without significant thermal damage to the remaining cartilage.

  2. Clinical, epidemiological and endoscopic characteristics of the synovial plica in patients with arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliste Manzano, Osvaldo; Morasen Cuevas, Ricardo; Fresneda Labori, Ramon; Matamoros Rodriguez, Adis

    2011-01-01

    A prospective study of patients with surgical treatment of the knee through arthroscopy was carried out at the Rheumatology Service, belonging to 'Saturnino Lora' Teaching Clinical Surgical Provincial Hospital from Santiago de Cuba during the years 2000-2009; a decade in which 663 knees were surgically treated and, 208 due to a synovial plica. This last one turned out to be the most frequent disease, with predominance in the female sex and the ages from 16 to 25 years. There was a marked clinicoarthroscopic correspondence. Preoperative diagnosis consisted of lesion of the internal meniscus, chondromalacia patellae and synovitis, reason why they should be kept in mind as differential diagnosis in this syndrome. The way of healing the surgical section of the synovial plica is the cause of symptomatic relapse and surgical reintervention, as it happened in the patients of the case material 54,0 %, mainly attributable to fibrosis in the wound area.(author)

  3. Unilateral RS3PE in a Patient of Seronegative Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Nandan Varshney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE is a rare but well-reported clinical entity. It is classically described as symmetrical involvement of both upper extremities. Asymmetrical involvement had also been reported, but unilateral presentation is very rare. We hereby report a case of unilateral RS3PE in a patient of seronegative rheumatoid arthritis which was initially misdiagnosed as cellulitis and was given high dose antibiotics without any significant improvement. Later a rheumatologic consultation leads to a prompt diagnosis, and treatment with steroids leads to dramatic reversal of symptoms. This case demonstrates the rare presentation of this rare clinical entity and highlights the necessity of awareness regarding unilateral disease to clinicians.

  4. Intra-articular Nodular Fasciitis: An Unexpected Diagnosis for a Joint Lesion: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MF Michelle Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathological lesions in and around a joint can arise from underlying dermis, subcutis, deep muscle, bone or synovium. Clinical presentation can include joint pain, joint swelling, palpable masses and mechanical restriction. Whilst giant cell tumour of tendon sheath, pigmented villonodular synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, lipoma arborescens, juxta articular myxomas and inflammatory arthritis are the better-known conditions of the joint. Intra-articular nodular fasciitis, on the other hand, is less well recognized both clinically and radiologically. It is rarely seen in routine practice and is only described in case reports in the literature. Due to the non-specific clinical and radiological findings as well as the unfamiliarity with the entity, the diagnosis of intra-articular nodular fasciitis is usually clinched only after histological examination. We present a case of intra-articular nodular fasciitis arising in the knee joint which was not suspected clinically or radiologically.

  5. SAPHO: syndrome or concept? Imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earwaker, J.W.S. [Department of Medical Imaging, Holy Spirit Hospital, Brisbane (Australia); Cotten, A. [Service de Radiologie OsteoArticulaire, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2003-06-01

    The SAPHO syndrome was a term coined to include a variety of musculoskeletal disorders associated with skin conditions, mainly palmoplantar pustulosis and acne conglobata. It is more correctly a spectrum which includes the following: skin lesions, osteoarticular manifestations of synovitis hyperostosis and osteitis affecting particular target sites, and.a clinical course marked by relapses and remissions. The major sites of involvement are the anterior chest wall, the spine, long bones, flat bones, and large and small joints. The distribution and severity of involvement varies from the adult to the pediatric form of chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO). The diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome is not difficult when the typical osteoarticular lesions are located in characteristic target sites. The diagnosis is more difficult if atypical sites are involved and there is no skin disease. (orig.)

  6. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  7. Aquatic antagonists: cutaneous sea urchin spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Clifford; Aronson, Erica R; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M

    2016-11-01

    Injuries from sea urchin spines are commonly seen in coastal regions with high levels of participation in water activities. Although these injuries may seem minor, the consequences vary based on the location of the injury. Sea urchin spine injuries may cause arthritis and synovitis from spines in the joints. Nonjoint injuries have been reported, and dermatologic aspects of sea urchin spine injuries rarely have been discussed. We present a case of a patient with sea urchin spines embedded in the thigh who subsequently developed painful skin nodules. Tissue from the site of the injury demonstrated foreign-body type granulomas. Following the removal of the spines and granulomatous tissue, the patient experienced resolution of the nodules and associated pain. Extraction of sea urchin spines can attenuate the pain and decrease the likelihood of granuloma formation, infection, and long-term sequelae.

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals in Radiosynoviorthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Arencibia, Jorge; Morin Zorrilla, Jose; Garcia Rodriguez, Enrique; Sagarra Veranes, Marta

    2010-01-01

    The Radiosynoviorthesis is a procedure of Metabolic Radiotherapy, consisting in the intraarticular injection of a radiopharmaceutical with a beta emitting radionuclide for the treatment of chronic synovitis, frequently present in rheumatoid arthritis, haemophilia and other systemic diseases. As this is a safe, effective and a relatively low-cost procedure, It is ordinarily used in Europe, USA and in some Latin American countries . The existing commercial products are based on 90 Y, 169 Er, 186 Re and 32 P, although research is carried out on the use of 188 Re, 166 Ho, among others radionuclides. In Cuba a suspension of Chromium Phosphate (III) labeled with 32 P, is on trial. The above-mentioned suspension has enough characteristics to become an efficient and safe product in practice. (Author)

  9. The craniocervical connection: a retrospective analysis of 300 whiplash patients with cervical and temporomandibular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, M H; Weisberg, J

    2000-07-01

    Because the concept of whiplash as a causative factor for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) is highly controversial, we decided to do a retrospective analysis of patients treated in our office who had sustained whiplash injuries and were treated for cervical and temporomandibular disorders. The records of 300 patients with TMD preceded by a motor vehicle accident were examined retrospectively. The most common presenting symptoms, in order, were: jaw pain, neck pain, post-traumatic headache, jaw fatigue, and severe temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking. The most common TMD diagnoses were: masseter trigger points, closing jaw muscle hyperactivity, TMJ synovitis, opening jaw muscle hyperactivity, and advanced TMJ disk derangement. Based primarily on the physical examination, we concluded that the TMJ and surrounding musculature should be examined similarly to other joints, with no preconceived notion that TMD pathology after whiplash is unlikely.

  10. Pyomyositis of tensor fascia lata: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Korhan; Unay, Koray; Ugutmen, Ender; Eren, Abdullah; Eceviz, Engin; Saygý, Baransel

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pyomyositis is a disease in which an abscess is formed deep within large striated muscles. Case presentation We report the case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with fever and a painful hip and was subsequently diagnosed with pyomyositis of the tensor fascia lata. In children with clinical and laboratory findings of inflammation in the vicinity of the hip joint, the differential diagnosis includes transient synovitis, an early stage of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, infectious arthritis of the hip, rheumatologic diseases and extracapsular infection such as osteomyelitis. Conclusion To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of pyomyositis of the tensor fascia lata. Although pyomyositis is a rare disease and the differential diagnosis includes a variety of other commonly observed diseases, pyomyositis should be considered in cases where children present with fever, leukocytosis and localized pain. PMID:18652647

  11. MRI features in de Quervain's tenosynovitis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glajchen, N.; Schweitzer, M.

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain's synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain's disease. De Quervain's tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  12. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Sigeki; Sato, Keiji; Sugiura, Hideshi; Iwata, Hisashi

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  13. Ultrasound appearance of knuckle pads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Ben, R. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Dehghanpisheh, K.; Chatham, W.W.; Alarcon, G.S. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Medicine; Lee, D.H.; Oakes, J. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States). Dept. of Surgery

    2006-11-15

    We describe the ultrasound appearance of knuckle pads. Retrospective analysis of imaging in a series of five patients initially referred for evaluation of periarticular soft-tissue swelling of the hands involving the dorsum of the PIP and MP joints. Two patients had associated Dupuytren's contractures. Ultrasound and radiographs of the hands in all patients were reviewed and correlated with clinical history and physical exams. Radiographs in four patients demonstrated dorsal soft-tissue thickening. Ultrasound exams showed increased dorsal subcutaneous thickening, with either diffuse or focal hypoechoic areas corresponding to the areas of soft-tissue fullness identified on physical exam. No erosions or synovial proliferation were identified either by radiographs or ultrasound of the underlying joints. Knuckle pads can sometimes be difficult to distinguish from synovitis on physical examination. Musculoskeletal ultrasound can quickly identify these superficial lesions and exclude underlying synovial proliferation.

  14. Contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography of the metacarpophalangeal joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Court-Payen, Michel; Strandberg, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine, with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI as the reference, if contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography (CE PDUS) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints provides additional information for evaluation of synovial inflammation compared...... with PDUS. One MCP joint in each of 15 RA patients and 3 healthy control persons were examined with PDUS before and after intravenous bolus Levovist contrast injection. Corresponding rates of early synovial enhancement (RESE), previously shown to be closely related to histopathological synovitis, were...... calculated from dynamic contrast-enhanced MR images obtained the same day. Prior to ultrasonography, the joint was evaluated clinically. Levovist increased the flow signal in 7 of 9 joints with pre-contrast flow-signal and in 0 of 9 without pre-contrast signal. No healthy controls showed CE PDUS signal...

  15. OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies. Summary of OMERACT 6 MR Imaging Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, F; Lassere, M; Edmonds, J

    2003-01-01

    correlates closely with histological evidence and work continues on validating MR erosions with reference to radiographic techniques. The RAMRIS has demonstrated good reliability for bone erosion and synovitis at the wrists and metacarpophalangeal joints subject to reader training, with slightly lower levels......Magnetic resonance image (MRI) scanning is a new method for imaging and quantifying joint inflammation and damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Over the past 4 years, the OMERACT MR Imaging Group has been developing and testing the RA-MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) for use in RA. The OMERACT filter...... and scoring, as well as cost and safety issues. The OMERACT RAMRIS provides a framework for scoring inflammation and damage in RA upon which further modifications can be built. It has been endorsed by the MRI working group and OMERACT 6 participants as useful for inclusion as an outcome measure in clinical...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in children with acute hip pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranner, G.; Ebner, F.; Fotter, R.; Justich, E. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Radiologische Klinik); Linhart, W. (Graz Univ. (Austria). Kinderklinik)

    1989-11-01

    45 children presenting with acute hip pain were prospectively evaluated with conventional radiography, radioisotope bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The final diagnoses were transient synovitis (n=17), septic arthritis (n=2), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCPD, n=13), epiphyseal dysplasia (n=2), other conditions (n=4), and normal findings (n=7). In the work-up MRI provided more morphologic information than other techniques and enlarged the diagnostic possibilities. It was the only imaging technique able to give an early indication of bone marrow involvement in systemic diseases. For the early diagnosis of LCPD, MRI was as sensitive as isotope bone scan and more precise than conventional radiography. In the follow-up of LCPD patients MRI was not able to indicate the start of revascularisation of the necrotic area, which bone scans showed reliably in six patients: But MRI provided excellent evaluation of the position, form and size of the femoral head and the surrounding soft tissues. (orig.).

  17. HISTOMORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE KNEE ARTICULAR CARTILAGE AND SYNOVIUM FOR METADIAPHYSEAL LEG LENGTHENING (EXPERIMENTAL-AND-MORPHOLOGICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Stupina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The knee articular cartilage and synovial membrane have been studied for metadiaphyseal leg lengthening using the methods of light miscroscopy, computer morpho- and stereometry. The manner of bone integrity breaking, the rate and rhythm of distraction conformed to the lengthening technique most often used in the clinic. The results of the histomorphometric analysis have demonstrated that when osteotomy at the level of metadiaphysis and manual distraction by 1 mm a day for 4 times is performed, synovitis of mild and moderate degree develops through subsynovial layer hypervascularization, as well as reactive-destructive changes in nerve fibers with the tendency to regeneration. The structural-functional changes of reactive and/or destructive-reparative character have been revealed in the articular cartilage, and the manifestation degree of these changes correlates with synovial membrane changes. The intensity of the destructive-reparative processes in the articular cartilage and synovial membrane depends on fixation stability.

  18. Intramuscular diffuse-type giant cell tumor within the hamstring muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Akio; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Oda, Yoshinao; Izumi, Teiyu; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse-type giant cell tumor (D-TGCT) is known as a synonym for pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVS), a condition usually found in the large joints. We report an extremely rare case of D-TGCT which was located within the hamstring muscle. The lesion was an incidental finding in a 62-year-old man who underwent positron emission tomography (PET) as part of a staging evaluation for gastric cancer. The lesion was resected. There has been neither metastasis nor recurrence during the 6-month period since resection. This case demonstrates that PVS/D-TGCT may have a high SUV on PET imaging, and for this reason PET may be useful for detecting both the tumor and any recurrence. (orig.)

  19. An unusual case of cycticercosis of the tendon sheath of the tendoachilles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Agarwal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Cysticercosis is an infection by the larval stage (cystcercus cellulosae of the cestode, Taenia Solium (pork tape worm, especially in those individuals who live in the endemic areas. After gaining entry into the body, the larvae become encysted and may lie in subcutaneous tissue, striated muscle, the vitreous humor, or other tissues. We report an unusual case of cysticercosis of the the tendon sheath of the tendoachilles that presented as a swelling of the tendoachilles. Upon Fine Needle Aspiration and Cytology (FNAC that were conducted preoperatively, the possibility of villonodular synovitis was identified. However, the cysticercosis diagnosis was confirmed later after an excisional biopsy was performed. We could find no reports in the literature concerning an occurrence of cysticercosis in the tendon sheath of tendoachilles.

  20. 166Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - biocompatibility study of 166Ho-chitosan in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Lee Jong Seok

    1997-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It is been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthrits and other inflammatory arthropathies. We developed the 166 Ho-chitosan complex for possible use as a radiation synovectomy agent. Holmium is the more practical isotope based on its higher radioactivity and logner half-life. And isotope based on its higher radioactivity and logner half-life. And chitosan is ideal and suitable particles based on its soluble and biodegradable characteristics. So we investigated the biocompatibility of the 166 Ho-chitosan complex to evaluated the suitability as a radiation synovectomy agent. In this study, we performed in vivo and in vitro stability test and biodistribution test. Our results indicate that 166 Ho-chitosan may be an effective radiopharmaceutical for radiation synovectomy. (author). 30 refs., 7 tabs

  1. {sup 166}Ho-chitosan as a radiation synovectomy agent - biocompatibility study of {sup 166}Ho-chitosan in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sug Jun; Lee, Soo Yong; Jeon, Dae Geun; Seok, Lee Jong [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-01-01

    Radiation synovectomy is a noninvasive therapy that has been investigated as an alternative to surgical synovectomy. It is been successfully employed in the treatment of synovitis in rheumatoid arthrits and other inflammatory arthropathies. We developed the {sup 166}Ho-chitosan complex for possible use as a radiation synovectomy agent. Holmium is the more practical isotope based on its higher radioactivity and logner half-life. And isotope based on its higher radioactivity and logner half-life. And chitosan is ideal and suitable particles based on its soluble and biodegradable characteristics. So we investigated the biocompatibility of the {sup 166}Ho-chitosan complex to evaluated the suitability as a radiation synovectomy agent. In this study, we performed in vivo and in vitro stability test and biodistribution test. Our results indicate that {sup 166}Ho-chitosan may be an effective radiopharmaceutical for radiation synovectomy. (author). 30 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Gallup poll: wind energy perception in France; Sondage perception de l'energie eolienne en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chartier, C. [Institut Synovate, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-01-01

    This gallup poll was carried out in January 2003 by the Synovate institute on request of the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe). It was made on a representative sample of 2090 people from different French regions, and on two over-samples of people living in the vicinity of wind farms in operation or in construction: 300 people in the Aude region and 230 people in the Finistere region. The wind energy remains widely accepted by French people (87%) and even more in areas close to wind farms (Aude: 98%, Finistere: 99%). The ecological and economical aspect of wind energy is the main advantage put forward (92%) while the aesthetics remains the main drawback (45%). (J.S.)

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, K.G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. The 'pre-erosive' radiologic signs of rheumatoid arthritis in soft tissue radiography of the hands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekelae, P.; Virtama, P.

    1978-01-01

    Soft tissue radiography of the hands using the mammographic immersion technique was performed on 119 patients, having definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis, and on 123 controls of matching age, sex, and professional distribution. A total of 7744 finger joints and carpal borders were investigated for joint swelling, periarticular edema, pre-erosive and erosive bone changes, joint space narrowing, and osteoarthritic joint margin spurs. Slight joint swelling and pre-erosive bone changes were found in connection with osteoarthritic joint changes in elderly control patients. Periarticular edema and moderate to massive joint swelling were quite reliable signs for synovitis. The incidence of pre-erosive bone signs was significantly greater in the rheumatoid arthritis group than in the control group, especially in patients less than 60 years old. These signs can be regarded as suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis; probability diagnosis could be performed using these signs and the Bayesian approach. (orig.) [de

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, N.R.; Crabbe, J.P.; McQueen, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Soft tissue masses of extremities: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seok Hyun; Yang, Seoung Oh; Choi, Jong Chul; Park, Byeong Ho; Lee, Ki Nam; Choi, Sun Seob; Chung, Duck Hwan [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-11-15

    To evaluate MR findings of soft tissue masses in extremities and to find the helpful findings of distinguish benignity from malignancy, 28 soft tissue masses (22 benign and 6 malignant) in extremities were reviewed. TI-weighted, proton density, T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA enhanced images were obtained. MR images allowed a specific diagnosis in large number of benign masses, such as hemangioma(8/9), lipoma(2/2), angiolipoma(1/1), epidermoid cyst(2/2), myositis ossificans(1/1), synovial chondromatosis(1/1) and pigmented villonodular synovitis(1/2). Specific diagnosis was difficult in the rest of the masses including malignancy. However, inhomogeneous signal intensities with necrosis and inhomogeneous enhancement may suggest malignant masses.

  7. Tumors of the soft tissues of the knee in childhood; Osteo-articulaire masse des tissus mous de genou. Imagerie des masses des tissus mous du genou chez l'enfant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludig, T.; Mainard, L.; Galloy, M.A.; Arnould, V.; Gerber, R.; Hoeffel, J.C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Nancy-Brabois, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    1998-04-01

    Soft tissue tumors of the knee are rare in childhood. Modern imaging modalities are very useful to evaluate these tumors. Their diagnosis has to be considered in view of the clinical content, their precise location and imaging features. Succinct review of the normal anatomy of the knee is made. We offer a diagnostic approach to these tumors in children including conventional radiology, ultrasound and MRI. We discuss the role of the different imaging techniques available for the diagnosis of these lesions, including pseudo-tumors such as popliteal cysts, hematoma, ossifying myositis, extra-articular benign and malignant tumors, as well as intra-articular lesions, synovial lipoma, osteochondromatosis and pigmented villo-nodular synovitis. MRI is particularly useful to evaluate the extent of the malignant tumors. (authors)

  8. Cold abscess of the anterior abdominal wall: An unusual primary presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohinder Kumar Malhotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is considered as ubiquitous disease as it involves any organ, but primary involvement of abdominal muscles is very rare. In most cases, the muscle involvement is secondary and is caused by either hematogenous route or direct inoculation from a tuberculous abdominal lymph node or extension from underlying tubercular synovitis and osteomyelitis. Autopsy studies have shown abdominal wall involvement in less than 1% of patients who died of tuberculosis. Antitubercular therapy is main form of management. Surgical intervention is always secondary in the form of either sonography or computerized tomography-guided aspiration or open drainage which is usually reserved for patients in whom medical treatment has failed. A case is hereby reported about primary tubercular anterior abdominal wall abscess without any evidence of pulmonary, skeletal or gastrointestinal tuberculosis in an apparently healthy individual with any past history of contact or previous antituberculosis therapy.

  9. The OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Peterfy, Charles G.; Bird, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scoring system (RAMRIS), evaluating bone erosion, bone marrow edema/osteitis, and synovitis, was introduced in 2002, and is now the standard method of objectively quantifying...... inflammation and damage by MRI in RA trials. The objective of this paper was to identify subsequent advances and based on them, to provide updated recommendations for the RAMRIS. Methods: MRI studies relevant for RAMRIS and technical and scientific advances were analyzed by the OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working...... Group, which used these data to provide updated considerations on image acquisition, RAMRIS definitions, and scoring systems for the original and new RA pathologies. Further, a research agenda was outlined. Results: Since 2002, longitudinal studies and clinical trials have documented RAMRIS variables...

  10. MRI features in de Quervain`s tenosynovitis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glajchen, N. [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schweitzer, M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain`s stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain`s synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain`s disease. De Quervain`s tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  11. Arthrosonography as a method of assessment of xefocam efficacy in rheumatoid gonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Much

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthrosonography of 74 knee joints performed in 37 pts with rheumatoid arthritis before treatment with xefocam (Nicomed in 34 revealed signs of intra and extra-articular inflammation with presence in 100% fluid in fore part of the joint, increase B. Suprapatellaris size and thickening of synovial membrane. Fluid in lateral parts was revealed in 33 joints and in back part - in 22 joints. Semimembranosus muscle tenosynovitis was revealed at 22 joints. After xefocam administration (intra-articular injections 8 mg once a week for 3 weeks signs of intra-articular inflammation decreased in 28 and extra-articular - in 21 joints. So xefocam provides anti-inflammatory effect and can be used for treatment of synovitis.

  12. Joint involvement in patients with early polymyalgia rheumatica using high-resolution ultrasound and its contribution to the EULAR/ACR 2012 classification criteria for polymyalgia rheumatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Sandra; Ehrenstein, Boris; Fleck, Martin; Hartung, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    To assess joint involvement and the contribution of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) to the novel European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology (EULAR/ACR) 2012 classification criteria in patients with polymyalgia rheumatic (PMR). MSUS was performed in 54 consecutive patients with recent-onset PMR. Biceps tenosynovitis of at least 1 shoulder has been observed in 70.4% of patients, and 64.8% had a bilateral biceps tenosynovitis. Subdeltoid bursitis (27.8% unilateral, 5.6% bilateral), glenohumeral synovitis (22.2% unilateral, 9.3% bilateral), and hip involvement (22.2% unilateral, 16.7% bilateral) were observed less frequently. The sensitivities of the classification criteria were 85.2% for EULAR/ACR without MSUS and 81.5% for EULAR/ACR with MSUS. The most common MSUS pathology was a biceps tenosynovitis. However, US findings had no effect on the sensitivity of the novel EULAR/ACR criteria for PMR.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: demonstration of progression between 1 and 6 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Neal R. [Auckland Hospital, Department of Radiology, Private Bag 92024, Auckland (New Zealand); Auckland Radiology Group, Auckland (New Zealand); Crabbe, Jeffrey P. [Auckland Radiology Group, Auckland (New Zealand); McQueen, Fiona M. [Auckland Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2004-12-01

    To describe the changes seen in the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging obtained at 1 year and 6 years. A cohort of patients with RA has been studied prospectively from symptom onset. MR scans of the dominant wrist in 31 patients obtained at 1 year and 6 years were compared for bone erosions, marrow signal change (oedema), synovial thickness and tenosynovitis. Twenty-two patients had an increase in erosion score in the interval and three patients showed a decrease in erosion score suggesting erosion healing. Fourteen patients had an increase in oedema score in the interval and eight patients had a decrease in oedema score. Synovial thickness increased in 13 patients and decreased in eight. Tenosynovitis increased in 15 patients and decreased in five. Bone erosions developed immediately adjacent to the tenosynovitis in two patients. MR imaging is useful in following the progress of bone erosions, marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis in RA. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. 5. Recent advances in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukner, Peter D; Crossley, Kay M; Morris, Hayden; Bartold, Simon J; Elliott, Bruce

    2006-02-20

    New research has changed our perception and management of common injuries. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy of the hip have shown that labral injuries, chondral injuries, rim lesions, synovitis and tears of the ligament teres are common causes of hip, groin and low-back pain. Hip arthroscopy is used both as a diagnostic and therapeutic tool; it has been shown to be of benefit in recent traumatic labral injury, but disappointing in the management of chronic hip pain (which may be associated with degenerative change, and chondral lesions of the acetabulum). The McConnell multimodal physiotherapy regimen is effective in treating patellofemoral pain. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture is three to five times more common in women, but neuromuscular training appears to decrease its incidence. Patellar tendon and hamstring grafts appear to be equally effective in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Articular cartilage defects remain a significant problem, and the efficacy of treatments such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is still unclear.

  16. Disorders of the hallux sesamoid complex: MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Schweitzer, M.E. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-08-01

    Numerous painful conditions can affect the first metatarsophalangeal-sesamoid joint complex. Symptoms can be of sudden or insidious onset, and be of acute or chronic duration. Although conventional radiography is recognized as the initial diagnostic procedure for these symptoms, there is often a need to proceed to MR imaging. MR imaging is sensitive and can be utilized in the investigation of the hallux sesamoid complex to differentiate soft tissue from osseous pathology. Synovitis, tendonitis, and bursitis can be distinguished from bony abnormalities such as sesamoid fracture, avascular necrosis, and osteomyelitis. An understanding of MR imaging features and techniques will result in the highest diagnostic yield. Early and accurate diagnosis of sesamoid complex disorders can guide the physician to the appropriate clinical management and prevent potentially harmful longstanding joint dysfunction. (orig.) With 11 figs., 30 refs.

  17. Disorders of the hallux sesamoid complex: MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasick, D.; Schweitzer, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Numerous painful conditions can affect the first metatarsophalangeal-sesamoid joint complex. Symptoms can be of sudden or insidious onset, and be of acute or chronic duration. Although conventional radiography is recognized as the initial diagnostic procedure for these symptoms, there is often a need to proceed to MR imaging. MR imaging is sensitive and can be utilized in the investigation of the hallux sesamoid complex to differentiate soft tissue from osseous pathology. Synovitis, tendonitis, and bursitis can be distinguished from bony abnormalities such as sesamoid fracture, avascular necrosis, and osteomyelitis. An understanding of MR imaging features and techniques will result in the highest diagnostic yield. Early and accurate diagnosis of sesamoid complex disorders can guide the physician to the appropriate clinical management and prevent potentially harmful longstanding joint dysfunction. (orig.)

  18. RS3PE Syndrome with Iliopsoas Bursitis Distinguished from an Iliopsoas Abscess Using a CT-guided Puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shoichi; Iwamoto, Naoki; Tsuji, Sosuke; Umeda, Masataka; Nishino, Ayako; Nakashima, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Takahisa; Horai, Yoshiro; Koga, Tomohiro; Kawashiri, Shin-ya; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man was diagnosed with remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) syndrome. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography for cancer screening showed a mass with low-density centers with an enhanced rim in the left iliopsoas muscle. We suspected an iliopsoas abscess and performed computed-tomography-guided puncture of the mass. Both Gram staining and the culture of the fluid were negative. We diagnosed the patient with RS3PE syndrome with iliopsoas bursitis and administered low-dose corticosteroids without antibiotics. The symptoms, including left hip pain, quickly disappeared following treatment. Clinicians should be aware that iliopsoas bursitis may resemble an iliopsoas abscess. As a result, it is important to make an accurate differential diagnosis.

  19. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B. E-mail: gujralrb@sgpgi.ac.in

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis.

  20. MRI features of tuberculosis of peripheral joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawlani, V.; Chandra, T.; Mishra, R.N.; Aggarwal, A.; Jain, U.K.; Gujral, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of peripheral tubercular arthritis. The clinical presentation of peripheral tubercular arthritis is variable and simulates other chronic inflammatory arthritic disorders. MRI is a highly sensitive technique which demonstrates fine anatomical details and identifies the early changes of arthritis, which are not visible on radiographs. The MRI features of tubercular arthritis include synovitis, effusion, central and peripheral erosions, active and chronic pannus, abscess, bone chips and hypo-intense synovium. These imaging features in an appropriate clinical setting may help in the diagnosis of tubercular arthritis. Early diagnosis and treatment can effectively eliminate the long-term morbidity of joints affected by tuberculosis

  1. CSF-1R Inhibitor Development: Current Clinical Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraud, Florent; Cousin, Sophie; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-09-05

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) and its ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin 34 (IL-34), regulate the function and survival of tumor-associated macrophages, which are involved in tumorigenesis and in the suppression of antitumor immunity. Moreover, the CSF-1R/CSF-1 axis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), a benign tumor of the synovium. As advanced or metastatic malignant solid tumors and relapsed/refractory PVNS remain unresolved therapeutic problems, new approaches are needed to improve the outcome of patients with these conditions. In solid tumors, targeting CSF-1R via either small molecules or antibodies has shown interesting results in vitro but limited antitumor activity in vivo. Concerning PVNS, clinical trials assessing CSF-1R inhibitors have revealed promising initial outcomes. Blocking CSF-1/CSF-1R signaling represents a promising immunotherapy approach and several new potential combination therapies for future clinical testing.

  2. Equilibrium blood pool scanning in the evaluation of hemophilic arthropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, S.; Green, D.; Rana, N.A.; Milgram, J.W.; Mintzer, R.

    1978-01-01

    Arthropathy was evaluated in six patients with severe hemophilia (factor VIII<1%) using the technique of blood pool scanning. Employing an in vivo method for erythrocyte labelling with technetium-99m, a dynamic perfusion sequence was obtained using a scintillation camera over the joint(s) to be examined. Subsequently, equilibrium blood pool images of the joints were obtained to determine regional blood volume. In young patients with repeated episodes of acute hemarthrosis, increased vascularity and increased blood pool in the affected joints were demonstrated. In older patients with fixed, contracted joints and degenerative arthropathy, vascularity and regional blood volume were not abnormal. Blood pool scanning is a safe, non-invasive technique that augments the clinical and radiographic examination of the joints. The method is helpful in distinguishing acute joint bleeding from chronic synovitis and arthritis, and may prove useful in selecting patients for synovectomy. (author)

  3. The role of adipocytokines in the pathogenesis of knee joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Magdalena; Trzeciak, Tomasz; Owecki, Maciej; Pucher, Andrzej; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal disability in the world. Traditionally, it has been thought that obesity contributes to the development and progression of OA by increased mechanical load of the joint structures. Nevertheless, studies have shown that adipose tissue-derived cytokines (adipocytokines) are a possible link between obesity and OA. Furthermore, according to recent findings, not only articular cartilage may be the main target of these cytokines but also the synovial membrane, subchondral bone and infrapatellar fat pad may be encompassed in the process of degradation. This review presents the most recent reports on the contribution of adipocytokines to the knee joint cartilage degradation, osteophyte formation, infrapatellar fat pad alterations and synovitis.

  4. Rheumatic Disease: Protease-Activated Receptor-2 in Synovial Joint Pathobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal McCulloch

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2 is one member of a small family of transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are activated via cleavage of their N terminus by serine proteases (e.g., tryptase, unveiling an N terminus tethered ligand which binds to the second extracellular loop of the receptor. Increasing evidence has emerged identifying key pathophysiological roles for PAR2 in both rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA. Importantly, this includes both pro-inflammatory and destructive roles. For example, in murine models of RA, the associated synovitis, cartilage degradation, and subsequent bone erosion are all significantly reduced in the absence of PAR2. Similarly, in experimental models of OA, PAR2 disruption confers protection against cartilage degradation, subchondral bone osteosclerosis, and osteophyte formation. This review focuses on the role of PAR2 in rheumatic disease and its potential as an important therapeutic target for treating pain and joint degradation.

  5. [Histological study on spontaneous osteoarthritis of the knee in C57 black mouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahama, A

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the initial changes and pathological process of osteoarthritis in male C57 black mice (Silberberg), which develop spontaneous osteoarthritic lesions in the knee joints. The initial event in the development of the lesions was the slight loss of glycosaminoglycans in the articular cartilage matrix of the tibia, adjacent to the free margin of the anterior segment of the meniscus at 3 months of age. Microscopy under polarized light revealed irregularity of the tangential layer in the corresponding area at 6 months of age. Horizontal cleft along the tidemark, defect of cartilage and eburnation of subchondral bone later developed. Osteoarthritic changes were observed in all mice aged 18 and 24 months. However, no fibrillation of the cartilage matrix, chondrocyte clustering, osteophyte formation or synovitis was observed, probably because of the small joint and poor reparative ability in the mouse.

  6. Inflammatory reaction in chondroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Sigeki [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sato, Keiji [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Sugiura, Hideshi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Iwata, Hisashi [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction accompanying chondroblastoma and to define the value of the finding in clinical practice. We reviewed the clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance (MR) findings in six patients with histologically proven chondroblastoma. In all cases, MR imaging showered marrow and soft tissue edema. In four of six cases, periosteal reaction related to intra-osseous edema was more clearly demonstrated on MR imaging than on radiographs. Follow-up MR studies after surgery were available in three patients and all showed disappearance of inflammatory responses such as marrow and soft tissue edema, and reactive synovitis. We propose that these inflammatory reactions of chondroblastomas are inportant signs for detecting residual tumor in recurrences after surgery, as well as for making a precise diagnosis. The MR changes may also be valuable in demonstrating eradication of the tumor. (orig./MG)

  7. Epidemiology of acute flaccid paralysis in Kermanshah province, 2004-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyghobad Ghadiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine epidemiologic features of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP during 2004-2009 in Kermanshah province. This cross-sectional descriptive study was done based on data records from Kermanshah health care center. In total 89 patients, 0-14 years old were enrolled study, which 36 of them were male and 53 were female. 50.6% of subjects were diagnosed as Guillain-barre, 6.7% transverse synovitis and 5.6% as arthritis. No any cases of poliomyelitis were diagnosed. The prevalence of reported of AFP during 2004-2009 in Kermanshah province was more than expected rate of 1 per 100000 according to WHO.

  8. Total elbow arthroplasty in primary osteoarthritis of the elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, T K; Adams, R A; Morrey, B F

    1998-10-01

    Primary osteoarthritis of the elbow is an infrequent condition typically managed by some form of debridement. There is no comment in the literature regarding prosthetic replacement for this condition. We report 5 patients (mean age, 68), with a minimum assessment of 3 years (range, 37-125 years) after total elbow arthroplasty. Complications in 4 patients included subluxation, fracture of a humeral component with particulate synovitis, heterotopic ossification, recurrent osteophyte formation, and transient ulnar neuropathy. Although revision was required in 2 of the 5, currently all experience had satisfactory outcomes. While replacement has proven ultimately to be a successful option for this high-demand patient group because of the high complication rate, we do not recommend replacement unless alternate operative options are deemed unacceptable.

  9. Interobserver agreement in ultrasonography of the finger and toe joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Court-Payen, Michel; Jacobsen, Søren

    2003-01-01

    on the same day by 2 ultrasound investigators (an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist and a rheumatologist with limited ultrasound training). Joint effusion, synovial thickening, bone erosions, and power Doppler signal were evaluated in accordance with an introduced 4-grade semiquantitative scoring system...... patients with active RA. A General Electric LOGIQ 500 ultrasound unit with a 7-13-MHz linear array transducer was used. In each patient, 5 preselected small joints (second and third metacarpophalangeal, second proximal interphalangeal, first and second metatarsophalangeal) were examined independently......, on which the investigators had reached consensus prior to the study. RESULTS: Exact agreement between the 2 observers was seen in 91% of the examinations with regard to bone erosions, in 86% with regard to synovitis, in 79% with regard to joint effusions, and in 87% with regard to power Doppler signal...

  10. Interobserver agreement in ultrasonography of the finger and toe joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szkudlarek, Marcin; Court-Payen, Michel; Jacobsen, Søren

    2003-01-01

    patients with active RA. A General Electric LOGIQ 500 ultrasound unit with a 7-13-MHz linear array transducer was used. In each patient, 5 preselected small joints (second and third metacarpophalangeal, second proximal interphalangeal, first and second metatarsophalangeal) were examined independently...... on the same day by 2 ultrasound investigators (an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist and a rheumatologist with limited ultrasound training). Joint effusion, synovial thickening, bone erosions, and power Doppler signal were evaluated in accordance with an introduced 4-grade semiquantitative scoring system......, on which the investigators had reached consensus prior to the study. RESULTS: Exact agreement between the 2 observers was seen in 91% of the examinations with regard to bone erosions, in 86% with regard to synovitis, in 79% with regard to joint effusions, and in 87% with regard to power Doppler signal...

  11. Reducing invasiveness, duration, and cost of magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis by omitting intravenous contrast injection -- Does it change the assessment of inflammatory and destructive joint changes by the OMERACT RAMRIS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G; O'Connor, Philip

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides highly sensitive assessment of inflammatory and destructive changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) joints, but intravenous (IV) Gd injection prolongs examination time and increases cost, invasiveness, and patient discomfort...... images, whereas complete image sets were available for the second reading. RESULTS: Gd contrast injection appeared unimportant to MRI scores of bone erosions and bone edema in RA wrist and MCP joints. However, when post-Gd MRI was considered the standard reference, MRI without Gd provided only moderate......: Omitting IV contrast injection did not change scores of bone erosions and bone edema, but decreased the reliability of synovitis scores. However, this disadvantage may for some purposes be outweighed by the possibility to assess more joints and/or greater feasibility....

  12. Patellofemoral joint dysfunction. Combined diagnostic imaging evaluation (X-rays, 3D helical CT and MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrascosa, P.; Sanchez, F.; Mazzucco, J.; Capanay, C.; Carrascosa, J.

    2000-01-01

    The comprehensive study including 3D helical CT, Magnetic Resonance (MR) and X-ray exams provide a more complete diagnosis than those obtained through the conventional CT. We studied 43 patients with presumptive or certain diagnosis of patellofemoral instability. All the patients were studied by: a) Radiological pair; b) Tomography under extension and flexion, without and with contraction, using a helical CT equipment; and c) MRI STIR sequence in axial plane. The findings were classified as muscular lesion, cartilage lesion, bone and associated lesions (e.g. synovitis), statistically comparing both studies (comprehensive vs. conventional). The results allow us to accept the hypothesis that the comprehensive study provides a more complete diagnosis about the origin of the patellofemoral dysfunction. In 65% of the patients, the conventional study gave a negative result. Only in 35% of the cases the result was positive, but incomplete, showing only 35.3% of the pathological findings detected by the comprehensive study. (author)

  13. The development of coxarthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermodsson, I.

    1983-01-01

    It is necessary to distinguish between coxarthrosis and age-related changes, as the latter are not signs of disease. Cartilage destruction is the earliest definite radiological sign of arthrosis. The femoral head is displaced when cartilage destruction and secondary osseous changes have reached an advanced stage. This implies a circulus vitiosus and an acceleration of the arthrotic process. Coxarthrosis can be divided into two types, medial and cranial. The size of the CE angle is of decisive importance for the type of coxarthrosis to be developed. The present study demonstrates that coxarthrosis is as a rule of a secondary nature, the aetiology being pre-arthrotic deformities that cause abnormal load conditions in the hip joint. Synovitis plays an important role in the pathogenesis in many cases. (orig.)

  14. Development of coxarthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermodsson, I.

    1983-08-01

    It is necessary to distinguish between coxarthrosis and age-related changes, as the latter are not signs of disease. Cartilage destruction is the earliest definite radiological sign of arthrosis. The femoral head is displaced when cartilage destruction and secondary osseous changes have reached an advanced stage. This implies a circulus vitiosus and an acceleration of the arthrotic process. Coxarthrosis can be divided into two types, medial and cranial. The size of the CE angle is of decisive importance for the type of coxarthrosis to be developed. The present study demonstrates that coxarthrosis is as a rule of a secondary nature, the aetiology being pre-arthrotic deformities that cause abnormal load conditions in the hip joint. Synovitis plays an important role in the pathogenesis in many cases.

  15. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Nemours Children' s Health System/Nemours Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Orlando, FL (United States); Awomolo, Agboola O. [Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Szabo, Sara [Medical College of Wisconsin and Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Department of Pathology, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  16. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Boesen, Mikael; Ellegaard, Karen

    2014-01-01

    was to compare site-specific release of inflammatory mediators and evaluate the corresponding anatomical sites by examining colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and MRI scans. METHODS: RA patients were evaluated on the basis of CDUS and 3-T MRI scans and subsequently underwent synovectomy using a needle arthroscopic.......02, approximate Spearman's ρ = 0.63). IL-8 associations with imaging outcome measures did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: The association between imaging activity and synovial inflammatory mediators underscores the high sensitivity of CDUS and MRI in the evaluation of RA disease activity....... The associations found in our present study have different implications for synovial mediator releases and corresponding imaging signs. For example, MCP-1 and IL-6 were associated with both general inflammation and bone destruction, in contrast to MIP-1β, which was involved solely in general synovitis. The lack...

  17. Unusual Cause of Knee Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazi Huri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of partial intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon as an unusual cause of pseudolocking of the knee. A 13-year-old semiprofessional soccer player applied to our clinic with a locked right knee in spite of the therapy applied (cold pack, NSAID, and immobilization in another institution 20 days after the injury. Significant extension loss was observed in his right knee with 30∘–90∘ ROM. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and arthroscopy confirmed the intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon and synovitis. The ruptured part of the tendon was debrided, and the inflammatory tissue around the tendon, which may lead to pseudolocking, was gently removed with a shaver in order to regain the normal ROM. The patient was discharged with full ROM and weight bearing first day after the surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first case demonstrating intrasubstance tear of popliteus tendon causing pseudolocking of the knee.

  18. The value of high-resolution sonography and MR imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of carpal tunnel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, W.; Judmaier, W.; Birbamer, G.; Hasenoehrl, K.; Schmidauer, C.

    1993-01-01

    120 wrists of 105 patients with carpal tunnel syndrome were studied preoperatively by high-resolution sonography. Follow-up examinations after carpal tunnel release were performed in 72 wrists. In addition, 40 wrists were examined preoperatively, and 20 wrists were examined postoperatively by MR imaging. Based on quantitative analysis of the cross-sectional area and shape of the median nerve and of the palmar bowing of the flexor retinaculum, sonography established the diagnosis in 95% of cases. MR was superior in the evaluation of mild degrees of median nerve compression, and in the detection of possible causes of the carpal tunnel syndrome, such as synovitis of the flexor tendon sheaths or ganglionic cysts. In postoperative follow-up, sonographic demonstration of a normally flattened median nerve was an excellent indicator of the successful carpal tunnel release. In 10 patients with persistent or recurrent symptoms after carpal tunnel release, the underlying pathology could be exactly demonstrated by MR. (orig.) [de

  19. T2 black lesions on routine knee MRI: differential considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Cho, Gina; Moore, Daniel; Pezeshk, Parham; Coyner, Katherine; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-01-01

    The majority of abnormal findings or lesions on T2-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are hyperintense due to increased perfusion or fluid content, such as infections, tumours or synovitis. Hypointense lesions on T2-weighted images (both fat-suppressed and non-fat-suppressed) are less common and can sometimes be overlooked. Such lesions have limited differential diagnostic possibilities, and include vacuum phenomenon, loose body, tenosynovial giant cell tumour, rheumatoid arthritis, haemochromatosis, gout, amyloid, chondrocalcinosis, hydroxyapetite deposition disease, lipoma arborescens, arthrofibrosis and iatrogenic lesions. These lesions often show characteristic appearances and predilections in the knee. In this article, the authors describe the MRI features of hypointense T2 lesions on routine knee MRI and outline a systematic diagnostic approach towards their evaluation. (orig.)

  20. Repair of experimentally produced defects in rabbit articular cartilage by autologous chondrocyte transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, D.A.; Pitman, M.I.; Peterson, L.; Menche, D.; Klein, M.

    1989-01-01

    Using the knee joints of New Zealand White rabbits, a baseline study was made to determine the intrinsic capability of cartilage for healing defects that do not fracture the subchondral plate. A second experiment examined the effect of autologous chondrocytes grown in vitro on the healing rate of these defects. To determine whether any of the reconstituted cartilage resulted from the chondrocyte graft, a third experiment was conducted involving grafts with chondrocytes that had been labeled prior to grafting with a nuclear tracer. Results were evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative light microscopy. Macroscopic results from grafted specimens displayed a marked decrease in synovitis and other degenerative changes. In defects that had received transplants, a significant amount of cartilage was reconstituted (82%) compared to ungrafted controls (18%). Autoradiography on reconstituted cartilage showed that there were labeled cells incorporated into the repair matrix

  1. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The question is when and how MRI should be used. The present article reviews our knowledge about, and provides suggestions for, the use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries. In clinical trials, the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) is a thoroughly...

  2. Five Simultaneous Primary Tumors in a Single Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey W. Williamson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Multiple primary malignancies (MPMs are present when a patient is diagnosed with more than one primary malignancy and when each tumor is histologically unrelated to the others. MPMs are considered synchronous when they present within 6 months of one another. Here, we report the case of a 57-year-old woman with a past medical history significant for melanoma in 1988, who presented in 2014 with 5 distinct tumors within 4 months: malignant melanoma of the right popliteal fossa, invasive lobular breast carcinoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma, and a giant cell tumor of tendon sheath/pigmented villonodular synovitis. We discuss her treatment and also present a brief review of the literature. The incidence of MPMs appears to be on the rise, which demands an interdisciplinary, multimodal, and personalized approach to care.

  3. Musculoskeletal ultrasound including definitions for ultrasonographic pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakefield, RJ; Balint, PV; Szkudlarek, Marcin

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has great potential as an outcome in rheumatoid arthritis trials for detecting bone erosions, synovitis, tendon disease, and enthesopathy. It has a number of distinct advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, including good patient tolerability and ability to scan multiple joints...... in a short period of time. However, there are scarce data regarding its validity, reproducibility, and responsiveness to change, making interpretation and comparison of studies difficult. In particular, there are limited data describing standardized scanning methodology and standardized definitions of US...... pathologies. This article presents the first report from the OMERACT ultrasound special interest group, which has compared US against the criteria of the OMERACT filter. Also proposed for the first time are consensus US definitions for common pathological lesions seen in patients with inflammatory arthritis....

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis: demonstration of progression between 1 and 6 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, Neal R.; Crabbe, Jeffrey P.; McQueen, Fiona M.

    2004-01-01

    To describe the changes seen in the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging obtained at 1 year and 6 years. A cohort of patients with RA has been studied prospectively from symptom onset. MR scans of the dominant wrist in 31 patients obtained at 1 year and 6 years were compared for bone erosions, marrow signal change (oedema), synovial thickness and tenosynovitis. Twenty-two patients had an increase in erosion score in the interval and three patients showed a decrease in erosion score suggesting erosion healing. Fourteen patients had an increase in oedema score in the interval and eight patients had a decrease in oedema score. Synovial thickness increased in 13 patients and decreased in eight. Tenosynovitis increased in 15 patients and decreased in five. Bone erosions developed immediately adjacent to the tenosynovitis in two patients. MR imaging is useful in following the progress of bone erosions, marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis in RA. (orig.)

  5. Chromium (III) phosphate labelled with several radionuclides for use in radiosynoviothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Arencibia, Jorge; Morin Zorrilla, Jose; Cruz Morales, Amed

    2012-01-01

    Radiosynoviorthesis is used in treating chronic synovitis, a frequent complication of some systemic diseases as rheumatoid arthritis and hemophilia. There are different colloids and radioactive suspensions recommended in the international clinical practice, but the number is reduced and the availability limited. A suspension of chromium (III) phosphate was obtained and characterized. It was found that the obtained product had a predominant particle size range of 0,8 to 5 μm and that when suspended in 2 % gelatin solution in 1mg/ml acetate buffer, it settled in no less than 3 hours. Technologies for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals of Chromium (III) Phosphate labeled with 32P and 90Y were described. There was demonstrated the feasibility of labeling the obtained suspension with other trivalent radionuclides such as 177Lu and 68Ga.

  6. Nuclear medicine therapy: current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Radioisotope therapy began in 1942 with the use of 131 I for Graves disease and 32 P for polycythemia vera. Local therapy with radioisotopes includes radiocolloids for malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions, intra-articular radiocolloids for chronic synovitis, intra-arterial radioactive microspheres for liver metastases, and intralymphatic administration for malignancies of the lymphatic system. The most widely practised use of radioisotopes for therapy is for the management of hyperthyroidism by 131 I. 131 is also being used effectively for thyroid cancer, particularly at the Radiation Medicine Centre, BARC. There is hope that a new generation of radiolabelled compounds is round the corner for therapy. Radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies aimed against specific tumor antigens have already shown great promise. Another area of interest is the use of minute lipid spheroids (vesicles) enclosing the radioactive drug which can be targeted to the tumor. (author). 19 refs

  7. Four therapeutic cases of RS3PE syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Naoya; Fukuda, Yukiko; Yang, Kwang-Seok; Aiba, Miyoji; Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2007-01-01

    RS3PE syndrome (Remitting Seronegative Symmetrical Synovitis with Pitting Edema Syndrome) is one of the disorders which present as polyarthritis. It is important to be aware of RS3PE syndrome when encountering elderly patients with polyarthritis who are negative for rheumatoid factor. We report 4 cases of RS3PE syndrome. All cases shared common clinical findings, such as acute onset, symmetrical polyarthritis, pitting edema of the hands and feet, and being negative for rheumatoid factor in serum. Treatment with corticosteroid was very effective in all cases. However, two patients showed a deteriorated clinical condition during the tapering of corticosteroid. Corticosteroid should be tapered off cautiously in patients with RS3PE syndrome. (author)

  8. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-01-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis

  9. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis

  10. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Arthur B; Awomolo, Agboola O; Szabo, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions.

  11. [A rare case of tubercular tenosynovitis in hospital surgeon as a result of an occupational accident caused by puncture with an infected needle. Prevention aspects and legal-medical evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delli Carri, R; Piscozzi, Paola; Massimelli, M; Falcetta, R

    2010-01-01

    The subject was a hospital surgeon who, in the course of routine outpatient surgery with aspiration to collect right lumbar material in a patient with suspected TB infection, accidentally punctured the fifth finger of the left hand with the needle used for this procedure. This led to involvement of the fifth finger of the left hand restricted to the soft tissue with preservation of joint and bone and tenosynovial involvement of the entire extremity. To draw attention to the repercussions for insurance with resulting absence from work for 126 days and an assessment of biological impairment of 2% by the Insurance Institute (INAIL). A case report is described of rare occupational tubercular synovitis. A rare event is reported that occurred in a senior staff member with particular insurance repercussions.

  12. Structural changes in the knee during weight loss maintenance after a significant weight loss in obese patients with osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, M; Christensen, R; Hunter, D J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare structural knee joint changes in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) that after an intensive weight loss therapy were randomized to continuous dietetic support, a specialized knee exercise program, or 'no attention' for 1 year. METHODS: 192 obese individuals with knee...... OA underwent an intensive 16-week weight loss program with subsequent randomization to one of the three treatment groups. Changes in cartilage loss, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), synovitis, and effusion were assessed using semi quantitative assessments of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained...... (difference: -0.21 [95%CI -0.40:-0.03]) and "no attention" (difference: -0.26 [95%CI -0.44:-0.07]) groups. CONCLUSION: In this 1 year follow-up after weight-loss in obese knee OA patients, we found a potentially increased number of BMLs in the exercise group compared to the diet and no attention groups...

  13. Tc-99m-MIBI Uptake in Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Park, Chan Hee; Hwang, Hee Sung; Bae, Moon Sun

    1996-01-01

    Technetium-99m MIBI was developed as a myocardiac perfusion imagine agent and has been used effectively in the detection and post-therapeutic evaluation of various neoplasm such as thyroid, lung, bone and breast tumors. As an infrequent findings, Tc-99m MIBI agent has shown in non-neoplastic pulmonary conditions including fibroding alveolitis, pulmonary actinomycosis, active pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary interstitial fibrosis in progressive systemic sclerosis and active osteomyelitis. In a recent report conducted by Cetin Oncel, Tc-99m MIBI imaging is an effective method in the detection and follow-up of pulmonary tuberculosis. We have also experienced Tc-99m-MIBI uptake in active pulmonary tuberculosis incidentally found in a patient with suspected proliferative villonodular synovitis of the left ankle.

  14. Preiser’s disease: two cases report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Ferrari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Preiser’s syndrome is a rare osteochondrosis affecting the carpal scaphoid, frequently related with an avascular necrosis. Osteoarthritic changes of the articular cartilage, local synovitis, and loose fragments are the most common findings associated with this syndrome. We report here two patients with Preiser’s syndrome, one with and one without a traumatic history, both presenting with pain, swelling and functional impairement of the wrist. In one patient radiography was sufficient for the diagnosis, in the other NMR was necessary to clearly establish type and extension of the lesion. Differential diagnosis may be sometimes difficult and the therapeutic approach on depends on several aspects, including etiology and type of occupational activity.

  15. Radiology today. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, F.H.W.; Donner, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    The book discusses the following contents: Advances in Cardiovascular Imaging: Digital Arteriography: Ongoing Developments. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cardiovascular System. Comparison of Vascular CT and MRI. Characterization of Vascular Lesions by Ultrasound - Progress in Vascular Interventions: Laser Angioplasty: A Review. Fibrinolytic Therapy Combined with Clot Extraction. Drugs Useful in Angioplasty. Developments in Cardiovascular Imaging: Blood Flow Measurements with Digital Arteriography. Selection of Imaging Techniques for Venous Thromboembolic Disease. Clinical Usefulness of High-Verus Low-Osmolality Contrast Agents. Developments in Angiographic and Interventional Instrumentation. Progress in Cardiovascular Interventions. Inferior Vena Cava Filters: Types, Placement, and Efficiency. Transluminal Vascular Stenting and Grafting. Venography and Sclerotherapy of Varioceles in Children and Adolescents. A New Catheter System - Important Hip Problems: Radiologic and Pathologic Correlation and Hip Disease. Comparison of Imaging Modalities in Femoral Head Necrosis. Osteoartrosis and Arthritis (Synovitis) of the Hip. Hip Anthrography

  16. Pyomyositis of tensor fascia lata: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Korhan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pyomyositis is a disease in which an abscess is formed deep within large striated muscles. Case presentation We report the case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with fever and a painful hip and was subsequently diagnosed with pyomyositis of the tensor fascia lata. In children with clinical and laboratory findings of inflammation in the vicinity of the hip joint, the differential diagnosis includes transient synovitis, an early stage of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease, infectious arthritis of the hip, rheumatologic diseases and extracapsular infection such as osteomyelitis. Conclusion To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of pyomyositis of the tensor fascia lata. Although pyomyositis is a rare disease and the differential diagnosis includes a variety of other commonly observed diseases, pyomyositis should be considered in cases where children present with fever, leukocytosis and localized pain.

  17. Synovial hemangiohamartoma presenting as knee pain, swelling and a soft tissue mass: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senol Serkan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of a patient with juxtaarticular hemangiohamartoma with a synovial extension associated with hemorrhagic synovitis and recurrent spontaneous hemarthrosis. Case presentation A 21-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of pain and swelling at her knee for 6 months. In the magnetic resonance imaging, T2-weighted and fat-suppressed scans revealed a mass with high signal intensity just posterior to the patellar tendon. We performed an excisional biopsy of the mass through an anterior longitudinal incision. Excised material included arterial and venous vascular structures, which were found to be spread among the fat, connective and peripheral nerve tissues microscopically. Conclusion Although hemangiohamartomas are not true neoplasms, they may cause knee pain, swelling and hemarthrosis that warrant surgical resection. This lesion, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis, especially in teenagers and young adults.

  18. Thrombotic manifestations in SAPHO syndrome. Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranco-Medina, Tatiana Elizabeth; Hidalgo-Calleja, Cristina; Calero-Paniagua, Ismael; Sánchez-González, María Dolores; Quesada-Moreno, Alba; Usategui-Martín, Ricardo; Pérez-Garrido, Laura; Gómez-Castro, Susana; Montilla-Morales, Carlos Alberto; Martínez-González, Olga; Del Pino-Montes, Javier

    2015-01-01

    SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) syndrome is a cluster of osteo-cutaneous manifestations that can lead to serious complications such as thrombosis of the subclavian vein or superior vena cava, mainly in patients with significant inflammatory involvement of the anterior-chest-wall. The objective of this study was to review the cases published in the medical literature related with the presence of thrombotic complications in patients diagnosed with SAPHO syndrome and to try to determine their possible pathogenic mechanism and risk factors. We analyzed 11 published reports of isolated clinical cases or case series, a total of 144 patients, which described a total of 15 cases of venous thrombosis. The clinical characteristics of these patients, evaluated to determine whether they meet the ASAS criteria for axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis, is analyzed the need for early diagnosis and treatment is highlighted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors in a child with Noonan syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, Arthur B.; Awomolo, Agboola O.; Szabo, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder with variable expression of distinctive facial features, webbed neck, chest deformity, short stature, cryptorchidism and congenital heart disease. The association of Noonan syndrome and giant cell granulomas of the mandible is widely reported. However, Noonan syndrome may also be associated with single or multifocal tenosynovial giant cell tumors, also referred to as pigmented villonodular synovitis. We report a child with Noonan syndrome, giant cell granulomas of the mandible and synovial and tenosynovial giant cell tumors involving multiple joints and tendon sheaths who was initially misdiagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is important for radiologists to be aware of the association of Noonan syndrome and multifocal giant cell lesions, which can range from the more commonly described giant cell granulomas of the mandible to isolated or multifocal intra- or extra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumors or a combination of all of these lesions. (orig.)

  20. 'pre-erosive' radiologic signs of rheumatoid arthritis in soft tissue radiography of the hands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, P; Virtama, P [Turku Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1978-01-01

    Soft tissue radiography of the hands using the mammographic immersion technique was performed on 119 patients, having definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis, and on 123 controls of matching age, sex, and professional distribution. A total of 7744 finger joints and carpal borders were investigated for joint swelling, periarticular edema, pre-erosive and erosive bone changes, joint space narrowing, and osteoarthritic joint margin spurs. Slight joint swelling and pre-erosive bone changes were found in connection with osteoarthritic joint changes in elderly control patients. Periarticular edema and moderate to massive joint swelling were quite reliable signs for synovitis. The incidence of pre-erosive bone signs was significantly greater in the rheumatoid arthritis group than in the control group, especially in patients less than 60 years old. These signs can be regarded as suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis; probability diagnosis could be performed using these signs and the Bayesian approach.

  1. MRI appearance of surgically proven abnormal accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhas, Naveen; Vinson, Emily N.; Cothran, R.L.; Helms, Clyde A.; Santangelo, James R.; Nunley, James A.

    2008-01-01

    A thickened accessory anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament (Bassett's ligament) of the ankle can be a cause of ankle impingement. Its imaging appearance is not well described. The purpose of this study was to determine if the ligament could be identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to determine associated abnormalities, and to determine if MRI could be used to differentiate normal from abnormal. Eighteen patients with a preoperative ankle MRI and an abnormal Bassett's ligament reported at surgery were found retrospectively. A separate cohort of 18 patients was selected as a control population. The presence of Bassett's ligament and its thickness were noted. The integrity and appearance of the lateral ankle ligaments, talar dome cartilage, and anterolateral gutter were also noted. In 34 of the 36 cases (94%), Bassett's ligament was identified on MRI. The ligament was seen in all three imaging planes and most frequently in the axial plane. The mean thickness of the ligament in the surgically abnormal cases was 2.37 mm, compared with 1.87 mm in the control with a p value = 0.015 (t test). Nine of the 18 abnormal cases (50%) had talar dome cartilage lesions as a result of contact with the ligament at surgery, with only 3 cases of high-grade defects seen on MRI. Fourteen of the 18 abnormal cases (78%) had of synovitis or scarring in the lateral gutter at surgery, with only 5 cases with scarring seen on MRI. The anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament was abnormal or torn in 8 of the 18 abnormal cases (44%) by MRI and confirmed in only 3 cases at surgery. Bassett's ligament can be routinely identified on MRI and was significantly thicker in patients who had it resected at surgery. An abnormal Bassett's ligament is often present in the setting of a normal anterior-inferior tibiofibular ligament. The cartilage abnormalities and synovitis associated with an abnormal Bassett's ligament are poorly detected by conventional MRI. (orig.)

  2. Improvement in symptoms and signs in the forefoot of patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-TNF therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewbury Keith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibition of tumour necrosis factor (TNF is an effective way of reducing synovitis and preventing joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, yet very little is known about its specific effect on foot pain and disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether anti-TNF therapy alters the presence of forefoot pathology and/or reduces foot pain and disability. Methods Consecutive RA patients starting anti-TNF therapy (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab were assessed for presence of synovial hypertrophy and synovitis in the 2nd and 5th metatarso-phalangeal (MTP joints and plantar forefoot bursal hypertrophy before and 12 weeks after therapy. Tender MTP joints and swollen bursae were established clinically by an experienced podiatrist and ultrasound (US images were acquired and interpreted by a radiologist. Assessment of patient reported disease impact on the foot was performed using the Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI. Results 31 patients (24 female, 7 male with RA (12 seronegative, 19 seropositive completed the study: mean age 59.6 (SD 10.1 years, disease duration 11.1 (SD 10.5 years, and previous number of Disease Modifying Anti Rheumatic Drugs 3.0 (1.6. Significant differences after therapy were found for Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (t = 4.014, p Presence of MTP joint synovial hypertrophy on US was noted in 67.5% of joints at baseline and 54.8% of joints at twelve weeks. Presence of plantar forefoot bursal hypertrophy on US was noted in 83.3% of feet at baseline and 75% at twelve weeks. Although there was a trend for reduction in observed presence of person specific forefoot pathology, when the frequencies were analysed (McNemar this was not significant. Conclusions Significant improvements were seen in patient reported foot pain and disability 12 weeks after commencing TNF inhibition in RA, but this may not be enough time to detect changes in forefoot pathology.

  3. Dynamic 3D-MR-angiography for assessing rheumatoid disease of the hand—A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Glaser, Christian; Horng, Annie; Helck, Andreas; Bauner, Kerstin U.; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hatz, Hans J.; Weckbach, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate highly temporally resolved MR-angiography (MRA) with time-resolved imaging with stochastic trajectories (TWIST) of the hand as supplementary tool for dynamic assessment of synovitis and vascular pathologies in rheumatoid diseases. Material and methods: A coronal dynamic TWIST–MRA-sequence (0.7 mm × 0.7 mm × 1.4 mm, temporal resolution 2.5 s, time of acquisition 4 min) of the predominantly affected hand of 17 patients with suspected rheumatoid disease was acquired after contrast administration (Multihance, Bracco Imaging SpA) at 3 T (Magnetom VERIO, 8-channel-knee-coil, Siemens Healthcare). As standard of reference, contrast enhanced non fat-saturated coronal and fat-saturated axial T1-w sequences were acquired. These static sequences and the dynamic TWIST–MRA–maximum-intensity-projections (MIP) were separately assessed by two readers in consensus, recording the number of synovial lesions (wrist, intercarpal, metacarpophaleangal/proximal/distal interphalangeal joints), signs of tenosynovitis and vasculitis. Diagnostic confidence was rated (4-point-scale: 4 = excellent; 1 = non-diagnostic). Statistical significance was tested using the Wilcoxon-rank-sum-test. Results: An insignificantly lower number of synovial lesions (n = 72 vs. 89; p = 0.1) and only 3/9 cases with tenosynovitis were identified by the TWIST–MRA. For detected lesions, diagnostic confidence was comparable (MRA: 3.64; static T1-w post contrast: 3.47). In patients with high clinical activity dynamic MRA showed very early synovial enhancement. Only dynamic MRA detected 3 cases of vasculitis (subsequently confirmed with digital-subtraction-angiography). Conclusion: TWIST–MRA facilitates fast detection of synovitis. Although dynamic MRA of the hand is inferior to static contrast enhanced sequences in assessing the number of synovitic and tenosynovitic lesions, its high temporal resolution allows for fast visual grading of disease activity and assessment of vasculitis

  4. Early Subchondral Bone Loss at Arthritis Onset Predicted Late Arthritis Severity in a Rat Arthritis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbon, Guillaume; Cleret, Damien; Linossier, Marie-Thérèse; Vico, Laurence; Marotte, Hubert

    2017-06-01

    Synovitis is usually observed before loss of articular function in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition to the synovium and according to the "Inside-Outside" theory, bone compartment is also involved in RA pathogenesis. Then, we investigated time dependent articular bone loss and prediction of early bone loss to late arthritis severity on the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) model. Lewis female rats were longitudinally monitored from arthritis induction (day 0), with early (day 10) and late (day 17) steps. Trabecular and cortical microarchitecture parameters of four ankle bones were assessed by microcomputed tomography. Gene expression was determined at sacrifice. Arthritis occurred at day 10 in AIA rats. At this time, bone erosions were detected on four ankle bones, with cortical porosity increase (+67%) and trabecular alterations including bone volume fraction (BV/TV: -13%), and trabecular thickness decrease. Navicular bone assessment was the most reproducible and sensitive. Furthermore, strong correlations were observed between bone alterations at day 10 and arthritis severity or bone loss at day 17, including predictability of day 10 BV/TV to day 17 articular index (R 2  = 0.76). Finally, gene expression at day 17 confirmed massive osteoclast activation and interestingly provided insights on strong activation of bone formation inhibitor markers at the joint level. In rat AIA, bone loss was already observed at synovitis onset and was predicted late arthritis severity. Our results reinforced the key role of subchondral bone in arthritis pathogenesis, in favour to the "Inside-Outside" theory. Mechanisms of bone loss in rat AIA involved resorption activation and formation inhibition changes. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1318-1325, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evaluation of the joint distribution at disease presentation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a large study across continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstra, Sytske Anne; Chopra, Arvind; Saluja, Manjit; Vega-Morales, David; Govind, Nimmisha; Huizinga, Tom W J; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Genetic and environmental risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are population dependent and may affect disease expression. Therefore, we studied tender and swollen joint involvement in patients newly diagnosed with RA in four countries and performed a subanalysis within countries to assess whether the influence of autoantibody positivity affected disease expression. Patients with symptom duration <2 years fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism 2010 RA classification criteria were selected from METEOR (Measurement of Efficacy of Treatment in the Era of Outcome in Rheumatology), an international observational database, and the Dutch Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic. Indian (n=947), Mexican (n=141), South African (n=164) and Dutch (n=947) autoantibody-positive and negative patients with RA, matched by symptom duration, were studied for swollen and tender joint distribution. Between countries, the reported distribution of swollen joint distribution differed, with more knee synovitis in Mexico, South Africa and India compared with the Netherlands (37%, 36%, 30% and 13%) and more elbow (29%, 23%, 7%, 7%) and shoulder synovitis (21%, 11%, 0%, 1%) in Mexico and South Africa compared with India and the Netherlands.Since the number of autoantibody-negative patients in Mexico and South Africa was limited, Indian and Dutch autoantibody-positive and negative patients with RA were compared. The number of swollen and tender joints was higher in autoantibody-negative patients, but the overall distribution of involved joints was similar. Joint involvement at diagnosis does not differ between autoantibody-positive and negative patients with RA in India and the Netherlands. However, joint involvement is reported differently across countries. More research is needed whether these differences are cultural and/or pathogenetic.

  6. Radiation Synovectomy: an effective alternative treatment for inflamed small joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavida, N; Notopoulos, A

    2010-01-01

    An inflamed painful joint is one of the most common indications for the patient to be referred to a rheumatologist or an orthopedician. In relation to the aetiology, the therapeutic approach might be systemic, local or a combination of them in some cases, always with the thought of balancing risk with benefit for the patient. In all cases, independently of the cause, the goal of therapy is to improve the quality of life through the reduction of pain, improvement of mobility and preservation of function. Nuclear Medicine has to offer Radiosynoviorthesis, an effective alternative procedure for treating inflamed small joints. Various radionuclides are available for radiosynoviorthesis. Their selection depends on the size of the joint to be treated. Small joints are mainly treated with [169Er] erbium under a fluoroscopic or sonographic guidance, usually with a simultaneous instillation of a corticoid. Candidates for radiosynoviorthesis should have been under a six-month systemic treatment without encouraging results or should have undergone at least one unsuccessful intra-articular injection of a long acting glucocorticoid. Since 1973, when [169Er] erbium was firstly suggested as a therapeutic agent for radiosynoviorthesis of the finger joints, there has been quite enough experience in its' application. It has been found to be cost effective in providing long term relief of pain and deformity of the inflamed joints in comparison to other therapeutic approaches. Additionally, there is no radiation risk and can be performed on an out patient basis. Therefore it can stand as an effective alternative procedure for treating early stages of chronic synovitis in RA (rheumatoid arthritis) patients, with minor damage of the cartilage and the adjacent bones, and for synovitis secondary to inflammatory arthropathies.

  7. Short-term effect of ultrasound-guided low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid injection on clinical outcomes and imaging changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the ankle and foot joints. A randomized controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Chih; Lee, Si-Huei; Lin, Hsiao-Yi; Liu, Fu-Wei; Chiou, Hong-Jen; Chan, Rai-Chi; Chou, Chen-Liang

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether hyaluronic acid (HA) injection into rheumatoid arthritis ankles and feet can achieve improvement in foot function and reduce synovial hyper-vascularization. Forty-four patients with RA having unilateral or bilateral painful ankle and foot involvement (N = 75) were studied. All the patients were randomized to receive HA (N = 40) or lidocaine (LI) (N = 35) injection at 2-week intervals; Clinical assessments were performed using a visual analog scale (VAS) and foot function index (FFI total ) including subscales of pain (FFI pain) before injection at baseline, 4 weeks (first evaluation) and 12 weeks (secondary evaluation). Imaging evaluation based on color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and synovitis scores was performed simultaneously. HA injection improved the VAS score (p = .009), FFI pain (p = .041), and FFI total (p = .032) considerably more than LI injections did at the first evaluation. The CDUS values at first evaluation (p = .005) and secondary evaluation (p injections reduced the CDUS values of more than half of the joints (54%, p = .042) while the control group exhibited no change (20%, p = .56). However, HA injection did not reduce the CDUS values more than LI injection did. Regarding the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy, no significant difference was observed between or within the groups in the synovitis scores. HA injection improved short-term foot function and pain reduction. HA injection may have a modest effect in reducing synovial hyper-vascularization. Further large-scale study is warranted to confirm this result.

  8. Osteoarthritis year in review 2015: biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, A M

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights a selection of recently published literature in the area of osteoarthritis biology. Major themes transpiring from a PubMed search covering the year between the 2014 and the 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) World Congress are explored. Inflammation emerged as a significant theme, revealing complex pathways that drive dramatic changes in cartilage homeostasis and in the synovium. Highlights include a homeostatic role for CXC chemokines in cartilage, identification of the zinc-ZIP8-MTF1 axis as an essential regulator of cartilage catabolism, and the discovery that a small aggrecan fragment can have catabolic and pro-inflammatory effects through Toll-like receptor 2. Synovitis can promote joint damage, partly through alarmins such as S100A8. Synovitis and synovial expression of the pro-algesic neurotrophin, Nerve Growth Factor, are associated with pain. Increasingly, researchers are considering specific pathogenic pathways that may operate in distinct subsets of osteoarthritis associated with distinct risk factors, including obesity, age, and joint injury. In obesity, the contribution of metabolic factors and diet is under intense investigation. The role of autophagy and oxidative stress in age-related osteoarthritis has been further explored. This approach may open avenues for targeted treatment of distinct phenotypes of osteoarthritis. Finally, a small selection of novel analgesic targets in the periphery is briefly discussed, including calcitonin gene-related peptide and the neuronal sodium voltage-gated channels, Nav1.7 and Nav1.8. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Obesity and rates of clinical remission and low MRI inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael D; Østergaard, Mikkel; Conaghan, Philip G; Emery, Paul; Baker, Daniel G; Baker, Joshua F

    2017-10-01

    Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for refractory rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated the impact of obesity on achieving clinical and imaging definitions of low disease activity. This study evaluated 470 patients with RA from GO-BEFORE and GO-FORWARD randomised clinical trials. Included patients had blinded clinical disease activity measures and MRI at baseline, 24 and 52 weeks. Synovitis, osteitis and total inflammation scores were determined using the RA MRI scoring system. Multivariable logistic regression analyses compared odds of achieving Disease Activity Score using 28 joints and C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) remission, low component measures, or low MRI inflammation measures at 24 weeks in patients with obesity versus no obesity. At 24 weeks, patients with obesity were significantly less likely to achieve DAS28(CRP) remission (OR 0.47; 95% CI 0.24 to 0.92, p=0.03). In contrast, patients with obesity had similar odds of achieving low synovitis (OR 0.94; 95% CI 0.51 to 1.72, p=0.84) and inflammation scores (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.61 to 2.22, p=0.64) and greater odds of achieving low osteitis scores (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.10 to 3.84, p=0.02) versus normal weight patients. Patients with RA and obesity have lower rates of DAS28 remission but similar rates of low MRI activity compared with patients without obesity, suggesting that obesity and its associated comorbidities can bias clinical disease activity measures. NCT00361335 and NCT00264550; Post-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Macrophage specific MRI imaging for antigen induced arthritides. A potential new strategy for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, G.H.; Rummeny, E.J.; Daldrup-Link, H.E.

    2007-01-01

    The present work describes the potential of iron oxides for the detection of macrophages in synovitis in experimental, antigen-induced arthritis. The pivotal role of macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in humans and in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in animal models is discussed. The latter appear to be very similar in many aspects to the human RA. We show the potential for iron oxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the macrophage content in the arthritic synovial membranes. The results of our own research, as well as those of other research groups, are presented and discussed. MRI after the intravenous (i.v.) administration of iron oxides enables the depiction of macrophage content in arthritic synovial membranes in AIA through the effects of the intracellular compartmentalisation of iron oxide particles. These effects can be demonstrated in 24-h delayed images after i.v. contrast application, on T2-weighted spin-echo or turbo-spin-echo sequences, and especially on T2 * -weighted gradient-echo sequences. The signal effects are not only apparent in high field strength (4.7 Tesla) but also on 1.5 Tesla clinical scanners. The use of iron oxides enables the determination of the macrophage content in synovitis in animals with AIA. This parameter represents a potential marker to determine disease activity, and possibly represents a marker to evaluate the effectiveness of specific therapies in human RA. Current knowledge of iron oxide-enhanced MRI is limited to animal models. The clinical evaluation of this new method in patients with RA has not yet been performed. However, based on the considerations presented here, significant progress in the diagnostic work-up of RA can be expected

  11. Automated synovium segmentation in doppler ultrasound images for rheumatoid arthritis assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Pak-Hei; Tan, York-Kiat; Xu, Shuoyu

    2018-02-01

    We need better clinical tools to improve monitoring of synovitis, synovial inflammation in the joints, in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) assessment. Given its economical, safe and fast characteristics, ultrasound (US) especially Doppler ultrasound is frequently used. However, manual scoring of synovitis in US images is subjective and prone to observer variations. In this study, we propose a new and robust method for automated synovium segmentation in the commonly affected joints, i.e. metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints, which would facilitate automation in quantitative RA assessment. The bone contour in the US image is firstly detected based on a modified dynamic programming method, incorporating angular information for detecting curved bone surface and using image fuzzification to identify missing bone structure. K-means clustering is then performed to initialize potential synovium areas by utilizing the identified bone contour as boundary reference. After excluding invalid candidate regions, the final segmented synovium is identified by reconnecting remaining candidate regions using level set evolution. 15 MCP and 15 MTP US images were analyzed in this study. For each image, segmentations by our proposed method as well as two sets of annotations performed by an experienced clinician at different time-points were acquired. Dice's coefficient is 0.77+/-0.12 between the two sets of annotations. Similar Dice's coefficients are achieved between automated segmentation and either the first set of annotations (0.76+/-0.12) or the second set of annotations (0.75+/-0.11), with no significant difference (P = 0.77). These results verify that the accuracy of segmentation by our proposed method and by clinician is comparable. Therefore, reliable synovium identification can be made by our proposed method.

  12. The impact of MRI on the clinical management of inflammatory arthritides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Ulrich [University of Alberta, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Balgrist University Hospital, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); Oestergaard, Mikkel [Copenhagen University Hospital at Glostrup, Department of Rheumatology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lambert, Robert G.W. [University of Alberta, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Maksymowych, Walter P. [University of Alberta, Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    In the past two decades, MRI has gained a major role in research and clinical management of patients with inflammatory arthritides, particularly in spondyloarthritis (SpA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and osteoarthritis (OA). MRI is regarded as the most sensitive imaging modality for detecting early SpA in young patients with inflammatory back pain and normal radiographs of the sacroiliac joints. The recently published Assessment of SpondyloArthritis International Society classification criteria for axial SpA include for the first time a positive MRI demonstrating sacroiliitis as an imaging criterion indicative of SpA together with at least one clinical feature of SpA. Recent data show that systematic assessment of sacroiliitis displayed on MRI has much greater diagnostic utility than previously reported and highlight the diagnostic relevance of structural lesions. In RA, MRI has predictive value for the development of disease in new onset undifferentiated arthritis, and MR pathology at disease onset is a highly significant predictor of radiographic erosions. Consequently MRI has been credited with an important role in the new ACR/EULAR 2010 classification criteria for RA. In OA, bone marrow edema (BME) and synovitis may serve as biomarkers in interventional trials. Treatment interventions targeting BME and synovitis observed on MRI in inflammatory arthritides may have a disease-modifying effect as these lesions are potentially reversible and have been shown to be associated with structural progression. Research should focus on the prognostic significance of MRI lesions in larger cohorts and whether adding MRI to routine care improves clinical and radiographic outcome in patients with inflammatory arthritides. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging for ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollow, M.

    2002-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is the prototypical form of the spondyloarthropathies, which at a prevalence of 2% is among the most frequent rheumatic diseases. Spondyloarthropathy comprises the following five disorders: AS, reactive arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, enteropathic arthritis in Crohn's disease, and ulcerosing colitis as well as undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy. In 99% of the patients with AS initial abnormal findings affect the sacroiliac joints. The radiographic changes required for diagnosing AS occur as late as 5-9 years after the onset of clinical symptoms. MRI of the sacroiliac joints reliably demonstrates both chronic inflammatory changes (erosions, sclerotic changes, bone bridges) and acute inflammatory changes (synovitis, capsulitis, osteitis) and allows for grading the chronicity and acuity of such changes. Enthesitis of the interosseous ligaments of the retroarticular space is a manifestation of AS. Spondylodiscitis (Andersson 1937) may occur as an inflammatory or non-inflammatory process (transdiscal fatigue fracture). Inflammations of the facet and costospinal joints developing into ankylosis are typical of AS. Changes of the vertebral bodies occur as anterior (Romanus 1952), posterior, and marginal spondylitis. All forms of spondyloarthropathies are furthermore characterized by asymmetrical synovitis of the large joints, particularly of the legs (gonarthritis, coxitis, tarsitis, peripheral oligoarthritis), rheumatic fibroosteitis (pelvic enthesitis, rheumatic calcaneopathy), and peri- and synchrondritis of the public symphisis and sternal synchondrosis. Since early inflammatory changes of the spinal column and of the extravertebral localizations in AS are demonstrated by MRI before they become apparent on radiographs, and thereby the diagnostic gap could be closed, the early use of MRI for diagnostic and follow-up is commendable, when new therapeutical options like the so-called 'biologicals' are employed. (orig.) [de

  14. Optimizing the MRI protocol of the sacroiliac joints in Spondyloarthritis: which para-axial sequence should be used?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giraudo, Chiara; Weber, Michael; Platzgummer, Hannes; Kainberger, Franz; Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Department of Biomedical Imaging und Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Magnaldi, Silvia [Fondazione Poliambulanza Istituto Ospedaliero, Dipartimento di Radiologia e Diagnostica per Immagini, Brescia (Italy); Puchner, Antonia [Medical University of Vienna, Vienna General Hospital, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-01-15

    To assess the diagnostic value of para-axial T2w-TSE (paT2) and fat-suppressed proton density (paPD-FS) MRI sequences for the evaluation of the sacroiliac joint (SIJ) of patients with axial Spondylarthritis (SpA). One hundred and six patients with clinical findings suggestive of SpA underwent an MR protocol of the SIJ with additional paPD-FS (41 patients) and paT2 (105 patients). Acute (bone marrow oedema [BME], enthesitis, capsulitis, synovitis) and chronic findings (erosions, ankylosis) were assessed by paPD-FS and compared with the gold standard post-contrast sequences, whereas chronic features (because of the lack of fat suppression) were evaluated on paT2 and compared with pcT1. paPD-FS demonstrated high sensitivity (98.9 %) and specificity (99.1 %) for BME; sensitivity and specificity for synovitis and enthesitis were 100 %; 85.7 % and 100 %, respectively, for capsulitis. paPD-FS and paT2 showed 100 % sensitivity and specificity for ankylosis; for erosions, paT2 demonstrated 85.3 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity, whereas paPD-FS, respectively, 98 % and 100 %. PaT2 and paPD-FS provided precious information enabling an accurate interpretation of the heterogeneous findings of SpA. paPD-FS showed good results in detecting acute and chronic lesions and its inclusion in a routine MR examination of the SIJ could increase the diagnostic performance of a pre-contrast protocol. (orig.)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of the hand in rheumatoid arthritis. New scientific insights and practical application; Magnetresonanztomographie der Hand bei rheumatoider Arthritis. Wissenschaftliche Ergebnisse und praktische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, K.G.A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institut fuer Radiologie am Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive diagnostic modality for the detection of inflammatory changes in peripheral joints. Nevertheless, the widespread clinical use of MRI in assessing patients with early rheumatoid arthritis is still hampered by the technical complexity and higher cost of MRI compared with conventional radiography. This overview summarizes the results of recent research and gives practical tips on how to perform MRI of the hands. The authors present an MR protocol for hand imaging, discuss the pros and cons of low-field MR scanners, and outline pitfalls and artifacts. The MRI changes associated with rheumatoid arthritis such as synovitis, tenosynovitis, erosions, and bone marrow edema are described including their prognostic significance. The proven facts on the validation and grading of MR changes in rheumatoid arthritis are summarized. Finally, the role of MRI in the differential diagnosis of arthritis is critically discussed. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) ist ein sensitives Verfahren zur Detektion entzuendlicher Veraenderungen der peripheren Gelenke. Den breiten Einsatz der MRT im Fruehstadium der rheumatoiden Arthritis behindern derzeit jedoch der im Vergleich zur konventionellen Roentgendiagnostik hoehere technische Aufwand und vermehrte Kosten. Diese Uebersichtsarbeit fasst wichtige Studienergebnisse zusammen und gibt praktische Hinweise fuer Hand-MRTs. Ein geeignetes Sequenzprotokoll wird vorgestellt, Vor- und Nachteile von Niederfeld-MRTs werden beruecksichtigt, moegliche Fehlerquellen und Artefakte diskutiert. Magnetresonanztomographische Befunde bei rheumatoider Arthritis wie Synovitis, Tenosynovitis, Erosionen und Knochenmarkoedeme werden beschrieben und deren prognostische Bedeutung dargestellt. Gesicherte Fakten zur Validierung und Moeglichkeiten der Graduierung MR-tomographischer Veraenderungen bei rheumatoider Arthritis werden zusammengefasst. Der Nutzen der MRT zur differenzialdiagnostischen

  16. Association of bone edema with the progression of bone erosions quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbona, Maria Pilar; Pàmies, Anna; Ares, Jesús; Almirall, Miriam; Navallas, Maria; Solano, Albert; Maymó, Joan

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the association of synovitis, bone marrow edema (BME), and tenosynovitis in the progression of erosions quantified by hand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1 year in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in remission. A total of 56 of 196 patients with early RA in remission at 1 year and with available MRI data at baseline and at 12 months were included. MRI images were assessed according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis Magnetic Resonance Imaging Scoring (RAMRIS) system. Persistent remission was defined as 28-joint Disease Activity Score-erythrocyte sedimentation rate ≤ 2.6 and/or Simplified Disease Activity Index ≤ 3.3 and/or the new boolean American College of Rheumatology/European League Against Rheumatism remission criteria for a continuous period of at least 6 months. Progression of bone erosions was defined as an increase of 1 or more units in annual RAMRIS score for erosions compared to baseline. At 1 year, the majority of patients with RA in sustained remission showed some inflammatory activity on MRI (94.6% synovitis, 46.4% BME, and 58.9% tenosynovitis) and 19 of the 56 patients (33.9%) showed MRI progression of bone erosions. A significant difference was observed in MRI BME at 1 year, with higher mean score in patients with progression compared to nonprogression of erosions (4.8 ± 5.6 and 1.4 ± 2.6, p = 0.03). Subclinical inflammation was identified by MRI in 96.4% of patients with RA in sustained clinical remission. Significantly higher scores of BME after sustained remission were observed in patients with progression of erosions compared to patients with no progression. The persistence of higher scores of BME may explain the progression of bone erosions in patients with persistent clinical remission.

  17. Circulating immune complexes contain citrullinated fibrinogen in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Okeke, Nwora Lance; Sharpe, Orr; Batliwalla, Franak M; Lee, Annette T; Ho, Peggy P; Tomooka, Beren H; Gregersen, Peter K; Robinson, William H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing evidence that autoantibodies and immune complexes (ICs) contribute to synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), yet the autoantigens incorporated in ICs in RA remain incompletely characterised. Methods We used the C1q protein to capture ICs from plasma derived from human RA and control patients. Antibodies specific for immunoglobulin were used to detect ICs, and fibrinogen antibodies were used to detect fibrinogen-containing ICs. RA and control plasma were separated by liquid chromatography, and fractions then characterised by ELISA, immunoblotting and mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemical staining was performed on rheumatoid synovial tissue. Results C1q-immunoassays demonstrated increased levels of IgG (p = 0.01) and IgM (p = 0.0002) ICs in plasma derived from RA patients possessing anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP+) autoantibodies as compared with healthy controls. About one-half of the anti-CCP+ RA possessed circulating ICs containing fibrinogen (p = 0.0004). Fractionation of whole RA plasma revealed citrullinated fibrinogen in the high molecular weight fractions that contained ICs. Positive correlations were observed between fibrinogen-containing ICs and anti-citrullinated fibrinogen autoantibodies, anti-CCP antibody, rheumatoid factor and certain clinical characteristics. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated co-localisation of fibrinogen, immunoglobulin and complement component C3 in RA pannus tissue. Mass spectrometry analysis of immune complexes immunoprecipitated from RA pannus tissue lysates demonstrated the presence of citrullinated fibrinogen. Conclusion Circulating ICs containing citrullinated fibrinogen are present in one-half of anti-CCP+ RA patients, and these ICs co-localise with C3 in the rheumatoid synovium suggesting that they contribute to synovitis in a subset of RA patients. PMID:18710572

  18. Doppler ultrasound imaging techniques for assessment of synovial inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippucci E

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Emilio Filippucci,1 Fausto Salaffi,1 Marina Carotti,2 Walter Grassi1 1Rheumatology Department, Polytechnic University of the Marche, Ancona, Italy; 2Department of Radiology, Polytechnic University of the Marche, Ancona, Italy Abstract: Ultrasound is an evolving technique, and the rapid progress made in ultrasound technology over the past ten years has dramatically increased its range of applications in rheumatology. One of the most exciting advances is the use of Doppler ultrasound imaging in the assessment of blood flow abnormalities at the synovial tissue level in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. This review describes the Doppler techniques available and their main applications in patients with inflammatory arthritis, discusses the evidence supporting their use, and outlines the latest advances in hardware and software. Spectral, color, and power Doppler allow sensitive assessment of vascular abnormalities at the synovial tissue level. Use of contrast agents enhances visualization of the small synovial vessels using color or power Doppler ultrasound and allows for accurate characterization of the rheumatoid pannus. Doppler techniques represent a unique method for assessment of synovial inflammation, showing blood flow characteristics in real time. They are safe, noninvasive, cost-effective, and have high sensitivity in revealing and monitoring synovitis. However, several questions still need to be answered. In the near future, the Doppler techniques described here, together with upcoming hardware and software facilities, will be investigated further and a consensus will be reached on their feasibility and appropriate use in daily rheumatologic practice. Keywords: power and color Doppler techniques, ultrasound, contrast media, synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis

  19. Development and reliability of a multi-modality scoring system for evaluation of disease progression in pre-clinical models of osteoarthritis: celecoxib may possess disease-modifying properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahifar, A; Jaremko, J L; Tessier, A G; Lambert, R G; Maksymowych, W P; Fallone, B G; Doschak, M R

    2014-10-01

    We sought to develop a comprehensive scoring system for evaluation of pre-clinical models of osteoarthritis (OA) progression, and use this to evaluate two different classes of drugs for management of OA. Post-traumatic OA (PTOA) was surgically induced in skeletally mature rats. Rats were randomly divided in three groups receiving either glucosamine (high dose of 192 mg/kg) or celecoxib (clinical dose) or no treatment. Disease progression was monitored utilizing micro-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), micro-computed tomography (CT) and histology. Pertinent features such as osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, joint effusion, bone marrow lesion (BML), cysts, loose bodies and cartilage abnormalities were included in designing a sensitive multi-modality based scoring system, termed the rat arthritis knee scoring system (RAKSS). Overall, an inter-observer correlation coefficient (ICC) of greater than 0.750 was achieved for each scored feature. None of the treatments prevented cartilage loss, synovitis, joint effusion, or sclerosis. However, celecoxib significantly reduced osteophyte development compared to placebo. Although signs of inflammation such as synovitis and joint effusion were readily identified at 4 weeks post-operation, we did not detect any BML. We report the development of a sensitive and reliable multi-modality scoring system, the RAKSS, for evaluation of OA severity in pre-clinical animal models. Using this scoring system, we found that celecoxib prevented enlargement of osteophytes in this animal model of PTOA, and thus it may be useful in preventing OA progression. However, it did not show any chondroprotective effect using the recommended dose. In contrast, high dose glucosamine had no measurable effects. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Coordinate and synergistic effects of extensive treadmill exercise and ovariectomy on articular cartilage degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Kazumasa; Muneta, Takeshi; Ojima, Miyoko; Yamada, Jun; Matsukura, Yu; Abula, Kahaer; Sekiya, Ichiro; Tsuji, Kunikazu

    2016-05-31

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease, little has been reported regarding the cooperative interaction among these factors on cartilage metabolism. Here we examined the synergistic effect of ovariectomy (OVX) and excessive mechanical stress (forced running) on articular cartilage homeostasis in a mouse model resembling a human postmenopausal condition. Mice were randomly divided into four groups, I: Sham, II: OVX, III: Sham and forced running (60 km in 6 weeks), and IV: OVX and forced running. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the degeneration of articular cartilage and synovitis in the knee joint. Morphological changes of subchondral bone were analyzed by micro-CT. Micro-CT analyses showed significant loss of metaphyseal trabecular bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) after OVX as described previously. Forced running increased the trabecular BV/TV in all mice. In the epiphyseal region, no visible alteration in bone morphology or osteophyte formation was observed in any of the four groups. Histological analysis revealed that OVX or forced running respectively had subtle effects on cartilage degeneration. However, the combination of OVX and forced running synergistically enhanced synovitis and articular cartilage degeneration. Although morphological changes in chondrocytes were observed during OA initiation, no signs of bone marrow edema were observed in any of the four experimental groups. We report the coordinate and synergistic effects of extensive treadmill exercise and ovariectomy on articular cartilage degeneration. Since no surgical procedure was performed on the knee joint directly in this model, this model is useful in addressing the molecular pathogenesis of naturally occurring OA.